WorldWideScience

Sample records for inspired visual representation

  1. Feature extraction inspired by visual cortex mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Xing; Gong, Weiguo; Li, Weihong

    2010-02-01

    Motivated by the mechanisms of mammalian primary visual cortex (V1), we propose a hierarchical model of feature extraction for object recognition. The proposed model consists of two layers, each of which emulates the functions of V1 simple cells and complex cells respectively. Filters learned from training images are applied at every position of the input image to get an edge feature representation. Then a maximum pooling operation is taken to increase shiftinvariance of the feature. Experiments on face recognition and crop-wise object detection show that our model is competitive with the state-of-the-art biologically-inspired method.

  2. Collective form generation through visual participatory representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Day, Dennis; Sharma, Nishant

    In order to inspire and inform designers with the users data from participatory research, it may be important to represent data in a visual format that is easily understandable to the designers. For a case study in vehicle design, the paper outlines visual representation of data and the use of the same in the collective form generation session with a set of designers (vehicle design students) where designers use sketching as a tool to discuss, conceptualise and negotiate concepts towards the final vehicle form. Further, this paper attempts to demonstrate how deep and tacit context sensitive information from participatory research takes a form manifestation in collective form conceptualization by a set of designers.

  3. The Statistics of Visual Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jobson, Daniel J.; Rahman, Zia-Ur; Woodell, Glenn A.

    2002-01-01

    The experience of retinex image processing has prompted us to reconsider fundamental aspects of imaging and image processing. Foremost is the idea that a good visual representation requires a non-linear transformation of the recorded (approximately linear) image data. Further, this transformation appears to converge on a specific distribution. Here we investigate the connection between numerical and visual phenomena. Specifically the questions explored are: (1) Is there a well-defined consistent statistical character associated with good visual representations? (2) Does there exist an ideal visual image? And (3) what are its statistical properties?

  4. A Lambda Term Representation Inspired by Linear Ordered Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Abel

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available We introduce a new nameless representation of lambda terms inspired by ordered logic. At a lambda abstraction, number and relative position of all occurrences of the bound variable are stored, and application carries the additional information where to cut the variable context into function and argument part. This way, complete information about free variable occurrence is available at each subterm without requiring a traversal, and environments can be kept exact such that they only assign values to variables that actually occur in the associated term. Our approach avoids space leaks in interpreters that build function closures. In this article, we prove correctness of the new representation and present an experimental evaluation of its performance in a proof checker for the Edinburgh Logical Framework. Keywords: representation of binders, explicit substitutions, ordered contexts, space leaks, Logical Framework.

  5. Transformation Properties of Learned Visual Representations

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Taco S.; Welling, Max

    2014-01-01

    When a three-dimensional object moves through a scene, a corresponding change occurs on the image plane and in the visual representation constructed by a learning algorithm. Starting with the idea that a good representation is one that transforms linearly under scene motions, we use standard results from group representation theory to show that any such representation is equivalent to a combination of particularly simple irreducible representations. We derive a striking rela...

  6. Unsupervised Learning of Visual Representations using Videos

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xiaolong; Gupta, Abhinav

    2015-01-01

    Is strong supervision necessary for learning a good visual representation? Do we really need millions of semantically-labeled images to train a ConvNet? In this paper, we present a simple yet surprisingly powerful approach for unsupervised learning of ConvNets. Specifically, we use hundreds of thousands of unlabeled videos from the web to learn visual representations. Our key idea is that we track millions of patches in these videos. Visual tracking provides the key supervis...

  7. On visual determination of full inspiration on CT images

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of experienced thoracic radiologists to assess full inspiration based on two CT slices, one above and one below the carina, in normal subjects. Ten healthy volunteers were studied. Total lung capacity (TLC) was measured with a body plethysmograph. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) was performed in two slices at TLC and at various expired volumes. Mean Hounsfield values (HU) were calculated. Unidentifiable images, stored on a web server, were analysed visually by experienced thoracic radiologists. The results show that the mean lung density at TLC varied by approximately 40 HU between individuals. Within an individual this may correspond to a decrease in lung volume of approximately 25% of TLC. On visual determination of images taken at 65-74% of TLC, more than one-third of the images were assessed as taken at full inspiration; of the images taken at 75-84% of TLC, approximately 50% were assessed as taken at full inspiration. We conclude that visual determination of full inspiration on CT images in normal subjects is highly inaccurate. If quantitative density measurements are to be used in the diagnosis or follow-up of lung disease, thorough control of full inspiration is recommended. (orig.)

  8. Differences between spatial and visual mental representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan FrederikSima

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This article investigates the relationship between visual mental representations and spatial mental representations in human visuo-spatial processing. By comparing two common theories of visuo-spatial processing - mental model theory and the theory of mental imagery - we identified two open questions: 1 which representations are modality-specific, and 2 what is the role of the two representations in reasoning. Two experiments examining eye movements and preferences for under-specified problems were conducted to investigate these questions. We found that significant spontaneous eye movements along the processed spatial relations occurred only when a visual mental representation is employed, but not with a spatial mental representation. Furthermore, the preferences for the answers of the under-specified problems differed between the two mental representations. The results challenge assumptions made by mental model theory and the theory of mental imagery.

  9. Distorted representation in visual tourism research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Trandberg

    2015-01-01

    Tourism research has recently been informed by non-representational theories to highlight the socio-material, embodied and heterogeneous composition of tourist experiences. These advances have contributed to further reflexivity and called for novel ways to animate representations. On this background, this paper develops the notion ‘distorted representation’ to illustrate that blurred and obscure photos can in fact be intelligible and sensible in understanding tourism. Through an exploration of the overwhelmed and unintended practices of visual fieldwork, distorted representation illustrates how photographic materialities, performativities and sensations contribute to new tourism knowledges. While highlighting the potential of distorted representation, the paper posits a cautionary note in regards to the influential role of academic journals in determining the qualities of visual data. The paper exemplifies distorted representation through three impressionistic tales derived from ethnographic research on the European rail travel phenomenon: interrail.

  10. Visual texture accurate material appearance measurement, representation and modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Haindl, Michal

    2013-01-01

    This book surveys the state of the art in multidimensional, physically-correct visual texture modeling. Features: reviews the entire process of texture synthesis, including material appearance representation, measurement, analysis, compression, modeling, editing, visualization, and perceptual evaluation; explains the derivation of the most common representations of visual texture, discussing their properties, advantages, and limitations; describes a range of techniques for the measurement of visual texture, including BRDF, SVBRDF, BTF and BSSRDF; investigates the visualization of textural info

  11. Visual tracking with multifeature joint sparse representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Wenhui; Chang, Faliang; Zhao, Zijian

    2015-01-01

    We present a visual tracking method with feature fusion via joint sparse presentation. The proposed method describes each target candidate by combining different features and joint sparse representation for robustness in coefficient estimation. Then, we build a probabilistic observation model based on the approximation error between the recovered candidate image and the observed sample. Finally, this observation model is integrated with a stochastic affine motion model to form a particle filter framework for visual tracking. Furthermore, a dynamic and robust template update strategy is applied to adapt the appearance variations of the target and reduce the possibility of drifting. Quantitative evaluations on challenging benchmark video sequences demonstrate that the proposed method is effective and can perform favorably compared to several state-of-the-art methods.

  12. Deep Neural Networks Rival the Representation of Primate IT Cortex for Core Visual Object Recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadieu, Charles F.; Hong, Ha; Yamins, Daniel L. K.; Pinto, Nicolas; Ardila, Diego; Solomon, Ethan A.; Majaj, Najib J.; DiCarlo, James J.

    2014-01-01

    The primate visual system achieves remarkable visual object recognition performance even in brief presentations, and under changes to object exemplar, geometric transformations, and background variation (a.k.a. core visual object recognition). This remarkable performance is mediated by the representation formed in inferior temporal (IT) cortex. In parallel, recent advances in machine learning have led to ever higher performing models of object recognition using artificial deep neural networks (DNNs). It remains unclear, however, whether the representational performance of DNNs rivals that of the brain. To accurately produce such a comparison, a major difficulty has been a unifying metric that accounts for experimental limitations, such as the amount of noise, the number of neural recording sites, and the number of trials, and computational limitations, such as the complexity of the decoding classifier and the number of classifier training examples. In this work, we perform a direct comparison that corrects for these experimental limitations and computational considerations. As part of our methodology, we propose an extension of “kernel analysis” that measures the generalization accuracy as a function of representational complexity. Our evaluations show that, unlike previous bio-inspired models, the latest DNNs rival the representational performance of IT cortex on this visual object recognition task. Furthermore, we show that models that perform well on measures of representational performance also perform well on measures of representational similarity to IT, and on measures of predicting individual IT multi-unit responses. Whether these DNNs rely on computational mechanisms similar to the primate visual system is yet to be determined, but, unlike all previous bio-inspired models, that possibility cannot be ruled out merely on representational performance grounds. PMID:25521294

  13. Cross-cultural understanding through visual representation

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Kristina, Beckman; Susan N, Smith.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo analiza los dibujos de los estudiantes internacionales que hicieron de su país natal para su tarea de composición. Estos estudiantes de inglés como segundo idioma a menudo tienen dificultad llenando los requisitos del programa de escritura cuyo enfoque es el discurso argumentativo con [...] tesis y apoyo. Cualquier ensayo considerado irrelevante se censura y se considera estar "fuera del topico". Algunos estudiantes ven esta estructura demasiado directa e irrespetuosa. Mientras que no todos los estudiantes encuentran fácil la representación visual, los dibujos relevan ciertas características multiculturales básicias incrustadas en la escritura que se reflejan en las asignaturas. Primeramente discutimos los dibujos para el contenido retórico y luego lo discutimos utilizando la perspectiva de los estudiantes. Finalmente, analizamos como se formó nuestra propia pedagogía. Abstract in english This article analyzes international students' drawings of their home countries' essay assignments. These English as a Second Language (ESL) students often have difficulty in meeting the local demands of our Writing Program, which centers on argumentative writing with thesis and support. Any part of [...] an essay deemed irrelevant is censured as "off topic;" some students see this structure as too direct or even impolite. While not all students found visual representation easy, the drawings reveal some basic assumptions about writing embodied in their native cultures' assignments. We discuss the drawings first for visual rhetorical content, then in the students' own terms. Last, we consider how our own pedagogy has been shaped.

  14. Visual learning by imitation with motor representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Manuel; Santos-Victor, José

    2005-06-01

    We propose a general architecture for action (mimicking) and program (gesture) level visual imitation. Action-level imitation involves two modules. The viewpoint Transformation (VPT) performs a "rotation" to align the demonstrator's body to that of the learner. The Visuo-Motor Map (VMM) maps this visual information to motor data. For program-level (gesture) imitation, there is an additional module that allows the system to recognize and generate its own interpretation of observed gestures to produce similar gestures/goals at a later stage. Besides the holistic approach to the problem, our approach differs from traditional work in i) the use of motor information for gesture recognition; ii) usage of context (e.g., object affordances) to focus the attention of the recognition system and reduce ambiguities, and iii) use iconic image representations for the hand, as opposed to fitting kinematic models to the video sequence. This approach is motivated by the finding of visuomotor neurons in the F5 area of the macaque brain that suggest that gesture recognition/imitation is performed in motor terms (mirror) and rely on the use of object affordances (canonical) to handle ambiguous actions. Our results show that this approach can outperform more conventional (e.g., pure visual) methods. PMID:15971913

  15. Acoustic Tactile Representation of Visual Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Pubudu Madhawa

    Our goal is to explore the use of hearing and touch to convey graphical and pictorial information to visually impaired people. Our focus is on dynamic, interactive display of visual information using existing, widely available devices, such as smart phones and tablets with touch sensitive screens. We propose a new approach for acoustic-tactile representation of visual signals that can be implemented on a touch screen and allows the user to actively explore a two-dimensional layout consisting of one or more objects with a finger or a stylus while listening to auditory feedback via stereo headphones. The proposed approach is acoustic-tactile because sound is used as the primary source of information for object localization and identification, while touch is used for pointing and kinesthetic feedback. A static overlay of raised-dot tactile patterns can also be added. A key distinguishing feature of the proposed approach is the use of spatial sound (directional and distance cues) to facilitate the active exploration of the layout. We consider a variety of configurations for acoustic-tactile rendering of object size, shape, identity, and location, as well as for the overall perception of simple layouts and scenes. While our primary goal is to explore the fundamental capabilities and limitations of representing visual information in acoustic-tactile form, we also consider a number of relatively simple configurations that can be tied to specific applications. In particular, we consider a simple scene layout consisting of objects in a linear arrangement, each with a distinct tapping sound, which we compare to a ''virtual cane.'' We will also present a configuration that can convey a ''Venn diagram.'' We present systematic subjective experiments to evaluate the effectiveness of the proposed display for shape perception, object identification and localization, and 2-D layout perception, as well as the applications. Our experiments were conducted with visually blocked subjects. The results are evaluated in terms of accuracy and speed, and they demonstrate the advantages of spatial sound for guiding the scanning finger or pointer in shape perception, object localization, and layout exploration. We show that these advantages increase with the amount of detail (smaller object size) in the display. Our experimental results show that the proposed system outperforms the state of the art in shape perception, including variable friction displays. We also demonstrate that, even though they are currently available only as static overlays, raised dot patterns provide the best shape rendition in terms of both the accuracy and speed. Our experiments with layout rendering and perception demonstrate that simultaneous representation of objects, using the most effective approaches for directionality and distance rendering, approaches the optimal performance level provided by visual layout perception. Finally, experiments with the virtual cane and Venn diagram configurations demonstrate that the proposed techniques can be used effectively in simple but nontrivial real-world applications. One of the most important conclusions of our experiments is that there is a clear performance gap between experienced and inexperienced subjects, which indicates that there is a lot of room for improvement with appropriate and extensive training. By exploring a wide variety of design alternatives and focusing on different aspects of the acoustic-tactile interfaces, our results offer many valuable insights and great promise for the design of future systematic tests visually impaired and visually blocked subjects, utilizing the most effective configurations.

  16. String-inspired representations of photon/gluon amplitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmadiniaz, Naser; Villanueva, Victor M

    2012-01-01

    The string-based Bern-Kosower rules provide an efficient way for obtaining parameter integral representations of the one-loop N - photon/gluon amplitudes involving a scalar, spinor or gluon loop, starting from a master formula and using a certain integration-by-parts (`IBP') procedure. Strassler observed that this algorithm also relates to gauge invariance, since it leads to the absorption of polarization vectors into field strength tensors. Here we present a systematic IBP algorithm that works for arbitrary N and leads to an integrand that is not only suitable for the application of the Bern-Kosower rules but also optimized with respect to gauge invariance. In the photon case this means manifest transversality at the integrand level, in the gluon case that a form factor decomposition of the amplitude into transversal and longitudinal parts is generated naturally by the IBP, without the necessity to consider the nonabelian Ward identities. Our algorithm is valid off-shell, and provides an extremely efficient ...

  17. Constructing visual representations : investigating the use of tangible tokens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huron, Samuel; Jansen, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    The accessibility of infovis authoring tools to a wide audience has been identified as a major research challenge. A key task in the authoring process is the development of visual mappings. While the infovis community has long been deeply interested in finding effective visual mappings, comparatively little attention has been placed on how people construct visual mappings. In this paper, we present the results of a study designed to shed light on how people transform data into visual representations. We asked people to create, update and explain their own information visualizations using only tangible building blocks. We learned that all participants, most of whom had little experience in visualization authoring, were readily able to create and talk about their own visualizations. Based on our observations, we discuss participants’ actions during the development of their visual representations and during their analytic activities. We conclude by suggesting implications for tool design to enable broader support for infovis authoring.

  18. Representation of object continuity in the visual cortex

    OpenAIRE

    O’herron, Philip; Von Heydt, Ru?diger

    2011-01-01

    An amazing feature of our visual system is the ability to detect and track objects in the stream of continually changing retinal images. Theories have proposed that the system creates temporary internal representations that persist across changing images, providing continuity. But how such representations are formed in the brain is not known. Here we examined the time course of the responses of border-ownership selective neurons in visual cortex to displays that portray object continuity. We ...

  19. Introducing Memory and Association Mechanism into a Biologically Inspired Visual Model

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Qiao; Yinlin, Li; Tang, Tang; Peng, Wang

    2013-01-01

    A famous biologically inspired hierarchical model firstly proposed by Riesenhuber and Poggio has been successfully applied to multiple visual recognition tasks. The model is able to achieve a set of position- and scale-tolerant recognition, which is a central problem in pattern recognition. In this paper, based on some other biological experimental results, we introduce the Memory and Association Mechanisms into the above biologically inspired model. The main motivations of ...

  20. Revisiting Curriculum Inquiry: The Role of Visual Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eilam, Billie; Ben-Peretz, Miriam

    2010-01-01

    How do visual representations (VRs) in curriculum materials influence theoretical curriculum frameworks? Suggesting that VRs' integration into curriculum materials affords a different lens for perceiving and understanding the curriculum domain, this study draws on a curricular perspective in relation to multi-representations in texts rather than…

  1. Visual Attention: from Bio-Inspired Modeling to Real-Time Implementation

    OpenAIRE

    Ouerhani, Nabil; Hu?gli, Heinz

    2004-01-01

    Visual Attention: From Bio-Inspired Modeling to Visual attention is the ability of a vision system, be it biological or artificial, to rapidly select the most salient and thus the most relevant data about the environment in which the system is operating. The main goal of this visual mechanism is to drastically reduce the amount of visual information that must be processed by high level and thus complex tasks, such as object recognition, which leads to a considerable speed up of the entire vis...

  2. Ambiguous science and the visual representation of the real

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbold, Curtis Robert

    The emergence of visual media as prominent and even expected forms of communication in nearly all disciplines, including those scientific, has raised new questions about how the art and science of communication epistemologically affect the interpretation of scientific phenomena. In this dissertation I explore how the influence of aesthetics in visual representations of science inevitably creates ambiguous meanings. As a means to improve visual literacy in the sciences, I call awareness to the ubiquity of visual ambiguity and its importance and relevance in scientific discourse. To do this, I conduct a literature review that spans interdisciplinary research in communication, science, art, and rhetoric. Furthermore, I create a paradoxically ambiguous taxonomy, which functions to exploit the nuances of visual ambiguities and their role in scientific communication. I then extrapolate the taxonomy of visual ambiguity and from it develop an ambiguous, rhetorical heuristic, the Tetradic Model of Visual Ambiguity. The Tetradic Model is applied to a case example of a scientific image as a demonstration of how scientific communicators may increase their awareness of the epistemological effects of ambiguity in the visual representations of science. I conclude by demonstrating how scientific communicators may make productive use of visual ambiguity, even in communications of objective science, and I argue how doing so strengthens scientific communicators' visual literacy skills and their ability to communicate more ethically and effectively.

  3. Discoveries from a Reggio-Inspired Classroom: Meeting Developmental Needs through the Visual Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griebling, Susan

    2011-01-01

    Educators from Reggio Emilia encourage educators to see children as competent and strong. They persuade educators to acknowledge the children's use of the visual arts as a "language," especially during project work. Inspired by the philosophy from Reggio Emilia, the author initiated a 10-week ethnographic study of young children in a…

  4. Configurable visual representations for business process monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Rapoports, Andrejs

    2011-01-01

    Business processes are one of the most important assets that a company has. The success of the business depends directly on the quality of these processes. This makes business process reengineering and business process improvement the key task of a business analyst. To support monitoring and analysis steps, an advanced approach for process visualization is required. The main problem is that several different professionals have to collaborate in order to prepare an expressive visualization ...

  5. Visual representations during saccadic eye movements

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Tirin; Tolias, Andreas S.; Schiller, Peter H.

    1998-01-01

    In normal vision, shifts of attention are usually followed by saccadic eye movements. Neurons in extrastriate area V4 are modulated by focal attention when eye movements are withheld, but they also respond in advance of visually guided saccadic eye movements. We have examined the visual selectivity of saccade-related responses of area V4 neurons in monkeys making delayed eye movements to receptive field stimuli of varying orientation. This task did not require the monkey to attend to orientat...

  6. Mechanisms and representations of language-mediated visual attention

    OpenAIRE

    FalkHuettig; RameshKumarMishra; ChristianN LOlivers

    2012-01-01

    The experimental investigation of language-mediated visual attention is a promising way to study the interaction of the cognitive systems involved in language, vision, attention, and memory. Here we review recent research addressing three key issues with regard to how this oculomotor behavior is instantiated: levels of representation at which language-derived and vision-derived representations are integrated; attentional mechanisms; and types of memory. Central points in our discussion are (a...

  7. Neural dynamics of image representation in the primary visual cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Yan, Xiaogang; Khambhati, Ankit; Liu, Lei; Lee, Tai Sing

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal connections in the primary visual cortex have been hypothesized to play a number of computational roles: association field for contour completion, surface interpolation, surround suppression, and saliency computation. Here, we argue that horizontal connections might also serve a critical role of computing the appropriate codes for image representation. That the early visual cortex or V1 explicitly represents the image we perceive has been a common assumption on computational theori...

  8. Data Representations, Transformations, and Statistics for Visual Reasoning

    CERN Document Server

    Maciejewski, Ross

    2011-01-01

    Analytical reasoning techniques are methods by which users explore their data to obtain insight and knowledge that can directly support situational awareness and decision making. Recently, the analytical reasoning process has been augmented through the use of interactive visual representations and tools which utilize cognitive, design and perceptual principles. These tools are commonly referred to as visual analytics tools, and the underlying methods and principles have roots in a variety of disciplines. This chapter provides an introduction to young researchers as an overview of common visual

  9. Efficient visual system processing of spatial and luminance statistics in representational and non-representational art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Daniel J.; Friedenberg, Jay D.; Rockmore, Daniel N.

    2009-02-01

    An emerging body of research suggests that artists consistently seek modes of representation that are efficiently processed by the human visual system, and that these shared properties could leave statistical signatures. In earlier work, we showed evidence that perceived similarity of representational art could be predicted using intensity statistics to which the early visual system is attuned, though semantic content was also found to be an important factor. Here we report two studies that examine the visual perception of similarity. We test a collection of non-representational art, which we argue possesses useful statistical and semantic properties, in terms of the relationship between image statistics and basic perceptual responses. We find two simple statistics-both expressed as single values-that predict nearly a third of the overall variance in similarity judgments of abstract art. An efficient visual system could make a quick and reasonable guess as to the relationship of a given image to others (i.e., its context) by extracting these basic statistics early in the visual stream, and this may hold for natural scenes as well as art. But a major component of many types of art is representational content. In a second study, we present findings related to efficient representation of natural scene luminances in landscapes by a well-known painter. We show empirically that elements of contemporary approaches to high-dynamic range tone-mapping-which are themselves deeply rooted in an understanding of early visual system coding-are present in the way Vincent Van Gogh transforms scene luminances into painting luminances. We argue that global tone mapping functions are a useful descriptor of an artist's perceptual goals with respect to global illumination and we present evidence that mapping the scene to a painting with different implied lighting properties produces a less efficient mapping. Together, these studies suggest that statistical regularities in art can shed light on visual processing.

  10. Neural dynamics of image representation in the primary visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaogang; Khambhati, Ankit; Liu, Lei; Lee, Tai Sing

    2012-01-01

    Horizontal connections in the primary visual cortex have been hypothesized to play a number of computational roles: association field for contour completion, surface interpolation, surround suppression, and saliency computation. Here, we argue that horizontal connections might also serve a critical role for computing the appropriate codes for image representation. That the early visual cortex or V1 explicitly represents the image we perceive has been a common assumption in computational theories of efficient coding (Olshausen and Field (1996)), yet such a framework for understanding the circuitry in V1 has not been seriously entertained in the neurophysiological community. In fact, a number of recent fMRI and neurophysiological studies cast doubt on the neural validity of such an isomorphic representation (Cornelissen et al., 2006; von der Heydt et al., 2003). In this study, we investigated, neurophysiologically, how V1 neurons respond to uniform color surfaces and show that spiking activities of neurons can be decomposed into three components: a bottom-up feedforward input, an articulation of color tuning and a contextual modulation signal that is inversely proportional to the distance away from the bounding contrast border. We demonstrate through computational simulations that the behaviors of a model for image representation are consistent with many aspects of our neural observations. We conclude that the hypothesis of isomorphic representation of images in V1 remains viable and this hypothesis suggests an additional new interpretation of the functional roles of horizontal connections in the primary visual cortex. PMID:22944076

  11. Dynamic distortion of visual position representation around moving objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Katsumi; Yokoi, Kenji

    2008-01-01

    The relative visual positions of briefly flashed stimuli are systematically modified in the presence of motion signals (R. Nijhawan, 2002; D. Whitney, 2002). Previously, we investigated the two-dimensional distortion of relative-position representations between moving and flashed stimuli. The results showed that the perceived position of a flash is not uniformly displaced but shifted toward a single convergent point back along the trajectory of a moving object (K. Watanabe & K. Yokoi, 2006, 2007). In the present study, we examined the temporal dynamics of the anisotropic distortion of visual position representation. While observers fixated on a stationary cross, a black disk appeared, moved along a horizontal trajectory, and disappeared. A white dot was briefly flashed at various positions relative to the moving disk and at various timings relative to the motion onset/offset. The temporal emerging-waning pattern of anisotropic mislocalization indicated that position representation in the space ahead of a moving object differs qualitatively from that in the space behind it. Thus, anisotropic mislocalization cannot be explained by either a spatially or a temporally homogeneous process. Instead, visual position representation is anisotropically influenced by moving objects in both space and time. PMID:18484819

  12. Robust Visual Tracking via Appearance Modeling and Sparse Representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available When appearance variation of object, partial occlusion or illumination change in object images occurs, most existing tracking approaches fail to track the target effectively. To deal with the problem, this paper proposed a robust visual tracking method based on appearance modeling and sparse representation. The proposed method exploits two-dimensional principal component analysis (2DPCA with sparse representation theory for constructing appearance model. Then tracking is achieved by Bayesian inference framework, in which a particle filter is applied to evaluate the target state sequentially over time. In addition, to make the observation model more robust, the incremental learning algorithm is used to update the template set. Both qualitative and quantitative evaluations on four publicly available benchmark video sequences demonstrate that the proposed visual tracking algorithm performs better than several state-of-the-art algorithms.

  13. VisGenome: visualization of single and comparative genome representations

    OpenAIRE

    Jakubowska, Joanna; Hunt, Ela; Chalmers, Matthew; McBride, Martin; Dominiczak, Anna F.

    2007-01-01

    VisGenome visualizes single and comparative representations for the rat, the mouse and the human chromosomes at different levels of detail. The tool offers smooth zooming and panning which is more flexible than seen in other browsers. It presents information available in Ensembl for single chromosomes, as well as homologies (orthologue predictions including ortholog one2one, apparent ortholog one2one, ortholog many2many) for any two chromosomes from different species. The application can quer...

  14. Visual Representation in the Wild: How Rhesus Monkeys Parse Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Munakata, Yuko; Santos, Laurie R.; Elizabeth S. Spelke; Hauser, Marc David; O'Reilly, Randall C.

    2001-01-01

    Visual object representation was studied in free-ranging rhesus monkeys. To facilitate comparison with humans, and to provide a new tool for neurophysiologists, we used a looking time procedure originally developed for studies of human infants. Monkeys' looking times were measured to displays with one or two distinct objects, separated or together, stationary or moving. Results indicate that rhesus monkeys used featural information to parse the displays into distinct objects, and they found e...

  15. Learning Visual Representations for Perception-Action Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piater, Justus; Jodogne, Sebastien

    2011-01-01

    We discuss vision as a sensory modality for systems that effect actions in response to perceptions. While the internal representations informed by vision may be arbitrarily complex, we argue that in many cases it is advantageous to link them rather directly to action via learned mappings. These arguments are illustrated by two examples of our own work. First, our RLVC algorithm performs reinforcement learning directly on the visual input space. To make this very large space manageable, RLVC interleaves the reinforcement learner with a supervised classification algorithm that seeks to split perceptual states so as to reduce perceptual aliasing. This results in an adaptive discretization of the perceptual space based on the presence or absence of visual features. Its extension RLJC also handles continuous action spaces. In contrast to the minimalistic visual representations produced by RLVC and RLJC, our second method learns structural object models for robust object detection and pose estimation by probabilistic inference. To these models, the method associates grasp experiences autonomously learned by trial and error. These experiences form a nonparametric representation of grasp success likelihoods over gripper poses, which we call a grasp density. Thus, object detection in a novel scene simultaneously produces suitable grasping options.

