WorldWideScience

Sample records for inspired visual representation

  1. Constructing visual representations

    Huron, Samuel; Jansen, Yvonne; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2014-01-01

    The accessibility of infovis authoring tools to a wide audience has been identified as a major research challenge. A key task in the authoring process is the development of visual mappings. While the infovis community has long been deeply interested in finding effective visual mappings......, comparatively little attention has been placed on how people construct visual mappings. In this paper, we present the results of a study designed to shed light on how people transform data into visual representations. We asked people to create, update and explain their own information visualizations using only...... tangible building blocks. We learned that all participants, most of whom had little experience in visualization authoring, were readily able to create and talk about their own visualizations. Based on our observations, we discuss participants’ actions during the development of their visual representations...

  2. Constructing visual representations

    Huron, Samuel; Jansen, Yvonne; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2014-01-01

    The accessibility of infovis authoring tools to a wide audience has been identified as a major research challenge. A key task in the authoring process is the development of visual mappings. While the infovis community has long been deeply interested in finding effective visual mappings......, comparatively little attention has been placed on how people construct visual mappings. In this paper, we present the results of a study designed to shed light on how people transform data into visual representations. We asked people to create, update and explain their own information visualizations using only...... tangible building blocks. We learned that all participants, most of whom had little experience in visualization authoring, were readily able to create and talk about their own visualizations. Based on our observations, we discuss participants’ actions during the development of their visual representations...

  3. Collective form generation through visual participatory representation

    Day, Dennis; Sharma, Nishant; Punekar, Ravi

    2012-01-01

    In order to inspire and inform designers with the users data from participatory research, it may be important to represent data in a visual format that is easily understandable to the designers. For a case study in vehicle design, the paper outlines visual representation of data and the use of the...

  4. Visual representations of Iranian transgenders.

    Shakerifar, Elhum

    2011-01-01

    Transsexuality in Iran has gained much attention and media coverage in the past few years, particularly in its questionable depiction as a permitted loophole for homosexuality, which is prohibited under Iran's Islamic-inspired legal system. Of course, attention in the West is also encouraged by the “shock” that sex change is available in Iran, a country that Western media and society delights in portraying as monolithically repressive. As a result, Iranian filmmakers inevitably have their own agendas, which are unsurprisingly brought into the film making process—from a desire to sell a product that will appeal to the Western market, to films that endorse specific socio-political agendas. This paper is an attempt to situate sex change and representations of sex change in Iran within a wider theoretical framework than the frequently reiterated conflation with homosexuality, and to open and engage with a wider debate concerning transsexuality in Iran, as well as to specifically analyze the representation of transexuality, in view of its current prominent presence in media. PMID:21910275

  5. A Lambda Term Representation Inspired by Linear Ordered Logic

    Andreas Abel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new nameless representation of lambda terms inspired by ordered logic. At a lambda abstraction, number and relative position of all occurrences of the bound variable are stored, and application carries the additional information where to cut the variable context into function and argument part. This way, complete information about free variable occurrence is available at each subterm without requiring a traversal, and environments can be kept exact such that they only assign values to variables that actually occur in the associated term. Our approach avoids space leaks in interpreters that build function closures. In this article, we prove correctness of the new representation and present an experimental evaluation of its performance in a proof checker for the Edinburgh Logical Framework. Keywords: representation of binders, explicit substitutions, ordered contexts, space leaks, Logical Framework.

  6. Unsupervised Learning of Visual Representations using Videos

    Wang, Xiaolong; Gupta, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Is strong supervision necessary for learning a good visual representation? Do we really need millions of semantically-labeled images to train a Convolutional Neural Network (CNN)? In this paper, we present a simple yet surprisingly powerful approach for unsupervised learning of CNN. Specifically, we use hundreds of thousands of unlabeled videos from the web to learn visual representations. Our key idea is that visual tracking provides the supervision. That is, two patches connected by a track...

  7. Differences between spatial and visual mental representations

    Jan FrederikSima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the relationship between visual mental representations and spatial mental representations in human visuo-spatial processing. By comparing two common theories of visuo-spatial processing - mental model theory and the theory of mental imagery - we identified two open questions: 1 which representations are modality-specific, and 2 what is the role of the two representations in reasoning. Two experiments examining eye movements and preferences for under-specified problems were conducted to investigate these questions. We found that significant spontaneous eye movements along the processed spatial relations occurred only when a visual mental representation is employed, but not with a spatial mental representation. Furthermore, the preferences for the answers of the under-specified problems differed between the two mental representations. The results challenge assumptions made by mental model theory and the theory of mental imagery.

  8. Mid-level Representation for Visual Recognition

    Nabi, Moin

    2015-01-01

    Visual Recognition is one of the fundamental challenges in AI, where the goal is to understand the semantics of visual data. Employing mid-level representation, in particular, shifted the paradigm in visual recognition. The mid-level image/video representation involves discovering and training a set of mid-level visual patterns (e.g., parts and attributes) and represent a given image/video utilizing them. The mid-level patterns can be extracted from images and videos using the motion and appe...

  9. Ant- and Ant-Colony-Inspired ALife Visual Art.

    Greenfield, Gary; Machado, Penousal

    2015-01-01

    Ant- and ant-colony-inspired ALife art is characterized by the artistic exploration of the emerging collective behavior of computational agents, developed using ants as a metaphor. We present a chronology that documents the emergence and history of such visual art, contextualize ant- and ant-colony-inspired art within generative art practices, and consider how it relates to other ALife art. We survey many of the algorithms that artists have used in this genre, address some of their aims, and explore the relationships between ant- and ant-colony-inspired art and research on ant and ant colony behavior. PMID:26280070

  10. The evolution of visual representation

    Gimbel, David Nelson; Dr P.R.S. Moorey

    2002-01-01

    PrefaceThe corpus of artifacts from the Lagas state constitutes what is arguably the single largest cohesive body of elite representational display forms thus far discovered to have come from Early Dynastic (ED) Sumer. Unlike the equally extraordinary finds from ED levels of Ur, which consist primarily of grave goods and small finds (Woolley 1934; Woolley 1956), what is unique about the finds from Lagas is that the majority of them are programmatic artifacts that were intended...

  11. On visual determination of full inspiration on CT images

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of experienced thoracic radiologists to assess full inspiration based on two CT slices, one above and one below the carina, in normal subjects. Ten healthy volunteers were studied. Total lung capacity (TLC) was measured with a body plethysmograph. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) was performed in two slices at TLC and at various expired volumes. Mean Hounsfield values (HU) were calculated. Unidentifiable images, stored on a web server, were analysed visually by experienced thoracic radiologists. The results show that the mean lung density at TLC varied by approximately 40 HU between individuals. Within an individual this may correspond to a decrease in lung volume of approximately 25% of TLC. On visual determination of images taken at 65-74% of TLC, more than one-third of the images were assessed as taken at full inspiration; of the images taken at 75-84% of TLC, approximately 50% were assessed as taken at full inspiration. We conclude that visual determination of full inspiration on CT images in normal subjects is highly inaccurate. If quantitative density measurements are to be used in the diagnosis or follow-up of lung disease, thorough control of full inspiration is recommended. (orig.)

  12. Distorted representation in visual tourism research

    Jensen, Martin Trandberg

    2016-01-01

    Tourism research has recently been informed by non-representational theories to highlight the socio-material, embodied and heterogeneous composition of tourist experiences. These advances have contributed to further reflexivity and called for novel ways to animate representations. On this...... background, this paper develops the notion ‘distorted representation’ to illustrate that blurred and obscure photos can in fact be intelligible and sensible in understanding tourism. Through an exploration of the overwhelmed and unintended practices of visual fieldwork, distorted representation illustrates...... how photographic materialities, performativities and sensations contribute to new tourism knowledges. While highlighting the potential of distorted representation, the paper posits a cautionary note in regards to the influential role of academic journals in determining the qualities of visual data...

  13. Visual information processing: the structure and creation of visual representations.

    Marr, D

    1980-07-01

    For human vision to be explained by a computational theory, the first question is plain: What are the problems that the brain solves when we see? It is argued that vision is the construction of efficient symbolic descriptions from images of the world. An important aspect of vision is therefore the choice of representations for the different kinds of information in a visual scene. An overall framework is suggested for extracting shape information from images, in which the analysis proceeds through three representations: (1) the primal sketch, which makes explicit the intensity changes and local two-dimensional geometry of an image; (2) 2 1/2-D sketch, which is a viewer-centred representation of the deplth, orientation and discontinuities of the visible surfaces; and (3) the 3-D model representation, which allows an object-centred description of the three-dimensional structure and organization of a viewed shape. The critical act in formulating computational theories for process capable of constructing these representations is the discovery of valid constraints on the way the world behaves, that provide sufficient additional information to allow recovery of the desired characteristic. Finally, once a computational theory for a process has been formulated, algorithms for implementing it may be designed, and their performance compared with that of the human visual processor. PMID:6106238

  14. Reconstructing representations of dynamic visual objects in early visual cortex.

    Chong, Edmund; Familiar, Ariana M; Shim, Won Mok

    2016-02-01

    As raw sensory data are partial, our visual system extensively fills in missing details, creating enriched percepts based on incomplete bottom-up information. Despite evidence for internally generated representations at early stages of cortical processing, it is not known whether these representations include missing information of dynamically transforming objects. Long-range apparent motion (AM) provides a unique test case because objects in AM can undergo changes both in position and in features. Using fMRI and encoding methods, we found that the "intermediate" orientation of an apparently rotating grating, never presented in the retinal input but interpolated during AM, is reconstructed in population-level, feature-selective tuning responses in the region of early visual cortex (V1) that corresponds to the retinotopic location of the AM path. This neural representation is absent when AM inducers are presented simultaneously and when AM is visually imagined. Our results demonstrate dynamic filling-in in V1 for object features that are interpolated during kinetic transformations. PMID:26712004

  15. Reconstructing representations of dynamic visual objects in early visual cortex

    Chong, Edmund; Familiar, Ariana M.; Shim, Won Mok

    2016-01-01

    As raw sensory data are partial, our visual system extensively fills in missing details, creating enriched percepts based on incomplete bottom-up information. Despite evidence for internally generated representations at early stages of cortical processing, it is not known whether these representations include missing information of dynamically transforming objects. Long-range apparent motion (AM) provides a unique test case because objects in AM can undergo changes both in position and in features. Using fMRI and encoding methods, we found that the “intermediate” orientation of an apparently rotating grating, never presented in the retinal input but interpolated during AM, is reconstructed in population-level, feature-selective tuning responses in the region of early visual cortex (V1) that corresponds to the retinotopic location of the AM path. This neural representation is absent when AM inducers are presented simultaneously and when AM is visually imagined. Our results demonstrate dynamic filling-in in V1 for object features that are interpolated during kinetic transformations. PMID:26712004

  16. Robust Visual Tracking via Fuzzy Kernel Representation

    Zhiqiang Wen

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A robust visual kernel tracking approach is presented for solving the problem of existing background pixels in object model. At first, after definition of fuzzy set on image is given, a fuzzy factor is embedded into object model to form the fuzzy kernel representation. Secondly, a fuzzy membership functions are generated by center-surround approach and log likelihood ratio of feature distributions. Thirdly, details about fuzzy kernel tracking algorithm is provided. After that, methods of parameter selection and performance evaluation for tracking algorithm are proposed. At last, a mass of experimental results are done to show our method can reduce the influence of the incomplete representation of object model via integrating both color features and background features.

  17. Visual texture accurate material appearance measurement, representation and modeling

    Haindl, Michal

    2013-01-01

    This book surveys the state of the art in multidimensional, physically-correct visual texture modeling. Features: reviews the entire process of texture synthesis, including material appearance representation, measurement, analysis, compression, modeling, editing, visualization, and perceptual evaluation; explains the derivation of the most common representations of visual texture, discussing their properties, advantages, and limitations; describes a range of techniques for the measurement of visual texture, including BRDF, SVBRDF, BTF and BSSRDF; investigates the visualization of textural info

  18. The Curious Robot: Learning Visual Representations via Physical Interactions

    Pinto, Lerrel; Gandhi, Dhiraj; Han, Yuanfeng; Park, Yong-Lae; Gupta, Abhinav

    2016-01-01

    What is the right supervisory signal to train visual representations? Current approaches in computer vision use category labels from datasets such as ImageNet to train ConvNets. However, in case of biological agents, visual representation learning does not require semantic labels. In fact, we argue that biological agents use active exploration and physical interactions with the world to learn visual representations unlike current vision systems which just use passive observations (images and ...

  19. Acoustic Tactile Representation of Visual Information

    Silva, Pubudu Madhawa

    Our goal is to explore the use of hearing and touch to convey graphical and pictorial information to visually impaired people. Our focus is on dynamic, interactive display of visual information using existing, widely available devices, such as smart phones and tablets with touch sensitive screens. We propose a new approach for acoustic-tactile representation of visual signals that can be implemented on a touch screen and allows the user to actively explore a two-dimensional layout consisting of one or more objects with a finger or a stylus while listening to auditory feedback via stereo headphones. The proposed approach is acoustic-tactile because sound is used as the primary source of information for object localization and identification, while touch is used for pointing and kinesthetic feedback. A static overlay of raised-dot tactile patterns can also be added. A key distinguishing feature of the proposed approach is the use of spatial sound (directional and distance cues) to facilitate the active exploration of the layout. We consider a variety of configurations for acoustic-tactile rendering of object size, shape, identity, and location, as well as for the overall perception of simple layouts and scenes. While our primary goal is to explore the fundamental capabilities and limitations of representing visual information in acoustic-tactile form, we also consider a number of relatively simple configurations that can be tied to specific applications. In particular, we consider a simple scene layout consisting of objects in a linear arrangement, each with a distinct tapping sound, which we compare to a ''virtual cane.'' We will also present a configuration that can convey a ''Venn diagram.'' We present systematic subjective experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed display for shape perception, object identification and localization, and 2-D layout perception, as well as the applications. Our experiments were conducted with visually blocked subjects. The results are evaluated in terms of accuracy and speed, and they demonstrate the advantages of spatial sound for guiding the scanning finger or pointer in shape perception, object localization, and layout exploration. We show that these advantages increase with the amount of detail (smaller object size) in the display. Our experimental results show that the proposed system outperforms the state of the art in shape perception, including variable friction displays. We also demonstrate that, even though they are currently available only as static overlays, raised dot patterns provide the best shape rendition in terms of both the accuracy and speed. Our experiments with layout rendering and perception demonstrate that simultaneous representation of objects, using the most effective approaches for directionality and distance rendering, approaches the optimal performance level provided by visual layout perception. Finally, experiments with the virtual cane and Venn diagram configurations demonstrate that the proposed techniques can be used effectively in simple but nontrivial real-world applications. One of the most important conclusions of our experiments is that there is a clear performance gap between experienced and inexperienced subjects, which indicates that there is a lot of room for improvement with appropriate and extensive training. By exploring a wide variety of design alternatives and focusing on different aspects of the acoustic-tactile interfaces, our results offer many valuable insights and great promise for the design of future systematic tests visually impaired and visually blocked subjects, utilizing the most effective configurations.

  20. Separate visual representations for perception and for visually guided behavior

    Bridgeman, Bruce

    1989-01-01

    Converging evidence from several sources indicates that two distinct representations of visual space mediate perception and visually guided behavior, respectively. The two maps of visual space follow different rules; spatial values in either one can be biased without affecting the other. Ordinarily the two maps give equivalent responses because both are veridically in register with the world; special techniques are required to pull them apart. One such technique is saccadic suppression: small target displacements during saccadic eye movements are not preceived, though the displacements can change eye movements or pointing to the target. A second way to separate cognitive and motor-oriented maps is with induced motion: a slowly moving frame will make a fixed target appear to drift in the opposite direction, while motor behavior toward the target is unchanged. The same result occurs with stroboscopic induced motion, where the frame jump abruptly and the target seems to jump in the opposite direction. A third method of separating cognitive and motor maps, requiring no motion of target, background or eye, is the Roelofs effect: a target surrounded by an off-center rectangular frame will appear to be off-center in the direction opposite the frame. Again the effect influences perception, but in half of the subjects it does not influence pointing to the target. This experience also reveals more characteristics of the maps and their interactions with one another, the motor map apparently has little or no memory, and must be fed from the biased cognitive map if an enforced delay occurs between stimulus presentation and motor response. In designing spatial displays, the results mean that what you see isn't necessarily what you get. Displays must be designed with either perception or visually guided behavior in mind.

  1. Visual Representations of the Water Cycle in Science Textbooks

    Vinisha, K.; Ramadas, J.

    2013-01-01

    Visual representations, including photographs, sketches and schematic diagrams, are a valuable yet often neglected aspect of textbooks. Visual means of communication are particularly helpful in introducing abstract concepts in science. For effective communication, visuals and text need to be appropriately integrated within the textbook. This study…

  2. Efficient visual tracking via low-complexity sparse representation

    Lu, Weizhi; Zhang, Jinglin; Kpalma, Kidiyo; Ronsin, Joseph

    2015-12-01

    Thanks to its good performance on object recognition, sparse representation has recently been widely studied in the area of visual object tracking. Up to now, little attention has been paid to the complexity of sparse representation, while most works are focused on the performance improvement. By reducing the computation load related to sparse representation hundreds of times, this paper proposes by far the most computationally efficient tracking approach based on sparse representation. The proposal simply consists of two stages of sparse representation, one is for object detection and the other for object validation. Experimentally, it achieves better performance than some state-of-the-art methods in both accuracy and speed.

  3. High-Level Visual Object Representations Are Constrained by Position

    Kravitz, Dwight J.; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Baker, Chris I.

    2010-01-01

    It is widely assumed that high-level visual object representations are position-independent (or invariant). While there is sensitivity to position in high-level object-selective cortex, position and object identity are thought to be encoded independently in the population response such that position information is available across objects and object information is available across positions. Contrary to this view, we show, with both behavior and neuroimaging, that visual object representation...

  4. Educating "The Simpsons": Teaching Queer Representations in Contemporary Visual Media

    Padva, Gilad

    2008-01-01

    This article analyzes queer representation in contemporary visual media and examines how the episode "Homer's Phobia" from Matt Groening's animation series "The Simpsons" can be used to deconstruct hetero- and homo-sexual codes of behavior, socialization, articulation, representation and visibility. The analysis is contextualized in the…

  5. Educating "The Simpsons": Teaching Queer Representations in Contemporary Visual Media

    Padva, Gilad

    2008-01-01

    This article analyzes queer representation in contemporary visual media and examines how the episode "Homer's Phobia" from Matt Groening's animation series "The Simpsons" can be used to deconstruct hetero- and homo-sexual codes of behavior, socialization, articulation, representation and visibility. The analysis is contextualized in the…

  6. Fundamentals of Guidelines for Visual Representation of Information

    Friborz Doroudi

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Information visualization is a computer-assisted method for data representation. By processing the information into a visual framework, it enables the user to observe, browse, receive and understand information. Information visualization is a new research field that concentrates on using visualizing techniques towards helping people understand and analyze data. The fundamentals of visualization includes GUI design, Computer Graphics, HCI, cognitive theories and graphic design. Based on Schneiderman’s classification, information visualization includes one, two, three ad multidimensional as well as time-based, hierarchical and network data.

  7. The epistemic representation: visual production and communication of scientific knowledge.

    Francisco López Cantos

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Despite its great influence on the History of Science, visual representations have attracted marginal interest until very recently and have often been regarded as a simple aid for mere illustration or scientific demonstration. However, it has been shown that visualization is an integral element of reasoning and a highly effective and common heuristic strategy in the scientific community and that the study of the conditions of visual production and communication are essential in the development of scientific knowledge. In this paper we deal with the nature of the various forms of visual representation of knowledge that have been happening throughout the history of science, taking as its starting point the illustrated monumental works and three-dimensional models that begin to develop within the scientific community around the fifteenth century. The main thesis of this paper is that any scientific visual representations have common elements that allow us to approach them from epistemic nature, heuristic and communicative dimension.

  8. Visual Literacy in Biology: A Comparison of Visual Representations in Textbooks and Journal Articles

    Rybarczyk, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Using course materials to promote visual literacy skills is an important aspect of undergraduate science education. A comparison study was undertaken to determine the composition of visual representations, specifically representations of data generated from experimental research, found in general biology and discipline-specific textbooks compared…

  9. Visual Literacy in Biology: A Comparison of Visual Representations in Textbooks and Journal Articles

    Rybarczyk, Brian

    2011-01-01

    Using course materials to promote visual literacy skills is an important aspect of undergraduate science education. A comparison study was undertaken to determine the composition of visual representations, specifically representations of data generated from experimental research, found in general biology and discipline-specific textbooks compared…

  10. A survey of visual preprocessing and shape representation techniques

    Olshausen, Bruno A.

    1988-01-01

    Many recent theories and methods proposed for visual preprocessing and shape representation are summarized. The survey brings together research from the fields of biology, psychology, computer science, electrical engineering, and most recently, neural networks. It was motivated by the need to preprocess images for a sparse distributed memory (SDM), but the techniques presented may also prove useful for applying other associative memories to visual pattern recognition. The material of this survey is divided into three sections: an overview of biological visual processing; methods of preprocessing (extracting parts of shape, texture, motion, and depth); and shape representation and recognition (form invariance, primitives and structural descriptions, and theories of attention).

  11. Evidence for Optimal Integration of Visual Feature Representations across Saccades

    Oostwoud Wijdenes, L.; Marshall, L.; Bays, P. M.

    2015-01-01

    We explore the visual world through saccadic eye movements, but saccades also present a challenge to visual processing by shifting externally stable objects from one retinal location to another. The brain could solve this problem in two ways: by overwriting preceding input and starting afresh with each fixation or by maintaining a representation of presaccadic visual features in working memory and updating it with new information from the remapped location. Crucially, when multiple objects ar...

  12. Visual-Spatial Attention Aids the Maintenance of Object Representations in Visual Working Memory

    Williams, Melonie; Pouget, Pierre; Boucher, Leanne; Woodman, Geoffrey F.

    2013-01-01

    Theories have proposed that the maintenance of object representations in visual working memory is aided by a spatial rehearsal mechanism. In this study, we used two different approaches to test the hypothesis that overt and covert visual-spatial attention mechanisms contribute to the maintenance of object representations in visual working memory. First, we tracked observers’ eye movements while remembering a variable number of objects during change-detection tasks. We observed that during the...

  13. Ambiguous science and the visual representation of the real

    Newbold, Curtis Robert

    The emergence of visual media as prominent and even expected forms of communication in nearly all disciplines, including those scientific, has raised new questions about how the art and science of communication epistemologically affect the interpretation of scientific phenomena. In this dissertation I explore how the influence of aesthetics in visual representations of science inevitably creates ambiguous meanings. As a means to improve visual literacy in the sciences, I call awareness to the ubiquity of visual ambiguity and its importance and relevance in scientific discourse. To do this, I conduct a literature review that spans interdisciplinary research in communication, science, art, and rhetoric. Furthermore, I create a paradoxically ambiguous taxonomy, which functions to exploit the nuances of visual ambiguities and their role in scientific communication. I then extrapolate the taxonomy of visual ambiguity and from it develop an ambiguous, rhetorical heuristic, the Tetradic Model of Visual Ambiguity. The Tetradic Model is applied to a case example of a scientific image as a demonstration of how scientific communicators may increase their awareness of the epistemological effects of ambiguity in the visual representations of science. I conclude by demonstrating how scientific communicators may make productive use of visual ambiguity, even in communications of objective science, and I argue how doing so strengthens scientific communicators' visual literacy skills and their ability to communicate more ethically and effectively.

  14. Robust Visual Tracking via Appearance Modeling and Sparse Representation

    Ming Li; Fanglan Ma; Fuzhong Nian

    2014-01-01

    When appearance variation of object, partial occlusion or illumination change in object images occurs, most existing tracking approaches fail to track the target effectively. To deal with the problem, this paper proposed a robust visual tracking method based on appearance modeling and sparse representation. The proposed method exploits two-dimensional principal component analysis (2DPCA) with sparse representation theory for constructing appearance model. Then tracking is achieved by Bayesian...

  15. Preserved visual representations despite change blindness in infants

    Wang, Su-Hua; Mitroff, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Combining theoretical hypotheses of infant cognition and adult perception, we present evidence that infants can maintain visual representations despite their failure to detect a change. Infants under 12 months typically fail to notice a change to an object’s height in a covering event. The present experiments demonstrated that 11-month-old infants can nevertheless maintain a viable representation of both the pre- and post-change heights despite their ‘change blindness’. These results suggest ...

  16. Visual Representation Determines Search Difficulty: Explaining Visual Search Asymmetries

    Neil Bruce

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In visual search experiments there exist a variety of experimental paradigms in which a symmetric set of experimental conditions yields asymmetric corresponding task performance. There are a variety of examples of this that currently lack a satisfactory explanation. In this paper, we demonstrate that distinct classes of asymmetries may be explained by virtue of a few simple conditions that are consistent with current thinking surrounding computational modeling of visual search and coding in the primate brain. This includes a detailed look at the role that stimulus familiarity plays in the determination of search performance. Overall, we demonstrate that all of these asymmetries have a common origin, namely, they are a consequence of the encoding that appears in the visual cortex. The analysis associated with these cases yields insight into the problem of visual search in general and predictions of novel search asymmetries.

  17. Visual Representation Determines Search Difficulty: Explaining Visual Search Asymmetries

    Neil Bruce

    2011-01-01

    In visual search experiments there exist a variety of experimental paradigms in which a symmetric set of experimental conditions yields asymmetric corresponding task performance. There are a variety of examples of this that currently lack a satisfactory explanation. In this paper, we demonstrate that distinct classes of asymmetries may be explained by virtue of a few simple conditions that are consistent with current thinking surrounding computational modeling of visual search and coding in t...

  18. Drawing Connections Across Conceptually Related Visual Representations in Science

    Hansen, Janice

    This dissertation explored beliefs about learning from multiple related visual representations in science, and compared beliefs to learning outcomes. Three research questions were explored: 1) What beliefs do pre-service teachers, non-educators and children have about learning from visual representations? 2) What format of presenting those representations is most effective for learning? And, 3) Can children's ability to process conceptually related science diagrams be enhanced with added support? Three groups of participants, 89 pre-service teachers, 211 adult non-educators, and 385 middle school children, were surveyed about whether they felt related visual representations presented serially or simultaneously would lead to better learning outcomes. Two experiments, one with adults and one with child participants, explored the validity of these beliefs. Pre-service teachers did not endorse either serial or simultaneous related visual representations for their own learning. They were, however, significantly more likely to indicate that children would learn better from serially presented diagrams. In direct contrast to the educators, middle school students believed they would learn better from related visual representations presented simultaneously. Experimental data indicated that the beliefs adult non-educators held about their own learning needs matched learning outcomes. These participants endorsed simultaneous presentation of related diagrams for their own learning. When comparing learning from related diagrams presented simultaneously to learning from the same diagrams presented serially indicate that those in the simultaneously condition were able to create more complex mental models. A second experiment compared children's learning from related diagrams across four randomly-assigned conditions: serial, simultaneous, simultaneous with signaling, and simultaneous with structure mapping support. Providing middle school students with simultaneous related diagrams with support for structure mapping led to a lessened reliance on surface features, and a better understanding of the science concepts presented. These findings suggest that presenting diagrams serially in an effort to reduce cognitive load may not be preferable for learning if making connections across representations, and by extension across science concepts, is desired. Instead, providing simultaneous diagrams with structure mapping support may result in greater attention to the salient relationships between related visual representations as well as between the representations and the science concepts they depict.

  19. Learning STEM Through Integrative Visual Representations

    Virk, Satyugjit Singh

    Previous cognitive models of memory have not comprehensively taken into account the internal cognitive load of chunking isolated information and have emphasized the external cognitive load of visual presentation only. Under the Virk Long Term Working Memory Multimedia Model of cognitive load, drawing from the Cowan model, students presented with integrated animations of the key neural signal transmission subcomponents where the interrelationships between subcomponents are visually and verbally explicit, were hypothesized to perform significantly better on free response and diagram labeling questions, than students presented with isolated animations of these subcomponents. This is because the internal attentional cognitive load of chunking these concepts is greatly reduced and hence the overall cognitive load is less for the integrated visuals group than the isolated group, despite the higher external load for the integrated group of having the interrelationships between subcomponents presented explicitly. Experiment 1 demonstrated that integrating the subcomponents of the neuron significantly enhanced comprehension of the interconnections between cellular subcomponents and approached significance for enhancing comprehension of the layered molecular correlates of the cellular structures and their interconnections. Experiment 2 corrected time on task confounds from Experiment 1 and focused on the cellular subcomponents of the neuron only. Results from the free response essay subcomponent subscores did demonstrate significant differences in favor of the integrated group as well as some evidence from the diagram labeling section. Results from free response, short answer and What-If (problem solving), and diagram labeling detailed interrelationship subscores demonstrated the integrated group did indeed learn the extra material they were presented with. This data demonstrating the integrated group learned the extra material they were presented with provides some initial support for the assertion that chunking mediated the greater gains in learning for the neural subcomponent concepts over the control.

  20. Carl Linnaeus and the visual representation of nature.

    Charmantier, Isabelle

    2011-01-01

    The Swedish naturalist Carl Linnaeus (1707-1778) is reputed to have transformed botanical practice by shunning the process of illustrating plants and relying on the primacy of literary descriptions of plant specimens. Botanists and historians have long debated Linnaeus's capacities as a draftsman. While some of his detailed sketches of plants and insects reveal a sure hand, his more general drawings of landscapes and people seem ill-executed. The overwhelming consensus, based mostly on his Lapland diary (1732), is that Linnaeus could not draw. Little has been said, however, on the role of drawing and other visual representations in Linnaeus's daily work as seen in his other numerous manuscripts. These manuscripts, held mostly at the Linnean Society of London, are peppered with sketches, maps, tables, and diagrams. Reassessing these manuscripts, along with the printed works that also contain illustrations of plant species, shows that Linnaeus's thinking was profoundly visual and that he routinely used visual representational devices in his various publications. This paper aims to explore the full range of visual representations Linnaeus used through his working life, and to reevaluate the epistemological value of visualization in the making of natural knowledge. By analyzing Linnaeus's use of drawings, maps, tables, and diagrams, I will show that he did not, as has been asserted, reduce the discipline of botany to text, and that his visual thinking played a fundamental role in his construction of new systems of classification. PMID:22363966

  1. Visualizing spin states using the spin coherent state representation

    Lee Loh, Yen; Kim, Monica

    2015-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum eigenfunctions are readily understood in terms of spherical harmonics. However, the quantum mechanical phenomenon of spin is often said to be mysterious and hard to visualize, with no classical analog. Many textbooks give a heuristic and somewhat unsatisfying picture of a precessing spin vector. Here, we show that the spin-coherent-state representation is a striking, elegant, and mathematically meaningful tool for visualizing spin states. We also demonstrate that cartographic projections such as the Hammer projection are useful for visualizing functions defined on spherical surfaces.

  2. Data Representations, Transformations, and Statistics for Visual Reasoning

    Maciejewski, Ross

    2011-01-01

    Analytical reasoning techniques are methods by which users explore their data to obtain insight and knowledge that can directly support situational awareness and decision making. Recently, the analytical reasoning process has been augmented through the use of interactive visual representations and tools which utilize cognitive, design and perceptual principles. These tools are commonly referred to as visual analytics tools, and the underlying methods and principles have roots in a variety of disciplines. This chapter provides an introduction to young researchers as an overview of common visual

  3. The neural representation of Arabic digits in visual cortex

    Hans Op de Beeck

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated how Arabic digits are represented in the visual cortex, and how their representation changes throughout the ventral visual processing stream, compared to the representation of letters. We probed these questions with two fMRI experiments. In Experiment 1, we explored whether we could find brain regions that were more activated for digits than for number words in a subtraction task. One such region was detected in lateral occipital cortex. However, the activity in this region might have been confounded by string length – number words contain more characters than digits. We therefore conducted a second experiment in which string length was systematically controlled. Experiment 2 revealed that the findings of the first experiment were task dependent (as it was only observed in a task in which numerosity was relevant or stimulus dependent (as it was only observed when the number of characters of a stimulus was not controlled. We further explored the characteristics of the activation patterns for digit and letter strings across the ventral visual processing stream through multi-voxel pattern analyses. We found an alteration in representations throughout the ventral processing stream from clustering based on amount of visual information in primary visual cortex towards clustering based on symbolic stimulus category higher in the visual hierarchy. The present findings converge to the conclusion that in the ventral visual system, as far as can be detected with fMRI, the distinction between Arabic digits and letter strings is represented in terms of distributed patterns rather than separate regions.

  4. Modulating foveal representation can influence visual discrimination in the periphery.

    Yu, Qing; Shim, Won Mok

    2016-02-01

    A previous study by Williams et al. (2008) provided evidence for a novel form of feedback in the visual system, whereby peripheral information is contained in foveal retinotopic cortex. Beyond its possible implication for peripheral object recognition, few studies have examined the effect of a direct behavioral manipulation of the foveal feedback representation. To address this question, we measured participants' peripheral visual discrimination performance while modulating their foveal representation in a series of psychophysical experiments. On each trial, participants discriminated the identities of briefly presented novel, three-dimensional objects or the orientations of gratings in a peripheral location while fixating at the center. Besides the peripheral target, another stimulus (foil) was also presented and masked at the fovea. Our results showed that for objects, when the foveal foil that was identical to the peripheral target was presented 150 ms after the onset of the peripheral target, visual discrimination of the peripheral target was improved. This congruency effect occurred even though participants did not consciously perceive the foveal stimulus. No such effect was observed when the foveal foil was presented simultaneously with the peripheral target, or when the foil was presented in a parafoveal location. The foil effect in gratings was different from that in objects in terms of its effective timing and foveal specificity, suggesting that foveal feedback may be specific to high-level objects. These results indicate that modulating foveal information can affect individuals' ability to discriminate peripheral objects, suggesting a functional role of foveal representations in peripheral visual perception. PMID:26885627

  5. The evaluative imaging of mental models - Visual representations of complexity

    Dede, Christopher

    1989-01-01

    The paper deals with some design issues involved in building a system that could visually represent the semantic structures of training materials and their underlying mental models. In particular, hypermedia-based semantic networks that instantiate classification problem solving strategies are thought to be a useful formalism for such representations; the complexity of these web structures can be best managed through visual depictions. It is also noted that a useful approach to implement in these hypermedia models would be some metrics of conceptual distance.

  6. The body voyage as visual representation and art performance

    Olsén, Jan-Eric

    2011-01-01

    with it. A further aim with the paper is to discuss what kind of image of the body that is conveyed through medical visual technologies, such as endoscopy, and relate it to contemporary discussions on embodiment, embodied vision and bodily presence. The paper concludes with a recent exhibition by the......This paper looks at the notion of the body as an interior landscape that is made intelligible through visual representation. It discerns the key figure of the inner corporeal voyage, identifies its main elements and examines how contemporary artists working with performances and installations deal...... French artist Christian Boltanski, which gives a somewhat different meaning to the idea of the body voyage....

  7. Robust Visual Tracking via Appearance Modeling and Sparse Representation

    Ming Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available When appearance variation of object, partial occlusion or illumination change in object images occurs, most existing tracking approaches fail to track the target effectively. To deal with the problem, this paper proposed a robust visual tracking method based on appearance modeling and sparse representation. The proposed method exploits two-dimensional principal component analysis (2DPCA with sparse representation theory for constructing appearance model. Then tracking is achieved by Bayesian inference framework, in which a particle filter is applied to evaluate the target state sequentially over time. In addition, to make the observation model more robust, the incremental learning algorithm is used to update the template set. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations on four publicly available benchmark video sequences demonstrate that the proposed visual tracking algorithm performs better than several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  8. Novice Interpretations of Visual Representations of Geosciences Data

    Burkemper, L. K.; Arthurs, L.

    2013-12-01

    Past cognition research of individual's perception and comprehension of bar and line graphs are substantive enough that they have resulted in the generation of graph design principles and graph comprehension theories; however, gaps remain in our understanding of how people process visual representations of data, especially of geologic and atmospheric data. This pilot project serves to build on others' prior research and begin filling the existing gaps. The primary objectives of this pilot project include: (i) design a novel data collection protocol based on a combination of paper-based surveys, think-aloud interviews, and eye-tracking tasks to investigate student data handling skills of simple to complex visual representations of geologic and atmospheric data, (ii) demonstrate that the protocol yields results that shed light on student data handling skills, and (iii) generate preliminary findings upon which tentative but perhaps helpful recommendations on how to more effectively present these data to the non-scientist community and teach essential data handling skills. An effective protocol for the combined use of paper-based surveys, think-aloud interviews, and computer-based eye-tracking tasks for investigating cognitive processes involved in perceiving, comprehending, and interpreting visual representations of geologic and atmospheric data is instrumental to future research in this area. The outcomes of this pilot study provide the foundation upon which future more in depth and scaled up investigations can build. Furthermore, findings of this pilot project are sufficient for making, at least, tentative recommendations that can help inform (i) the design of physical attributes of visual representations of data, especially more complex representations, that may aid in improving students' data handling skills and (ii) instructional approaches that have the potential to aid students in more effectively handling visual representations of geologic and atmospheric data that they might encounter in a course, television news, newspapers and magazines, and websites. Such recommendations would also be the potential subject of future investigations and have the potential to impact the design features when data is presented to the public and instructional strategies not only in geoscience courses but also other science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses.

  9. Invariant Representations of Visual Streams in the Spike Domain

    Lazar, Aurel A.

    2009-01-01

    We investigate a model architecture for invariant representations of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation) in the spike domain. The stimuli are encoded with a population of spiking neurons, processed in the spike domain and finally decoded. The population of spiking neurons includes interconnected neural circuits with level crossing spiking mechanisms as well as integrate-and-fire neuron models with feedback. A number of spike domain processing algorit...

  10. Lenses – Light, Bodies and Representations. A paper on the optical device that enables visual perception through representation

    Rehder, Mads

    I will discuss the many unique lenses available to visual anthropological research and how a nuanced and differentiated view on them can be the key to understanding the complexity of the representations we, as visual anthropologist, are creating.......I will discuss the many unique lenses available to visual anthropological research and how a nuanced and differentiated view on them can be the key to understanding the complexity of the representations we, as visual anthropologist, are creating....

  11. Visual Representations of DNA Replication: Middle Grades Students' Perceptions and Interpretations

    Patrick, Michelle D.; Carter, Glenda; Wiebe, Eric N.

    2005-01-01

    Visual representations play a critical role in the communication of science concepts for scientists and students alike. However, recent research suggests that novice students experience difficulty extracting relevant information from representations. This study examined students' interpretations of visual representations of DNA replication. Each…

  12. Visual Literacy and Biochemistry Learning: The role of external representations

    V.J.S.V. Santos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Visual Literacy can bedefined as people’s ability to understand, use, think, learn and express themselves through external representations (ER in a given subject. This research aims to investigate the development of abilities of ERs reading and interpretation by students from a Biochemistry graduate course of theFederal University of São João Del-Rei. In this way, Visual Literacy level was  assessed using a questionnaire validatedin a previous educational research. This diagnosis questionnaire was elaborated according to six visual abilitiesidentified as essential for the study of the metabolic pathways. The initial statistical analysis of data collectedin this study was carried out using ANOVA method. Results obtained showed that the questionnaire used is adequate for the research and indicated that the level of Visual Literacy related to the metabolic processes increased significantly with the progress of the students in the graduation course. There was also an indication of a possible interference in the student’s performancedetermined by the cutoff punctuation in the university selection process.

  13. Object class recognition based on compressive sensing with sparse features inspired by hierarchical model in visual cortex

    Lu, Pei; Xu, Zhiyong; Yu, Huapeng; Chang, Yongxin; Fu, Chengyu; Shao, Jianxin

    2012-11-01

    According to models of object recognition in cortex, the brain uses a hierarchical approach in which simple, low-level features having high position and scale specificity are pooled and combined into more complex, higher-level features having greater location invariance. At higher levels, spatial structure becomes implicitly encoded into the features themselves, which may overlap, while explicit spatial information is coded more coarsely. In this paper, the importance of sparsity and localized patch features in a hierarchical model inspired by visual cortex is investigated. As in the model of Serre, Wolf, and Poggio, we first apply Gabor filters at all positions and scales; feature complexity and position/scale invariance are then built up by alternating template matching and max pooling operations. In order to improve generalization performance, the sparsity is proposed and data dimension is reduced by means of compressive sensing theory and sparse representation algorithm. Similarly, within computational neuroscience, adding the sparsity on the number of feature inputs and feature selection is critical for learning biologically model from the statistics of natural images. Then, a redundancy dictionary of patch-based features that could distinguish object class from other categories is designed and then object recognition is implemented by the process of iterative optimization. The method is test on the UIUC car database. The success of this approach suggests a proof for the object class recognition in visual cortex.

  14. Independent sources of anisotropy in visual orientation representation: a visual and a cognitive oblique effect.

    Balikou, Panagiota; Gourtzelidis, Pavlos; Mantas, Asimakis; Moutoussis, Konstantinos; Evdokimidis, Ioannis; Smyrnis, Nikolaos

    2015-11-01

    The representation of visual orientation is more accurate for cardinal orientations compared to oblique, and this anisotropy has been hypothesized to reflect a low-level visual process (visual, "class 1" oblique effect). The reproduction of directional and orientation information also leads to a mean error away from cardinal orientations or directions. This anisotropy has been hypothesized to reflect a high-level cognitive process of space categorization (cognitive, "class 2," oblique effect). This space categorization process would be more prominent when the visual representation of orientation degrades such as in the case of working memory with increasing cognitive load, leading to increasing magnitude of the "class 2" oblique effect, while the "class 1" oblique effect would remain unchanged. Two experiments were performed in which an array of orientation stimuli (1-4 items) was presented and then subjects had to realign a probe stimulus within the previously presented array. In the first experiment, the delay between stimulus presentation and probe varied, while in the second experiment, the stimulus presentation time varied. The variable error was larger for oblique compared to cardinal orientations in both experiments reproducing the visual "class 1" oblique effect. The mean error also reproduced the tendency away from cardinal and toward the oblique orientations in both experiments (cognitive "class 2" oblique effect). The accuracy or the reproduced orientation degraded (increasing variable error) and the cognitive "class 2" oblique effect increased with increasing memory load (number of items) in both experiments and presentation time in the second experiment. In contrast, the visual "class 1" oblique effect was not significantly modulated by any one of these experimental factors. These results confirmed the theoretical predictions for the two anisotropies in visual orientation reproduction and provided support for models proposing the categorization of orientation in visual working memory. PMID:26226929

  15. Teaching with Concrete and Abstract Visual Representations: Effects on Students' Problem Solving, Problem Representations, and Learning Perceptions

    Moreno, Roxana; Ozogul, Gamze; Reisslein, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In 3 experiments, we examined the effects of using concrete and/or abstract visual problem representations during instruction on students' problem-solving practice, near transfer, problem representations, and learning perceptions. In Experiments 1 and 2, novice students learned about electrical circuit analysis with an instructional program that…

  16. Comparing visual and motor cortex: representational coding versus dynamical systems

    Jeffrey S. Seely

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Systems neuroscience often employs models that explain neural responses in terms of represented stimulus features or movement parameters. These models can be powerful, but do not apply equally well to all circuits. For example, the activity of a central pattern generator is best captured by its intrinsic dynamics. Here, we examine the population response in a number of cortical areas, and ask whether responses appear stimulus driven (i.e. are better described as a function of external parameters or internally generated (i.e. are better described by a dynamical system. We analyzed datasets (44 - 218 single and/or multi-unit isolations from visual areas V1 and MT (recorded during the presentation of visual stimuli and from primary motor and premotor cortex (recorded during a delayed reach task. Our analyses did not fit particular representational or dynamical models, but instead asked whether basic features of the data tended to obey or violate the expectations of a dynamical system. The principal expectation is, for a k-dimensional dynamical system, the number of temporal patterns (modes present in the data should tend to be 1. For the neural data from visual areas (2 datasets the ratio lay close to the stimulus-driven prediction (ratios = 0.8, 1.1, while the population response from the motor areas (4 datasets appeared more dynamical (ratios = 1.6, 1.8, 1.8, 2.4. These results indicate that, in visual areas the overall structure of the data is consistent with responses being largely a function of stimulus parameters. In contrast, in motor areas the structure of the data argues that responses are more strongly dominated by internal dynamics.

  17. Fixed-Rank Representation for Unsupervised Visual Learning

    Liu, Risheng; De la Torre, Fernando; Su, Zhixun

    2012-01-01

    Subspace clustering and feature extraction are two of the most extensive unsupervised visual learning tasks in computer vision and pattern recognition. In this paper, we pose these two problems in a unified framework, named fixed-rank representation (FRR). For subspace clustering, our first contribution is to show that, when the data is clean, we can efficiently solve FRR in closed-form and the global optimal solution to FRR can exactly recover the multiple subspace structure. Furthermore, we prove that under some suitable conditions, even with insufficient observations, the memberships of data points still can be exactly recovered by FRR. In the case that the data is corrupted by noises and outliers, a sparse regularization is introduced to achieve robustness for FRR. For feature extraction, we provide some new insights to understand existing methods, which lead to a new approach for robust feature extraction. As a non-trivial byproduct, a fast numerical solver is developed for FRR. Experimental results on b...

  18. Algebra of the Visual: The London Underground Map and the Art It Has Inspired

    Alan Ashton-Smith

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available "Algebra of the Visual: The London Underground Map and the Art It Has Inspired" by Alan Ashton-Smith. The London Underground symbolizes London, and the London Underground map, designed by Harry Beck in 1931, symbolizes the London Underground. Accordingly, Beck’s map has in itself come to be a recognizable signifier of London. Its impact resonates beyond this city though: it is also the prototype for metro maps worldwide, with its basic topological structure having been adopted for use on the subways of many other cities. (NANO: New American Notes Online

  19. Reading visual representations of 'Ndabeni' in the public realms

    Sipokazi Sambumbu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay outlines and analyses contemporary image representations of Ndabeni (also called kwa-Ndabeni, a location near Cape Town where a group of people became confined between 1901 and 1936 following an outbreak of the bubonic plague in the city. This location was to shape Cape Town's landscape for a little less that thirty-five years, accommodating people who were forcibly removed from the Cape Town docklands and from District Six. Images representing this place have been produced, archived, recovered, modified, reproduced and circulated in different ways and contexts. Ndabeni has become public knowledge through public visual representations that have been produced across a range of sites in post-apartheid Cape Town. I focus on three sites: the Victoria and Alfred Waterfront, the District Six Museum, and the Eziko Restaurant and Catering School. In each case I analyse the processes through which the Ndabeni images in question have been used and reused over time in changing contexts. I analyse the 'modalities' in which these images have been composed, interpreted and employed and in which knowledge has been mediated. I explore the contents and contexts of the storyboards and exhibition panels that purport to represent Ndabeni. Finally, I discuss potential meanings that could be constructed if the images could be read independent of the texts.

  20. A unified data representation theory for network visualization, ordering and coarse-graining

    Kovács, István A; Csermely, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Representation of large data sets became a key question of many scientific disciplines in the last decade. Several approaches for network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining accomplished this goal. However, there was no underlying theoretical framework linking these problems. Here we show an elegant, information theoretic data representation approach as a unified solution of network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining. The optimal representation is the hardest to distinguish from the original data matrix, measured by the relative entropy. The representation of network nodes as probability distributions provides an efficient visualization method and, in one dimension, an ordering of network nodes and edges. Coarse-grained representations of the input network enable both efficient data compression and hierarchical visualization to achieve high quality representations of larger data sets. Our unified data representation theory will help the analysis of huge data sets in science, by reve...

  1. A unified data representation theory for network visualization, ordering and coarse-graining

    Kovács, István A.; Mizsei, Réka; Csermely, Péter

    2015-09-01

    Representation of large data sets became a key question of many scientific disciplines in the last decade. Several approaches for network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining accomplished this goal. However, there was no underlying theoretical framework linking these problems. Here we show an elegant, information theoretic data representation approach as a unified solution of network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining. The optimal representation is the hardest to distinguish from the original data matrix, measured by the relative entropy. The representation of network nodes as probability distributions provides an efficient visualization method and, in one dimension, an ordering of network nodes and edges. Coarse-grained representations of the input network enable both efficient data compression and hierarchical visualization to achieve high quality representations of larger data sets. Our unified data representation theory will help the analysis of extensive data sets, by revealing the large-scale structure of complex networks in a comprehensible form.

  2. Distinct Visual Working Memory Systems for View-Dependent and View-Invariant Representation

    Wood, Justin N.

    2009-01-01

    Background How do people sustain a visual representation of the environment? Currently, many researchers argue that a single visual working memory system sustains non-spatial object information such as colors and shapes. However, previous studies tested visual working memory for two-dimensional objects only. In consequence, the nature of visual working memory for three-dimensional (3D) object representation remains unknown. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, I show that when sustaining info...