  16. Human-visual-system-inspired tone mapping algorithm for HDR images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzi, Alessandro; Gatta, Carlo; Piacentini, Benedetta; Fierro, Massimo; Marini, Daniele

    2004-06-01

    In this paper we present a tone mapping operator (TMO) for High Dynamic Range images, inspired by human visual system adaptive mechanisms. The proposed TMO is able to perform color constancy without a priori information about the scene. This is a consequence of its HVS inspiration. In our humble opinion, color constancy is very useful in TMO since we assume that it is preferable to look at an image that reproduces the color sensation rather than an image that follows classic photographic reproduction. Our proposal starts from the analysis of Retinex and ACE algorithms. Then we have extended ACE to HDR images, introducing novel features. These are two non-linear controls: the first control allows the model to find a good trade-off between visibility and color distribution modifying the local operator at each pixel-to-pixel comparison while the second modifies the interaction between pixels estimating the local contrast. Solution towards unsupervised parameters tuning are proposed.

  17. Anticipatory visual perception as a bio-inspired mechanism underlying robot locomotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Alejandra; Laschi, Cecilia

    2010-01-01

    Anticipation of sensory consequences of actions is critical for the predictive control of movement that explains most of our sensory-motor behaviors. Plenty of neuroscientific studies in humans suggest evidence of anticipatory mechanisms based on internal models. Several robotic implementations of predictive behaviors have been inspired on those biological mechanisms in order to achieve adaptive agents. This paper provides an overview of such neuroscientific and robotic evidences; a high-level architecture of sensory-motor coordination based on anticipatory visual perception and internal models is then introduced; and finally, the paper concludes by discussing the relevance of the proposed architecture within the context of current research in humanoid robotics. PMID:21096813

  18. A neuron-inspired computational architecture for spatiotemporal visual processing: real-time visual sensory integration for humanoid robots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzbach, Andreas; Cheng, Gordon

    2014-06-01

    In this article, we present a neurologically motivated computational architecture for visual information processing. The computational architecture's focus lies in multiple strategies: hierarchical processing, parallel and concurrent processing, and modularity. The architecture is modular and expandable in both hardware and software, so that it can also cope with multisensory integrations - making it an ideal tool for validating and applying computational neuroscience models in real time under real-world conditions. We apply our architecture in real time to validate a long-standing biologically inspired visual object recognition model, HMAX. In this context, the overall aim is to supply a humanoid robot with the ability to perceive and understand its environment with a focus on the active aspect of real-time spatiotemporal visual processing. We show that our approach is capable of simulating information processing in the visual cortex in real time and that our entropy-adaptive modification of HMAX has a higher efficiency and classification performance than the standard model (up to ?+6%). PMID:24687170

  19. Visualization Through Knowledge Representation Model for Social Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar; Athar Javed, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge management is a systematic and organizationally specified process and knowledge management system is all those technological components; software, hardware, people and processes supporting knowledge management initiative. These initiatives includes work flow maps, web sites, portals, document/team management system, data warehouses, data mining processes, databases, contact lists, virtual teams, collaboration tools, customer relationship management, applications and news (Davenport and Prusak 1998, Jashapara 2004). Knowledge is not important per se (Agostini et al 2003) instead the process of knowing, learning and creating knowledge is the relevant aspect (Nonaka and Takeuchi 1995). In this paper knowledge representation is presented in 3D style for the understanding and visualization of dynamics of complex social networks by developing a TANetworkTool (Task Analysis Network Tool). The standard or normal representation of a typical social network is through a graph data structure in 2D. The dynamics of larger social networks is so complex some time it becomes difficult to understand the various levels of interactions and dependencies just by mere representation through a tree or graph. Although, many analytical methods provide relationship dependencies, role of different nodes and their importance in the network. In this paper we are presenting a visualization of networks by rotating the network through various dimensions to provide a more realistic view to understand the dynamics of complex social networks and complimenting the analytical results. This representation can also help authorities not necessarily having specific scientific background to understand and perhaps take preventive actions required in certain specific scenarios for example dealing with terrorist/covert networks.

  20. Visual Literacy and Biochemistry Learning: The role of external representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.J.S.V. Santos

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Visual Literacy can bedefined as people’s ability to understand, use, think, learn and express themselves through external representations (ER in a given subject. This research aims to investigate the development of abilities of ERs reading and interpretation by students from a Biochemistry graduate course of theFederal University of São João Del-Rei. In this way, Visual Literacy level was  assessed using a questionnaire validatedin a previous educational research. This diagnosis questionnaire was elaborated according to six visual abilitiesidentified as essential for the study of the metabolic pathways. The initial statistical analysis of data collectedin this study was carried out using ANOVA method. Results obtained showed that the questionnaire used is adequate for the research and indicated that the level of Visual Literacy related to the metabolic processes increased significantly with the progress of the students in the graduation course. There was also an indication of a possible interference in the student’s performancedetermined by the cutoff punctuation in the university selection process.

  1. A unified data representation theory for network visualization, ordering and coarse-graining

    CERN Document Server

    Kovács, István A; Csermely, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Representation of large data sets became a key question of many scientific disciplines in the last decade. Several approaches for network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining accomplished this goal. However, there was no underlying theoretical framework linking these problems. Here we show an elegant, information theoretic data representation approach as a unified solution of network visualization, data ordering and coarse-graining. The optimal representation is the hardest to distinguish from the original data matrix, measured by the relative entropy. The representation of network nodes as probability distributions provides an efficient visualization method and, in one dimension, an ordering of network nodes and edges. Coarse-grained representations of the input network enable both efficient data compression and hierarchical visualization to achieve high quality representations of larger data sets. Our unified data representation theory will help the analysis of huge data sets in science, by reve...

  2. Neural representations for the generation of inventive conceptions inspired by adaptive feature optimization of biological species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hao; Liu, Jia; Zhang, Qinglin

    2014-01-01

    Inventive conceptions amount to creative ideas for designing devices that are both original and useful. The generation of inventive conceptions is a key element of the inventive process. However, neural mechanisms of the inventive process remain poorly understood. Here we employed functional feature association tasks and event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate neural substrates for the generation of inventive conceptions. The functional MRI (fMRI) data revealed significant activations at Brodmann area (BA) 47 in the left inferior frontal gyrus and at BA 18 in the left lingual gyrus, when participants performed biological functional feature association tasks compared with non-biological functional feature association tasks. Our results suggest that the left inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47) is associated with novelty-based representations formed by the generation and selection of semantic relatedness, and the left lingual gyrus (BA 18) is involved in relevant visual imagery in processing of semantic relatedness. The findings might shed light on neural mechanisms underlying the inventive process. PMID:23582377

  3. Teaching with Concrete and Abstract Visual Representations: Effects on Students' Problem Solving, Problem Representations, and Learning Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Roxana; Ozogul, Gamze; Reisslein, Martin

    2011-01-01

    In 3 experiments, we examined the effects of using concrete and/or abstract visual problem representations during instruction on students' problem-solving practice, near transfer, problem representations, and learning perceptions. In Experiments 1 and 2, novice students learned about electrical circuit analysis with an instructional program that…

  4. Inter-subject neural code converter for visual image representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Kentaro; Miyawaki, Yoichi; Kamitani, Yukiyasu

    2015-06-01

    Brain activity patterns differ from person to person, even for an identical stimulus. In functional brain mapping studies, it is important to align brain activity patterns between subjects for group statistical analyses. While anatomical templates are widely used for inter-subject alignment in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) studies, they are not sufficient to identify the mapping between voxel-level functional responses representing specific mental contents. Recent work has suggested that statistical learning methods could be used to transform individual brain activity patterns into a common space while preserving representational contents. Here, we propose a flexible method for functional alignment, "neural code converter," which converts one subject's brain activity pattern into another's representing the same content. The neural code converter was designed to learn statistical relationships between fMRI activity patterns of paired subjects obtained while they saw an identical series of stimuli. It predicts the signal intensity of individual voxels of one subject from a pattern of multiple voxels of the other subject. To test this method, we used fMRI activity patterns measured while subjects observed visual images consisting of random and structured patches. We show that fMRI activity patterns for visual images not used for training the converter could be predicted from those of another subject where brain activity was recorded for the same stimuli. This confirms that visual images can be accurately reconstructed from the predicted activity patterns alone. Furthermore, we show that a classifier trained only on predicted fMRI activity patterns could accurately classify measured fMRI activity patterns. These results demonstrate that the neural code converter can translate neural codes between subjects while preserving contents related to visual images. While this method is useful for functional alignment and decoding, it may also provide a basis for brain-to-brain communication using the converted pattern for designing brain stimulation. PMID:25842289

  5. Fixed-Rank Representation for Unsupervised Visual Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Risheng; De la Torre, Fernando; Su, Zhixun

    2012-01-01

    Subspace clustering and feature extraction are two of the most extensive unsupervised visual learning tasks in computer vision and pattern recognition. In this paper, we pose these two problems in a unified framework, named fixed-rank representation (FRR). For subspace clustering, our first contribution is to show that, when the data is clean, we can efficiently solve FRR in closed-form and the global optimal solution to FRR can exactly recover the multiple subspace structure. Furthermore, we prove that under some suitable conditions, even with insufficient observations, the memberships of data points still can be exactly recovered by FRR. In the case that the data is corrupted by noises and outliers, a sparse regularization is introduced to achieve robustness for FRR. For feature extraction, we provide some new insights to understand existing methods, which lead to a new approach for robust feature extraction. As a non-trivial byproduct, a fast numerical solver is developed for FRR. Experimental results on b...

  6. Reading visual representations of 'Ndabeni' in the public realms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sipokazi Sambumbu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay outlines and analyses contemporary image representations of Ndabeni (also called kwa-Ndabeni, a location near Cape Town where a group of people became confined between 1901 and 1936 following an outbreak of the bubonic plague in the city. This location was to shape Cape Town's landscape for a little less that thirty-five years, accommodating people who were forcibly removed from the Cape Town docklands and from District Six. Images representing this place have been produced, archived, recovered, modified, reproduced and circulated in different ways and contexts. Ndabeni has become public knowledge through public visual representations that have been produced across a range of sites in post-apartheid Cape Town. I focus on three sites: the Victoria and Alfred Waterfront, the District Six Museum, and the Eziko Restaurant and Catering School. In each case I analyse the processes through which the Ndabeni images in question have been used and reused over time in changing contexts. I analyse the 'modalities' in which these images have been composed, interpreted and employed and in which knowledge has been mediated. I explore the contents and contexts of the storyboards and exhibition panels that purport to represent Ndabeni. Finally, I discuss potential meanings that could be constructed if the images could be read independent of the texts.

  7. Reading visual representations of 'Ndabeni' in the public realms

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Sipokazi, Sambumbu.

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This essay outlines and analyses contemporary image representations of Ndabeni (also called kwa-Ndabeni), a location near Cape Town where a group of people became confined between 1901 and 1936 following an outbreak of the bubonic plague in the city. This location was to shape Cape Town's landscape [...] for a little less that thirty-five years, accommodating people who were forcibly removed from the Cape Town docklands and from District Six. Images representing this place have been produced, archived, recovered, modified, reproduced and circulated in different ways and contexts. Ndabeni has become public knowledge through public visual representations that have been produced across a range of sites in post-apartheid Cape Town. I focus on three sites: the Victoria and Alfred Waterfront, the District Six Museum, and the Eziko Restaurant and Catering School. In each case I analyse the processes through which the Ndabeni images in question have been used and reused over time in changing contexts. I analyse the 'modalities' in which these images have been composed, interpreted and employed and in which knowledge has been mediated. I explore the contents and contexts of the storyboards and exhibition panels that purport to represent Ndabeni. Finally, I discuss potential meanings that could be constructed if the images could be read independent of the texts.

  8. Distributed representation of objects in the human ventral visual pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishai, Alumit; Ungerleider, Leslie G.; Martin, Alex; Schouten, Jennifer L.; Haxby, James V.

    1999-01-01

    Brain imaging and electrophysiological recording studies in humans have reported discrete cortical regions in posterior ventral temporal cortex that respond preferentially to faces, buildings, and letters. These findings suggest a category-specific anatomically segregated modular organization of the object vision pathway. Here we present data from a functional MRI study in which we found three distinct regions of ventral temporal cortex that responded preferentially to faces and two categories of other objects, namely houses and chairs, and had a highly consistent topological arrangement. Although the data could be interpreted as evidence for separate modules, we found that each category also evoked significant responses in the regions that responded maximally to other stimuli. Moreover, each category was associated with its own differential pattern of response across ventral temporal cortex. These results indicate that the representation of an object is not restricted to a region that responds maximally to that object, but rather is distributed across a broader expanse of cortex. We propose that the functional architecture of the ventral visual pathway is not a mosaic of category-specific modules but instead is a continuous representation of information about object form that has a highly consistent and orderly topological arrangement. PMID:10430951

  9. Introducing memory and association mechanism into a biologically inspired visual model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, Hong; Li, Yinlin; Tang, Tang; Wang, Peng

    2014-09-01

    A famous biologically inspired hierarchical model (HMAX model), which was proposed recently and corresponds to V1 to V4 of the ventral pathway in primate visual cortex, has been successfully applied to multiple visual recognition tasks. The model is able to achieve a set of position- and scale-tolerant recognition, which is a central problem in pattern recognition. In this paper, based on some other biological experimental evidence, we introduce the memory and association mechanism into the HMAX model. The main contributions of the work are: 1) mimicking the active memory and association mechanism and adding the top down adjustment to the HMAX model, which is the first try to add the active adjustment to this famous model and 2) from the perspective of information, algorithms based on the new model can reduce the computation storage and have a good recognition performance. The new model is also applied to object recognition processes. The primary experimental results show that our method is efficient with a much lower memory requirement. PMID:24184793

  10. Exploring Middle School Students' Representational Competence in Science: Development and Verification of a Framework for Learning with Visual Representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tippett, Christine Diane

    Scientific knowledge is constructed and communicated through a range of forms in addition to verbal language. Maps, graphs, charts, diagrams, formulae, models, and drawings are just some of the ways in which science concepts can be represented. Representational competence---an aspect of visual literacy that focuses on the ability to interpret, transform, and produce visual representations---is a key component of science literacy and an essential part of science reading and writing. To date, however, most research has examined learning from representations rather than learning with representations. This dissertation consisted of three distinct projects that were related by a common focus on learning from visual representations as an important aspect of scientific literacy. The first project was the development of an exploratory framework that is proposed for use in investigations of students constructing and interpreting multimedia texts. The exploratory framework, which integrates cognition, metacognition, semiotics, and systemic functional linguistics, could eventually result in a model that might be used to guide classroom practice, leading to improved visual literacy, better comprehension of science concepts, and enhanced science literacy because it emphasizes distinct aspects of learning with representations that can be addressed though explicit instruction. The second project was a metasynthesis of the research that was previously conducted as part of the Explicit Literacy Instruction Embedded in Middle School Science project (Pacific CRYSTAL, http://www.educ.uvic.ca/pacificcrystal). Five overarching themes emerged from this case-to-case synthesis: the engaging and effective nature of multimedia genres, opportunities for differentiated instruction using multimodal strategies, opportunities for assessment, an emphasis on visual representations, and the robustness of some multimodal literacy strategies across content areas. The third project was a mixed-methods verification study that was conducted to refine and validate the theoretical framework. This study examined middle school students' representational competence and focused on students' creation of visual representations such as labelled diagrams, a form of representation commonly found in science information texts and textbooks. An analysis of the 31 Grade 6 participants' representations and semistructured interviews revealed five themes, each of which supports one or more dimensions of the exploratory framework: participants' use of color, participants' choice of representation (form and function), participants' method of planning for representing, participants' knowledge of conventions, and participants' selection of information to represent. Together, the results of these three projects highlight the need for further research on learning with rather than learning from representations.

  11. Virtual-real spatial information visualization registration using affine representations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xueling; Ren, Fu; Du, Qingyun

    2009-10-01

    Virtual-real registration in Outdoor Augmented Reality is committed to enhance user's spatial cognition by overlaying virtual geographical objects on real scene. According to analyze fiducial detection registration method in indoor AR, for the purpose of avoiding complex and tedious process of position tracking and camera calibration in traditional registration methods, it puts forward and practices a virtual-real spatial information visualization registration method using affine representations. Based on the observation from Koenderink and van Doorn, Ullman and Basri in 1991 which is given a set of four or more non-coplanar 3D points, the projection of all points in the set can be computed as a linear combination of the projection of just four of the points, it sets up global affine coordinate system in light of world coordinates, camera coordinates and virtual coordinates and extracts four feature points from scene image and calculates the global affine coordinates of key points of virtual objects. Then according to a linear homogeneous coordinates of the four feature point's projection, it calculates projection pixel coordinates of key points of virtual objects. In addition, it proposes an approach to obtain pixel relative depth for hidden surface removal. Finally, by a case study, it verifies the feasibility and efficiency of the registration methods. The method would not only explore a new research direction for Geographical Information Science, but also would provide location-based information and services for outdoor AR.

  12. Lewis-inspired representation of dissociable water in clusters and Grotthuss chains

    OpenAIRE

    Kale, Seyit; Herzfeld, Judith; Dai, Stacy; Blank, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Proton transfer to and from water is critical to the function of water in many settings. However, it has been challenging to model. Here, we present proof-of-principle for an efficient yet robust model based on Lewis-inspired submolecular particles with interactions that deviate from Coulombic at short distances to take quantum effects into account. This “LEWIS” model provides excellent correspondence with experimental structures for water molecules and water clusters in their neutral, pr...

  13. A bio-inspired visual collision detection mechanism for cars: combining insect inspired neurons to create a robust system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafford, Richard; Santer, Roger D; Rind, F Claire

    2007-02-01

    The lobula giant movement detector (LGMD) of locusts is a visual interneuron that responds with an increasing spike frequency to an object approaching on a direct collision course. Recent studies involving the use of LGMD models to detect car collisions showed that it could detect collisions, but the neuron produced collision alerts to non-colliding, translating, stimuli in many cases. This study presents a modified model to address these problems. It shows how the neurons pre-synaptic to the LGMD show a remarkable ability to filter images, and only colliding and translating stimuli produce excitation in the neuron. It then integrates the LGMD network with models based on the elementary movement detector (EMD) neurons from the fly visual system, which are used to analyse directional excitation patterns in the biologically filtered images. Combining the information from the LGMD neuron and four directionally sensitive neurons produces a robust collision detection system for a wide range of automotive test situations. PMID:17027143

  14. Computational intelligence in multi-feature visual pattern recognition hand posture and face recognition using biologically inspired approaches

    CERN Document Server

    Pisharady, Pramod Kumar; Poh, Loh Ai

    2014-01-01

    This book presents a collection of computational intelligence algorithms that addresses issues in visual pattern recognition such as high computational complexity, abundance of pattern features, sensitivity to size and shape variations and poor performance against complex backgrounds. The book has 3 parts. Part 1 describes various research issues in the field with a survey of the related literature. Part 2 presents computational intelligence based algorithms for feature selection and classification. The algorithms are discriminative and fast. The main application area considered is hand posture recognition. The book also discusses utility of these algorithms in other visual as well as non-visual pattern recognition tasks including face recognition, general object recognition and cancer / tumor classification. Part 3 presents biologically inspired algorithms for feature extraction. The visual cortex model based features discussed have invariance with respect to appearance and size of the hand, and provide good...

  15. Visual Representations on High School Biology, Chemistry, Earth Science, and Physics Assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaDue, Nicole D.; Libarkin, Julie C.; Thomas, Stephen R.

    2015-05-01

    The pervasive use of visual representations in textbooks, curricula, and assessments underscores their importance in K-12 science education. For example, visual representations figure prominently in the recent publication of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS Lead States in Next generation science standards: for states, by states. Achieve, Inc. on behalf of the twenty-six states and partners that collaborated on the NGSS, 2013). Although assessments of the NGSS have yet to be developed, most students are currently evaluated on their ability to interpret science visuals. While numerous studies exist on particular visuals, it is unclear whether the same types of visuals are emphasized in all science disciplines. The present study is an evaluation of the similarities and differences of visuals used to assess students' knowledge of chemistry, earth science, living environment (biology), and physics on the New York State Regents examination. Analysis of 266 distinct visual representations categorized across the four content examinations reveals that the frequency and type of visuals vary greatly between disciplines. Diagrams, Graphs, Tables, and Maps are the most prevalent across all science disciplines. Maps, Cartograms, and Time Charts are unique to the Earth Science examination, and Network Diagrams are unique to the living environment (biology) examination. This study identifies which representations are most critical for training students across the science disciplines in anticipation of the implementation and eventual assessment of the NGSS.

  16. Supporting Representational Competence in High School Biology with Computer-Based Biomolecular Visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Anna; Brinkerhoff, Jonathan

    2007-01-01

    This study assessed the effectiveness of computer-based biomolecular visualization activities on the development of high school biology students' representational competence as a means of understanding and visualizing protein structure/function relationships. Also assessed were students' attitudes toward these activities. Sixty-nine students…

  17. Comparing visual representations across human fMRI and computational vision

    OpenAIRE

    Leeds, Daniel D.; Seibert, Darren A.; Pyles, John A.; Tarr, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Feedforward visual object perception recruits a cortical network that is assumed to be hierarchical, progressing from basic visual features to complete object representations. However, the nature of the intermediate features related to this transformation remains poorly understood. Here, we explore how well different computer vision recognition models account for neural object encoding across the human cortical visual pathway as measured using fMRI. These neural data, collected during the vie...

  18. Representation of spatial frequency and orientation in the visual cortex

    OpenAIRE

    Everson, R. M.; Prashanth, A. K.; Gabbay, M.; Knight, B W; Sirovich, L; KAPLAN, E

    1998-01-01

    Knowledge of the response of the primary visual cortex to the various spatial frequencies and orientations in the visual scene should help us understand the principles by which the brain recognizes patterns. Current information about the cortical layout of spatial frequency response is still incomplete because of difficulties in recording and interpreting adequate data. Here, we report results from a study of the cat primary visual cortex in which we employed a new image-analysis method that ...

  19. Population coding of visual space: comparison of spatial representations in the dorsal and ventral pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnneBSereno

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Although the representation of space is as fundamental to visual processing as the representation of shape, it has received relatively little attention from neurophysiological investigations. In this study we characterize representations of space within visual cortex, and examine how they differ in a first direct comparison between dorsal and ventral subdivisions of the visual pathways. Neural activities were recorded in anterior inferotemporal cortex (AIT and lateral intraparietal cortex (LIP of awake behaving monkeys, structures associated with the ventral and dorsal visual pathways respectively, as a stimulus was presented at different locations within the visual field. In spatially selective cells, we find greater modulation of cell responses in LIP with changes in stimulus position. Further, using a novel population-based statistical approach (namely, multidimensional scaling, we recover the spatial map implicit within activities of neural populations, allowing us to quantitatively compare the geometry of neural space with physical space. We show that a population of spatially selective LIP neurons, despite having large receptive fields, is able to almost perfectly reconstruct stimulus locations within a low-dimensional representation. In contrast, a population of AIT neurons, despite each cell being spatially selective, provide less accurate low-dimensional reconstructions of stimulus locations. They produce instead only a topologically (categorically correct rendition of space, which nevertheless might be critical for object and scene recognition. Furthermore, we found that the spatial representation recovered from population activity shows greater translation invariance in LIP than in AIT. We suggest that LIP spatial representations may be dimensionally isomorphic with 3D physical space, while in AIT spatial representations may reflect a more categorical representation of space (e.g., “next to” or “above”.

  20. Digital representations of the real world how to capture, model, and render visual reality

    CERN Document Server

    Magnor, Marcus A; Sorkine-Hornung, Olga; Theobalt, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Create Genuine Visual Realism in Computer Graphics Digital Representations of the Real World: How to Capture, Model, and Render Visual Reality explains how to portray visual worlds with a high degree of realism using the latest video acquisition technology, computer graphics methods, and computer vision algorithms. It explores the integration of new capture modalities, reconstruction approaches, and visual perception into the computer graphics pipeline.Understand the Entire Pipeline from Acquisition, Reconstruction, and Modeling to Realistic Rendering and ApplicationsThe book covers sensors fo

  1. A review of visual memory capacity: Beyond individual items and towards structured representations

    OpenAIRE

    Brady, Timothy F.; Konkle, Talia; Alvarez, George A.

    2011-01-01

    Traditional memory research has focused on identifying separate memory systems and exploring different stages of memory processing. This approach has been valuable for establishing a taxonomy of memory systems and characterizing their function, but has been less informative about the nature of stored memory representations. Recent research on visual memory has shifted towards a representation-based emphasis, focusing on the contents of memory, and attempting to determine the format and struct...

  2. Parsed and fixed block representations of visual information for image retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Soo Hyun; Juang, Biing-Hwang

    2009-02-01

    The theory of linguistics teaches us the existence of a hierarchical structure in linguistic expressions, from letter to word root, and on to word and sentences. By applying syntax and semantics beyond words, one can further recognize the grammatical relationship between among words and the meaning of a sequence of words. This layered view of a spoken language is useful for effective analysis and automated processing. Thus, it is interesting to ask if a similar hierarchy of representation of visual information does exist. A class of techniques that have a similar nature to the linguistic parsing is found in the Lempel-Ziv incremental parsing scheme. Based on a new class of multidimensional incremental parsing algorithms extended from the Lempel-Ziv incremental parsing, a new framework for image retrieval, which takes advantage of the source characterization property of the incremental parsing algorithm, was proposed recently. With the incremental parsing technique, a given image is decomposed into a number of patches, called a parsed representation. This representation can be thought of as a morphological interface between elementary pixel and a higher level representation. In this work, we examine the properties of two-dimensional parsed representation in the context of imagery information retrieval and in contrast to vector quantization; i.e. fixed square-block representations and minimum average distortion criteria. We implemented four image retrieval systems for the comparative study; three, called IPSILON image retrieval systems, use parsed representation with different perceptual distortion thresholds and one uses the convectional vector quantization for visual pattern analysis. We observe that different perceptual distortion in visual pattern matching does not have serious effects on the retrieval precision although allowing looser perceptual thresholds in image compression result poor reconstruction fidelity. We compare the effectiveness of the use of the parsed representations, as constructed under the latent semantic analysis (LSA) paradigm so as to investigate their varying capabilities in capturing semantic concepts. The result clearly demonstrates the superiority of the parsed representation.

  3. SVEN: Informative Visual Representation of Complex Dynamic Structure

    CERN Document Server

    Arendt, Dustin L

    2014-01-01

    Graphs change over time, and typically variations on the small multiples or animation pattern is used to convey this dynamism visually. However, both of these classical techniques have significant drawbacks, so a new approach, Storyline Visualization of Events on a Network (SVEN) is proposed. SVEN builds on storyline techniques, conveying nodes as contiguous lines over time. SVEN encodes time in a natural manner, along the horizontal axis, and optimizes the vertical placement of storylines to decrease clutter (line crossings, straightness, and bends) in the drawing. This paper demonstrates SVEN on several different flavors of real-world dynamic data, and outlines the remaining near-term future work.