  3. Representational momentum reveals visual anticipation differences in the upper and lower visual fields.

    Gottwald, Victoria M; Lawrence, Gavin P; Hayes, Amy E; Khan, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Recent empirical research has revealed differences in functional capacity between the upper and lower visual fields (VFs), with the lower VF exhibiting superiority in visual perception skills. Similarly, functional differences between the left and right hemispheres elicit a predominance for visuospatial processing in the left visual field (left VF). Both anatomical as well as evolutionary arguments have been adopted in accounting for these variations in function. Preceding upper and lower VF research has typically investigated either static stimulus perception or the visual processing of upper limb action. The aim of the current research was to investigate whether the lower VF benefits associated with limb control transcend to visual anticipation (the perception of motion). Methods were based on Khan and Lawrence (Exp Brain Res 164:395-398, 2005), who investigated upper/lower VF differences in visuomotor control, but utilising a representational momentum paradigm to isolate perceptual processes. Thirty-two participants were randomised into either a left or right VF group and completed a perceptual computer-based task in the upper and lower VF, where they were required to judge the final position of a moving object before it disappeared. Two aspects of the distributions of same responses were then analysed; the central tendency (weighted means) and the variability. Results revealed that in the left VF, weighted means for the lower VF were significantly greater than for the upper VF [t(14) = 2.242, p = 0.042]. In both left and right VFs, variability was greater in the upper compared to lower VF. This provides new findings regarding visual processes in the different visual fields. While visual search and large scene perception has been found to be superior in the upper VF, here we find that visual anticipation, like target-directed visuomotor skill, is superior in the lower VF. PMID:25929553

  4. A neuron-inspired computational architecture for spatiotemporal visual processing: real-time visual sensory integration for humanoid robots.

    Holzbach, Andreas; Cheng, Gordon

    2014-06-01

    In this article, we present a neurologically motivated computational architecture for visual information processing. The computational architecture's focus lies in multiple strategies: hierarchical processing, parallel and concurrent processing, and modularity. The architecture is modular and expandable in both hardware and software, so that it can also cope with multisensory integrations - making it an ideal tool for validating and applying computational neuroscience models in real time under real-world conditions. We apply our architecture in real time to validate a long-standing biologically inspired visual object recognition model, HMAX. In this context, the overall aim is to supply a humanoid robot with the ability to perceive and understand its environment with a focus on the active aspect of real-time spatiotemporal visual processing. We show that our approach is capable of simulating information processing in the visual cortex in real time and that our entropy-adaptive modification of HMAX has a higher efficiency and classification performance than the standard model (up to ?+6%). PMID:24687170

  5. Exploring Middle School Students' Representational Competence in Science: Development and Verification of a Framework for Learning with Visual Representations

    Tippett, Christine Diane

    Scientific knowledge is constructed and communicated through a range of forms in addition to verbal language. Maps, graphs, charts, diagrams, formulae, models, and drawings are just some of the ways in which science concepts can be represented. Representational competence---an aspect of visual literacy that focuses on the ability to interpret, transform, and produce visual representations---is a key component of science literacy and an essential part of science reading and writing. To date, however, most research has examined learning from representations rather than learning with representations. This dissertation consisted of three distinct projects that were related by a common focus on learning from visual representations as an important aspect of scientific literacy. The first project was the development of an exploratory framework that is proposed for use in investigations of students constructing and interpreting multimedia texts. The exploratory framework, which integrates cognition, metacognition, semiotics, and systemic functional linguistics, could eventually result in a model that might be used to guide classroom practice, leading to improved visual literacy, better comprehension of science concepts, and enhanced science literacy because it emphasizes distinct aspects of learning with representations that can be addressed though explicit instruction. The second project was a metasynthesis of the research that was previously conducted as part of the Explicit Literacy Instruction Embedded in Middle School Science project (Pacific CRYSTAL, http://www.educ.uvic.ca/pacificcrystal). Five overarching themes emerged from this case-to-case synthesis: the engaging and effective nature of multimedia genres, opportunities for differentiated instruction using multimodal strategies, opportunities for assessment, an emphasis on visual representations, and the robustness of some multimodal literacy strategies across content areas. The third project was a mixed-methods verification study that was conducted to refine and validate the theoretical framework. This study examined middle school students' representational competence and focused on students' creation of visual representations such as labelled diagrams, a form of representation commonly found in science information texts and textbooks. An analysis of the 31 Grade 6 participants' representations and semistructured interviews revealed five themes, each of which supports one or more dimensions of the exploratory framework: participants' use of color, participants' choice of representation (form and function), participants' method of planning for representing, participants' knowledge of conventions, and participants' selection of information to represent. Together, the results of these three projects highlight the need for further research on learning with rather than learning from representations.

  6. Visual Representations on High School Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics Assessments

    LaDue, Nicole D.; Libarkin, Julie C.; Thomas, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    The pervasive use of visual representations in textbooks, curricula, and assessments underscores their importance in K-12 science education. For example, visual representations figure prominently in the recent publication of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS Lead States in Next generation science standards: for states, by states.…

  7. Visual Representations on High School Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics Assessments

    LaDue, Nicole D.; Libarkin, Julie C.; Thomas, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    The pervasive use of visual representations in textbooks, curricula, and assessments underscores their importance in K-12 science education. For example, visual representations figure prominently in the recent publication of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS Lead States in Next generation science standards: for states, by states.…

  8. Invariant Representations of Visual Streams in the Spike Domain

    Aurel A Lazar

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a model architecture for invariant representations of visual stimuli such as natural and synthetic video streams (movies, animation in the spike domain. The stimuli are encoded with a population of spiking neurons, processed in the spike domain and finally decoded. The population of spiking neurons includes interconnected neural circuits with level crossing spiking mechanisms as well as integrate-and-fire neuron models with feedback. A number of spike domain processing algorithms are demonstrated including faithful stimulus recovery, as well as simple operations on the original visual stimulus such as translations, rotations and zooming. All these operations are executed in the spike domain. Finally, the processed spike trains are decoded and the faithful recovery of the stimulus and its transformations is obtained. We show that the class of linear operations described above can easily be realized with the same basic stimulus decoding algorithm [1]. What changes in the architecture, however, is the switching matrix (i.e., the input/output "wiring' of the spike domain switching building block. For example, for a particular setting of the switching matrix, the original stimulus is faithfully recovered. For other settings, translations, rotations and dilations (or combinations of these operations of the original video stream are obtained. The implementability of these elementary transformations originates from the structure of the neuron receptive fields that form an overcomplete spatial (or spatiotemporal filterbank. Our architecture suggests that identity-preserving transformations between different layers of the visual system are easily obtained by changing the connectivity between the different neural layers. Combinations of the aforementioned elementary transformations realize any linear transformation (e.g., zoom into a particular region. This addresses the correspondence problem of identifying equivalent stimuli while constantly changing visual fixations. Furthermore, our architecture generates in real-time the entire object manifold [2]. The latter is obtained by a set of identity-preserving transformations, and thereby, it is invariant with respect to (essentially arbitrary translations, rotations and zooming. By computing the object manifold in real-time, the problem of object recognition is therefore mapped into one of determining whether any arbitrary stored object belongs to the just-computed object manifold [3]. Acknowledgements:The work presented here was supported in part by NIH under grant number R01 DC008701-01 and in part by NSF under grant number CCF-06-35252. E.A. Pnevmatikakis was also supported by the Onassis Public Benefit Foundation.

  9. Size-Sensitive Perceptual Representations Underlie Visual and Haptic Object Recognition

    Craddock, M; Lawson, R.

    2009-01-01

    A variety of similarities between visual and haptic object recognition suggests that the two modalities may share common representations. However, it is unclear whether such common representations preserve low-level perceptual features or whether transfer between vision and haptics is mediated by high-level, abstract representations. Two experiments used a sequential shape-matching task to examine the effects of size changes on unimodal and crossmodal visual and haptic object recognition. Par...

  10. Parametric eigenspace representation for visual learning and recognition

    Murase, H.; Nayar, Shree K.

    1993-06-01

    We address the problem of automatically learning object models for recognition and pose estimation. In contrast to the traditional approach, we formulate the recognition problem as one of matching visual appearance rather than shape. The appearance of an object in a two- dimensional image depends on its shape, reflectance properties, pose in the scene, and the illumination conditions. While shape and reflectance are intrinsic properties of an object and are constant, pose and illumination vary from scene to scene. We present a new compact representation of object appearance that is parametrized by pose and illumination. For each object of interest, a large set of images is obtained by automatically varying pose and illumination. This large image set is compressed to obtain a low-dimensional subspace, called the eigenspace, in which the object is represented as a hypersurface. Given an unknown input image, the recognition system projects the image onto the eigenspace. The object is recognized based on the hypersurface it lies on. The exact position of the projection on the hypersurface determines the object's pose in the image. We have conducted experiments using several objects with complex appearance characteristics. We conclude with a discussion on various issues related to the learning and recognition techniques proposed in the paper.

  11. Virtual-real spatial information visualization registration using affine representations

    Wu, Xueling; Ren, Fu; Du, Qingyun

    2009-10-01

    Virtual-real registration in Outdoor Augmented Reality is committed to enhance user's spatial cognition by overlaying virtual geographical objects on real scene. According to analyze fiducial detection registration method in indoor AR, for the purpose of avoiding complex and tedious process of position tracking and camera calibration in traditional registration methods, it puts forward and practices a virtual-real spatial information visualization registration method using affine representations. Based on the observation from Koenderink and van Doorn, Ullman and Basri in 1991 which is given a set of four or more non-coplanar 3D points, the projection of all points in the set can be computed as a linear combination of the projection of just four of the points, it sets up global affine coordinate system in light of world coordinates, camera coordinates and virtual coordinates and extracts four feature points from scene image and calculates the global affine coordinates of key points of virtual objects. Then according to a linear homogeneous coordinates of the four feature point's projection, it calculates projection pixel coordinates of key points of virtual objects. In addition, it proposes an approach to obtain pixel relative depth for hidden surface removal. Finally, by a case study, it verifies the feasibility and efficiency of the registration methods. The method would not only explore a new research direction for Geographical Information Science, but also would provide location-based information and services for outdoor AR.

  12. Honeybees as a model for the study of visually guided flight, navigation, and biologically inspired robotics.

    Srinivasan, Mandyam V

    2011-04-01

    Research over the past century has revealed the impressive capacities of the honeybee, Apis mellifera, in relation to visual perception, flight guidance, navigation, and learning and memory. These observations, coupled with the relative ease with which these creatures can be trained, and the relative simplicity of their nervous systems, have made honeybees an attractive model in which to pursue general principles of sensorimotor function in a variety of contexts, many of which pertain not just to honeybees, but several other animal species, including humans. This review begins by describing the principles of visual guidance that underlie perception of the world in three dimensions, obstacle avoidance, control of flight speed, and orchestrating smooth landings. We then consider how navigation over long distances is accomplished, with particular reference to how bees use information from the celestial compass to determine their flight bearing, and information from the movement of the environment in their eyes to gauge how far they have flown. Finally, we illustrate how some of the principles gleaned from these studies are now being used to design novel, biologically inspired algorithms for the guidance of unmanned aerial vehicles. PMID:21527730

  13. A visual representation system for the scheduling and management of projects

    Pollalis, S.N.

    1992-01-01

    A VISUAL SCHEDULING AND MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (VSMS) This work proposes a new system for the visual representation of projects that displays the quantities of work, resources and cost. This new system, called Visual Scheduling and Management System, has a built-in hierarchical system to provide different levels of schedules, and visually superimposes planned and actual data to become a control device. It is also designed to schedule and manage projects with repeating tasks at various locations. T...

  14. New contributions in overcomplete image representations inspired from the functional architecture of the visal cortex

    Fischer, Sylvain

    2007-01-01

    [ES] La presente tesis doctoral tiene como objetivo indagar en algunos paralelismos entre la arquitectura funcional de las áreas visuales primarias y el tratamiento de imágenes. Un primer objetivo consiste en mejorar los modelos existentes de visión biológica basándose en la teoría de la información. Un segundo es el desarrollo de nuevos algoritmos de tratamiento de imágenes inspirados de la visión natural. Los datos disponibles sobre el sistema visual abarcan estudios fisiológ...

  15. Visual representations in knowledge management: framework and cases

    Martin J. Eppler; Burkhard, Remo A.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to explore the potential of visualization for corporate knowledge management. The employed methodology consists of a taxonomy of visualization formats that are embedded in a conceptual framework to guide the application of visualization in knowledge management according to the type of knowledge that is visualized, the knowledge management objective, the target group, and the application situation. This conceptual framework is illustrated through real-life exampl...

  16. The Comparison of Visual Working Memory Representations with Perceptual Inputs

    Hyun, Joo-seok; Woodman, Geoffrey F.; Vogel, Edward K.; Hollingworth, Andrew; Luck, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    The human visual system can notice differences between memories of previous visual inputs and perceptions of new visual inputs, but the comparison process that detects these differences has not been well characterized. In this study, the authors tested the hypothesis that differences between the memory of a stimulus array and the perception of a…

  17. Sparse representation, modeling and learning in visual recognition theory, algorithms and applications

    Cheng, Hong

    2015-01-01

    This unique text/reference presents a comprehensive review of the state of the art in sparse representations, modeling and learning. The book examines both the theoretical foundations and details of algorithm implementation, highlighting the practical application of compressed sensing research in visual recognition and computer vision. Topics and features: provides a thorough introduction to the fundamentals of sparse representation, modeling and learning, and the application of these techniques in visual recognition; describes sparse recovery approaches, robust and efficient sparse represen

  18. Learning Subclass Representations for Visually-varied Image Classification

    Li, Xinchao; XU Peng; Shi, Yue; Larson, Martha; Hanjalic, Alan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a subclass-representation approach that predicts the probability of a social image belonging to one particular class. We explore the co-occurrence of user-contributed tags to find subclasses with a strong connection to the top level class. We then project each image on to the resulting subclass space to generate a subclass representation for the image. The novelty of the approach is that subclass representations make use of not only the content of the photos themselv...

  19. Visual Representations on High School Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics Assessments

    LaDue, Nicole D.; Libarkin, Julie C.; Thomas, Stephen R.

    2015-12-01

    The pervasive use of visual representations in textbooks, curricula, and assessments underscores their importance in K-12 science education. For example, visual representations figure prominently in the recent publication of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS Lead States in Next generation science standards: for states, by states. Achieve, Inc. on behalf of the twenty-six states and partners that collaborated on the NGSS, 2013). Although assessments of the NGSS have yet to be developed, most students are currently evaluated on their ability to interpret science visuals. While numerous studies exist on particular visuals, it is unclear whether the same types of visuals are emphasized in all science disciplines. The present study is an evaluation of the similarities and differences of visuals used to assess students' knowledge of chemistry, earth science, living environment (biology), and physics on the New York State Regents examination. Analysis of 266 distinct visual representations categorized across the four content examinations reveals that the frequency and type of visuals vary greatly between disciplines. Diagrams, Graphs, Tables, and Maps are the most prevalent across all science disciplines. Maps, Cartograms, and Time Charts are unique to the Earth Science examination, and Network Diagrams are unique to the living environment (biology) examination. This study identifies which representations are most critical for training students across the science disciplines in anticipation of the implementation and eventual assessment of the NGSS.

  20. The Nature of Experience Determines Object Representations in the Visual System

    Wong, Yetta K.; Folstein, Jonathan R.; Gauthier, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    Visual perceptual learning (PL) and perceptual expertise (PE) traditionally lead to different training effects and recruit different brain areas, but reasons for these differences are largely unknown. Here, we tested how the learning history influences visual object representations. Two groups were trained with tasks typically used in PL or PE…

  1. "Radio-Active" Learning: Visual Representation of Radioactive Decay Using Dice

    Klein, Lynda; Kagan, David

    2010-01-01

    The idea of using a dice game to simulate radioactive decay is not new. However, modern pedagogy encourages, if not requires, us to provide multiple representations and visualizations for our students. The advantage of interactive engagement methods also has been made clear. Here we describe a highly visual and interactive use of dice to develop…

  2. Spinal cord injury affects the interplay between visual and sensorimotor representations of the body

    Ionta, Silvio; Villiger, Michael; Jutzeler, Catherine R; Freund, Patrick; Curt, Armin; Gassert, Roger

    2016-01-01

    The brain integrates multiple sensory inputs, including somatosensory and visual inputs, to produce a representation of the body. Spinal cord injury (SCI) interrupts the communication between brain and body and the effects of this deafferentation on body representation are poorly understood. We investigated whether the relative weight of somatosensory and visual frames of reference for body representation is altered in individuals with incomplete or complete SCI (affecting lower limbs’ somatosensation), with respect to controls. To study the influence of afferent somatosensory information on body representation, participants verbally judged the laterality of rotated images of feet, hands, and whole-bodies (mental rotation task) in two different postures (participants’ body parts were hidden from view). We found that (i) complete SCI disrupts the influence of postural changes on the representation of the deafferented body parts (feet, but not hands) and (ii) regardless of posture, whole-body representation progressively deteriorates proportionally to SCI completeness. These results demonstrate that the cortical representation of the body is dynamic, responsive, and adaptable to contingent conditions, in that the role of somatosensation is altered and partially compensated with a change in the relative weight of somatosensory versus visual bodily representations. PMID:26842303

  3. Learning Visual Representations for Perception-Action Systems

    Piater, Justus; Jodogne, Sebastien; Detry, Renaud; Kraft, Dirk; Krüger, Norbert; Kroemer, Oliver; Peters, Jan

    2011-01-01

    We discuss vision as a sensory modality for systems that effect actions in response to perceptions. While the internal representations informed by vision may be arbitrarily complex, we argue that in many cases it is advantageous to link them rather directly to action via learned mappings. These...... RLJC, our second method learns structural object models for robust object detection and pose estimation by probabilistic inference. To these models, the method associates grasp experiences autonomously learned by trial and error. These experiences form a nonparametric representation of grasp success...

  4. The Representation of Object Viewpoint in Human Visual Cortex

    Andresen, David R.; Vinberg, Joakim; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2008-01-01

    Understanding the nature of object representations in the human brain is critical for understanding the neural basis of invariant object recognition. However, the degree to which object representations are sensitive to object viewpoint is unknown. Using fMRI we employed a parametric approach to examine the sensitivity to object view as a function of rotation (0°–180°), category (animal/vehicle) and fMRI-adaptation paradigm (short or long-lagged). For both categories and fMRI-adaptation paradi...

  5. Perisaccadic Updating of Visual Representations and Attentional States: Linking Behavior and Neurophysiology

    Marino, Alexandria C.; James A. Mazer

    2016-01-01

    During natural vision, saccadic eye movements lead to frequent retinal image changes that result in different neuronal subpopulations representing the same visual feature across fixations. Despite these potentially disruptive changes to the neural representation, our visual percept is remarkably stable. Visual receptive field remapping, characterized as an anticipatory shift in the position of a neuron’s spatial receptive field immediately before saccades, has been proposed as one possible ne...

  6. Visualization and Rule Validation in Human-Behavior Representation

    Moya, Lisa Jean; McKenzie, Frederic D.; Nguyen, Quynh-Anh H.

    2008-01-01

    Human behavior representation (HBR) models simulate human behaviors and responses. The Joint Crowd Federate [TM] cognitive model developed by the Virginia Modeling, Analysis, and Simulation Center (VMASC) and licensed by WernerAnderson, Inc., models the cognitive behavior of crowds to provide credible crowd behavior in support of military…

  7. Newborn chickens generate invariant object representations at the onset of visual object experience.

    Wood, Justin N

    2013-08-20

    To recognize objects quickly and accurately, mature visual systems build invariant object representations that generalize across a range of novel viewing conditions (e.g., changes in viewpoint). To date, however, the origins of this core cognitive ability have not yet been established. To examine how invariant object recognition develops in a newborn visual system, I raised chickens from birth for 2 weeks within controlled-rearing chambers. These chambers provided complete control over all visual object experiences. In the first week of life, subjects' visual object experience was limited to a single virtual object rotating through a 60° viewpoint range. In the second week of life, I examined whether subjects could recognize that virtual object from novel viewpoints. Newborn chickens were able to generate viewpoint-invariant representations that supported object recognition across large, novel, and complex changes in the object's appearance. Thus, newborn visual systems can begin building invariant object representations at the onset of visual object experience. These abstract representations can be generated from sparse data, in this case from a visual world containing a single virtual object seen from a limited range of viewpoints. This study shows that powerful, robust, and invariant object recognition machinery is an inherent feature of the newborn brain. PMID:23918372

  8. Population coding of visual space: comparison of spatial representations in the dorsal and ventral pathways

    Anne B Sereno

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the representation of space is as fundamental to visual processing as the representation of shape, it has received relatively little attention from neurophysiological investigations. In this study we characterize representations of space within visual cortex, and examine how they differ in a first direct comparison between dorsal and ventral subdivisions of the visual pathways. Neural activities were recorded in anterior inferotemporal cortex (AIT and lateral intraparietal cortex (LIP of awake behaving monkeys, structures associated with the ventral and dorsal visual pathways respectively, as a stimulus was presented at different locations within the visual field. In spatially selective cells, we find greater modulation of cell responses in LIP with changes in stimulus position. Further, using a novel population-based statistical approach (namely, multidimensional scaling, we recover the spatial map implicit within activities of neural populations, allowing us to quantitatively compare the geometry of neural space with physical space. We show that a population of spatially selective LIP neurons, despite having large receptive fields, is able to almost perfectly reconstruct stimulus locations within a low-dimensional representation. In contrast, a population of AIT neurons, despite each cell being spatially selective, provide less accurate low-dimensional reconstructions of stimulus locations. They produce instead only a topologically (categorically correct rendition of space, which nevertheless might be critical for object and scene recognition. Furthermore, we found that the spatial representation recovered from population activity shows greater translation invariance in LIP than in AIT. We suggest that LIP spatial representations may be dimensionally isomorphic with 3D physical space, while in AIT spatial representations may reflect a more categorical representation of space (e.g., “next to” or “above”.

  9. Visual representations in portuguese produced english language teaching coursebooks

    Nicolas Robert Hurst

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the role of illustrations in the context of English Language Teaching (ELT) coursebooks produced in Portugal. Taking illustrations to be one pilar in the construction of meaning through the representation of culture, the discussion shifts between their use over the last 35 years and their potential as a source of innovation and improvement in this area of ELT materials development. The central issue relates to the need for illustrations to perform s...

  10. North Korea and the politics of visual representation

    Shim, David; Nabers, Dirk

    2011-01-01

    Within international discourses on security, North Korea is often associated with risk and danger, emanating paradoxically from what can be called its strengths - particularly military strength, as embodied by its missile and nuclear programs - and its weaknesses - such as its ever-present political, economic, and food crises - which are considered to be imminent threats to international peace and stability. We argue that images play an important role in these representations, and suggest tha...

  11. Computational intelligence in multi-feature visual pattern recognition hand posture and face recognition using biologically inspired approaches

    Pisharady, Pramod Kumar; Poh, Loh Ai

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of computational intelligence algorithms that addresses issues in visual pattern recognition such as high computational complexity, abundance of pattern features, sensitivity to size and shape variations and poor performance against complex backgrounds. The book has 3 parts. Part 1 describes various research issues in the field with a survey of the related literature. Part 2 presents computational intelligence based algorithms for feature selection and classification. The algorithms are discriminative and fast. The main application area considered is hand posture recognition. The book also discusses utility of these algorithms in other visual as well as non-visual pattern recognition tasks including face recognition, general object recognition and cancer / tumor classification. Part 3 presents biologically inspired algorithms for feature extraction. The visual cortex model based features discussed have invariance with respect to appearance and size of the hand, and provide good...

  12. Visual representation of age as a function of the level of ageism.

    Dion Marcoux, Youna; Blais, Caroline; Fiset, Daniel; Goulet, Arianne; Pruneau, Chloë; Forget, Hélène

    2015-09-01

    Recently, it has been shown that visual representations of ethnic outgroup faces are negatively biased in prejudiced individuals (Dotsch et al., 2008). The present study verified if the visual representations of young vs. old-aged prototypical individuals are influenced by the level of ageism of the observer. In phase 1 of the experiment, 28 young participants (Mage=20.43) took part in a reverse correlation task (Mangini & Biederman, 2004). On each trial, two stimuli were created by adding visual noise to a base face (i.e. morph of 40 young and 40 old faces), and were simultaneously presented to the participant. The task was to indicate which one was the most prototypical of the young-aged group (500 trials), or of the old-aged group (500 trials). The implicit age bias was measured with the Implicit Association Test (Lane et al., 2007). For each participant, the visual representation of the young-aged group (vs. old-aged group) was revealed by summing the noise fields of the stimuli selected as the most typical of the young-aged (vs. old-aged) group. In phase 2, 24 naive participants were asked to estimate, on a scale from 11 to 101, the age of the individual visual representations measured in phase 1. The average estimate across the judge participants was calculated for each of the individual visual representation. The age estimates of the visual representations of the nine participants with the highest vs. lowest level of ageism were compared. For the visual representation of the young-aged group, we found no effet of the level of ageism [Mhigh=28.86; Mlow=29.97; t(23)=1.55, p=0.13]. However, we showed that the visual representation of a prototypical old-aged individual is older in the mind of the high ageism individuals [Mhigh=44.30; Mlow=40.92; t(23)=-4.19, p=0.0004]. Thus, our results suggest that ageism alters the perception of old-aged individuals by making them appear older. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326909

  13. Ambiguous Science and the Visual Representation of the Real

    Newbold, Curtis Robert

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of visual media as prominent and even expected forms of communication in nearly all disciplines, including those scientific, has raised new questions about how the art and science of communication epistemologically affect the interpretation of scientific phenomena. In this dissertation I explore how the influence of aesthetics in…

  14. Challenging cavalier perspective: an iconological study of visual perception of depth in Chinese representational space

    Xiao, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Cavalier Perspective has previously been described as merely a pictorial technique of spatial representation within the history of Chinese painting. It is a common belief that this unique visual system is capable of providing an experience of three-dimensional spatial perception in both representational art and actual space, in a manner similar to technique of foreshortening and perspective in post-renaissance western art. However, as Chinese ancient artists have a different understanding of ...

  15. A review of visual memory capacity: Beyond individual items and towards structured representations

    Brady, Timothy F; Konkle, Talia; Alvarez, George A.

    2011-01-01

    Traditional memory research has focused on identifying separate memory systems and exploring different stages of memory processing. This approach has been valuable for establishing a taxonomy of memory systems and characterizing their function, but has been less informative about the nature of stored memory representations. Recent research on visual memory has shifted towards a representation-based emphasis, focusing on the contents of memory, and attempting to determine the format and struct...

  16. Visual Working Memory Capacity for Color Is Independent of Representation Resolution

    Ye, Chaoxiong; Zhang, Lingcong; Liu, Taosheng; Li, Hong; Liu, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    Background The relationship between visual working memory (VWM) capacity and resolution of representation have been extensively investigated. Several recent ERP studies using orientation (or arrow) stimuli suggest that there is an inverse relationship between VWM capacity and representation resolution. However, different results have been obtained in studies using color stimuli. This could be due to important differences in the experimental paradigms used in previous studies. Methodology/Prin...

  17. Digital representations of the real world how to capture, model, and render visual reality

    Magnor, Marcus A; Sorkine-Hornung, Olga; Theobalt, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Create Genuine Visual Realism in Computer Graphics Digital Representations of the Real World: How to Capture, Model, and Render Visual Reality explains how to portray visual worlds with a high degree of realism using the latest video acquisition technology, computer graphics methods, and computer vision algorithms. It explores the integration of new capture modalities, reconstruction approaches, and visual perception into the computer graphics pipeline.Understand the Entire Pipeline from Acquisition, Reconstruction, and Modeling to Realistic Rendering and ApplicationsThe book covers sensors fo

  18. Gustave Caillebotte and Visual Representation: Perspective, Photography and Movement

    Pelacchi, Laetitia

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This dissertation examines spatial composition in Caillebotte’s painting and, through it, his ways of producing visual experience for the viewer. The four chapters evaluate the artist’s methods of composition through the use of perspective, photography, light and colour and depiction of the figures. This project will explore the development of his pictorial space organisation through the study of his realist works of the 1870s and the understanding of his convergence with Impres...

  19. The Influence of Similarity on Visual Working Memory Representations

    Lin, Po-Han; Steven J Luck

    2009-01-01

    In verbal memory, similarity between items in memory often leads to interference and impaired memory performance. The present study sought to determine whether analogous interference effects would be observed in visual working memory by varying the similarity of the to-be-remembered objects in a color change-detection task. Instead of leading to interference and impaired performance, increased similarity among the items being held in memory led to improved performance. Moreover, when two simi...

  20. Multiple Visual Field Representations in the Visual Wulst of a Laterally Eyed Bird, the Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata)

    2016-01-01

    The visual wulst is the telencephalic target of the avian thalamofugal visual system. It contains several retinotopically organised representations of the contralateral visual field. We used optical imaging of intrinsic signals, electrophysiological recordings, and retrograde tracing with two fluorescent tracers to evaluate properties of these representations in the zebra finch, a songbird with laterally placed eyes. Our experiments revealed that there is some variability of the neuronal maps between individuals and also concerning the number of detectable maps. It was nonetheless possible to identify three different maps, a posterolateral, a posteromedial, and an anterior one, which were quite constant in their relation to each other. The posterolateral map was in contrast to the two others constantly visible in each successful experiment. The topography of the two other maps was mirrored against that map. Electrophysiological recordings in the anterior and the posterolateral map revealed that all units responded to flashes and to moving bars. Mean directional preferences as well as latencies were different between neurons of the two maps. Tracing experiments confirmed previous reports on the thalamo-wulst connections and showed that the anterior and the posterolateral map receive projections from separate clusters within the thalamic nuclei. Maps are connected to each other by wulst intrinsic projections. Our experiments confirm that the avian visual wulst contains several separate retinotopic maps with both different physiological properties and different thalamo-wulst afferents. This confirms that the functional organization of the visual wulst is very similar to its mammalian equivalent, the visual cortex. PMID:27139912

  1. Multiple Visual Field Representations in the Visual Wulst of a Laterally Eyed Bird, the Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata).

    Bischof, Hans-Joachim; Eckmeier, Dennis; Keary, Nina; Löwel, Siegrid; Mayer, Uwe; Michael, Neethu

    2016-01-01

    The visual wulst is the telencephalic target of the avian thalamofugal visual system. It contains several retinotopically organised representations of the contralateral visual field. We used optical imaging of intrinsic signals, electrophysiological recordings, and retrograde tracing with two fluorescent tracers to evaluate properties of these representations in the zebra finch, a songbird with laterally placed eyes. Our experiments revealed that there is some variability of the neuronal maps between individuals and also concerning the number of detectable maps. It was nonetheless possible to identify three different maps, a posterolateral, a posteromedial, and an anterior one, which were quite constant in their relation to each other. The posterolateral map was in contrast to the two others constantly visible in each successful experiment. The topography of the two other maps was mirrored against that map. Electrophysiological recordings in the anterior and the posterolateral map revealed that all units responded to flashes and to moving bars. Mean directional preferences as well as latencies were different between neurons of the two maps. Tracing experiments confirmed previous reports on the thalamo-wulst connections and showed that the anterior and the posterolateral map receive projections from separate clusters within the thalamic nuclei. Maps are connected to each other by wulst intrinsic projections. Our experiments confirm that the avian visual wulst contains several separate retinotopic maps with both different physiological properties and different thalamo-wulst afferents. This confirms that the functional organization of the visual wulst is very similar to its mammalian equivalent, the visual cortex. PMID:27139912

  2. Berries Bittersweet: Visual Representations of Black Female Sexuality in Contemporary American Pornography

    Cruz, Ariane Renee

    2010-01-01

    My dissertation, Berries Bittersweet: Visual Representations of Black Female Sexuality in Contemporary American Pornography interrogates how pornography, from the 1930s to the present, functions as an essential site in the production of black female sexuality. Closely reading a diverse pool of primary pornographic visual materials, across print, moving image and the internet, such as photographs, magazines, trade magazines, videos, DVDs, and internet website viewings, I argue that pornograph...

  3. Newborn chickens generate invariant object representations at the onset of visual object experience

    Wood, Justin N.

    2013-01-01

    To recognize objects quickly and accurately, mature visual systems build invariant object representations that generalize across a range of novel viewing conditions (e.g., changes in viewpoint). To date, however, the origins of this core cognitive ability have not yet been established. To examine how invariant object recognition develops in a newborn visual system, I raised chickens from birth for 2 weeks within controlled-rearing chambers. These chambers provided complete control over all vi...

  4. A Biologically-Inspired Framework for Contour Detection Using Superpixel-Based Candidates and Hierarchical Visual Cues

    Xiao Sun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Contour detection has been extensively investigated as a fundamental problem in computer vision. In this study, a biologically-inspired candidate weighting framework is proposed for the challenging task of detecting meaningful contours. In contrast to previous models that detect contours from pixels, a modified superpixel generation processing is proposed to generate a contour candidate set and then weigh the candidates by extracting hierarchical visual cues. We extract the low-level visual local cues to weigh the contour intrinsic property and mid-level visual cues on the basis of Gestalt principles for weighting the contour grouping constraint. Experimental results tested on the BSDS benchmark show that the proposed framework exhibits promising performances to capture meaningful contours in complex scenes.

  5. Robust visual tracking of infrared object via sparse representation model

    Ma, Junkai; Liu, Haibo; Chang, Zheng; Hui, Bin

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust tracking method for infrared object. We introduce the appearance model and the sparse representation in the framework of particle filter to achieve this goal. Representing every candidate image patch as a linear combination of bases in the subspace which is spanned by the target templates is the mechanism behind this method. The natural property, that if the candidate image patch is the target so the coefficient vector must be sparse, can ensure our algorithm successfully. Firstly, the target must be indicated manually in the first frame of the video, then construct the dictionary using the appearance model of the target templates. Secondly, the candidate image patches are selected in following frames and the sparse coefficient vectors of them are calculated via l1-norm minimization algorithm. According to the sparse coefficient vectors the right candidates is determined as the target. Finally, the target templates update dynamically to cope with appearance change in the tracking process. This paper also addresses the problem of scale changing and the rotation of the target occurring in tracking. Theoretic analysis and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is effective and robust.

  6. Emergence of realism: Enhanced visual artistry and high accuracy of visual numerosity representation after left prefrontal damage.

    Takahata, Keisuke; Saito, Fumie; Muramatsu, Taro; Yamada, Makiko; Shirahase, Joichiro; Tabuchi, Hajime; Suhara, Tetsuya; Mimura, Masaru; Kato, Motoichiro

    2014-05-01

    Over the last two decades, evidence of enhancement of drawing and painting skills due to focal prefrontal damage has accumulated. It is of special interest that most artworks created by such patients were highly realistic ones, but the mechanism underlying this phenomenon remains to be understood. Our hypothesis is that enhanced tendency of realism was associated with accuracy of visual numerosity representation, which has been shown to be mediated predominantly by right parietal functions. Here, we report a case of left prefrontal stroke, where the patient showed enhancement of artistic skills of realistic painting after the onset of brain damage. We investigated cognitive, functional and esthetic characteristics of the patient?s visual artistry and visual numerosity representation. Neuropsychological tests revealed impaired executive function after the stroke. Despite that, the patient?s visual artistry related to realism was rather promoted across the onset of brain damage as demonstrated by blind evaluation of the paintings by professional art reviewers. On visual numerical cognition tasks, the patient showed higher performance in comparison with age-matched healthy controls. These results paralleled increased perfusion in the right parietal cortex including the precuneus and intraparietal sulcus. Our data provide new insight into mechanisms underlying change in artistic style due to focal prefrontal lesion. PMID:24631259

  7. The Uses of Literacy in Studying Computer Games: Comparing Students' Oral and Visual Representations of Games

    Pelletier, Caroline

    2005-01-01

    This paper compares the oral and visual representations which 12 to 13-year-old students produced in studying computer games as part of an English and Media course. It presents the arguments for studying multimodal texts as part of a literacy curriculum and then provides an overview of the games course devised by teachers and researchers. The…

  8. Representations of the Moon in Children's Literature: An Analysis of Written and Visual Text

    Trundle, Kathy Cabe; Troland, Thomas H.; Pritchard, T. Gail

    2008-01-01

    This review focused on the written and visual representation of the moon in 80 children's books, including Caldecott Medal and Honor books over the past 20 years. Results revealed that many of these books misrepresent the moon and even reinforce misconceptions about lunar phases. Teachers who use children's literature that misrepresents the moon…

  9. Developing Explanations and Developing Understanding: Students Explain the Phases of the Moon Using Visual Representations

    Parnafes, Orit

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a theoretical model of the process by which students construct and elaborate explanations of scientific phenomena using visual representations. The model describes progress in the underlying conceptual processes in students' explanations as a reorganization of fine-grained knowledge elements based on the Knowledge in Pieces…

  10. Priming Contour-Deleted Images: Evidence for Immediate Representations in Visual Object Recognition.

    Biederman, Irving; Cooper, Eric E.

    1991-01-01

    Speed and accuracy of identification of pictures of objects are facilitated by prior viewing. Contributions of image features, convex or concave components, and object models in a repetition priming task were explored in 2 studies involving 96 college students. Results provide evidence of intermediate representations in visual object recognition.…

  11. Emerging Object Representations in the Visual System Predict Reaction Times for Categorization.

    Ritchie, J Brendan; Tovar, David A; Carlson, Thomas A

    2015-06-01

    Recognizing an object takes just a fraction of a second, less than the blink of an eye. Applying multivariate pattern analysis, or "brain decoding", methods to magnetoencephalography (MEG) data has allowed researchers to characterize, in high temporal resolution, the emerging representation of object categories that underlie our capacity for rapid recognition. Shortly after stimulus onset, object exemplars cluster by category in a high-dimensional activation space in the brain. In this emerging activation space, the decodability of exemplar category varies over time, reflecting the brain's transformation of visual inputs into coherent category representations. How do these emerging representations relate to categorization behavior? Recently it has been proposed that the distance of an exemplar representation from a categorical boundary in an activation space is critical for perceptual decision-making, and that reaction times should therefore correlate with distance from the boundary. The predictions of this distance hypothesis have been born out in human inferior temporal cortex (IT), an area of the brain crucial for the representation of object categories. When viewed in the context of a time varying neural signal, the optimal time to "read out" category information is when category representations in the brain are most decodable. Here, we show that the distance from a decision boundary through activation space, as measured using MEG decoding methods, correlates with reaction times for visual categorization during the period of peak decodability. Our results suggest that the brain begins to read out information about exemplar category at the optimal time for use in choice behaviour, and support the hypothesis that the structure of the representation for objects in the visual system is partially constitutive of the decision process in recognition. PMID:26107634

  12. Visual dream content, graphical representation and EEG alpha activity in congenitally blind subjects.

    Bértolo, Helder; Paiva, Teresa; Pessoa, Lara; Mestre, Tiago; Marques, Raquel; Santos, Rosa

    2003-02-01

    It is currently claimed that congenitally blind do not have visual imagery and are therefore unable to present visual contents in their dreams. The aim of our study was to quantitatively evaluate the existence of visual imagery in born-blind dreams and to correlate it with objective measures, such as sleep EEG frequency components, namely with alpha attenuation (regarded as an indicator of visual activity), and graphical analysis of dream pictorial representations. The investigation was carried out via simultaneous recordings of dream reports and polysomnography, during nocturnal sleep at volunteers' homes; scheduled regular awakenings during the night provided the data for dream and EEG analysis. In the morning, subjects were asked to make a drawing of their dream images. Congenitally blind (n=10) were comparable to normal sighted subjects (n=9): the two groups presented equivalent visual activity indices, and no differences in the analysis of graphical representation of dreaming imagery. However, blind subjects presented a lower rate of dream recall than sighted (27% versus 42%). Both groups had significant negative correlation between Visual Activity Index (VAI) and alpha power in the central and occipital O2 derivations (blind: C4: r=-0.615, Pblind in O1 (r=-0.573, PBlind individuals have significantly lower alpha activity in the central derivation. In conclusion, the congenitally blind have visual content in their dreams and are able to draw it and, as expected, their VAI is negatively correlated with EEG alpha power. PMID:12527101

  13. Chu Culture Modeling Elements and Their Inspiration for Urban Visual Image Design

    Li, Jianwen

    2014-01-01

    This paper will concentrate on the artifact culture of Hubei, the cradle of Chu culture. It begins with the analysis of visual elements in ancient Chu culture, including the forms, colors, ornamentations, etc. Based on that, it explores the possibility of adopting the essence of visual art in Chu culture into contemporary urban visual design of Hubei province.

  14. Perisaccadic Updating of Visual Representations and Attentional States: Linking Behavior and Neurophysiology.

    Marino, Alexandria C; Mazer, James A

    2016-01-01

    During natural vision, saccadic eye movements lead to frequent retinal image changes that result in different neuronal subpopulations representing the same visual feature across fixations. Despite these potentially disruptive changes to the neural representation, our visual percept is remarkably stable. Visual receptive field remapping, characterized as an anticipatory shift in the position of a neuron's spatial receptive field immediately before saccades, has been proposed as one possible neural substrate for visual stability. Many of the specific properties of remapping, e.g., the exact direction of remapping relative to the saccade vector and the precise mechanisms by which remapping could instantiate stability, remain a matter of debate. Recent studies have also shown that visual attention, like perception itself, can be sustained across saccades, suggesting that the attentional control system can also compensate for eye movements. Classical remapping could have an attentional component, or there could be a distinct attentional analog of visual remapping. At this time we do not yet fully understand how the stability of attentional representations relates to perisaccadic receptive field shifts. In this review, we develop a vocabulary for discussing perisaccadic shifts in receptive field location and perisaccadic shifts of attentional focus, review and synthesize behavioral and neurophysiological studies of perisaccadic perception and perisaccadic attention, and identify open questions that remain to be experimentally addressed. PMID:26903820

  15. Women And Visual Representations Of Space In Two Chinese Film Adaptations Of Hamlet

    CHEANG WAI FONG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies two Chinese film adaptations of Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Xiaogang Feng’s The Banquet (2006 and Sherwood Hu’s Prince of the Himalayas (2006, by focusing on their visual representations of spaces allotted to women. Its thesis is that even though on the original Shakespearean stage details of various spaces might not be as vividly represented as in modern film productions, spaces are still crucial dramatic elements imbued with powerful significations. By analyzing the two Chinese film adaptations alongside the original Hamlet text, the paper attempts to reinterpret their different representations of spaces in relation to their different historical-cultural gender notions.

  16. The Focus of Attention in Visual Working Memory: Protection of Focused Representations and Its Individual Variation

    Heuer, Anna; Schubö, Anna

    2016-01-01

    Visual working memory can be modulated according to changes in the cued task relevance of maintained items. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying this modulation. In particular, we studied the consequences of attentional selection for selected and unselected items, and the role of individual differences in the efficiency with which attention is deployed. To this end, performance in a visual working memory task as well as the CDA/SPCN and the N2pc, ERP components associated with visual working memory and attentional processes, were analysed. Selection during the maintenance stage was manipulated by means of two successively presented retrocues providing spatial information as to which items were most likely to be tested. Results show that attentional selection serves to robustly protect relevant representations in the focus of attention while unselected representations which may become relevant again still remain available. Individuals with larger retrocueing benefits showed higher efficiency of attentional selection, as indicated by the N2pc, and showed stronger maintenance-associated activity (CDA/SPCN). The findings add to converging evidence that focused representations are protected, and highlight the flexibility of visual working memory, in which information can be weighted according its relevance. PMID:27099938

  17. Computational modeling of the neural representation of object shape in the primate ventral visual system

    Eguchi, Akihiro; Mender, Bedeho M. W.; Evans, Benjamin D.; Humphreys, Glyn W.; Stringer, Simon M.

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in successive stages of the primate ventral visual pathway encode the spatial structure of visual objects. In this paper, we investigate through computer simulation how these cell firing properties may develop through unsupervised visually-guided learning. Individual neurons in the model are shown to exploit statistical regularity and temporal continuity of the visual inputs during training to learn firing properties that are similar to neurons in V4 and TEO. Neurons in V4 encode the conformation of boundary contour elements at a particular position within an object regardless of the location of the object on the retina, while neurons in TEO integrate information from multiple boundary contour elements. This representation goes beyond mere object recognition, in which neurons simply respond to the presence of a whole object, but provides an essential foundation from which the brain is subsequently able to recognize the whole object. PMID:26300766

  18. Generating 3D Visual Expression Using Semantic Simplification Description Based on Logical Representation

    Rabiah, A. K.; Sembok, T. M. T.; Halimah, B. Z.

    Performance on a question answering system is reflected by the number of correct answers that is produce from a list of alternate choices. However, many answers would appear in documents and passages laden with terms from the query. It becomes more difficult and eventually impossible to make a precise answer to a query. The aim of this study is to determine the keyword of the precise answer to a specific query and illustrate the answer in visual expression. In this paper we propose a method to translate text into visual expression, closest to the correct answer. To achieve a significant illustration capability it is necessary to develop methods of dealing with knowledge base. Firstly, we must consider the real world and the visual expression of key information that can be extracted from the words. The proposed system will analyse and match them using visual semantic simplification description based on logical representation.

  19. Computational Modelling of the Neural Representation of Object Shape in the Primate Ventral Visual System

    Akihiro Eguchi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Neurons in successive stages of the primate ventral visual pathway encode the spatial structure of visual objects. In this paper, we investigate through computer simulation how these cell firing properties may develop through unsupervised visually-guided learning. Individual neurons in the model are shown to exploit statistical regularity and temporal continuity of the visual inputs during training to learn firing properties that are similar to neurons in V4 and TEO. Neurons in V4 encode the conformation of boundary contour elements at a particular position within an object regardless of the location of the object on the retina, while neurons in TEO integrate information from multiple boundary contour elements. This representation goes beyond mere object recognition, in which neurons simply respond to the presence of a whole object, but provides an essential foundation from which the brain is subsequently able to recognise the whole object.

  20. Functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation reveals a noncategorical representation of hue in early visual cortex

    Persichetti, Andrew S.; Sharon L Thompson-Schill; Butt, Omar H.; Brainard, David H.; Aguirre, Geoffrey K

    2015-01-01

    Color names divide the fine-grained gamut of color percepts into discrete categories. A categorical transition must occur somewhere between the initial encoding of the continuous spectrum of light by the cones and the verbal report of the name of a color stimulus. Here, we used a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation experiment to examine the representation of hue in the early visual cortex. Our stimuli varied in hue between blue and green. We found in the early visual areas...

  1. A Reggio-Inspired Music Atelier: Opening the Door between Visual Arts and Music

    Hanna, Wendell

    2014-01-01

    The Reggio Emilia approach is based on the idea that every child has at least, "one hundred languages" available for expressing perspectives of the world, and one of those languages is music. While all of the arts (visual, music, dance, drama) are considered equally important in Reggio schools, the visual arts have been particularly…

  2. A Reggio-Inspired Music Atelier: Opening the Door between Visual Arts and Music

    Hanna, Wendell

    2014-01-01

    The Reggio Emilia approach is based on the idea that every child has at least, "one hundred languages" available for expressing perspectives of the world, and one of those languages is music. While all of the arts (visual, music, dance, drama) are considered equally important in Reggio schools, the visual arts have been particularly…

  3. Visual enhancement based on salient region detection and layered difference representation

    Li, Yi; Zhang, Yunfeng; Cao, Lihua; Chen, Juan

    2016-02-01

    We propose a novel image enhancement method based on salient region detection and a layered difference representation of 2D histograms. We first obtain the visual salient region corresponding to maximal human attention using saliency filters. Then, we obtain a difference vector for the visual salient region by solving a constrained optimization problem of the layered difference representation at a specified layer. Finally, the new difference vector and the difference vector of the original image are aggregated to enhance the salient region and protect other regions from overstretching or brightness shift. Experimental results including comparisons with other methods show that our proposed algorithm produces more suitable enhanced images compared with the results of existing algorithms.

  4. Experience-driven formation of parts-based representations in a model of layered visual memory

    Jitsev, Jenia

    2009-01-01

    Growing neuropsychological and neurophysiological evidence suggests that the visual cortex uses parts-based representations to encode, store and retrieve relevant objects. In such a scheme, objects are represented as a set of spatially distributed local features, or parts, arranged in stereotypical fashion. To encode the local appearance and to represent the relations between the constituent parts, there has to be an appropriate memory structure formed by previous experience with visual objects. Here, we propose a model how a hierarchical memory structure supporting efficient storage and rapid recall of parts-based representations can be established by an experience-driven process of self-organization. The process is based on the collaboration of slow bidirectional synaptic plasticity and homeostatic unit activity regulation, both running at the top of fast activity dynamics with winner-take-all character. These neural mechanisms lay down the basis for cooperation and competition between the distributed units...

  5. Brain activity associated with translation from a visual to a symbolic representation in algebra and geometry.

    Leikin, Mark; Waisman, Ilana; Shaul, Shelley; Leikin, Roza

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a small part of a larger interdisciplinary study that investigates brain activity (using event related potential methodology) of male adolescents when solving mathematical problems of different types. The study design links mathematics education research with neurocognitive studies. In this paper we performed a comparative analysis of brain activity associated with the translation from visual to symbolic representations of mathematical objects in algebra and geometry. Algebraic tasks require translation from graphical to symbolic representation of a function, whereas tasks in geometry require translation from a drawing of a geometric figure to a symbolic representation of its property. The findings demonstrate that electrical activity associated with the performance of geometrical tasks is stronger than that associated with solving algebraic tasks. Additionally, we found different scalp topography of the brain activity associated with algebraic and geometric tasks. Based on these results, we argue that problem solving in algebra and geometry is associated with different patterns of brain activity. PMID:24738538

  6. Non-sparse Linear Representations for Visual Tracking with Online Reservoir Metric Learning

    Li, Xi; Shi, Qinfeng; Dick, Anthony; Hengel, Anton van den

    2012-01-01

    Most sparse linear representation-based trackers need to solve a computationally expensive L1-regularized optimization problem. To address this problem, we propose a visual tracker based on non-sparse linear representations, which admit an efficient closed-form solution without sacrificing accuracy. Moreover, in order to capture the correlation information between different feature dimensions, we learn a Mahalanobis distance metric in an online fashion and incorporate the learned metric into the optimization problem for obtaining the linear representation. We show that online metric learning using proximity comparison significantly improves the robustness of the tracking, especially on those sequences exhibiting drastic appearance changes. Furthermore, in order to prevent the unbounded growth in the number of training samples for the metric learning, we design a time-weighted reservoir sampling method to maintain and update limited-sized foreground and background sample buffers for balancing sample diversity ...

  7. Visual representation of knowledge in the field of Library and Information Science of IRAN

    Afsoon Sabetpour; Gholamreza Fadaie; Nader Naghshineh; Vafa Ghobadpour

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The present research has been done to visual representation of knowledge and determination vacuum and density points of scientific trends of faculty members of state universities of IRAN in Library & Information Science field. Method: Curriculum Vitae of each faculty member with census method were collected and its content analyzed. Then using a checklist, the rate scientific tendencies were extracted. NodeXL software was deployed to map out the levels. Results: The results showed th...

  8. A Graphical Representation Framework for Enhanced Visualization of Construction Control Processes

    Hays, Benjamin James

    2002-01-01

    Graphical representation for construction control information--processes such as scheduling, budgeting and RFIs--follows no formalized method. Many graphics neglect relevant information necessary to highlight trends in or relationships between processes. The principles of data graphics offer visual capabilities beyond those currently employed by the construction industry to display appropriate information in a manner that enhances comprehension of control processes. This paper describes a ...

  9. Feature integration and object representations along the dorsal stream visual hierarchy

    Carolyn Jeane Perry; Mazyar Fallah

    2014-01-01

    The visual system is split into two processing streams: a ventral stream that receives color and form information and a dorsal stream that receives motion information. Each stream processes that information hierarchically, with each stage building upon the previous. In the ventral stream this leads to the formation of object representations that ultimately allow for object recognition regardless of changes in the surrounding environment. In the dorsal stream, this hierarchical processing has ...

  10. Transform-invariant visual representations in self-organizing spiking neural networks

    Benjamin Evans

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The ventral visual pathway achieves object and face recognition by building transform-invariant representations from elementary visual features. In previous computer simulation studies with rate-coded neural networks, the development of transform invariant representations has been demonstrated using either of two biologically plausible learning mechanisms, Trace learning and Continuous Transformation (CT learning. However, it has not previously been investigated how transform invariant representations may be learned in a more biologically accurate spiking neural network. A key issue is how the synaptic connection strengths in such a spiking network might self-organize through Spike-Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP where the change in synaptic strength is dependent on the relative times of the spikes emitted by the pre- and postsynaptic neurons rather than simply correlated activity driving changes in synaptic efficacy. Here we present simulations with conductance-based integrate-and-fire (IF neurons using a STDP learning rule to address these gaps in our understanding. It is demonstrated that with the appropriate selection of model pa- rameters and training regime, the spiking network model can utilize either Trace-like or CT-like learning mechanisms to achieve transform-invariant representations.

  11. Shedding new light on representational neglect: The importance of dissociating visual and spatial components.

    Wansard, Murielle; Meulemans, Thierry; Geurten, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decade, many studies have demonstrated that visuospatial working memory (VSWM) can be divided into two subsystems, dealing respectively with spatial and visual information. A similar dissociation has been observed in brain-damaged patients without neglect for mental imagery skills. The first aim of the present study was to examine whether performance dissociations between spatial and visual mental imagery can be observed in unilateral neglect. The second objective was to further investigate the role of spatial and visual working memory subsystems in the mental representation abilities of neglect patients and healthy controls, and their dependence on the nature of the mental imagery tasks performed. The results showed that spatial and visual imagery processes can be selectively impaired in unilateral neglect. Spatial working memory skills were also found to strongly predict spatial imagery score in the two experimental groups. However, contrary to what was observed in healthy controls, visual working memory did not appear to predict performance on visual imagery tasks in neglect patients. Overall, these findings highlight the importance of investigating both visual and spatial components of working memory and mental imagery in neglect patients. PMID:26896630

  12. Representação visual de estruturas biológicas em materiais de ensino Visual representation of biological structures in teaching material

    Marina Azevedo Morato

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi motivado pela necessidade de se definir parâmetros de apresentação e tratamento da informação científica em materiais de ensino. Através de consultas a bibliotecas e a especialistas em ciências da saúde e artes gráficas e visuais, fez-se uma pesquisa que resultou na descrição comparativa entre as primeiras manifestações da ilustração científica na anatomia e a trajetória da representação visual do conhecimento sobre a célula. O estudo traz ainda exemplos significativos de ilustrações utilizadas como elementos de análise.Parameters must be defined for presenting and handling scientific information presented in the form of teaching materials. Through library research and consultations with specialists in the health sciences and in graphic arts and design, this study undertook a comparative description of the first examples of scientific illustrations of anatomy and the evolution of visual representations of knowledge on the cell. The study includes significant examples of illustrations which served as elements of analysis.

  13. Bio-inspired modeling and implementation of the ocelli visual system of flying insects.

    Gremillion, Gregory; Humbert, J Sean; Krapp, Holger G

    2014-12-01

    Two visual sensing modalities in insects, the ocelli and compound eyes, provide signals used for flight stabilization and navigation. In this article, a generalized model of the ocellar visual system is developed for a 3-D visual simulation environment based on behavioral, anatomical, and electrophysiological data from several species. A linear measurement model is estimated from Monte Carlo simulation in a cluttered urban environment relating state changes of the vehicle to the outputs of the ocellar model. A fully analog-printed circuit board sensor based on this model is designed and fabricated. Open-loop characterization of the sensor to visual stimuli induced by self motion is performed. Closed-loop stabilizing feedback of the sensor in combination with optic flow sensors is implemented onboard a quadrotor micro-air vehicle and its impulse response is characterized. PMID:25217116

  14. Visual Behaviour Based Bio-Inspired Polarization Techniques in Computer Vision and Robotics

    Shabayek, Abd El Rahman; Morel, Olivier; Fofi, David

    2012-01-01

    For long time, it was thought that the sensing of polarization by animals is invariably related to their behavior, such as navigation and orientation. Recently, it was found that polarization can be part of a high-level visual perception, permitting a wide area of vision applications. Polarization vision can be used for most tasks of color vision including object recognition, contrast enhancement, camouflage breaking, and signal detection and discrimination. The polarization based visual beha...

  15. Visual representation of National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease and Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network criteria for anaphylaxis

    Manivannan, Veena; Decker, Wyatt W; Latha G. Stead; Li, James T.C.; Campbell, Ronna L.

    2009-01-01

    We present a user-friendly visual representation of The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Disease and the Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network criteria so as to enhance recognition of anaphylaxis and active teaching and learning.

  16. Biologically Inspired Visual Model With Preliminary Cognition and Active Attention Adjustment.

    Qiao, Hong; Xi, Xuanyang; Li, Yinlin; Wu, Wei; Li, Fengfu

    2015-11-01

    Recently, many computational models have been proposed to simulate visual cognition process. For example, the hierarchical Max-Pooling (HMAX) model was proposed according to the hierarchical and bottom-up structure of V1 to V4 in the ventral pathway of primate visual cortex, which could achieve position- and scale-tolerant recognition. In our previous work, we have introduced memory and association into the HMAX model to simulate visual cognition process. In this paper, we improve our theoretical framework by mimicking a more elaborate structure and function of the primate visual cortex. We will mainly focus on the new formation of memory and association in visual processing under different circumstances as well as preliminary cognition and active adjustment in the inferior temporal cortex, which are absent in the HMAX model. The main contributions of this paper are: 1) in the memory and association part, we apply deep convolutional neural networks to extract various episodic features of the objects since people use different features for object recognition. Moreover, to achieve a fast and robust recognition in the retrieval and association process, different types of features are stored in separated clusters and the feature binding of the same object is stimulated in a loop discharge manner and 2) in the preliminary cognition and active adjustment part, we introduce preliminary cognition to classify different types of objects since distinct neural circuits in a human brain are used for identification of various types of objects. Furthermore, active cognition adjustment of occlusion and orientation is implemented to the model to mimic the top-down effect in human cognition process. Finally, our model is evaluated on two face databases CAS-PEAL-R1 and AR. The results demonstrate that our model exhibits its efficiency on visual recognition process with much lower memory storage requirement and a better performance compared with the traditional purely computational methods. PMID:25532204

  17. Automatic frame-centered object representation and integration revealed by iconic memory, visual priming, and backward masking

    Lin, Zhicheng; He, Sheng

    2012-01-01

    Object identities (“what”) and their spatial locations (“where”) are processed in distinct pathways in the visual system, raising the question of how the what and where information is integrated. Because of object motions and eye movements, the retina-based representations are unstable, necessitating nonretinotopic representation and integration. A potential mechanism is to code and update objects according to their reference frames (i.e., frame-centered representation and integration). To is...

  18. Social Categories Shape the Neural Representation of Emotion: Evidence from a Visual Face Adaptation Task.

    Marte Otten

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A number of recent behavioral studies have shown that emotional expressions are differently perceived depending on the race of a face, and that that perception of race cues is influenced by emotional expressions. However, neural processes related to the perception of invariant cues that indicate the identity of a face (such as race are often described to proceed independently of processes related to the perception of cues that can vary over time (such as emotion. Using a visual face adaptation paradigm, we tested whether these behavioral interactions between emotion and race also reflect interdependent neural representation of emotion and race. We compared visual emotion aftereffects when the adapting face and ambiguous test face differed in race or not. Emotion aftereffects were much smaller in different race trials than same race trials, indicating that the neural representation of a facial expression is significantly different depending on whether the emotional face is black or white. It thus seems that invariable cues such as race interact with variable face cues such as emotion not just at a response level, but also at the level of perception and neural representation.

  19. Objets Sonores: Une Repr\\'esentation Bio-Inspir\\'ee Hi\\'erarchique Parcimonieuse \\`A Tr\\`es Grandes Dimensions Utilisable En Reconnaissance; Auditory Objects: Bio-Inspired Hierarchical Sparse High Dimensional Representation for Recognition

    Brodeur, Simon; Rouat, Jean

    2013-01-01

    L'accent est plac\\'e dans cet article sur la structure hi\\'erarchique, l'aspect parcimonieux de la repr\\'esentation de l'information sonore, la tr\\`es grande dimension des caract\\'eristiques ainsi que sur l'ind\\'ependance des caract\\'eristiques permettant de d\\'efinir les composantes des objets sonores. Les notions d'objet sonore et de repr\\'esentation neuronale sont d'abord introduites, puis illustr\\'ees avec une application en analyse de signaux sonores vari\\'es: parole, musique et environn...

  20. Multivoxel Object Representations in Adult Human Visual Cortex Are Flexible: An Associative Learning Study.

    Senoussi, Mehdi; Berry, Isabelle; VanRullen, Rufin; Reddy, Leila

    2016-06-01

    Learning associations between co-occurring events enables us to extract structure from our environment. Medial-temporal lobe structures are critical for associative learning. However, the role of the ventral visual pathway (VVP) in associative learning is not clear. Do multivoxel object representations in the VVP reflect newly formed associations? We show that VVP multivoxel representations become more similar to each other after human participants learn arbitrary new associations between pairs of unrelated objects (faces, houses, cars, chairs). Participants were scanned before and after 15 days of associative learning. To evaluate how object representations changed, a classifier was trained on discriminating two nonassociated categories (e.g., faces/houses) and tested on discriminating their paired associates (e.g., cars/chairs). Because the associations were arbitrary and counterbalanced across participants, there was initially no particular reason for this cross-classification decision to tend toward either alternative. Nonetheless, after learning, cross-classification performance increased in the VVP (but not hippocampus), on average by 3.3%, with some voxels showing increases of up to 10%. For example, a chair multivoxel representation that initially resembled neither face nor house representations was, after learning, classified as more similar to that of faces for participants who associated chairs with faces and to that of houses for participants who associated chairs with houses. Additionally, learning produced long-lasting perceptual consequences. In a behavioral priming experiment performed several months later, the change in cross-classification performance was correlated with the degree of priming. Thus, VVP multivoxel representations are not static but become more similar to each other after associative learning. PMID:26836513

  1. Joint Low-Rank and Sparse Principal Feature Coding for Enhanced Robust Representation and Visual Classification.

    Zhang, Zhao; Li, Fanzhang; Zhao, Mingbo; Zhang, Li; Yan, Shuicheng

    2016-06-01

    Recovering low-rank and sparse subspaces jointly for enhanced robust representation and classification is discussed. Technically, we first propose a transductive low-rank and sparse principal feature coding (LSPFC) formulation that decomposes given data into a component part that encodes low-rank sparse principal features and a noise-fitting error part. To well handle the outside data, we then present an inductive LSPFC (I-LSPFC). I-LSPFC incorporates embedded low-rank and sparse principal features by a projection into one problem for direct minimization, so that the projection can effectively map both inside and outside data into the underlying subspaces to learn more powerful and informative features for representation. To ensure that the learned features by I-LSPFC are optimal for classification, we further combine the classification error with the feature coding error to form a unified model, discriminative LSPFC (D-LSPFC), to boost performance. The model of D-LSPFC seamlessly integrates feature coding and discriminative classification, so the representation and classification powers can be enhanced. The proposed approaches are more general, and several recent existing low-rank or sparse coding algorithms can be embedded into our problems as special cases. Visual and numerical results demonstrate the effectiveness of our methods for representation and classification. PMID:27046875

  2. Characterizing the information content of a newly hatched chick's first visual object representation.

    Wood, Justin N

    2015-03-01

    How does object recognition emerge in the newborn brain? To address this question, I examined the information content of the first visual object representation built by newly hatched chicks (Gallus gallus). In their first week of life, chicks were raised in controlled-rearing chambers that contained a single virtual object rotating around a single axis. In their second week of life, I tested whether subjects had encoded information about the identity and viewpoint of the virtual object. The results showed that chicks built object representations that contained both object identity information and view-specific information. However, there was a trade-off between these two types of information: subjects who were more sensitive to identity information were less sensitive to view-specific information, and vice versa. This pattern of results is predicted by iterative, hierarchically organized visual processing machinery, the machinery that supports object recognition in adult primates. More generally, this study shows that invariant object recognition is a core cognitive ability that can be operational at the onset of visual object experience. PMID:24980274

  3. Direct isosurface visualization of hex-based high-order geometry and attribute representations.

    Martin, Tobias; Cohen, Elaine; Kirby, Robert M

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, we present a novel isosurface visualization technique that guarantees the accurate visualization of isosurfaces with complex attribute data defined on (un)structured (curvi)linear hexahedral grids. Isosurfaces of high-order hexahedral-based finite element solutions on both uniform grids (including MRI and CT scans) and more complex geometry representing a domain of interest that can be rendered using our algorithm. Additionally, our technique can be used to directly visualize solutions and attributes in isogeometric analysis, an area based on trivariate high-order NURBS (Non-Uniform Rational B-splines) geometry and attribute representations for the analysis. Furthermore, our technique can be used to visualize isosurfaces of algebraic functions. Our approach combines subdivision and numerical root finding to form a robust and efficient isosurface visualization algorithm that does not miss surface features, while finding all intersections between a view frustum and desired isosurfaces. This allows the use of view-independent transparency in the rendering process. We demonstrate our technique through a straightforward CPU implementation on both complex-structured and complex-unstructured geometries with high-order simulation solutions, isosurfaces of medical data sets, and isosurfaces of algebraic functions. PMID:22442127

  4. Visually guided gait modifications for stepping over an obstacle: a bio-inspired approach.

    Silva, Pedro; Matos, Vitor; Santos, Cristina P

    2014-02-01

    There is an increasing interest in conceiving robotic systems that are able to move and act in an unstructured and not predefined environment, for which autonomy and adaptability are crucial features. In nature, animals are autonomous biological systems, which often serve as bio-inspiration models, not only for their physical and mechanical properties, but also their control structures that enable adaptability and autonomy-for which learning is (at least) partially responsible. This work proposes a system which seeks to enable a quadruped robot to online learn to detect and to avoid stumbling on an obstacle in its path. The detection relies in a forward internal model that estimates the robot's perceptive information by exploring the locomotion repetitive nature. The system adapts the locomotion in order to place the robot optimally before attempting to step over the obstacle, avoiding any stumbling. Locomotion adaptation is achieved by changing control parameters of a central pattern generator (CPG)-based locomotion controller. The mechanism learns the necessary alterations to the stride length in order to adapt the locomotion by changing the required CPG parameter. Both learning tasks occur online and together define a sensorimotor map, which enables the robot to learn to step over the obstacle in its path. Simulation results show the feasibility of the proposed approach. PMID:24469319

  5. Product design for elderly-visual design information inspired a new perspective in design education:

    Langeveld, L.H.

    2014-01-01

    A workshop Product Design for Elderly was held in Beijing and organized by the School of Digital Media and Design, Beijing University of Posts and Telecommunications. A domestic appliances company had sponsored a part of the workshop and brought in the topics. The objectives of the workshop were creating a product design by each design team. and gaining design competence with use of visual design information. The work method was based on the sequential design process of Pahl and Beitz. The ar...

  6. The Concept of Happiness as Conveyed in Visual Representations: Analysis of the Work of Early Childhood Educators

    Russo-Zimet, Gila; Segel, Sarit

    2014-01-01

    This research was designed to examine how early-childhood educators pursuing their graduate degrees perceive the concept of happiness, as conveyed in visual representations. The research methodology combines qualitative and quantitative paradigms using the metaphoric collage, a tool used to analyze visual and verbal aspects. The research…

  7. Functional organization and visual representations in human ventral lateral prefrontal cortex

    Annie Wai Yiu Chan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuroimaging studies in both human and non-human primates have identified face selective activation in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex even in the absence of working memory demands. Further, research has suggested that this face-selective response is largely driven by the presence of the eyes. However, the nature and origin of visual category responses in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex remain unclear. Further, in a broader sense, how do these findings relate to our current understandings of lateral prefrontal cortex? What do these findings tell us about the underlying function and organization principles of the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex? What is the future direction for investigating visual representations in this cortex? This review focuses on the function, topography, and circuitry of the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex to enhance our understanding of the evolution and development of this cortex.

  8. Picture this: The value of multiple visual representations for student learning of quantum concepts in general chemistry

    Allen, Emily Christine

    Mental models for scientific learning are often defined as, "cognitive tools situated between experiments and theories" (Duschl & Grandy, 2012). In learning, these cognitive tools are used to not only take in new information, but to help problem solve in new contexts. Nancy Nersessian (2008) describes a mental model as being "[loosely] characterized as a representation of a system with interactive parts with representations of those interactions. Models can be qualitative, quantitative, and/or simulative (mental, physical, computational)" (p. 63). If conceptual parts used by the students in science education are inaccurate, then the resulting model will not be useful. Students in college general chemistry courses are presented with multiple abstract topics and often struggle to fit these parts into complete models. This is especially true for topics that are founded on quantum concepts, such as atomic structure and molecular bonding taught in college general chemistry. The objectives of this study were focused on how students use visual tools introduced during instruction to reason with atomic and molecular structure, what misconceptions may be associated with these visual tools, and how visual modeling skills may be taught to support students' use of visual tools for reasoning. The research questions for this study follow from Gilbert's (2008) theory that experts use multiple representations when reasoning and modeling a system, and Kozma and Russell's (2005) theory of representational competence levels. This study finds that as students developed greater command of their understanding of abstract quantum concepts, they spontaneously provided additional representations to describe their more sophisticated models of atomic and molecular structure during interviews. This suggests that when visual modeling with multiple representations is taught, along with the limitations of the representations, it can assist students in the development of models for reasoning about abstract topics such as atomic and molecular structure. There is further gain if students' difficulties with these representations are targeted through the use additional instruction such as a workbook that requires the students to exercise their visual modeling skills.

  9. Mapping human visual representations in space and time by neural networks.

    Cichy, Radoslaw; Khosla, Aditya; Pantazis, Dimitrios; Torralba, Antonio; Oliva, Aude

    2015-09-01

    The neural machinery underlying visual object recognition comprises a hierarchy of cortical regions in the ventral visual stream. The spatiotemporal dynamics of information flow in this hierarchy of regions is largely unknown. Here we tested the hypothesis that there is a correspondence between the spatiotemporal neural processes in the human brain and the layer hierarchy of a deep convolutional neural network (CNN). We presented 118 images of real-world objects to human participants (N=15) while we measured their brain activity with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and magnetoencephalography (MEG). We trained an 8 layer (5 convolutional layers, 3 fully connected layers) CNN to predict 683 object categories with 900K training images from the ImageNet dataset. We obtained layer-specific CNN responses to the same 118 images. To compare brain-imaging data with the CNN in a common framework, we used representational similarity analysis. The key idea is that if two conditions evoke similar patterns in brain imaging data, they should also evoke similar patterns in the computer model. We thus determined 'where' (fMRI) and 'when' (MEG) the CNNs predicted brain activity. We found a correspondence in hierarchy between cortical regions, processing time, and CNN layers. Low CNN layers predicted MEG activity early and high layers relatively later; low CNN layers predicted fMRI activity in early visual regions, and high layers in late visual regions. Surprisingly, the correspondence between CNN layer hierarchy and cortical regions held for the ventral and dorsal visual stream. Results were dependent on amount of training and type of training material. Our results show that CNNs are a promising formal model of human visual object recognition. Combined with fMRI and MEG, they provide an integrated spatiotemporal and algorithmically explicit view of the first few hundred milliseconds of object recognition. Meeting abstract presented at VSS 2015. PMID:26326064

  10. A biologically inspired psychometric function for accuracy of visual identification as a function of exposure duration

    Petersen, Anders; Andersen, Tobias

    , all of these having a temporal offset included, as well as the ex-Gaussian, and finally a new psychometric function, motivated from single-neuron studies by (Albrecht, Geisler, Frazor & Crane, 2002). The new psychometric function stands out by having a nonmonotonous hazard rate which is initially...... rising from zero, then peaking, and finally decaying to a somewhat sustained plateau, mimicking closely observed instantaneous firing rates of monkey visual cortex neurons. The new psychometric function fits well to experimental data in both the present study and in a previous study of single......-letter identification accuracy (Bundesen & Harms, 1999). Also, we conducted a follow-up experiment to test the ability of the psychometric functions to fit single-letter identification data, at different stimulus contrast levels; also in this experiment the new psychometric function prevailed. Further, after insertion...

  11. Exploiting a Reliable Structural Appearance Model for Visual Tracking with Sparse Representation

    Hainan Zhao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study proposes a novel approach of exploiting a reliable structural appearance model for visual tracking. The proposed method samples overlapped local image patches within the target region and evaluates the reliabilities of these local patches respectively by introducing a sample based local sparse representation for each local patch. The occluded or deteriorative patches are excluded, only the stable ones are employed to construct a reliable structural appearance model, which is used for likelihood computation. In addition, the reliability evaluation of local patch facilitates our selective update scheme, by which we reduce the influence of the occluded target template and alleviate the drift problem. Experiments on challenging video sequences demonstrate that the proposed tracking algorithm performs favorably against several state-of-the-art methods.

  12. Representation of visual scenes by local neuronal populations in layer 2/3 of mouse visual cortex

    Fritjof Helmchen

    2011-01-01

    How are visual scenes encoded in local neural networks of visual cortex? In rodents, visual cortex lacks a columnar organization so that processing of diverse features from a spot in visual space could be performed locally by populations of neighboring neurons. To examine how complex visual scenes are represented by local microcircuits in mouse visual cortex we measured visually-evoked responses of layer 2/3 neuronal populations using 3D two-photon calcium imaging. Both natural and artificial...

  13. Representation of visual scenes by local neuronal populations in layer 2/3 of mouse visual cortex

    Kampa, B M; Roth, M. M.; Göbel, W; Helmchen, F.

    2011-01-01

    How are visual scenes encoded in local neural networks of visual cortex? In rodents, visual cortex lacks a columnar organization so that processing of diverse features from a spot in visual space could be performed locally by populations of neighboring neurons. To examine how complex visual scenes are represented by local microcircuits in mouse visual cortex we measured visually evoked responses of layer 2/3 neuronal populations using 3D two-photon calcium imaging. Both natural and artificial...

  14. Multi-source adaptation joint kernel sparse representation for visual classification.

    Tao, JianWen; Hu, Wenjun; Wen, Shiting

    2016-04-01

    Most of the existing domain adaptation learning (DAL) methods relies on a single source domain to learn a classifier with well-generalized performance for the target domain of interest, which may lead to the so-called negative transfer problem. To this end, many multi-source adaptation methods have been proposed. While the advantages of using multi-source domains of information for establishing an adaptation model have been widely recognized, how to boost the robustness of the computational model for multi-source adaptation learning has only recently received attention. To address this issue for achieving enhanced performance, we propose in this paper a novel algorithm called multi-source Adaptation Regularization Joint Kernel Sparse Representation (ARJKSR) for robust visual classification problems. Specifically, ARJKSR jointly represents target dataset by a sparse linear combination of training data of each source domain in some optimal Reproduced Kernel Hilbert Space (RKHS), recovered by simultaneously minimizing the inter-domain distribution discrepancy and maximizing the local consistency, whilst constraining the observations from both target and source domains to share their sparse representations. The optimization problem of ARJKSR can be solved using an efficient alternative direction method. Under the framework ARJKSR, we further learn a robust label prediction matrix for the unlabeled instances of target domain based on the classical graph-based semi-supervised learning (GSSL) diagram, into which multiple Laplacian graphs constructed with the ARJKSR are incorporated. The validity of our method is examined by several visual classification problems. Results demonstrate the superiority of our method in comparison to several state-of-the-arts. PMID:26894961

  15. Separating the Innocents from the Illegals: visual representation of the victims of sex trafficking in anti-trafficking campaigns

    Stolic, Tijana

    2014-01-01

    This thesis critically explores the discursive formations around the visual representation of the victims of sex trafficking in six anti-trafficking campaigns totalling 18 photographs. Critical discourse analysis is utilised as a methodological approach, while semiotics and iconography are used as methods of visual analysis. Picking up on the previous studies of the discourses of trafficking, the study aims to place the dominant discourses of trafficking into the context of humanitarian appea...

  16. The Culture of Visual Representations in Spectroscopic Education and Laboratory Instruction

    Hentschel, Klaus

    This study on spectroscopic training mainly from 1860-1914 drawing on archival documentation at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Wellesley College reveals a conspicuous emphasis on drawing skills and consultation of spectral maps, besides textbooks. This culture of visual representations liberated science education from a philologically dominated pedagogy in the late 19th century. Student notebooks are ladened with sketches from laboratory observations, lantern-slide projections, or posters. I describe the various didactic techniques used to facilitate visualization and memorization of specific spectroscopic Gestalten and show how these graphic resources were used to train the difficult skill of classifying stellar spectra. In its heyday, spectroscopy was firmly integrated in the curriculum to become an important part of the practical training not only of scientists but also of liberal arts students, even finding its way into vocational schools and Gymnasia. Within the framework of this Anschauungsunterricht I identify the teaching traditions and link them to the laboratory exercises by Kohlrausch, Pickering, Lockyer and Weinhold.

  17. Incidental learning of probability information is differentially affected by the type of visual working memory representation.

    van Lamsweerde, Amanda E; Beck, Melissa R

    2015-12-01

    In this study, we investigated whether the ability to learn probability information is affected by the type of representation held in visual working memory. Across 4 experiments, participants detected changes to displays of coloured shapes. While participants detected changes in 1 dimension (e.g., colour), a feature from a second, nonchanging dimension (e.g., shape) predicted which object was most likely to change. In Experiments 1 and 3, items could be grouped by similarity in the changing dimension across items (e.g., colours and shapes were repeated in the display), while in Experiments 2 and 4 items could not be grouped by similarity (all features were unique). Probability information from the predictive dimension was learned and used to increase performance, but only when all of the features within a display were unique (Experiments 2 and 4). When it was possible to group by feature similarity in the changing dimension (e.g., 2 blue objects appeared within an array), participants were unable to learn probability information and use it to improve performance (Experiments 1 and 3). The results suggest that probability information can be learned in a dimension that is not explicitly task-relevant, but only when the probability information is represented with the changing dimension in visual working memory. PMID:26010021

  18. Features of the retinotopic representation in the visual wulst of a laterally eyed bird, the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata).

    Michael, Neethu; Löwel, Siegrid; Bischof, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The visual wulst of the zebra finch comprises at least two retinotopic maps of the contralateral eye. As yet, it is not known how much of the visual field is represented in the wulst neuronal maps, how the organization of the maps is related to the retinal architecture, and how information from the ipsilateral eye is involved in the activation of the wulst. Here, we have used autofluorescent flavoprotein imaging and classical anatomical methods to investigate such characteristics of the most posterior map of the multiple retinotopic representations. We found that the visual wulst can be activated by visual stimuli from a large part of the visual field of the contralateral eye. Horizontally, the visual field representation extended from -5° beyond the beak tip up to +125° laterally. Vertically, a small strip from -10° below to about +25° above the horizon activated the visual wulst. Although retinal ganglion cells had a much higher density around the fovea and along a strip extending from the fovea towards the beak tip, these areas were not overrepresented in the wulst map. The wulst area activated from the foveal region of the ipsilateral eye, overlapped substantially with the middle of the three contralaterally activated regions in the visual wulst, and partially with the other two. Visual wulst activity evoked by stimulation of the frontal visual field was stronger with contralateral than with binocular stimulation. This confirms earlier electrophysiological studies indicating an inhibitory influence of the activation of the ipsilateral eye on wulst activity elicited by stimulating the contralateral eye. The lack of a foveal overrepresentation suggests that identification of objects may not be the primary task of the zebra finch visual wulst. Instead, this brain area may be involved in the processing of visual information necessary for spatial orientation. PMID:25853253

  19. Features of the Retinotopic Representation in the Visual Wulst of a Laterally Eyed Bird, the Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata)

    Michael, Neethu; Löwel, Siegrid; Bischof, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The visual wulst of the zebra finch comprises at least two retinotopic maps of the contralateral eye. As yet, it is not known how much of the visual field is represented in the wulst neuronal maps, how the organization of the maps is related to the retinal architecture, and how information from the ipsilateral eye is involved in the activation of the wulst. Here, we have used autofluorescent flavoprotein imaging and classical anatomical methods to investigate such characteristics of the most posterior map of the multiple retinotopic representations. We found that the visual wulst can be activated by visual stimuli from a large part of the visual field of the contralateral eye. Horizontally, the visual field representation extended from -5° beyond the beak tip up to +125° laterally. Vertically, a small strip from -10° below to about +25° above the horizon activated the visual wulst. Although retinal ganglion cells had a much higher density around the fovea and along a strip extending from the fovea towards the beak tip, these areas were not overrepresented in the wulst map. The wulst area activated from the foveal region of the ipsilateral eye, overlapped substantially with the middle of the three contralaterally activated regions in the visual wulst, and partially with the other two. Visual wulst activity evoked by stimulation of the frontal visual field was stronger with contralateral than with binocular stimulation. This confirms earlier electrophysiological studies indicating an inhibitory influence of the activation of the ipsilateral eye on wulst activity elicited by stimulating the contralateral eye. The lack of a foveal overrepresentation suggests that identification of objects may not be the primary task of the zebra finch visual wulst. Instead, this brain area may be involved in the processing of visual information necessary for spatial orientation. PMID:25853253

  20. What Happens to Student Learning When Color Is Added to a New Knowledge Representation Strategy? Implications from Visual Thinking Networking.

    Longo, Palma J.

    A long-term study was conducted to test the effectiveness of visual thinking networking (VTN), a new generation of knowledge representation strategies with 56 ninth grade earth science students. The recent findings about the brain's organization and processing conceptually ground VTN as a new cognitive tool used by learners when making their…

  1. VStops: A Thinking Strategy and Visual Representation Approach in Mathematical Word Problem Solving toward Enhancing STEM Literacy

    Abdullah, Nasarudin; Halim, Lilia; Zakaria, Effandi

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the impact of strategic thinking and visual representation approaches (VStops) on the achievement, conceptual knowledge, metacognitive awareness, awareness of problem-solving strategies, and student attitudes toward mathematical word problem solving among primary school students. The experimental group (N = 96)…

  2. The effects of a visualization-centered curriculum on conceptual understanding and representational competence in high school biology

    Wilder, Anna

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a visualization-centered curriculum, Hemoglobin: A Case of Double Identity, on conceptual understanding and representational competence in high school biology. Sixty-nine students enrolled in three sections of freshman biology taught by the same teacher participated in this study. Online Chemscape Chime computer-based molecular visualizations were incorporated into the 10-week curriculum to introduce students to fundamental structure and function relationships. Measures used in this study included a Hemoglobin Structure and Function Test, Mental Imagery Questionnaire, Exam Difficulty Survey, the Student Assessment of Learning Gains, the Group Assessment of Logical Thinking, the Attitude Toward Science in School Assessment, audiotapes of student interviews, students' artifacts, weekly unit activity surveys, informal researcher observations and a teacher's weekly questionnaire. The Hemoglobin Structure and Function Test, consisting of Parts A and B, was administered as a pre and posttest. Part A used exclusively verbal test items to measure conceptual understanding, while Part B used visual-verbal test items to measure conceptual understanding and representational competence. Results of the Hemoglobin Structure and Function pre and posttest revealed statistically significant gains in conceptual understanding and representational competence, suggesting the visualization-centered curriculum implemented in this study was effective in supporting positive learning outcomes. The large positive correlation between posttest results on Part A, comprised of all-verbal test items, and Part B, using visual-verbal test items, suggests this curriculum supported students' mutual development of conceptual understanding and representational competence. Evidence based on student interviews, Student Assessment of Learning Gains ratings and weekly activity surveys indicated positive attitudes toward the use of Chemscape Chime software and the computer-based molecular visualization activities as learning tools. Evidence from these same sources also indicated that students felt computer-based molecular visualization activities in conjunction with other classroom activities supported their learning. Implications for instructional design are discussed.

  3. Images as Representations: Visual Sources on Education and Childhood in the Past

    Dekker, Jeroen J.H.

    2015-01-01

    The challenge of using images for the history of education and childhood will be addressed in this article by looking at them as representations. Central is the relationship between representations and reality. The focus is on the power of paintings as representations of aspects of realities. First the meaning of representation for images as…

  4. Queering boundaries: semen and visual representations from the Middle Ages and in the era of the AIDS crisis.

    Ricco, J P

    1994-01-01

    In this essay I address some of the ways in which certain images, which share visual and verbal vocabularies of body fluids, visualize male-male sexual identities and body practices. Through the articulation of these terms, and most especially semen, body boundaries are at once delineated and transgressed. The differential relatedness of these images from the Middle Ages and the late 1980s and 1990s is underlined by the ways they subvert contemporary conventions of visual representation while always remaining accessible. It is this efficacy which allows me to link these representations, and which I attempt to articulate. To put this in other terms, I am interested in the ways in which boundaries of the body prove themselves fluid, as fluids of the body cross body-boundaries. PMID:7798608

  5. Incremental learning of 3D-DCT compact representations for robust visual tracking.

    Li, Xi; Dick, Anthony; Shen, Chunhua; van den Hengel, Anton; Wang, Hanzi

    2013-04-01

    Visual tracking usually requires an object appearance model that is robust to changing illumination, pose, and other factors encountered in video. Many recent trackers utilize appearance samples in previous frames to form the bases upon which the object appearance model is built. This approach has the following limitations: 1) The bases are data driven, so they can be easily corrupted, and 2) it is difficult to robustly update the bases in challenging situations. In this paper, we construct an appearance model using the 3D discrete cosine transform (3D-DCT). The 3D-DCT is based on a set of cosine basis functions which are determined by the dimensions of the 3D signal and thus independent of the input video data. In addition, the 3D-DCT can generate a compact energy spectrum whose high-frequency coefficients are sparse if the appearance samples are similar. By discarding these high-frequency coefficients, we simultaneously obtain a compact 3D-DCT-based object representation and a signal reconstruction-based similarity measure (reflecting the information loss from signal reconstruction). To efficiently update the object representation, we propose an incremental 3D-DCT algorithm which decomposes the 3D-DCT into successive operations of the 2D discrete cosine transform (2D-DCT) and 1D discrete cosine transform (1D-DCT) on the input video data. As a result, the incremental 3D-DCT algorithm only needs to compute the 2D-DCT for newly added frames as well as the 1D-DCT along the third dimension, which significantly reduces the computational complexity. Based on this incremental 3D-DCT algorithm, we design a discriminative criterion to evaluate the likelihood of a test sample belonging to the foreground object. We then embed the discriminative criterion into a particle filtering framework for object state inference over time. Experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and robustness of the proposed tracker. PMID:22868649

  6. Attention modulates maintenance of representations in visual short-term memory.

    Kuo, Bo-Cheng; Stokes, Mark G; Nobre, Anna Christina

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that selective attention is of considerable importance for encoding task-relevant items into visual short-term memory (VSTM) according to our behavioral goals. However, it is not known whether top-down attentional biases can continue to operate during the maintenance period of VSTM. We used ERPs to investigate this question across two experiments. Specifically, we tested whether orienting attention to a given spatial location within a VSTM representation resulted in modulation of the contralateral delay activity (CDA), a lateralized ERP marker of VSTM maintenance generated when participants selectively encode memory items from one hemifield. In both experiments, retrospective cues during the maintenance period could predict a specific item (spatial retrocue) or multiple items (neutral retrocue) that would be probed at the end of the memory delay. Our results revealed that VSTM performance is significantly improved by orienting attention to the location of a task-relevant item. The behavioral benefit was accompanied by modulation of neural activity involved in VSTM maintenance. Spatial retrocues reduced the magnitude of the CDA, consistent with a reduction in memory load. Our results provide direct evidence that top-down control modulates neural activity associated with maintenance in VSTM, biasing competition in favor of the task-relevant information. PMID:21736457

  7. Visual representation of knowledge in the field of Library and Information Science of IRAN

    Afsoon Sabetpour

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The present research has been done to visual representation of knowledge and determination vacuum and density points of scientific trends of faculty members of state universities of IRAN in Library & Information Science field. Method: Curriculum Vitae of each faculty member with census method were collected and its content analyzed. Then using a checklist, the rate scientific tendencies were extracted. NodeXL software was deployed to map out the levels. Results: The results showed that the trends are concentrated in Scientometrics, Research method in Library & Information Science, information organization, information resources, psychology, Education, Management, the Web, Knowledge management, Academic Libraries, Information services, Information Theories and collection management. Apparently, the Library & Information Science community of experts pays little or no attention to the Library & Information Science applications in the fields of chemistry, Cartography, museum, law, art, school libraries as well as to independent subject clusters such as minorities in library, information architecture, mentoring in library science, library automation, preservation, oral history, cybernetics, copyright, information marketing and information economy. Lack of efforts on these areas is remarkable.

  8. Dynamic visualization in a developing framework for the representation of geographic data

    Connie Blok

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to translate the characteristics of geographic data into signs and signals that can be perceived from a map, a language consisting of building blocks and a syntax are required. The first language to be developed was a graphic sign language, introduced by Bertin. His framework has been adapted and extended. It now includes languages for other senses, like touch and hearing, and even smell and taste are currently being investigated. In this paper it has been argued that the overall framework is continuously growing under the influence of technological, conceptual and user-oriented developments. Technological developments in particular are rapid. For example, they allow the representation of geographic data in virtual environments, which can be experienced through multiple senses. If cartographers want to play a role here, they should be willing to contribute to further extension of the framework, which may never be complete. In addition, current definitions of the concepts 'cartography' and 'map' have to be adapted. An example of user-oriented developments is the growing awareness of different types of map use, ranging from presentation to analysis/exploration. Application of the sign language may be different for each type of use, so the framework also needs further development in this direction. As an example, research ideas with respect to the use of dynamic visualization variables in cartographic animations for exploration purposes are included.

  9. Contrasting vertical and horizontal representations of affect in emotional visual search.

    Damjanovic, Ljubica; Santiago, Julio

    2016-02-01

    Independent lines of evidence suggest that the representation of emotional evaluation recruits both vertical and horizontal spatial mappings. These two spatial mappings differ in their experiential origins and their productivity, and available data suggest that they differ in their saliency. Yet, no study has so far compared their relative strength in an attentional orienting reaction time task that affords the simultaneous manifestation of both types of mapping. Here, we investigated this question using a visual search task with emotional faces. We presented angry and happy face targets and neutral distracter faces in top, bottom, left, and right locations on the computer screen. Conceptual congruency effects were observed along the vertical dimension supporting the 'up = good' metaphor, but not along the horizontal dimension. This asymmetrical processing pattern was observed when faces were presented in a cropped (Experiment 1) and whole (Experiment 2) format. These findings suggest that the 'up = good' metaphor is more salient and readily activated than the 'right = good' metaphor, and that the former outcompetes the latter when the task context affords the simultaneous activation of both mappings. PMID:26106061

  10. Location-Unbound Color-Shape Binding Representations in Visual Working Memory.

    Saiki, Jun

    2016-02-01

    The mechanism by which nonspatial features, such as color and shape, are bound in visual working memory, and the role of those features' location in their binding, remains unknown. In the current study, I modified a redundancy-gain paradigm to investigate these issues. A set of features was presented in a two-object memory display, followed by a single object probe. Participants judged whether the probe contained any features of the memory display, regardless of its location. Response time distributions revealed feature coactivation only when both features of a single object in the memory display appeared together in the probe, regardless of the response time benefit from the probe and memory objects sharing the same location. This finding suggests that a shared location is necessary in the formation of bound representations but unnecessary in their maintenance. Electroencephalography data showed that amplitude modulations reflecting location-unbound feature coactivation were different from those reflecting the location-sharing benefit, consistent with the behavioral finding that feature-location binding is unnecessary in the maintenance of color-shape binding. PMID:26710821

  11. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    Cerviño, Laura I.; Gupta, Sonia; Rose, Mary A.; Yashar, Catheryn; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-11-01

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p 2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  12. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p 2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  13. The use of multiple representations and visualizations in student learning of introductory physics: An example from work and energy

    Zou, Xueli

    In the past three decades, physics education research has primarily focused on student conceptual understanding; little work has been conducted to investigate student difficulties in problem solving. In cognitive science and psychology, however, extensive studies have explored the differences in problem solving between experts and naive students. A major finding indicates that experts often apply qualitative representations in problem solving, but that novices use an equation-centered method. This dissertation describes investigations into the use of multiple representations and visualizations in student understanding and problem solving with the concepts of work and energy. A multiple-representation strategy was developed to help students acquire expertise in solving work-energy problems. In this approach, a typical work-energy problem is considered as a physical process. The process is first described in words-the verbal representation of the process. Next, a sketch or a picture, called a pictorial representation, is used to represent the process. This is followed by work-energy bar charts-a physical representation of the same processes. Finally, this process is represented mathematically by using a generalized work-energy equation. In terms of the multiple representations, the goal of solving a work- energy problem is to represent the physical process the more intuitive pictorial and diagrammatic physical representations. Ongoing assessment of student learning indicates that this multiple-representation technique is more effective than standard instruction methods in student problem solving. visualize this difficult-to-understand concept, a guided- inquiry learning activity using a pair of model carts and an experiment problem using a sandbag were developed. Assessment results have shown that these research-based materials are effective in helping students visualize this concept and give a pictorial idea of ``where the kinetic energy goes'' during inelastic collisions. The research and curriculum development was conducted in the context of the introductory calculus-based physics course. Investigations were carried out using common physics education research tools, including open-ended surveys, written test questions, and individual student interviews.

  14. A deep learning architecture for image representation, visual interpretability and automated basal-cell carcinoma cancer detection.

    Cruz-Roa, Angel Alfonso; Arevalo Ovalle, John Edison; Madabhushi, Anant; González Osorio, Fabio Augusto

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents and evaluates a deep learning architecture for automated basal cell carcinoma cancer detection that integrates (1) image representation learning, (2) image classification and (3) result interpretability. A novel characteristic of this approach is that it extends the deep learning architecture to also include an interpretable layer that highlights the visual patterns that contribute to discriminate between cancerous and normal tissues patterns, working akin to a digital staining which spotlights image regions important for diagnostic decisions. Experimental evaluation was performed on set of 1,417 images from 308 regions of interest of skin histopathology slides, where the presence of absence of basal cell carcinoma needs to be determined. Different image representation strategies, including bag of features (BOF), canonical (discrete cosine transform (DCT) and Haar-based wavelet transform (Haar)) and proposed learned-from-data representations, were evaluated for comparison. Experimental results show that the representation learned from a large histology image data set has the best overall performance (89.4% in F-measure and 91.4% in balanced accuracy), which represents an improvement of around 7% over canonical representations and 3% over the best equivalent BOF representation. PMID:24579166

  15. Writing Inspired

    Tischhauser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Students need inspiration to write. Assigning is not teaching. In order to inspire students to write fiction worth reading, teachers must take them through the process of writing. Physical objects inspire good writing with depth. In this article, the reader will be taken through the process of inspiring young writers through the use of boxes.…

  16. The Representation of Color across the Human Visual Cortex: Distinguishing Chromatic Signals Contributing to Object Form Versus Surface Color.

    Seymour, K J; Williams, M A; Rich, A N

    2016-05-01

    Many theories of visual object perception assume the visual system initially extracts borders between objects and their background and then "fills in" color to the resulting object surfaces. We investigated the transformation of chromatic signals across the human ventral visual stream, with particular interest in distinguishing representations of object surface color from representations of chromatic signals reflecting the retinal input. We used fMRI to measure brain activity while participants viewed figure-ground stimuli that differed either in the position or in the color contrast polarity of the foreground object (the figure). Multivariate pattern analysis revealed that classifiers were able to decode information about which color was presented at a particular retinal location from early visual areas, whereas regions further along the ventral stream exhibited biases for representing color as part of an object's surface, irrespective of its position on the retina. Additional analyses showed that although activity in V2 contained strong chromatic contrast information to support the early parsing of objects within a visual scene, activity in this area also signaled information about object surface color. These findings are consistent with the view that mechanisms underlying scene segmentation and the binding of color to object surfaces converge in V2. PMID:25681421

  17. A Review of the Effects of Visual-Spatial Representations and Heuristics on Word Problem Solving in Middle School Mathematics

    Kribbs, Elizabeth; Rogowsky, Beth A.

    2015-01-01

    Mathematics word-problems continue to be an insurmountable challenge for many middle school students. Educators have used pictorial and schematic illustrations within the classroom to help students visualize these problems. However, the data shows that pictorial representations can be more harmful than helpful in that they only display objects or persons while neglecting the spatial relationships between those components (Hegarty & Kozhevnikov, p. 686). Research supports schematic diagram...

  18. Representation of Gravity-Aligned Scene Structure in Ventral Pathway Visual Cortex.

    Vaziri, Siavash; Connor, Charles E

    2016-03-21

    The ventral visual pathway in humans and non-human primates is known to represent object information, including shape and identity [1]. Here, we show the ventral pathway also represents scene structure aligned with the gravitational reference frame in which objects move and interact. We analyzed shape tuning of recently described macaque monkey ventral pathway neurons that prefer scene-like stimuli to objects [2]. Individual neurons did not respond to a single shape class, but to a variety of scene elements that are typically aligned with gravity: large planes in the orientation range of ground surfaces under natural viewing conditions, planes in the orientation range of ceilings, and extended convex and concave edges in the orientation range of wall/floor/ceiling junctions. For a given neuron, these elements tended to share a common alignment in eye-centered coordinates. Thus, each neuron integrated information about multiple gravity-aligned structures as they would be seen from a specific eye and head orientation. This eclectic coding strategy provides only ambiguous information about individual structures but explicit information about the environmental reference frame and the orientation of gravity in egocentric coordinates. In the ventral pathway, this could support perceiving and/or predicting physical events involving objects subject to gravity, recognizing object attributes like animacy based on movement not caused by gravity, and/or stabilizing perception of the world against changes in head orientation [3-5]. Our results, like the recent discovery of object weight representation [6], imply that the ventral pathway is involved not just in recognition, but also in physical understanding of objects and scenes. PMID:26923785

  19. KCRC-LCD: Discriminative Kernel Collaborative Representation with Locality Constrained Dictionary for Visual Categorization

    Liu, Weiyang; Yu, Zhiding; Lu, Lijia; Wen, Yandong; Li, Hui; Zou, Yuexian

    2014-01-01

    We consider the image classification problem via kernel collaborative representation classification with locality constrained dictionary (KCRC-LCD). Specifically, we propose a kernel collaborative representation classification (KCRC) approach in which kernel method is used to improve the discrimination ability of collaborative representation classification (CRC). We then measure the similarities between the query and atoms in the global dictionary in order to construct a locality constrained ...

  20. Computational Modelling of the Neural Representation of Object Shape in the Primate Ventral Visual System

    Akihiro Eguchi

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in successive stages of the primate ventral visual pathway encode the spatial structure of visual objects. In this paper, we investigate through computer simulation how these cell firing properties may develop through unsupervised visually-guided learning. Individual neurons in the model are shown to exploit statistical regularity and temporal continuity of the visual inputs during training to learn firing properties that are similar to neurons in V4 and TEO. Neurons in V4 encode the ...