  4. Representation of spatial frequency and orientation in the visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everson, R M; Prashanth, A K; Gabbay, M; Knight, B W; Sirovich, L; Kaplan, E

    1998-07-01

    Knowledge of the response of the primary visual cortex to the various spatial frequencies and orientations in the visual scene should help us understand the principles by which the brain recognizes patterns. Current information about the cortical layout of spatial frequency response is still incomplete because of difficulties in recording and interpreting adequate data. Here, we report results from a study of the cat primary visual cortex in which we employed a new image-analysis method that allows improved separation of signal from noise and that we used to examine the neurooptical response of the primary visual cortex to drifting sine gratings over a range of orientations and spatial frequencies. We found that (i) the optical responses to all orientations and spatial frequencies were well approximated by weighted sums of only two pairs of basis pictures, one pair for orientation and a different pair for spatial frequency; (ii) the weightings of the two pictures in each pair were approximately in quadrature (1/4 cycle apart); and (iii) our spatial frequency data revealed a cortical map that continuously assigns different optimal spatial frequency responses to different cortical locations over the entire spatial frequency range. PMID:9653187

  5. Ambiguous Science and the Visual Representation of the Real

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newbold, Curtis Robert

    2012-01-01

    The emergence of visual media as prominent and even expected forms of communication in nearly all disciplines, including those scientific, has raised new questions about how the art and science of communication epistemologically affect the interpretation of scientific phenomena. In this dissertation I explore how the influence of aesthetics in…

  6. Reading visual representations of 'Ndabeni' in the public realms

    OpenAIRE

    Sipokazi Sambumbu

    2010-01-01

    This essay outlines and analyses contemporary image representations of Ndabeni (also called kwa-Ndabeni), a location near Cape Town where a group of people became confined between 1901 and 1936 following an outbreak of the bubonic plague in the city. This location was to shape Cape Town's landscape for a little less that thirty-five years, accommodating people who were forcibly removed from the Cape Town docklands and from District Six. Images representing this place have been produced, archi...

  7. A Reggio-Inspired Music Atelier: Opening the Door between Visual Arts and Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Wendell

    2014-01-01

    The Reggio Emilia approach is based on the idea that every child has at least, "one hundred languages" available for expressing perspectives of the world, and one of those languages is music. While all of the arts (visual, music, dance, drama) are considered equally important in Reggio schools, the visual arts have been particularly…

  8. Body-Centered Representations for Visually-Guided Action Emerge during Early Infancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, Rick O.; Johnson, Mark H.

    1997-01-01

    Investigated the nature of spatial representations underlying simple visually guided actions with 3- and 7-month-old infants. Saccades in older infants were executed within body-centered spatial coordinates that account for intervening eye movements, whereas younger infants responded according to the target's retinocentric locations without…

  9. The Role of Visual Experience on the Representation and Updating of Novel Haptic Scenes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqualotto, Achille; Newell, Fiona N.

    2007-01-01

    We investigated the role of visual experience on the spatial representation and updating of haptic scenes by comparing recognition performance across sighted, congenitally and late blind participants. We first established that spatial updating occurs in sighted individuals to haptic scenes of novel objects. All participants were required to…

  10. Generating and Analyzing Visual Representations of Conic Sections with the Use of Technological Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Trigo, Manuel; Espinosa-Perez, Hugo; Reyes-Rodriguez, Aaron

    2006-01-01

    Technological tools have the potential to offer students the possibility to represent information and relationships embedded in problems and concepts in ways that involve numerical, algebraic, geometric, and visual approaches. In this paper, the authors present and discuss an example in which an initial representation of a mathematical object…

  11. The visual language of spatial representation – a barrier, or a crossroad?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeja Zupan?i? Strojan

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with techniques of representation of architectural and urbanistic ideas about space and its changes. It delves into the communication process between co-creators of space and points out the issue of different understanding of visual representation techniques that stem from different levels in capabilities of visual expression and understanding of visual messages. The issue of ignorance of specifics of professional language is emphasised as a consequence of its habitualness. The presented research checks and analyses the effect of abstract/concrete visual representation and their effectiveness in communicating messages to expert and lay publics. Following the discussion about results, numerous new issues arise, concerning possibilities for narrowing the gap between various publics and finding common ground. Amongst different solutions about improving communication between actors in the creation of space, the article emphasises the potential of permanent education. However the quest is not for improvements in general understanding of visual language, but consequentially to devise ways, modes and their positive consequences on the cultural environment and spatial culture.

  12. Attention enhances multi-voxel representation of novel objects in frontal, parietal and visual cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolgar, Alexandra; Williams, Mark A; Rich, Anina N

    2015-04-01

    Selective attention is fundamental for human activity, but the details of its neural implementation remain elusive. One influential theory, the adaptive coding hypothesis (Duncan, 2001, An adaptive coding model of neural function in prefrontal cortex, Nature Reviews Neuroscience 2:820-829), proposes that single neurons in certain frontal and parietal regions dynamically adjust their responses to selectively encode relevant information. This selective representation may in turn support selective processing in more specialized brain regions such as the visual cortices. Here, we use multi-voxel decoding of functional magnetic resonance images to demonstrate selective representation of attended--and not distractor--objects in frontal, parietal, and visual cortices. In addition, we highlight a critical role for task demands in determining which brain regions exhibit selective coding. Strikingly, representation of attended objects in frontoparietal cortex was highest under conditions of high perceptual demand, when stimuli were hard to perceive and coding in early visual cortex was weak. Coding in early visual cortex varied as a function of attention and perceptual demand, while coding in higher visual areas was sensitive to the allocation of attention but robust to changes in perceptual difficulty. Consistent with high-profile reports, peripherally presented objects could also be decoded from activity at the occipital pole, a region which corresponds to the fovea. Our results emphasize the flexibility of frontoparietal and visual systems. They support the hypothesis that attention enhances the multi-voxel representation of information in the brain, and suggest that the engagement of this attentional mechanism depends critically on current task demands. PMID:25583612

  13. Layered representation and visualization technique for 3D GIS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hui-xin; Xie, Dan-rui; Xue, Hui-feng

    2005-12-01

    It is essential to generate efficient three-dimensional (3D) spatial data model in 3D modeling and visualization, because the data processed is multiple in scale and large in volume. A new vector spatial data structure model based on layered index is proposed according to the geologic data features. It can be used to establish 3D solid model efficiently. Moreover, a dynamic discrete network model is proposed to establish the topological relations for control points in adjoining data layers automatically. The use of topological relations facilitates the implementation of generating surface model. By loading inner attribute data, the 3D solid model is finally established. To evaluate the performance of the approach proposed, a 3D GIS simulation system is developed. The experimental results demonstrate that the approach can generate complex 3D solid model with higher accuracy and better time performance.

  14. Real-time Visual Tracking Using Sparse Representation

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Hanxi; Shi, Qinfeng

    2010-01-01

    The $\\ell_1$ tracker obtains robustness by seeking a sparse representation of the tracking object via $\\ell_1$ norm minimization \\cite{Xue_ICCV_09_Track}. However, the high computational complexity involved in the $ \\ell_1 $ tracker restricts its further applications in real time processing scenario. Hence we propose a Real Time Compressed Sensing Tracking (RTCST) by exploiting the signal recovery power of Compressed Sensing (CS). Dimensionality reduction and a customized Orthogonal Matching Pursuit (OMP) algorithm are adopted to accelerate the CS tracking. As a result, our algorithm achieves a real-time speed that is up to $6,000$ times faster than that of the $\\ell_1$ tracker. Meanwhile, RTCST still produces competitive (sometimes even superior) tracking accuracy comparing to the existing $\\ell_1$ tracker. Furthermore, for a stationary camera, a further refined tracker is designed by integrating a CS-based background model (CSBM). This CSBM-equipped tracker coined as RTCST-B, outperforms most state-of-the-a...

  15. Robust visual tracking of infrared object via sparse representation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Junkai; Liu, Haibo; Chang, Zheng; Hui, Bin

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we propose a robust tracking method for infrared object. We introduce the appearance model and the sparse representation in the framework of particle filter to achieve this goal. Representing every candidate image patch as a linear combination of bases in the subspace which is spanned by the target templates is the mechanism behind this method. The natural property, that if the candidate image patch is the target so the coefficient vector must be sparse, can ensure our algorithm successfully. Firstly, the target must be indicated manually in the first frame of the video, then construct the dictionary using the appearance model of the target templates. Secondly, the candidate image patches are selected in following frames and the sparse coefficient vectors of them are calculated via l1-norm minimization algorithm. According to the sparse coefficient vectors the right candidates is determined as the target. Finally, the target templates update dynamically to cope with appearance change in the tracking process. This paper also addresses the problem of scale changing and the rotation of the target occurring in tracking. Theoretic analysis and experimental results show that the proposed algorithm is effective and robust.

  16. Experience-driven formation of parts-based representations in a model of layered visual memory

    CERN Document Server

    Jitsev, Jenia

    2009-01-01

    Growing neuropsychological and neurophysiological evidence suggests that the visual cortex uses parts-based representations to encode, store and retrieve relevant objects. In such a scheme, objects are represented as a set of spatially distributed local features, or parts, arranged in stereotypical fashion. To encode the local appearance and to represent the relations between the constituent parts, there has to be an appropriate memory structure formed by previous experience with visual objects. Here, we propose a model how a hierarchical memory structure supporting efficient storage and rapid recall of parts-based representations can be established by an experience-driven process of self-organization. The process is based on the collaboration of slow bidirectional synaptic plasticity and homeostatic unit activity regulation, both running at the top of fast activity dynamics with winner-take-all character. These neural mechanisms lay down the basis for cooperation and competition between the distributed units...

  17. The Influence of Social Comparison on Visual Representation of One's Face

    OpenAIRE

    Zell, Ethan; Balcetis, Emily

    2012-01-01

    Can the effects of social comparison extend beyond explicit evaluation to visual self-representation—a perceptual stimulus that is objectively verifiable, unambiguous, and frequently updated? We morphed images of participants' faces with attractive and unattractive references. With access to a mirror, participants selected the morphed image they perceived as depicting their face. Participants who engaged in upward comparison with relevant attractive targets selected a less attractive morph ...

  18. Invariance of brain-wave representations of simple visual images and their names

    OpenAIRE

    Suppes, Patrick; Han, Bing; Epelboim, Julie; Lu, Zhong-Lin

    1999-01-01

    In two experiments, electric brain waves of 14 subjects were recorded under several different conditions to study the invariance of brain-wave representations of simple patches of colors and simple visual shapes and their names, the words blue, circle, etc. As in our earlier work, the analysis consisted of averaging over trials to create prototypes and test samples, to both of which Fourier transforms were applied, followed by filtering and an inverse transformation to the time domain. A leas...

  19. Infrared dim and small target detecting and tracking method inspired by Human Visual System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiabin; Huang, Xinsheng; Zheng, Yongbin; Shen, Lurong; Bai, Shengjian

    2014-01-01

    Detecting and tracking dim and small target in infrared images and videos is one of the most important techniques in many computer vision applications, such as video surveillance and infrared imaging precise guidance. Recently, more and more algorithms based on Human Visual System (HVS) have been proposed to detect and track the infrared dim and small target. In general, HVS concerns at least three mechanisms including contrast mechanism, visual attention and eye movement. However, most of the existing algorithms simulate only a single one of the HVS mechanisms, resulting in many drawbacks of these algorithms. A novel method which combines the three mechanisms of HVS is proposed in this paper. First, a group of Difference of Gaussians (DOG) filters which simulate the contrast mechanism are used to filter the input image. Second, a visual attention, which is simulated by a Gaussian window, is added at a point near the target in order to further enhance the dim small target. This point is named as the attention point. Eventually, the Proportional-Integral-Derivative (PID) algorithm is first introduced to predict the attention point of the next frame of an image which simulates the eye movement of human being. Experimental results of infrared images with different types of backgrounds demonstrate the high efficiency and accuracy of the proposed method to detect and track the dim and small targets.

  20. Representação visual de estruturas biológicas em materiais de ensino Visual representation of biological structures in teaching material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Azevedo Morato

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi motivado pela necessidade de se definir parâmetros de apresentação e tratamento da informação científica em materiais de ensino. Através de consultas a bibliotecas e a especialistas em ciências da saúde e artes gráficas e visuais, fez-se uma pesquisa que resultou na descrição comparativa entre as primeiras manifestações da ilustração científica na anatomia e a trajetória da representação visual do conhecimento sobre a célula. O estudo traz ainda exemplos significativos de ilustrações utilizadas como elementos de análise.Parameters must be defined for presenting and handling scientific information presented in the form of teaching materials. Through library research and consultations with specialists in the health sciences and in graphic arts and design, this study undertook a comparative description of the first examples of scientific illustrations of anatomy and the evolution of visual representations of knowledge on the cell. The study includes significant examples of illustrations which served as elements of analysis.

  1. Representação visual de estruturas biológicas em materiais de ensino / Visual representation of biological structures in teaching material

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Marina Azevedo, Morato; Miriam, Struchiner; Eduardo, Bordoni; Regina Maria Vieira, Ricciardi.

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho foi motivado pela necessidade de se definir parâmetros de apresentação e tratamento da informação científica em materiais de ensino. Através de consultas a bibliotecas e a especialistas em ciências da saúde e artes gráficas e visuais, fez-se uma pesquisa que resultou na descrição compa [...] rativa entre as primeiras manifestações da ilustração científica na anatomia e a trajetória da representação visual do conhecimento sobre a célula. O estudo traz ainda exemplos significativos de ilustrações utilizadas como elementos de análise. Abstract in english Parameters must be defined for presenting and handling scientific information presented in the form of teaching materials. Through library research and consultations with specialists in the health sciences and in graphic arts and design, this study undertook a comparative description of the first ex [...] amples of scientific illustrations of anatomy and the evolution of visual representations of knowledge on the cell. The study includes significant examples of illustrations which served as elements of analysis.

  2. Brain activity associated with translation from a visual to a symbolic representation in algebra and geometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leikin, Mark; Waisman, Ilana; Shaul, Shelley; Leikin, Roza

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a small part of a larger interdisciplinary study that investigates brain activity (using event related potential methodology) of male adolescents when solving mathematical problems of different types. The study design links mathematics education research with neurocognitive studies. In this paper we performed a comparative analysis of brain activity associated with the translation from visual to symbolic representations of mathematical objects in algebra and geometry. Algebraic tasks require translation from graphical to symbolic representation of a function, whereas tasks in geometry require translation from a drawing of a geometric figure to a symbolic representation of its property. The findings demonstrate that electrical activity associated with the performance of geometrical tasks is stronger than that associated with solving algebraic tasks. Additionally, we found different scalp topography of the brain activity associated with algebraic and geometric tasks. Based on these results, we argue that problem solving in algebra and geometry is associated with different patterns of brain activity. PMID:24738538

  3. Non-sparse Linear Representations for Visual Tracking with Online Reservoir Metric Learning

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Xi; Shi, Qinfeng; Dick, Anthony; Hengel, Anton van den

    2012-01-01

    Most sparse linear representation-based trackers need to solve a computationally expensive L1-regularized optimization problem. To address this problem, we propose a visual tracker based on non-sparse linear representations, which admit an efficient closed-form solution without sacrificing accuracy. Moreover, in order to capture the correlation information between different feature dimensions, we learn a Mahalanobis distance metric in an online fashion and incorporate the learned metric into the optimization problem for obtaining the linear representation. We show that online metric learning using proximity comparison significantly improves the robustness of the tracking, especially on those sequences exhibiting drastic appearance changes. Furthermore, in order to prevent the unbounded growth in the number of training samples for the metric learning, we design a time-weighted reservoir sampling method to maintain and update limited-sized foreground and background sample buffers for balancing sample diversity ...

  4. Learning local appearances with sparse representation for robust and fast visual tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Tianxiang; Li, You-Fu; Zhou, Xiaolong

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, we present a novel appearance model using sparse representation and online dictionary learning techniques for visual tracking. In our approach, the visual appearance is represented by sparse representation, and the online dictionary learning strategy is used to adapt the appearance variations during tracking. We unify the sparse representation and online dictionary learning by defining a sparsity consistency constraint that facilitates the generative and discriminative capabilities of the appearance model. An elastic-net constraint is enforced during the dictionary learning stage to capture the characteristics of the local appearances that are insensitive to partial occlusions. Hence, the target appearance is effectively recovered from the corruptions using the sparse coefficients with respect to the learned sparse bases containing local appearances. In the proposed method, the dictionary is undercomplete and can thus be efficiently implemented for tracking. Moreover, we employ a median absolute deviation based robust similarity metric to eliminate the outliers and evaluate the likelihood between the observations and the model. Finally, we integrate the proposed appearance model with the particle filter framework to form a robust visual tracking algorithm. Experiments on benchmark video sequences show that the proposed appearance model outperforms the other state-of-the-art approaches in tracking performance. PMID:25029548

  5. Transform-invariant visual representations in self-organizing spiking neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BenjaminEvans

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The ventral visual pathway achieves object and face recognition by building transform-invariant representations from elementary visual features. In previous computer simulation studies with rate-coded neural networks, the development of transform invariant representations has been demonstrated using either of two biologically plausible learning mechanisms, Trace learning and Continuous Transformation (CT learning. However, it has not previously been investigated how transform invariant representations may be learned in a more biologically accurate spiking neural network. A key issue is how the synaptic connection strengths in such a spiking network might self-organize through Spike-Time Dependent Plasticity (STDP where the change in synaptic strength is dependent on the relative times of the spikes emitted by the pre- and postsynaptic neurons rather than simply correlated activity driving changes in synaptic efficacy. Here we present simulations with conductance-based integrate-and-fire (IF neurons using a STDP learning rule to address these gaps in our understanding. It is demonstrated that with the appropriate selection of model pa- rameters and training regime, the spiking network model can utilize either Trace-like or CT-like learning mechanisms to achieve transform-invariant representations.

  6. A biologically inspired psychometric function for accuracy of visual identification as a function of exposure duration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Anders; Andersen, Tobias

    The psychometric function of letter identification is typically described as a function of stimulus intensity. However, the effect of stimulus exposure duration on letter identification remains poorly described. This is surprising because the effect of exposure duration has played a central role in modelling human performance in whole and partial report tasks in which multiple simultaneously presented letters are to be reported (Shibuya & Bundesen, 1988). Therefore, we investigated visual letter identification as a function of exposure duration. On each trial, a single randomly chosen letter (A-Z) was presented at the centre of the screen. Exposure duration was varied from 5 to 210 milliseconds. The letter was followed by a pattern mask. Three subjects each completed 54,080 trials in a 26-Alternative Forced Choice procedure. We compared the exponential, the gamma and the Weibull psychometric functions, all of these having a temporal offset included, as well as the ex-Gaussian, and finally a new psychometric function, motivated from single-neuron studies by (Albrecht, Geisler, Frazor & Crane, 2002). The new psychometric function stands out by having a nonmonotonous hazard rate which is initially rising from zero, then peaking, and finally decaying to a somewhat sustained plateau, mimicking closely observed instantaneous firing rates of monkey visual cortex neurons. The new psychometric function fits well to experimental data in both the present study and in a previous study of single-letter identification accuracy (Bundesen & Harms, 1999). Also, we conducted a follow-up experiment to test the ability of the psychometric functions to fit single-letter identification data, at different stimulus contrast levels; also in this experiment the new psychometric function prevailed. Further, after insertion into Bundesen’s Theory of Visual Attention (Bundesen, 1990), the new psychometric function enables closer fits to data from a previous whole and partial report experiment.

  7. The Effects of Visual Cues and Learners' Field Dependence in Multiple External Representations Environment for Novice Program Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Liew Tze; Sazilah, Salam

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of visual cues in multiple external representations (MER) environment on the learning performance of novices' program comprehension. Program codes and flowchart diagrams were used as dual representations in multimedia environment to deliver lessons on C-Programming. 17 field independent participants and 16 field…

  8. When memory is not enough: Electrophysiological evidence for goal-dependent use of working memory representations in guiding visual attention

    OpenAIRE

    Carlisle, Nancy B.; Woodman, Geoffrey F.

    2011-01-01

    Biased competition theory proposes that representations in working memory drive visual attention to select similar inputs. However, behavioral tests of this hypothesis have led to mixed results. These inconsistent findings could be due to the inability of behavioral measures to reliably detect the early, automatic effects on attentional deployment that the memory representations exert. Alternatively, executive mechanisms may govern how working memory representations influence attention based ...

  9. Functional magnetic resonance imaging adaptation reveals a noncategorical representation of hue in early visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persichetti, Andrew S; Thompson-Schill, Sharon L; Butt, Omar H; Brainard, David H; Aguirre, Geoffrey K

    2015-05-01

    Color names divide the fine-grained gamut of color percepts into discrete categories. A categorical transition must occur somewhere between the initial encoding of the continuous spectrum of light by the cones and the verbal report of the name of a color stimulus. Here, we used a functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) adaptation experiment to examine the representation of hue in the early visual cortex. Our stimuli varied in hue between blue and green. We found in the early visual areas (V1, V2/3, and hV4) a smoothly increasing recovery from adaptation with increasing hue distance between adjacent stimuli during both passive viewing (Experiment 1) and active categorization (Experiment 2). We examined the form of the adaptation effect and found no evidence that a categorical representation mediates the release from adaptation for stimuli that cross the blue-green color boundary. Examination of the direct effect of stimulus hue on the fMRI response did, however, reveal an enhanced response to stimuli near the blue-green category border. This was largest in hV4 and when subjects were engaged in active categorization of the stimulus hue. In contrast with a recent report from another laboratory (Bird, Berens, Horner, & Franklin, 2014), we found no evidence for a categorical representation of color in the middle frontal gyrus. A post hoc whole-brain analysis, however, revealed several regions in the frontal cortex with a categorical effect in the adaptation response. Overall, our results support the idea that the representation of color in the early visual cortex is primarily fine grained and does not reflect color categories. PMID:26024465

  10. The Concept of Happiness as Conveyed in Visual Representations: Analysis of the Work of Early Childhood Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo-Zimet, Gila; Segel, Sarit

    2014-01-01

    This research was designed to examine how early-childhood educators pursuing their graduate degrees perceive the concept of happiness, as conveyed in visual representations. The research methodology combines qualitative and quantitative paradigms using the metaphoric collage, a tool used to analyze visual and verbal aspects. The research…

  11. Interference Effects Demonstrate Distinct Roles for Visual and Motor Imagery during the Mental Representation of Human Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, J.A.

    2005-01-01

    Four experiments were completed to characterize the utilization of visual imagery and motor imagery during the mental representation of human action. In Experiment 1, movement time functions for a motor imagery human locomotion task conformed to a speed-accuracy trade-off similar to Fitts' Law, whereas those for a visual imagery object motion task…

  12. From pre-attentive processes to durable representation: an ERP index of visual distraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysoeva, Olga V; Lange, Elke B; Sorokin, Alexander B; Campbell, Tom

    2015-03-01

    Visual search and oddball paradigms were combined to investigate memory for to-be-ignored color changes in a group of 12 healthy participants. The onset of unexpected color change of an irrelevant stimulus evoked two reliable ERP effects: a component of the event-related potential (ERP), similar to the visual mismatch negativity response (vMMN), with a latency of 120-160 ms and a posterior distribution over the left hemisphere and Late Fronto-Central Negativity (LFCN) with a latency of 320-400 ms, apparent at fronto-central electrodes and some posterior sites. Color change of that irrelevant stimulus also slowed identification of a visual target, indicating distraction. The amplitude of this color-change vMMN, but not LFCN, indexed this distraction effect. That is, electrophysiological and behavioral measures were correlated. The interval between visual scenes approximated 1s (611-1629 ms), indicating that the brain's sensory memory for the color of the preceding visual scenes must persist for at least 600 ms. Therefore, in the case of the neural code for color, durable memory representations are formed in an obligatory manner. PMID:25523346

  13. A bio-inspired method and system for visual object-based attention and segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, David J.; Khosla, Deepak

    2010-04-01

    This paper describes a method and system of human-like attention and object segmentation in visual scenes that (1) attends to regions in a scene in their rank of saliency in the image, (2) extracts the boundary of an attended proto-object based on feature contours, and (3) can be biased to boost the attention paid to specific features in a scene, such as those of a desired target object in static and video imagery. The purpose of the system is to identify regions of a scene of potential importance and extract the region data for processing by an object recognition and classification algorithm. The attention process can be performed in a default, bottom-up manner or a directed, top-down manner which will assign a preference to certain features over others. One can apply this system to any static scene, whether that is a still photograph or imagery captured from video. We employ algorithms that are motivated by findings in neuroscience, psychology, and cognitive science to construct a system that is novel in its modular and stepwise approach to the problems of attention and region extraction, its application of a flooding algorithm to break apart an image into smaller proto-objects based on feature density, and its ability to join smaller regions of similar features into larger proto-objects. This approach allows many complicated operations to be carried out by the system in a very short time, approaching real-time. A researcher can use this system as a robust front-end to a larger system that includes object recognition and scene understanding modules; it is engineered to function over a broad range of situations and can be applied to any scene with minimal tuning from the user.

  14. How to Make a Good Animation: A Grounded Cognition Model of How Visual Representation Design Affects the Construction of Abstract Physics Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongzhou; Gladding, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Visual representations play a critical role in teaching physics. However, since we do not have a satisfactory understanding of how visual perception impacts the construction of abstract knowledge, most visual representations used in instructions are either created based on existing conventions or designed according to the instructor's…

  15. Space reconstruction by primary visual cortex activity: a parallel, non-computational mechanism of object representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gur, Moshe

    2015-04-01

    The current view posits that objects, despite changes in appearance, are uniquely encoded by 'expert' cells. This view is untenable. First, even if cell ensemble responses are invariant and unique, we are consciously aware of all of the objects' details. Second, in addition to detail preservation, data show that the current hypothesis fails to account for uniqueness and invariance. I present an alternative view whereby objects' representation and recognition are based on parallel representation of space by primary visual cortex (V1) responses. Information necessary for invariance and other attributes is handled in series by other cortical areas through integration, interpolation, and hierarchical convergence. The parallel and serial mechanisms combine to enable our flexible space perception. Only in this alternative view is conscious perception consistent with the underlying architecture. PMID:25839087

  16. Functional organization and visual representations in human ventral lateral prefrontal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnieWai YiuChan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent neuroimaging studies in both human and non-human primates have identified face selective activation in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex even in the absence of working memory demands. Further, research has suggested that this face-selective response is largely driven by the presence of the eyes. However, the nature and origin of visual category responses in the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex remain unclear. Further, in a broader sense, how do these findings relate to our current understandings of lateral prefrontal cortex? What do these findings tell us about the underlying function and organization principles of the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex? What is the future direction for investigating visual representations in this cortex? This review focuses on the function, topography, and circuitry of the ventral lateral prefrontal cortex to enhance our understanding of the evolution and development of this cortex.

  17. Visual, haptic and bimodal scene perception: evidence for a unitary representation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intraub, Helene; Morelli, Frank; Gagnier, Kristin M

    2015-05-01

    Participants studied seven meaningful scene-regions bordered by removable boundaries (30s each). In Experiment 1 (N = 80) participants used visual or haptic exploration and then minutes later, reconstructed boundary position using the same or the alternate modality. Participants in all groups shifted boundary placement outward (boundary extension), but visual study yielded the greater error. Critically, this modality-specific difference in boundary extension transferred without cost in the cross-modal conditions, suggesting a functionally unitary scene representation. In Experiment 2 (N = 20), bimodal study led to boundary extension that did not differ from haptic exploration alone, suggesting that bimodal spatial memory was constrained by the more "conservative" haptic modality. In Experiment 3 (N = 20), as in picture studies, boundary memory was tested 30s after viewing each scene-region and as with pictures, boundary extension still occurred. Results suggest that scene representation is organized around an amodal spatial core that organizes bottom-up information from multiple modalities in combination with top-down expectations about the surrounding world. PMID:25725370

  18. The role of visual representations in the learning and teaching of science: An introduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John K. GILBERT

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Representations are the entities with which all thinking is considered to take place. Hence they are central to the process of learning and consequently to that of teaching. They are therefore important in the conduct and learning of science, given the central commitment of that discipline to providing evidence-based explanations of natural phenomena, in which underlying entities and mechanisms have to be postulated and substantiated on the basis of empirical enquiry. The three generic types of representation and the modes in which they are expressed are presented against the background of an established model of their acquisition, processing and display. The two meanings of ‘visualization’ are discussed as is the key role played by fluency in them in the attainment of expert status in the processes of science. The nature and origins of students’ problems in attaining this ‘metavisual competence’ are derived from a review of the literature. Good practice in the teaching of the conventions of representation is suggested. Specific research and development is needed if this key aspect of knowledge acquisition and display is to be fully recognised in the varied curricula of formal science education and in the provision of opportunities for the informal communication of science.

  19. Experience-driven formation of parts-based representations in a model of layered visual memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JeniaJitsev

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Growing neuropsychological and neurophysiological evidence suggests that the visual cortex uses parts-based representations to encode, store and retrieve relevant objects. In such a scheme, objects are represented as a set of spatially distributed local features, or parts, arranged in stereotypical fashion. To encode the local appearance and to represent the relations between the constituent parts, there has to be an appropriate memory structure formed by previous experience with visual objects. Here, we propose a model how a hierarchical memory structure supporting efficient storage and rapid recall of parts-based representations can be established by an experience-driven process of self-organization. The process is based on the collaboration of slow bidirectional synaptic plasticity and homeostatic unit activity regulation, both running at the top of fast activity dynamics with winner-take-all character modulated by an oscillatory rhythm. These neural mechanisms lay down the basis for cooperation and competition between the distributed units and their synaptic connections. Choosing human face recognition as a test task, we show that, under the condition of open-ended, unsupervised incremental learning, the system is able to form memory traces for individual faces in a parts-based fashion. On a lower memory layer the synaptic structure is developed to represent local facial features and their interrelations, while the identities of different persons are captured explicitly on a higher layer. An additional property of the resulting representations is the sparseness of both the activity during the recall and the synaptic patterns comprising the memory traces.

  20. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p 2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  1. Using surface imaging and visual coaching to improve the reproducibility and stability of deep-inspiration breath hold for left-breast-cancer radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerviño, Laura I.; Gupta, Sonia; Rose, Mary A.; Yashar, Catheryn; Jiang, Steve B.

    2009-11-01

    Late cardiac complications may arise after left-breast radiation therapy. Deep-inspiration breath hold (DIBH) allows reduction of the irradiated heart volume at the same time as it reduces tumor bed motion and increases lung sparing. In the present study, we have evaluated the improvement in reproducibility and stability of the DIBH for left-breast-cancer treatment when visual coaching is provided with the aid of 3D video surface imaging and video goggles. Five left-breast-cancer patients and fifteen healthy volunteers were asked to perform a series of DIBHs without and with visual coaching. Reproducibility and stability of DIBH were measured for each individual with and without visual coaching. The average reproducibility and stability changed from 2.1 mm and 1.5 mm, respectively, without visual feedback to 0.5 mm and 0.7 mm with visual feedback, showing a significant statistical difference (p 2 mm) in reproducibility and stability were observed in 35% and 15% of the subjects, respectively. The average chest wall excursion of the DIBH with respect to the free breathing preceding the DIBH was found to be 11.3 mm. The reproducibility and stability of the DIBH improve significantly from the visual coaching provided to the patient, especially in those patients with poor reproducibility and stability.

  2. The Concept of Happiness as Conveyed in Visual Representations: Analysis of the Work of Early Childhood Educators

    OpenAIRE

    Gila Russo-Zimet; Sarit Segel

    2014-01-01

    This research was designed to examine how early-childhood educators pursuing their graduate degrees perceive the concept of happiness, as conveyed in visual representations. The research methodology combines qualitative and quantitative paradigms using the metaphoric collage, a tool used to analyze visual and verbal aspects. The research population included 32 students from various locations in Israel. The findings revealed that the concept of happiness is perceived as love, spirituality and ...

  3. Features of the Retinotopic Representation in the Visual Wulst of a Laterally Eyed Bird, the Zebra Finch (Taeniopygia guttata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Neethu; Löwel, Siegrid; Bischof, Hans-Joachim

    2015-01-01

    The visual wulst of the zebra finch comprises at least two retinotopic maps of the contralateral eye. As yet, it is not known how much of the visual field is represented in the wulst neuronal maps, how the organization of the maps is related to the retinal architecture, and how information from the ipsilateral eye is involved in the activation of the wulst. Here, we have used autofluorescent flavoprotein imaging and classical anatomical methods to investigate such characteristics of the most posterior map of the multiple retinotopic representations. We found that the visual wulst can be activated by visual stimuli from a large part of the visual field of the contralateral eye. Horizontally, the visual field representation extended from -5° beyond the beak tip up to +125° laterally. Vertically, a small strip from -10° below to about +25° above the horizon activated the visual wulst. Although retinal ganglion cells had a much higher density around the fovea and along a strip extending from the fovea towards the beak tip, these areas were not overrepresented in the wulst map. The wulst area activated from the foveal region of the ipsilateral eye, overlapped substantially with the middle of the three contralaterally activated regions in the visual wulst, and partially with the other two. Visual wulst activity evoked by stimulation of the frontal visual field was stronger with contralateral than with binocular stimulation. This confirms earlier electrophysiological studies indicating an inhibitory influence of the activation of the ipsilateral eye on wulst activity elicited by stimulating the contralateral eye. The lack of a foveal overrepresentation suggests that identification of objects may not be the primary task of the zebra finch visual wulst. Instead, this brain area may be involved in the processing of visual information necessary for spatial orientation. PMID:25853253

  4. The effects of a visualization-centered curriculum on conceptual understanding and representational competence in high school biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Anna

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a visualization-centered curriculum, Hemoglobin: A Case of Double Identity, on conceptual understanding and representational competence in high school biology. Sixty-nine students enrolled in three sections of freshman biology taught by the same teacher participated in this study. Online Chemscape Chime computer-based molecular visualizations were incorporated into the 10-week curriculum to introduce students to fundamental structure and function relationships. Measures used in this study included a Hemoglobin Structure and Function Test, Mental Imagery Questionnaire, Exam Difficulty Survey, the Student Assessment of Learning Gains, the Group Assessment of Logical Thinking, the Attitude Toward Science in School Assessment, audiotapes of student interviews, students' artifacts, weekly unit activity surveys, informal researcher observations and a teacher's weekly questionnaire. The Hemoglobin Structure and Function Test, consisting of Parts A and B, was administered as a pre and posttest. Part A used exclusively verbal test items to measure conceptual understanding, while Part B used visual-verbal test items to measure conceptual understanding and representational competence. Results of the Hemoglobin Structure and Function pre and posttest revealed statistically significant gains in conceptual understanding and representational competence, suggesting the visualization-centered curriculum implemented in this study was effective in supporting positive learning outcomes. The large positive correlation between posttest results on Part A, comprised of all-verbal test items, and Part B, using visual-verbal test items, suggests this curriculum supported students' mutual development of conceptual understanding and representational competence. Evidence based on student interviews, Student Assessment of Learning Gains ratings and weekly activity surveys indicated positive attitudes toward the use of Chemscape Chime software and the computer-based molecular visualization activities as learning tools. Evidence from these same sources also indicated that students felt computer-based molecular visualization activities in conjunction with other classroom activities supported their learning. Implications for instructional design are discussed.

  5. Continuous visual properties of number influence the formation of novel symbolic representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkley, Rebecca; Scerif, Gaia

    2015-09-01

    Numerical symbols are thought to be mapped onto preexisting nonsymbolic representations of number. A growing body of evidence suggests that nonsymbolic numerical processing is significantly influenced by the associated visual properties of continuous quantity (e.g., surface area, density), but their role in the acquisition of novel symbols is unknown. Forty undergraduate students were trained to associate novel abstract symbols with numerical magnitudes. Half of the symbols were associated with nonsymbolic arrays in which total surface area and numerosity were correlated ("congruent"), and the other symbols were associated with arrays in which total surface area was equated across numerosities ("incongruent"). As numbers are represented in multiple formats (words, digits, nonsymbolic arrays), we also tested whether providing auditory nonword labels facilitated symbol learning. Following training, participants engaged in speeded comparisons of the newly learnt symbols. Comparisons were affected by the ratio between the numerosities associated with each symbol, a characteristic marker of numerical processing. Furthermore, comparisons were hardest for large-ratio comparisons of symbols associated with incongruent area and numerosity pairing during learning. In turn, these findings call for the further investigation of visual parameters on the development of numerical cognition. PMID:25622722

  6. Dynamic visualization in a developing framework for the representation of geographic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie Blok

    2000-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to translate the characteristics of geographic data into signs and signals that can be perceived from a map, a language consisting of building blocks and a syntax are required. The first language to be developed was a graphic sign language, introduced by Bertin. His framework has been adapted and extended. It now includes languages for other senses, like touch and hearing, and even smell and taste are currently being investigated. In this paper it has been argued that the overall framework is continuously growing under the influence of technological, conceptual and user-oriented developments. Technological developments in particular are rapid. For example, they allow the representation of geographic data in virtual environments, which can be experienced through multiple senses. If cartographers want to play a role here, they should be willing to contribute to further extension of the framework, which may never be complete. In addition, current definitions of the concepts 'cartography' and 'map' have to be adapted. An example of user-oriented developments is the growing awareness of different types of map use, ranging from presentation to analysis/exploration. Application of the sign language may be different for each type of use, so the framework also needs further development in this direction. As an example, research ideas with respect to the use of dynamic visualization variables in cartographic animations for exploration purposes are included.

  7. Retrieval of Brain Tumors with Region-Specific Bag-of-Visual-Words Representations in Contrast-Enhanced MRI Images

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Meiyan; Yang, Wei; Yu, Mei; Lu, Zhentai; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2012-01-01

    A content-based image retrieval (CBIR) system is proposed for the retrieval of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) images of brain tumors. In this CBIR system, spatial information in the bag-of-visual-words model and domain knowledge on the brain tumor images are considered for the representation of brain tumor images. A similarity metric is learned through a distance metric learning algorithm to reduce the gap between the visual features and the semantic concepts in an image. The lear...

  8. A deep learning architecture for image representation, visual interpretability and automated basal-cell carcinoma cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Roa, Angel Alfonso; Arevalo Ovalle, John Edison; Madabhushi, Anant; González Osorio, Fabio Augusto

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents and evaluates a deep learning architecture for automated basal cell carcinoma cancer detection that integrates (1) image representation learning, (2) image classification and (3) result interpretability. A novel characteristic of this approach is that it extends the deep learning architecture to also include an interpretable layer that highlights the visual patterns that contribute to discriminate between cancerous and normal tissues patterns, working akin to a digital staining which spotlights image regions important for diagnostic decisions. Experimental evaluation was performed on set of 1,417 images from 308 regions of interest of skin histopathology slides, where the presence of absence of basal cell carcinoma needs to be determined. Different image representation strategies, including bag of features (BOF), canonical (discrete cosine transform (DCT) and Haar-based wavelet transform (Haar)) and proposed learned-from-data representations, were evaluated for comparison. Experimental results show that the representation learned from a large histology image data set has the best overall performance (89.4% in F-measure and 91.4% in balanced accuracy), which represents an improvement of around 7% over canonical representations and 3% over the best equivalent BOF representation. PMID:24579166

  9. Adding words to the brain's visual dictionary: novel word learning selectively sharpens orthographic representations in the VWFA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glezer, Laurie S; Kim, Judy; Rule, Josh; Jiang, Xiong; Riesenhuber, Maximilian

    2015-03-25

    The nature of orthographic representations in the human brain is still subject of much debate. Recent reports have claimed that the visual word form area (VWFA) in left occipitotemporal cortex contains an orthographic lexicon based on neuronal representations highly selective for individual written real words (RWs). This theory predicts that learning novel words should selectively increase neural specificity for these words in the VWFA. We trained subjects to recognize novel pseudowords (PWs) and used fMRI rapid adaptation to compare neural selectivity with RWs, untrained PWs (UTPWs), and trained PWs (TPWs). Before training, PWs elicited broadly tuned responses, whereas responses to RWs indicated tight tuning. After training, TPW responses resembled those of RWs, whereas UTPWs continued to show broad tuning. This change in selectivity was specific to the VWFA. Therefore, word learning appears to selectively increase neuronal specificity for the new words in the VWFA, thereby adding these words to the brain's visual dictionary. PMID:25810526

  10. Representación social de los prestadores de servicios de salud en la discapacidad visual / Social representation of the health service providers in visual disability

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Guillermo, Díaz Llanes; Judith, Prieto Sedano.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introducción: el conocimiento de la representación social de los prestadores de servicios de salud resulta de suma importancia para la salud pública, debido a su influencia en la calidad de su relación con los pacientes. Objetivo: caracterizar la representación social de los prestadores de servicios [...] de salud acerca de la discapacidad visual. Métodos: estudio de caso realizado en el policlínico "Hermanos Ruíz Aboy" en San Miguel del Padrón en el período de enero a junio de 2012. Participaron 33 informantes clave escogidos por muestreo intencional. Las técnicas de indagación empleadas fueron la asociación libre de palabras y las entrevistas en profundidad. Resultados: el estudio reveló la existencia en los prestadores de una representación angustiosa-conmiserativa-dependiente que configura elementos provenientes de referentes experienciales, componentes afectivos e insumos informacionales relacionados con las personas en situación de discapacidad visual. Conclusiones: los prestadores de servicios de salud investigados tiene en el núcleo de sus representaciones experiencias y conocimientos relacionados con el daño anatómico que condiciona limitación e incapacidad para la participación en la vida social de las personas con discapacidad visual, pero las asociaciones relativas a las necesidades de atención, definen un deficiente reconocimiento de elementos que garantizarían la compensación e integración psicosocial en estas personas. Abstract in english Introduction: knowing the social representation of the health service providers is very important for the public health, due to their influence on the quality of relationship with the patients. Objective: to characterize the social representation of the health service providers on visual disability. [...] Methods: case study performed in "Hermanos Ruiz Aboy" in San Miguel del Padron municipality in the period of January through June, 2012. Thirty three key informants selected by intentional sampling participated. The research techniques were free association of words and in-depth interviews. Results: this study disclosed the existence in health providers of an anguishing-commisserative-dependent representation that shapes elements from experience referents, affective components and informational inputs related to the persons facing visual disability. Conclusions: the health service providers under research have, in the core of their representation, experiences and knowledge linked to the anatomical damage that causes limitation and disability to be involved in the people with visual disability; however, the relative associations with the care requirements define a poor recognition of those elements that would assure compensation and psychosocial integration of these people.

  11. How to make a good animation: A grounded cognition model of how visual representation design affects the construction of abstract physics knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhongzhou; Gladding, Gary

    2014-06-01

    Visual representations play a critical role in teaching physics. However, since we do not have a satisfactory understanding of how visual perception impacts the construction of abstract knowledge, most visual representations used in instructions are either created based on existing conventions or designed according to the instructor's intuition, which leads to a significant variance in their effectiveness. In this paper we propose a cognitive mechanism based on grounded cognition, suggesting that visual perception affects understanding by activating "perceptual symbols": the basic cognitive unit used by the brain to construct a concept. A good visual representation activates perceptual symbols that are essential for the construction of the represented concept, whereas a bad representation does the opposite. As a proof of concept, we conducted a clinical experiment in which participants received three different versions of a multimedia tutorial teaching the integral expression of electric potential. The three versions were only different by the details of the visual representation design, only one of which contained perceptual features that activate perceptual symbols essential for constructing the idea of "accumulation." On a following post-test, participants receiving this version of tutorial significantly outperformed those who received the other two versions of tutorials designed to mimic conventional visual representations used in classrooms.

  12. KCRC-LCD: Discriminative Kernel Collaborative Representation with Locality Constrained Dictionary for Visual Categorization

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Weiyang; Yu, Zhiding; Lu, Lijia; Wen, Yandong; Li, Hui; Zou, Yuexian

    2014-01-01

    We consider the image classification problem via kernel collaborative representation classification with locality constrained dictionary (KCRC-LCD). Specifically, we propose a kernel collaborative representation classification (KCRC) approach in which kernel method is used to improve the discrimination ability of collaborative representation classification (CRC). We then measure the similarities between the query and atoms in the global dictionary in order to construct a loc...

  13. Learning multisensory representations for auditory-visual transfer of sequence category knowledge: a probabilistic language of thought approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yildirim, Ilker; Jacobs, Robert A

    2015-06-01

    If a person is trained to recognize or categorize objects or events using one sensory modality, the person can often recognize or categorize those same (or similar) objects and events via a novel modality. This phenomenon is an instance of cross-modal transfer of knowledge. Here, we study the Multisensory Hypothesis which states that people extract the intrinsic, modality-independent properties of objects and events, and represent these properties in multisensory representations. These representations underlie cross-modal transfer of knowledge. We conducted an experiment evaluating whether people transfer sequence category knowledge across auditory and visual domains. Our experimental data clearly indicate that we do. We also developed a computational model accounting for our experimental results. Consistent with the probabilistic language of thought approach to cognitive modeling, our model formalizes multisensory representations as symbolic "computer programs" and uses Bayesian inference to learn these representations. Because the model demonstrates how the acquisition and use of amodal, multisensory representations can underlie cross-modal transfer of knowledge, and because the model accounts for subjects' experimental performances, our work lends credence to the Multisensory Hypothesis. Overall, our work suggests that people automatically extract and represent objects' and events' intrinsic properties, and use these properties to process and understand the same (and similar) objects and events when they are perceived through novel sensory modalities. PMID:25338656

  14. Representações visuais para recuperação de informação na BDTD-UFPE / Visual representations to information retrieval in BDTD-UFPE

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Renato Fernandes, Correa; Jessica Monique de Lira, Vieira.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Analisa a aplicabilidade de visualizações, como interfaces amigáveis para Sistemas de Recuperação de Informação (SRIs), bem como discute a construção de representação visual de informações para o SRI da Biblioteca Digital de Teses e Dissertações (BDTD) da Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (UFPE). A [...] metodologia consiste em estudo de caso, envolvendo análise do uso de visualizações em sites de SRIs e discussão dos caminhos percorridos para construção de visualizações para recuperação de teses e dissertações do Programa de Pós-Graduação em Direto da UFPE. Conclui-se que interfaces de SRIs, que disponibilizam visualizações, transmitem informações de forma agradável e interativa, possibilitando a recuperação de documentos relevantes e garantido melhor socialização dos conhecimentos. Entretanto, a escolha da visualização a ser construída para determinado SRI, deve levar em conta não só as vantagens do uso das mesmas pelo usuário, mas, também, o atendimento aos requisitos de organização da informação necessários para construção de cada visualização. Abstract in english This article analyzes the applicability of visualizations as friendly interfaces for Information Retrieval Systems (IRSs) and discusses the construction of visual representation of information to the IRS of the Digital Library of Theses and Dissertations (BDTD) at Federal University of Pernambuco (U [...] FPE). The methodology consists of case study involving analysis of the use of visualizations in SRIs sites, and discussion of the paths chosen to build visualizations for retrieval of theses and dissertations of the Law Graduate Program at UFPE. We conclude that SRI interfaces that provide visualizations convey information so enjoyable and interactive, allowing the retrieval of relevant documents and ensuring better socialization of knowledge. However, the choice of one visualization to be built for a specific SRI, should take into account not only the advantages for users of using the same, but also meeting the requirements of information organizing required for construction of each visualization.

  15. Cardiac and pulmonary dose reduction for tangentially irradiated breast cancer, utilizing deep inspiration breath-hold with audio-visual guidance, without compromising target coverage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose. Cardiac disease and pulmonary complications are documented risk factors in tangential breast irradiation. Respiratory gating radiotherapy provides a possibility to substantially reduce cardiopulmonary doses. This CT planning study quantifies the reduction of radiation doses to the heart and lung, using deep inspiration breath-hold (DIBH). Patients and methods. Seventeen patients with early breast cancer, referred for adjuvant radiotherapy, were included. For each patient two CT scans were acquired; the first during free breathing (FB) and the second during DIBH. The scans were monitored by the Varian RPM respiratory gating system. Audio coaching and visual feedback (audio-visual guidance) were used. The treatment planning of the two CT studies was performed with conformal tangential fields, focusing on good coverage (V95>98%) of the planning target volume (PTV). Dose-volume histograms were calculated and compared. Doses to the heart, left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery, ipsilateral lung and the contralateral breast were assessed. Results. Compared to FB, the DIBH-plans obtained lower cardiac and pulmonary doses, with equal coverage of PTV. The average mean heart dose was reduced from 3.7 to 1.7 Gy and the number of patients with >5% heart volume receiving 25 Gy or more was reduced from four to one of the 17 patients. With DIBH the heart was completely out of the beam portals for ten patients, with FB this could not be achieved for an with FB this could not be achieved for any of the 17 patients. The average mean dose to the LAD coronary artery was reduced from 18.1 to 6.4 Gy. The average ipsilateral lung volume receiving more than 20 Gy was reduced from 12.2 to 10.0%. Conclusion. Respiratory gating with DIBH, utilizing audio-visual guidance, reduces cardiac and pulmonary doses for tangentially treated left sided breast cancer patients without compromising the target coverage

  16. Visual Number Beats Abstract Numerical Magnitude: Format-dependent Representation of Arabic Digits and Dot Patterns in Human Parietal Cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulthé, Jessica; De Smedt, Bert; Op de Beeck, Hans P

    2015-07-01

    In numerical cognition, there is a well-known but contested hypothesis that proposes an abstract representation of numerical magnitude in human intraparietal sulcus (IPS). On the other hand, researchers of object cognition have suggested another hypothesis for brain activity in IPS during the processing of number, namely that this activity simply correlates with the number of visual objects or units that are perceived. We contrasted these two accounts by analyzing multivoxel activity patterns elicited by dot patterns and Arabic digits of different magnitudes while participants were explicitly processing the represented numerical magnitude. The activity pattern elicited by the digit "8" was more similar to the activity pattern elicited by one dot (with which the digit shares the number of visual units but not the magnitude) compared to the activity pattern elicited by eight dots, with which the digit shares the represented abstract numerical magnitude. A multivoxel pattern classifier trained to differentiate one dot from eight dots classified all Arabic digits in the one-dot pattern category, irrespective of the numerical magnitude symbolized by the digit. These results were consistently obtained for different digits in IPS, its subregions, and many other brain regions. As predicted from object cognition theories, the number of presented visual units forms the link between the parietal activation elicited by symbolic and nonsymbolic numbers. The current study is difficult to reconcile with the hypothesis that parietal activation elicited by numbers would reflect a format-independent representation of number. PMID:25633646

  17. Preliminary tests of a possible outdoor light adaptation solution for a fly inspired visual sensor: a biomimetic solution - biomed 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Brian K; Wright, Cameron H G; Barrett, Steven F

    2011-01-01

    Two previous papers, presented at RMBS in 2009 and 2010, introduced a fly inspired vision sensor that could adapt to indoor light conditions by mimicking the light adaptation process of the commonhousefly, Muscadomestica. A new system has been designed that should allow the sensor to adapt to outdoor light conditions which will enable the sensor?s use inapplications such as: unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) obstacle avoidance, UAV landing support, target tracking, wheelchair guidance, large structure monitoring, and many other outdoor applications. A sensor of this type is especially suited for these applications due to features of hyperacuity (or an ability to achieve movement resolution beyond the theoretical limit), extreme sensitivity to motion, and (through software simulation) image edge extraction, motion detection, and orientation and location of a line.Many of these qualities are beyond the ability of traditional computervision sensors such as charge coupled device (CCD) arrays.To achieve outdoor light adaptation, a variety of design obstacles have to be overcome such as infrared interference, dynamic range expansion, and light saturation. The newly designed system overcomes the latter two design obstacles by mimicking the fly?s solution of logarithmic compression followed by removal of the average background light intensity. This paper presents the new design and the preliminary tests that were conducted to determine its effectiveness. PMID:21525612

  18. Reduced lung dose and improved inspiration level reproducibility in visually guided DIBH compared to audio coached EIG radiotherapy for breast cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damkjær, Sidsel M S; Aznar, Marianne C

    2013-01-01

    Patients with left-sided breast cancer with lymph node involvement have routinely been treated with enhanced inspiration gating (EIG) for a decade at our institution. In a transition from EIG to deep inspiration breath hold (DIBH) we compared the two techniques with focus on target coverage, dose to organs at risk and reproducibility of the inspiration level (IL).

  19. The degraded concept representation system in semantic dementia: damage to pan-modal hub, then visual spoke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Paul; Jones, Roy W; Ralph, Matthew A Lambon

    2012-12-01

    The core clinical feature of semantic dementia is a progressive yet selective degradation of conceptual knowledge. Understanding the cognitive and neuroanatomical basis for this deficit is a key challenge for both clinical and basic science. Some researchers attribute the deficit to damage to pan-modal conceptual representations that are independent of any particular sensory-motor modality and are represented in the ventrolateral anterior temporal lobes. Others claim that damage to modality-specific visual feature representations in the occipitotemporal 'ventral stream' is responsible. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that concept degradation in semantic dementia involves a combination of these pan-modal and modality-specific elements. We investigated factors influencing knowledge of object concepts by analysing 43 sets of picture-naming data from patients with semantic dementia. We found a strong influence of two pan-modal factors: highly familiar and typical items were named more accurately than less familiar/atypical items at all stages of the disorder. Items associated with rich sensory-motor information were also named more successfully at all stages, and this effect was present for sound/motion knowledge and tactile/action knowledge when these modalities were studied separately. However, there was no advantage for items rich in visual colour/form characteristics; instead, this factor had an increasingly negative impact in the later stages of the disorder. We propose that these results are best explained by a combination of (i) degradation of modality-independent conceptual representations, which is present throughout the disorder and is a consequence of atrophy focused on the ventrolateral anterior temporal lobes; and (ii) a later additional deficit for concepts that depend heavily on visual colour/form information, caused by the spreading of atrophy to posterior ventral temporal regions specialized for representing this information. This explanation is consistent with a graded hub-and-spoke model of conceptual knowledge, in which there is a gradual convergence of information along the temporal lobes, with visual attributes represented in the posterior cortex giving way to pan-modal representations in the anterior areas. PMID:23250888

  20. Visual Representation of Sports Activities in Secondary School English and Turkish Coursebooks

    OpenAIRE

    Zorba, Mehmet Galip

    2014-01-01

    Along with language teaching purposes, coursebooks also convey different kinds of cultural and social messages through both written texts and visualization. Therefore, studying coursebooks in terms of such qualities is necessary in foreign language education. In the learning process, visualization plays a pivotal role since visuals cater for concrete sensory stimuli and thus is an indispensable part in all coursebooks. The aim of this study is to comparatively investigate how sports, includin...

  1. Students' Use of Three Different Visual Representations to Interpret Whether Molecules Are Polar or Nonpolar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Host, Gunnar E.; Schonborn, Konrad J.; Palmerius, Karljohan E. Lundin

    2012-01-01

    Visualizing molecular properties is often crucial for constructing conceptual understanding in chemistry. However, research has revealed numerous challenges surrounding students' meaningful interpretation of the relationship between the geometry and electrostatic properties of molecules. This study explored students' (n = 18) use of three visual

  2. Developing a Local Instruction Theory for Learning the Concept of Angle through Visual Field Activities and Spatial Representations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bustang B

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a study on designing and testing an instructional sequence for the teaching and learning of the concept of angle in Indonesian primary schools. The study’s context is employing the current reform movement adopting Pendidikan Matematika Realistik Indonesia (an Indonesian version of Realistic Mathematics Education. Using a design research approach, a hypothetical learning trajectory was developed and a set of activities was performed to gain a better understanding of how the third grade students’ (aged 8 – 9 years understanding of the concept of angle may be fostered. Theoretical development is driven by an iterative process of designing instructional activities, performing teaching experiments and conducting retrospective analysis in order to contribute to local instruction theory on the concept of angle. The concept of angle emerged and evolved during long term classroom activities of visual field activities involving vision and spatial representations. Classroom events were recorded, group works were video-taped and student materials were collected. Qualitative analysis of a teaching experiment showed that by conducting the visual field activities involving vision and constructing spatial representations, students could develop their understanding of the concept of angle as well as their initial understanding of the notion of vision lines and blind spots.

  3. 'Investigating gender-based visual representations on the websites of entry-level occupational therapy programmes in Ireland and the United Kingdom.’

    OpenAIRE

    Mahon, Lochlainn

    2013-01-01

    Objectives - The purpose of this research is to gain an insight into the online visual marketing of the occupational therapy undergraduate and graduate entry-level courses within Ireland and the United Kingdom. This study examines the specific characteristics of the current visual representations that exist across these university websites. As there are a small proportion of men within the occupational therapy profession, it has become imperative to explore the current practices presented in ...

  4. Emerging Object Representations in the Visual System Predict Reaction Times for Categorization

    OpenAIRE

    Ritchie, J. Brendan; Tovar, David A.; Carlson, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Recognizing an object takes just a fraction of a second, less than the blink of an eye. Applying multivariate pattern analysis, or “brain decoding”, methods to magnetoencephalography (MEG) data has allowed researchers to characterize, in high temporal resolution, the emerging representation of object categories that underlie our capacity for rapid recognition. Shortly after stimulus onset, object exemplars cluster by category in a high-dimensional activation space in the brain. In this emergi...