  1. The Effect of Visual-Chunking-Representation Accommodation on Geometry Testing for Students with Math Disabilities

    Zhang, Dake; Ding, Yi; Stegall, Joanna; Mo, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Students who struggle with learning mathematics often have difficulties with geometry problem solving, which requires strong visual imagery skills. These difficulties have been correlated with deficiencies in visual working memory. Cognitive psychology has shown that chunking of visual items accommodates students' working memory deficits. This…

  2. The Effect of Visual-Chunking-Representation Accommodation on Geometry Testing for Students with Math Disabilities

    Zhang, Dake; Ding, Yi; Stegall, Joanna; Mo, Lei

    2012-01-01

    Students who struggle with learning mathematics often have difficulties with geometry problem solving, which requires strong visual imagery skills. These difficulties have been correlated with deficiencies in visual working memory. Cognitive psychology has shown that chunking of visual items accommodates students' working memory deficits. This…

  3. Representações visuais para recuperação de informação na BDTD-UFPE / Visual representations to information retrieval in BDTD-UFPE

    Renato Fernandes, Correa; Jessica Monique de Lira, Vieira.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Analisa a aplicabilidade de visualizações, como interfaces amigáveis para Sistemas de Recuperação de Informação (SRIs), bem como discute a construção de representação visual de informações para o SRI da Biblioteca Digital de Teses e Dissertações (BDTD) da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE). A [...] metodologia consiste em estudo de caso, envolvendo análise do uso de visualizações em sites de SRIs e discussão dos caminhos percorridos para construção de visualizações para recuperação de teses e dissertações do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Direto da UFPE. Conclui-se que interfaces de SRIs, que disponibilizam visualizações, transmitem informações de forma agradável e interativa, possibilitando a recuperação de documentos relevantes e garantido melhor socialização dos conhecimentos. Entretanto, a escolha da visualização a ser construída para determinado SRI, deve levar em conta não só as vantagens do uso das mesmas pelo usuário, mas, também, o atendimento aos requisitos de organização da informação necessários para construção de cada visualização. Abstract in english This article analyzes the applicability of visualizations as friendly interfaces for Information Retrieval Systems (IRSs) and discusses the construction of visual representation of information to the IRS of the Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (BDTD) at Federal University of Pernambuco (U [...] FPE). The methodology consists of case study involving analysis of the use of visualizations in SRIs sites, and discussion of the paths chosen to build visualizations for retrieval of theses and dissertations of the Law Graduate Program at UFPE. We conclude that SRI interfaces that provide visualizations convey information so enjoyable and interactive, allowing the retrieval of relevant documents and ensuring better socialization of knowledge. However, the choice of one visualization to be built for a specific SRI, should take into account not only the advantages for users of using the same, but also meeting the requirements of information organizing required for construction of each visualization.

  4. Students' Use of Three Different Visual Representations to Interpret Whether Molecules Are Polar or Nonpolar

    Host, Gunnar E.; Schonborn, Konrad J.; Palmerius, Karljohan E. Lundin

    2012-01-01

    Visualizing molecular properties is often crucial for constructing conceptual understanding in chemistry. However, research has revealed numerous challenges surrounding students' meaningful interpretation of the relationship between the geometry and electrostatic properties of molecules. This study explored students' (n = 18) use of three visual…

  5. The Crossmodal Facilitation of Visual Object Representations by Sound: Evidence from the Backward Masking Paradigm

    Chen, Yi-Chuan; Spence, Charles

    2011-01-01

    We report a series of experiments designed to demonstrate that the presentation of a sound can facilitate the identification of a concomitantly presented visual target letter in the backward masking paradigm. Two visual letters, serving as the target and its mask, were presented successively at various interstimulus intervals (ISIs). The results…

  6. Visual representation of costs in the productive process: a case study on a footwear industry in Portugal

    Levi da Silva Guimarães

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, conventional production systems have gone through changes in the face of intensified competition among companies. The occurrence of these changes has boosted the development of decision-making assistance tools for the production systems. However, most of these instruments do not allow the visualization of the costs involved throughout industrial operations. This study comprises the integration of the "Waste Identification Diagrams" (WID, current tool for visualization and analysis of production processes, along with "Time-Driven Activity-Based Costing" (TDABC, strategic management cost tool, seeking to create a model that visually demonstrates waste and relate its occurrence to operating costs. For that, the research adopted a descriptive-exploratory approach, based on a case study carried out in a footwear industry. The analysis showed that the integration of tools allowed for the representation of costs based on the time equations from the TDABC, associated with the visualization of the production process by the WID. The study concludes that the WID can be integrated to the TDABC tool, creating a management model for making decisions based on the operating costs of the production process.

  7. Improving of Junior High School Visual Thinking Representation Ability in Mathematical Problem Solving by CTL

    Surya, Edy; Sabandar, Jozua; Kusumah, Yaya S.; Darhim

    2013-01-01

    The students' difficulty which was found is in the problem of understanding, drawing diagrams, reading the charts correctly, conceptual formal mathematical understanding, and mathematical problem solving. The appropriate problem representation is the basic way in order to understand the problem itself and make a plan to solve it. This research was…

  8. Infants' observation of others' actions: Brief movement-specific visual experience primes motor representations.

    Boyer, Ty W; Bertenthal, Bennett I

    2016-03-01

    Recent research suggests that infants' observation of others' reaching actions activates corresponding motor representations which develop with their motor experience. Contralateral reaching develops a few months later than ipsilateral reaching, and 9-month-old infants are less likely to map the observation of these reaches to their motor representations. The goal of the current study was to test whether a brief familiarization with contralateral reaching is sufficient to prime this less developed motor representation to increase the likelihood of its activation. In Experiment 1, infants were familiarized with contralateral reaching before they were tested in an observational version of the A-not-B paradigm. A significant number of infants searched incorrectly, suggesting that the observation of contralateral reaching primed their motor representations. In Experiment 2, infants were familiarized with ipsilateral reaching, which shared the goals but not the movements associated with the contralateral reaches observed during testing, and they did not show a search bias. Taken together, these results suggest that a brief familiarization with a movement-specific behaviour facilitates the direct matching of observed and executed actions. PMID:26206276

  9. The time course of protecting a visual memory representation from perceptual interference

    Eren Gunseli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cueing a remembered item during the delay of a visual memory task leads to enhanced recall of the cued item compared to when an item is not cued. This cueing benefit has been proposed to reflect attention within visual memory being shifted from a distributed mode to a focused mode, thus protecting the cued item against perceptual interference. Here we investigated the dynamics of building up this mnemonic protection against visual interference by systematically varying the SOA between cue onset and a subsequent visual mask in an orientation memory task. Experiment 1 showed that a cue counteracted the deteriorating effect of pattern masks. Experiment 2 demonstrated that building up this protection is a continuous process that is completed in approximately half a second after cue onset. The similarities between shifting attention in perceptual and remembered space are discussed.

  10. A Neural Representation of Depth from Motion Parallax in Macaque Visual Cortex

    Nadler, Jacob W.; ANGELAKI, DORA E.; DeAngelis, Gregory C

    2008-01-01

    Perception of depth is a fundamental challenge for the visual system, particularly for observers moving through their environment. The brain makes use of multiple visual cues to reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of a scene. One potent cue, motion parallax, frequently arises during translation of the observer because the images of objects at different distances move across the retina with different velocities. Human psychophysical studies have demonstrated that motion parallax can be...

  11. The Effect of Visual Representation Style in Problem-Solving: A Perspective from Cognitive Processes

    Nyamsuren, Enkhbold,; Taatgen, Niels A.

    2013-01-01

    Using results from a controlled experiment and simulations based on cognitive models, we show that visual presentation style can have a significant impact on performance in a complex problem-solving task. We compared subject performances in two isomorphic, but visually different, tasks based on a card game of SET. Although subjects used the same strategy in both tasks, the difference in presentation style resulted in radically different reaction times and significant deviations in scanpath pa...

  12. Neuronal learning of invariant object representation in the ventral visual stream is not dependent on reward

    Li, Nuo; DiCarlo, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Neurons at the top of primate ventral visual stream (inferior temporal cortex, IT) have selectivity for objects that is highly tolerant to variation in the object’s appearance on the retina. Previous non-human primate (Macaca mulatta) studies suggest that this neuronal tolerance is at least partly supported by the natural temporal contiguity of visual experience, because altering that temporal contiguity can robustly alter adult IT position and size tolerance. According to that work, it is th...

  13. Preliminary tests of a possible outdoor light adaptation solution for a fly inspired visual sensor: a biomimetic solution - biomed 2011.

    Dean, Brian K; Wright, Cameron H G; Barrett, Steven F

    2011-01-01

    Two previous papers, presented at RMBS in 2009 and 2010, introduced a fly inspired vision sensor that could adapt to indoor light conditions by mimicking the light adaptation process of the commonhousefly, Muscadomestica. A new system has been designed that should allow the sensor to adapt to outdoor light conditions which will enable the sensor’s use inapplications such as: unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) obstacle avoidance, UAV landing support, target tracking, wheelchair guidance, large structure monitoring, and many other outdoor applications. A sensor of this type is especially suited for these applications due to features of hyperacuity (or an ability to achieve movement resolution beyond the theoretical limit), extreme sensitivity to motion, and (through software simulation) image edge extraction, motion detection, and orientation and location of a line.Many of these qualities are beyond the ability of traditional computervision sensors such as charge coupled device (CCD) arrays.To achieve outdoor light adaptation, a variety of design obstacles have to be overcome such as infrared interference, dynamic range expansion, and light saturation. The newly designed system overcomes the latter two design obstacles by mimicking the fly’s solution of logarithmic compression followed by removal of the average background light intensity. This paper presents the new design and the preliminary tests that were conducted to determine its effectiveness. PMID:21525612

  14. A modeling language for 3D process plant layout representation, exchange and visualization

    Paviot, Thomas; Fortineau, Virginie; Lamouri, Samir; Louis-Sidney, Ludovic

    2012-01-01

    In the nuclear industry, achieving Long Term Data Preservation is a requirement for nuclear power plants to be safely built, operated over five or six decades and retired. Among them, CAD data suffers from some strong dependencies on the software vendors and its data model thus leading to a possible weakness in the preservation workflow. This paper presents a modeling language, suitable for the 3D representation of a process plant layout, based upon a procedural Constructive Solid Geometry (C...

  15. The role of visual representations in the learning and teaching of science: An introduction

    John K. GILBERT

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Representations are the entities with which all thinking is considered to take place. Hence they are central to the process of learning and consequently to that of teaching. They are therefore important in the conduct and learning of science, given the central commitment of that discipline to providing evidence-based explanations of natural phenomena, in which underlying entities and mechanisms have to be postulated and substantiated on the basis of empirical enquiry. The three generic types of representation and the modes in which they are expressed are presented against the background of an established model of their acquisition, processing and display. The two meanings of ‘visualization’ are discussed as is the key role played by fluency in them in the attainment of expert status in the processes of science. The nature and origins of students’ problems in attaining this ‘metavisual competence’ are derived from a review of the literature. Good practice in the teaching of the conventions of representation is suggested. Specific research and development is needed if this key aspect of knowledge acquisition and display is to be fully recognised in the varied curricula of formal science education and in the provision of opportunities for the informal communication of science.

  16. a Study on Mental Representations for Realistic Visualization the Particular Case of Ski Trail Mapping

    Balzarini, R.; Dalmasso, A.; Murat, M.

    2015-08-01

    This article presents preliminary results from a research project in progress that brings together geographers, cognitive scientists, historians and computer scientists. The project investigates the evolution of a particular territorial model: ski trails maps. Ski resorts, tourist and sporting innovations for mountain economies since the 1930s, have needed cartographic representations corresponding to new practices of the space.Painter artists have been involved in producing ski maps with painting techniques and panoramic views, which are by far the most common type of map, because they allow the resorts to look impressive to potential visitors. These techniques have evolved throughout the mutations of the ski resorts. Paper ski maps no longer meet the needs of a large part of the customers; the question now arises of their adaptation to digital media. In a computerized process perspective, the early stage of the project aims to identify the artist-representations, based on conceptual and technical rules, which are handled by users-skiers to perform a task (location, wayfinding, decision-making) and can be transferred to a computer system. This article presents the experimental phase that analyzes artist and user mental representations that are at stake during the making and the reading of a paper ski map. It particularly focuses on how the invention of the artist influences map reading.

  17. Cardiac and pulmonary dose reduction for tangentially irradiated breast cancer, utilizing deep inspiration breath-hold with audio-visual guidance, without compromising target coverage

    Background and purpose. Cardiac disease and pulmonary complications are documented risk factors in tangential breast irradiation. Respiratory gating radiotherapy provides a possibility to substantially reduce cardiopulmonary doses. This CT planning study quantifies the reduction of radiation doses to the heart and lung, using deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). Patients and methods. Seventeen patients with early breast cancer, referred for adjuvant radiotherapy, were included. For each patient two CT scans were acquired; the first during free breathing (FB) and the second during DIBH. The scans were monitored by the Varian RPM respiratory gating system. Audio coaching and visual feedback (audio-visual guidance) were used. The treatment planning of the two CT studies was performed with conformal tangential fields, focusing on good coverage (V95>98%) of the planning target volume (PTV). Dose-volume histograms were calculated and compared. Doses to the heart, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, ipsilateral lung and the contralateral breast were assessed. Results. Compared to FB, the DIBH-plans obtained lower cardiac and pulmonary doses, with equal coverage of PTV. The average mean heart dose was reduced from 3.7 to 1.7 Gy and the number of patients with >5% heart volume receiving 25 Gy or more was reduced from four to one of the 17 patients. With DIBH the heart was completely out of the beam portals for ten patients, with FB this could not be achieved for any of the 17 patients. The average mean dose to the LAD coronary artery was reduced from 18.1 to 6.4 Gy. The average ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 20 Gy was reduced from 12.2 to 10.0%. Conclusion. Respiratory gating with DIBH, utilizing audio-visual guidance, reduces cardiac and pulmonary doses for tangentially treated left sided breast cancer patients without compromising the target coverage

  18. Representation of the visual field in the anterior thalamus of the leopard frog, Rana pipiens.

    Skorina, Laura K; Recktenwald, Eric W; Dudkin, Elizabeth A; Saidel, William M; Gruberg, Edward R

    2016-05-16

    We used physiological and anatomical methods to elucidate how the visual field is represented in the part of the dorsal anterior thalamus of the leopard frog that receives direct retinal projections. We recorded extracellularly while presenting visual stimuli, and characterized a physiologically defined region that encompasses the retinal projections as well as an extended zone beyond them. We probed the area systematically to determine if the zone is organized in a visuotopic map: we found that it is not. We found that units in this region respond only to stimuli in the contralateral half of the visual field, which is similar to what is seen in the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus in mammals. When we backfilled retinal ganglion cells from application of HRP to the anterior thalamus, we found labeled cells only in those parts of the retina corresponding to the contralateral hemifield, confirming our physiological observations. PMID:27064110

  19. Visual Representation of Sports Activities in Secondary School English and Turkish Coursebooks

    Mehmet Galip ZORBA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Along with language teaching purposes, coursebooks also convey different kinds of cultural and social messages through both written texts and visualization. Therefore, studying coursebooks in terms of such qualities is necessary in foreign language education. In the learning process, visualization plays a pivotal role since visuals cater for concrete sensory stimuli and thus is an indispensable part in all co ursebooks. The aim of this study is to comparatively investigate how sports, including recreational activities, are portrayed in secondary school English and Turkish coursebooks prepared according to the new education system in relation to such variables a s which sports are particularly shown, and sex of persons doing sports and/or recreational activities. A total number of eight coursebooks (four English and four Turkish are studied and the findings are also compared with similar studies. The results show ed the problems associated with these coursebooks.

  20. From pixels to gestures : learning visual representations for human analysis in color and depth data sequences

    Hernandez-Vela, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    [cat] L’anàlisi visual de persones a partir d'imatges és un tema de recerca molt important, atesa la rellevància que té a una gran quantitat d'aplicacions dins la visió per computador, com per exemple: detecció de vianants, monitorització i vigilància,interacció persona-màquina, “e-salut” o sistemes de recuperació d’matges a partir de contingut, entre d'altres. En aquesta tesi volem aprendre diferents representacions visuals del cos humà, que siguin útils per a la anàlisi visual de per...

  1. Open Source Software in Teaching Physics: A Case Study on Vector Algebra and Visual Representations

    Cataloglu, Erdat

    2006-01-01

    This study aims to report the effort on teaching vector algebra using free open source software (FOSS). Recent studies showed that students have difficulties in learning basic physics concepts. Constructivist learning theories suggest the use of visual and hands-on activities in learning. We will report on the software used for this purpose. The…

  2. Newly Qualifying Teachers' Perspectives of Diversity and Inclusion: "Understanding through Visual Representations"

    Phillipson, Sivanes; Forlin, Chris

    2011-01-01

    This research explores the use of visual imagery as a strategy for gaining a greater understanding of diversity and inclusion within regular schools as perceived from the perspective of 118 newly qualifying teachers in Hong Kong. Dyads or small groups of teachers participating in a teacher education course were asked to represent their…

  3. The Effect of Visual Representation Style in Problem-Solving: A Perspective from Cognitive Processes

    Nyamsuren, Enkhbold; Taatgen, Niels A.

    2013-01-01

    Using results from a controlled experiment and simulations based on cognitive models, we show that visual presentation style can have a significant impact on performance in a complex problem-solving task. We compared subject performances in two isomorphic, but visually different, tasks based on a card game of SET. Although subjects used the same strategy in both tasks, the difference in presentation style resulted in radically different reaction times and significant deviations in scanpath patterns in the two tasks. Results from our study indicate that low-level subconscious visual processes, such as differential acuity in peripheral vision and low-level iconic memory, can have indirect, but significant effects on decision making during a problem-solving task. We have developed two ACT-R models that employ the same basic strategy but deal with different presentations styles. Our ACT-R models confirm that changes in low-level visual processes triggered by changes in presentation style can propagate to higher-level cognitive processes. Such a domino effect can significantly affect reaction times and eye movements, without affecting the overall strategy of problem solving. PMID:24260415

  4. The effect of visual representation style in problem-solving: a perspective from cognitive processes.

    Nyamsuren, Enkhbold; Taatgen, Niels A

    2013-01-01

    Using results from a controlled experiment and simulations based on cognitive models, we show that visual presentation style can have a significant impact on performance in a complex problem-solving task. We compared subject performances in two isomorphic, but visually different, tasks based on a card game of SET. Although subjects used the same strategy in both tasks, the difference in presentation style resulted in radically different reaction times and significant deviations in scanpath patterns in the two tasks. Results from our study indicate that low-level subconscious visual processes, such as differential acuity in peripheral vision and low-level iconic memory, can have indirect, but significant effects on decision making during a problem-solving task. We have developed two ACT-R models that employ the same basic strategy but deal with different presentations styles. Our ACT-R models confirm that changes in low-level visual processes triggered by changes in presentation style can propagate to higher-level cognitive processes. Such a domino effect can significantly affect reaction times and eye movements, without affecting the overall strategy of problem solving. PMID:24260415

  5. Visual working memory representations guide the detection of emotional faces: An ERP study.

    Fan, Lingxia; Ding, Cody; Guo, Renlu; Xu, Mengsi; Diao, Liuting; Yang, Dong

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the correlates of the influences exerted by visual working memory (VWM) on attentional selection of emotional faces using electrophysiological method. Participants performed a search task to detect happy or angry faces among groups of neutral faces while simultaneously keeping in VWM a colour cue presented initially. A visual working memory test was required at last to ensure that the cue had been maintained in VWM. Happy faces elicited a larger amplitude N2pc ERP component when VWM features matched the target face (valid condition) and a smaller amplitude when VWM features matched a distractor face (invalid condition), compared with the neutral condition (wherein VWM features did not match any face in the search array). Additionally, angry faces elicited a greater N2pc amplitude in valid trials than in neutral and invalid trials. Although VWM could guide the attentional deployment of angry and happy faces, the guidance was subject to an anger superiority effect. PMID:26731647

  6. statnet: Software Tools for the Representation, Visualization, Analysis and Simulation of Network Data

    Mark S. Handcock; Hunter, David R; Carter T. Butts; Goodreau, Steven M.; Martina Morris

    2007-01-01

    statnet is a suite of software packages for statistical network analysis. The packages implement recent advances in network modeling based on exponential-family random graph models (ERGM). The components of the package provide a comprehensive framework for ERGM-based network modeling, including tools for model estimation, model evaluation, model-based network simulation, and network visualization. This broad functionality is powered by a central Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. The ...

  7. Social categories shape the neural representation of emotion: evidence from a visual face adaptation task

    Marte Otten

    2012-01-01

    A number of recent behavioral studies have shown that emotional expressions are differently perceived depending on the race of a face, and that perception of race cues is influenced by emotional expressions. However, neural processes related to the perception of invariant cues that indicate the identity of a face (such as race) are often described to proceed independently of processes related to the perception of cues that can vary over time (such as emotion). Using a visual face adaptation p...

  8. Attention Modulates Maintenance of Representations in Visual Short-Term Memory

    Kuo, Bo-Cheng; Stokes, Mark G; Nobre, Anna Christina

    2011-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that selective attention is of considerable importance for encoding task-relevant items into visual short-term memory (VSTM) according to our behavioural goals. However, it is not known whether top-down attentional biases can continue to operate during the maintenance period of VSTM. We used event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate this question across two experiments. Specifically, we tested whether orienting attention to a given spatial location within a VSTM...

  9. Visual-somatosensory interactions in mental representations of the body and the face

    Beck, Brianna

    2015-01-01

    The body is represented in the brain at levels that incorporate multisensory information. This thesis focused on interactions between vision and cutaneous sensations (i.e., touch and pain). Experiment 1 revealed that there are partially dissociable pathways for visual enhancement of touch (VET) depending upon whether one sees one’s own body or the body of another person. This indicates that VET, a seeming low-level effect on spatial tactile acuity, is actually sensitive to body identity. ...

  10. Linked Data based Health Information Representation, Visualization and Retrieval System on the Semantic Web

    Tilahun, Binyam Chakilu

    2013-01-01

    To better facilitate health information dissemination, using flexible ways to represent, query and visualize health data becomes increasingly important. Semantic Web technologies, which provide a common framework by allowing data to be shared and reused between applications, can be applied to the management of health data. Linked open data - a new semantic web standard to publish and link heterogonous data- allows not only human, but also machine to brows data in unlimited w...

  11. Hierarchical Novelty-Familiarity Representation in the Visual System by Modular Predictive Coding

    Vladimirskiy, Boris; Urbanczik, Robert; Senn, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Predictive coding has been previously introduced as a hierarchical coding framework for the visual system. At each level, activity predicted by the higher level is dynamically subtracted from the input, while the difference in activity continuously propagates further. Here we introduce modular predictive coding as a feedforward hierarchy of prediction modules without back-projections from higher to lower levels. Within each level, recurrent dynamics optimally segregates the input into novelty...

  12. INSPIRE - Premission

    Taylor, William W. L.; Mideke, Michael; Pine, William E.; Ericson, James D.

    The Interactive NASA Space Physics Ionosphere Radio Experiment (INSPIRE) designed to assist in a Space Experiments with Particle Accelerators (SEPAC) project is discussed. INSPIRE is aimed at recording data from a large number of receivers on the ground to determine the exact propagation paths and absorption of radio waves at frequencies between 50 Hz and 7 kHz. It is indicated how to participate in the experiment that will involve high school classes, colleges, and amateur radio operators.

  13. Incremental Learning of 3D-DCT Compact Representations for Robust Visual Tracking

    Li, Xi; Dick, Anthony; Shen, Chunhua; Hengel, Anton van den; Wang, Hanzi

    2012-01-01

    Visual tracking usually requires an object appearance model that is robust to changing illumination, pose and other factors encountered in video. In this paper, we construct an appearance model using the 3D discrete cosine transform (3D-DCT). The 3D-DCT is based on a set of cosine basis functions, which are determined by the dimensions of the 3D signal and thus independent of the input video data. In addition, the 3D-DCT can generate a compact energy spectrum whose high-frequency coefficients...

  14. The VIPER project (Visualization Integration Platform for Exploration Research): a biologically inspired autonomous reconfigurable robotic platform for diverse unstructured environments

    Schubert, Oliver J.; Tolle, Charles R.

    2004-09-01

    Over the last decade the world has seen numerous autonomous vehicle programs. Wheels and track designs are the basis for many of these vehicles. This is primarily due to four main reasons: a vast preexisting knowledge base for these designs, energy efficiency of power sources, scalability of actuators, and the lack of control systems technologies for handling alternate highly complex distributed systems. Though large efforts seek to improve the mobility of these vehicles, many limitations still exist for these systems within unstructured environments, e.g. limited mobility within industrial and nuclear accident sites where existing plant configurations have been extensively changed. These unstructured operational environments include missions for exploration, reconnaissance, and emergency recovery of objects within reconfigured or collapsed structures, e.g. bombed buildings. More importantly, these environments present a clear and present danger for direct human interactions during the initial phases of recovery operations. Clearly, the current classes of autonomous vehicles are incapable of performing in these environments. Thus the next generation of designs must include highly reconfigurable and flexible autonomous robotic platforms. This new breed of autonomous vehicles will be both highly flexible and environmentally adaptable. Presented in this paper is one of the most successful designs from nature, the snake-eel-worm (SEW). This design implements shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators which allow for scaling of the robotic SEW designs from sub-micron scale to heavy industrial implementations without major conceptual redesigns as required in traditional hydraulic, pneumatic, or motor driven systems. Autonomous vehicles based on the SEW design posses the ability to easily move between air based environments and fluid based environments with limited or no reconfiguration. Under a SEW designed vehicle, one not only achieves vastly improved maneuverability within a highly unstructured environment, but also gains robotic manipulation abilities, normally relegated as secondary add-ons within existing vehicles, all within one small condensed package. The prototype design presented includes a Beowulf style computing system for advanced guidance calculations and visualization computations. All of the design and implementation pertaining to the SEW robot discussed in this paper is the product of a student team under the summer fellowship program at the DOEs INEEL.

  15. Large Scale Isosurface Bicubic Subdivision-Surface Wavelets for Representation and Visualization

    Bertram, M.; Duchaineau, M.A.; Hamann, B.; Joy, K.I.

    2000-01-05

    We introduce a new subdivision-surface wavelet transform for arbitrary two-manifolds with boundary that is the first to use simple lifting-style filtering operations with bicubic precision. We also describe a conversion process for re-mapping large-scale isosurfaces to have subdivision connectivity and fair parameterizations so that the new wavelet transform can be used for compression and visualization. The main idea enabling our wavelet transform is the circular symmetrization of the filters in irregular neighborhoods, which replaces the traditional separation of filters into two 1-D passes. Our wavelet transform uses polygonal base meshes to represent surface topology, from which a Catmull-Clark-style subdivision hierarchy is generated. The details between these levels of resolution are quickly computed and compactly stored as wavelet coefficients. The isosurface conversion process begins with a contour triangulation computed using conventional techniques, which we subsequently simplify with a variant edge-collapse procedure, followed by an edge-removal process. This provides a coarse initial base mesh, which is subsequently refined, relaxed and attracted in phases to converge to the contour. The conversion is designed to produce smooth, untangled and minimally-skewed parameterizations, which improves the subsequent compression after applying the transform. We have demonstrated our conversion and transform for an isosurface obtained from a high-resolution turbulent-mixing hydrodynamics simulation, showing the potential for compression and level-of-detail visualization.

  16. Hierarchical visual representations enhance complex pattern learning in honeybees (Apis mellifera

    Adrian G Dyer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Traditional views of insect vision use parameterised high-contrast stimuli and assume both simple reflexive responses to stimuli and an incapacity to configure pattern elements in a unified percept [1]; but such models cannot account for the wide range of very complex visual discriminations that the bee visual system masters with continued experience [2-6]. We test the learning of configured flower patterns, or non-configured elements. Bees were trained with differential conditioning to discriminate similar [2-5] flower stimuli, scrambled or high contrast stimuli (Fig. 1. After 12 trials (36 bees/group only the correctly configured 'normal' contrast flower stimuli were learnt to a level significantly different from chance expectation (*1 sample t-test, df35, p Figure 1. Four independent groups of bees were individually trained to the stimuli (rows 1&3 in the respective columns (e.g. one group of bees learnt flowers in column 1. The stimuli are complex and contain similar low level cues [2-5], represented here by the FFT of stimuli (rows 2&4 under stimuli. Only configured flowers of ‘normal’ contrast were learnt (mean choice frequency +/-S.E.M..

  17. Prior Knowledge about Objects Determines Neural Color Representation in Human Visual Cortex.

    Vandenbroucke, A R E; Fahrenfort, J J; Meuwese, J D I; Scholte, H S; Lamme, V A F

    2016-04-01

    To create subjective experience, our brain must translate physical stimulus input by incorporating prior knowledge and expectations. For example, we perceive color and not wavelength information, and this in part depends on our past experience with colored objects ( Hansen et al. 2006; Mitterer and de Ruiter 2008). Here, we investigated the influence of object knowledge on the neural substrates underlying subjective color vision. In a functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment, human subjects viewed a color that lay midway between red and green (ambiguous with respect to its distance from red and green) presented on either typical red (e.g., tomato), typical green (e.g., clover), or semantically meaningless (nonsense) objects. Using decoding techniques, we could predict whether subjects viewed the ambiguous color on typical red or typical green objects based on the neural response of veridical red and green. This shift of neural response for the ambiguous color did not occur for nonsense objects. The modulation of neural responses was observed in visual areas (V3, V4, VO1, lateral occipital complex) involved in color and object processing, as well as frontal areas. This demonstrates that object memory influences wavelength information relatively early in the human visual system to produce subjective color vision. PMID:25323417

  18. Visual representation of carbon dioxide adsorption in a low-volatile bituminous coal molecular model

    Marielle R. Narkiewicz; Jonathan P. Mathews [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States). Department of Energy and Minerals Engineering

    2009-09-15

    Carbon dioxide can be sequestered in unmineable coal seams to aid in mitigating global climate change, while concurrently CH{sub 4} can be desorbed from the coal seam and used as a domestic energy source. In this work, a previously constructed molecular representation was used to simulate several processes that occur during sequestration, such as sorption capacities of CO{sub 2} and CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}-induced swelling, contraction because of CH{sub 4} and water loss, and the pore-blocking role of moisture. This is carried out by calculating the energy minima of the molecular model with different amounts of CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and H{sub 2}O. The model used is large (>2000 atoms) and contains a molecular-weight distribution, so that it has the flexibility to be used by other researchers and for other purposes in the future. In the low-level molecular modeling presented here, it was anticipated that CO{sub 2} would be adsorbed more readily than CH{sub 4}, that swelling would be anisotropic, greater perpendicular to the bedding plane because of the rank of this coal, and finally, that, with the addition of moisture, CO{sub 2} capacity in the coal would be reduced. As expected with this high-rank coal, there was swelling when CO{sub 2} perturbed the structure of approximately 5%. It was found that, on the basis of the interconnected pore structure and molecular sizes, CO{sub 2} was able to access 12.4% more of the pore volume (as defined by helium) than CH{sub 4}, in the rigid molecular representation. With water as stationary molecules, mostly hydrogen bound to the coal oxygen functionality, pore access decreased by 5.1% of the pore volume for CO{sub 2} accessibility and 4.7% of the pore volume for CH{sub 4} accessibility. 36 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  19. Physical Properties, Exciton Analysis, and Visualization of Core-Excited States: An Intermediate State Representation Approach.

    Wenzel, Jan; Dreuw, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    The theoretical simulation of X-ray absorption spectra is in general a challenging task. However, for small and medium-sized organic molecules, the algebraic diagrammatic construction scheme (ADC) for the polarization operator in combination with the core-valence separation approximation (CVS) has proven to yield core-excitation energies and transition moments with almost quantitative accuracy allowing for reliable construction of X-ray absorption spectra. Still, to understand core-excitation processes in detail, it is not sufficient to only compute energies, but also properties like static dipole moments and state densities are important as they provide deeper insight into the nature of core-excited states. Here, we present for the first time an implementation of the intermediate state representation (ISR) approach in combination with the CVS approximation (CVS-ISR), which gives, in combination with the CVS-ADC method, direct access to core-excited state properties. The performance of the CVS-ADC/CVS-ISR approach is demonstrated by means of small- and medium-sized organic molecules. Besides the calculation of core-excited state dipole moments, advanced analyses of core-excited state densities are performed using descriptors like exciton sizes and distances. Plotting electron and hole densities helps to determine the character of the state, and in particular, the investigation of detachment/attachment densities provides information about orbital relaxation effects that are crucial for understanding core excitations. PMID:26845396

  20. Effects of Visual Representation on Social Influence in Computer-Mediated Communication: Experimental Tests of the Social Identity Model of Deindividuation Effects

    Lee, Eun-Ju

    2004-01-01

    Two experiments investigated if and how visual representation of interactants affects depersonalization and conformity to group norms in anonymous computer-mediated communication (CMC). In Experiment 1, a 2 (intergroup versus interpersonal) x 2 (same character versus different character) between-subjects design experiment (N=60), each participant…

  1. Visual and narrative representations of mental health and addiction by law enforcement.

    Boyd, Jade; Boyd, Susan; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    In Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada's third largest city, the Vancouver Police Department (VPD), has positioned itself as being at the forefront of mental health regulation. The VPD problematization of the "mental health crisis" in Vancouver draws on discourses of addiction and dangerousness. This is partially achieved by the twinning of mental health with addiction (dual diagnoses) and a focus on illegal drug consumption, and is supported through law enforcement's role as active claims-makers. Consequently, there is a mobilization of resources to identify, discipline, and contain people identified as mentally ill and addicted with little examination of both the textual and visual discourses that serve this purpose. This article addresses this gap through an analysis of the images and discursive framing of people with mental illness and addictions by the VPD in two Vancouver Police Department reports published in 2008 and 2009. PMID:25980943

  2. Remembering to Forget: Marginalised Visual Representations in the Irish Nation Narrative

    Gail Baylis

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The period 1890 to 1914 witnesses a European-wide crisis in masculinity and an acceleration of modern nationalism.  The figure of the boy becomes a central symbol for re-securing both masculinity and the nation.  As a consequence boy culture became increasing associated with militarism.  Nation states are masculine institutions and therefore it hardly surprises that the story that the modern state tells to legitimise its origins prioritises masculine concerns. This study focuses on the construction of visual nation-building narratives expressed through nationalist boy culture in Ireland at the beginning of the twentieth century. It aims to connect these currents to the broader European context and, in the process, evaluate the relationship between gendering and nationalism at this specific historical juncture. It argues that by focusing on the role and development of boy culture during this period we can better understand why the nation narrative prioritises one vi­su­alised story of national self-determinacy over a num­ber of competing versions, and it foregrounds the re­silience of hegemonic masculinity in this. In this context, which photographs are chosen to support the nation narrative and which get forgotten is significant because it indicates the gendered nature of nation formation.

  3. SU-E-J-62: Breath Hold for Left-Sided Breast Cancer: Visually Monitored Deep Inspiration Breath Hold Amplitude Evaluated Using Real-Time Position Management

    Purpose: We used Real-Time Position Management (RPM) to evaluate breath hold amplitude and variability when gating with a visually monitored deep inspiration breath hold technique (VM-DIBH) with retrospective cine image chest wall position verification. Methods: Ten patients with left-sided breast cancer were treated using VM-DIBH. Respiratory motion was passively collected once weekly using RPM with the marker block positioned at the xiphoid process. Cine images on the tangent medial field were acquired on fractions with RPM monitoring for retrospective verification of chest wall position during breath hold. The amplitude and duration of all breath holds on which treatment beams were delivered were extracted from the RPM traces. Breath hold position coverage was evaluated for symmetric RPM gating windows from ± 1 to 5 mm centered on the average breath hold amplitude of the first measured fraction as a baseline. Results: The average (range) breath hold amplitude and duration was 18 mm (3–36 mm) and 19 s (7–34 s). The average (range) of amplitude standard deviation per patient over all breath holds was 2.7 mm (1.2–5.7 mm). With the largest allowable RPM gating window (± 5 mm), 4 of 10 VM-DIBH patients would have had ≥ 10% of their breath hold positions excluded by RPM. Cine verification of the chest wall position during the medial tangent field showed that the chest wall was greater than 5 mm from the baseline in only 1 out of 4 excluded patients. Cine images verify the chest wall/breast position only, whether this variation is acceptable in terms of heart sparing is a subject of future investigation. Conclusion: VM-DIBH allows for greater breath hold amplitude variability than using a 5 mm gating window with RPM, while maintaining chest wall positioning accuracy within 5 mm for the majority of patients

  4. The Effect of Using a Visual Representation Tool in a Teaching-Learning Sequence for Teaching Newton's Third Law

    Savinainen, Antti; Mäkynen, Asko; Nieminen, Pasi; Viiri, Jouni

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a research-based teaching-learning sequence (TLS) that focuses on the notion of interaction in teaching Newton's third law (N3 law) which is, as earlier studies have shown, a challenging topic for students to learn. The TLS made systematic use of a visual representation tool—an interaction diagram (ID)—highlighting interactions between objects and addressing the learning demand related to N3 law. This approach had been successful in enhancing students' understanding of N3 law in pilot studies conducted by teacher-researchers. However, it was unclear whether teachers, who have neither been involved with the research nor received intensive tutoring, could replicate the positive results in ordinary school settings. To address this question, we present an empirical study conducted in 10 Finnish upper secondary schools with students (n = 261, aged 16) taking their mandatory physics course. The study design involved three groups: the heavy ID group (the TLS with seven to eight exercises on IDs), the light ID group (two to three exercises on IDs) and the no ID group (no exercises on IDs). The heavy and light ID groups answered eight ID questions, and all the students answered four questions on N3 law after teaching the force concept. The findings clearly suggest that systematic use of the IDs in teaching the force concept significantly fostered students' understanding of N3 law even with teachers who have no intensive tutoring or research background.

  5. Questions of Representations in Architecture

    2015-01-01

    Questions of Representations in Architecture is the first major Danish contribution to the current international discussion on architects' use of representations and the significance of visual media for architecture.......Questions of Representations in Architecture is the first major Danish contribution to the current international discussion on architects' use of representations and the significance of visual media for architecture....

  6. Color image quality assessment with biologically inspired feature and machine learning

    Deng, Cheng; Tao, Dacheng

    2010-07-01

    In this paper, we present a new no-reference quality assessment metric for color images by using biologically inspired features (BIFs) and machine learning. In this metric, we first adopt a biologically inspired model to mimic the visual cortex and represent a color image based on BIFs which unifies color units, intensity units and C1 units. Then, in order to reduce the complexity and benefit the classification, the high dimensional features are projected to a low dimensional representation with manifold learning. Finally, a multiclass classification process is performed on this new low dimensional representation of the image and the quality assessment is based on the learned classification result in order to respect the one of the human observers. Instead of computing a final note, our method classifies the quality according to the quality scale recommended by the ITU. The preliminary results show that the developed metric can achieve good quality evaluation performance.

  7. Endogenous Biologically Inspired Art of Complex Systems.

    Ji, Haru; Wakefield, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Since 2007, Graham Wakefield and Haru Ji have looked to nature for inspiration as they have created a series of "artificial natures," or interactive visualizations of biologically inspired complex systems that can evoke nature-like aesthetic experiences within mixed-reality art installations. This article describes how they have applied visualization, sonification, and interaction design in their work with artificial ecosystems and organisms using specific examples from their exhibited installations. PMID:26780760

  8. Visual perception from the perspective of a representational, non-reductionistic, level-dependent account of perception and conscious awareness

    Overgaard, Morten; Mogensen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    that mental representations consist of functions at several different levels of analysis, including truly localized perceptual elementary functions and perceptual algorithmic modules, which are interconnections of the elementary functions. We suggest that conscious content relates to the 'top level' of...

  9. On the self-organization of a hierarchical memory for compositional object representation in the visual cortex

    Jitsev, Evgueni

    2011-01-01

    At present, there is a huge lag between the artificial and the biological information processing systems in terms of their capability to learn. This lag could be certainly reduced by gaining more insight into the higher functions of the brain like learning and memory. For instance, primate visual cortex is thought to provide the long-term memory for the visual objects acquired by experience. The visual cortex handles effortlessly arbitrary complex objects by decomposing them rapidly into cons...

  10. Towards a visual social psychology of identity and representation: photographing the self, weaving the family in a multicultural British community

    Howarth, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    This comprehensive volume provides an unprecedented illustration of the potential for visual methods in psychology. Each chapter explores the set of theoretical, methodological, as well as ethical and analytical issues that shape the ways in which visual qualitative research is conducted in psychology. Using a variety of forms of visual data, including photography, documentary film-making, drawing, internet media, model making, walking and map drawing, video recording and collages, each autho...

  11. Sociocultural Knowledge and Visual Re(-)Presentations of Black Masculinity and Community: Reading "The Wire" for Critical Multicultural Teacher Education

    Brown, Keffrelyn D.; Kraehe, Amelia

    2011-01-01

    In this article we consider the implications of using popular visual media as a pedagogic tool for helping teachers acquire critical sociocultural knowledge to work more effectively with students of color, particularly Black males. Drawing from a textual analysis (McKee 2001, 2003; Rose 2001) conducted in the critical visual studies tradition…

  12. Sociocultural Knowledge and Visual Re(-)Presentations of Black Masculinity and Community: Reading "The Wire" for Critical Multicultural Teacher Education

    Brown, Keffrelyn D.; Kraehe, Amelia

    2011-01-01

    In this article we consider the implications of using popular visual media as a pedagogic tool for helping teachers acquire critical sociocultural knowledge to work more effectively with students of color, particularly Black males. Drawing from a textual analysis (McKee 2001, 2003; Rose 2001) conducted in the critical visual studies tradition…

  13. The crime scene of representation - A case study of the visual identity of the exhibition Rauma Biennale Balticum 2014

    Kokkonen, Laura

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis, I have researched the visual identity of the exhibition Rauma Biennale Balticum 2014 – Crime Scene that I co-curated with Henna Paunu and Janne Koski. The exhibition at Rauma Art Museum presented fifteen contemporary art projects that addressed issues of crime and punishment; activism; ethics; and social justice. In my research I have analyzed two images which were part of the exhibition’s visual identity, designed by Kasino Creative Studio. They presented the face of a young ...

  14. A new computer program for topological, visual analysis of 3D particle configurations based on visual representation of radial distribution function peaks as bonds

    Metere, Alfredo; Dzugutov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    We present a new program able to perform unique visual analysis on generic particle systems: PASYVAT (PArticle SYstem Visual Analysis Tool). More specifically, it can perform a selection of multiple interparticle distance ranges from a radial distribution function (RDF) plot and display them in 3D as bonds. This software can be used with any data set representing a system of particles in 3D. In this manuscript the reader will find a description of the program and its internal structure, with emphasis on its applicability in the study of certain particle configurations, obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulation in condensed matter physics.

  15. Deep generative learning of location-invariant visual word recognition

    Maria GraziaDi Bono; MarcoZorzi

    2013-01-01

    It is widely believed that orthographic processing implies an approximate, flexible coding of letter position, as shown by relative-position and transposition priming effects in visual word recognition. These findings have inspired alternative proposals about the representation of letter position, ranging from noisy coding across the ordinal positions to relative position coding based on open bigrams. This debate can be cast within the broader problem of learning location-invariant representa...

  16. Visual perception from the perspective of a representational, non-reductionistic, level-dependent account of perception and conscious awareness

    Overgaard, Morten; Mogensen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a new model to interpret seemingly conflicting evidence concerning the correlation of consciousness and neural processes. Based on an analysis of research of blindsight and subliminal perception, the reorganization of elementary functions and consciousness framework suggests...... that mental representations consist of functions at several different levels of analysis, including truly localized perceptual elementary functions and perceptual algorithmic modules, which are interconnections of the elementary functions. We suggest that conscious content relates to the ‘top level’ of...... analysis in a ‘situational algorithmic strategy’ that reflects the general state of an individual. We argue that conscious experience is intrinsically related to representations that are available to guide behaviour. From this perspective, we find that blindsight and subliminal perception can be explained...

  17. Celebrated, Dispossessed and Worshiped. Representations of the Tragic Destiny of the Hero in Contemporary Caribbean Visual Imaginary

    Garrido Castellano, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    The present paper focuses on analyzing the images of violence through the representation of heroes associated to combat contexts. Specifically, we will examine those cases in which that hero, despite its champion condition, appears defeated, overcome by the context. The reflections of artists such as Marcos Lora Read (Dominican Republic), Javier Castro (Cuba) and Ebony Patterson (Jamaica), by using various artistic mediums, have used the image of the hero to deconstruct elements of their soci...

  18. Impact of stride-coupled gaze shifts of walking blowflies on the neuronal representation of visual targets

    Daniel Kress

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During locomotion animals rely heavily on visual cues gained from the environment to guide their behavior. Examples are basic behaviors like collision avoidance or the approach to a goal. The saccadic gaze strategy of flying flies, which separates translational from rotational phases of locomotion, has been suggested to facilitate the extraction of environmental information, because only image flow evoked by translational self-motion contains relevant distance information about the surrounding world. In contrast to the translational phases of flight during which gaze direction is kept largely constant, walking flies experience continuous rotational image flow that is coupled to their stride-cycle. The consequences of these self-produced image shifts for the extraction of environmental information are still unclear. To assess the impact of stride-coupled image shifts on visual information processing, we performed electrophysiological recordings from the HSE cell, a motion sensitive wide-field neuron in the blowfly visual system. This cell has been concluded to play a key role in mediating optomotor behavior, self-motion estimation and spatial information processing. We used visual stimuli that were based on the visual input experienced by walking blowflies while approaching a black vertical bar. The response of HSE to these stimuli was dominated by periodic membrane potential fluctuations evoked by stride-coupled image shifts. Nevertheless, during the approach the cell’s response contained information about the bar and its background. The response components evoked by the bar were larger than the responses to its background, especially during the last phase of the approach. However, as revealed by targeted modifications of the visual input during walking, the extraction of distance information on the basis of HSE responses is much impaired by stride-coupled retinal image shifts. Possible mechanisms that may cope with these stride-coupled responses are discussed.

  19. Celebrated, Dispossessed and Worshiped. Representations of the Tragic Destiny of the Hero in Contemporary Caribbean Visual Imaginary

    Garrido Castellano, Carlos

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper focuses on analyzing the images of violence through the representation of heroes associated to combat contexts. Specifically, we will examine those cases in which that hero, despite its champion condition, appears defeated, overcome by the context. The reflections of artists such as Marcos Lora Read (Dominican Republic, Javier Castro (Cuba and Ebony Patterson (Jamaica, by using various artistic mediums, have used the image of the hero to deconstruct elements of their societies, offering a discourse able to produce subversive values from the heroic tragedy.

  20. Representations of modality-specific affective processing for visual and auditory stimuli derived from functional magnetic resonance imaging data.

    Shinkareva, Svetlana V; Wang, Jing; Kim, Jongwan; Facciani, Matthew J; Baucom, Laura B; Wedell, Douglas H

    2014-07-01

    There is converging evidence that people rapidly and automatically encode affective dimensions of objects, events, and environments that they encounter in the normal course of their daily routines. An important research question is whether affective representations differ with sensory modality. This research examined the nature of the dependency of affect and sensory modality at a whole-brain level of analysis in an incidental affective processing paradigm. Participants were presented with picture and sound stimuli that differed in positive or negative valence in an event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging experiment. Global statistical tests, applied at a level of the individual, demonstrated significant sensitivity to valence within modality, but not valence across modalities. Modality-general and modality-specific valence hypotheses predict distinctly different multidimensional patterns of the stimulus conditions. Examination of lower dimensional representation of the data demonstrated separable dimensions for valence processing within each modality. These results provide support for modality-specific valence processing in an incidental affective processing paradigm at a whole-brain level of analysis. Future research should further investigate how stimulus-specific emotional decoding may be mediated by the physical properties of the stimuli. PMID:24302696

  1. Sparse Representations-Based Super-Resolution of Key-Frames Extracted from Frames-Sequences Generated by a Visual Sensor Network

    Muhammad Sajjad

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Visual sensor networks (VSNs usually generate a low-resolution (LR frame-sequence due to energy and processing constraints. These LR-frames are not very appropriate for use in certain surveillance applications. It is very important to enhance the resolution of the captured LR-frames using resolution enhancement schemes. In this paper, an effective framework for a super-resolution (SR scheme is proposed that enhances the resolution of LR key-frames extracted from frame-sequences captured by visual-sensors. In a VSN, a visual processing hub (VPH collects a huge amount of visual data from camera sensors. In the proposed framework, at the VPH, key-frames are extracted using our recent key-frame extraction technique and are streamed to the base station (BS after compression. A novel effective SR scheme is applied at BS to produce a high-resolution (HR output from the received key-frames. The proposed SR scheme uses optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (OOMP for sparse-representation recovery in SR. OOMP does better in terms of detecting true sparsity than orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP. This property of the OOMP helps produce a HR image which is closer to the original image. The K-SVD dictionary learning procedure is incorporated for dictionary learning. Batch-OMP improves the dictionary learning process by removing the limitation in handling a large set of observed signals. Experimental results validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme and show its superiority over other state-of-the-art schemes.

  2. Sparse representations-based super-resolution of key-frames extracted from frames-sequences generated by a visual sensor network.

    Sajjad, Muhammad; Mehmood, Irfan; Baik, Sung Wook

    2014-01-01

    Visual sensor networks (VSNs) usually generate a low-resolution (LR) frame-sequence due to energy and processing constraints. These LR-frames are not very appropriate for use in certain surveillance applications. It is very important to enhance the resolution of the captured LR-frames using resolution enhancement schemes. In this paper, an effective framework for a super-resolution (SR) scheme is proposed that enhances the resolution of LR key-frames extracted from frame-sequences captured by visual-sensors. In a VSN, a visual processing hub (VPH) collects a huge amount of visual data from camera sensors. In the proposed framework, at the VPH, key-frames are extracted using our recent key-frame extraction technique and are streamed to the base station (BS) after compression. A novel effective SR scheme is applied at BS to produce a high-resolution (HR) output from the received key-frames. The proposed SR scheme uses optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (OOMP) for sparse-representation recovery in SR. OOMP does better in terms of detecting true sparsity than orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP). This property of the OOMP helps produce a HR image which is closer to the original image. The K-SVD dictionary learning procedure is incorporated for dictionary learning. Batch-OMP improves the dictionary learning process by removing the limitation in handling a large set of observed signals. Experimental results validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme and show its superiority over other state-of-the-art schemes. PMID:24566632

  3. Does using a visual-representation tool foster students ability to identify forces and construct free-body diagrams?

    Savinainen, Antti; Mäkynen, Asko; Nieminen, Pasi; Viiri, Jouni

    2013-01-01

    Earlier research has shown that after physics instruction, many students have difficulties with the force concept, and with constructing free-body diagrams (FBDs). It has been suggested that treating forces as interactions could help students to identify forces as well as to construct the correct FBDs. While there is evidence that identifying interactions helps students in quantitative problem solving, there is no previous research investigating the effect of a visual-representati...

  4. Representational Inquiry Competences in Science Games

    Magnussen, Rikke

    includes studies of how students construct visual representations of the cases they investigate and how they use these representations to establish hypotheses and evidence. The term ‘Representational Inquiry Competences' is developed; it refers to the students' ability to construct, productively use......, transform and criticize visual representations as an integrated part of conducting an inquiry in the science game...

  5. The Inspirational Leader

    Benigni, Mark D.; Hughes, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Amid the focus on improved standardized test scores, differentiated instruction, value-added initiatives and improved teacher evaluation, one must not ignore an education leader's need to inspire and be inspired. But how do education leaders inspire their students and teachers during some of the most difficult economic times the nation has ever…

  6. Effect of 1% Inspired CO2 During Head-Down Tilt on Ocular Structures, Cerebral Blood Flow, and Visual Acuity in Healthy Human Subjects

    Laurie, S. S.; Hu, X.; Lee, S. M. C.; Martin, D. S.; Phillips, T. R.; Ploutz-Snyder, R.; Smith, S. M.; Stenger, M. B.; Taibbi, G.; Zwart, S. R.; Vizzeri, G.

    2016-01-01

    The cephalad fluid shift induced by microgravity has been hypothesized to elevate intracranial pressure (ICP) and contribute to the development of the visual impairment/intracranial pressure (VIIP) syndrome experienced by many astronauts during and after long-duration space flight. In addition, elevated ambient partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) on the International Space Station (ISS) has also been hypothesized to contribute to the development of VIIP. We seek to determine if an acute, mild CO2 exposure, similar to that occurring on the ISS, combined with the cephalad fluid shift induced by head-down tilt will induce ophthalmic and ICP changes consistent with the VIIP syndrome.

  7. Virtual visual reminiscing pain stimulation of allodynia patients activates cortical representation of pain and emotions. fMRI study

    It is widely known that sensation of the pain is derived from sensory-discriminative factor and emotional factor. Especially in chronic pain, emotional factors and psychosocial backgrounds are more likely to contribute for the patients' discomfort. The aim of this study is to investigate how emotional factor of pain participates in intractable pain. We employed functional MRI (fMRI) to compare the brain activations occurring in the orthopaedic neuropathic pain patients with allodynia and normal individuals in response to the visual virtual painful experience. During fMRI scanning, a video demonstrating an actual tactile stimulation of the palm and its imitation were shown to participants. In contrast to normal individuals, allodynia patients also displayed activation of the areas reflecting emotions: frontal lobe and anterior cingulate. These findings suggest that brain have important role in the development and maintaining of peripheral originated chronic painful condition. (author)

  8. Visualizing Summary Statistics and Uncertainty

    Potter, K.

    2010-08-12

    The graphical depiction of uncertainty information is emerging as a problem of great importance. Scientific data sets are not considered complete without indications of error, accuracy, or levels of confidence. The visual portrayal of this information is a challenging task. This work takes inspiration from graphical data analysis to create visual representations that show not only the data value, but also important characteristics of the data including uncertainty. The canonical box plot is reexamined and a new hybrid summary plot is presented that incorporates a collection of descriptive statistics to highlight salient features of the data. Additionally, we present an extension of the summary plot to two dimensional distributions. Finally, a use-case of these new plots is presented, demonstrating their ability to present high-level overviews as well as detailed insight into the salient features of the underlying data distribution. © 2010 The Eurographics Association and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Bioarchitecture - Inspirations From Nature

    eryıldız, semih halil; MEZINI, Ledita

    2012-01-01

    Engineers, architects, and artists often refer to nature as a basis. Many engineers find their structural inspiration from plant life, in a spider’s web, a piece of coral, a beehive, or in the structural development of animals. Bioarchitecture is a particular moment in which architecture, engineering, and art converge as they are using the same inspirations. By taking a look around, designers can find inspiration everywhere – particularly in nature. Nature provides us with an amaz...

  10. Eesti õpetaja pälvis Inspiration Software'i stipendiumi / Ave Lauringson

    Lauringson, Ave

    2007-01-01

    USA tarkvarafirma Inspiration Software tegi teatavaks 30 õpetaja nimed üle maailma, kes saavad 2007. aasta haridusstipendiumi (Inspired Teacher Scholarships for Visual Learning). Nende seas on ka Lasnamäe Lasteaia-Algkooli õpetaja, Tiigrihüppe SA ekspert ja koolitaja ning Tiigri Tegija 2007 auhinnasaaja Ingrid Maadvere

  11. Context Effects and Inter-Representation Activation: An Experimental Study

    Wachelke, J.

    2012-01-01

    The paper concerns the study of structural relations among social representations. Departing from the assumption that social representations are interconnected forming representational systems, the research aim was to verify if context salience of a cognem from one social representation is associated with a higher activation rate of a cognem from another representation within the same representational system. The rationale is inspired by Moliner’s studies about context effects, social images ...

  12. Translation-Invariant Representation for Cumulative Foot Pressure Images

    Zheng, Shuai; Tan, Tieniu

    2010-01-01

    Human can be distinguished by different limb movements and unique ground reaction force. Cumulative foot pressure image is a 2-D cumulative ground reaction force during one gait cycle. Although it contains pressure spatial distribution information and pressure temporal distribution information, it suffers from several problems including different shoes and noise, when putting it into practice as a new biometric for pedestrian identification. In this paper, we propose a hierarchical translation-invariant representation for cumulative foot pressure images, inspired by the success of Convolutional deep belief network for digital classification. Key contribution in our approach is discriminative hierarchical sparse coding scheme which helps to learn useful discriminative high-level visual features. Based on the feature representation of cumulative foot pressure images, we develop a pedestrian recognition system which is invariant to three different shoes and slight local shape change. Experiments are conducted on...

  13. Clay Bells: Edo Inspiration

    Wagner, Tom

    2010-01-01

    The ceremonial copper and iron bells at the Smithsonian's National Museum of African Art were the author's inspiration for an interdisciplinary unit with a focus on the contributions various cultures make toward the richness of a community. The author of this article describes an Edo bell-inspired ceramic project incorporating slab-building…

  14. Inspiration from britain?

    Vagnby, Bo

    2008-01-01

    Danish housing policy needs a dose of renewed social concern - and could find new inspiration in Britain's housing and urban planning policies, says Bo Vagnby. Udgivelsesdato: November......Danish housing policy needs a dose of renewed social concern - and could find new inspiration in Britain's housing and urban planning policies, says Bo Vagnby. Udgivelsesdato: November...

  15. Bio-inspired vision

    Nature still outperforms the most powerful computers in routine functions involving perception, sensing and actuation like vision, audition, and motion control, and is, most strikingly, orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than its artificial competitors. The reasons for the superior performance of biological systems are subject to diverse investigations, but it is clear that the form of hardware and the style of computation in nervous systems are fundamentally different from what is used in artificial synchronous information processing systems. Very generally speaking, biological neural systems rely on a large number of relatively simple, slow and unreliable processing elements and obtain performance and robustness from a massively parallel principle of operation and a high level of redundancy where the failure of single elements usually does not induce any observable system performance degradation. In the late 1980's, Carver Mead demonstrated that silicon VLSI technology can be employed in implementing ''neuromorphic'' circuits that mimic neural functions and fabricating building blocks that work like their biological role models. Neuromorphic systems, as the biological systems they model, are adaptive, fault-tolerant and scalable, and process information using energy-efficient, asynchronous, event-driven methods. In this paper, some basics of neuromorphic electronic engineering and its impact on recent developments in optical sensing and artificial vision are presented. It is demonstrated that bio-inspired vision systems have the potential to outperform conventional, frame-based vision acquisition and processing systems in many application fields and to establish new benchmarks in terms of redundancy suppression/data compression, dynamic range, temporal resolution and power efficiency to realize advanced functionality like 3D vision, object tracking, motor control, visual feedback loops, etc. in real-time. It is argued that future artificial vision systems, if they are to succeed in demanding applications such as autonomous robot navigation, micro-manipulation or high-speed tracking, must exploit the power of the asynchronous, frame-free, biomimetic approach.

  16. Bio-inspired vision

    Posch, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nature still outperforms the most powerful computers in routine functions involving perception, sensing and actuation like vision, audition, and motion control, and is, most strikingly, orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than its artificial competitors. The reasons for the superior performance of biological systems are subject to diverse investigations, but it is clear that the form of hardware and the style of computation in nervous systems are fundamentally different from what is used in artificial synchronous information processing systems. Very generally speaking, biological neural systems rely on a large number of relatively simple, slow and unreliable processing elements and obtain performance and robustness from a massively parallel principle of operation and a high level of redundancy where the failure of single elements usually does not induce any observable system performance degradation. In the late 1980`s, Carver Mead demonstrated that silicon VLSI technology can be employed in implementing ``neuromorphic'' circuits that mimic neural functions and fabricating building blocks that work like their biological role models. Neuromorphic systems, as the biological systems they model, are adaptive, fault-tolerant and scalable, and process information using energy-efficient, asynchronous, event-driven methods. In this paper, some basics of neuromorphic electronic engineering and its impact on recent developments in optical sensing and artificial vision are presented. It is demonstrated that bio-inspired vision systems have the potential to outperform conventional, frame-based vision acquisition and processing systems in many application fields and to establish new benchmarks in terms of redundancy suppression/data compression, dynamic range, temporal resolution and power efficiency to realize advanced functionality like 3D vision, object tracking, motor control, visual feedback loops, etc. in real-time. It is argued that future artificial vision systems, if they are to succeed in demanding applications such as autonomous robot navigation, micro-manipulation or high-speed tracking, must exploit the power of the asynchronous, frame-free, biomimetic approach.

  17. A geometric representation of continued fractions

    Beardon, Alan F; Short, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Inspired by work of Ford, we describe a geometric representation of real and complex continued fractions by chains of horocycles and horospheres in hyperbolic space. We explore this representation using the isometric action of the group of Moebius transformations on hyperbolic space, and prove a classical theorem on continued fractions.

  18. Integrating visual information across camera movements with a visual-motor calibration map

    Prokopowicz, P.N. [Univ. of Chicago, IL (United States); Cooper, P.R. [Northwestern Univ., Evanston, IL (United States)

    1996-12-31

    Facing the competing demands for wider field of view and higher spatial resolution, computer vision will evolve toward greater use of foveal sensors and frequent camera movements. Integration of visual information across movements becomes a fundamental problem. We show that integration is possible using a biologically-inspired representation we call the visual-motor calibration map. The map is a memory-based model of the relationship between camera movements and corresponding pixel locations before and after any movement. The map constitutes a self-calibration that can compensate for non-uniform sampling, lens distortion, mechanical misalignments, and arbitrary pixel reordering. Integration takes place entirely in a retinotopic frame, using a short-term, predictive visual memory.

  19. Physicists get INSPIREd

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Particle physicists thrive on information. They first create information by performing experiments or elaborating theoretical conjectures and then they share it through publications and various web tools. The INSPIRE service, just released, will bring state of the art information retrieval to the fingertips of researchers.   Keeping track of the information shared within the particle physics community has long been the task of libraries at the larger labs, such as CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, as well as the focus of indispensible services like arXiv and those of the Particle Data Group. In 2007, many providers of information in the field came together for a summit at SLAC to see how physics information resources could be enhanced, and the INSPIRE project emerged from that meeting. The vision behind INSPIRE was built by a survey launched by the four labs to evaluate the real needs of the community. INSPIRE responds to these directives from the community by combining the most successful aspe...

  20. Fear Selectively Modulates Visual Mental Imagery and Visual Perception

    Kosslyn, Stephen Michael; Borst, Grégoire

    2010-01-01

    Emotions have been shown to modulate low-level visual processing of simple stimuli. In this study, we investigate whether emotions only modulate processing of visual representations created from direct visual inputs or whether they also modulate representations that underlie visual mental images. Our results demonstrate that when participants visualize or look at the global shape of written words (low-spatial-frequency visual information), the prior brief presentation of fearful faces enhance...

  1. Digital models for architectonical representation

    Stefano Brusaporci

    2011-01-01

    Digital instruments and technologies enrich architectonical representation and communication opportunities. Computer graphics is organized according the two phases of visualization and construction, that is modeling and rendering, structuring dichotomy of software technologies. Visualization modalities give different kinds of representations of the same 3D model and instruments produce a separation between drawing and image’s creation. Reverse modeling can be related to a synthesis process, ‘...

  2. Ndebele Inspired Houses

    Rice, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    The house paintings of the South African Ndebele people are more than just an attempt to improve the aesthetics of a community; they are a source of identity and significance for Ndebele women. In this article, the author describes an art project wherein students use the tradition of Ndebele house painting as inspiration for creating their own…

  3. Inspirations in medical genetics.

    Asadollahi, Reza

    2016-02-01

    There are abundant instances in the history of genetics and medical genetics to illustrate how curiosity, charisma of mentors, nature, art, the saving of lives and many other matters have inspired great discoveries. These achievements from deciphering genetic concepts to characterizing genetic disorders have been crucial for management of the patients. There remains, however, a long pathway ahead. PMID:24658215

  4. An eye for inspiration

    2009-11-01

    The discovery that the eye of a particular mantis shrimp has an achromatic quarter-waveplate that is superior to modern-day devices could be a source of inspiration to those designing optical components. Nature Photonics spoke to Nicholas Roberts, one of the researchers involved in the study.

  5. Laptops and Inspired Writing

    Warschauer, Mark; Arada, Kathleen; Zheng, Binbin

    2010-01-01

    Can daily access to laptop computers help students become better writers? Are such programs affordable? Evidence from the Inspired Writing program in Littleton Public Schools, Colorado, USA, provides a resounding yes to both questions. The program employs student netbooks, open-source software, cloud computing, and social media to help students in…

  6. Interaction for visualization

    Tominski, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Visualization has become a valuable means for data exploration and analysis. Interactive visualization combines expressive graphical representations and effective user interaction. Although interaction is an important component of visualization approaches, much of the visualization literature tends to pay more attention to the graphical representation than to interaction.The goal of this work is to strengthen the interaction side of visualization. Based on a brief review of general aspects of interaction, we develop an interaction-oriented view on visualization. This view comprises five key as

  7. Visually Exploring Transportation Schedules.

    Palomo, Cesar; Guo, Zhan; Silva, Cláudio T; Freire, Juliana

    2016-01-01

    Public transportation schedules are designed by agencies to optimize service quality under multiple constraints. However, real service usually deviates from the plan. Therefore, transportation analysts need to identify, compare and explain both eventual and systemic performance issues that must be addressed so that better timetables can be created. The purely statistical tools commonly used by analysts pose many difficulties due to the large number of attributes at trip- and station-level for planned and real service. Also challenging is the need for models at multiple scales to search for patterns at different times and stations, since analysts do not know exactly where or when relevant patterns might emerge and need to compute statistical summaries for multiple attributes at different granularities. To aid in this analysis, we worked in close collaboration with a transportation expert to design TR-EX, a visual exploration tool developed to identify, inspect and compare spatio-temporal patterns for planned and real transportation service. TR-EX combines two new visual encodings inspired by Marey's Train Schedule: Trips Explorer for trip-level analysis of frequency, deviation and speed; and Stops Explorer for station-level study of delay, wait time, reliability and performance deficiencies such as bunching. To tackle overplotting and to provide a robust representation for a large numbers of trips and stops at multiple scales, the system supports variable kernel bandwidths to achieve the level of detail required by users for different tasks. We justify our design decisions based on specific analysis needs of transportation analysts. We provide anecdotal evidence of the efficacy of TR-EX through a series of case studies that explore NYC subway service, which illustrate how TR-EX can be used to confirm hypotheses and derive new insights through visual exploration. PMID:26529697

  8. Mussel-Inspired Materials

    Krogsgaard, Marie; Nue, Vicki; Birkedal, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Improved understanding of the underwater attachment strategy of the blue mussels and other marine organisms has inspired researchers to find new routes to advanced materials. Mussels use polyphenols, such as the catechol-containing amino acid 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), to attach to surfaces....... Catechols and their analogues can undergo both oxidative covalent cross-linking under alkaline conditions and take part in coordination chemistry. The former has resulted in the widespread use of polydopamine and related materials. The latter is emerging as a tool to make self-healing materials due to the...... reversible nature of coordination bonds. We review how mussel-inspired materials have been made with a focus on the less developed use of metal coordination and illustrate how this chemistry can be widely to make self-healing materials....

  9. A biologically inspired controller

    Carneal, James P; Fuller, Chris R.

    1995-01-01

    A biologically inspired control approach for reducing vibrations in distributed elastic systems has been derived and experimentally verified for narrow-band excitation. The control paradigm approximates natural biological systems for initiating movement, in that a low number of signals are sent from an advanced, centralized controller (analogous to the motor cortex of the brain) and are then distributed by local simple rules to multiple control actuators (analogous to muscle fiber). Both theo...

  10. Inspiral into Gargantua

    Gralla, Samuel E; Warburton, Niels

    2016-01-01

    We model the inspiral of a compact object into a more massive black hole rotating very near the theoretical maximum. We find that once the body enters the near-horizon regime the gravitational radiation is characterized by a constant frequency, equal to (twice) the horizon frequency, with an exponentially damped profile. This contrasts with the usual "chirping" behavior and, if detected, would constitute a "smoking gun" for a near-extremal black hole in nature.

  11. Biologically inspired intelligent robots

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Breazeal, Cynthia

    2003-07-01

    Humans throughout history have always sought to mimic the appearance, mobility, functionality, intelligent operation, and thinking process of biological creatures. This field of biologically inspired technology, having the moniker biomimetics, has evolved from making static copies of human and animals in the form of statues to the emergence of robots that operate with realistic behavior. Imagine a person walking towards you where suddenly you notice something weird about him--he is not real but rather he is a robot. Your reaction would probably be "I can't believe it but this robot looks very real" just as you would react to an artificial flower that is a good imitation. You may even proceed and touch the robot to check if your assessment is correct but, as oppose to the flower case, the robot may be programmed to respond physical and verbally. This science fiction scenario could become a reality as the current trend continues in developing biologically inspired technologies. Technology evolution led to such fields as artificial muscles, artificial intelligence, and artificial vision as well as biomimetic capabilities in materials science, mechanics, electronics, computing science, information technology and many others. This paper will review the state of the art and challenges to biologically-inspired technologies and the role that EAP is expected to play as the technology evolves.

  12. Inspiring a generation

    2012-01-01

    The motto of the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games is ‘Inspire a generation’ so it was particularly pleasing to see science, the LHC and Higgs bosons featuring so strongly in the opening ceremony of the Paralympics last week.   It’s a sign of just how far our field has come that such a high-profile event featured particle physics so strongly, and we can certainly add our support to that motto. If the legacy of London 2012 is a generation inspired by science as well as sport, then the games will have more than fulfilled their mission. Particle physics has truly inspiring stories to tell, going well beyond Higgs and the LHC, and the entire community has played its part in bringing the excitement of frontier research in particle physics to a wide audience. Nevertheless, we cannot rest on our laurels: maintaining the kind of enthusiasm for science we witnessed at the Paralympic opening ceremony will require constant vigilance, and creative thinking about ways to rea...

  13. Quantum-Inspired Maximizer

    Zak, Michail

    2008-01-01

    A report discusses an algorithm for a new kind of dynamics based on a quantum- classical hybrid-quantum-inspired maximizer. The model is represented by a modified Madelung equation in which the quantum potential is replaced by different, specially chosen 'computational' potential. As a result, the dynamics attains both quantum and classical properties: it preserves superposition and entanglement of random solutions, while allowing one to measure its state variables, using classical methods. Such optimal combination of characteristics is a perfect match for quantum-inspired computing. As an application, an algorithm for global maximum of an arbitrary integrable function is proposed. The idea of the proposed algorithm is very simple: based upon the Quantum-inspired Maximizer (QIM), introduce a positive function to be maximized as the probability density to which the solution is attracted. Then the larger value of this function will have the higher probability to appear. Special attention is paid to simulation of integer programming and NP-complete problems. It is demonstrated that the problem of global maximum of an integrable function can be found in polynomial time by using the proposed quantum- classical hybrid. The result is extended to a constrained maximum with applications to integer programming and TSP (Traveling Salesman Problem).

  14. Visualizing structures of speech expressiveness

    Herbelin, Bruno; Jensen, Karl Kristoffer; Graugaard, Lars

    vowels and consonants, and which converts the speech energy into visual particles that form complex visual structures, provides us with a mean to present the expressiveness of speech into a visual mode. This system is presented in an artwork whose scenario is inspired from the reasons of language. The...

  15. Point cloud representation.

    Linsen, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Reconstructing a surface out of a three-dimensional set of points, which is obtained by sampling an object's boundary, is done by generating an arbitrary triangular mesh. Our approach is to obviate the computation of such a mesh connectivity and to represent the object's surface only by the point cloud. We discuss how such a point cloud representation can be visualized and present processing steps like coarsifying and smoothing, which are important for dealing with the ...

  16. Numerical representations in primates.

    Hauser, M D; MacNeilage, P; M. Ware

    1996-01-01

    Research has demonstrated that human infants and nonhuman primates have a rudimentary numerical system that enables them to count objects or events. More recently, however, studies using a preferential looking paradigm have suggested that preverbal human infants are capable of simple arithmetical operations, such as adding and subtracting a small number of visually presented objects. These findings implicate a relatively sophisticated representational system in the absence of language. To exp...

  17. An active system for visually-guided reaching in 3D across binocular fixations.

    Martinez-Martin, Ester; del Pobil, Angel P; Chessa, Manuela; Solari, Fabio; Sabatini, Silvio P

    2014-01-01

    Based on the importance of relative disparity between objects for accurate hand-eye coordination, this paper presents a biological approach inspired by the cortical neural architecture. So, the motor information is coded in egocentric coordinates obtained from the allocentric representation of the space (in terms of disparity) generated from the egocentric representation of the visual information (image coordinates). In that way, the different aspects of the visuomotor coordination are integrated: an active vision system, composed of two vergent cameras; a module for the 2D binocular disparity estimation based on a local estimation of phase differences performed through a bank of Gabor filters; and a robotic actuator to perform the corresponding tasks (visually-guided reaching). The approach's performance is evaluated through experiments on both simulated and real data. PMID:24672295

  18. When science inspires art

    Anaïs Vernède

    2011-01-01

    On Tuesday 18 January 2011, artist Pipilotti Rist came to CERN to find out how science could provide her with a source of inspiration for her art and perhaps to get ideas for future work. Pipilotti, who is an eclectic artist always on the lookout for an original source of inspiration, is almost as passionate about physics as she is about art.   Ever Is Over All, 1997, audio video installation by Pipilotti Rist.  View of the installation at the National Museum for Foreign Art, Sofia, Bulgaria. © Pipilotti Rist. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Angel Tzvetanov. Swiss video-maker Pipilotti Rist (her real name is Elisabeth Charlotte Rist), who is well-known in the international art world for her highly colourful videos and creations, visited CERN for the first time on Tuesday 18 January 2011.  Her visit represented a trip down memory lane, since she originally studied physics before becoming interested in pursuing a career as an artist and going on to de...

  19. Poetic representation

    Wulf-Andersen, Trine Østergaard

    2012-01-01

    be written up and disseminated. The article takes a methodological focus, considering general aims and methods of the research project, before turning to the elaboration on how poetic representations have been constructed and employed as a vehicle for certain kinds of participation, representation......, and dialogue, of situated participants. The article includes a lengthy example of a poetic representation of one participant’s story, and the author comments on the potentials of ‘doing’ poetic representations as an example of writing in ways that challenges what sometimes goes unasked in...... participative social work research. The article moves to ‘trouble’ understandings of participative research as egalitarian and consensus-driven, and proposes a focus on the tensions and positioning of knowledge production....

  20. Icon of the Holy Mandylion and representation of multi-layered visual identity of Božidar Vuković

    Borozan Igor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available It was in the monastery of Saint Francis in Venice in the year 1520 when Božidar Vuković purchased the icon of the Holy Mandylion. By that particular acquisition, this prominent publisher originating from Zeta has visualized his new position in the sixteenth century Venice. The multi-layered identity of Božidar Vuković was manifested by the subsequent inclusion of the noble coat of arms of the House of Vuković on the back of the icon. By the use of verbal and visual language the artificial initiation of Božidar Vuković within the distinguished members of Venetian society has been confirmed. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 177001: Predstave identiteta u verbalno-vizuelnoj kulturi novog doba

  1. Value Representations

    Rasmussen, Majken Kirkegaard; Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2011-01-01

    the perspective brings valuable insights on different approaches to technology, but instead to view gender through a value lens. Contributing to this perspective, we have developed Value Representations as a design-oriented instrument for staging a reflective dialogue with users. Value Representations...... are fictional, value-driven concepts developed to promote dialogue with users about their values and how they may materialize with respect to interaction design in their everyday lives....

  2. Poetic representation

    Wulf-Andersen, Trine Østergaard

    2012-01-01

    , and dialogue, of situated participants. The article includes a lengthy example of a poetic representation of one participant’s story, and the author comments on the potentials of ‘doing’ poetic representations as an example of writing in ways that challenges what sometimes goes unasked in...... participative social work research. The article moves to ‘trouble’ understandings of participative research as egalitarian and consensus-driven, and proposes a focus on the tensions and positioning of knowledge production....

  3. Biologically Inspired Organic Light-Emitting Diodes.

    Kim, Jae-Jun; Lee, Jaeho; Yang, Sung-Pyo; Kim, Ha Gon; Kweon, Hee-Seok; Yoo, Seunghyup; Jeong, Ki-Hun

    2016-05-11

    Many animal species employ highly conspicuous traits as courtship signals for successful mating. Fireflies utilize their bioluminescent light as visual courtship signals. In addition to efficient bioluminescent light emission, the structural components of the firefly lantern also contribute to the enhancement of conspicuous optical signaling. Recently, these firefly lantern ultrastructures have attracted much interest and inspired highly efficient light management approaches. Here we report on the unique optical function of the hierarchical ultrastructures found in a firefly (Pyrocoelia rufa) and their biological inspiration of highly efficient organic light-emitting diode (OLED) applications. The hierarchical structures are comprised of longitudinal nanostructures and asymmetric microstructures, which were successfully replicated using geometry-guided resist reflow, replica molding, and polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) oxidation. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the bioinspired OLEDs was enhanced by up to 61%. The bioinspired OLEDs clearly showed side-enhanced super-Lambertian emission with a wide-viewing angle. The highly efficient light extraction and wide-angle illumination suggest how the hierarchical structures likely improve the recognition of firefly optical courtship signals over a wide-angle range. At the same time, the biologically inspired designs provide a new paradigm for designing functional optical surfaces for lighting or display applications. PMID:27014918

  4. Combining Bio-inspired Sensing with Bio-inspired Locomotion

    Shaikh, Danish; Hallam, John; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    In this paper we present a preliminary Braitenberg vehicle–like approach to combine bio-inspired audition with bio-inspired quadruped locomotion in simulation. Locomotion gaits of the salamander–like robot Salamandra robotica are modified by a lizard’s peripheral auditory system model that...

  5. Social representations, alternative representations and semantic barriers

    Gillespie, Alex

    2008-01-01

    Social representations research has tended to focus upon the representations that groups have in relation to some object. The present article elaborates the concept of social representations by pointing to the existence of “alternative representations” as sub-components within social representations. Alternative representations are the ideas and images the group has about how other groups represent the given object. Alternative representations are thus representations of other people's repres...

  6. Visual Semiotics & Uncertainty Visualization: An Empirical Study.

    MacEachren, A M; Roth, R E; O'Brien, J; Li, B; Swingley, D; Gahegan, M

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents two linked empirical studies focused on uncertainty visualization. The experiments are framed from two conceptual perspectives. First, a typology of uncertainty is used to delineate kinds of uncertainty matched with space, time, and attribute components of data. Second, concepts from visual semiotics are applied to characterize the kind of visual signification that is appropriate for representing those different categories of uncertainty. This framework guided the two experiments reported here. The first addresses representation intuitiveness, considering both visual variables and iconicity of representation. The second addresses relative performance of the most intuitive abstract and iconic representations of uncertainty on a map reading task. Combined results suggest initial guidelines for representing uncertainty and discussion focuses on practical applicability of results. PMID:26357158

  7. Cyclotomic Hecke algebras: Jucys-Murphy elements, representations, classical limit

    Ogievetsky, Oleg; Poulain D'Andecy, Loic

    2011-01-01

    An inductive approach to the representation theory of cyclotomic Hecke algebras, inspired by Okounkov and Vershik, is developed. We study the common spectrum of the Jucys-Murphy elements using representations of the simplest affine Hecke algebra. Representations are constructed with the help of a new associative algebra whose underlying vector space is the tensor product of the cyclotomic Hecke algebra with the free associative algebra generated by standard m-tableaux. The classical limit of th...

  8. A recurrent working memory architecture for emergent speech representation

    Mark Elshaw

    2009-01-01

    This research considers a recurrent self-organising map (RSOM) working memory architecture for emergent speech representation, which is inspired by evidence from human neuroscience studies. The main purpose of this research is to demonstrate that a neural architecture can develop meaningful self-organised representations of speech using phone-like structures. By using this representational approach it should be possible, in a similar fashion to infants, to improve the performance of automatic...

  9. Visuo-haptic multisensory object recognition, categorization, and representation

    SimonLacey

    2014-01-01

    Visual and haptic unisensory object processing show many similarities in terms of categorization, recognition, and representation. In this review, we discuss how these similarities contribute to multisensory object processing. In particular, we show that similar unisensory visual and haptic representations lead to a shared multisensory representation underlying both cross-modal object recognition and view-independence. This shared representation suggests a common neural substrate and we revie...

  10. Quiver representations

    Schiffler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    This book is intended to serve as a textbook for a course in Representation Theory of Algebras at the beginning graduate level. The text has two parts. In Part I, the theory is studied in an elementary way using quivers and their representations. This is a very hands-on approach and requires only basic knowledge of linear algebra. The main tool for describing the representation theory of a finite-dimensional algebra is its Auslander-Reiten quiver, and the text introduces these quivers as early as possible. Part II then uses the language of algebras and modules to build on the material developed before. The equivalence of the two approaches is proved in the text. The last chapter gives a proof of Gabriel’s Theorem. The language of category theory is developed along the way as needed.

  11. Representational Machines

    Petersson, Dag; Dahlgren, Anna; Vestberg, Nina Lager

    Photography not only represents space. Space is produced photographically. Since its inception in the 19th century, photography has brought to light a vast array of represented subjects. Always situated in some spatial order, photographic representations have been operatively underpinned by social...... the enterprises of the medium. This is the subject of Representational Machines: How photography enlists the workings of institutional technologies in search of establishing new iconic and social spaces. Together, the contributions to this edited volume span historical epochs, social environments......, technological possibilities, and genre distinctions. Presenting several distinct ways of producing space photographically, this book opens a new and important field of inquiry for photography research....

  12. Group representations

    Karpilovsky, G

    1994-01-01

    This third volume can be roughly divided into two parts. The first part is devoted to the investigation of various properties of projective characters. Special attention is drawn to spin representations and their character tables and to various correspondences for projective characters. Among other topics, projective Schur index and projective representations of abelian groups are covered. The last topic is investigated by introducing a symplectic geometry on finite abelian groups. The second part is devoted to Clifford theory for graded algebras and its application to the corresponding theory

  13. Visualization rhetoric: framing effects in narrative visualization.

    Hullman, Jessica; Diakopoulos, Nicholas

    2011-12-01

    Narrative visualizations combine conventions of communicative and exploratory information visualization to convey an intended story. We demonstrate visualization rhetoric as an analytical framework for understanding how design techniques that prioritize particular interpretations in visualizations that "tell a story" can significantly affect end-user interpretation. We draw a parallel between narrative visualization interpretation and evidence from framing studies in political messaging, decision-making, and literary studies. Devices for understanding the rhetorical nature of narrative information visualizations are presented, informed by the rigorous application of concepts from critical theory, semiotics, journalism, and political theory. We draw attention to how design tactics represent additions or omissions of information at various levels-the data, visual representation, textual annotations, and interactivity-and how visualizations denote and connote phenomena with reference to unstated viewing conventions and codes. Classes of rhetorical techniques identified via a systematic analysis of recent narrative visualizations are presented, and characterized according to their rhetorical contribution to the visualization. We describe how designers and researchers can benefit from the potentially positive aspects of visualization rhetoric in designing engaging, layered narrative visualizations and how our framework can shed light on how a visualization design prioritizes specific interpretations. We identify areas where future inquiry into visualization rhetoric can improve understanding of visualization interpretation. PMID:22034342

  14. Immuno-inspired robotic applications: a review

    Raza, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Artificial immune systems primarily mimic the adaptive nature of biological immune functions. Their ability to adapt to varying pathogens makes such systems a suitable choice for various robotic applications. Generally, AIS-based robotic applications map local instantaneous sensory information into either an antigen or a co-stimulatory signal, according to the choice of representation schema. Algorithms then use relevant immune functions to output either evolved antibodies or maturity of dendritic cells, in terms of actuation signals. It is observed that researchers, in an attempt to solve the problem in hand, do not try to replicate the biological immunity but select necessary immune functions instead, resulting in an ad-hoc manner these applications are reported. Authors, therefore, present a comprehensive review of immuno-inspired robotic applications in an attempt to categorize them according to underlying immune definitions. Implementation details are tabulated in terms of corresponding mathematical expr...

  15. Biologically inspired emotion recognition from speech

    Buscicchio Cosimo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Emotion recognition has become a fundamental task in human-computer interaction systems. In this article, we propose an emotion recognition approach based on biologically inspired methods. Specifically, emotion classification is performed using a long short-term memory (LSTM recurrent neural network which is able to recognize long-range dependencies between successive temporal patterns. We propose to represent data using features derived from two different models: mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC and the Lyon cochlear model. In the experimental phase, results obtained from the LSTM network and the two different feature sets are compared, showing that features derived from the Lyon cochlear model give better recognition results in comparison with those obtained with the traditional MFCC representation.

  16. Biologically inspired emotion recognition from speech

    Caponetti, Laura; Buscicchio, Cosimo Alessandro; Castellano, Giovanna

    2011-12-01

    Emotion recognition has become a fundamental task in human-computer interaction systems. In this article, we propose an emotion recognition approach based on biologically inspired methods. Specifically, emotion classification is performed using a long short-term memory (LSTM) recurrent neural network which is able to recognize long-range dependencies between successive temporal patterns. We propose to represent data using features derived from two different models: mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC) and the Lyon cochlear model. In the experimental phase, results obtained from the LSTM network and the two different feature sets are compared, showing that features derived from the Lyon cochlear model give better recognition results in comparison with those obtained with the traditional MFCC representation.

  17. Holography Inspired Stringy Hadrons

    Sonnenschein, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    Holography inspired stringy hadrons (HISH) is a set of models that describe hadrons: mesons, baryons and glueballs as strings in at four dimensional space time. The models are based on a \\map" from stringy hadrons of holographic confining backgrounds. In this note we review the "derivation" of the models. We start with a brief reminder of the passage from the AdS5xS5 string theory to certain flavored confining holographic models. We then describe the string configurations in holographic backgrounds that correspond to a Wilson line,a meson,a baryon and a glueball. The key ingredients of the four dimensional picture of hadrons are the \\string endpoint mass" and the "baryonic string vertex". We determine the classical trajectories of the HISH. We review the current understanding of the quantization of the hadronic strings. We end with a summary of the comparison of the outcome of the HISH models with the PDG data about mesons and baryons. We extract the values of the tension, masses and intercepts from best ?ts,...

  18. Microflyers: inspiration from nature

    Sirohi, Jayant

    2013-04-01

    Over the past decade, there has been considerable interest in miniaturizing aircraft to create a class of extremely small, robotic vehicles with a gross mass on the order of tens of grams and a dimension on the order of tens of centimeters. These are collectively refered to as micro aerial vehicles (MAVs) or microflyers. Because the size of microflyers is on the same order as that of small birds and large insects, engineers are turning to nature for inspiration. Bioinspired concepts make use of structural or aerodynamic mechanisms that are observed in insects and birds, such as elastic energy storage and unsteady aerodynamics. Biomimetic concepts attempt to replicate the form and function of natural flyers, such as flapping-wing propulsion and external appearance. This paper reviews recent developments in the area of man-made microflyers. The design space for microflyers will be described, along with fundamental physical limits to miniaturization. Key aerodynamic phenomena at the scale of microflyers will be highlighted. Because the focus is on bioinspiration and biomimetics, scaled-down versions of conventional aircraft, such as fixed wing micro air vehicles and microhelicopters will not be addressed. A few representative bioinspired and biomimetic microflyer concepts developed by researchers will be described in detail. Finally, some of the sensing mechanisms used by natural flyers that are being implemented in man-made microflyers will be discussed.

  19. Inspiration, anyone? (Editorial

    Lindsay Glynn

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available I have to admit that writing an editorial for this issue was a struggle. Trying to sit down and write when the sun was shining outside and most of my colleagues were on vacation was, to say the least, difficult. Add to that research projects and conferences…let’s just say that I found myself less than inspired. A pitiful plea for ideas to a colleague resulted in the reintroduction to a few recent evidence based papers and resources which inspired further searching and reading. Though I generally find myself surrounded (more like buried in research papers and EBLIP literature, somehow I had missed the great strides that have been made of late in the world of evidence based library and information practice. I realize now that I am inspired by the researchers, authors and innovators who are putting EBLIP on the proverbial map. My biggest beef with library literature in general has been the plethora of articles highlighting what we should be doing. Take a close look at the evidence based practitioners in the information professions: these are some of the people who are actively practicing what has been preached for the past few years. Take, for example, the about‐to‐be released Libraries using Evidence Toolkit by Northern Sydney Central Coast Health and The University of Newcastle, Australia (see their announcement in this issue. An impressive advisory group is responsible for maintaining the currency and relevancy of the site as well as promoting the site and acting as a steering committee for related projects. This group is certainly doing more than “talking the talk”: they took their experience at the 3rd International Evidence Based Librarianship Conference and did something with the information they obtained by implementing solutions that worked in their environment. The result? The creation of a collection of tools for all of us to use. This toolkit is just what EBLIP needs: a portal to resources aimed at supporting the information specialists who want to adopt the evidence based model of practice. I have already got it bookmarked and set up an RSS feed. Even before the official toolkit launch, a wealth of information is available on the website including presentations, project and events information, and a blog containing site updates. There has been much discussion on increasing the knowledge base from which to draw evidence for library and information practitioners. Original research needs to be published so that we can use it as evidence to support our decision making. The literature is lacking the significant numbers of publication types widely considered to be the highest level of evidence: systematic reviews, meta‐analyses and randomized controlled trials. This issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice proudly boasts both a systematic review/meta‐analysis and a randomized controlled trial. Denise Koufogiannakis and Natasha Wiebe, in their systematic review/meta‐analysis, provide evidence that shows that computer assisted instruction is as effective as traditional instruction for students at an introductory, undergraduate level. Nicola Pearce‐Smith compared the effectiveness of self‐directed, web‐based learning with a classroom‐based, interactive workshop in her randomized controlled trial. I am looking forward to reading and utilizing more and more of these in the future. Another example is even closer to home. I recently attended a strategic planning meeting at my institution where new services and procedures were discussed. Unlike the past, when new initiatives were implemented and later evaluated, all librarians instinctively indicated that the literature should be searched first to see if there was any evidence either for or against changing or adding new services or procedures. The evidence based model of practice is catching on. I know that there are numerous examples of information practitioners taking a proactive role in putting research into practice, and many research papers that are worth mentioning. To highlight them all would be a task much too grand for an editorial. Kudos to all of you, and thanks for the inspiration.

  20. Inspired by CERN

    2004-01-01

    Art students inspired by CERN will be returning to show their work 9 to 16 October in Building 500, outside the Auditorium. Seventeen art students from around Europe visited CERN last January for a week of introductions to particle physics and astrophysics, and discussions with CERN scientists about their projects. A CERN scientist "adopted"each artist so they could ask questions during and after the visit. Now the seeds planted during their visit have come to fruition in a show using many media and exploring varied concepts, such as how people experience the online world, the sheer scale of CERN's equipment, and the abstractness of the entities scientists are looking for. "The work is so varied, people are going to love some pieces and detest others," says Andrew Charalambous, the project coordinator from University College London who is also curating the exhibition. "It's contemporary modern art, and that's sometimes difficult to take in." For more information on this thought-provoking show, see: htt...

  1. UNIVERSO REPRESENTACIONAL DEL ARTE RUPESTRE DEL SITIO LOS MELLIZOS (PROVINCIA DEL CHOAPA:: CONVENCIONES VISUALES Y RELACIONES CULTURALES REPRESENTATIONAL UNIVERSE OF LOS MELLIZOS ROCK ART SITE (CHOAPA PROVINCE:: VISUAL CONVENTIONS AND CULTURAL RELATIONS

    Paola González Carvajal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo examina nuevos caminos metodológicos para el estudio de la iconografía del arte rupestre del sitio Los Mellizos. En particular, se emplean los principios geométricos de la simetría en la descripción y la comprensión de este arte visual. Luego se clasifican sus formas y estructuras subyacentes. Al mismo tiempo, la estructura del diseño ha demostrado ser un atributo sensible a problemas relacionados con la identidad de grupo y los procesos de intercambio e interacción. Para abordar este último aspecto, un segundo esfuerzo fue realizado al comparar los patrones decorativos de Los Mellizos con patrones decorativos de la decoración cerámica de culturas prehispánicas presentes en la región. Como resultado de este ejercicio identificamos una fuerte presencia de iconografía Inka o Diaguita-Inka, así como otras influencias culturales.This paper examines new methodological approaches to the systematic study of Los Mellizos rock art iconography. In particular, we use the geometrical principles of symmetry to describe and understand this visual art, then classify the forms and underlying structures. At the same time, the structure of the design has been shown to be sensitive to issues of group identity, exchange and interaction. Therefore, a secondary effort compares Los Mellizos decorative patterns with ceramic decorative patterns of the pre-Hispanic cultures present in the region. As a result of this exercise, we identified the strong presence of Inka and Diaguita-Inka visual patterns and other cultural influences.

  2. Learning Visualizations by Analogy: Promoting Visual Literacy through Visualization Morphing.

    Ruchikachorn, Puripant; Mueller, Klaus

    2015-09-01

    We propose the concept of teaching (and learning) unfamiliar visualizations by analogy, that is, demonstrating an unfamiliar visualization method by linking it to another more familiar one, where the in-betweens are designed to bridge the gap of these two visualizations and explain the difference in a gradual manner. As opposed to a textual description, our morphing explains an unfamiliar visualization through purely visual means. We demonstrate our idea by ways of four visualization pair examples: data table and parallel coordinates, scatterplot matrix and hyperbox, linear chart and spiral chart, and hierarchical pie chart and treemap. The analogy is commutative i.e. any member of the pair can be the unfamiliar visualization. A series of studies showed that this new paradigm can be an effective teaching tool. The participants could understand the unfamiliar visualization methods in all of the four pairs either fully or at least significantly better after they observed or interacted with the transitions from the familiar counterpart. The four examples suggest how helpful visualization pairings be identified and they will hopefully inspire other visualization morphings and associated transition strategies to be identified. PMID:26357285

  3. Digital models for architectonical representation

    Stefano Brusaporci

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital instruments and technologies enrich architectonical representation and communication opportunities. Computer graphics is organized according the two phases of visualization and construction, that is modeling and rendering, structuring dichotomy of software technologies. Visualization modalities give different kinds of representations of the same 3D model and instruments produce a separation between drawing and image’s creation. Reverse modeling can be related to a synthesis process, ‘direct modeling’ follows an analytic procedure. The difference between interactive and not interactive applications is connected to the possibilities offered by informatics instruments, and relates to modeling and rendering. At the same time the word ‘model’ describes different phenomenon (i.e. files: mathematical model of the building and of the scene; raster representation and post-processing model. All these correlated different models constitute the architectonical interpretative model, that is a simulation of reality made by the model for improving the knowledge.

  4. Bio-inspired Political Systems

    Mezza-Garcia, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    In this paper I consider the necessity and the possibilities of engineering bio-inspired political systems. Systems capable of harnessing the complexity of the human social systems and their increasingly growing and diversifying interactions.

  5. Nature-inspired optimization algorithms

    Yang, Xin-She

    2014-01-01

    Nature-Inspired Optimization Algorithms provides a systematic introduction to all major nature-inspired algorithms for optimization. The book's unified approach, balancing algorithm introduction, theoretical background and practical implementation, complements extensive literature with well-chosen case studies to illustrate how these algorithms work. Topics include particle swarm optimization, ant and bee algorithms, simulated annealing, cuckoo search, firefly algorithm, bat algorithm, flower algorithm, harmony search, algorithm analysis, constraint handling, hybrid methods, parameter tuning

  6. Visualization analysis and design

    Munzner, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Visualization Analysis and Design provides a systematic, comprehensive framework for thinking about visualization in terms of principles and design choices. The book features a unified approach encompassing information visualization techniques for abstract data, scientific visualization techniques for spatial data, and visual analytics techniques for interweaving data transformation and analysis with interactive visual exploration. It emphasizes the careful validation of effectiveness and the consideration of function before form. The book breaks down visualization design according to three questions: what data users need to see, why users need to carry out their tasks, and how the visual representations proposed can be constructed and manipulated. It walks readers through the use of space and color to visually encode data in a view, the trade-offs between changing a single view and using multiple linked views, and the ways to reduce the amount of data shown in each view. The book concludes with six case stu...

  7. Visual modelling electrochemical processes

    Semenenko, M.G. [Bauman Moscow State Technical University, Kaluga Branch, Bazhenov str., 2, 248600, Kaluga (Russian Federation)

    2009-06-01

    Visual modelling assumes a graphic form of model description and visual representation of research results. The main element of modelling system representation is a block diagram. Owing to appearance of this line of investigation (<>) a software was produced (for example, Simulink in MatLab). The examples of ordinary differential equations solving schemes for initial stage discharge of lead-acid battery positive electrode visual modelling are presented. The comparative analysis of two algorithms (a shooting method and algorithm similar to back propagation algorithm used in the neural networks theory) also is carried out. (author)

  8. Physicists Get INSPIREd: INSPIRE Project and Grid Applications

    INSPIRE is the new high-energy physics scientific information system developed by CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. INSPIRE combines the curated and trusted contents of SPIRES database with Invenio digital library technology. INSPIRE contains the entire HEP literature with about one million records and in addition to becoming the reference HEP scientific information platform, it aims to provide new kinds of data mining services and metrics to assess the impact of articles and authors. Grid and cloud computing provide new opportunities to offer better services in areas that require large CPU and storage resources including document Optical Character Recognition (OCR) processing, full-text indexing of articles and improved metrics. D4Science-II is a European project that develops and operates an e-Infrastructure supporting Virtual Research Environments (VREs). It develops an enabling technology (gCube) which implements a mechanism for facilitating the interoperation of its e-Infrastructure with other autonomously running data e-Infrastructures. As a result, this creates the core of an e-Infrastructure ecosystem. INSPIRE is one of the e-Infrastructures participating in D4Science-II project. In the context of the D4Science-II project, the INSPIRE e-Infrastructure makes available some of its resources and services to other members of the resulting ecosystem. Moreover, it benefits from the ecosystem via a dedicated Virtual Organization giving access to an array of resources ranging from computing and storage resources of grid infrastructures to data and services.

  9. Physicists Get INSPIREd: INSPIRE Project and Grid Applications

    Klem, Jukka; Iwaszkiewicz, Jan

    2011-12-01

    INSPIRE is the new high-energy physics scientific information system developed by CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. INSPIRE combines the curated and trusted contents of SPIRES database with Invenio digital library technology. INSPIRE contains the entire HEP literature with about one million records and in addition to becoming the reference HEP scientific information platform, it aims to provide new kinds of data mining services and metrics to assess the impact of articles and authors. Grid and cloud computing provide new opportunities to offer better services in areas that require large CPU and storage resources including document Optical Character Recognition (OCR) processing, full-text indexing of articles and improved metrics. D4Science-II is a European project that develops and operates an e-Infrastructure supporting Virtual Research Environments (VREs). It develops an enabling technology (gCube) which implements a mechanism for facilitating the interoperation of its e-Infrastructure with other autonomously running data e-Infrastructures. As a result, this creates the core of an e-Infrastructure ecosystem. INSPIRE is one of the e-Infrastructures participating in D4Science-II project. In the context of the D4Science-II project, the INSPIRE e-Infrastructure makes available some of its resources and services to other members of the resulting ecosystem. Moreover, it benefits from the ecosystem via a dedicated Virtual Organization giving access to an array of resources ranging from computing and storage resources of grid infrastructures to data and services.