  5. A modeling language for 3D process plant layout representation, exchange and visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Paviot, Thomas; Fortineau, Virginie; Lamouri, Samir; Louis-sidney, Ludovic

    2012-01-01

    In the nuclear industry, achieving Long Term Data Preservation is a requirement for nuclear power plants to be safely built, operated over five or six decades and retired. Among them, CAD data suffers from some strong dependencies on the software vendors and its data model thus leading to a possible weakness in the preservation workflow. This paper presents a modeling language, suitable for the 3D representation of a process plant layout, based upon a procedural Constructive Solid Geometry (C...

  6. User Interface for 3D Visualization with Emphasis on Combined Voxel and Surface Representation : Design Report

    OpenAIRE

    Lyngset, Runar Ylvisåker

    2006-01-01

    The thesis presents a user interface design aimed at the scenario where a dual representation of a volume is desired in order to emphasize certain parts of a volume using surface graphics while the rest of the volume is rendered using direct volume rendering techniques. A typical situation in which this configuration can prove useful is when studying images acquired for medical purposes. Sometimes the user wants to identify and represent an organ using an opaque surface in an otherwise ...

  7. Inspire Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohach, Barbara M.; Meade, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The authors collaborated on hosting a "Spring Inspire Day." planned and delivered by preservice elementary teachers as a social studies/science methods project. Projects that have authentic application opportunities can make learning meaningful for prospective teachers as well as elementary students. With the impetus for an integrated…

  8. Inspired Landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon, Robert; Spruch, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    It has been nearly 400 years since Harvard College was created, and since then, thousands of colleges and universities have been built across the United States. From the classically inspired lines of Thomas Jefferson's University of Virginia to the Spanish architecture at Stanford University, every campus has its own personality. It's not unusual,…

  9. Flow visualization study of a two-dimensional representation of the Space Shuttle launch pad configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mclachland, B. G.; Zilliac, G. G.; Davis, S. S.

    1987-01-01

    The loss of the Space Shuttle Challenger was caused by the failure of the aft joint O-ring seals in its right solid rocket booster. It has been suggested by several sources that wind conditions through a reduction in temperature of the right solid rocket booster caused by the wind blowing across the cold external tank, played a role in the O-ring failure. To check the plausibility of the wind theory, an experiment was carried out in a water towing tank to visualize the flow past a two-dimensional model representing a cross section of the Space Shuttle launch configuration. The periodic formation of vortices was found to characterize the wake generated by the model. It is suggested that this organized motion in the flow is the dominant mechanism that accomplishes heat transfer from the external tank to the right solid rocket booster. Flow visualization results consisting of photographs that show instantaneous streamline patterns of the flow are presented.

  10. Social Categories Shape the Neural Representation of Emotion: Evidence from a Visual Face Adaptation Task.

    OpenAIRE

    MarteOtten

    2012-01-01

    A number of recent behavioral studies have shown that emotional expressions are differently perceived depending on the race of a face, and that perception of race cues is influenced by emotional expressions. However, neural processes related to the perception of invariant cues that indicate the identity of a face (such as race) are often described to proceed independently of processes related to the perception of cues that can vary over time (such as emotion). Using a visual face adaptation p...

  11. Neural Representations of Contextual Guidance in Visual Search of Real-World Scenes

    OpenAIRE

    Preston, Tim J.; Guo, Fei; Das, Koel; Giesbrecht, Barry; Eckstein, Miguel P.

    2013-01-01

    Exploiting scene context and object– object co-occurrence is critical in guiding eye movements and facilitating visual search, yet the mediating neural mechanisms are unknown. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging while observers searched for target objects in scenes and used multivariate pattern analyses (MVPA) to show that the lateral occipital complex (LOC) can predict the coarse spatial location of observers’ expectations about the likely location of 213 different targets absent f...

  12. Retrieval of brain tumors with region-specific bag-of-visual-words representations in contrast-enhanced MRI images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Meiyan; Yang, Wei; Yu, Mei; Lu, Zhentai; Feng, Qianjin; Chen, Wufan

    2012-01-01

    A content-based image retrieval (CBIR) system is proposed for the retrieval of T1-weighted contrast-enhanced MRI (CE-MRI) images of brain tumors. In this CBIR system, spatial information in the bag-of-visual-words model and domain knowledge on the brain tumor images are considered for the representation of brain tumor images. A similarity metric is learned through a distance metric learning algorithm to reduce the gap between the visual features and the semantic concepts in an image. The learned similarity metric is then used to measure the similarity between two images and then retrieve the most similar images in the dataset when a query image is submitted to the CBIR system. The retrieval performance of the proposed method is evaluated on a brain CE-MRI dataset with three types of brain tumors (i.e., meningioma, glioma, and pituitary tumor). The experimental results demonstrate that the mean average precision values of the proposed method range from 90.4% to 91.5% for different views (transverse, coronal, and sagittal) with an average value of 91.0%. PMID:23243462

  13. Ant Robotic Swarm for Visualizing Invisible Hazardous Substances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Oyekan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inspired by the simplicity of how nature solves its problems, this paper presents a novel approach that would enable a swarm of ant robotic agents (robots with limited sensing, communication, computational and memory resources form a visual representation of distributed hazardous substances within an environment dominated by diffusion processes using a decentralized approach. Such a visual representation could be very useful in enabling a quicker evacuation of a city’s population affected by such hazardous substances. This is especially true if the ratio of emergency workers to the population number is very small.

  14. Fotografías de indígenas en manuales escolares argentinos: representaciones visuales y connotaciones textuales / Photographs of indigenous people in argentinian school textbooks: visual representations and textual connotations

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    María José, Saletta.

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este trabajo es analizar las fotografías de pueblos originarios argentinos utilizadas en manuales escolares de 2o y 3o ciclo publicados por dos editoriales: Santillana y Aique. Se presentan los resultados de un análisis cuantitativo y cualitativo de 93 fotografías correspondientes a 3 [...] 8 manuales publicados entre los anos 2000 y 2005. Se reconoce qué tipo de imágenes son utilizadas, la presencia o no de cultura material autóctona, la utilización de epígrafes y la adscripción étnica de los retratados. Se concluye que existe una representación diferencial a favor de aquellas imágenes que muestran pueblos originarios con su cultura material, pero, al mismo tiempo, una utilización de un lenguaje que emplea términos como "aborigen", que implica un sesgo homogeneizador. Las fotografías son empleadas sólo en su función denotativa, mientras que se deja de lado la connotación visual en privilegio de la textual. La información presente en epígrafes y textos que acompanan a las imágenes no cumple con los requisitos necesarios de precisión y rigurosidad. Abstract in english The aim of this paper is to analyze photographs of native people in Argentinean primary and secondary school textbooks published by two companies, Santillana and Aique. Results from quantitative and qualitative analyses of 93 images taken from 38 school text books published between 2000 and 2005 are [...] presented. Type of image used, presence of autochthonous material culture, use of epigraphs, and the ethnic adscription of the subjects portrayed are analyzed. It is concluded that there is differential representation in favor of those images showing native people with their material culture, although the use of language that contains derogative terms such as "aborigen" (i.e., native people) at the same time clearly indicates an homogenizing bias. Images are used mostly denotatively, while textual connotation is privileged over visual connotation. Information on the epigraphs and texts accompanying an image do not fulfill the requirements of thoroughness and accuracy, thus reducing the images to illustrations rather than useful documents.

  15. Large Scale Isosurface Bicubic Subdivision-Surface Wavelets for Representation and Visualization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertram, M.; Duchaineau, M.A.; Hamann, B.; Joy, K.I.

    2000-01-05

    We introduce a new subdivision-surface wavelet transform for arbitrary two-manifolds with boundary that is the first to use simple lifting-style filtering operations with bicubic precision. We also describe a conversion process for re-mapping large-scale isosurfaces to have subdivision connectivity and fair parameterizations so that the new wavelet transform can be used for compression and visualization. The main idea enabling our wavelet transform is the circular symmetrization of the filters in irregular neighborhoods, which replaces the traditional separation of filters into two 1-D passes. Our wavelet transform uses polygonal base meshes to represent surface topology, from which a Catmull-Clark-style subdivision hierarchy is generated. The details between these levels of resolution are quickly computed and compactly stored as wavelet coefficients. The isosurface conversion process begins with a contour triangulation computed using conventional techniques, which we subsequently simplify with a variant edge-collapse procedure, followed by an edge-removal process. This provides a coarse initial base mesh, which is subsequently refined, relaxed and attracted in phases to converge to the contour. The conversion is designed to produce smooth, untangled and minimally-skewed parameterizations, which improves the subsequent compression after applying the transform. We have demonstrated our conversion and transform for an isosurface obtained from a high-resolution turbulent-mixing hydrodynamics simulation, showing the potential for compression and level-of-detail visualization.

  16. Visual and narrative representations of mental health and addiction by law enforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, Jade; Boyd, Susan; Kerr, Thomas

    2015-07-01

    In Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada's third largest city, the Vancouver Police Department (VPD), has positioned itself as being at the forefront of mental health regulation. The VPD problematization of the "mental health crisis" in Vancouver draws on discourses of addiction and dangerousness. This is partially achieved by the twinning of mental health with addiction (dual diagnoses) and a focus on illegal drug consumption, and is supported through law enforcement's role as active claims-makers. Consequently, there is a mobilization of resources to identify, discipline, and contain people identified as mentally ill and addicted with little examination of both the textual and visual discourses that serve this purpose. This article addresses this gap through an analysis of the images and discursive framing of people with mental illness and addictions by the VPD in two Vancouver Police Department reports published in 2008 and 2009. PMID:25980943

  17. Concurrent Dynamic Visualizations With Expressive Petri Net Representations to Enrich the Understanding of Biological and Pathological Processes: an Application to Signaling Pathways

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    F., Ramos; C., Hallal; A., Nieto; D., García; J., Berúmen; D., Escárcega.

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available En biología de sistemas la visualización dinámica y las representaciones expresivas son necesarias para representar interacciones múltiples que ocurren durante los procesos biológicos en bioredes. La visualización dinámica facilita a los usuarios interactuar con modelos de bioredes, mientras que las [...] representaciones deben expresar como se llevan a cabo las interacciones dentro de éstas. A pesar de que diversas bases de datos proveen de redes a los usuarios, generalmente la información y representación contenidas en cada una son diferentes, y la interacción usuario-biored es restringida debido a la visualización estática. Una solución que se ha adoptado es hacer converger varias representaciones para obtener una más completa. Sin embargo, debido al uso de diferentes formatos incompatibles entre ellos y a las múltiples conexiones involucradas en las redes, la integración frecuentemente resulta en modelos erróneos y en una maraña de conexiones representadas en la red que son muy difíciles de analizar y manipular. En este trabajo introducimos la visualización dinámica concurrente (VDC) de una misma vía, la cual es recuperada de diferentes bases de datos y transformada a representaciones en redes de Petri para facilitar el entendimiento de los procesos biológicos y modificar las vías obtenidas interactuando con ellas. Hemos aplicado esta estrategia al análisis de la vía de señalización de Notch, asociada a cáncer cérvicouterino, obteniéndola de tres diferentes fuentes, comparándolas y manipulándolas simultáneamente interactuando con la VDC provista, hasta la generación de una vía personalizada. Abstract in english Dynamic visualizations and expressive representations are needed in systems biology to handle multiple interactions occurring during the biological processes of biopathway representations. Dynamic visualizations allow users an ease of interaction with pathway models. At the same time, representation [...] s of biopathways should express how interactions take place. In spite of the fact that diverse databases provide users with pathways, their information and representation are frequently different from each other and show restricted interactions because of their static visualization. An adopted solution is to merge diverse representations to obtain a richer one. However, due to different formats and the multiple links involved in the pathway representations, the merge results frequently in erroneous models and in a tangle web of relations very hard to be manipulated. Instead, this work introduces a concurrent dynamic visualization (CDV) of the same pathway, which is retrieved from different sites and then transformed into Petri net representations to facilitate the understanding of their biological processes by interacting with them. We applied this approach to the analysis of the Notch signaling pathway, associated with cervical cancer; we obtained it from different sources which we compared and manipulated simultaneously by interacting with the provided CDV until the user generated a personalized pathway.

  18. Deep generative learning of location-invariant visual word recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Maria GraziaDi Bono; MarcoZorzi

    2013-01-01

    It is widely believed that orthographic processing implies an approximate, flexible coding of letter position, as shown by relative-position and transposition priming effects in visual word recognition. These findings have inspired alternative proposals about the representation of letter position, ranging from noisy coding across the ordinal positions to relative position coding based on open bigrams. This debate can be cast within the broader problem of learning location-invariant representa...

  19. Processos comunicacionais em ambiente escolar: o potencial de sentidos de representações visuais / Communicational processes in school setting: the potential of meanings of the visual representations / Procesos comunicacionales en ambiente escolar: potencial de los significados en las representaciones visuales

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luciana Coutinho Pagliarini de, Souza; Maria Ogécia, Drigo.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo, resultado de pesquisa em desenvolvimento sob os auspícios da FAPESP, trata de interseções entre Comunicação e Educação inseridas no ambiente educacional a partir de recursos pedagógicos disponibilizados, como o livro didático. Objetiva-se refletir sobre o potencial de sentidos engendrad [...] os em representações visuais sobre masculino/feminimo que constam de livros didáticos e para tanto apresentam-se reflexões sobre imagens; sobre a alteridade e o processo de construção da identidade cultural na pós-modernidade, enquanto o instrumental para análise das representações visuais selecionadas está baseado na semiótica peirceana. As representações visuais cumprem o propósito de abrir caminho para reflexões no campo Comunicação/Educação capazes de gerarem ações que podem redundar na possibilidade de construção de um pensamento crítico em relação às representações visuais. Abstract in spanish Este artículo, resulta de una investigación en desarrollo apoyada por la Fundación de Apoyo a la Investigación del Estado de São Paulo - FAPESP, trata de intersecciones entre la Comunicación y la Educación inserta en el ámbito educativo con recursos didácticos disponibles, tales como el libro de tex [...] to. Objetivase la reflexión sobre el potencial de los sentidos engendrados en representaciones visuales de sexo masculino/feminimo contenidos en los libros de texto. Para tanto se presentan reflexiones sobre las imágenes en la contemporaneidad; la alteridad y la construcción de la identidad cultural en la postmodernidad, mientras el instrumental de análisis de las representaciones visuales se basa en la semiótica peirceana. Las representaciones visuales cumplen el propósito de dar paso a las reflexiones de la Comunicación / Educación capaz de generar acciones que pueden resultar en la posibilidad de construir un pensamiento crítico en relación a las representaciones visuales de campo. Abstract in english This paper is result of a research that is being developed under the auspices of FAPESP and it shows intersections between Communication and Education in the educational environment with teaching resources available, such as the textbook. In order to think about the potential of visual representatio [...] ns about male/female that are in textbooks and, for that, it shows some reflections about images; about the process of the construction of cultural identity are presented, while the semiotics analyses of the visual representation is made from peircean semiotics. Visual representations fulfill the purpose to make way for reflections in the field Communication / Education capable of generating actions that could result in the possibility of building critical thinking in relation to visual representations.

  20. External and Internal Representations in the Acquisition and Use of Knowledge: Visualization Effects on Mental Model Construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnotz, Wolfgang; Kurschner, Christian

    2008-01-01

    This article investigates whether different formats of visualizing information result in different mental models constructed in learning from pictures, whether the different mental models lead to different patterns of performance in subsequently presented tasks, and how these visualization effects can be modified by further external…

  1. The Trial of the Soul. Post-Byzantine Visual Representations of the Tollbooths in the Romanian Churches in Maramure?

    OpenAIRE

    Betea, Raluca

    2011-01-01

    The present article analysis the representations of the aerial tollbooths in the iconography of the Last Judgment painted during the seventeenth and eighteenth century in the wooden churches, situated in the southern part of the historical Maramure? (Máramaros) County (nowadays Romania). Besides the representations of the customhouses as a series of booths arranged vertically, diagonally or even horizontally, in Maramure? the painters used two other designs, namely the tower customhouses a...

  2. A new computer program for topological, visual analysis of 3D particle configurations based on visual representation of radial distribution function peaks as bonds

    CERN Document Server

    Metere, Alfredo; Dzugutov, Mikhail

    2015-01-01

    We present a new program able to perform unique visual analysis on generic particle systems: PASYVAT (PArticle SYstem Visual Analysis Tool). More specifically, it can perform a selection of multiple interparticle distance ranges from a radial distribution function (RDF) plot and display them in 3D as bonds. This software can be used with any data set representing a system of particles in 3D. In this manuscript the reader will find a description of the program and its internal structure, with emphasis on its applicability in the study of certain particle configurations, obtained from classical molecular dynamics simulation in condensed matter physics.

  3. Driven: True Stories of Inspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    With a rotating series of quotes from Jack Kerouac, Victor Hugo, and Khalil Gibran, the homepage for "Driven: True Stories of Inspiration" is quite visually enticing. Created by the Exploratorium in San Francisco, this website provides interviews and conversations with creative types from all over. These vignettes seek to answer and explore questions like "How are creative investigations sparked?" and "What does a state of inspiration feel like?" Included here are profiles of San Francisco-based musician Thao Nguyen and Gerd Mairandres, who works as the head of the wig and make-up department at the San Francisco Opera. Most of the profiles are about five minutes long, and visitors can click on the "Upcoming" tab to learn about those that will be released onto the website shortly.

  4. Visual perception from the perspective of a representational, non-reductionistic, level-dependent account of perception and conscious awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Morten; Mogensen, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    This article proposes a new model to interpret seemingly conflicting evidence concerning the correlation of consciousness and neural processes. Based on an analysis of research of blindsight and subliminal perception, the reorganization of elementary functions and consciousness framework suggests that mental representations consist of functions at several different levels of analysis, including truly localized perceptual elementary functions and perceptual algorithmic modules, which are interconnections of the elementary functions. We suggest that conscious content relates to the 'top level' of analysis in a 'situational algorithmic strategy' that reflects the general state of an individual. We argue that conscious experience is intrinsically related to representations that are available to guide behaviour. From this perspective, we find that blindsight and subliminal perception can be explained partly by too coarse-grained methodology, and partly by top-down enhancing of representations that normally would not be relevant to action.

  5. The Inspirational Leader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benigni, Mark D.; Hughes, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Amid the focus on improved standardized test scores, differentiated instruction, value-added initiatives and improved teacher evaluation, one must not ignore an education leader's need to inspire and be inspired. But how do education leaders inspire their students and teachers during some of the most difficult economic times the nation has ever…

  6. Eesti õpetaja pälvis Inspiration Software'i stipendiumi / Ave Lauringson

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lauringson, Ave

    2007-01-01

    USA tarkvarafirma Inspiration Software tegi teatavaks 30 õpetaja nimed üle maailma, kes saavad 2007. aasta haridusstipendiumi (Inspired Teacher Scholarships for Visual Learning). Nende seas on ka Lasnamäe Lasteaia-Algkooli õpetaja, Tiigrihüppe SA ekspert ja koolitaja ning Tiigri Tegija 2007 auhinnasaaja Ingrid Maadvere

  7. Representaciones visuales del cuerpo humano: análisis de los nuevos libros de primaria de ciencias naturales en la reforma educativa mexicana / Visual Representations of the Human Body: An Analysis of the New Elementary Science Textbooks in Mexico's Educational Reform

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Yolanda, Postigo; Asunción, López-Manjón.

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available En este trabajo analizamos las concepciones sobre la naturaleza de las representaciones visuales sobre el cuerpo humano que dirigen su selección, diseño y tratamiento didáctico en los nuevos libros de primaria de ciencias naturales (3° a 6° grados) de la Reforma Integral de la Educación Básica en Mé [...] xico. Se describen dos tipos de concepciones: una intuitiva, que asume una simplicidad y facilidad en el uso de las imágenes junto con una naturaleza realista de las mismas, y una más compleja, de naturaleza constructivista, en la que se consideran las imágenes como un sistema externo de representación con las dificultades que demanda su uso. Los resultados muestran que la concepción que subyace a las imágenes sobre el cuerpo humano de 3° a 6° grados corresponde a una de tipo intuitivo con pocos cambios respecto de su tratamiento en los libros de texto anteriores a la Reforma. Abstract in english This study analyzes the natural conceptions of the visual representations of the human body that guide selection, design, and didactic treatment in the new elementary science textbooks (3rd grade to 6th grade) of Mexico's Integral Reform of Basic Education. Two types of conceptions are described: an [...] intuitive conception, which assumes simplicity and facility in the use of images, along with a realistic representation; and a more complex conception of a constructivist nature that considers images to be an external system of representation with the difficulties their use demands. The results show that the underlying conception of the images of the human body from the 3rd to the 6th grades corresponds to an intuitive type with few changes, with respect to textbooks prior to the Reform.

  8. Visualizers of solidarity: organizational politics in humanitarian and international development NGOs

    OpenAIRE

    Orgad, Shani

    2013-01-01

    iscussion of the visual politics of solidarity, in relation specifically to the representation of suffering and development, has been grounded in analysis of images. This article seeks to expand this debate by exploring the organizational politics that shape and are shaped by these images. The article is inspired by production studies in the cultural industries and draws on interviews with 17 professionals from 10 UK-based international development and humanitarian organizations that are enga...

  9. Impact of stride-coupled gaze shifts of walking blowflies on the neuronal representation of visual targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Kress

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During locomotion animals rely heavily on visual cues gained from the environment to guide their behavior. Examples are basic behaviors like collision avoidance or the approach to a goal. The saccadic gaze strategy of flying flies, which separates translational from rotational phases of locomotion, has been suggested to facilitate the extraction of environmental information, because only image flow evoked by translational self-motion contains relevant distance information about the surrounding world. In contrast to the translational phases of flight during which gaze direction is kept largely constant, walking flies experience continuous rotational image flow that is coupled to their stride-cycle. The consequences of these self-produced image shifts for the extraction of environmental information are still unclear. To assess the impact of stride-coupled image shifts on visual information processing, we performed electrophysiological recordings from the HSE cell, a motion sensitive wide-field neuron in the blowfly visual system. This cell has been concluded to play a key role in mediating optomotor behavior, self-motion estimation and spatial information processing. We used visual stimuli that were based on the visual input experienced by walking blowflies while approaching a black vertical bar. The response of HSE to these stimuli was dominated by periodic membrane potential fluctuations evoked by stride-coupled image shifts. Nevertheless, during the approach the cell’s response contained information about the bar and its background. The response components evoked by the bar were larger than the responses to its background, especially during the last phase of the approach. However, as revealed by targeted modifications of the visual input during walking, the extraction of distance information on the basis of HSE responses is much impaired by stride-coupled retinal image shifts. Possible mechanisms that may cope with these stride-coupled responses are discussed.

  10. Sparse Representations-Based Super-Resolution of Key-Frames Extracted from Frames-Sequences Generated by a Visual Sensor Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Sajjad

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Visual sensor networks (VSNs usually generate a low-resolution (LR frame-sequence due to energy and processing constraints. These LR-frames are not very appropriate for use in certain surveillance applications. It is very important to enhance the resolution of the captured LR-frames using resolution enhancement schemes. In this paper, an effective framework for a super-resolution (SR scheme is proposed that enhances the resolution of LR key-frames extracted from frame-sequences captured by visual-sensors. In a VSN, a visual processing hub (VPH collects a huge amount of visual data from camera sensors. In the proposed framework, at the VPH, key-frames are extracted using our recent key-frame extraction technique and are streamed to the base station (BS after compression. A novel effective SR scheme is applied at BS to produce a high-resolution (HR output from the received key-frames. The proposed SR scheme uses optimized orthogonal matching pursuit (OOMP for sparse-representation recovery in SR. OOMP does better in terms of detecting true sparsity than orthogonal matching pursuit (OMP. This property of the OOMP helps produce a HR image which is closer to the original image. The K-SVD dictionary learning procedure is incorporated for dictionary learning. Batch-OMP improves the dictionary learning process by removing the limitation in handling a large set of observed signals. Experimental results validate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme and show its superiority over other state-of-the-art schemes.

  11. Literature Review for the Influence of Visual Models and Instructional Methods on the Development of Students' Graphic Representations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langan, Jean

    1996-01-01

    Provides an overview of the research literature concerning the development of graphic art skills, relevant instructional methods, and the specific use of visual models as an instructional method. Pertinent findings, relevant methodological issues, and major conclusions are all discussed. Briefly addresses the viewpoints of gestalt and learning…

  12. Spatial representation in blindness

    OpenAIRE

    Dodds, A. G.

    1980-01-01

    The role of previous visual experience in relation to spatial representation is investigated by comparing the performance of the congenitally blind, the late-blinded and the sighted blindfolded on a number, of near-space tasks involving mental rotation, mental manipulation and scale transformation, and a far-space task involving the representation of two routes by means of pointing, drawing and the making of spatial inferences. In relation to the former, the role of visual imagery in assi...

  13. Sistema de visualización remota para la representación interactiva de volúmenes de datos médicos / Remote visualization system for interactive representation of medical volume dataset

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Osvaldo, Pereira Bárzaga; Leitniz, Pérez Buján; Ramón, Carrasco Velar.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Las aplicaciones de visualización médica han adquirido un elevado auge en la medicina a nivel mundial, ya que les permite a los médicos especialistas realizar diagnósticos preoperatorios no invasivos y de alta precisión desde una perspectiva 3D. La idea principal de la misma es obtener un modelo tri [...] dimensional de alta resolución gráfica a partir de imágenes médicas digitales de las modalidades de Tomografía Axial Computarizada y Resonancia Magnética Nuclear. Los usuarios de este tipo de aplicaciones demandan de forma creciente que las aplicaciones permitan el diagnóstico de patologías en un entorno de trabajo colaborativo. En este trabajo presentamos una arquitectura para sistemas de visualización remota basados en la transmisión de imágenes. El esquema de comunicación y transmisión de datos e imágenes entre el servidor y los clientes utiliza RTP como protocolo de comunicación. Los resultados obtenidos demuestran que la variante de algoritmo RLE implementada permite obtener visualizaciones interactivas y en tiempo real con un consumo mínimo del ancho de banda de la red. Abstract in english Three-dimensional medical visualization applications have acquired a high rise in medicine. They allow specialized doctors to make preoperative diagnostics with high accuracy from a 3D perspective. The main idea of medical visualization is to obtain a three-dimensional and high-resolution graphics f [...] rom digital medical imaging modalities like computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. The users of these applications increasingly demand that applications allow diagnosis in a collaborative work environment. Architecture for remote visualization systems based on image is presented. The server and client scheme of communication and transmission of data and images use RTP as communication protocol. Our results show that the implemented variant of RLE algorithm allows interactive and real time representation with a minimum of bandwidth.

  14. ProfileGrids as a new visual representation of large multiple sequence alignments: a case study of the RecA protein family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abajian Aaron C

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple sequence alignments are a fundamental tool for the comparative analysis of proteins and nucleic acids. However, large data sets are no longer manageable for visualization and investigation using the traditional stacked sequence alignment representation. Results We introduce ProfileGrids that represent a multiple sequence alignment as a matrix color-coded according to the residue frequency occurring at each column position. JProfileGrid is a Java application for computing and analyzing ProfileGrids. A dynamic interaction with the alignment information is achieved by changing the ProfileGrid color scheme, by extracting sequence subsets at selected residues of interest, and by relating alignment information to residue physical properties. Conserved family motifs can be identified by the overlay of similarity plot calculations on a ProfileGrid. Figures suitable for publication can be generated from the saved spreadsheet output of the colored matrices as well as by the export of conservation information for use in the PyMOL molecular visualization program. We demonstrate the utility of ProfileGrids on 300 bacterial homologs of the RecA family – a universally conserved protein involved in DNA recombination and repair. Careful attention was paid to curating the collected RecA sequences since ProfileGrids allow the easy identification of rare residues in an alignment. We relate the RecA alignment sequence conservation to the following three topics: the recently identified DNA binding residues, the unexplored MAW motif, and a unique Bacillus subtilis RecA homolog sequence feature. Conclusion ProfileGrids allow large protein families to be visualized more effectively than the traditional stacked sequence alignment form. This new graphical representation facilitates the determination of the sequence conservation at residue positions of interest, enables the examination of structural patterns by using residue physical properties, and permits the display of rare sequence features within the context of an entire alignment. JProfileGrid is free for non-commercial use and is available from http://www.profilegrid.org. Furthermore, we present a curated RecA protein collection that is more diverse than previous data sets; and, therefore, this RecA ProfileGrid is a rich source of information for nanoanatomy analysis.