  10. Brain-inspired Stochastic Models and Implementations

    Al-Shedivat, Maruan

    2015-05-12

    One of the approaches to building artificial intelligence (AI) is to decipher the princi- ples of the brain function and to employ similar mechanisms for solving cognitive tasks, such as visual perception or natural language understanding, using machines. The recent breakthrough, named deep learning, demonstrated that large multi-layer networks of arti- ficial neural-like computing units attain remarkable performance on some of these tasks. Nevertheless, such artificial networks remain to be very loosely inspired by the brain, which rich structures and mechanisms may further suggest new algorithms or even new paradigms of computation. In this thesis, we explore brain-inspired probabilistic mechanisms, such as neural and synaptic stochasticity, in the context of generative models. The two questions we ask here are: (i) what kind of models can describe a neural learning system built of stochastic components? and (ii) how can we implement such systems e ̆ciently? To give specific answers, we consider two well known models and the corresponding neural architectures: the Naive Bayes model implemented with a winner-take-all spiking neural network and the Boltzmann machine implemented in a spiking or non-spiking fashion. We propose and analyze an e ̆cient neuromorphic implementation of the stochastic neu- ral firing mechanism and study the e ̄ects of synaptic unreliability on learning generative energy-based models implemented with neural networks.

  11. Representational learning for sonar ATR

    Isaacs, Jason C.

    2014-06-01

    Learned representations have been shown to give hopeful results for solving a multitude of novel learning tasks, even though these tasks may be unknown when the model is being trained. A few notable examples include the techniques of topic models, deep belief networks, deep Boltzmann machines, and local discriminative Gaussians, all inspired by human learning. This self-learning of new concepts via rich generative models has emerged as a promising area of research in machine learning. Although there has been recent progress, existing computational models are still far from being able to represent, identify and learn the wide variety of possible patterns and struc- ture in real-world data. An important issue for further consideration is the use of unsupervised representations for novel underwater target recognition applications. This work will discuss and demonstrate the use of latent Dirichlet allocation and autoencoders for learning unsupervised representations of objects in sonar imagery. The objective is to make these representations more abstract and invariant to noise in the training distribution and improve performance.

  12. Cognition inspired framework for indoor scene annotation

    Ye, Zhipeng; Liu, Peng; Zhao, Wei; Tang, Xianglong

    2015-09-01

    We present a simple yet effective scene annotation framework based on a combination of bag-of-visual words (BoVW), three-dimensional scene structure estimation, scene context, and cognitive theory. From a macroperspective, the proposed cognition-based hybrid motivation framework divides the annotation problem into empirical inference and real-time classification. Inspired by the inference ability of human beings, common objects of indoor scenes are defined for experience-based inference, while in the real-time classification stage, an improved BoVW-based multilayer abstract semantics labeling method is proposed by introducing abstract semantic hierarchies to narrow the semantic gap and improve the performance of object categorization. The proposed framework was evaluated on a variety of common data sets and experimental results proved its effectiveness.

  13. Representational Thickness

    Mullins, Michael

    by ‘professionals’ to ‘laypeople’. The thesis articulates problems in VR’s current application, specifically the CAVE and Panorama theatres, and seeks an understanding of how these problems may be addressed. The central questions that have motivated this research project are thus: What is...... architectural VR representation? How is virtual reality used in public participation and how do virtual environments affect participatory decision making? How does VR thus affect the physical world of built environment? Given the practical collaborative possibilities of immersive technology, how can they best...

  14. BINARY WAVELET TRANSFORM FOR IMAGE REPRESENTATION

    ASHOK.M

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The MRA (Multi resolution analysis for an image provides specific information localized in space or frequency domain .In this paper an efficient representation of the visual information is presented using Binary wavelet Transform for both color and gray level image. Analytical results shows that this method proves to be more efficient in representing the visual information than the earlier

  15. Representation of non-periodic functions by trigonometric series with almost integer frequencies

    Kozma, G.; Olevskii, A.

    1999-08-01

    Inspired by Menshov's representation theorem, we prove that there exists a sequence of frequecies such that any measurable (complex valued) function on R can be represented as a sum of almost everywhere convergent trigonometric series with these frequencies.

  16. Development & Implementation of a PyMOL 'putty' Representation

    Mura, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    The PyMOL molecular graphics program has been modi?ed to introduce a new 'putty' cartoon representation, akin to the 'sausage'-style representation of the MOLMOL molecular visualization (MolVis) software package. This document outlines the development and implementation of the putty representation.

  17. Inspiring Student Self-Motivation

    Virginia Brackett

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available While normally appreciative of the invitation to join colleagues in a discussion of pedagogy and what “works” in the classroom, I have in most instances reluctantly participated in discussion of student motivation. I dip my toe into this philosophical quagmire only if permitted license to substitute the phrase student inspiration in place of student motivation. I also find it helpful to turn the rhetorical tables, as it were, and consider self-motivation on the part of students. The concept of individuals who hold some sense of self that a classroom mentor may nurture through student inspiration is one in which I place a modicum of trust. To “inspire” is literally to “breathe in,” to actively pull sustenance from a proffered external source. Active student determination based on some sense of self may couple with instructor inspiration to promote academic success.

  18. Inspiration fra NY-times

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye

    2015-01-01

    NY-times har en ugentlig klumme med gode råd. For nogle uger siden var ugens inspiration henvendt til lærere/undervisere og drejede sig om, hvordan man skaber taletid til alle uden at have favoritter og overse de mere stille elever.......NY-times har en ugentlig klumme med gode råd. For nogle uger siden var ugens inspiration henvendt til lærere/undervisere og drejede sig om, hvordan man skaber taletid til alle uden at have favoritter og overse de mere stille elever....

  19. Bio-Inspired Antifouling Strategies

    Kirschner, Chelsea M.; Brennan, Anthony B.

    2012-08-01

    Biofouling is a complex, dynamic problem that globally impacts both the economy and environment. Interdisciplinary research in marine biology, polymer science, and engineering has led to the implementation of bio-inspired strategies for the development of the next generation of antifouling marine coatings. Natural fouling defense mechanisms have been mimicked through chemical, physical, and/or stimuli-responsive strategies. This review outlines the detrimental effects associated with biofouling, describes the theoretical basis for antifouling coating design, and highlights prominent advances in bio-inspired antifouling technologies.

  20. Representation learning for histopathology image analysis

    Arevalo Ovalle, John Edilson

    2013-01-01

    Abstract. Nowadays, automatic methods for image representation and analysis have been successfully applied in several medical imaging problems leading to the emergence of novel research areas like digital pathology and bioimage informatics. The main challenge of these methods is to deal with the high visual variability of biological structures present in the images, which increases the semantic gap between their visual appearance and their high level meaning. Particularly, the visual variabil...

  1. Neural representation of objects in space: a dual coding account.

    Humphreys, G. W.

    1998-01-01

    I present evidence on the nature of object coding in the brain and discuss the implications of this coding for models of visual selective attention. Neuropsychological studies of task-based constraints on: (i) visual neglect; and (ii) reading and counting, reveal the existence of parallel forms of spatial representation for objects: within-object representations, where elements are coded as parts of objects, and between-object representations, where elements are coded as independent objects. ...

  2. The matrix of inspiration

    Oehlmann, Dietmar; Ohlmann, Odile M.; Danzebrink, Hans U.

    2005-04-01

    The research of Odile Meulien and Dietmar Ohlmann is about perceiving a multidimensional world. Not about the cyberspace created for new cinema creation, nor the reality which seems to be created by communication. It's the search for the reality we perceive, when the mind "touches" an object with its senses. In fact, it is a study of the surface of an object, which we can record in its visual appearing, its structure, shape and colors. When using photographic media, the tactile sense of the structure is missing, when using some other reproductive media; we experience somewhere a sensation of fault, something different. When using holography, we are able to record some three dimensional shape which has in fact a lot of parameter of a realistic copy. What is missing is the touch, the smell, the way we can go close and far, surround the object, relate the reflected light to its surrounding. The only interesting attribute of a hologram is for Dietmar Ohlmann its capacity to illustrate a continuum. He likes its changing diffractive character during daytime and surrounds lighting. For Odile Meulien the continuum of a hologram represents a new possible model for understanding wholeness in a social context. In fact, both are working on an educational process together, helping children and adults to find a new position of their own in harmony with living surrounding. Dietmar Ohlmann is working on his artistic side, while Odile Meulien works on educational programs experiencing the perspective of a curator and social analyst. New is the implication of using the latest of the techniques like the atomic force microscopy, which make possible to touch the holographic grating while the holographic image remains untouched. In other words it is the reverse of the usual approach of objects which at first we touch to investigate further. Their difference in experiencing and perceiving scientific and technical approach brings a lot of paradigm in their discussion. Together they will perform this exchange, as a matrix, understood as source, of new ideas.

  3. Representations of content: psychological foundations and didactical background

    TomᚠJanko

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This theoretical study concerns the issue of representations. Representation is a concept used when analysing and explaining human perception, cognition, communication, and learning. Firstly, we introduce the psychological foundations of the concept. Secondly, we clarify the concept of representations and its division in cognitive psychology. We define two basic forms of external representations - verbal and visual. In social psychology, the concept is used for explaining of how much individual cognition is determined by socio-cultural factors. Further, we mention the concept of representations that draws on the Theory of social representations (Moscovici and Vygotsky's ideas. The author seeks to develop a concept of representations usable in didactic discourse. The importance of representations for content-oriented didactics is clarified. We also define the levels on which a teacher reasons when using representations during instruction. Representations of curricular content, which are believed to play an important role when presenting the content to students, are also mentioned.

  4. Bio-Inspired Computer Vision: Setting the Basis for a New Departure

    Medathati, N V Kartheek; Neumann, Heiko; Masson, Guillaume; Kornprobst, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Studies in biological vision have always been a great source of inspiration for design of computer vision algorithms. In the past, several successful methods were designed with varying degrees of correspondence with biological vision studies, ranging from purely functional inspiration to methods that utilize models that were primarily developed for explaining biological observations. Even though it seems well recognized that computational models of visual cortex can help in design of computer...

  5. Ventral-stream-like shape representation: from pixel intensity values to trainable object-selective COSFIRE models.

    Azzopardi, George; Petkov, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable abilities of the primate visual system have inspired the construction of computational models of some visual neurons. We propose a trainable hierarchical object recognition model, which we call S-COSFIRE (S stands for Shape and COSFIRE stands for Combination Of Shifted FIlter REsponses) and use it to localize and recognize objects of interests embedded in complex scenes. It is inspired by the visual processing in the ventral stream (V1/V2 → V4 → TEO). Recognition and localization of objects embedded in complex scenes is important for many computer vision applications. Most existing methods require prior segmentation of the objects from the background which on its turn requires recognition. An S-COSFIRE filter is automatically configured to be selective for an arrangement of contour-based features that belong to a prototype shape specified by an example. The configuration comprises selecting relevant vertex detectors and determining certain blur and shift parameters. The response is computed as the weighted geometric mean of the blurred and shifted responses of the selected vertex detectors. S-COSFIRE filters share similar properties with some neurons in inferotemporal cortex, which provided inspiration for this work. We demonstrate the effectiveness of S-COSFIRE filters in two applications: letter and keyword spotting in handwritten manuscripts and object spotting in complex scenes for the computer vision system of a domestic robot. S-COSFIRE filters are effective to recognize and localize (deformable) objects in images of complex scenes without requiring prior segmentation. They are versatile trainable shape detectors, conceptually simple and easy to implement. The presented hierarchical shape representation contributes to a better understanding of the brain and to more robust computer vision algorithms. PMID:25126068

  6. Ventral-stream-like shape representation: from pixel intensity values to trainable object-selective COSFIRE models

    George Azzopardi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable abilities of the primate visual cortex have inspired the construction of computational models of some visual neurons. We propose a trainable hierarchical object recognition model, which we call S-COSFIRE (S stands for Shape and COSFIRE stands for Combination Of Shifted FIlter REsponses and use it to localize and recognize objects of interests embedded in complex scenes. It is inspired by the visual processing in the ventral stream (V1/V2 -> V4 -> TEO. Recognition and localization of objects embedded in complex scenes is important for many computer vision applications. Most existing methods require prior segmentation of the objects from the background which on its turn requires recognition. A S-COSFIRE filter is automatically configured to be selective for an arrangement of contour-based features that belong to a prototype shape specified by an example. The configuration comprises selecting relevant vertex detectors and determining certain blur and shift parameters. The response is computed as the weighted geometric mean of the blurred and shifted responses of the selected vertex detectors. S-COSFIRE filters share similar properties with some neurons in inferotemporal cortex, which provided inspiration for this work. We demonstrate the effectiveness of S-COSFIRE filters in two applications: letter and keyword spotting in handwritten manuscripts and object spotting in complex scenes for the computer vision system of a domestic robot. S-COSFIRE filters are effective to recognize and localize (deformable objects in images of complex scenes without requiring prior segmentation. They are versatile trainable shape detectors, conceptually simple and easy to implement. The presented hierarchical shape representation contributes to a better understanding of the brain and to more robust computer vision algorithms.

  7. Inspiration: One Percent and Rising

    Walling, Donovan R.

    2009-01-01

    Inventor Thomas Edison once famously declared, "Genius is one percent inspiration and ninety-nine percent perspiration." If that's the case, then the students the author witnessed at the International Student Media Festival (ISMF) last November in Orlando, Florida, are geniuses and more. The students in the ISMF pre-conference workshop had much to…

  8. INSPIRE Network Services SOAP Framework

    Villa, Matteo; Di Matteo, Giovanni; LUCCHI Roberto; Millot, Michel; KANELLOPOULOS Ioannis

    2008-01-01

    The goal of this document is to provide a definition and rationale for a proposed INSPIRE SOAP framework (SOAP nodes policy, RPC, attachments, WS-I, WSDL) and description of issues and solutions for the specific geospatial domain, for example GML handling in SOAP messages or interfaces definition of the OGC specifications.

  9. Novel locomotion via biological inspiration

    Quinn, Roger D.; Boxerbaum, Alexander; Palmer, Luther; Chiel, Hillel; Diller, Eric; Hunt, Alexander; Bachmann, Richard

    2011-05-01

    Animal behavioral, physiological and neurobiological studies are providing a wealth of inspirational data for robot design and control. Several very different biologically inspired mobile robots will be reviewed. A robot called DIGbot is being developed that moves independent of the direction of gravity using Distributed Inward Gripping (DIG) as a rapid and robust attachment mechanism observed in climbing animals. DIGbot is an 18 degree of freedom hexapod with onboard power and control systems. Passive compliance in its feet, which is inspired by the flexible tarsus of the cockroach, increases the robustness of the adhesion strategy and enables DIGbot to execute large steps and stationary turns while walking on mesh screens. A Whegs™ robot, inspired by insect locomotion principles, is being developed that can be rapidly reconfigured between tracks and wheel-legs and carry GeoSystems Zipper Mast. The mechanisms that cause it to passively change its gait on irregular terrain have been integrated into its hubs for a compact and modular design. The robot is designed to move smoothly on moderately rugged terrain using its tracks and run on irregular terrain and stairs using its wheel-legs. We are also developing soft bodied robots that use peristalsis, the same method of locomotion earthworms use. We present a technique of using a braided mesh exterior to produce fluid waves of motion along the body of the robot that increase the robot's speed relative to previous designs. The concept is highly scalable, for endoscopes to water, oil or gas line inspection.

  10. London: An Art Teacher's Inspiration

    Guhin, Paula

    2012-01-01

    Often overshadowed in people's minds by Paris, London is truly an artist's jewel. The art and architecture, history, gardens and museums are inspiring, yes, but there's so much more to this ancient city. The performances, attractions and markets are a boon to the creative soul. London can be surprisingly inexpensive to visit. Gazing at statues,…

  11. Scientific visualization uncertainty, multifield, biomedical, and scalable visualization

    Chen, Min; Johnson, Christopher; Kaufman, Arie; Hagen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Based on the seminar that took place in Dagstuhl, Germany in June 2011, this contributed volume studies the four important topics within the scientific visualization field: uncertainty visualization, multifield visualization, biomedical visualization and scalable visualization. • Uncertainty visualization deals with uncertain data from simulations or sampled data, uncertainty due to the mathematical processes operating on the data, and uncertainty in the visual representation, • Multifield visualization addresses the need to depict multiple data at individual locations and the combination of multiple datasets, • Biomedical is a vast field with select subtopics addressed from scanning methodologies to structural applications to biological applications, • Scalability in scientific visualization is critical as data grows and computational devices range from hand-held mobile devices to exascale computational platforms. Scientific Visualization will be useful to practitioners of scientific visualization, ...

  12. Measuring visual abilities and visual knowledge of aviation security screeners

    Schwaninger, Adrian; Hardmeier, Diana; Hofer, Franziska

    2004-01-01

    A central aspect of airport security is reliable detection of forbidden objects in passenger bags using X-ray screening equipment. Human recognition involves visual processing of the X-ray image and matching items with object representations stored in visual memory. Thus, without knowing which objects are forbidden and what they look like, prohibited items are difficult to recognize (aspect of visual knowledge). In order to measure whether a screener has acquired the necessary visual knowledg...

  13. Abstract and associatively based representations in human sequence learning.

    Spiegel, Rainer; McLaren, I P L

    2003-01-01

    We give an analysis of performance in an artificial neural network for which the claim had been made that it could learn abstract representations. Our argument is that this network is associative in nature, and cannot develop abstract representations. The network thus converges to a solution that is solely based on the statistical regularities of the training set. Inspired by human experiments that have shown that humans can engage in both associative (statistical) and abstract learning, we p...

  14. Knowledge representation for basic visual categories

    Phelps, R I; Musgrove, P B

    1985-01-01

    This paper reports work on a model of machine learning which is based on the psychological theory of prototypical concepts. This theory is that concepts learnt naturally from interaction with the environment (basic categories) are not structured or defined in logical terms but are clustered in accordance with their similarity to a central prototype, representing the "most typical'' member.

  15. Understanding Confidence Intervals With Visual Representations

    Navruz, Bilgin; DELEN, Erhan

    2014-01-01

    In the present paper, we showed how confidence intervals (CIs) are valuable and useful in research studies when they are used in the correct form with correct interpretations. The sixth edition of the APA (2010) Publication Manual strongly recommended reporting CIs in research studies, and it was described as “the best reporting strategy” (p. 34). Misconceptions and correct interpretations of CIs were presented from several textbooks. In addition, limitations of the null hypothesis statistica...

  16. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules

    Ertl Peter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. Summary A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach “Molecule Cloud”. The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Conclusions Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large data sets, including PubChem, ChEMBL and ZINC databases using the Molecule Cloud diagrams are provided.

  17. Institutionalizing New Ideas Through Visualization

    Meyer, Renate; Jancsary, Dennis; Höllerer, Markus A.; Boxenbaum, Eva

    How do visualization and visual forms of communication influence the process of transforming a novel idea into established organizational practice? In this paper, we build theory with regard to the role of visuals in manifesting and giving form to an innovative idea as it proceeds through various...... representations diffuse more rapidly and further than the practices themselves. Consolidating the relationship between abstract ideas and specific practice, such visual or multi-modal representations facilitate the implementation of novel ideas, reinforce particular translations, and imbue associated...

  18. Computer aided surface representation

    Barnhill, R.E.

    1990-02-19

    The central research problem of this project is the effective representation, computation, and display of surfaces interpolating to information in three or more dimensions. If the given information is located on another surface, then the problem is to construct a surface defined on a surface''. Sometimes properties of an already defined surface are desired, which is geometry processing''. Visualization of multivariate surfaces is possible by means of contouring higher dimensional surfaces. These problems and more are discussed below. The broad sweep from constructive mathematics through computational algorithms to computer graphics illustrations is utilized in this research. The breadth and depth of this research activity makes this research project unique.

  19. A Tony Thomas-Inspired Guide to INSPIRE

    The SPIRES database was created in the late 1960s to catalogue the high energy physics preprints received by the SLAC Library. In the early 1990s it became the first database on the web and the first website outside of Europe. Although indispensible to the HEP community, its aging software infrastructure is becoming a serious liability. In a joint project involving CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, a new database, INSPIRE, is being created to replace SPIRES using CERN's modern, open-source Invenio database software. INSPIRE will maintain the content and functionality of SPIRES plus many new features. I describe this evolution from the birth of SPIRES to the current day, noting that the career of Tony Thomas spans this timeline.

  20. A Tony Thomas-Inspired Guide to INSPIRE

    O' Connell, Heath B.; /Fermilab

    2010-04-01

    The SPIRES database was created in the late 1960s to catalogue the high energy physics preprints received by the SLAC Library. In the early 1990s it became the first database on the web and the first website outside of Europe. Although indispensible to the HEP community, its aging software infrastructure is becoming a serious liability. In a joint project involving CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, a new database, INSPIRE, is being created to replace SPIRES using CERN's modern, open-source Invenio database software. INSPIRE will maintain the content and functionality of SPIRES plus many new features. I describe this evolution from the birth of SPIRES to the current day, noting that the career of Tony Thomas spans this timeline.

  1. Deep generative learning of location-invariant visual word recognition.

    Di Bono, Maria Grazia; Zorzi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    It is widely believed that orthographic processing implies an approximate, flexible coding of letter position, as shown by relative-position and transposition priming effects in visual word recognition. These findings have inspired alternative proposals about the representation of letter position, ranging from noisy coding across the ordinal positions to relative position coding based on open bigrams. This debate can be cast within the broader problem of learning location-invariant representations of written words, that is, a coding scheme abstracting the identity and position of letters (and combinations of letters) from their eye-centered (i.e., retinal) locations. We asked whether location-invariance would emerge from deep unsupervised learning on letter strings and what type of intermediate coding would emerge in the resulting hierarchical generative model. We trained a deep network with three hidden layers on an artificial dataset of letter strings presented at five possible retinal locations. Though word-level information (i.e., word identity) was never provided to the network during training, linear decoding from the activity of the deepest hidden layer yielded near-perfect accuracy in location-invariant word recognition. Conversely, decoding from lower layers yielded a large number of transposition errors. Analyses of emergent internal representations showed that word selectivity and location invariance increased as a function of layer depth. Word-tuning and location-invariance were found at the level of single neurons, but there was no evidence for bigram coding. Finally, the distributed internal representation of words at the deepest layer showed higher similarity to the representation elicited by the two exterior letters than by other combinations of two contiguous letters, in agreement with the hypothesis that word edges have special status. These results reveal that the efficient coding of written words-which was the model's learning objective-is largely based on letter-level information. PMID:24065939

  2. Deep generative learning of location-invariant visual word recognition

    Maria GraziaDi Bono

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available It is widely believed that orthographic processing implies an approximate, flexible coding of letter position, as shown by relative-position and transposition priming effects in visual word recognition. These findings have inspired alternative proposals about the representation of letter position, ranging from noisy coding across the ordinal positions to relative position coding based on open bigrams. This debate can be cast within the broader problem of learning location-invariant representations of written words, that is, a coding scheme abstracting the identity and position of letters (and combinations of letters from their eye-centred (i.e., retinal locations. We asked whether location-invariance would emerge from deep unsupervised learning on letter strings and what type of intermediate coding would emerge in the resulting hierarchical generative model. We trained a deep network with three hidden layers on an artificial dataset of letter strings presented at five possible retinal locations. Though word-level information (i.e., word identity was never provided to the network during training, linear decoding from the activity of the deepest hidden layer yielded near-perfect accuracy in location-invariant word recognition. Conversely, decoding from lower layers yielded a large number of transposition errors. Analyses of emergent internal representations showed that word selectivity and location invariance increased as a function of layer depth. Conversely, there was no evidence for bigram coding. Finally, the distributed internal representation of words at the deepest layer showed higher similarity to the representation elicited by the two exterior letters than by other combinations of two contiguous letters, in agreement with the hypothesis that word edges have special status. These results reveal that the efficient coding of written words – which was the model’s learning objective – is largely based on letter-level information.

  3. E6 inspired composite Higgs model

    Nevzorov, R

    2015-01-01

    We consider a composite Higgs model embedded into a Grand Unified Theory(GUT) based on the E_6 gauge group. The phenomenological viability of this E_6 inspired composite Higgs model (E6CHM) implies that standard model (SM) elementary fermions with different baryon or lepton number should stem from different 27 representations of E_6. We present a six-dimensional orbifold GUT model in which the E_6 gauge symmetry is broken to the SM gauge group so that the appropriate splitting of the bulk 27-plets takes place. In this model the strongly coupled sector is localised on one of the branes and possesses an SU(6) global symmetry that contains the SU(3)_C\\times SU(2)_W\\times U(1)_Y subgroup. In this case the approximate gauge coupling unification can be attained if the right-handed top quark is a composite state and the elementary sector involves extra exotic matter beyond the SM which ensures anomaly cancellation. The breakdown of the approximate SU(6) symmetry at low energies in this model results in a set of the ...

  4. Decrypting $SO(10)$-inspired leptogenesis

    Di Bari, Pasquale; Fiorentin, Michele Re

    2014-01-01

    Encouraged by the recent results from neutrino oscillation experiments, we perform an analytical study of $SO(10)$-inspired models and leptogenesis with hierarchical right-handed (RH) neutrino spectrum. Under the approximation of negligible misalignment between the neutrino Yukawa basis and the charged lepton basis, we find an analytical expression for the final asymmetry directly in terms of the low energy neutrino parameters that fully reproduces previous numerical results. This expression also shows that is possible to identify an effective leptogenesis phase for these models. When we also impose the wash-out of a large pre-existing asymmetry $N^{\\rm p,i}_{B-L}$, the strong thermal (ST) condition, we derive analytically all those constraints on the low energy neutrino parameters that characterise the {\\rm ST}-$SO(10)$-inspired leptogenesis solution, confirming previous numerical results. In particular we show why, though neutrino masses have to be necessarily normally ordered, the solution implies an analy...

  5. Jellyfish inspired underwater unmanned vehicle

    Villanueva, Alex; Bresser, Scott; Chung, Sanghun; Tadesse, Yonas; Priya, Shashank

    2009-03-01

    An unmanned underwater vehicle (UUV) was designed inspired by the form and functionality of a Jellyfish. These natural organisms were chosen as bio-inspiration for a multitude of reasons including: efficiency of locomotion, lack of natural predators, proper form and shape to incorporate payload, and varying range of sizes. The structure consists of a hub body surrounded by bell segments and microcontroller based drive system. The locomotion of UUV was achieved by shape memory alloy "Biometal Fiber" actuation which possesses large strain and blocking force with adequate response time. The main criterion in design of UUV was the use of low-profile shape memory alloy actuators which act as artificial muscles. In this manuscript, we discuss the design of two Jellyfish prototypes and present experimental results illustrating the performance and power consumption.

  6. Biologically inspired models for swarming

    Justh, Eric W.; Kowtha, Vijayanand

    2007-04-01

    "Understanding" the behavior of a biological system typically means formulating a sensible model, postulating a feedback law (incorporating biologically plausible sensory measurements), and experimentally verifying that the model and feedback law are consistent with nature. This approach is illustrated well in the work of K. Ghose, T. K. Horiuchi, P. S. Krishnaprasad, and C. F. Moss (and colleagues) on insect pursuit by echolocating bats. In work of F. Zhang, E. W. Justh, and P. S. Krishnaprasad, similar modeling principles and feedback laws have also been shown to play an important role in biologically-inspired formation-control and obstacle-avoidance laws. Building on this earlier work, we seek to identify a bio-inspired framework for cooperative swarming, in which the apparently complicated trajectories of individuals are explained by feedback laws which take a relatively simple form. The objectives of such swarming (e.g., for teams of unmanned vehicles) could include rendezvous, target capture (or destruction), and cooperative sensing.

  7. Building Hierarchical Representations for Oracle Character and Sketch Recognition.

    Jun Guo; Changhu Wang; Roman-Rangel, Edgar; Hongyang Chao; Yong Rui

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we study oracle character recognition and general sketch recognition. First, a data set of oracle characters, which are the oldest hieroglyphs in China yet remain a part of modern Chinese characters, is collected for analysis. Second, typical visual representations in shape- and sketch-related works are evaluated. We analyze the problems suffered when addressing these representations and determine several representation design criteria. Based on the analysis, we propose a novel hierarchical representation that combines a Gabor-related low-level representation and a sparse-encoder-related mid-level representation. Extensive experiments show the effectiveness of the proposed representation in both oracle character recognition and general sketch recognition. The proposed representation is also complementary to convolutional neural network (CNN)-based models. We introduce a solution to combine the proposed representation with CNN-based models, and achieve better performances over both approaches. This solution has beaten humans at recognizing general sketches. PMID:26571529

  8. Social insects inspire human design

    Holbrook, C. Tate; Clark, Rebecca M.; Moore, Dani; Overson, Rick P.; Penick, Clint A.; Smith, Adrian A.

    2010-01-01

    The international conference ‘Social Biomimicry: Insect Societies and Human Design’, hosted by Arizona State University, USA, 18–20 February 2010, explored how the collective behaviour and nest architecture of social insects can inspire innovative and effective solutions to human design challenges. It brought together biologists, designers, engineers, computer scientists, architects and businesspeople, with the dual aims of enriching biology and advancing biomimetic design.

  9. Knowledge Representations for Planning Manipulation Tasks

    Zacharias, Franziska

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, the capability map, a novel general representation of the kinematic capabilities of a robot arm, is introduced. The capability map allows to determine how well regions of the workspace are reachable for the end effector in different orientations. It is a representation that can be machine processed as well as intuitively visualized for the human. The capability map and the derived algorithms are a valuable source of information for high- and low-level planning processes. T...

  10. Chaos game representation of gene structure.

    Jeffrey, H J

    1990-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for representing DNA sequences. It permits the representation and investigation of patterns in sequences, visually revealing previously unknown structures. Based on a technique from chaotic dynamics, the method produces a picture of a gene sequence which displays both local and global patterns. The pictures have a complex structure which varies depending on the sequence. The method is termed Chaos Game Representation (CGR). CGR raises a new set of questions ab...

  11. Graphical representation of squeezed-state variances

    Loudon, Rodney

    1989-02-01

    A geometrical representation of quadrature variances using Booth's (1873) elliptical lemniscate has been applied to the description of squeezed states of a single-mode radiation field and a two-level atom. It is found that the pedal curve of the usual ellipse, a form of lemniscate, provides a more direct representation of the required phase-dependent variances. The principal squeezing axes discussed by Luks et al., (1988) can be simply visualized using these curves.

  12. Why is Information Displaced from Visual Working Memory during Visual Search?

    Woodman, Geoffrey F.; Luck, Steven J.

    2009-01-01

    Research has shown that performing visual search while maintaining representations in visual working memory displaces up to one object’s worth of information from memory. This memory displacement has previously been attributed to a nonspecific disruption of the memory representation by the mere presentation of the visual search array, and the goal of the present study was to determine whether it instead reflects the use of visual working memory in the actual search process. The first hypothes...

  13. Biologically inspired visual navigation in indoor and outdoor environments

    Röben, Frank

    2009-01-01

    Diese Doktorarbeit beschäftigt sich mit vier Themen: dem Polarisations-Licht-Kompass, lokalen visuellen Homing-Methoden, Outdoor-Navigation mit Farbkontrasten sowie der Reinigungsrobotersteuerung. Insekten, speziell Bienen und Ameisen, sind in der Lage, das Polarisationsmuster des Himmels, welches erzeugt wird durch das Auftreffen der Sonnenstrahlen auf die Atmosphäre der Erde, zu nutzen, um sich zu orientieren. Hierbei ist es unerheblich, ob der Himmel klar oder teilweise wolkenbedeckt is...

  14. Exploring Representation in the Middle Grades: Investigations in Geometry with Virtual Manipulatives

    Moyer-Packenham, Patricia S.; Bolyard, J. J.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the importance of virtual manipulatives from the Internet to geometrical learning and teaching in classrooms. Purpose of the incorporation of virtual manipulatives; Definition of dynamic visual representation; Advantages of virtual manipulatives; Discussion on the concept of representation.

  15. Visualizing guided tours

    Poulsen, Signe Herbers; Fjord-Larsen, Mads; Hansen, Frank Allan; Christensen, Bent Guldbjerg

    This paper identifies several problems with navigating and visualizing guided tours in traditional hypermedia systems. We discuss solutions to these problems, including the representation of guided tours as 3D metro maps with content preview. Issues regarding navigation and disorientation are...

  16. Perception, Cognition, and Visualization.

    Arnheim, Rudolf

    1991-01-01

    Described are how pictures can combine aspects of naturalistic representation with more formal shapes to enhance cognitive understanding. These "diagrammatic" shapes derive from geometrical elementary and thereby bestow visual concreteness to concepts conveyed by the pictures. Leonardo da Vinci's anatomical drawings are used as examples…

  17. Factorizations and physical representations

    A Hilbert space in M dimensions is shown explicitly to accommodate representations that reflect the decomposition of M into prime numbers. Representations that exhibit the factorization of M into two relatively prime numbers: the kq representation (Zak J 1970 Phys. Today 23 51), and related representations termed q1q2 representations (together with their conjugates) are analysed, as well as a representation that exhibits the complete factorization of M. In this latter representation each quantum number varies in a subspace that is associated with one of the prime numbers that make up M

  18. Toward Turing's A-type Unorganised Machines in an Unconventional Substrate: a Dynamic Representation in Compartmentalised Excitable Chemical Media

    Bull, Larry; Holley, Julian; Costello, Ben De Lacy; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Turing presented a general representation scheme by which to achieve artificial intelligence - unorganised machines. Significantly, these were a form of discrete dynamical system and yet such representations remain relatively unexplored. Further, at the same time as also suggesting that natural evolution may provide inspiration for search mechanisms to design machines, he noted that mechanisms inspired by the social aspects of learning may prove useful. This paper presents initial results fro...

  19. Visual Mining of Epidemic Networks

    Clémençon, Stéphan; Rossi, Fabrice; Tran, Viet Chi; 10.1007/978-3-642-21498-1_35

    2012-01-01

    We show how an interactive graph visualization method based on maximal modularity clustering can be used to explore a large epidemic network. The visual representation is used to display statistical tests results that expose the relations between the propagation of HIV in a sexual contact network and the sexual orientation of the patients.

  20. A Biologically Inspired CMOS Image Sensor

    Sarkar, Mukul

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems are a source of inspiration in the development of small autonomous sensor nodes. The two major types of optical vision systems found in nature are the single aperture human eye and the compound eye of insects. The latter are among the most compact and smallest vision sensors. The eye is a compound of individual lenses with their own photoreceptor arrays.  The visual system of insects allows them to fly with a limited intelligence and brain processing power. A CMOS image sensor replicating the perception of vision in insects is discussed and designed in this book for industrial (machine vision) and medical applications. The CMOS metal layer is used to create an embedded micro-polarizer able to sense polarization information. This polarization information is shown to be useful in applications like real time material classification and autonomous agent navigation. Further the sensor is equipped with in pixel analog and digital memories which allow variation of the dynamic range and in-pixel b...

  1. VISUAL VOCABULARY IN BRANDING

    Adriana Vintean; Ovidiu Matiu

    2011-01-01

    Visual vocabulary or visual language is a set of symbols used to describe a system or a process; it refers to all graphical representations that supplement a brand image, a logo, and build a brand identity that is bound to remain invariable even when the sign undergoes fundamental changes. The article is a presentation of the concept of visual vocabulary/language and of its relevance to branding and marketing. We argue that these symbols are culturally dependent and a key element in brand des...

  2. Towards Ecology Inspired Software Engineering

    Baudry, Benoit; Monperrus, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Les écosystèmes sont des systèmes complexes et dynamiques. Au cours de l'évolution, ils ont développé des capacités avancées pour fournir des fonctions stables, et ce malgré des changements constants dans l'environnement. Dans ce papier, nous discutons l'hypothèse que les lois dirigeant l'organisation et le développement des écosystèmes sont une source d'inspiration riche pour l'architecture et la construction des logiciels.

  3. The representational consequences of intentional forgetting: Impairments to both the probability and fidelity of long-term memory.

    Fawcett, Jonathan M; Lawrence, Michael A; Taylor, Tracy L

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether intentional forgetting impacts only the likelihood of later retrieval from long-term memory or whether it also impacts the fidelity of those representations that are successfully retrieved. We accomplished this by combining an item-method directed forgetting task with a testing procedure and modeling approach inspired by the delayed-estimation paradigm used in the study of visual short-term memory (STM). Abstract or concrete colored images were each followed by a remember (R) or forget (F) instruction and sometimes by a visual probe requiring a speeded detection response (E1-E3). Memory was tested using an old-new (E1-E2) or remember-know-no (E3) recognition task followed by a continuous color judgment task (E2-E3); a final experiment included only the color judgment task (E4). Replicating the existing literature, more "old" or "remember" responses were made to R than F items and RTs to postinstruction visual probes were longer following F than R instructions. Color judgments were more accurate for successfully recognized or recollected R than F items (E2-E3); a mixture model confirmed a decrease to both the probability of retrieving the F items as well as the fidelity of the representation of those F items that were retrieved (E4). We conclude that intentional forgetting is an effortful process that not only reduces the likelihood of successfully encoding an item for later retrieval, but also produces an impoverished memory trace even when those items are retrieved; these findings draw a parallel between the control of memory representations within working and long-term memory. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:26709589

  4. The Representational Consequences of Intentional Forgetting: Impairments to Both the Probability and Fidelity of Long-Term Memory

    2016-01-01

    We investigated whether intentional forgetting impacts only the likelihood of later retrieval from long-term memory or whether it also impacts the fidelity of those representations that are successfully retrieved. We accomplished this by combining an item-method directed forgetting task with a testing procedure and modeling approach inspired by the delayed-estimation paradigm used in the study of visual short-term memory (STM). Abstract or concrete colored images were each followed by a remember (R) or forget (F) instruction and sometimes by a visual probe requiring a speeded detection response (E1–E3). Memory was tested using an old–new (E1–E2) or remember-know-no (E3) recognition task followed by a continuous color judgment task (E2–E3); a final experiment included only the color judgment task (E4). Replicating the existing literature, more “old” or “remember” responses were made to R than F items and RTs to postinstruction visual probes were longer following F than R instructions. Color judgments were more accurate for successfully recognized or recollected R than F items (E2–E3); a mixture model confirmed a decrease to both the probability of retrieving the F items as well as the fidelity of the representation of those F items that were retrieved (E4). We conclude that intentional forgetting is an effortful process that not only reduces the likelihood of successfully encoding an item for later retrieval, but also produces an impoverished memory trace even when those items are retrieved; these findings draw a parallel between the control of memory representations within working and long-term memory. PMID:26709589

  5. 3D texture-based hybrid visualizations

    Boada, Imma; Navazo Álvaro, Isabel

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, the visualization of hybrid scenes that contain volume data and a fitted extracted surface is addressed. The proposed algorithm is based on a integrated octree-based representation: the ‘‘hybrid octree.’’ The hybrid octree allows to obtain multiresolution representation of the volume data and it also maintains a decimated surface codification. The proposed visualization approach uses three-dimensional-textures for the visualization of the volume data and integrates the surface ...

  6. Representación visual de la movilización estudiantil en Chile: las fotografías de las marchas como espacios de narración, actuación e identificación política (Visual representation of the student mobilization in Chile: the photographs of marches as spaces of narrative, action and political identification

    Camila Cárdenas Neira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available El artículo explora la representación visual de las marchas estudiantiles suscitadas en Chile durante el 2011, con el propósito de describir los actores e identidades grupales simbolizadas, así como las acciones sociales y los modos como son legitimadas o deslegitimadas en la interacción. Se analiza un corpus fotográfico del libro "Marchas" (Yutronic y Ortiz, 2012, desde un marco teórico-metodológico que considera aportaciones de los Estudios Críticos del Discurso y la Semiótica Social. Se plantea que las fotografías de las marchas constituyen una narración capaz de organizar significados que estructuran formas de actuación e identificación política en oposición, excluyendo a otros participantes críticos del conflicto educativo, como las élites políticas y económicas. Se construye así un tipo de confrontación entre jóvenes y fuerzas policiales, que simplifica la lucha ideológica y refuerza estereotipos sobre grupos cuya acción, al ser objeto de una mediatización permanente, es cognitivamente reforzada. Se concluye que la narración indagada constituye una opción de representación que enfatiza el carácter histórico de la protesta estudiantil, proveyendo un espacio de visibilización de la acción juvenil postdictatorial. (This paper explores the visual representation of student’s protests raised in Chile during 2011. The purpose is to describe the actors and symbolized group identities, as well as the social actions and the ways in which these specific actions are legitimized or delegitimized in the interaction. The corpus is a photographic book entitled "Marchas" (Marches (Yutronic & Ortiz, 2012, which is analyzed from a theoretical and methodological framework that considers input from Critical Discourse Studies and Social Semiotics. The paper claims that the photographs of marches are able to organize narrative meanings which structure opposite forms of performance and political identification, excluding other critical participants in the educational conflict, such as political and economic elites. Thus, it is constructed a type of confrontation between young people and police, which simplifies the ideological struggle and reinforces stereotypes about groups whose action, being subject to constant media coverage, is, therefore, cognitively enhanced. The paper concludes that the narration inquired is an option of representation that emphasizes the historical character of the students’ protest, providing in this way a space that makes visible the postdictatorial action of youth.

  7. Visual grouping in human parietal cortex

    Chun, Marvin M.; Xu, Yaoda

    2007-01-01

    To efficiently extract visual information from complex visual scenes to guide behavior and thought, visual input needs to be organized into discrete units that can be selectively attended and processed. One important such selection unit is visual objects. A crucial factor determining object-based selection is the grouping between visual elements. Although human lesion data have pointed to the importance of the parietal cortex in object-based representations, our understanding of these parieta...

  8. Learning sparse discriminative representations for land cover classification in the Arctic

    Moody, Daniela I.; Brumby, Steven P.; Rowland, Joel C.; Gangodagamage, Chandana

    2012-10-01

    Neuroscience-inspired machine vision algorithms are of current interest in the areas of detection and monitoring of climate change impacts, and general Land Use/Land Cover classification using satellite image data. We describe an approach for automatic classification of land cover in multispectral satellite imagery of the Arctic using sparse representations over learned dictionaries. We demonstrate our method using DigitalGlobe Worldview-2 8-band visible/near infrared high spatial resolution imagery of the MacKenzie River basin. We use an on-line batch Hebbian learning rule to build spectral-textural dictionaries that are adapted to this multispectral data. We learn our dictionaries from millions of overlapping image patches and then use a pursuit search to generate sparse classification features. We explore unsupervised clustering in the sparse representation space to produce land-cover category labels. This approach combines spectral and spatial textural characteristics to detect geologic, vegetative, and hydrologic features. We compare our technique to standard remote sensing algorithms. Our results suggest that neuroscience-based models are a promising approach to practical pattern recognition problems in remote sensing, even for datasets using spectral bands not found in natural visual systems.

  9. High-order statistics of weber local descriptors for image representation.

    Han, Xian-Hua; Chen, Yen-Wei; Xu, Gang

    2015-06-01

    Highly discriminant visual features play a key role in different image classification applications. This study aims to realize a method for extracting highly-discriminant features from images by exploring a robust local descriptor inspired by Weber's law. The investigated local descriptor is based on the fact that human perception for distinguishing a pattern depends not only on the absolute intensity of the stimulus but also on the relative variance of the stimulus. Therefore, we firstly transform the original stimulus (the images in our study) into a differential excitation-domain according to Weber's law, and then explore a local patch, called micro-Texton, in the transformed domain as Weber local descriptor (WLD). Furthermore, we propose to employ a parametric probability process to model the Weber local descriptors, and extract the higher-order statistics to the model parameters for image representation. The proposed strategy can adaptively characterize the WLD space using generative probability model, and then learn the parameters for better fitting the training space, which would lead to more discriminant representation for images. In order to validate the efficiency of the proposed strategy, we apply three different image classification applications including texture, food images and HEp-2 cell pattern recognition, which validates that our proposed strategy has advantages over the state-of-the-art approaches. PMID:25167565

  10. From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology From biologically-inspired physics to physics-inspired biology

    Kornyshev, Alexei A.

    2010-10-01

    The conference 'From DNA-Inspired Physics to Physics-Inspired Biology' (1-5 June 2009, International Center for Theoretical Physics, Trieste, Italy) that myself and two former presidents of the American Biophysical Society—Wilma Olson (Rutgers University) and Adrian Parsegian (NIH), with the support of an ICTP team (Ralf Gebauer (Local Organizer) and Doreen Sauleek (Conference Secretary)), have organized was intended to establish stronger links between the biology and physics communities on the DNA front. The relationships between them were never easy. In 1997, Adrian published a paper in Physics Today ('Harness the Hubris') summarizing his thoughts about the main obstacles for a successful collaboration. The bottom line of that article was that physicists must seriously learn biology before exploring it and even having an interpreter, a friend or co-worker, who will be cooperating with you and translating the problems of biology into a physical language, may not be enough. He started his story with a joke about a physicist asking a biologist: 'I want to study the brain. Tell me something about it!' Biologist: 'First, the brain consists of two parts, and..' Physicist: 'Stop. You have told me too much.' Adrian listed a few direct avenues where physicists' contributions may be particularly welcome. This gentle and elegantly written paper caused, however, a stormy reaction from Bob Austin (Princeton), published together with Adrian's notes, accusing Adrian of forbidding physicists to attack big questions in biology straightaway. Twelve years have passed and many new developments have taken place in the biologist-physicist interaction. This was something I addressed in my opening conference speech, with my position lying somewhere inbetween Parsegian's and Austin's, which is briefly outlined here. I will first recall certain precepts or 'dogmas' that fly in the air like Valkyries, poisoning those relationships. Since the early seventies when I was a first year PhD student at the Frumkin Institute in Moscow attending hot theoretical seminars chaired by Benjamin Levich (1917-1986, a pupil of Landau and the founding father of physical-chemical hydrodynamics), I particularly remember one of his many jokes he used to spice up his seminar. When some overly enthusiastic speaker was telling us with 100% confidence how the electron transfers between atomic moieties in a solvent near an electrode, and what the molecules exactly do to promote the transfer, he used to ask the speaker: 'How do you know it? Have you been there?' Today this is no longer a question or even a joke. We have plenty of experimental tools to 'get there'. The list of such techniques is too long to cover fully, I may just refer to FIONA (fluorescence imaging with nanometer accuracy) which allows us to trace the motion of myosin on actin or kinesin on microtubules and similar aspects of protein motility in vivo and in vitro (fluorescence methods were at the center of the Biological and Molecular Machine Program at Kavli ITP, Santa Barbara, where the founders of those techniques taught us what we can learn using them) or visualizing the positions of adsorbed counterions on DNA by synchrotron radiation. Therefore, the following dogmas can be given: Dogma 1: 'Seeing is believing'. Once, I asked an Assistant Professor from one of the top US universities, who was preaching such methods, had he tried to plot his data in some coordinates, where I would have expected his data to lie on a straight line. The answer was, 'Come on, what you speak about is 20th century science; it's no longer interesting!' I am afraid he was not unique in his generation, voting for what I would call 'MTV-science'. This science does make you dance, but on its own is not sufficient without a deep theoretical analysis of what you actually see. Otherwise, 'what you see is what you get' and not more. Dogma 2: 'A theory must contain not more than exponential functions, logarithms and alike. Otherwise the job should be left with computers. No Bessel functions, please!' This point of view was advocated by my office mate at KITP, Rob Philips, Professor of Applied Physics and Molecular Biophysics at Caltech, who found his new love—biology: from solid state theory. We had heated arguments about it. And my strongest one was that it was the maths of the now famous paper by Cochran et al [1] that allowed Watson and Crick to decipher the DNA x-ray patterns of Rosalind Franklin. The CCV formula for the x-ray scattering intensity fully explained the structure of the famous cross of the scattering maxima on the (kz, K)-map, where kz and K are, respectively, the components of the scattering wave-vector transfer in the direction along the main axis of the columnar array of the DNA molecules and in the perpendicular plane. From the distance and the position of the darkest spots on that pattern it was possible to deduce that the studied DNA has a shape of a double helix, to find its radius, the width of the minor and major groove, the vertical rise between base pairs, and the helical pitch. There were still some features in that pattern which have not been noticed, which were only understood half a century later after the corresponding extension of the CCV theory [2, 3], but those were not essential for solving the structure of DNA itself at that time, but rather for the understanding of DNA-DNA interactions and their effect on more subtle aspects of DNA structure, which are an issue today. The 'Bessel function' was the key player in the CCV equation and the extensions that followed. Dogma 3:'This happened once. It is unlikely to ever happen again' (from a conversation with a respectable editor of a high-profile biological journal about the revolution made by physics in biology). This is a common opinion, at least in the biological community. Note, that of the four discoverers of the DNA structure, three were physicists and only Watson was a biologist, and the key secret in that discovery was the 'chemistry' between an enthusiastic biologist (Watson) and physicist (Crick) that helped them to find common language, and as a result discover not only the structure but also the 'function' of DNA. Now we know that the machinery of DNA replication is very complex, promoted by motor proteins such as DNA helicase, polymerase, ligases etc, but the complementary principle of synthesis of two identical DNA molecules on the unwound complimentary single strands as templates remains the same as mentioned in the famous phrase ('It did not escape our attention') of the first Watson-Crick paper. Dogma 4: (Almost literally from a letter from Don Roy Forsdyke, Biochemistry Professor at Queens Ontario). 'Biologists will not read a paper with formulae. The biological literature is vast. Biologists have too many papers to read and too many experiments to make. They will leave aside any reading that looks difficult'. If this is true, and I think it is, we are in big trouble; this brings us to the next dogma. Dogma 5: (Catch 22) It is impossible to publish a serious theoretical paper in a biological journal. Physicists, particularly, theorists need derivations to prove the validity of their findings. But with the derivations in the script, the paper will be rejected. If you still publish it in a physical journal it will not be read by those to whom it is addressed. Dogma 6:Physicists are too ignorant to offer biologists anything useful. Perhaps, some new spectroscopic method or apparatus for force measurement, but that's about it. Leave biology to professionals. Full stop. I make no comments about this extreme point of view, referring the reader to the dispute between Parsegian and Austin, which is still quite relevant today. Next, a pearl of wisdom of a theoretical physicist, Nobel Laureate in Physiology and Medicine, Max Delbrück (Caltech), formulated in his 1949 lecture in Copenhagen, the principles on which organisms of today are based must have been determined by a couple of billion years of evolutionary history; 'you cannot expect to explain so wise an old bird in a few simple words'. It is indisputably so, but it is followed by two other competing sub-dogmas: Dogma N6a: Physics wants to simplify and unify things, as much as possible, biology resists the reductionist approach and is happy about diversification and complexity. In my opinion all these dogmas have been beaten by this icon, the understanding of which gave rise to the idea of DNA replication and all the following principles of molecular biology. Not only 'this will happen again' but on a smaller scale this happens all the time. Generally, through centuries, physics and mathematics have changed our lives completely. In a short article one cannot give a full list of such achievements from Aristotle's time, but I name just a few of the summits of the last two centuries. A great physicist Rutherford (who was, by the way, a Nobel Laureate in Chemistry for 'his investigations into the disintegration of the elements, and the chemistry of radioactive substances') was also famous for an extreme (and definitely outdated) statement: 'All science is either stamp collecting or physics'. Let us paraphrase him and collect some stamps. I have no space to stop on the Faraday-Ampere laws of stationary electricity (who cares, electric current comes from a plug would be the answer of most of people unfamiliar with physics, and forget about electricity that is supplied to biological laboratories). So, let us go straight away to James Clerk Maxwell. He derived four equations that related electricity and magnetism and, as the legend tells us, it took him seven years to write the fourth equation to complete the set with four unknown variables. The story of the fourth Maxwell equation is one of the most dramatic stories in the history of science [4]. As a solution of that set he obtained relativistically-invariant electromagnetic waves, which no one saw and the consequences of which no one had foreseen at that time. But very soon Hertz understood how to generate them, Thomson how to receive them, and now we have the world all connected online. My next stamp goes to the Zhukovski equation of the hydrodynamics of a wing, which explained how aerodynamic lift force is generated. Now we can get from London to Washington in a third of a day, essentially due to that equation. Of the many things that the genius of Einstein discovered his energy-matter relation has led us to atomic power, whether we like it or not. Rutherford and Bohr unraveled the structure of atoms and all our materials science followed from it. Discovery of the transistor made the world of electronics and computers possible, and, again—whether we like it or not—most of us spend many hours daily staring at computer screens. Crick's equations and Franklin-Wilkins' observations (made possible by Roentgen's discovery that I omitted to mention after Maxwell) gave rise to the world of molecular biology which could also be easily forgotten by the wide public, if not our ever grateful forensic experts. Just two more milestones of much more 'modest' caliber. This is the discovery of lasers which are massively used for communication, in medicine and spectroscopy, including biological research. Next, I mention the discovery of scanning probe techniques, which allowed us to see individual atoms. For these two I did not even find stamps, but I am sure they must exist somewhere. The STM has just led Stuart Lindsey's team (University of Arizona) to the first steps towards ultrafast sequencing of DNA using functionalized STM tips. At the Abdus Salam International Center for Theoretical Physics there is no need to convince anyone that involved mathematics and physics is needed. But neither do we need to explain to anyone there that the applications of physics may be equally exciting as its fundamentals. The appreciation of massive achievements of physical methods in DNA research made it possible to host and massively sponsor this DNA conference at the ICTP. The conference was generously co-sponsored by the Wellcome Trust (UK). It comprised approximately 60 talks on topically focused sessions devoted to: DNA mechanics DNA structure, interactions and aggregation Recognition of homologous genes Conformational dynamics, supercoiling and packing DNA compactization in viruses DNA-protein interaction and recognition DNA in confinement (pores and vesicles) Smart DNA (robotics, nano-architectures, switches, sensors and DNA electronics) The success of the conference was that it was not a meeting of a club of physicists interested in biology, but a meeting of physicists, carrying out important work widely published not only in physical but also biological journals, with the leading biologists who, personally, were keenly interested in learning what novelties physical methods and existing knowledge could offer them. They were equally eager to explain to physicists and mathematicians the most challenging paradigms of molecular biology research. The conference was opened by two inspiring high-impact talks, from a Director of the European Molecular Genetics Center in Trieste, Arturo Falaschi, the Editor of HFSP Journal (who sadly just passed away last month), and from a scientist of the next generation, Lynn Zechiedrich, Professor of Baylor Medical School and former co-worker of the late Nick Cozzarelly. Both showed astounding manifestations of the polymeric behavior of DNA, where physics is eagerly awaited like rain in the desert. However, at the whole conference about 40% of lectures were delivered by biologists. In this short article it is not possible to cover even the most exciting presentations, and I refer interested readers to the website [5] where further information can be found. I will outline below just a couple of issues. The conference revealed big progress in understanding the details of DNA mechanics, including its local sequence-dependent elastic properties. Progress was achieved in understanding the role of electrostatic interactions with ions and charged moieties that can influence the shape and elasticity of DNA, highlighted particularly in the studies of Jim Maher (University of Minnesota). Generally, the role of helical structure dependent, so called `helix-specific' interactions on which the lecture of Sergey Leikin (NIH) was focused, was unequivocally found to play a crucial role in the interaction, aggregation and assembly of DNA—from liquid crystals to intracellular compartments, as well as viral capsids. One of the hottest sessions was devoted to the 'last great enigma' of genetic recombination: its 'zero' stage—the recognition of homologous genes. The big picture was overviewed in biological terms by Adi Barzel (following a 'manifesto' article with Martin Kupiec [6]). New experiments were then reported that showed that DNA can recognize its homology from a distance without unzipping and local base pair formation. The reported published experiments of an Imperial-NIH team [7], widely discussed last year under a controversial notion of DNA-'telepathy' (in quotes, of course), were based on the direct observation of spontaneous segregation of homologous DNA in cholesteric liquid crystals. The reported by Mara Prentiss, and now published, beautiful experiments of the Harvard team [8] were more involved and were based on the application of the magnetic bead technique (purely physical methods). These have unambiguously demonstrated homology pairing at the double-stranded DNA level, also providing evidence of unimportance of defect-based Watson and Crick pairing in this phenomenon. Both kinds of experiments supported the expectations of an electrostatic snapshot recognition mechanism behind intact, double-stranded DNA homology pairing [9]. But none of them has yet systematically studied its various features, after which one could consider the mentioned mechanism experimentally confirmed. Discussions at breakout meetings referred to the experiments to be performed, that might finally rebute the last presumption of molecular biology that only Watson and Crick pairing can provide recognition, i.e. that the recognition between intact double stranded DNA is impossible. Notably the suggested electrostatic snap-shot recognition mechanism is also based on the helical structure of DNA and correlation of the structure with the text of the sequence (for further details see [10].) DNA packing in chromatin and chromatin dynamics were the main focus of the conference. Andrew Travers (Ecole Normale Superiore de Cachan), exposed the problem in all its biological complexity, followed by the physical insight into its modeling, overviewed by Helmut Schiessel. Using different kinds of single molecule pulling experiments Jörge Langowski (University of Heidelberg) and David Bensimon (Laboratoire Physique Statistique, Paris) revealed invaluable insights into nucleosome opening and the role of remodeling factors. Jim Kadonaga (UCSD) reported a discovery of a new ATP driven motor-protein, exhibiting annealing/reverse helicase activity. Lars Nordensiöld (Singapore Nanyang TU) has established the sequence of counterions promoting DNA compactization in chromatin, and so on. Another class of astounding results was related with the structure of DNA phases, coils and toroids in viral capcids, understanding of which at the nanoscopic level, is instrumental for the development of antiviral therapies. Bill Gelbart (UCLA) and Avi Ben-Shaul (Hebrew University of Jerusalem) highlighted various aspects of packing inside the capsids, as well as how viral DNA or RNA can get in and out. Amazing observations of Francoise Livolant have shown the local liquid crystalline structure of DNA in that dense packing. The experiments of her group have unambiguously demonstrated azimuthal correlations between the densely packed double strands, in agreement with similar effects detected earlier in wet DNA fibers described on the physical level in the talk of Sergey Leikin [11]. No matter which aspect of DNA research was discussed at the conference, the physical chemistry of solution, particularly the role of counterions, was found to be extraordinarily important. Loren Williams (Georgia Tech) presented decisive synchrotron x-ray 3d-maps of distribution of the most important class of adsorbed counterions between the major and minor grooves of DNA or phosphates. Purely physical methods were used to obtain them with the results crucial for understanding the resulting charge patterns of DNA (including the adsorbed counterions) that determine DNA physical behaviour and DNA-DNA helix specific forces. The conference has shown substantial progress in the characterization, understanding of physics, geometry and topology of DNA-supercoiling, as well as its biological implementations, and a set of lectures was devoted to its modeling and experimental characterization. New techniques were also the center of attention, such as DNA transport through solid-state pores. In particular, Serge Lemay (Kavli Institute, TU Delft, now at Twente) has shown a number of new developments related to a combination of magnetic tweezers techniques and transport, allowing him to precisely characterize the trapping of DNA in the pores and revealing what can be learned from it. Amit Meller (BU) reported an intriguing result showing that DNA capture rate increases with its length for medium long DNA whereas there is no length dependence for longer molecules. Statistical physics of polymers was needed to explain this, revealing also a crucial role of electrostatics. Creation of salt gradients across the pore is providing a tool that increases the sensitivity of this popular new method by an order of magnitude. A unique single molecule technique to study the effect of RNA polymeraze backtracking, using a dual trap optical tweezers assay, was reported by Stephan Grill (Max-Plank Institute, Dresden). Many theoretical models reported at the conference were elegant, but most importantly closely related to experimental findings. On the first day of the meeting we were able to celebrate Adrian Parsegian's 70th birthday. A worldwide renowned figure in modern biological physics, its distinguished veteran, a former President of the Biophysical Society and an author of many seminal, pioneering papers, Adrian has worked at the NIH for four decades and over the last two has led a vibrant Structural and Physical Biology Laboratory, created by him. Adrian has done a lot for physicists and biologists coming closer together. That summer, full of his ever young energy—an example for many young scientists—he is moving to build a new research team as a Professor at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. My feeling is that something is beginning to move in the difficult interactions between the physical and biological communities, the progress noticeable at least at the scale of 130 people present in Trieste. A few years ago, Paul Selvin, a biophysicist at the University of Illinois who has made crucial contributions to the visualization and characterization of biomolecular motility, suggested that if Rutherford was alive today, he would have possibly conclude that 'All science is either....biology or tool-making for biology... or not fundable'. Generally, 'pride and prejudice' today is no longer on the side of physicists. But in order to overcome the barrier of skepticism we, physicists, not only should not be shy about what we were able to demonstrate in the test tube, but also have to think how we could show that our 'beautiful physical effects' work equally inside the cell! This is much more difficult. Many of us will not be able to do it alone without finding a biologist match. Crick was not only a great mind, he was also lucky to meet his biologist. But Crick himself was very serious about real biology rather than just 'biologically-inspired physics'. And this is what Adrian advised all of us to do in his 1997 Physics Today paper. But in support of his opponent, Bob Austin, I wish to quote the conclusion from a memorable Steven Hawking's talk at the White House: 'The greatest discoveries of the 21st century will be, where we don't expect them'. So, physics will bring surprises to biology, and the conference left us no doubt of it. Acknowledgments I wish to thank John Seddon (Imperial College, UK) for useful remarks about these comments. The initial version of this article featured a collection of post stamps/photos, illustrating the discoveries mentioned in it. As it was difficult to obtain permissions to reproduce these pictures in print, we had to delete all of them, at the last moment. I apologize for this, but although the presentation became less flashy, I still think that the arguments remained clear. There is therefore nobody to acknowledge on this front. References [1] Cochran W, Crick F H C and Vand V 1952 The structure of synthetic polypeptides. I. The transform of atoms on a helix Acta Crystallogr. 5 581 [2] Kornyshev A A, Lee D J, Leikin S and Wynveen A 2007 Structure and interactions of biological helices Rev. Mod. Phys. 79 943-96 [3] Wynveen A, Lee D J, Kornyshev A A and Leikin S 2008 Helical coherence of DNA in crystals and solution Nucl. Acids Res. 36 5540-51 [4] Shapiro I S 1973 On the history of the discovery of Maxwell's equations Sov. Phys. Usp. 15 651 [5] http://cdsagenda5.ictp.trieste.it/full_display.php?ida=a08164 [6] Kupiec M 2008 Finding a match: how do homologous sequences get together for recombination Nature Rev. Genetics 9 27-37 [7] Baldwin G et al 2008 Duplex DNA recognize sequence homology in protein free environment J. Phys. Chem. B 112 1060-64 [8] Danilowicz C, Lee C H, Kim K, Hatch K, Coljee V W, Kleckner N and Prentiss M 2009 Single molecule detection of direct, homologous, DNA/DNA pairing Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci USA 106 19824-9 [9] Kornyshev A and Leikin S 2001 Sequence recognition in the pairing of DNA duplexes Phys. Rev. Lett. 86 13666 Kornyshev A A and Wynveen A 2009 The homology recognition well as an innate property of DNA structure Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci USA 106 4683 [10] Kornyshev A A 2010 Physics of DNA: unraveling hidden abilities encoded in the structure of 'the most important molecule' Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. at press doi:10.1039/C004107F [11] Kornyshev A A, Lee D J, Leikin S, Wynveen A and Zimmerman S 2005 Direct observation of azimuthal correlations between DNA in hydrated aggregate Phys. Rev. Lett. 95 148102

  11. The Creative Dimension of Visuality

    Michelsen, Anders Ib

    This essay reflects critically on the notion of visuality, a centrepiece of current theory on visual culture and its underlying idea of a structural ‘discursive determination’ of visual phenomena. Is the visual really to be addressed through the post-war heritage of discourse and representation a...... the invisible’ to the notion of collective creativity and ‘the imaginary institution of society’ of Cornelius Castoriadis. In the theoretical relationship between Merleau-Ponty and Castoriadis it is possible to indicate a notion of visuality as a creative dimension....

  12. Guard Cell and Tropomyosin Inspired Chemical Sensor

    Jacquelyn K.S. Nagel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sensors are an integral part of many engineered products and systems. Biological inspiration has the potential to improve current sensor designs as well as inspire innovative ones. This paper presents the design of an innovative, biologically-inspired chemical sensor that performs “up-front” processing through mechanical means. Inspiration from the physiology (function of the guard cell coupled with the morphology (form and physiology of tropomyosin resulted in two concept variants for the chemical sensor. Applications of the sensor design include environmental monitoring of harmful gases, and a non-invasive approach to detect illnesses including diabetes, liver disease, and cancer on the breath.

  13. Visualization of Social Networks

    Chen, Ing-Xiang; Yang, Cheng-Zen

    With the ubiquitous characteristic of the Internet, today many online social environments are provided to connect people. Various social relationships are thus created, connected, and migrated from our real lives to the Internet environment from different social groups. Many social communities and relationships are also quickly constructed and connected via instant personal messengers, blogs, Twitter, Facebook, and a great variety of online social services. Since social network visualizations can structure the complex relationships between different groups of individuals or organizations, they are helpful to analyze the social activities and relationships of actors, particularly over a large number of nodes. Therefore, many studies and visualization tools have been investigated to present social networks with graph representations. In this chapter, we will first review the background of social network analysis and visualization methods, and then introduce various novel visualization applications for social networks. Finally, the challenges and the future development of visualizing online social networks are discussed.

  14. Visual Signs of Ageing

    Helle Rexbye

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Consumer culture has placed the ageing body in a dilemma of representation. Physical appearance has become increasingly important as a symbol of identity, and at the same time society idealizes youth. This study explores visual ageing empirically. By using photographs of older persons (70+ as starting point, it is explored how visual age is assessed and interpreted. It is shown that informants read age in a spread of stages and categories. Main age indicators are biological markers: skin, eyes, and hair colour, but supplemented by vigour, style, and grooming. Furthermore, in-depth interviews indicate that visual age is mainly interpreted into categories and moral regulations rooted in early modernity. Subsequently the question of a postmodern perspective of visual ageing is discussed in this article. The empirical findings in the study question a postmodern fluidity of visual signs – at least when the concern is signs of ageing.

  15. Seq2Logo: a method for construction and visualization of amino acid binding motifs and sequence profiles including sequence weighting, pseudo counts and two-sided representation of amino acid enrichment and depletion

    Thomsen, Martin Christen Frølund; Nielsen, Morten

    Seq2Logo is a web-based sequence logo generator. Sequence logos are a graphical representation of the information content stored in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) and provide a compact and highly intuitive representation of the position-specific amino acid composition of binding motifs, active...... sites, etc. in biological sequences. Accurate generation of sequence logos is often compromised by sequence redundancy and low number of observations. Moreover, most methods available for sequence logo generation focus on displaying the position-specific enrichment of amino acids, discarding the equally...... valuable information related to amino acid depletion. Seq2logo aims at resolving these issues allowing the user to include sequence weighting to correct for data redundancy, pseudo counts to correct for low number of observations and different logotype representations each capturing different aspects...

  16. Brackets in representation algebras of Hopf algebras

    Massuyeau, Gwenael; Turaev, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    For any graded bialgebras $A$ and $B$, we define a commutative graded algebra $A_B$ representing the functor of so-called $B$-representations of $A$. When $A$ is a cocommutative graded Hopf algebra and $B$ is a commutative ungraded Hopf algebra, we introduce a method deriving a Gerstenhaber bracket in $A_B$ from a Fox pairing in $A$ and a balanced biderivation in $B$. Our construction is inspired by Van den Bergh's non-commutative Poisson geometry, and may be viewed as an algebraic generaliza...

  17. Using models and representations in learning and teaching about the atom : A systematic literature review

    Netzell, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    This study is a systematic literature review on the role of models and representations in the teaching, learning and understanding of the atom and atomic concepts. The aim of the study is to investigate the role of different visual representations, what models and representations are used in the science classroom, how learners interpret different external representations of the atom, what mental models students construct, and how the representations can be used and designed for meaningful lea...

  18. The Spatial Representation of Dynamic Scenes - An Integrative Approach

    Huff, Markus; Schwan, Stephan; Garsoffky, Bärbel

    This paper addresses the spatial representation of dynamic scenes, particularly the question whether recognition performance is viewpoint dependent or viewpoint invariant. Beginning with the delimitation of static and dynamic scene recognition, the viewpoint dependency of visual recognition performance and the structure of the underlying mental representation are discussed. In the following, two parameters (an easy to identify event model and salient static features) are identified which appeared to be accountable for viewpoint dependency or viewpoint invariance of visual recognition performance for dynamic scenes.

  19. Chaos game representation for comparison of whole genomes

    Sasikumar Roschen; Joseph Jijoy

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Chaos game representation of genome sequences has been used for visual representation of genome sequence patterns as well as alignment-free comparisons of sequences based on oligonucleotide frequencies. However the potential of this representation for making alignment-based comparisons of whole genome sequences has not been exploited. Results We present here a fast algorithm for identifying all local alignments between two long DNA sequences using the sequence information ...

  20. Think Spatial: The Representation in Mental Rotation Is Nonvisual

    Liesefeld, Heinrich R.; Zimmer, Hubert D.

    2013-01-01

    For mental rotation, introspection, theories, and interpretations of experimental results imply a certain type of mental representation, namely, visual mental images. Characteristics of the rotated representation can be examined by measuring the influence of stimulus characteristics on rotational speed. If the amount of a given type of information…

  1. Masked Primes Activate Feature Representations in Reading Aloud

    Mousikou, Petroula; Roon, Kevin D.; Rastle, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Theories of reading aloud are silent about the role of subphonemic/subsegmental representations in translating print to sound. However, there is empirical evidence suggesting that feature representations are activated in speech production and visual word recognition. In the present study, we sought to determine whether masked primes activate…

  2. Collide@CERN: sharing inspiration

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Late last year, Julius von Bismarck was appointed to be CERN's first "artist in residence" after winning the Collide@CERN Digital Arts award. He’ll be spending two months at CERN starting this March but, to get a flavour of what’s in store, he visited the Organization last week for a crash course in its inspiring activities.   Julius von Bismarck, taking a closer look... When we arrive to interview German artist Julius von Bismarck, he’s being given a presentation about antiprotons’ ability to kill cancer cells. The whiteboard in the room contains graphs and equations that might easily send a non-scientist running, yet as Julius puts it, “if I weren’t interested, I’d be asleep”. Given his numerous questions, he must have been fascinated. “This ‘introduction’ week has been exhilarating,” says Julius. “I’ve been able to interact ...

  3. Decrypting SO(10-inspired leptogenesis

    Pasquale Di Bari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Encouraged by the recent results from neutrino oscillation experiments, we perform an analytical study of SO(10-inspired models and leptogenesis with hierarchical right-handed (RH neutrino spectrum. Under the approximation of negligible misalignment between the neutrino Yukawa basis and the charged lepton basis, we find an analytical expression for the final asymmetry directly in terms of the low energy neutrino parameters that fully reproduces previous numerical results. This expression also shows that it is possible to identify an effective leptogenesis phase for these models. When we also impose the wash-out of a large pre-existing asymmetry NB−Lp,i, the strong thermal (ST condition, we derive analytically all those constraints on the low energy neutrino parameters that characterise the ST-SO(10-inspired leptogenesis solution, confirming previous numerical results. In particular we show why, though neutrino masses have to be necessarily normally ordered, the solution implies an analytical lower bound on the effective neutrino-less double beta decay neutrino mass, mee≳8 meV, for NB−Lp,i=10−3, testable with next generation experiments. This, in combination with an upper bound on the atmospheric mixing angle, necessarily in the first octant, forces the lightest neutrino mass within a narrow range m1≃(10–30 meV (corresponding to ∑imi≃(75–125 meV. We also show why the solution could correctly predict a non-vanishing reactor neutrino mixing angle and requires the Dirac phase to be in the fourth quadrant, implying sin⁡δ (and JCP negative as hinted by current global analyses. Many of the analytical results presented (expressions for the orthogonal matrix, RH neutrino mixing matrix, masses and phases can have applications beyond leptogenesis.

  4. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  5. Integrated Visualization Environment for Science Mission Modeling Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed work will provide NASA with an integrated visualization environment providing greater insight and a more intuitive representation of large technical...

  6. An Exploration of Design Students' Inspiration Process

    Dazkir, Sibel S.; Mower, Jennifer M.; Reddy-Best, Kelly L.; Pedersen, Elaine L.

    2013-01-01

    Our purpose was to explore how different sources of inspiration influenced two groups of students' inspiration process and their attitudes toward their design projects. Assigned sources of inspiration and instructor's assistance in the search for inspiration varied for two groups of students completing a small culture inspired product…

  7. Sensitivity to the visual field origin of natural image patches in human low-level visual cortex

    Damien J Mannion

    2015-01-01

    Asymmetries in the response to visual patterns in the upper and lower visual fields (above and below the centre of gaze) have been associated with ecological factors relating to the structure of typical visual environments. Here, we investigated whether the content of the upper and lower visual field representations in low-level regions of human visual cortex are specialised for visual patterns that arise from the upper and lower visual fields in natural images. We presented image patches, dr...

  8. Learning Deep Face Representation

    Fan, Haoqiang; Cao, Zhimin; Jiang, Yuning; Yin, Qi; Doudou, Chinchilla

    2014-01-01

    Face representation is a crucial step of face recognition systems. An optimal face representation should be discriminative, robust, compact, and very easy-to-implement. While numerous hand-crafted and learning-based representations have been proposed, considerable room for improvement is still present. In this paper, we present a very easy-to-implement deep learning framework for face representation. Our method bases on a new structure of deep network (called Pyramid CNN). The proposed Pyrami...

  9. Binary neutron star inspiral, LIGO, and cosmology

    Finn, L. S.

    1995-01-01

    Recent work on the expected event rate of neutron star inspiral signals in the LIGO detector is summarized. The observed signals will be from inspirals at cosmological distances, and the important cosmological effects on the event rate and spectrum are discussed. This paper is a contribution to the proceedings of the 17th Texas Symposium held in Munich, 12-17 December 1994.

  10. Veto Studies for LIGO Inspiral Triggers

    Christensen, Nelson

    2005-01-01

    LIGO recently conducted its third scientific data run, S3. Here we summarize the veto and data quality studies conducted by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration in connection with the search for binary inspiral signals in the S3 data. LIGO's interferometer channels and physical environmental monitors were monitored, and events in these channels coincident with inspiral triggers were examined.

  11. Business Inspiration: Small Business Leadership in Recovery?

    Rae, David; Price, Liz; Bosworth, Gary; Parkinson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Business Inspiration was a short, action-centred leadership and innovation development programme designed for owners and managers of smaller firms to address business survival and repositioning needs arising from the UK's economic downturn. The article examines the design and delivery of Business Inspiration and the impact of the programme on…

  12. Business Inspiration: Small Business Leadership in Recovery?

    Rae, David; Price, Liz; Bosworth, Gary; Parkinson, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Business Inspiration was a short, action-centred leadership and innovation development programme designed for owners and managers of smaller firms to address business survival and repositioning needs arising from the UK's economic downturn. The article examines the design and delivery of Business Inspiration and the impact of the programme on…

  13. The representational dynamics of remembered projectile locations.

    De Sá Teixeira, Nuno Alexandre; Hecht, Heiko; Oliveira, Armando Mónica

    2013-12-01

    When people are instructed to locate the vanishing location of a moving target, systematic errors forward in the direction of motion (M-displacement) and downward in the direction of gravity (O-displacement) are found. These phenomena came to be linked with the notion that physical invariants are embedded in the dynamic representations generated by the perceptual system. We explore the nature of these invariants that determine the representational mechanics of projectiles. By manipulating the retention intervals between the target's disappearance and the participant's responses, while measuring both M- and O-displacements, we were able to uncover a representational analogue of the trajectory of a projectile. The outcomes of three experiments revealed that the shape of this trajectory is discontinuous. Although the horizontal component of such trajectory can be accounted for by perceptual and oculomotor factors, its vertical component cannot. Taken together, the outcomes support an internalization of gravity in the visual representation of projectiles. PMID:23398260

  14. Flavor A Language for Media Representation

    Eleftheriadis, A; Eleftheriadis, Alexandros; Hong, Danny

    2003-01-01

    Flavor (Formal Language for Audio-Visual Object Representation) has been created as a language for describing coded multimedia bitstreams in a formal way so that the code for reading and writing bitstreams can be automatically generated. It is an extension of C++ and Java, in which the typing system incorporates bitstream representation semantics. This allows describing in a single place both the in-memory representation of data as well as their bitstream-level (compressed) representation. Flavor also comes with a translator that automatically generates standard C++ or Java code from the Flavor source code so that direct access to compressed multimedia information by application developers can be achieved with essentially zero programming. Flavor has gone through many enhancements and this paper fully describes the latest version of the language and the translator. The software has been made into an open source project as of Version 4.1, and the latest downloadable Flavor package is available at http://flavor...

  15. New Inspirations in Nature: A Survey

    Nitesh Maganlal Sureja

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the past few decades, the studies on algorithms inspired by nature have shown that these methods can be efficiently used to eliminate most of the difficulties of classical methods. Nature inspired algorithms are widely used to solve optimization problems with complex nature. Various research works are carried out and algorithms are presented based on that during last few decades. Recently, some new algorithms inspired from nature are proposed to further improve the solutions obtained by the algorithms presented before. In this paper, a survey of five recently introduced Nature inspired algorithms is carried out. They include Firefly algorithm (FA, Cuckoo Search (CS, and Bat Inspired Algorithm (BA. Each of these algorithms are introduced and applied on various numerical optimization functions by various authors. We have tried to review and study the papers published by the authors and present a conclusion of this survey based on the results obtained.

  16. Highly eccentric inspirals into a black hole

    Osburn, Thomas; Warburton, Niels; Evans, Charles R.

    2016-03-01

    We model the inspiral of a compact stellar-mass object into a massive nonrotating black hole including all dissipative and conservative first-order-in-the-mass-ratio effects on the orbital motion. The techniques we develop allow inspirals with initial eccentricities as high as e ˜0.8 and initial separations as large as p ˜50 to be evolved through many thousands of orbits up to the onset of the plunge into the black hole. The inspiral is computed using an osculating elements scheme driven by a hybridized self-force model, which combines Lorenz-gauge self-force results with highly accurate flux data from a Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli code. The high accuracy of our hybrid self-force model allows the orbital phase of the inspirals to be tracked to within ˜0.1 radians or better. The difference between self-force models and inspirals computed in the radiative approximation is quantified.

  17. MUlti-Store Tracker (MUSTer): a Cognitive Psychology Inspired Approach to Object Tracking

    Zhibin, Hong; Chen, Zhe,; WANG, CHAOHUI; Mei, Xue; Prokhorov, Danil; Tao, Dacheng

    2015-01-01

    Variations in the appearance of a tracked object, such as changes in geometry/photometry, camera viewpoint, illumination , or partial occlusion, pose a major challenge to object tracking. Here, we adopt cognitive psychology principles to design a flexible representation that can adapt to changes in object appearance during tracking. Inspired by the well-known Atkinson-Shiffrin Memory Model, we propose MUlti-Store Tracker (MUSTer), a dual-component approach consisting of short-and long-term me...

  18. Visual Impairment

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Visual Impairment KidsHealth > For Teens > Visual Impairment Print A ... with the brain, making vision impossible. What Is Visual Impairment? Many people have some type of visual ...

  19. Visual field

    Perimetry; Tangent screen exam; Automated perimetry exam; Goldmann visual field exam; Humphrey visual field exam ... Confrontation visual field exam : This is a quick and basic check of the visual field. The health care provider ...

  20. Words, shape, visual search and visual working memory in 3-year-old children

    Vales, Catarina; Smith, Linda B.

    2014-01-01

    Do words cue children’s visual attention, and if so, what are the relevant mechanisms? Across four experiments, 3-year-old children (N = 163) were tested in visual search tasks in which targets were cued with only a visual preview versus a visual preview and a spoken name. The experiments were designed to determine whether labels facilitated search times and to examine one route through which labels could have their effect: By influencing the visual working memory representation of the target...

  1. A specialized face-processing model inspired by the organization of monkey face patches explains several face-specific phenomena observed in humans

    Farzmahdi, Amirhossein; Rajaei, Karim; Ghodrati, Masoud; Ebrahimpour, Reza; Khaligh-Razavi, Seyed-Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Converging reports indicate that face images are processed through specialized neural networks in the brain –i.e. face patches in monkeys and the fusiform face area (FFA) in humans. These studies were designed to find out how faces are processed in visual system compared to other objects. Yet, the underlying mechanism of face processing is not completely revealed. Here, we show that a hierarchical computational model, inspired by electrophysiological evidence on face processing in primates, is able to generate representational properties similar to those observed in monkey face patches (posterior, middle and anterior patches). Since the most important goal of sensory neuroscience is linking the neural responses with behavioral outputs, we test whether the proposed model, which is designed to account for neural responses in monkey face patches, is also able to predict well-documented behavioral face phenomena observed in humans. We show that the proposed model satisfies several cognitive face effects such as: composite face effect and the idea of canonical face views. Our model provides insights about the underlying computations that transfer visual information from posterior to anterior face patches. PMID:27113635

  2. Visual Learning in Application of Integration

    Bt Shafie, Afza; Barnachea Janier, Josefina; Bt Wan Ahmad, Wan Fatimah

    Innovative use of technology can improve the way how Mathematics should be taught. It can enhance student's learning the concepts through visualization. Visualization in Mathematics refers to us of texts, pictures, graphs and animations to hold the attention of the learners in order to learn the concepts. This paper describes the use of a developed multimedia courseware as an effective tool for visual learning mathematics. The focus is on the application of integration which is a topic in Engineering Mathematics 2. The course is offered to the foundation students in the Universiti Teknologi of PETRONAS. Questionnaire has been distributed to get a feedback on the visual representation and students' attitudes towards using visual representation as a learning tool. The questionnaire consists of 3 sections: Courseware Design (Part A), courseware usability (Part B) and attitudes towards using the courseware (Part C). The results showed that students demonstrated the use of visual representation has benefited them in learning the topic.

  3. Bio-inspired method and system for actionable intelligence

    Khosla, Deepak; Chelian, Suhas E.

    2009-05-01

    This paper describes a bio-inspired VISion based actionable INTelligence system (VISINT) that provides automated capabilities to (1) understand objects, patterns, events and behaviors in vision data; (2) translate this understanding into timely recognition of novel and anomalous entities; and (3) discover underlying hierarchies and relationships between disparate labels entered by multiple users to provide a consistent data representation. VISINT is both a system and a novel collection of novel bio-inspired algorithms/modules. These modules can be used independently for various aspects of the actionable intelligence problem or sequenced together for an end-to-end actionable intelligence system. The algorithms can be useful in many other applications such as scene understanding, behavioral analysis, automatic surveillance systems, etc. The bio-inspired algorithms are a novel combination of hierarchical spatial and temporal networks based on the Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART). The novel aspects of this work are that it is an end-to-end system for actionable intelligence that combines existing and novel implementations of various modules in innovative ways to develop a system concept for actionable intelligence. Although there are other algorithms/implementations of several of the modules in VISINT, they suffer from various limitations and often system integration is not considered. The overall VISINT system can be viewed an incremental learning system where no offline training is required and data from multiple sources and times can be seamlessly integrated. The user is in the loop, but due to the semi-supervised nature of the underlying algorithms, only significant variations of entities, not all false alarms, are shown to the user. It does not forget the past even with new learning. While VISINT is designed as a vision-based system, it could also work with other kinds of sensor data that can recognize and locate individual objects in the scene. Beyond that stage of object recognition and localization, all aspects of VISINT are applicable to other kinds of sensor data.

  4. Inspired at a book fair

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    During the Frankfurt book fair last October, the CERN stand drew quite the crowd. Director-General Rolf Heuer was there to promote CERN’s mission and the "LHC: the Large Hadron Collider" book. He met a lot of visitors and for one of them there was also a nice follow-up…   Marcus and his father visiting the LINAC facility. Fifteen year-old Marcus lives in Lauterecken near Frankfurt. The popular book fair last autumn was for him a nice opportunity to get in touch with the CERN environment. Inspired by the stand and what the CERN people were describing, he started to ask more and more questions… So many, that Rolf Heuer decided to invite him to come to CERN and find out some of the answers for himself. A few weeks later, while recovering from an exciting visit to the ATLAS underground cavern and other CERN installations with a cup of tea in Restaurant 1, Marcus shared his enthusiasm about the Organization: “When I was younger, my moth...

  5. Fracture Mechanics: Inspirations from Nature

    David Taylor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In Nature there are many examples of materials performing structural functions. Nature requires materials which are stiff and strong to provide support against various forces, including self-weight, the dynamic forces involved in movement, and external loads such as wind or the actions of a predator. These materials and structures have evolved over millions of years; the science of Biomimetics seeks to understand Nature and, as a result, to find inspiration for the creation of better engineering solutions. There has been relatively little fundamental research work in this area from a fracture mechanics point of view. Natural materials are quite brittle and, as a result, they have evolved several interesting strategies for preventing failure by crack propagation. Fatigue is also a major problem for many animals and plants. In this paper, several examples will be given of recent work in the Bioengineering Research Centre at Trinity College Dublin, investigating fracture and fatigue in such diverse materials as bamboo, the legs and wings of insects, and living cells.

  6. Multiple representations and mechanisms for visuomotor adaptation in young children.

    Tahej, Pierre-Karim; Ferrel-Chapus, Carole; Olivier, Isabelle; Ginhac, Dominique; Rolland, Jean-Pierre

    2012-12-01

    In this study, we utilized transformed spatial mappings to perturb visuomotor integration in 5-yr-old children and adults. The participants were asked to perform pointing movements under five different conditions of visuomotor rotation (from 0° to 180°), which were designed to reveal explicit vs. implicit representations as well as the mechanisms underlying the visual-motor mapping. Several tests allowed us to separately evaluate sensorimotor (i.e., the dynamic dimension of movement) and cognitive (i.e., the explicit representations of target position and the strategies used by the participants) representations of visuo-proprioceptive distortion. Our results indicate that children do not establish representations in the same manner as adults and that children exhibit multiple visuomotor representations. Sensorimotor representations were relatively precise, presumably due to the recovery of proprioceptive information and efferent copy. Furthermore, a bidirectional mechanism was used to re-map visual and motor spaces. In contrast, cognitive representations were supplied with visual information and followed a unidirectional visual-motor mapping. Therefore, it appears that sensorimotor mechanisms develop before the use of explicit strategies during development, and young children showed impaired visuomotor adaptation when confronted with large distortions. PMID:22704964

  7. Visualizing abstract objects and relations

    Kamada, Tomihisa

    1989-01-01

    Pictorial representations are very useful for humans to understand complicated relations or structures. This is the reason that the user interface of information systems is strongly required to visualize many kinds of information in a wide variety of graphical forms. At present, however, only some very specialized visualization techniques have been developed probably because the generality in the visualization has not been appreciated correctly. This book presents a visualization framework for translating abstract objects and relations, typically represented in textual forms, into pictorial re

  8. Bio-inspired computation in telecommunications

    Yang, Xin-She; Ting, TO

    2015-01-01

    Bio-inspired computation, especially those based on swarm intelligence, has become increasingly popular in the last decade. Bio-Inspired Computation in Telecommunications reviews the latest developments in bio-inspired computation from both theory and application as they relate to telecommunications and image processing, providing a complete resource that analyzes and discusses the latest and future trends in research directions. Written by recognized experts, this is a must-have guide for researchers, telecommunication engineers, computer scientists and PhD students.

  9. Image Representation Using EPANECHNIKOV Density Feature Points Estimator

    Tranos Zuva

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In image retrieval most of the existing visual content based representation methods are usually applicationdependent or non robust, making them not suitable for generic applications. These representation methodsuse visual contents such as colour, texture, shape,size etc. Human image recognition is largely basedonshape, thus making it very appealing for image representation algorithms in computer vision.In this paper we propose a generic image representation algorithm using Epanechnikov Density FeaturePoints Estimator (EDFPE. It is invariant to rotation, scale and translation. The image density featurepoints within defined rectangular rings around thegravitational centre of the image are obtained in theform of a vector. The EDFPE is applied to the vector representation of the image. The Cosine AngleDistance (CAD algorithm is used to measure similarity of the images in the database. Quantitativeevaluation of the performance of the system and comparison with other algorithms was done

  10. Diagrammatic Representational Constraints of Spatial Scale in Earth-Moon System Astronomy Instruction

    Taylor, Roger S.; Grundstrom, Erika D.

    2011-01-01

    Given that astronomy heavily relies on visual representations it is especially likely for individuals to assume that instructional materials, such as visual representations of the Earth-Moon system (EMS), would be relatively accurate. However, in our research, we found that images in middle-school textbooks and educational webpages were commonly…

  11. Diagrammatic Representational Constraints of Spatial Scale in Earth-Moon System Astronomy Instruction

    Taylor, Roger S.; Grundstrom, Erika D.

    2011-01-01

    Given that astronomy heavily relies on visual representations it is especially likely for individuals to assume that instructional materials, such as visual representations of the Earth-Moon system (EMS), would be relatively accurate. However, in our research, we found that images in middle-school textbooks and educational webpages were commonly…

  12. Augmented Segmentation and Visualization for Presentation Videos

    Haubold, Alexander; Kender, John R.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate methods of segmenting, visualizing, and indexing presentation videos by separately considering audio and visual data. The audio track is segmented by speaker, and augmented with key phrases which are extracted using an Automatic Speech Recognizer (ASR). The video track is segmented by visual dissimilarities and augmented by representative key frames. An interactive user interface combines a visual representation of audio, video, text, and key frames, and allows the user to navi...

  13. Neural pathways for visual speech perception

    Bernstein, Lynne E.; Liebenthal, Einat

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the questions, what levels of speech can be perceived visually, and how is visual speech represented by the brain? Review of the literature leads to the conclusions that every level of psycholinguistic speech structure (i.e., phonetic features, phonemes, syllables, words, and prosody) can be perceived visually, although individuals differ in their abilities to do so; and that there are visual modality-specific representations of speech qua speech in higher-level vision bra...

  14. Visual Vocabulary Learning and Its Application to 3D and Mobile Visual Search

    Cao, Liujuan

    2012-01-01

    In this technical report, we review related works and recent trends in visual vocabulary based web image search, object recognition, mobile visual search, and 3D object retrieval. Especial focuses would be also given for the recent trends in supervised/unsupervised vocabulary optimization, compact descriptor for visual search, as well as in multi-view based 3D object representation.

  15. Text Representation by a Computational Model of Reading

    Serrano Moreno, José Ignacio; Castillo Sobrino, María Dolores del

    2006-01-01

    Abstract. Traditional document indexing methods, although useful, do not take into account some important aspects of language, such as syntax and semantics. Unlikely, semantic hyperspaces are mathematical and statistical-based techniques that do it. However, although they are an improvement on traditional methods, the output representation is still vector like. This paper proposes a computational model of text reading, called Cognitive Reading Indexing (CRIM), inspired by so...

  16. Parallel graphics and visualization

    Santos, Luís Paulo; Raffin, Bruno; Heirich, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Computer Graphics and Visualization are two fields that continue to evolve at a fast pace, always addressing new application areas and achieving better and faster results. The volume of data processed by such applications keeps getting larger and the illumination and light transport models used to generate pictorial representations of this data keep getting more sophisticated. Richer illumination and light transport models allow the generation of richer images that con...

  17. On the Visualization of German Grammar

    Clausing, Gerhard

    1975-01-01

    Shows the advantages of using visual representations of certain systematic aspects of a grammar. Simplified diagrams prove useful as mnemonic and explanation devices in the foreign language classroom. Two examples are given for teaching German to speakers of English. (TL)

  18. Sampling systems for visual field assessment and computerised perimetry.

    Drasdo, N; Peaston, W C

    1980-01-01

    Three successive stages in the representations of the visual image are studied by computations from the best available data. The results are embodied in projections, drawn automatically. These projections are related to the assessment of visual disability and the dimensions of lesions in the retina and visual pathway. Fields can be assessed visually with the aid of graticules or directly during computerised perimetry.

  19. Canonical Visual Size for Real-World Objects

    Konkle, Talia; Oliva, Aude

    2011-01-01

    Real-world objects can be viewed at a range of distances and thus can be experienced at a range of visual angles within the visual field. Given the large amount of visual size variation possible when observing objects, we examined how internal object representations represent visual size information. In a series of experiments which required…

  20. Canonical Visual Size for Real-World Objects

    Konkle, Talia; Oliva, Aude

    2011-01-01

    Real-world objects can be viewed at a range of distances and thus can be experienced at a range of visual angles within the visual field. Given the large amount of visual size variation possible when observing objects, we examined how internal object representations represent visual size information. In a series of experiments which required…

  1. Understanding representations in design

    Bødker, Susanne

    1998-01-01

    Representing computer applications and their use is an important aspect of design. In various ways, designers need to externalize design proposals and present them to other designers, users, or managers. This article deals with understanding design representations and the work they do in design....... The article is based on a series of theoretical concepts coming out of studies of scientific and other work practices and on practical experiences from design of computer applications. The article presents alternatives to the ideas that design representations are mappings of present or future work...... situations and computer applications. It suggests that representations are primarily containers of ideas and that representation is situated at the same time as representations are crossing boundaries between various design and use activities. As such, representations should be carriers of their own contexts...

  2. Arbitrary waveform generator biologically inspired

    Highlights: • A system biologically inspired that produces arbitrary analog signals is studied. • The proposed system is based in the BVAM biological model. • The system is analyzed with a discrete equivalent system defined by a Poincaré map. • The operation regimes of the system are identified changing the control parameter. • The system functionality is shown by the simulations obtained from SIMULINK™. -- Abstract: This work shows and analyzes a system that produces arbitrary waveforms, which is a simplification, based on spatial discretization, of the BVAM model proposed by Barrio et al. in 1999 [1] to model the biological pattern formation. Since the analytical treatment of non-linear terms of this system is often prohibitive, its dynamic has been analyzed using a discrete equivalent system defined by a Poincaré map. In this analysis, the bifurcation diagrams and the Lyapunov exponent are the tools used to identify the different operating regimes of the system and to provide evidence of the periodicity and randomness of the generated waveforms. Also, it is shown that the analyzed system presents the period doubling phenomenon, the values of its bifurcation points are related by the Feigenbaum constant and they converge to the onset of chaos. It is shown that, the analyzed system can be electronically implemented using operational amplifiers to produce arbitrary waveforms when varying a single control parameter. The functionality and behavior of the ideal electronic implementation of the analyzed system is shown by the simulations obtained from the MatLab–Simulink™ toolbox. Finally, some problems related to a real electronic implementation are discussed. This paper gives a brief overview of how ideas from biology can be used to design new systems that produce arbitrary waveforms

  3. Nature-inspired computing for control systems

    2016-01-01

    The book presents recent advances in nature-inspired computing, giving a special emphasis to control systems applications. It reviews different techniques used for simulating physical, chemical, biological or social phenomena at the purpose of designing robust, predictive and adaptive control strategies. The book is a collection of several contributions, covering either more general approaches in control systems, or methodologies for control tuning and adaptive controllers, as well as exciting applications of nature-inspired techniques in robotics. On one side, the book is expected to motivate readers with a background in conventional control systems to try out these powerful techniques inspired by nature. On the other side, the book provides advanced readers with a deeper understanding of the field and a broad spectrum of different methods and techniques. All in all, the book is an outstanding, practice-oriented reference guide to nature-inspired computing addressing graduate students, researchers and practi...

  4. Flexible Retinotopy: Motion-Dependent Position Coding in the Visual Cortex

    Whitney, David; Goltz, Herbert C.; Thomas, Christopher G.; Gati, Joseph S; Menon, Ravi S.; Goodale, Melvyn A.

    2003-01-01

    Although the visual cortex is organized retinotopically, it is not clear whether the cortical representation of position necessarily reflects perceived position. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we show that the retinotopic representation of a stationary object in the cortex was systematically shifted when visual motion was present in the scene. Whereas the object could appear shifted in the direction of the visual motion, the representation of the object in the visual cort...

  5. Design visual thinking tools for mixed initiative systems

    Pu, Pearl; Lalanne, Denis

    2002-01-01

    Visual thinking tools are visualization-enabled mixed initiative systems that empower people in solving complex problems by engaging them in the entire resolution process, suggesting appropriate actions with visual cues, and reducing their cognitive load with visual representations of their tasks. At the same time, the visual interaction style provides an alternative to the dialog-based model employed in most mixed-initiative (MI) systems. Visual thinking tools avoid complex analyses of turn ...

  6. Moduli of Galois Representations

    Wang Erickson, Carl William

    2013-01-01

    The theme of this thesis is the study of moduli stacks of representations of an associative algebra, with an eye toward continuous representations of profinite groups such as Galois groups. The central object of study is the geometry of the map \\(\\bar{\\psi}\\) from the moduli stack of representations to the moduli scheme of pseudorepresentations. The first chapter culminates in showing that \\(\\bar{\\psi}\\) is very close to an adequate moduli space of Alper. In particular, \\(\\bar{\\psi}\\) is u...

  7. Representation recovers information

    Thornton, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Early agreement within cognitive science on the topic of representation has now given way to a combination of positions. Some question the significance of representation in cognition. Others continue to argue in favor, but the case has not been demonstrated in any formal way. The present paper sets out a framework in which the value of representation-use can be mathematically measured, albeit in a broadly sensory context rather than a specifically cognitive one. Key to the approach is the use...

  8. Vetoes for Inspiral Triggers in LIGO Data

    Christensen, Nelson; Shawhan, Peter; González, Gabriela; Collaboration, for the LIGO Scientific

    2004-01-01

    Presented is a summary of studies by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration's Inspiral Analysis Group on the development of possible vetoes to be used in evaluation of data from the first two LIGO science data runs. Numerous environmental monitor signals and interferometer control channels have been analyzed in order to characterize the interferometers' performance. The results of studies on selected data segments are provided in this paper. The vetoes used in the compact binary inspiral analyses ...

  9. Veto studies for LIGO inspiral triggers

    LIGO recently conducted its third scientific data run, S3. Here, we summarize the veto and data quality studies conducted by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration in connection with the search for binary inspiral signals in the S3 data. The veto results presented here come from studies on the S3 playground data. LIGO's interferometer channels and physical environmental monitors were monitored, and events in these channels coincident with inspiral triggers were examined

  10. Inspirational Catalogue of Master Thesis Proposals 2015

    Thorndahl, Søren

    2015-01-01

    This catalog presents different topics for master thesis projects. It is important to emphasize that the project descriptions only serves as an inspiration and that you always can discuss with the potential supervisors the specific contents of a project.......This catalog presents different topics for master thesis projects. It is important to emphasize that the project descriptions only serves as an inspiration and that you always can discuss with the potential supervisors the specific contents of a project....

  11. Voice Coil Controlled Inspiration and Expiration Valves

    Bergqvist, Per; Kemmler, Linus

    2012-01-01

    This master thesis was performed at Maquet Critical Care located in Solna, Stockholm. Maquet Critical Care is a market leader in high performance medical ventilators. A ventilator is a medical device that helps patients to breathe. Two of the most vital components of a ventilator are the valves that are closest to the patient. These are the inspiration valve and the expiration valve. The main purpose with this thesis is to get, theoretical as well as practical insights into the inspiration an...