  15. Translation-Invariant Representation for Cumulative Foot Pressure Images

    CERN Document Server

    Zheng, Shuai; Tan, Tieniu

    2010-01-01

    Human can be distinguished by different limb movements and unique ground reaction force. Cumulative foot pressure image is a 2-D cumulative ground reaction force during one gait cycle. Although it contains pressure spatial distribution information and pressure temporal distribution information, it suffers from several problems including different shoes and noise, when putting it into practice as a new biometric for pedestrian identification. In this paper, we propose a hierarchical translation-invariant representation for cumulative foot pressure images, inspired by the success of Convolutional deep belief network for digital classification. Key contribution in our approach is discriminative hierarchical sparse coding scheme which helps to learn useful discriminative high-level visual features. Based on the feature representation of cumulative foot pressure images, we develop a pedestrian recognition system which is invariant to three different shoes and slight local shape change. Experiments are conducted on...

  16. Bio-inspired vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posch, C.

    2012-01-01

    Nature still outperforms the most powerful computers in routine functions involving perception, sensing and actuation like vision, audition, and motion control, and is, most strikingly, orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than its artificial competitors. The reasons for the superior performance of biological systems are subject to diverse investigations, but it is clear that the form of hardware and the style of computation in nervous systems are fundamentally different from what is used in artificial synchronous information processing systems. Very generally speaking, biological neural systems rely on a large number of relatively simple, slow and unreliable processing elements and obtain performance and robustness from a massively parallel principle of operation and a high level of redundancy where the failure of single elements usually does not induce any observable system performance degradation. In the late 1980`s, Carver Mead demonstrated that silicon VLSI technology can be employed in implementing ``neuromorphic'' circuits that mimic neural functions and fabricating building blocks that work like their biological role models. Neuromorphic systems, as the biological systems they model, are adaptive, fault-tolerant and scalable, and process information using energy-efficient, asynchronous, event-driven methods. In this paper, some basics of neuromorphic electronic engineering and its impact on recent developments in optical sensing and artificial vision are presented. It is demonstrated that bio-inspired vision systems have the potential to outperform conventional, frame-based vision acquisition and processing systems in many application fields and to establish new benchmarks in terms of redundancy suppression/data compression, dynamic range, temporal resolution and power efficiency to realize advanced functionality like 3D vision, object tracking, motor control, visual feedback loops, etc. in real-time. It is argued that future artificial vision systems, if they are to succeed in demanding applications such as autonomous robot navigation, micro-manipulation or high-speed tracking, must exploit the power of the asynchronous, frame-free, biomimetic approach.

  17. Bio-inspired vision

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nature still outperforms the most powerful computers in routine functions involving perception, sensing and actuation like vision, audition, and motion control, and is, most strikingly, orders of magnitude more energy-efficient than its artificial competitors. The reasons for the superior performance of biological systems are subject to diverse investigations, but it is clear that the form of hardware and the style of computation in nervous systems are fundamentally different from what is used in artificial synchronous information processing systems. Very generally speaking, biological neural systems rely on a large number of relatively simple, slow and unreliable processing elements and obtain performance and robustness from a massively parallel principle of operation and a high level of redundancy where the failure of single elements usually does not induce any observable system performance degradation. In the late 1980's, Carver Mead demonstrated that silicon VLSI technology can be employed in implementing ''neuromorphic'' circuits that mimic neural functions and fabricating building blocks that work like their biological role models. Neuromorphic systems, as the biological systems they model, are adaptive, fault-tolerant and scalable, and process information using energy-efficient, asynchronous, event-driven methods. In this paper, some basics of neuromorphic electronic engineering and its impact on recent developments in optical sensing and artificial vision are optical sensing and artificial vision are presented. It is demonstrated that bio-inspired vision systems have the potential to outperform conventional, frame-based vision acquisition and processing systems in many application fields and to establish new benchmarks in terms of redundancy suppression/data compression, dynamic range, temporal resolution and power efficiency to realize advanced functionality like 3D vision, object tracking, motor control, visual feedback loops, etc. in real-time. It is argued that future artificial vision systems, if they are to succeed in demanding applications such as autonomous robot navigation, micro-manipulation or high-speed tracking, must exploit the power of the asynchronous, frame-free, biomimetic approach.

  18. Unsupervised classification and visual representation of situations in surveillance videos using slow feature analysis for situation retrieval applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, Frank

    2015-03-01

    Today, video surveillance systems produce thousands of terabytes of data. This source of information can be very valuable, as it contains spatio-temporal information about abnormal, similar or periodic activities. However, a search for certain situations or activities in unstructured large-scale video footage can be exhausting or even pointless. Searching surveillance video footage is extremely difficult due to the apparent similarity of situations, especially for human observers. In order to keep this amount manageable and hence usable, this paper aims at clustering situations regarding their visual content as well as motion patterns. Besides standard image content descriptors like HOG, we present and investigate novel descriptors, called Franklets, which explicitly encode motion patterns for certain image regions. Slow feature analysis (SFA) will be performed for dimension reduction based on the temporal variance of the features. By reducing the dimension with SFA, a higher feature discrimination can be reached compared to standard PCA dimension reduction. The effects of dimension reduction via SFA will be investigated in this paper. Cluster results on real data from the Hamburg Harbour Anniversary 2014 will be presented with both, HOG feature descriptors and Franklets. Furthermore, we could show that by using SFA an improvement to standard PCA techniques could be achieved. Finally, an application to visual clustering with self-organizing maps will be introduced.

  19. Virtual visual reminiscing pain stimulation of allodynia patients activates cortical representation of pain and emotions. fMRI study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is widely known that sensation of the pain is derived from sensory-discriminative factor and emotional factor. Especially in chronic pain, emotional factors and psychosocial backgrounds are more likely to contribute for the patients' discomfort. The aim of this study is to investigate how emotional factor of pain participates in intractable pain. We employed functional MRI (fMRI) to compare the brain activations occurring in the orthopaedic neuropathic pain patients with allodynia and normal individuals in response to the visual virtual painful experience. During fMRI scanning, a video demonstrating an actual tactile stimulation of the palm and its imitation were shown to participants. In contrast to normal individuals, allodynia patients also displayed activation of the areas reflecting emotions: frontal lobe and anterior cingulate. These findings suggest that brain have important role in the development and maintaining of peripheral originated chronic painful condition. (author)

  20. Physicists get INSPIREd

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Particle physicists thrive on information. They first create information by performing experiments or elaborating theoretical conjectures and then they share it through publications and various web tools. The INSPIRE service, just released, will bring state of the art information retrieval to the fingertips of researchers.   Keeping track of the information shared within the particle physics community has long been the task of libraries at the larger labs, such as CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, as well as the focus of indispensible services like arXiv and those of the Particle Data Group. In 2007, many providers of information in the field came together for a summit at SLAC to see how physics information resources could be enhanced, and the INSPIRE project emerged from that meeting. The vision behind INSPIRE was built by a survey launched by the four labs to evaluate the real needs of the community. INSPIRE responds to these directives from the community by combining the most successful aspe...

  1. Interaction for visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Tominski, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Visualization has become a valuable means for data exploration and analysis. Interactive visualization combines expressive graphical representations and effective user interaction. Although interaction is an important component of visualization approaches, much of the visualization literature tends to pay more attention to the graphical representation than to interaction.The goal of this work is to strengthen the interaction side of visualization. Based on a brief review of general aspects of interaction, we develop an interaction-oriented view on visualization. This view comprises five key as

  2. Inspiration is "Mission Critical"

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, D. W.; DeVore, E.; Lebofsky, L.

    2014-07-01

    In spring 2013, the President's budget proposal restructured the nation's approach to STEM education, eliminating ˜$50M of NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) funding with the intent of transferring it to the Dept. of Education, National Science Foundation, and Smithsonian Institution. As a result, Education and Public Outreach (EPO) would no longer be a NASA mission requirement and funds that had already been competed, awarded, and productively utilized were lost. Since 1994, partnerships of scientists, engineers, and education specialists were required to create innovative approaches to EPO, providing a direct source of inspiration for today's youth that may now be lost. Although seldom discussed or evaluated, "inspiration" is the beginning of lasting education. For decades, NASA's crewed and robotic missions have motivated students of all ages and have demonstrated a high degree of leverage in society. Through personal experiences we discuss (1) the importance of inspiration in education, (2) how NASA plays a vital role in STEM education, (3) examples of high-leverage educational materials showing why NASA should continue embedding EPO specialists within mission teams, and (4) how we can document the role of inspiration. We believe that personal histories are an important means of assessing the success of EPO. We hope this discussion will lead other people to document similar stories of educational success and perhaps to undertake longitudinal studies of the impact of inspiration.

  3. Visual sedimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huron, Samuel; Vuillemot, Romain; Fekete, Jean-Daniel

    2013-12-01

    We introduce Visual Sedimentation, a novel design metaphor for visualizing data streams directly inspired by the physical process of sedimentation. Visualizing data streams (e. g., Tweets, RSS, Emails) is challenging as incoming data arrive at unpredictable rates and have to remain readable. For data streams, clearly expressing chronological order while avoiding clutter, and keeping aging data visible, are important. The metaphor is drawn from the real-world sedimentation processes: objects fall due to gravity, and aggregate into strata over time. Inspired by this metaphor, data is visually depicted as falling objects using a force model to land on a surface, aggregating into strata over time. In this paper, we discuss how this metaphor addresses the specific challenge of smoothing the transition between incoming and aging data. We describe the metaphor's design space, a toolkit developed to facilitate its implementation, and example applications to a range of case studies. We then explore the generative capabilities of the design space through our toolkit. We finally illustrate creative extensions of the metaphor when applied to real streams of data. PMID:24051811

  4. Inspiration, anyone? (Editorial)

    OpenAIRE

    Lindsay Glynn

    2006-01-01

    I have to admit that writing an editorial for this issue was a struggle. Trying to sit down and write when the sun was shining outside and most of my colleagues were on vacation was, to say the least, difficult. Add to that research projects and conferences…let’s just say that I found myself less than inspired. A pitiful plea for ideas to a colleague resulted in the reintroduction to a few recent evidence based papers and resources which inspired further searching and reading. T...

  5. Inspiring Exercises for Undergraduates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Tzee-Char

    1999-01-01

    Inspiring exercises are used to guide students at all levels to rediscover the essential meaning of various individual pieces of mathematics. Presents five sets of examples including Abel's identity, Hensel's lemma, finitely generated Abelian groups, Baire's category theorem, and the Weierstrass preparation theorem. (Author/ASK)

  6. Cell 2-representations of finitary 2-categories

    OpenAIRE

    Mazorchuk, Volodymyr; Miemietz, Vanessa

    2010-01-01

    We study 2-representations of finitary 2-categories with involution and adjunctions by functors on module categories over finite dimensional algebras. In particular, we define, construct and describe in detail (right) cell 2-representations inspired by Kazhdan-Lusztig cell modules for Hecke algebras. Under some natural assumptions we show that cell 2-representations are strongly simple and do not depend on the choice of a right cell inside a two-sided cell. This reproves and...

  7. Wavelet Based Image Compression Using Sparse Representation And Vector Quantization

    OpenAIRE

    Bedarkar, Smita T.; Ambatkar, N. S.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: Ordinary images, as well as most natural and manmade signals, are compressible and can, therefore, be well represented in a domain in which the signal is sparse. Sparse signal representations have found use in a large number of applications including image compression. Inspired by recent theoretical advances in sparse representation, we propose an image compression using wavelet, sparse representation and vector quantization.

  8. Nanotechnology: Inspiration from Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Sheeparamatti B; Sheeparamatti R; Kadadevaramath J

    2007-01-01

    Nanotechnology is molecular manipulation. Any branch of technology that results from our ability to control and manipulate matter on length scales of 1-100 nm can be treated as nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is not new to nature. Nature has been doing molecular manipulation to build its systems like plants and animals. After observing and understanding the fundamental design principles of natural products, one gets inspiration to build his own nanoproducts. This paper stimulates a nanotechnic...

  9. Quantum-Inspired Maximizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zak, Michail

    2008-01-01

    A report discusses an algorithm for a new kind of dynamics based on a quantum- classical hybrid-quantum-inspired maximizer. The model is represented by a modified Madelung equation in which the quantum potential is replaced by different, specially chosen 'computational' potential. As a result, the dynamics attains both quantum and classical properties: it preserves superposition and entanglement of random solutions, while allowing one to measure its state variables, using classical methods. Such optimal combination of characteristics is a perfect match for quantum-inspired computing. As an application, an algorithm for global maximum of an arbitrary integrable function is proposed. The idea of the proposed algorithm is very simple: based upon the Quantum-inspired Maximizer (QIM), introduce a positive function to be maximized as the probability density to which the solution is attracted. Then the larger value of this function will have the higher probability to appear. Special attention is paid to simulation of integer programming and NP-complete problems. It is demonstrated that the problem of global maximum of an integrable function can be found in polynomial time by using the proposed quantum- classical hybrid. The result is extended to a constrained maximum with applications to integer programming and TSP (Traveling Salesman Problem).

  10. Inspiring a generation

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    The motto of the 2012 Olympic and Paralympic Games is ‘Inspire a generation’ so it was particularly pleasing to see science, the LHC and Higgs bosons featuring so strongly in the opening ceremony of the Paralympics last week.   It’s a sign of just how far our field has come that such a high-profile event featured particle physics so strongly, and we can certainly add our support to that motto. If the legacy of London 2012 is a generation inspired by science as well as sport, then the games will have more than fulfilled their mission. Particle physics has truly inspiring stories to tell, going well beyond Higgs and the LHC, and the entire community has played its part in bringing the excitement of frontier research in particle physics to a wide audience. Nevertheless, we cannot rest on our laurels: maintaining the kind of enthusiasm for science we witnessed at the Paralympic opening ceremony will require constant vigilance, and creative thinking about ways to rea...

  11. Astronomy. Inspiration. Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanic, N.

    2008-10-01

    This paper speculates how poetry and other kind of arts are tightly related to astronomy. Hence the connection between art and natural sciences in general will be discussed in the frame of ongoing multidisciplinary project `Astronomy. Inspiration. Art' at Public Observatory in Belgrade (started in 2004). This project tends to inspire (better to say `infect') artist with a cosmic themes and fantastic sceneries of the Universe. At the very beginning of the project, Serbian poet and philosopher Laza Lazi? (who published 49 books of poetry, stories and novels), as well as writer Gordana Maleti? (with 25 published novels for children) were interested to work on The Inspiration by Astronomical Phenomena in Serbian Literature. Five young artists and scientists include their new ideas and new approach to multidisciplinary studies too (Srdjan Djuki?, Nenad Jeremi?, Olivera Obradovi?, Romana Vujasinovi?, Elena Dimoski). Two books that will be presented in details in the frame of this Project, "STARRY CITIES" (http://zavod.co.yu) and "ASTROLIES", don't offer only interesting illustrations, images from the latest astronomical observations and currently accepted cosmological theories -- those books induces, provoking curiosity in a specific and witty way, an adventure and challenge to explore and create.

  12. Advanced visual analytics interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Keim, Daniel; Bak, Peter; Bertini, Enrico; Oelke, Daniela; Spretke, David; Ziegler, Hartmut

    2010-01-01

    Advanced visual interfaces, like the ones found in information visualization, intend to offer a view on abstract data spaces to enable users to make sense of them. By mapping data to visual representations and providing interactive tools to explore and navigate, it is possible to get an understanding of the data and possibly discover new knowledge. With the advent of modern data collection and analysis technologies, the direct visualization of data starts to show its limitations due to limite...

  13. Perceptions of Talented Students in Their Visual Representations about the Future World and Technology (Üstün Yetenekli Ö?rencilerin Görsel Anlat?mlar?nda Gelece?in Dünyas?na ve Teknolojisine ?li?kin Alg?lar?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Duygu Eri?ti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose and significance: The present study aimed at investigating talented students’ artistic representations and perceptions regarding the future world and technology through their animated designs according to their design-based representations. A learning environment which allows talented students to use their ability, thoughts and creativity in the process of design-based instructional activities is of great interest for them. It is important for talented students to have instructional experiences which provide independent and unique learning opportunities and special application areas that allow these students to show their abilities (CfBT, 2008. Results: The participants of the study were talented elementary school students attending the Education Programs for Talented Students (EPTS at Anadolu University. The criterion sampling method was used to select the research participants. The criterion for selecting the participants was attendance in the course of ‘Computer-Aided Graphics Design’ offered in the EPTS. The participants included a total of 35 elementary school 6th, 7th and 8th grade talented students. The study was conducted in three phases: instruction process, design process and evaluation process. Some preliminary preparations related to the design program were carried out considering that the students would use them while doing animated designs through the instruction process. The instruction phase involved an animated representation study during which the students designed their own animations. In the last phase, all the animate designs of the talented students were analyzed. The thematic analysis based on qualitative research method along with art-based inquiry was used. The thematic coding system for analyzing concepts revealed from the research data was implemented. The visual language used in pictorial representations produce messages, with its specialized codes. The degree of students’ understanding and explaining their perceptions of technology in future composes the visual codes in this research. The results obtained in the study were grouped under two themes: talented elementary school students’ ways of perception of the future world and talented elementary school students’ ways of perception of future technology.Discussion: Students’ perceptions about the future world in their visual representations and in the interview forms based on their visual representations were mostly classified under the theme of the extinction of the world, nature and universe. Students had quite unusual and original ideas about future technology. It was seen that the students put forward such subthemes as voyages between planets and space cars, flying cars, aliens’ visit to the world, street air-conditioners, voyage to the moon by space rockets and voyage via teleportation. The students who generally had negative views about the future world considered technology as a way of solution to the awaiting problems in future. In the research process, based on the researcher’s observations, it could be stated that the students taking design education were in the process of making design-related decisions and testing and discussing their knowledge about a certain goal; that they revised their needs, efficacies and creative potentials regarding the goal determined; and that they experimented, evaluated, developed and associated their decisions with the design process.Conclusions: Depending on the findings of the present study, it can be concluded that students’ perceptions of the future world and technology reveal quite a negative picture in general. There could be a number of reasons for this negative picture; however, considering the technology and media interaction involving students, it could be stated that there are negative reflections of such environments and the popular culture within this context. In addition, the themes regarding the extinction of the world and collision of the planets envisaged by the talented students for the future world as well as the students’ visual repr

  14. Visualization rhetoric: framing effects in narrative visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hullman, Jessica; Diakopoulos, Nicholas

    2011-12-01

    Narrative visualizations combine conventions of communicative and exploratory information visualization to convey an intended story. We demonstrate visualization rhetoric as an analytical framework for understanding how design techniques that prioritize particular interpretations in visualizations that "tell a story" can significantly affect end-user interpretation. We draw a parallel between narrative visualization interpretation and evidence from framing studies in political messaging, decision-making, and literary studies. Devices for understanding the rhetorical nature of narrative information visualizations are presented, informed by the rigorous application of concepts from critical theory, semiotics, journalism, and political theory. We draw attention to how design tactics represent additions or omissions of information at various levels-the data, visual representation, textual annotations, and interactivity-and how visualizations denote and connote phenomena with reference to unstated viewing conventions and codes. Classes of rhetorical techniques identified via a systematic analysis of recent narrative visualizations are presented, and characterized according to their rhetorical contribution to the visualization. We describe how designers and researchers can benefit from the potentially positive aspects of visualization rhetoric in designing engaging, layered narrative visualizations and how our framework can shed light on how a visualization design prioritizes specific interpretations. We identify areas where future inquiry into visualization rhetoric can improve understanding of visualization interpretation. PMID:22034342

  15. Tree-inspired piezoelectric energy harvesting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobbs, William B.; Hu, David L.

    2012-01-01

    We design and test micro-watt energy-harvesters inspired by tree trunks swaying in the wind. A uniform flow vibrates a linear array of four cylinders affixed to piezoelectric energy transducers. Particular attention is paid to measuring the energy generated as a function of cylinder spacing, flow speed, and relative position of the cylinder within the array. Peak power is generated using cylinder center-to-center spacings of 3.3 diameters and flow speeds in which the vortex shedding frequency is 1.6 times the natural frequency of the cylinders. Using these flow speeds and spacings, the power generated by downstream cylinders can exceed that of leading cylinders by more than an order of magnitude. We visualize the flow in this system by studying the behavior of a dynamically matched flowing soap film with imbedded styrofoam disks. Our qualitative visualizations suggest that peak energy harvesting occurs under conditions in which vortices have fully detached from the leading cylinder.

  16. Inspire a generation

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Depuis le début du processus de candidature en 2003, Londres 2012 s’attache à démontrer ce qui peut être réalisé grâce à l’inspiration que suscite le sport, à l’héritage qu’il nous lègue, et au rôle de catalyseur des Mouvements olympiques et paralympiques qui, par leur pouvoir, leur influence et leurs valeurs, peuvent apporter à la jeunesse du monde entier des changements positifs et l’envie d’agir. Aujourd’hui, après des années de planification et de préparatifs...

  17. You shall know an object by the company it keeps: An investigation of semantic representations derived from object co-occurrence in visual scenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Zahra; McClelland, James L; Hoffman, Paul

    2014-09-01

    An influential position in lexical semantics holds that semantic representations for words can be derived through analysis of patterns of lexical co-occurrence in large language corpora. Firth (1957) famously summarised this principle as "you shall know a word by the company it keeps". We explored whether the same principle could be applied to non-verbal patterns of object co-occurrence in natural scenes. We performed latent semantic analysis (LSA) on a set of photographed scenes in which all of the objects present had been manually labelled. This resulted in a representation of objects in a high-dimensional space in which similarity between two objects indicated the degree to which they appeared in similar scenes. These representations revealed similarities among objects belonging to the same taxonomic category (e.g., items of clothing) as well as cross-category associations (e.g., between fruits and kitchen utensils). We also compared representations generated from this scene dataset with two established methods for elucidating semantic representations: (a) a published database of semantic features generated verbally by participants and (b) LSA applied to a linguistic corpus in the usual fashion. Statistical comparisons of the three methods indicated significant association between the structures revealed by each method, with the scene dataset displaying greater convergence with feature-based representations than did LSA applied to linguistic data. The results indicate that information about the conceptual significance of objects can be extracted from their patterns of co-occurrence in natural environments, opening the possibility for such data to be incorporated into existing models of conceptual representation. PMID:25196838

  18. When science inspires art

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Vernède

    2011-01-01

    On Tuesday 18 January 2011, artist Pipilotti Rist came to CERN to find out how science could provide her with a source of inspiration for her art and perhaps to get ideas for future work. Pipilotti, who is an eclectic artist always on the lookout for an original source of inspiration, is almost as passionate about physics as she is about art.   Ever Is Over All, 1997, audio video installation by Pipilotti Rist.  View of the installation at the National Museum for Foreign Art, Sofia, Bulgaria. © Pipilotti Rist. Courtesy the artist and Hauser & Wirth. Photo by Angel Tzvetanov. Swiss video-maker Pipilotti Rist (her real name is Elisabeth Charlotte Rist), who is well-known in the international art world for her highly colourful videos and creations, visited CERN for the first time on Tuesday 18 January 2011.  Her visit represented a trip down memory lane, since she originally studied physics before becoming interested in pursuing a career as an artist and going on to de...

  19. Visualization analysis and design

    CERN Document Server

    Munzner, Tamara

    2015-01-01

    Visualization Analysis and Design provides a systematic, comprehensive framework for thinking about visualization in terms of principles and design choices. The book features a unified approach encompassing information visualization techniques for abstract data, scientific visualization techniques for spatial data, and visual analytics techniques for interweaving data transformation and analysis with interactive visual exploration. It emphasizes the careful validation of effectiveness and the consideration of function before form. The book breaks down visualization design according to three questions: what data users need to see, why users need to carry out their tasks, and how the visual representations proposed can be constructed and manipulated. It walks readers through the use of space and color to visually encode data in a view, the trade-offs between changing a single view and using multiple linked views, and the ways to reduce the amount of data shown in each view. The book concludes with six case stu...

  20. Biologically-Inspired Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leske, Cavin.

    A Web site from Michigan State University (1) is a useful starting point for learning about biologically inspired technologies. In addition to briefly discussing the natural processes that are most commonly studied in the development of such technologies, there is a large collection of links to other research efforts and related material. The Ant Colony Optimization project (2) uses the behavior of ants as a model to solve optimization problems, such as how to minimize Internet traffic congestion. Several downloadable research papers are included on the project's homepage, as well as links to news stories, radio broadcasts, and conference proceedings about ant algorithms. A seminar course at the University of Virginia (3) in spring 2003 considered aspects of biologically-inspired computing. The course homepage has links to journal articles and research papers that range in topic from evolutionary programming to spacecraft designs based on living cells. Biomimetics is the focus of work being done at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (4). One of the selected publications available on the Web site will be presented at an international conference in July 2003. The paper discusses the use of artificial muscles in intelligent robots. A research group at the California Institute of Technology (5) is studying the capability of DNA and other biomolecules to process information and implement algorithms. A general overview of the group's purpose and motivation is provided, as well as a number of publications. An excellent background of some of the most significant developments in artificial life and intelligence is given in a 56-page paper from Hewlett-Packard Laboratories (6). The author discusses many different issues, including neural networks and software agents, and concludes by alluding to future application areas. Cutting edge, biologically-inspired robots are the topic of a June 2003 news article from The Boston Globe (7). These robots include RoboLobster and BigDog, the latter of which is said will be able to run at fifteen miles per hour when it is finished around the beginning of 2005. Finally, a NASA technology brief from May 2003 (8) discusses efforts to combine characteristics of several different species into one artificial creation to optimally serve the purposes of a mission.

  1. A Biologically Inspired Classifier

    CERN Document Server

    Bagnoli, Franco

    2007-01-01

    We present a method for measuring the distance among records based on the correlations of data stored in the corresponding database entries. The original method (F. Bagnoli, A. Berrones and F. Franci. Physica A 332 (2004) 509-518) was formulated in the context of opinion formation. The opinions expressed over a set of topic originate a ``knowledge network'' among individuals, where two individuals are nearer the more similar their expressed opinions are. Assuming that individuals' opinions are stored in a database, the authors show that it is possible to anticipate an opinion using the correlations in the database. This corresponds to approximating the overlap between the tastes of two individuals with the correlations of their expressed opinions. In this paper we extend this model to nonlinear matching functions, inspired by biological problems such as microarray (probe-sample pairing). We investigate numerically the error between the correlation and the overlap matrix for eight sequences of reference with r...

  2. Meaning-focused and Quantum-inspired Information Retrieval

    OpenAIRE

    Aerts, Diederik; Broekaert, Jan; Sozzo, Sandro; Veloz, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, quantum-based methods have promisingly integrated the traditional procedures in information retrieval (IR) and natural language processing (NLP). Inspired by our research on the identification and application of quantum structures in cognition, more specifically our work on the representation of concepts and their combinations, we put forward a 'quantum meaning based' framework for structured query retrieval in text corpora and standardized testing corpora. ...

  3. Trianguline representations

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Trianguline representations are a certain class of p-adic representations of Gal(Qp^alg/Qp) like the crystalline, semistable and de Rham representations of Fontaine. Their definition involves the theory of (phi,Gamma)-modules. In this survey, we explain the theory of (phi,Gamma)-modules and the definition and properties of trianguline representations. After that, we give some examples of their occurrence in arithmetic geometry.

  4. Knowledge Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Birukou, Mikalai

    2002-01-01

    This work analyses main features that should be present in knowledge representation. It suggests a model for representation and a way to implement this model in software. Representation takes care of both low-level sensor information and high-level concepts.