  12. INSPIRE from the JRC Point of View

    Vlado Cetl

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarises some recent developments in INSPIRE implementation from the JRC (Joint Research Centre point of view. The INSPIRE process started around 11 years ago and today, clear results and benefits can be seen. Spatial data are more accessible and shared more frequently between countries and at the European level. In addition to this, efficient, unified coordination and collaboration between different stakeholders and participants has been achieved, which is another great success. The JRC, as a scientific think-tank of the European Commission, has played a very important role in this process from the very beginning. This role is in line with its mission, which is to provide customer-driven scientific and technical support for the conception, development, implementation and monitoring of European Union (EU policies. The JRC acts as the overall technical coordinator of INSPIRE, but it also carries out the activities necessary to support the coherent implementation of INSPIRE, by helping member states in the implementation process. Experiences drawn from collaboration and negotiation in each country and at the European level will be of great importance in the revision of the INSPIRE Directive, which is envisaged for 2014. Keywords: spatial data infrastructure (SDI; INSPIRE; development; Joint Research Centre (JRC

  13. Observations and Measurements Design Patterns within INSPIRE

    Schleidt, K.; Cox, S.; Grellet, S.; Lowe, D.; Lutz, M.; Portele, C.; Sarretta, A.; Ventouras, S.

    2012-04-01

    Several INSPIRE spatial data themes have been specified so that their scope, in addition to classical geographic information, includes measured, modelled or simulated data. The FprEN ISO 19156 standard on Observations and Measurements (O&M) was designed for the explicit purpose of creating application schemas for such data, and thus shall be used in INSPIRE as a basis for developing data models for these themes. The following INSPIRE themes have identified O&M as integrally relevant to their thematic domain and are including elements of O&M in their data specifications: • Geology • Oceanographic geographical features • Atmospheric conditions and Meteorological geographical features • Environmental monitoring facilities • Soil In addition to these themes, several other INSPIRE themes have been identified to which observational information, while not at the core of the data specification, is relevant. Some examples of this are the INSPIRE theme "Species distribution", where primary occurrence data could be provided together with the aggregate distribution, as well as "Industrial and production facilities", where the provision of emissions data on such facilities would be useful for various environmental reporting obligations. While the O&M standard provides a generic framework for the provision of measurement data, it is also kept very abstract, and there are many ways of implementing the core structures in specific application schemas. In order to assure the consistent application of the O&M classes and properties across different INSPIRE themes, a cross-thematic working group on the use of O&M in INSPIRE has been convened. This group has analysed the requirements towards O&M within INSPIRE, identified the types of O&M design patterns required in INSPIRE and developed both additional classes identified as necessary within INSPIRE as well as guidelines detailing how this standard is to be used within INSPIRE. Some examples for these additional classes are: • the ObservationCollection class (which was included in O&M v1.0, but has been removed in the final version of FprEN ISO 19156), that serves as a container for semantically grouping multiple observations; • the ObservableProperty class, that provides structures for the definition of complex observed properties including statistical qualifiers and constraints; • the ObservingCapabilities class for providing information about the types of measurements that a facility or instrument can make in a way that reflects the semantics of the actual Observations; • the further specialization of the OM_Process (with identifier, responsible party, etc.) class that is primarily empty within the O&M concept. These additional classes and guidelines can be used by the various INSPIRE themes that integrate or reference the O&M standard, as well as for other specifications that are created outside of the INSPIRE process and extend existing INSPIRE specifications with the use of O&M. The INSPIRE O&M guidelines also contain generic analysis which may be of interest when evaluating how and whether to apply O&M to a particular domain. The results of this work will be presented.

  14. Visual Perception of Force: Comment on White (2012)

    Hubbard, Timothy L.

    2012-01-01

    White (2012) proposed that kinematic features in a visual percept are matched to stored representations containing information regarding forces (based on prior haptic experience) and that information in the matched, stored representations regarding forces is then incorporated into visual perception. Although some elements of White's (2012) account…

  15. Promote Chemistry Learning with Dynamic Visualizations: Generation, Selection, and Critique

    Zhang, Zhihui

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic visualizations can strengthen chemistry instruction by illustrating atomic level phenomena. Visualizations can help students add ideas about unseen phenomena involving atomic particles. They allow students to interact with phenomena that cannot be investigated in hands-on laboratories. Connecting dynamic, atomic representations with associated observable phenomena and symbolic representations has the potential to increase the coherence and comprehensiveness of student understanding. C...

  16. Why the verbal may be experienced as visual

    Fedrová, Stanislava; Jedličková, Alice

    Newcastle upon Tyne : Cambridge Scholars publishing, 2010 - (Dadejík, O.; Stejskal, J.), s. 76-88 ISBN 978-1-4438-2428-6 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90560517 Keywords : verbal representation * visual representation * visuality * multisensoriality * description * experientiality * intermediality * intertextuality * mental imagery Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  17. Fast Wavelet-Based Visual Classification

    Yu, Guoshen; Slotine, Jean-Jacques

    2008-01-01

    We investigate a biologically motivated approach to fast visual classification, directly inspired by the recent work of Serre et al. Specifically, trading-off biological accuracy for computational efficiency, we explore using wavelet and grouplet-like transforms to parallel the tuning of visual cortex V1 and V2 cells, alternated with max operations to achieve scale and translation invariance. A feature selection procedure is applied during learning to accelerate recognition. We introduce a si...

  18. Visualizing Dynamic Networks with Matrix Cubes

    Bach, Benjamin; Pietriga, Emmanuel; Fekete, Jean-Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Designing visualizations of dynamic networks is challenging, both because the data sets tend to be complex and because the tasks associated with them are often cognitively demand­ ing. We introduce the Matrix Cube, a novel visual representa­ tion and navigation model for dynamic networks, inspired by the way people comprehend and manipulate physical cubes. Users can change their perspective on the data by rotating or decomposing the 3D cube. These manipulations can produce a range of differen...

  19. Ernst Gombrich and Western representations of the sacred art of India

    Partha Mitter

    2012-01-01

    Lecture at the Institut für Kunstgeschichte, University of Vienna, 16 May 2012 on western representations of ancient Indian art aims at explaining the author’s relationship with his teacher E. H. Gombrich, and the intellectual inspiration behind his work, Much Maligned Monsters: History of Western Representations of Indian Art. The roots of western misrepresentations of Indian art in the 19th century went back to the Middle Ages. The early travellers’ stereotypes of monstrous gods of India ow...

  20. Inscriptions Becoming Representations in Representational Practices

    Medina, Richard; Suthers, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the interaction of 3 students working on mathematics problems over several days in a virtual math team. Our analysis traces out how successful collaboration in a later session is contingent upon the work of prior sessions and shows how the development of representational practices is an important aspect of these participants' problem…

  1. Student Representation in Polytechnics

    Cox, Caroline; Marks, John

    1975-01-01

    Discusses student representation in academic government with particular reference to the academic boards of the 30 designated polytechnics in England and Wales. In addition to discussing underlying principles of student representation, the article gives data for polytechnic university senates. (Author/PG)

  2. Configuration space representation in parallel coordinates

    Fiorini, Paolo; Inselberg, Alfred

    1989-01-01

    By means of a system of parallel coordinates, a nonprojective mapping from R exp N to R squared is obtained for any positive integer N. In this way multivariate data and relations can be represented in the Euclidean plane (embedded in the projective plane). Basically, R squared with Cartesian coordinates is augmented by N parallel axes, one for each variable. The N joint variables of a robotic device can be represented graphically by using parallel coordinates. It is pointed out that some properties of the relation are better perceived visually from the parallel coordinate representation, and that new algorithms and data structures can be obtained from this representation. The main features of parallel coordinates are described, and an example is presented of their use for configuration space representation of a mechanical arm (where Cartesian coordinates cannot be used).

  3. Perceptions of Talented Students in Their Visual Representations about the Future World and Technology (Üstün Yetenekli Öğrencilerin Görsel Anlatımlarında Geleceğin Dünyasına ve Teknolojisine İlişkin Algıları

    S. Duygu Erişti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and significance: The present study aimed at investigating talented students’ artistic representations and perceptions regarding the future world and technology through their animated designs according to their design-based representations. A learning environment which allows talented students to use their ability, thoughts and creativity in the process of design-based instructional activities is of great interest for them. It is important for talented students to have instructional experiences which provide independent and unique learning opportunities and special application areas that allow these students to show their abilities (CfBT, 2008. Results: The participants of the study were talented elementary school students attending the Education Programs for Talented Students (EPTS at Anadolu University. The criterion sampling method was used to select the research participants. The criterion for selecting the participants was attendance in the course of ‘Computer-Aided Graphics Design’ offered in the EPTS. The participants included a total of 35 elementary school 6th, 7th and 8th grade talented students. The study was conducted in three phases: instruction process, design process and evaluation process. Some preliminary preparations related to the design program were carried out considering that the students would use them while doing animated designs through the instruction process. The instruction phase involved an animated representation study during which the students designed their own animations. In the last phase, all the animate designs of the talented students were analyzed. The thematic analysis based on qualitative research method along with art-based inquiry was used. The thematic coding system for analyzing concepts revealed from the research data was implemented. The visual language used in pictorial representations produce messages, with its specialized codes. The degree of students’ understanding and explaining their perceptions of technology in future composes the visual codes in this research. The results obtained in the study were grouped under two themes: talented elementary school students’ ways of perception of the future world and talented elementary school students’ ways of perception of future technology.Discussion: Students’ perceptions about the future world in their visual representations and in the interview forms based on their visual representations were mostly classified under the theme of the extinction of the world, nature and universe. Students had quite unusual and original ideas about future technology. It was seen that the students put forward such subthemes as voyages between planets and space cars, flying cars, aliens’ visit to the world, street air-conditioners, voyage to the moon by space rockets and voyage via teleportation. The students who generally had negative views about the future world considered technology as a way of solution to the awaiting problems in future. In the research process, based on the researcher’s observations, it could be stated that the students taking design education were in the process of making design-related decisions and testing and discussing their knowledge about a certain goal; that they revised their needs, efficacies and creative potentials regarding the goal determined; and that they experimented, evaluated, developed and associated their decisions with the design process.Conclusions: Depending on the findings of the present study, it can be concluded that students’ perceptions of the future world and technology reveal quite a negative picture in general. There could be a number of reasons for this negative picture; however, considering the technology and media interaction involving students, it could be stated that there are negative reflections of such environments and the popular culture within this context. In addition, the themes regarding the extinction of the world and collision of the planets envisaged by the talented students for the future world as well as the students’ visual representations within the scope of the animated designs differ with respect to fantastic features. Their perceptions mostly focused on surrealistic themes. In this respect, depending on the research findings, talented elementary school students could not be said to have positive views about technological developments.

  4. A bio-inspired image coder with temporal scalability

    Masmoudi, Khaled; Kornprobst, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    We present a novel bio-inspired and dynamic coding scheme for static images. Our coder aims at reproducing the main steps of the visual stimulus processing in the mammalians retina taking into account its time behavior. The main novelty of this work is to show how to exploit the time behavior of the retina cells to ensure, in a simple way, scalability and bit allocation. To do so, our main source of inspiration will be the biologically plausible retina model called Virtual Retina. Following a similar structure, our model has two stages. The first stage is an image transform which is performed by the outer layers in the retina. Here it is modelled by filtering the image with a bank of difference of Gaussians with time-delays. The second stage is a time-dependent analog-to-digital conversion which is performed by the inner layers in the retina. Thanks to its conception, our coder enables scalability and bit allocation across time. Also, compared to the JPEG standards, our decoded images do not show annoying art...

  5. Autonomous UAV persistent surveillance using bio-inspired strategies

    Burman, Jerry; Hespanha, Joao; Madhow, Upamanyu; Isaacs, Jason; Venkateswaran, Sriram; Pham, Tien

    2012-06-01

    A team consisting of Teledyne Scientific Company, the University of California at Santa Barbara, the Army Research Laboratory, the Engineer Research and Development Center, and IBM UK is developing technologies in support of automated data exfiltration from heterogeneous battlefield sensor networks to enhance situational awareness for dismounts and command echelons. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) provide an effective means to autonomously collect data from a sparse network of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) that cannot communicate with each other. UAVs are used to reduce the system reaction time by generating autonomous collection routes that are data-driven. Bioinspired techniques for autonomous search provide a novel strategy to detect, capture and fuse data from heterogeneous sensor networks. The bio-inspired algorithm is based on chemotaxis or the motion of bacteria seeking nutrients in their environment. Field tests of a bio-inspired system that routed UAVs were conducted in June 2011 at Camp Roberts, CA. The field test results showed that such a system can autonomously detect and locate the source of terrestrial events with very high accuracy and visually verify the event. In June 2011, field tests of the system were completed and include the use of multiple autonomously controlled UAVs, detection and disambiguation of multiple acoustic events occurring in short time frames, optimal sensor placement based on local phenomenology and the use of the International Technology Alliance (ITA) Sensor Network Fabric. The system demonstrated TRL 6 performance in the field at Camp Roberts.

  6. The Trade-offs with Space Time Cube Representation of Spatiotemporal Patterns

    Kristensson, Per Ola; Dahlback, Nils; Anundi, Daniel; Bjornstad, Marius; Gillberg, Hanna; Haraldsson, Jonas; Martensson, Ingrid; Nordvall, Matttias; Stahl, Josefin

    2007-01-01

    Space time cube representation is an information visualization technique where spatiotemporal data points are mapped into a cube. Fast and correct analysis of such information is important in for instance geospatial and social visualization applications. Information visualization researchers have previously argued that space time cube representation is beneficial in revealing complex spatiotemporal patterns in a dataset to users. The argument is based on the fact that both time and spatial in...

  7. Beyond sensory images: Object-based representation in the human ventral pathway

    Pietrini, Pietro; Furey, Maura L.; Ricciardi, Emiliano; Gobbini, M. Ida; Wu, W.-H. Carolyn; Cohen, Leonardo; Guazzelli, Mario; Haxby, James V.

    2004-01-01

    We investigated whether the topographically organized, category-related patterns of neural response in the ventral visual pathway are a representation of sensory images or a more abstract representation of object form that is not dependent on sensory modality. We used functional MRI to measure patterns of response evoked during visual and tactile recognition of faces and manmade objects in sighted subjects and during tactile recognition in blind subjects. Results showed that visual and tactil...

  8. Measurement of the flow past a cactus-inspired cylinder

    Oweis, Ghanem F.; El-Makdah, Adnan M.

    2012-11-01

    Desert cacti are tall cylindrical plants characterized by longitudinal u- or v-shaped grooves that run parallel to the plant axis, covering its surface area. We study the wake flow modifications resulting from the introduction of cactus-inspired surface grooves to a circular cylinder. Particle image velocimetry PIV is implemented in a wind tunnel to visualize and quantify the wake flow from a cactus cylinder in cross wind and an equivalent circular cylinder at Re O(1E5). The cactus wake exhibits superior behavior over its circular counterpart as seen from the mean and turbulent velocity profiles. The surface flow within the grooves is also probed to elucidate the origins of the wake alterations. Lastly, we use simple statistical analysis based only on the wake velocity fields, under the assumption of periodicity of the shedding, to recover the time varying flow from the randomly acquired PIV snapshots.

  9. A Brief Review of Nature-Inspired Algorithms for Optimization

    Fister Jr, Iztok; Yang, Xin-She; Fister, Iztok; Brest, Janez; Fister, Dušan

    2013-01-01

    Swarm intelligence and bio-inspired algorithms form a hot topic in the developments of new algorithms inspired by nature. These nature-inspired metaheuristic algorithms can be based on swarm intelligence, biological systems, physical and chemical systems. Therefore, these algorithms can be called swarm-intelligence-based, bio-inspired, physics-based and chemistry-based, depending on the sources of inspiration. Though not all of them are efficient, a few algorithms have proved to be very effic...

  10. VACS : Visual Analytics Suite for Cyber Security - Visual Exploration of Cyber Security Datasets

    Fischer, Fabian; Keim, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Visual exploration of cyber security datasets is an important and highly relevant field of research. To address the cyber security challenge of the VAST Challenge 2013, we utilized our novel Visual Analytics Suite for Cyber Security (VACS) to visually explore the given datasets using a combination of different visual representations. VACS primarily provides a dashboard view, host-based thumbnail overview and a querying interface to retrieve and drill down to investigate suspicious hosts.

  11. Modulation of visual responses in the superior temporal sulcus by audio-visual congruency

    Logothetis, Nikos K.

    2010-01-01

    Our ability to identify or recognize visual objects is often enhanced by evidence provided by other sensory modalities. Yet, where and how visual object processing benefits from the information received by the other senses remains unclear. One candidate region is the temporal lobe, which features neural representations of visual objects, and in which previous studies have provided evidence for multisensory influences on neural responses. In the present study we directly tested whether visual ...

  12. Modulation of Visual Responses in the Superior Temporal Sulcus by Audio-Visual Congruency

    Dahl, Christoph D.; Logothetis, Nikos K.; Kayser, Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Our ability to identify or recognize visual objects is often enhanced by evidence provided by other sensory modalities. Yet, where and how visual object processing benefits from the information received by the other senses remains unclear. One candidate region is the temporal lobe, which features neural representations of visual objects, and in which previous studies have provided evidence for multisensory influences on neural responses. In the present study we directly tested whether visual ...

  13. Highly eccentric inspirals into a black hole

    Osburn, Thomas; Evans, Charles R

    2015-01-01

    We model the inspiral of a compact stellar-mass object into a massive non-rotating black hole including all dissipative and conservative first-order-in-the-mass-ratio effects on the orbital motion. The techniques we develop allow inspirals with initial eccentricities as high as $e\\sim0.8$ and initial separations as large as $\\sim 100M$ to be evolved through many thousands of orbits up to the onset of the plunge into the black hole. The inspiral is computed using an osculating elements scheme driven by a hybridized self-force model, which combines Lorenz-gauge self-force results with highly accurate flux data from a Regge-Wheeler-Zerilli code. The high accuracy of our hybrid self-force model allows the orbital phase of the inspirals to be tracked to within $\\sim0.1$ radians or better. The difference between self-force models and inspirals computed in the radiative approximation is quantified.

  14. Large-scale functional models of visual cortex for remote sensing

    Brumby, Steven P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kenyon, Garrett [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rasmussen, Craig E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swaminarayan, Sriram [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bettencourt, Luis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Landecker, Will [PORTLAND STATE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroscience has revealed many properties of neurons and of the functional organization of visual cortex that are believed to be essential to human vision, but are missing in standard artificial neural networks. Equally important may be the sheer scale of visual cortex requiring {approx}1 petaflop of computation. In a year, the retina delivers {approx}1 petapixel to the brain, leading to massively large opportunities for learning at many levels of the cortical system. We describe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop large-scale functional models of visual cortex on LANL's Roadrunner petaflop supercomputer. An initial run of a simple region VI code achieved 1.144 petaflops during trials at the IBM facility in Poughkeepsie, NY (June 2008). Here, we present criteria for assessing when a set of learned local representations is 'complete' along with general criteria for assessing computer vision models based on their projected scaling behavior. Finally, we extend one class of biologically-inspired learning models to problems of remote sensing imagery.

  15. CT scans of the hypopharynx and larynx during inspiration, expiration, breath holding and phonation

    Fujii, Naoko; Anno, Hirofumi; Ito, Tsuyoshi; Ohashi, Ichiro; Takahashi, Masaki; Koga, Sukehiko; Iwata, Sigenobu; Ikuta, Katsumi

    1988-11-01

    CT scans of the hypopharynx and larynx during inspiration, expiration, breath holding and phonation of the letter E were performed on seven volunteers. Two mm contiguous scans were obtained to span the glottis and supraglottic area. The vocal cords were shown in the paramedian or median position on breath holding and phonation. The ditails of the arytenoid cartilages were better visualized with thin slices. The laryngeal ventricles were demonstrable on phonation scans.

  16. Robust Models for Optic Flow Coding in Natural Scenes Inspired by Insect Biology

    Brinkworth, Russell S. A.; O'Carroll, David C.

    2009-01-01

    The extraction of accurate self-motion information from the visual world is a difficult problem that has been solved very efficiently by biological organisms utilizing non-linear processing. Previous bio-inspired models for motion detection based on a correlation mechanism have been dogged by issues that arise from their sensitivity to undesired properties of the image, such as contrast, which vary widely between images. Here we present a model with multiple levels of non-linear dynamic adapt...

  17. Design and globalization can graphic design in mass communication inspire a global culture?

    Nguyen, V.; Prebys, C. (C.)

    2010-01-01

    In this paper I deliver four points which support my assertion that graphic design in mass communication can inspire a global culture informed by Christianity. First, I argue that the environment in which people consistently find themselves will over time influence and affect the interior dispositions of the person, and when occurring in great numbers, the culture. I argue for the importance of graphic design as a vital component in the development of culture and how as visual ...

  18. Google Earth: Inspiration and Instrument for the Study of Ancient Civilizations

    Jaroslav Klokočník; Jan Kostelecký; Karel Pavelka

    2011-01-01

    Satellite imaging is well known as a useful tool in many scientific disciplines and various applications.  Google Earth, with its free access, is now - thanks to increasing resolution and precision - such a tool. It can be very inspiring. It improves the visualization and dissemination of scientific data, and opens doors to new discoveries. For example, many Nasca geoglyphs are now visible to Google Earth and so are the orientations of Chinese pyramids, which appear to be laid out with the ai...

  19. The DynAlloy Visualizer

    Bendersky, Pablo; Galeotti, Juan Pablo; Garbervetsky, Diego

    2014-01-01

    We present an extension to the DynAlloy tool to navigate DynAlloy counterexamples: the DynAlloy Visualizer. The user interface mimics the functionality of a programming language debugger. Without this tool, a DynAlloy user is forced to deal with the internals of the Alloy intermediate representation in order to debug a flaw in her model.

  20. A Visual Information Retrieval Tool.

    Zhang, Jin

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of visualization for information retrieval, that transforms unseen internal semantic representation of a document collection into visible geometric displays, focuses on DARE (Distance Angle Retrieval Environment). Highlights include expression of information need; interpretation and manipulation of information retrieval models; ranking…

  1. Representation, philosophical issues about.

    Roth, Martin A

    2010-01-01

    The concept of representation plays a central role in philosophical and scientific theorizing about the mind, and according to the representational theory of mind (RTM), a wide variety of cognitive and perceptual capacities are best explained in terms of the occurrence and processing of mental representations. The concept of representation remains elusive, however, and there is no widespread agreement among philosophers or cognitive scientists over what it is for one thing to represent another. One reason for the lack of consensus is that philosophers and scientists deploy the concept in many different ways for many different purposes. Another reason for the lack of consensus is that, while it is generally agreed that a scientifically useful notion of representation should be informed and constrained by what we know about brains, there is disagreement over what contemporary neuroscience does or does not suggest about the nature of representation. This article discusses some of the key issues involved in developing a general theory of mental representation, in light of these divergent purposes and conflicting views. Copyright © 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:26272836

  2. Visual agnosia.

    Álvarez, R; Masjuan, J

    2016-03-01

    Visual agnosia is defined as an impairment of object recognition, in the absence of visual acuity or cognitive dysfunction that would explain this impairment. This condition is caused by lesions in the visual association cortex, sparing primary visual cortex. There are 2 main pathways that process visual information: the ventral stream, tasked with object recognition, and the dorsal stream, in charge of locating objects in space. Visual agnosia can therefore be divided into 2 major groups depending on which of the two streams is damaged. The aim of this article is to conduct a narrative review of the various visual agnosia syndromes, including recent developments in a number of these syndromes. PMID:26358494

  3. Indecomposable representations for parabose algebra

    A general study of the representations of the graded Lie algebra of parabose oscillators is given. Besides realizing the standard representations, we also find some interesting indecomposable (not fully reducible) representations. (author)

  4. Full Restoration of Visual Encrypted Color Images

    Persson, Simeon

    2011-01-01

    While strictly black and white images have been the basis for visual cryptography, there has been a lack of an easily implemented format for colour images. This paper establishes a simple, yet secure way of implementing visual cryptography with colour, assuming a binary data representation.

  5. Visual Training for Sustainable Forest Management

    Aik, Chong-Tek; Tway, Duane C.

    2004-01-01

    It is increasingly important for timber companies to train managers in the principles and practices of sustainable forest management. One of the most effective ways to conduct such training is through use of visual training methods. This is partly because visual representations encode large amounts of information and help learners to grasp…

  6. Modulation of visual responses in the superior temporal sulcus by audio-visual congruency

    Nikos K Logothetis

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to identify or recognize visual objects is often enhanced by evidence provided by other sensory modalities. Yet, where and how visual object processing benefits from the information received by the other senses remains unclear. One candidate region is the temporal lobe, which features neural representations of visual objects, and in which previous studies have provided evidence for multisensory influences on neural responses. In the present study we directly tested whether visual representations in the lower bank of the superior temporal sulcus (STS benefit from acoustic information. To this end, we recorded neural responses in alert monkeys passively watching audio-visual scenes, and quantified the impact of simultaneously presented sounds on responses elicited by the presentation of naturalistic visual scenes. Using methods of stimulus decoding and information theory, we then asked whether the responses of STS neurons become more reliable and informative in multisensory contexts. Our results demonstrate that STS neurons are indeed sensitive to the modality composition of the sensory stimulus. Importantly, information provided by STS neurons’ responses about the particular visual stimulus being presented was highest during congruent audio-visual and unimodal visual stimulation, but was reduced during incongruent bimodal stimulation. Together, these findings demonstrate that higher visual representations in the STS not only convey information about the visual input but also depend on the acoustic context of a visual scene.

  7. Visual Field

    Sokolová Šidlová, Jana; Beneš, Pavel; Holoubková, Zuzana

    2013-01-01

    This article is dedicated to main information about visual field, monocular and binocular ranges of visual field including their defects. Visual field loss may occur to disease of the eye, optic nerve or brain. Typical changes are present at glaucoma and macular degeneration. Visual pathway is also mentioned. The basic medical examinations of visual fields are Amsler grid, kinetic and static perimetry and the other. Newer method is microperimetry which detects the changes directly on the reti...

  8. Black hole binary inspiral and trajectory dominance

    Price, Richard H.; Khanna, Gaurav; Hughes, Scott A.

    2013-11-01

    Gravitational waves emitted during the inspiral, plunge and merger of a black hole binary carry linear momentum. This results in an astrophysically important recoil to the final merged black hole, a “kick” that can eject it from the nucleus of a galaxy. In a previous paper we showed that the puzzling partial cancellation of an early kick by a late antikick, and the dependence of the cancellation on black hole spin, can be understood from the phenomenology of the linear momentum waveforms. Here we connect that phenomenology to its underlying cause, the spin dependence of the inspiral trajectories. This insight suggests that the details of the plunge can be understood more broadly with a focus on inspiral trajectories.

  9. Black hole binary inspiral and trajectory dominance

    Price, Richard H; Hughes, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Gravitational waves emitted during the inspiral, plunge and merger of a black hole binary carry linear momentum. This results in an astrophysically important recoil to the final merged black hole, a ``kick'' that can eject it from the nucleus of a galaxy. In a previous paper we showed that the puzzling partial cancellation of an early kick by a late antikick, and the dependence of the cancellation on black hole spin, can be understood from the phenomenology of the linear momentum waveforms. Here we connect that phenomenology to its underlying cause, the spin-dependence of the inspiral trajectories. This insight suggests that the details of plunge can be understood more broadly with a focus on inspiral trajectories.

  10. Nature-inspired computation in engineering

    2016-01-01

    This timely review book summarizes the state-of-the-art developments in nature-inspired optimization algorithms and their applications in engineering. Algorithms and topics include the overview and history of nature-inspired algorithms, discrete firefly algorithm, discrete cuckoo search, plant propagation algorithm, parameter-free bat algorithm, gravitational search, biogeography-based algorithm, differential evolution, particle swarm optimization and others. Applications include vehicle routing, swarming robots, discrete and combinatorial optimization, clustering of wireless sensor networks, cell formation, economic load dispatch, metamodeling, surrogated-assisted cooperative co-evolution, data fitting and reverse engineering as well as other case studies in engineering. This book will be an ideal reference for researchers, lecturers, graduates and engineers who are interested in nature-inspired computation, artificial intelligence and computational intelligence. It can also serve as a reference for relevant...

  11. Visual Mementos: Reflecting Memories with Personal Data.

    Thudt, Alice; Baur, Dominikus; Huron, Samuel; Carpendale, Sheelagh

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we discuss the creation of visual mementos as a new application area for visualization. We define visual mementos as visualizations of personally relevant data for the purpose of reminiscing, and sharing of life experiences. Today more people collect digital information about their life than ever before. The shift from physical to digital archives poses new challenges and opportunities for self-reflection and self-representation. Drawing on research on autobiographical memory and on the role of artifacts in reminiscing, we identified design challenges for visual mementos: mapping data to evoke familiarity, expressing subjectivity, and obscuring sensitive details for sharing. Visual mementos can make use of the known strengths of visualization in revealing patterns to show the familiar instead of the unexpected, and extend representational mappings beyond the objective to include the more subjective. To understand whether people's subjective views on their past can be reflected in a visual representation, we developed, deployed and studied a technology probe that exemplifies our concept of visual mementos. Our results show how reminiscing has been supported and reveal promising new directions for self-reflection and sharing through visual mementos of personal experiences. PMID:26529711

  12. Using 3D in Visualization

    Wood, Jo; Kirschenbauer, Sabine; Döllner, Jürgen; Lopes, Adriano; Bodum, Lars

    The notion of three-dimensionality is applied to five stages of the visualization pipeline. While 3D visulization is most often associated with the visual mapping and representation of data, this chapter also identifies its role in the management and assembly of data, and in the media used to...... display 3D imagery. The extra cartographic degree of freedom offered by using 3D is explored and offered as a motivation for employing 3D in visualization. The use of VR and the construction of virtual environments exploit navigational and behavioral realism, but become most usefil when combined with...

  13. Action simulation: Time course and representational mechanisms

    AnneSpringer

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The notion of action simulation refers to the ability to re-enact foreign actions (i.e., actions observed in other individuals. Simulating others’ actions implies a 'mirroring' of their activities, based on one’s own sensorimotor competencies. Here, we discuss theoretical and experimental approaches to action simulation and the study of its representational underpinnings. One focus of our discussion is on the timing of internal simulation and its relation to the timing of external action, and a paradigm that requires participants to predict the future course of actions that are temporarily occluded from view. We address transitions between perceptual mechanisms (referring to action representation before and after occlusion and simulation mechanisms (referring to action representation during occlusion. Findings suggest that action simulation runs in real-time; acting on newly created action representations rather than relying on continuous visual extrapolations. A further focus of our discussion pertains to the functional characteristics of the mechanisms involved in predicting other people’s actions. We propose that two processes are engaged, dynamic updating and static matching, which may draw on both semantic and motor information. In a concluding section, we discuss these findings in the context of broader theoretical issues related to action and event representation, arguing that a detailed functional analysis of action simulation in cognitive, neural, and computational terms may help to further advance our understanding of action cognition and motor control.

  14. Image Representation Using EPANECHNIKOV Density Feature Points Estimator

    Tranos Zuva

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In image retrieval most of the existing visual content based representation methods are usually application dependent or non robust, making them not suitable for generic applications. These representation methods use visual contents such as colour, texture, shape, size etc. Human image recognition is largely based on shape, thus making it very appealing for image repr esentation algorithms in computer vision. In this paper we propose a generic image representation algorithm using Epanechnikov Density Feature Points Estimator (EDFPE. It is invariant to rotation, scale and translation. The image density feature points within defined rectangular rings around the gravitational centre of the image are obtained in the form of a vector. The EDFPE is applied to the vecto r representation of the image. The Cosine Angle Distance (CAD algorithm is used to measure similarity of the images in the database. Quantitative evaluation of the performance of the system and comparison with other algorithms was done.

  15. Dimensionality of object representations in monkey inferotemporal cortex

    Lehky, Sidney R.; Kiani, Roozbeh; Esteky, Hossein; Tanaka, Keiji

    2014-01-01

    We have calculated the intrinsic dimensionality of visual object representations in anterior inferotemporal (AIT) cortex, based on responses of a large sample of cells stimulated with photographs of diverse objects. As dimensionality was dependent on data set size, we determined asymptotic dimensionality as both the number of neurons and number of stimulus image approached infinity. Our final dimensionality estimate was 93 (SD: ± 11), indicating that there is basis set of approximately a hundred independent features that characterize the dimensions of neural object space. We believe this is the first estimate of the dimensionality of neural visual representations based on single-cell neurophysiological data. The dimensionality of AIT object representations was much lower than the dimensionality of the stimuli. We suggest that there may be a gradual reduction in the dimensionality of object representations in neural populations going from retina to inferotemporal cortex, as receptive fields become increasingly complex. PMID:25058707

  16. Crossmodal Association of Visual and Haptic Material Properties of Objects in the Monkey Ventral Visual Cortex.

    Goda, Naokazu; Yokoi, Isao; Tachibana, Atsumichi; Minamimoto, Takafumi; Komatsu, Hidehiko

    2016-04-01

    Just by looking at an object, we can recognize its non-visual properties, such as hardness. The visual recognition of non-visual object properties is generally accurate [1], and influences actions toward the object [2]. Recent studies suggest that, in the primate brain, this may involve the ventral visual cortex, which represents objects in a way that reflects not only visual but also non-visual object properties, such as haptic roughness, hardness, and weight [3-7]. This new insight raises a fundamental question: how does the visual cortex come to represent non-visual properties-knowledge that cannot be acquired directly through vision? Here we addressed this unresolved question using fMRI in macaque monkeys. Specifically, we explored whether and how simple visuo-haptic experience-just seeing and touching objects made of various materials-can shape representational content in the visual cortex. We measured brain activity evoked by viewing images of objects before and after the monkeys acquired the visuo-haptic experience and decoded the representational space from the activity patterns [8]. We show that simple long-term visuo-haptic experience greatly impacts representation in the posterior inferior temporal cortex, the higher ventral visual cortex. After the experience, but not before, the activity pattern in this region well reflected the haptic material properties of the experienced objects. Our results suggest that neural representation of non-visual object properties in the visual cortex emerges through long-term crossmodal exposure to objects. This highlights the importance of unsupervised learning of crossmodal associations through everyday experience [9-12] for shaping representation in the visual cortex. PMID:26996504

  17. Blood Clotting Inspired Polymer Physics

    Sing, Charles Edward

    The blood clotting process is one of the human body's masterpieces in targeted molecular manipulation, as it requires the activation of the clotting cascade at a specific place and a specific time. Recent research in the biological sciences have discovered that one of the protein molecules involved in the initial stages of the clotting response, von Willebrand Factor (vWF), exhibits counterintuitive and technologically useful properties that are driven in part by the physical environment in the bloodstream at the site of a wound. In this thesis, we take inspiration from initial observations of the vWF in experiments, and aim to describe the behaviors observed in this process within the context of polymer physics. By understanding these physical principles, we hope to harness nature's ability to both direct molecules in both spatial and conformational coordinates. This thesis is presented in three complementary sections. After an initial introduction describing the systems of interest, we first describe the behavior of collapsed Lennard-Jones polymers in the presence of an infinite medium. It has been shown that simple bead-spring homopolymer models describe vWF quite well in vitro. We build upon this previous work to first describe the behavior of a collapsed homopolymer in an elongational fluid flow. Through a nucleation-protrusion mechanism, scaling relationships can be developed to provide a clear picture of a first-order globule-stretch transition and its ramifications in dilute-solution rheology. The implications of this behavior and its relation to the current literature provides qualitative explanations for the physiological process of vasoconstriction. In an effort to generalize these observations, we present an entire theory on the behavior of polymer globules under influence of any local fluid flow. Finally, we investigate the internal dynamics of these globules by probing their pulling response in an analogous fashion to force spectroscopy. We elucidate the presence of both a solid-liquid dynamic globule transition and a contour-based description of internal globule friction. It is possible to incrementally add levels of details to these Lennard-Jones polymer models to more accurately represent biological molecules. In the second section of this thesis, we investigate the consequences of incorporating a Bell-model behavior into single homopolymer interactions to describe a "self-associating'' polymer. We first demonstrate how this model is, in equilibrium, essentially the same as a Lennard-Jones polymer, however we demonstrate that the polymer dynamics are indeed both drastically different and tunable. This has ramifications under the presence of dynamic loads, and we investigate single-molecule response to both shear and pulling stimuli. In the former, we find novel and tunable giant non-monotonic stretching responses. In the latter, we use our observations to develop a complete and general theory of pulling these types of molecules that has ramifications in both the study of biological polymers and in the design of soft materials with tunable mechanical response. The final section introduces concepts related to the behavior of collapsed polymers in fluid flows near surfaces. During the blood clotting process, vWF undergoes a counterintuitive adsorption process and here we begin to develop the physical fundamentals required to understand this process. After a brief introduction to the relevant hydrodynamic treatment we use in simulations, we first describe the presence of a hydrodynamic lift force and the formalism we use as we include it in the context of our theory. We reveal the presence of a non-monotonic lift force, and subsequently utilize this theoretical formalism to describe the adsorption and desorption behavior of a collapsed polymer globule near an attractive surface. We investigate the limit of large flows and highly attractive surfaces by providing a description of the conformational and hydrodynamic behavior of a polymer tethered at a surface. We finally discuss the behaviors of a polymer that associates with a surface, and postulate the importance of such processes in vWF function. We finally include an addendum that describes an unrelated project that investigates the possibilities of using superparamagnetic beads as a tool for hydrodynamic propulsion by assembling these beads into "rotors" near a surface to create microwalkers that have interesting applications in self-assembled microfluidic chips. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, libraries.mit.edu/docs - docs mit.edu)

  18. Vetoes for inspiral triggers in LIGO data

    Presented is a summary of studies by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration's Inspiral Analysis Group on the development of possible vetoes to be used in the evaluation of data from the first two LIGO science data runs. Numerous environmental monitor signals and interferometer control channels have been analysed in order to characterize the interferometers' performance. The results of studies on selected data segments are provided in this paper. The vetoes used in the compact binary inspiral analyses of LIGO's S1 and S2 science data runs are presented and discussed

  19. Quantum-inspired resonance for associative memory

    A new kind of dynamics for simulations based upon quantum-classical hybrid is discussed. The model is represented by a modified Madelung equation in which the quantum potential is replaced by different, specially chosen potentials. As a result, the dynamics attains both quantum and classical properties: it preserves superposition and entanglement of random solutions, while allowing one to measure its state variables using classical methods. Such an optimal combination of characteristics is a perfect match for quantum-inspired information processing. In this paper, the retrieval of stored items from an exponentially large unsorted database is performed by quantum-inspired resonance using polynomial resources due to quantum-like superposition effect.

  20. Vetoes for inspiral triggers in LIGO data

    Christensen, Nelson [Physics and Astronomy, Carleton College, Northfield, MN 55057 (United States); Shawhan, Peter [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Gonzalez, Gabriela [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2004-10-21

    Presented is a summary of studies by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration's Inspiral Analysis Group on the development of possible vetoes to be used in the evaluation of data from the first two LIGO science data runs. Numerous environmental monitor signals and interferometer control channels have been analysed in order to characterize the interferometers' performance. The results of studies on selected data segments are provided in this paper. The vetoes used in the compact binary inspiral analyses of LIGO's S1 and S2 science data runs are presented and discussed.

  1. Hyperfinite Representation of Distributions

    J Sousa Pinto; R F Hoskins

    2000-11-01

    Hyperfinite representation of distributions is studied following the method introduced by Kinoshita [2, 3], although we use a different approach much in the vein of [4]. Products and Fourier transforms of representatives of distributions are also analysed.

  2. Representations and Relations

    Koťátko, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 3 (2014), s. 282-302. ISSN 1335-0668 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : representation * proposition * truth-conditions * belief-ascriptions * reference * externalism * fiction Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  3. Finding the best visualization of an ontology

    Fabritius, Christina Valentin; Madsen, Nadia Lyngaa; Clausen, Jens; Larsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    An ontology is a classification model for a given domain. In information retrieval ontologies are used to perform broad searches. An ontology can be visualized as nodes and edges. Each node represents an element and each edge a relation between a parent and a child element. Working with an ontology...... becomes easier with a visual representation. An idea is to use the expressive power that a 3D representation to provide visualization for the user. In this paper we propose a new method for positioning the elements of the visualized concept lattice in the 3D world based on Operations Research (OR) methods....... One method uses a discrete location model to create an initial solution and we propose heuristic methods to further improve the visual result. We evaluate the visual results according to our success criteria and the feedback from users. Running times of the heuristic indicate that an improved version...

  4. Finding the best visualization of an ontology

    Fabritius, Christina; Madsen, Nadia; Clausen, Jens; Larsen, Jesper

    2006-01-01

    An ontology is a classification model for a given domain.In information retrieval ontologies are used to perform broad searches.An ontology can be visualized as nodes and edges. Each node represents an element and each edge a relation between a parent and a child element. Working with an ontology...... becomes easier with a visual representation. An idea is to use the expressive power that a 3D representation to provide visualization for the user. In this paper we propose a new method for positioning the elements of the visualized concept lattice in the 3D world based on Operations Research (OR) methods....... One method uses a discrete location model to create an initial solution and we propose heuristic methods to further improve the visual result. We evaluate the visual results according to our success criteria and the feedback from users. Running times of the heuristic indicate that an improved version...

  5. Signal- and Symbol-based Representations in Computer Vision

    Krüger, Norbert; Felsberg, Michael

    We discuss problems of signal-- and symbol based representations in terms of three dilemmas which are faced in the design of each vision system. Signal- and symbol-based representations are opposite ends of a spectrum of conceivable design decisions caught at opposite sides of the dilemmas. We make...... inherent problems explicit and describe potential design decisions for artificial visual systems to deal with the dilemmas....

  6. Category-Epitomes : Discriminatively Minimalist Representations for Object Categories

    Sarvadevabhatla, Ravi Kiran; Babu, R. Venkatesh

    2015-01-01

    Freehand line sketches are an interesting and unique form of visual representation. Typically, such sketches are studied and utilized as an end product of the sketching process. However, we have found it instructive to study the sketches as sequentially accumulated composition of drawing strokes added over time. Studying sketches in this manner has enabled us to create novel sparse yet discriminative sketch-based representations for object categories which we term category-epitomes. Our proce...

  7. Medial Temporal Lobe Damage Impairs Representation of Simple Stimuli

    David E Warren; Duff, Melissa C.; Tranel, Daniel.; Cohen, Neal J.

    2010-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe (MTL) damage in humans is typically thought to produce a circumscribed impairment in the acquisition of new enduring memories, but recent reports have documented deficits even in short-term maintenance. We examined possible maintenance deficits in a population of MTL amnesics, with the goal of characterizing their impairments as either representational drift or outright loss of representation over time. Patients and healthy comparisons performed a visual search task in wh...

  8. Medial temporal lobe damage impairs representation of simple stimuli

    Daniel Tranel; Cohen, Neal J.

    2010-01-01

    Medial temporal lobe damage in humans is typically thought to produce a circumscribed impairment in the acquisition of new enduring memories, but recent reports have documented deficits even in short-term maintenance. We examined possible maintenance deficits in a population of medial temporal lobe amnesics, with the goal of characterizing their impairments as either representational drift or outright loss of representation over time. Patients and healthy comparisons performed a visual sear...

  9. Implicit body representations and the conscious body image.

    Longo, M. R.; Haggard, P

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed that somatosensory processing relies on a class of implicit body representations showing large distortions of size and shape. The relation between these representations and the conscious body image remains unclear. Dissociations have been reported in the clinical literature on eating disorders between different body image measures, with larger and more consistent distortions found with depictive measures, in which participants compare their body to a visual depict...

  10. Dualgrid : a closed representation space for consistent spatial databases

    Cotelo Lema, José Antonio

    2012-01-01

    [Abstract] In the past decades, much effort has been devoted to the integration of spatial information within more traditional information systems. To support such integration, spatial data representation technology has been intensively improved, from conceptual and discrete models for data representation and query languages, to indexing and visualization technologies and interoperability standards. As a result of all these efforts, Geographic Information Systems (GIS) are nowadays a widely u...

  11. Simultaneous Control of Attention by Multiple Working Memory Representations

    Beck, Valerie M.; Hollingworth, Andrew; Steven J Luck

    2012-01-01

    Working memory representations play a key role in controlling attention, making it possible to shift attention to task relevant objects. Visual working memory has a capacity of 3–4 objects, but recent studies suggest that only one representation can guide attention at a given moment. We directly tested this proposal by monitoring eye movements while observers searched for one or two different colors in arrays containing two or four different colors. First, we identified behavioral signatures ...

  12. Finding the best visualization of an ontology

    Fabritius, Christina Valentin; Madsen, Nadia Lyngaa; Clausen, Jens; Larsen, Jesper

    2004-01-01

    An ontology is a classification model for a given domain. In information retrieval ontologies are used to perform broad searches. An ontology can be visualized as nodes and edges. Each node represents an element and each edge a relation between a parent and a child element. Working with an ontology becomes easier with a visual representation. An idea is to use the expressive power that a 3D representation to provide visualization for the user. In this paper we propose a new method for positio...

  13. Visual Programming of Subsumption - Based Reactive Behaviour

    Philip T. Cox

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available General purpose visual programming languages (VPLs promote the construction of programs that are more comprehensible, robust, and maintainable by enabling programmers to directly observe and manipulate algorithms and data. However, they usually do not exploit the visual representation of entities in the problem domain, even if those entities and their interactions have obvious visual representations, as is the case in the robot control domain. We present a formal control model for autonomous robots, based on subsumption, and use it as the basis for a VPL in which reactive behaviour is programmed via interactions with a simulation.

  14. Representations of orthosymplectic superalgebras

    Finite-dimensional graded tensor representations of OSp(M/N) are enumerated via standard Young diagrams, and their corresponding highest weight and Kac-Dynkin labels are given. A uniform set of conditions on the diagram shape, necessary and sufficient for atypicality, are presented. Weight space techniques are used to provide a complete analysis of all atypical representations for the low-rank cases OSp(2/2), OSp(3/2) and OSp(4/2). (author)

  15. Exergy representations in thermodynamics

    Favrat, Daniel; Maréchal, François

    2015-01-01

    The paper reviews various representations of exergy and exergy losses in energy systems going from simple heat exchanger (heat transfer, dissipation and embedded exergy) to the exergy of full energy systems from fossil or non fossil resources (including the diffusion exergy). The systems shown include shell in tube heat exchangers, thermal power cycles, cogeneration, heat pump direct heating systems and cryogenic systems. The representations include simple gravitational analogies to extended ...

  16. Multiple sparse representations classification

    Plenge, Esben; Klein, Stefan; Niessen, Wiro; Meijering, Erik

    2015-01-01

    textabstractSparse representations classification (SRC) is a powerful technique for pixelwise classification of images and it is increasingly being used for a wide variety of image analysis tasks. The method uses sparse representation and learned redundant dictionaries to classify image pixels. In this empirical study we propose to further leverage the redundancy of the learned dictionaries to achieve a more accurate classifier. In conventional SRC, each image pixel is associated with a small...

  17. Multiple Sparse Representations Classification

    Plenge, Esben; Klein, Stefan S.; Niessen, Wiro J.; Meijering, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Sparse representations classification (SRC) is a powerful technique for pixelwise classification of images and it is increasingly being used for a wide variety of image analysis tasks. The method uses sparse representation and learned redundant dictionaries to classify image pixels. In this empirical study we propose to further leverage the redundancy of the learned dictionaries to achieve a more accurate classifier. In conventional SRC, each image pixel is associated with a small patch surro...

  18. Analytic Representations of Yang-Mills Amplitudes

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N E J; Damgaard, Poul H; Feng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Scattering amplitudes in Yang-Mills theory can be represented in the formalism of Cachazo, He and Yuan (CHY) as integrals over an auxiliary projective space---fully localized on the support of the scattering equations. Because solving the scattering equations is difficult and summing over the solutions algebraically complex, a method of directly integrating the terms that appear in this representation has long been sought. We solve this important open problem by first rewriting the terms in a manifestly Mobius-invariant form and then using monodromy relations (inspired by analogy to string theory) to decompose terms into those for which combinatorial rules of integration are known. The result is a systematic procedure to obtain analytic, covariant forms of Yang-Mills tree-amplitudes for any number of external legs and in any number of dimensions. As examples, we provide compact analytic expressions for amplitudes involving up to six gluons of arbitrary helicities.

  19. Canonical Visual Size for Real-World Objects

    Konkle, Talia; Oliva, Aude

    2011-01-01

    Real-world objects can be viewed at a range of distances and thus can be experienced at a range of visual angles within the visual field. Given the large amount of visual size variation possible when observing objects, we examined how internal object representations represent visual size information. In a series of experiments which required observers to access existing object knowledge, we observed that real-world objects have a consistent visual size at which they are drawn, imagined, and p...

  20. REcall Venice - Exploring disciplines of visual literacy through difficult heritage

    Tvedebrink, Tenna Doktor Olsen; Fisker, Anna Marie; Møller, Hans Ramsgaard

    According to James Elkin visual literacy is interpreted as material representations, which communicate knowledge and create insight through their visual appearance. Based on the EU Cultural Heritage project REcall, we argue that visual literacy can also relate to interdisciplinary knowledge rooted......, and archeologists question the role of architectural environments when dealing with war heritage. Today, there are still traces left from WWII in the European architectural environments, traces that by visual literacy represent unpleasant memories. However, these visual literacies have shaped our...