  5. Biologically inspired emotion recognition from speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caponetti, Laura; Buscicchio, Cosimo Alessandro; Castellano, Giovanna

    2011-12-01

    Emotion recognition has become a fundamental task in human-computer interaction systems. In this article, we propose an emotion recognition approach based on biologically inspired methods. Specifically, emotion classification is performed using a long short-term memory (LSTM) recurrent neural network which is able to recognize long-range dependencies between successive temporal patterns. We propose to represent data using features derived from two different models: mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC) and the Lyon cochlear model. In the experimental phase, results obtained from the LSTM network and the two different feature sets are compared, showing that features derived from the Lyon cochlear model give better recognition results in comparison with those obtained with the traditional MFCC representation.

  6. Biologically inspired emotion recognition from speech

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buscicchio Cosimo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Emotion recognition has become a fundamental task in human-computer interaction systems. In this article, we propose an emotion recognition approach based on biologically inspired methods. Specifically, emotion classification is performed using a long short-term memory (LSTM recurrent neural network which is able to recognize long-range dependencies between successive temporal patterns. We propose to represent data using features derived from two different models: mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC and the Lyon cochlear model. In the experimental phase, results obtained from the LSTM network and the two different feature sets are compared, showing that features derived from the Lyon cochlear model give better recognition results in comparison with those obtained with the traditional MFCC representation.

  7. Immuno-inspired robotic applications: a review

    CERN Document Server

    Raza, Ali

    2012-01-01

    Artificial immune systems primarily mimic the adaptive nature of biological immune functions. Their ability to adapt to varying pathogens makes such systems a suitable choice for various robotic applications. Generally, AIS-based robotic applications map local instantaneous sensory information into either an antigen or a co-stimulatory signal, according to the choice of representation schema. Algorithms then use relevant immune functions to output either evolved antibodies or maturity of dendritic cells, in terms of actuation signals. It is observed that researchers, in an attempt to solve the problem in hand, do not try to replicate the biological immunity but select necessary immune functions instead, resulting in an ad-hoc manner these applications are reported. Authors, therefore, present a comprehensive review of immuno-inspired robotic applications in an attempt to categorize them according to underlying immune definitions. Implementation details are tabulated in terms of corresponding mathematical expr...

  8. Action Representation and Recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Weinland, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Recognizing human actions is an important and challenging topic in computer vision, withmany important applications including video surveillance, video indexing and understanding of social interaction. From a computational perspective, actions can be defined as four-dimensional patterns, in space and in time. Such patterns can be modeled using several representations which differ from each other with respect to, among others, the visual information used, e.g. shape or appearance, the represen...

  9. Combining Bio-inspired Sensing with Bio-inspired Locomotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaikh, Danish; Hallam, John

    In this paper we present a preliminary Braitenberg vehicle–like approach to combine bio-inspired audition with bio-inspired quadruped locomotion in simulation. Locomotion gaits of the salamander–like robot Salamandra robotica are modified by a lizard’s peripheral auditory system model that modulates the parameters of the locomotor central pattern generators. We present phonotactic performance results of the simulated lizard-salamander hybrid robot.

  10. Inspired by CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Art students inspired by CERN will be returning to show their work 9 to 16 October in Building 500, outside the Auditorium. Seventeen art students from around Europe visited CERN last January for a week of introductions to particle physics and astrophysics, and discussions with CERN scientists about their projects. A CERN scientist "adopted"each artist so they could ask questions during and after the visit. Now the seeds planted during their visit have come to fruition in a show using many media and exploring varied concepts, such as how people experience the online world, the sheer scale of CERN's equipment, and the abstractness of the entities scientists are looking for. "The work is so varied, people are going to love some pieces and detest others," says Andrew Charalambous, the project coordinator from University College London who is also curating the exhibition. "It's contemporary modern art, and that's sometimes difficult to take in." For more information on this thought-provoking show, see: htt...

  11. War Isn’t Hell, It’s Entertainment:  : Essays on Visual Media and the Representation of Conflict

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schubart, Rikke

    2009-01-01

    The interdisciplinary anthology War Isn’t Hell, It’s Entertainment analyses the relationship between war and the military on the one hand, and, on the other hand, entertainment, fiction, visual media, and cultural products. It examines war and film stars; war and films; war memorials; war and propaganda; war and the internet; war and computer games redigeret med Fabian Virchow, Tanja Thomas, Debra White-Stanley

  12. Scientific visualization uncertainty, multifield, biomedical, and scalable visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Chen, Min; Johnson, Christopher; Kaufman, Arie; Hagen, Hans

    2014-01-01

    Based on the seminar that took place in Dagstuhl, Germany in June 2011, this contributed volume studies the four important topics within the scientific visualization field: uncertainty visualization, multifield visualization, biomedical visualization and scalable visualization. • Uncertainty visualization deals with uncertain data from simulations or sampled data, uncertainty due to the mathematical processes operating on the data, and uncertainty in the visual representation, • Multifield visualization addresses the need to depict multiple data at individual locations and the combination of multiple datasets, • Biomedical is a vast field with select subtopics addressed from scanning methodologies to structural applications to biological applications, • Scalability in scientific visualization is critical as data grows and computational devices range from hand-held mobile devices to exascale computational platforms. Scientific Visualization will be useful to practitioners of scientific visualization, ...

  13. Inspiring Student Self-Motivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia Brackett

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available While normally appreciative of the invitation to join colleagues in a discussion of pedagogy and what “works” in the classroom, I have in most instances reluctantly participated in discussion of student motivation. I dip my toe into this philosophical quagmire only if permitted license to substitute the phrase student inspiration in place of student motivation. I also find it helpful to turn the rhetorical tables, as it were, and consider self-motivation on the part of students. The concept of individuals who hold some sense of self that a classroom mentor may nurture through student inspiration is one in which I place a modicum of trust. To “inspire” is literally to “breathe in,” to actively pull sustenance from a proffered external source. Active student determination based on some sense of self may couple with instructor inspiration to promote academic success.

  14. Brain-inspired Stochastic Models and Implementations

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shedivat, Maruan

    2015-05-12

    One of the approaches to building artificial intelligence (AI) is to decipher the princi- ples of the brain function and to employ similar mechanisms for solving cognitive tasks, such as visual perception or natural language understanding, using machines. The recent breakthrough, named deep learning, demonstrated that large multi-layer networks of arti- ficial neural-like computing units attain remarkable performance on some of these tasks. Nevertheless, such artificial networks remain to be very loosely inspired by the brain, which rich structures and mechanisms may further suggest new algorithms or even new paradigms of computation. In this thesis, we explore brain-inspired probabilistic mechanisms, such as neural and synaptic stochasticity, in the context of generative models. The two questions we ask here are: (i) what kind of models can describe a neural learning system built of stochastic components? and (ii) how can we implement such systems e ?ciently? To give specific answers, we consider two well known models and the corresponding neural architectures: the Naive Bayes model implemented with a winner-take-all spiking neural network and the Boltzmann machine implemented in a spiking or non-spiking fashion. We propose and analyze an e ?cient neuromorphic implementation of the stochastic neu- ral firing mechanism and study the e ?ects of synaptic unreliability on learning generative energy-based models implemented with neural networks.

  15. Nature-inspired optimization algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xin-She

    2014-01-01

    Nature-Inspired Optimization Algorithms provides a systematic introduction to all major nature-inspired algorithms for optimization. The book's unified approach, balancing algorithm introduction, theoretical background and practical implementation, complements extensive literature with well-chosen case studies to illustrate how these algorithms work. Topics include particle swarm optimization, ant and bee algorithms, simulated annealing, cuckoo search, firefly algorithm, bat algorithm, flower algorithm, harmony search, algorithm analysis, constraint handling, hybrid methods, parameter tuning

  16. Tactile mental body parts representation in obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarpina, Federica; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Molinari, Enrico

    2014-12-30

    Obese people?s distortions in visually-based mental body-parts representations have been reported in previous studies, but other sensory modalities have largely been neglected. In the present study, we investigated possible differences in tactilely-based body-parts representation between an obese and a healthy-weight group; additionally we explore the possible relationship between the tactile- and the visually-based body representation. Participants were asked to estimate the distance between two tactile stimuli that were simultaneously administered on the arm or on the abdomen, in the absence of visual input. The visually-based body-parts representation was investigated by a visual imagery method in which subjects were instructed to compare the horizontal extension of body part pairs. According to the results, the obese participants overestimated the size of the tactilely-perceived distances more than the healthy-weight group when the arm, and not the abdomen, was stimulated. Moreover, they reported a lower level of accuracy than did the healthy-weight group when estimating horizontal distances relative to their bodies, confirming an inappropriate visually-based mental body representation. Our results imply that body representation disturbance in obese people is not limited to the visual mental domain, but it spreads to the tactilely perceived distances. The inaccuracy was not a generalized tendency but was body-part related. PMID:25312390

  17. The Molecule Cloud - compact visualization of large collections of molecules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertl Peter

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Analysis and visualization of large collections of molecules is one of the most frequent challenges cheminformatics experts in pharmaceutical industry are facing. Various sophisticated methods are available to perform this task, including clustering, dimensionality reduction or scaffold frequency analysis. In any case, however, viewing and analyzing large tables with molecular structures is necessary. We present a new visualization technique, providing basic information about the composition of molecular data sets at a single glance. Summary A method is presented here allowing visual representation of the most common structural features of chemical databases in a form of a cloud diagram. The frequency of molecules containing particular substructure is indicated by the size of respective structural image. The method is useful to quickly perceive the most prominent structural features present in the data set. This approach was inspired by popular word cloud diagrams that are used to visualize textual information in a compact form. Therefore we call this approach “Molecule Cloud”. The method also supports visualization of additional information, for example biological activity of molecules containing this scaffold or the protein target class typical for particular scaffolds, by color coding. Detailed description of the algorithm is provided, allowing easy implementation of the method by any cheminformatics toolkit. The layout algorithm is available as open source Java code. Conclusions Visualization of large molecular data sets using the Molecule Cloud approach allows scientists to get information about the composition of molecular databases and their most frequent structural features easily. The method may be used in the areas where analysis of large molecular collections is needed, for example processing of high throughput screening results, virtual screening or compound purchasing. Several example visualizations of large data sets, including PubChem, ChEMBL and ZINC databases using the Molecule Cloud diagrams are provided.

  18. Inspiration, anyone? (Editorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay Glynn

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available I have to admit that writing an editorial for this issue was a struggle. Trying to sit down and write when the sun was shining outside and most of my colleagues were on vacation was, to say the least, difficult. Add to that research projects and conferences…let’s just say that I found myself less than inspired. A pitiful plea for ideas to a colleague resulted in the reintroduction to a few recent evidence based papers and resources which inspired further searching and reading. Though I generally find myself surrounded (more like buried in research papers and EBLIP literature, somehow I had missed the great strides that have been made of late in the world of evidence based library and information practice. I realize now that I am inspired by the researchers, authors and innovators who are putting EBLIP on the proverbial map. My biggest beef with library literature in general has been the plethora of articles highlighting what we should be doing. Take a close look at the evidence based practitioners in the information professions: these are some of the people who are actively practicing what has been preached for the past few years. Take, for example, the about?to?be released Libraries using Evidence Toolkit by Northern Sydney Central Coast Health and The University of Newcastle, Australia (see their announcement in this issue. An impressive advisory group is responsible for maintaining the currency and relevancy of the site as well as promoting the site and acting as a steering committee for related projects. This group is certainly doing more than “talking the talk”: they took their experience at the 3rd International Evidence Based Librarianship Conference and did something with the information they obtained by implementing solutions that worked in their environment. The result? The creation of a collection of tools for all of us to use. This toolkit is just what EBLIP needs: a portal to resources aimed at supporting the information specialists who want to adopt the evidence based model of practice. I have already got it bookmarked and set up an RSS feed. Even before the official toolkit launch, a wealth of information is available on the website including presentations, project and events information, and a blog containing site updates. There has been much discussion on increasing the knowledge base from which to draw evidence for library and information practitioners. Original research needs to be published so that we can use it as evidence to support our decision making. The literature is lacking the significant numbers of publication types widely considered to be the highest level of evidence: systematic reviews, meta?analyses and randomized controlled trials. This issue of Evidence Based Library and Information Practice proudly boasts both a systematic review/meta?analysis and a randomized controlled trial. Denise Koufogiannakis and Natasha Wiebe, in their systematic review/meta?analysis, provide evidence that shows that computer assisted instruction is as effective as traditional instruction for students at an introductory, undergraduate level. Nicola Pearce?Smith compared the effectiveness of self?directed, web?based learning with a classroom?based, interactive workshop in her randomized controlled trial. I am looking forward to reading and utilizing more and more of these in the future. Another example is even closer to home. I recently attended a strategic planning meeting at my institution where new services and procedures were discussed. Unlike the past, when new initiatives were implemented and later evaluated, all librarians instinctively indicated that the literature should be searched first to see if there was any evidence either for or against changing or adding new services or procedures. The evidence based model of practice is catching on. I know that there are numerous examples of information practitioners taking a proactive role in putting research into practice, and many research papers that are worth mentioning. To highlight them all would be a task muc

  19. Finite representations of a quiver arising from string theory

    CERN Document Server

    Zhu, X

    2005-01-01

    Inspired by Cachazo, Katz and Vafa (``Geometric transitions and $\\mathcal {N}=1$ quiver theories'' (hep-th/0108120)), we examine representations of ``${N}=1$ quivers'' arising from string theory. We derive some mathematical consequences of the physics, and show that these results are a natural extension of Gabriel's ADE theorem. Extending the usual ADE case that relates quiver representations to curves on surfaces, we relate these new quiver representations to curves on threefolds.

  20. Finite representations of a quiver arising from string theory

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Xinyun

    2005-01-01

    Inspired by Cachazo, Katz and Vafa (``Geometric transitions and $\\mathcal {N}=1$ quiver theories'' (hep-th/0108120)), we examine representations of ``${N}=1$ quivers'' arising from string theory. We derive some mathematical consequences of the physics, and show that these results are a natural extension of Gabriel's ADE theorem. Extending the usual ADE case that relates quiver representations to curves on surfaces, we relate these new quiver representations to curves on thre...

  1. UNIVERSO REPRESENTACIONAL DEL ARTE RUPESTRE DEL SITIO LOS MELLIZOS (PROVINCIA DEL CHOAPA:: CONVENCIONES VISUALES Y RELACIONES CULTURALES REPRESENTATIONAL UNIVERSE OF LOS MELLIZOS ROCK ART SITE (CHOAPA PROVINCE:: VISUAL CONVENTIONS AND CULTURAL RELATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola González Carvajal

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Este trabajo examina nuevos caminos metodológicos para el estudio de la iconografía del arte rupestre del sitio Los Mellizos. En particular, se emplean los principios geométricos de la simetría en la descripción y la comprensión de este arte visual. Luego se clasifican sus formas y estructuras subyacentes. Al mismo tiempo, la estructura del diseño ha demostrado ser un atributo sensible a problemas relacionados con la identidad de grupo y los procesos de intercambio e interacción. Para abordar este último aspecto, un segundo esfuerzo fue realizado al comparar los patrones decorativos de Los Mellizos con patrones decorativos de la decoración cerámica de culturas prehispánicas presentes en la región. Como resultado de este ejercicio identificamos una fuerte presencia de iconografía Inka o Diaguita-Inka, así como otras influencias culturales.This paper examines new methodological approaches to the systematic study of Los Mellizos rock art iconography. In particular, we use the geometrical principles of symmetry to describe and understand this visual art, then classify the forms and underlying structures. At the same time, the structure of the design has been shown to be sensitive to issues of group identity, exchange and interaction. Therefore, a secondary effort compares Los Mellizos decorative patterns with ceramic decorative patterns of the pre-Hispanic cultures present in the region. As a result of this exercise, we identified the strong presence of Inka and Diaguita-Inka visual patterns and other cultural influences.

  2. UNIVERSO REPRESENTACIONAL DEL ARTE RUPESTRE DEL SITIO LOS MELLIZOS (PROVINCIA DEL CHOAPA):: CONVENCIONES VISUALES Y RELACIONES CULTURALES / REPRESENTATIONAL UNIVERSE OF LOS MELLIZOS ROCK ART SITE (CHOAPA PROVINCE):: VISUAL CONVENTIONS AND CULTURAL RELATIONS

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Paola, González Carvajal.

    Full Text Available Este trabajo examina nuevos caminos metodológicos para el estudio de la iconografía del arte rupestre del sitio Los Mellizos. En particular, se emplean los principios geométricos de la simetría en la descripción y la comprensión de este arte visual. Luego se clasifican sus formas y estructuras subya [...] centes. Al mismo tiempo, la estructura del diseño ha demostrado ser un atributo sensible a problemas relacionados con la identidad de grupo y los procesos de intercambio e interacción. Para abordar este último aspecto, un segundo esfuerzo fue realizado al comparar los patrones decorativos de Los Mellizos con patrones decorativos de la decoración cerámica de culturas prehispánicas presentes en la región. Como resultado de este ejercicio identificamos una fuerte presencia de iconografía Inka o Diaguita-Inka, así como otras influencias culturales. Abstract in english This paper examines new methodological approaches to the systematic study of Los Mellizos rock art iconography. In particular, we use the geometrical principles of symmetry to describe and understand this visual art, then classify the forms and underlying structures. At the same time, the structure [...] of the design has been shown to be sensitive to issues of group identity, exchange and interaction. Therefore, a secondary effort compares Los Mellizos decorative patterns with ceramic decorative patterns of the pre-Hispanic cultures present in the region. As a result of this exercise, we identified the strong presence of Inka and Diaguita-Inka visual patterns and other cultural influences.

  3. Physicists Get INSPIREd: INSPIRE Project and Grid Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klem, Jukka; Iwaszkiewicz, Jan

    2011-12-01

    INSPIRE is the new high-energy physics scientific information system developed by CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. INSPIRE combines the curated and trusted contents of SPIRES database with Invenio digital library technology. INSPIRE contains the entire HEP literature with about one million records and in addition to becoming the reference HEP scientific information platform, it aims to provide new kinds of data mining services and metrics to assess the impact of articles and authors. Grid and cloud computing provide new opportunities to offer better services in areas that require large CPU and storage resources including document Optical Character Recognition (OCR) processing, full-text indexing of articles and improved metrics. D4Science-II is a European project that develops and operates an e-Infrastructure supporting Virtual Research Environments (VREs). It develops an enabling technology (gCube) which implements a mechanism for facilitating the interoperation of its e-Infrastructure with other autonomously running data e-Infrastructures. As a result, this creates the core of an e-Infrastructure ecosystem. INSPIRE is one of the e-Infrastructures participating in D4Science-II project. In the context of the D4Science-II project, the INSPIRE e-Infrastructure makes available some of its resources and services to other members of the resulting ecosystem. Moreover, it benefits from the ecosystem via a dedicated Virtual Organization giving access to an array of resources ranging from computing and storage resources of grid infrastructures to data and services.

  4. Covariance Descriptor based on Bio-inspired Features for Person Re-identification and Face Verification

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Bingpeng; Su, Yu; Jurie, Frederic

    2014-01-01

    Avoiding the use of complicated pre-processing steps such as accurate face and body part segmentation or image normalization, this paper proposes a novel face/person image representation which can properly handle background and illumination variations. Denoted as gBiCov, this representation relies on the combination of Biologically Inspired Features (BIF) and Covariance descriptors. More precisely, gBiCov is obtained by computing and encoding the difference between BIF features at different s...

  5. Hyperspectral imagery super-resolution by compressive sensing inspired dictionary learning and spatial-spectral regularization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wei; Xiao, Liang; Liu, Hongyi; Wei, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Due to the instrumental and imaging optics limitations, it is difficult to acquire high spatial resolution hyperspectral imagery (HSI). Super-resolution (SR) imagery aims at inferring high quality images of a given scene from degraded versions of the same scene. This paper proposes a novel hyperspectral imagery super-resolution (HSI-SR) method via dictionary learning and spatial-spectral regularization. The main contributions of this paper are twofold. First, inspired by the compressive sensing (CS) framework, for learning the high resolution dictionary, we encourage stronger sparsity on image patches and promote smaller coherence between the learned dictionary and sensing matrix. Thus, a sparsity and incoherence restricted dictionary learning method is proposed to achieve higher efficiency sparse representation. Second, a variational regularization model combing a spatial sparsity regularization term and a new local spectral similarity preserving term is proposed to integrate the spectral and spatial-contextual information of the HSI. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively recover spatial information and better preserve spectral information. The high spatial resolution HSI reconstructed by the proposed method outperforms reconstructed results by other well-known methods in terms of both objective measurements and visual evaluation. PMID:25608212

  6. Ventral-stream-like shape representation: from pixel intensity values to trainable object-selective COSFIRE models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Azzopardi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The remarkable abilities of the primate visual cortex have inspired the construction of computational models of some visual neurons. We propose a trainable hierarchical object recognition model, which we call S-COSFIRE (S stands for Shape and COSFIRE stands for Combination Of Shifted FIlter REsponses and use it to localize and recognize objects of interests embedded in complex scenes. It is inspired by the visual processing in the ventral stream (V1/V2 -> V4 -> TEO. Recognition and localization of objects embedded in complex scenes is important for many computer vision applications. Most existing methods require prior segmentation of the objects from the background which on its turn requires recognition. A S-COSFIRE filter is automatically configured to be selective for an arrangement of contour-based features that belong to a prototype shape specified by an example. The configuration comprises selecting relevant vertex detectors and determining certain blur and shift parameters. The response is computed as the weighted geometric mean of the blurred and shifted responses of the selected vertex detectors. S-COSFIRE filters share similar properties with some neurons in inferotemporal cortex, which provided inspiration for this work. We demonstrate the effectiveness of S-COSFIRE filters in two applications: letter and keyword spotting in handwritten manuscripts and object spotting in complex scenes for the computer vision system of a domestic robot. S-COSFIRE filters are effective to recognize and localize (deformable objects in images of complex scenes without requiring prior segmentation. They are versatile trainable shape detectors, conceptually simple and easy to implement. The presented hierarchical shape representation contributes to a better understanding of the brain and to more robust computer vision algorithms.

  7. Ventral-stream-like shape representation: from pixel intensity values to trainable object-selective COSFIRE models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azzopardi, George; Petkov, Nicolai

    2014-01-01

    The remarkable abilities of the primate visual system have inspired the construction of computational models of some visual neurons. We propose a trainable hierarchical object recognition model, which we call S-COSFIRE (S stands for Shape and COSFIRE stands for Combination Of Shifted FIlter REsponses) and use it to localize and recognize objects of interests embedded in complex scenes. It is inspired by the visual processing in the ventral stream (V1/V2 ? V4 ? TEO). Recognition and localization of objects embedded in complex scenes is important for many computer vision applications. Most existing methods require prior segmentation of the objects from the background which on its turn requires recognition. An S-COSFIRE filter is automatically configured to be selective for an arrangement of contour-based features that belong to a prototype shape specified by an example. The configuration comprises selecting relevant vertex detectors and determining certain blur and shift parameters. The response is computed as the weighted geometric mean of the blurred and shifted responses of the selected vertex detectors. S-COSFIRE filters share similar properties with some neurons in inferotemporal cortex, which provided inspiration for this work. We demonstrate the effectiveness of S-COSFIRE filters in two applications: letter and keyword spotting in handwritten manuscripts and object spotting in complex scenes for the computer vision system of a domestic robot. S-COSFIRE filters are effective to recognize and localize (deformable) objects in images of complex scenes without requiring prior segmentation. They are versatile trainable shape detectors, conceptually simple and easy to implement. The presented hierarchical shape representation contributes to a better understanding of the brain and to more robust computer vision algorithms. PMID:25126068

  8. ESQUEMAS VISUALES Y EMPLAZAMIENTO DE LAS REPRESENTACIONES RUPESTRES DE CAMÉLIDOS DEL LOA SUPERIOR EN TIEMPOS INCAICOS: ¿UNA NUEVA ESTRATEGIA DE INCORPORACIÓN DE ESTE TERRITORIO AL TAWANTINSUYU? / VISUAL OUTLINES AND LOCATION OF CAMELIDS REPRESENTATIONS OF THE UPPER LOA DURING THE INCA TIMES: A NEW STRATEGY OF THE TAWANTINSUYU TO INCORPORATE THIS TERRITORY?

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Marcela A., Sepúlveda R..

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los resultados obtenidos del estudio del arte rupestre adscrito al período Tardío (1.450- 1.540 d.C.), correspondiente a la presencia Inka en la región del Loa Superior. En particular, se analizan las representaciones de camélidos de varios sitios de la cuenca del río Salado, en compara [...] ción con algunas del Alto Loa. Este trabajo expone, por un lado, un análisis de las formas anatómicas representadas, definidas como esquemas visuales; y, por otro, algunas observaciones acerca de los emplazamientos de estas manifestaciones rupestres, ligados a distintas actividades de la vida cotidiana. Las características enunciadas para el arte rupestre del período Tardío sugieren una estrecha relación con la expansión incaica en la región. A modo de hipótesis, se amplía una de las interpretaciones anteriores planteadas en la cuenca del río Salado, que considera que el arte rupestre sería utilizado por el Inka como una estrategia de dominación e integración al Tawantinsuyu, ejercida de modo diferencial en el Loa Superior Abstract in english I present the results of study rock art dated to the Late period (1.450- 1.540 A.D.), which corresponds to the Inka presence in the upper Loa region. Particularly, I analized camelid representations from several sites of the Salado river basin and compared them with representation from the upper Loa [...] river. I present an analysis of anatomical forms defined as visual schemaes, along with observations about the location of the rock art, related to different activities of everyday life. The described characteristics of Late period rock art suggest a tight relation to the Inka expansion in the region. My hypothesis, expands on previous interpretations, for the Salado river basin, which consider that the rock art was used by the Inka as a strategy for domination and integration into Tawantinsuyu, carried out in a different fashion in the upper Loa basin

  9. ESQUEMAS VISUALES Y EMPLAZAMIENTO DE LAS REPRESENTACIONES RUPESTRES DE CAMÉLIDOS DEL LOA SUPERIOR EN TIEMPOS INCAICOS: ¿UNA NUEVA ESTRATEGIA DE INCORPORACIÓN DE ESTE TERRITORIO AL TAWANTINSUYU? VISUAL OUTLINES AND LOCATION OF CAMELIDS REPRESENTATIONS OF THE UPPER LOA DURING THE INCA TIMES: A NEW STRATEGY OF THE TAWANTINSUYU TO INCORPORATE THIS TERRITORY?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela A. Sepúlveda R.

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Se presentan los resultados obtenidos del estudio del arte rupestre adscrito al período Tardío (1.450- 1.540 d.C., correspondiente a la presencia Inka en la región del Loa Superior. En particular, se analizan las representaciones de camélidos de varios sitios de la cuenca del río Salado, en comparación con algunas del Alto Loa. Este trabajo expone, por un lado, un análisis de las formas anatómicas representadas, definidas como esquemas visuales; y, por otro, algunas observaciones acerca de los emplazamientos de estas manifestaciones rupestres, ligados a distintas actividades de la vida cotidiana. Las características enunciadas para el arte rupestre del período Tardío sugieren una estrecha relación con la expansión incaica en la región. A modo de hipótesis, se amplía una de las interpretaciones anteriores planteadas en la cuenca del río Salado, que considera que el arte rupestre sería utilizado por el Inka como una estrategia de dominación e integración al Tawantinsuyu, ejercida de modo diferencial en el Loa SuperiorI present the results of study rock art dated to the Late period (1.450- 1.540 A.D., which corresponds to the Inka presence in the upper Loa region. Particularly, I analized camelid representations from several sites of the Salado river basin and compared them with representation from the upper Loa river. I present an analysis of anatomical forms defined as visual schemaes, along with observations about the location of the rock art, related to different activities of everyday life. The described characteristics of Late period rock art suggest a tight relation to the Inka expansion in the region. My hypothesis, expands on previous interpretations, for the Salado river basin, which consider that the rock art was used by the Inka as a strategy for domination and integration into Tawantinsuyu, carried out in a different fashion in the upper Loa basin

  10. Digital models for architectonical representation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Brusaporci

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital instruments and technologies enrich architectonical representation and communication opportunities. Computer graphics is organized according the two phases of visualization and construction, that is modeling and rendering, structuring dichotomy of software technologies. Visualization modalities give different kinds of representations of the same 3D model and instruments produce a separation between drawing and image’s creation. Reverse modeling can be related to a synthesis process, ‘direct modeling’ follows an analytic procedure. The difference between interactive and not interactive applications is connected to the possibilities offered by informatics instruments, and relates to modeling and rendering. At the same time the word ‘model’ describes different phenomenon (i.e. files: mathematical model of the building and of the scene; raster representation and post-processing model. All these correlated different models constitute the architectonical interpretative model, that is a simulation of reality made by the model for improving the knowledge.

  11. Kinds of inspiration in interaction design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halskov, Kim

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we explore the role of sources of inspiration in interaction design. We identify four strategies for relating sources of inspiration to emerging ideas: selection; adaptation; translation; and combination. As our starting point, we argue that sources of inspiration are a form of knowledge crucial to creativity. Our research is based on empirical findings arising from the use of Inspiration Card Workshops, which are collaborative design events in which domain and technology insight are combined to create design concepts. In addition to the systematically introduced sources of inspiration that form part of the workshop format, a number of spontaneous sources of inspiration emerged during these workshops.

  12. Physicists Get INSPIREd: INSPIRE Project and Grid Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    INSPIRE is the new high-energy physics scientific information system developed by CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. INSPIRE combines the curated and trusted contents of SPIRES database with Invenio digital library technology. INSPIRE contains the entire HEP literature with about one million records and in addition to becoming the reference HEP scientific information platform, it aims to provide new kinds of data mining services and metrics to assess the impact of articles and authors. Grid and cloud computing provide new opportunities to offer better services in areas that require large CPU and storage resources including document Optical Character Recognition (OCR) processing, full-text indexing of articles and improved metrics. D4Science-II is a European project that develops and operates an e-Infrastructure supporting Virtual Research Environments (VREs). It develops an enabling technology (gCube) which implements a mechanism for facilitating the interoperation of its e-Infrastructure with other autonomously running data e-Infrastructures. As a result, this creates the core of an e-Infrastructure ecosystem. INSPIRE is one of the e-Infrastructures participating in D4Science-II project. In the context of the D4Science-II project, the INSPIRE e-Infrastructure makes available some of its resources and services to other members of the resulting ecosystem. Moreover, it benefits from the ecosystem via a dedicated Virtual Organization giving access to an array of resources ra giving access to an array of resources ranging from computing and storage resources of grid infrastructures to data and services.

  13. Deep generative learning of location-invariant visual word recognition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria GraziaDi Bono

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available It is widely believed that orthographic processing implies an approximate, flexible coding of letter position, as shown by relative-position and transposition priming effects in visual word recognition. These findings have inspired alternative proposals about the representation of letter position, ranging from noisy coding across the ordinal positions to relative position coding based on open bigrams. This debate can be cast within the broader problem of learning location-invariant representations of written words, that is, a coding scheme abstracting the identity and position of letters (and combinations of letters from their eye-centred (i.e., retinal locations. We asked whether location-invariance would emerge from deep unsupervised learning on letter strings and what type of intermediate coding would emerge in the resulting hierarchical generative model. We trained a deep network with three hidden layers on an artificial dataset of letter strings presented at five possible retinal locations. Though word-level information (i.e., word identity was never provided to the network during training, linear decoding from the activity of the deepest hidden layer yielded near-perfect accuracy in location-invariant word recognition. Conversely, decoding from lower layers yielded a large number of transposition errors. Analyses of emergent internal representations showed that word selectivity and location invariance increased as a function of layer depth. Conversely, there was no evidence for bigram coding. Finally, the distributed internal representation of words at the deepest layer showed higher similarity to the representation elicited by the two exterior letters than by other combinations of two contiguous letters, in agreement with the hypothesis that word edges have special status. These results reveal that the efficient coding of written words – which was the model’s learning objective – is largely based on letter-level information.

  14. Deep generative learning of location-invariant visual word recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bono, Maria Grazia; Zorzi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    It is widely believed that orthographic processing implies an approximate, flexible coding of letter position, as shown by relative-position and transposition priming effects in visual word recognition. These findings have inspired alternative proposals about the representation of letter position, ranging from noisy coding across the ordinal positions to relative position coding based on open bigrams. This debate can be cast within the broader problem of learning location-invariant representations of written words, that is, a coding scheme abstracting the identity and position of letters (and combinations of letters) from their eye-centered (i.e., retinal) locations. We asked whether location-invariance would emerge from deep unsupervised learning on letter strings and what type of intermediate coding would emerge in the resulting hierarchical generative model. We trained a deep network with three hidden layers on an artificial dataset of letter strings presented at five possible retinal locations. Though word-level information (i.e., word identity) was never provided to the network during training, linear decoding from the activity of the deepest hidden layer yielded near-perfect accuracy in location-invariant word recognition. Conversely, decoding from lower layers yielded a large number of transposition errors. Analyses of emergent internal representations showed that word selectivity and location invariance increased as a function of layer depth. Word-tuning and location-invariance were found at the level of single neurons, but there was no evidence for bigram coding. Finally, the distributed internal representation of words at the deepest layer showed higher similarity to the representation elicited by the two exterior letters than by other combinations of two contiguous letters, in agreement with the hypothesis that word edges have special status. These results reveal that the efficient coding of written words-which was the model's learning objective-is largely based on letter-level information. PMID:24065939

  15. Object representation and distance encoding in three-dimensional environments by a neural circuit in the visual system of the blowfly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Pei; Heitwerth, Jochen; Kern, Roland; Kurtz, Rafael; Egelhaaf, Martin

    2012-06-01

    Three motion-sensitive key elements of a neural circuit, presumably involved in processing object and distance information, were analyzed with optic flow sequences as experienced by blowflies in a three-dimensional environment. This optic flow is largely shaped by the blowfly's saccadic flight and gaze strategy, which separates translational flight segments from fast saccadic rotations. By modifying this naturalistic optic flow, all three analyzed neurons could be shown to respond during the intersaccadic intervals not only to nearby objects but also to changes in the distance to background structures. In the presence of strong background motion, the three types of neuron differ in their sensitivity for object motion. Object-induced response increments are largest in FD1, a neuron long known to respond better to moving objects than to spatially extended motion patterns, but weakest in VCH, a neuron that integrates wide-field motion from both eyes and, by inhibiting the FD1 cell, is responsible for its object preference. Small but significant object-induced response increments are present in HS cells, which serve both as a major input neuron of VCH and as output neurons of the visual system. In both HS and FD1, intersaccadic background responses decrease with increasing distance to the animal, although much more prominently in FD1. This strong dependence of FD1 on background distance is concluded to be the consequence of the activity of VCH that dramatically increases its activity and, thus, its inhibitory strength with increasing distance. PMID:22423002

  16. Visualization of Complex Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Viste, Magnhild

    2008-01-01

    Complex systems are difficult to understand. To aid understanding of complex dynamic systems the field of system dynamics has developed a set of visualization methods for graphic representation of the simulation models of complex systems. The resulting visualizations, however, may sometimes be difficult to understand for audiences without a background in the scientific investigation of complex dynamic systems. It is therefore necessary to find new ways of representing complex s...

  17. The matrix of inspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehlmann, Dietmar; Ohlmann, Odile M.; Danzebrink, Hans U.

    2005-04-01

    The research of Odile Meulien and Dietmar Ohlmann is about perceiving a multidimensional world. Not about the cyberspace created for new cinema creation, nor the reality which seems to be created by communication. It's the search for the reality we perceive, when the mind "touches" an object with its senses. In fact, it is a study of the surface of an object, which we can record in its visual appearing, its structure, shape and colors. When using photographic media, the tactile sense of the structure is missing, when using some other reproductive media; we experience somewhere a sensation of fault, something different. When using holography, we are able to record some three dimensional shape which has in fact a lot of parameter of a realistic copy. What is missing is the touch, the smell, the way we can go close and far, surround the object, relate the reflected light to its surrounding. The only interesting attribute of a hologram is for Dietmar Ohlmann its capacity to illustrate a continuum. He likes its changing diffractive character during daytime and surrounds lighting. For Odile Meulien the continuum of a hologram represents a new possible model for understanding wholeness in a social context. In fact, both are working on an educational process together, helping children and adults to find a new position of their own in harmony with living surrounding. Dietmar Ohlmann is working on his artistic side, while Odile Meulien works on educational programs experiencing the perspective of a curator and social analyst. New is the implication of using the latest of the techniques like the atomic force microscopy, which make possible to touch the holographic grating while the holographic image remains untouched. In other words it is the reverse of the usual approach of objects which at first we touch to investigate further. Their difference in experiencing and perceiving scientific and technical approach brings a lot of paradigm in their discussion. Together they will perform this exchange, as a matrix, understood as source, of new ideas.

  18. Inspiration fra NY-times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejersbo, Lisser Rye

    NY-times har en ugentlig klumme med gode råd. For nogle uger siden var ugens inspiration henvendt til lærere/undervisere og drejede sig om, hvordan man skaber taletid til alle uden at have favoritter og overse de mere stille elever.

  19. Social insects inspire human design

    OpenAIRE

    Holbrook, C. Tate; Clark, Rebecca M.; Moore, Dani; Overson, Rick P.; Penick, Clint A.; Smith, Adrian A.

    2010-01-01

    The international conference ‘Social Biomimicry: Insect Societies and Human Design’, hosted by Arizona State University, USA, 18–20 February 2010, explored how the collective behaviour and nest architecture of social insects can inspire innovative and effective solutions to human design challenges. It brought together biologists, designers, engineers, computer scientists, architects and businesspeople, with the dual aims of enriching biology and advancing biomimetic design.

  20. Novel locomotion via biological inspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Roger D.; Boxerbaum, Alexander; Palmer, Luther; Chiel, Hillel; Diller, Eric; Hunt, Alexander; Bachmann, Richard

    2011-05-01

    Animal behavioral, physiological and neurobiological studies are providing a wealth of inspirational data for robot design and control. Several very different biologically inspired mobile robots will be reviewed. A robot called DIGbot is being developed that moves independent of the direction of gravity using Distributed Inward Gripping (DIG) as a rapid and robust attachment mechanism observed in climbing animals. DIGbot is an 18 degree of freedom hexapod with onboard power and control systems. Passive compliance in its feet, which is inspired by the flexible tarsus of the cockroach, increases the robustness of the adhesion strategy and enables DIGbot to execute large steps and stationary turns while walking on mesh screens. A Whegs™ robot, inspired by insect locomotion principles, is being developed that can be rapidly reconfigured between tracks and wheel-legs and carry GeoSystems Zipper Mast. The mechanisms that cause it to passively change its gait on irregular terrain have been integrated into its hubs for a compact and modular design. The robot is designed to move smoothly on moderately rugged terrain using its tracks and run on irregular terrain and stairs using its wheel-legs. We are also developing soft bodied robots that use peristalsis, the same method of locomotion earthworms use. We present a technique of using a braided mesh exterior to produce fluid waves of motion along the body of the robot that increase the robot's speed relative to previous designs. The concept is highly scalable, for endoscopes to water, oil or gas line inspection.

  1. Supporting Polyrepresentation in a Quantum-inspired geometrical Retrieval Framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frommholz, Ingo; Larsen, Birger

    2010-01-01

    The relevance of a document has many facets, going beyond the usual topical one, which have to be considered to satisfy a user's information need. Multiple representations of documents, like user-given reviews or the actual document content, can give evidence towards certain facets of relevance. In this respect polyrepresentation of documents, where such evidence is combined, is a crucial concept to estimate the relevance of a document. In this paper, we discuss how a geometrical retrieval framework inspired by quantum mechanics can be extended to support polyrepresentation. We show by example how different representations of a document can be modelled in a Hilbert space, similar to physical systems known from quantum mechanics. We further illustrate how these representations are combined by means of the tensor product to support polyrepresentation, and discuss the case that representations of documents are not independent from a user point of view. Besides giving a principled framework for polyrepresentation, the potential of this approach is to capture and formalise the complex interdependent relationships that the different representations can have between each other.

  2. Guard Cell and Tropomyosin Inspired Chemical Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Nagel, Jacquelyn K. S.

    2013-01-01

    Sensors are an integral part of many engineered products and systems. Biological inspiration has the potential to improve current sensor designs as well as inspire innovative ones. This paper presents the design of an innovative, biologically-inspired chemical sensor that performs “up-front” processing through mechanical means. Inspiration from the physiology (function) of the guard cell coupled with the morphology (form) and physiology of tropomyosin resulted in two concept variants for ...

  3. A Tony Thomas-Inspired Guide to INSPIRE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Connell, Heath B.; /Fermilab

    2010-04-01

    The SPIRES database was created in the late 1960s to catalogue the high energy physics preprints received by the SLAC Library. In the early 1990s it became the first database on the web and the first website outside of Europe. Although indispensible to the HEP community, its aging software infrastructure is becoming a serious liability. In a joint project involving CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, a new database, INSPIRE, is being created to replace SPIRES using CERN's modern, open-source Invenio database software. INSPIRE will maintain the content and functionality of SPIRES plus many new features. I describe this evolution from the birth of SPIRES to the current day, noting that the career of Tony Thomas spans this timeline.

  4. Visual Recognition Memory across Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Emily J. H.; Pascalis, Olivier; Eacott, Madeline J.; Herbert, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated the development of representational flexibility in visual recognition memory during infancy using the Visual Paired Comparison (VPC) task. In Experiment 1, 6- and 9-month-old infants exhibited recognition when familiarization and test occurred in the same room, but showed no evidence of recognition when…

  5. Visual Mining of Epidemic Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Clémençon, Stéphan; Rossi, Fabrice; Tran, Viet Chi; 10.1007/978-3-642-21498-1_35

    2012-01-01

    We show how an interactive graph visualization method based on maximal modularity clustering can be used to explore a large epidemic network. The visual representation is used to display statistical tests results that expose the relations between the propagation of HIV in a sexual contact network and the sexual orientation of the patients.

  6. E6 inspired composite Higgs model

    CERN Document Server

    Nevzorov, R

    2015-01-01

    We consider a composite Higgs model embedded into a Grand Unified Theory(GUT) based on the E_6 gauge group. The phenomenological viability of this E_6 inspired composite Higgs model (E6CHM) implies that standard model (SM) elementary fermions with different baryon or lepton number should stem from different 27 representations of E_6. We present a six-dimensional orbifold GUT model in which the E_6 gauge symmetry is broken to the SM gauge group so that the appropriate splitting of the bulk 27-plets takes place. In this model the strongly coupled sector is localised on one of the branes and possesses an SU(6) global symmetry that contains the SU(3)_C\\times SU(2)_W\\times U(1)_Y subgroup. In this case the approximate gauge coupling unification can be attained if the right-handed top quark is a composite state and the elementary sector involves extra exotic matter beyond the SM which ensures anomaly cancellation. The breakdown of the approximate SU(6) symmetry at low energies in this model results in a set of the ...

  7. CT anatomy of the diaphragm: changes in end inspiration and end expiration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Sung Jin; Han, Hae Ja; Kim, Wang Jung; Bae, Il Hun; Han, Gi Seok; Cha, Sang Hoon; Park, Kil Sun; Kim, Dae Young [Chungbuk National Univ. College of Medicine, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-02-01

    To assess the change in configuration of the diaphragm between scans obtained at end inspiration and end expiration. Two series of CT scans at end inspiration and at end expiration were obtained in 37 patients. We evaluated the changes in the type of anterior diaphragm, pseudotumor, undulation of the diaphragm, and diaphragmatic defect during the respiratory phases. The configuration of the anterior portion of the diaphragm changed between end inspiratory and end expiratory CT scans in 25(67.6%) of 37 patients. Diaphragmatic defect, diaphragmatic pseudotumor, and undulation of the diaphragm were more frequent at end inspiration (13.5%, 18.9%, 37.8%, respectively) than at end expiration (0%, 5.4%, 10.8%, respectively). There is a change in the configuration of the anterior portion of the diaphragm and we also observed differences in the visualization of diaphragmatic defects, pseudotumor, and undulation between scans obtained at end inspiration and end expiration.

  8. Quiver representations

    CERN Document Server

    Schiffler, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    This book is intended to serve as a textbook for a course in Representation Theory of Algebras at the beginning graduate level. The text has two parts. In Part I, the theory is studied in an elementary way using quivers and their representations. This is a very hands-on approach and requires only basic knowledge of linear algebra. The main tool for describing the representation theory of a finite-dimensional algebra is its Auslander-Reiten quiver, and the text introduces these quivers as early as possible. Part II then uses the language of algebras and modules to build on the material developed before. The equivalence of the two approaches is proved in the text. The last chapter gives a proof of Gabriel’s Theorem. The language of category theory is developed along the way as needed.

  9. Decrypting $SO(10)$-inspired leptogenesis

    CERN Document Server

    Di Bari, Pasquale; Fiorentin, Michele Re

    2014-01-01

    Encouraged by the recent results from neutrino oscillation experiments, we perform an analytical study of $SO(10)$-inspired models and leptogenesis with hierarchical right-handed (RH) neutrino spectrum. Under the approximation of negligible misalignment between the neutrino Yukawa basis and the charged lepton basis, we find an analytical expression for the final asymmetry directly in terms of the low energy neutrino parameters that fully reproduces previous numerical results. This expression also shows that is possible to identify an effective leptogenesis phase for these models. When we also impose the wash-out of a large pre-existing asymmetry $N^{\\rm p,i}_{B-L}$, the strong thermal (ST) condition, we derive analytically all those constraints on the low energy neutrino parameters that characterise the {\\rm ST}-$SO(10)$-inspired leptogenesis solution, confirming previous numerical results. In particular we show why, though neutrino masses have to be necessarily normally ordered, the solution implies an analy...

  10. Bio-inspired functional materials

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Hua

    2012-01-01

    The thesis shows strategies how to learn from Mother Nature to make functional materials. Firstly, inspired by lotus leaf and water strider, superhydrophobic and superoleophobic surfaces are prepared from nanofibrillated cellulose aerogels. Furthermore, we explore potential applications of the superhydrophobic and superoleophobic materials for carrying cargo on liquid surfaces and continuous propulsion. Interestingly, the self-propelled locomotion has constant velocity and can last for prolon...

  11. Inspiring Student Self-Motivation

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia Brackett

    2007-01-01

    While normally appreciative of the invitation to join colleagues in a discussion of pedagogy and what “works” in the classroom, I have in most instances reluctantly participated in discussion of student motivation. I dip my toe into this philosophical quagmire only if permitted license to substitute the phrase student inspiration in place of student motivation. I also find it helpful to turn the rhetorical tables, as it were, and consider self-motivation on the part of students. The conce...

  12. Social insects inspire human design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holbrook, C Tate; Clark, Rebecca M; Moore, Dani; Overson, Rick P; Penick, Clint A; Smith, Adrian A

    2010-08-23

    The international conference 'Social Biomimicry: Insect Societies and Human Design', hosted by Arizona State University, USA, 18-20 February 2010, explored how the collective behaviour and nest architecture of social insects can inspire innovative and effective solutions to human design challenges. It brought together biologists, designers, engineers, computer scientists, architects and businesspeople, with the dual aims of enriching biology and advancing biomimetic design. PMID:20392721

  13. Biologically inspired dynamic material systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studart, André R

    2015-03-01

    Numerous examples of material systems that dynamically interact with and adapt to the surrounding environment are found in nature, from hair-based mechanoreceptors in animals to self-shaping seed dispersal units in plants to remodeling bone in vertebrates. Inspired by such fascinating biological structures, a wide range of synthetic material systems have been created to replicate the design concepts of dynamic natural architectures. Examples of biological structures and their man-made counterparts are herein revisited to illustrate how dynamic and adaptive responses emerge from the intimate microscale combination of building blocks with intrinsic nanoscale properties. By using top-down photolithographic methods and bottom-up assembly approaches, biologically inspired dynamic material systems have been created 1)?to sense liquid flow with hair-inspired microelectromechanical systems, 2)?to autonomously change shape by utilizing plantlike heterogeneous architectures, 3)?to homeostatically influence the surrounding environment through self-regulating adaptive surfaces, and 4)?to spatially concentrate chemical species by using synthetic microcompartments. The ever-increasing complexity and remarkable functionalities of such synthetic systems offer an encouraging perspective to the rich set of dynamic and adaptive properties that can potentially be implemented in future man-made material systems. PMID:25583299

  14. Institutionalizing New Ideas Through Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Renate; Jancsary, Dennis

    How do visualization and visual forms of communication influence the process of transforming a novel idea into established organizational practice? In this paper, we build theory with regard to the role of visuals in manifesting and giving form to an innovative idea as it proceeds through various stages of institutionalization. Ideas become institutionalized not merely through widespread diffusion in a cognitive-discursive form but eventually through their translation into concrete activities and transformation into specific patterns of organizational practice. We argue that visualization plays a pivotal and unique role in this process. Visualization bridges the ideational with the practical realm by providing representations of ideas, connecting them to existing knowledge, and illustrating the specific actions that instantiate them. Similar to verbal discourse, and often in tandem, visual representations diffuse more rapidly and further than the practices themselves. Consolidating the relationship between abstract ideas and specific practice, such visual or multi-modal representations facilitate the implementation of novel ideas, reinforce particular translations, and imbue associated organizational practice with legitimacy – and thus solidify the coupling of innovative ideas and organizational practice. Extending existing research, we develop a set of propositions linking dimensions of visuality and visualization to the different stages of institutionalization in order to explain the institutional trajectory of new ideas. Our analysis advances insight into a core dimension of institutionalization: the transformation of an idea into practice.

  15. Representing Representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Aaron M.

    2010-01-01

    What can be known and how to render what we know are perpetual quandaries met by qualitative research, complicated further by the understanding that the everyday discourses influencing our representations are often tacit, unspoken or heard so often that they seem to warrant little reflection. In this article, I offer analytic memos as a means for…

  16. A Biologically Inspired CMOS Image Sensor

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Mukul

    2013-01-01

    Biological systems are a source of inspiration in the development of small autonomous sensor nodes. The two major types of optical vision systems found in nature are the single aperture human eye and the compound eye of insects. The latter are among the most compact and smallest vision sensors. The eye is a compound of individual lenses with their own photoreceptor arrays.  The visual system of insects allows them to fly with a limited intelligence and brain processing power. A CMOS image sensor replicating the perception of vision in insects is discussed and designed in this book for industrial (machine vision) and medical applications. The CMOS metal layer is used to create an embedded micro-polarizer able to sense polarization information. This polarization information is shown to be useful in applications like real time material classification and autonomous agent navigation. Further the sensor is equipped with in pixel analog and digital memories which allow variation of the dynamic range and in-pixel b...

  17. Representación visual de la movilización estudiantil en Chile: las fotografías de las marchas como espacios de narración, actuación e identificación política (Visual representation of the student mobilization in Chile: the photographs of marches as spaces of narrative, action and political identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Cárdenas Neira

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available El artículo explora la representación visual de las marchas estudiantiles suscitadas en Chile durante el 2011, con el propósito de describir los actores e identidades grupales simbolizadas, así como las acciones sociales y los modos como son legitimadas o deslegitimadas en la interacción. Se analiza un corpus fotográfico del libro "Marchas" (Yutronic y Ortiz, 2012, desde un marco teórico-metodológico que considera aportaciones de los Estudios Críticos del Discurso y la Semiótica Social. Se plantea que las fotografías de las marchas constituyen una narración capaz de organizar significados que estructuran formas de actuación e identificación política en oposición, excluyendo a otros participantes críticos del conflicto educativo, como las élites políticas y económicas. Se construye así un tipo de confrontación entre jóvenes y fuerzas policiales, que simplifica la lucha ideológica y refuerza estereotipos sobre grupos cuya acción, al ser objeto de una mediatización permanente, es cognitivamente reforzada. Se concluye que la narración indagada constituye una opción de representación que enfatiza el carácter histórico de la protesta estudiantil, proveyendo un espacio de visibilización de la acción juvenil postdictatorial. (This paper explores the visual representation of student’s protests raised in Chile during 2011. The purpose is to describe the actors and symbolized group identities, as well as the social actions and the ways in which these specific actions are legitimized or delegitimized in the interaction. The corpus is a photographic book entitled "Marchas" (Marches (Yutronic & Ortiz, 2012, which is analyzed from a theoretical and methodological framework that considers input from Critical Discourse Studies and Social Semiotics. The paper claims that the photographs of marches are able to organize narrative meanings which structure opposite forms of performance and political identification, excluding other critical participants in the educational conflict, such as political and economic elites. Thus, it is constructed a type of confrontation between young people and police, which simplifies the ideological struggle and reinforces stereotypes about groups whose action, being subject to constant media coverage, is, therefore, cognitively enhanced. The paper concludes that the narration inquired is an option of representation that emphasizes the historical character of the students’ protest, providing in this way a space that makes visible the postdictatorial action of youth.

  18. Abstract and associatively based representations in human sequence learning.

    OpenAIRE

    Spiegel, Rainer; Mclaren, I. P. L.

    2003-01-01

    We give an analysis of performance in an artificial neural network for which the claim had been made that it could learn abstract representations. Our argument is that this network is associative in nature, and cannot develop abstract representations. The network thus converges to a solution that is solely based on the statistical regularities of the training set. Inspired by human experiments that have shown that humans can engage in both associative (statistical) and abstract learning, we p...

  19. POR UNA NUEVA IMAGEN DE CIUDAD. LA REPRESENTACIÓN GRÁFICO-VISUAL DEL PAISAJE ARBÓREO DE SANTIAGO DE CALI: EL RESCATE DE UN NUEVO IMAGINARIO URBANO / TOWARDS A NEW IMAGE OF THE CITY THE GRAPHIC- VISUAL REPRESENTATION OF THE ARBOREAL LANDSCAPE OF SANTIAGO DE CALI: THE RESCUE OF A NEW URBAN IMAGINARY

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    RICARDO, CASTRO RAMOS.

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Se busca posicionar un imaginario urbano en la ciudad de Cali (Colombia) mediante el reconocimiento del potencial paisajístico arbóreo que la identifica en su singularidad. La representación gráfico-visual es parte de la metodología que permite el reconocimiento de componentes sintácticos, semántico [...] s y pragmáticos que, unida a la metodología de incursión urbana diseñada para la agnición del espacio, se alimenta con el método de creación de imaginarios para proponer y desarrollar uno nuevo a nivel social. Se obtiene un proyecto que desarrolla la metodología de incursión urbana y proyecta la etapa siguiente que determina el genius loci de las configuraciones verdes; en otra etapa, constituirá rutas virtuales on line y rutas presenciales en pro de la cualificación estética de los sujetos que las realizan y el imaginario social previsto. Abstract in english This paper seeks to establish a new urban imaginary of the city of Call by recognizing its tree landscape potential that identifies the city in its singularity. Graphic-visual representation is the methodology that allows sintaxtic, semantic and pragmatic components, that together with an Urban incu [...] rsión methodology, designed by this research project that incorporates the method of imagery creation for the purpose of developing a proposing a new one at the social level. A Project is obtained, that develops urban incursión methods and towards a second part that determines the genius-loci of green areas. In a following stage, on-line virtual routes, as well as others are developed in search of an esthetic qualification of the actors that define them as well as the social imagery that results.

  20. Bio-Inspired Hovering Control for an Aerial Robot Equipped with a Decoupled Eye and a Rate Gyro

    OpenAIRE

    Manecy, Augustin; Viollet, S.; Marchand, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    This work provides an hovering control strategy for a sighted robot, the eye of which being decoupled from the body and controlled by means of a tiny rotative piezo motor. The main purpose of this paper is to show the effectiveness and the efficiency of this fundamental bio-inspired mechanical decoupling. Indeed, it exhibits several benefits: * it enables to stabilize the robot's gaze on the basis of three bio-inspired oculomotor reflexes (ORs) : a visual fixation reflex (VFR), a translationa...

  1. Integrated Visualization Environment for Science Mission Modeling Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed work will provide NASA with an integrated visualization environment providing greater insight and a more intuitive representation of large technical...

  2. The greenhouse effect visualizer: a tool for the science classroom

    OpenAIRE

    Gordin, Douglas N.; Edelson, Daniel C.; Pea, Roy D.

    1995-01-01

    The Greenhouse Effect Visualizer (GEV) is designed to help students visualize data sets related to the earth's energy balance. This work was inspired by the benefits scientific visualization have provided to scientists in discovering patterns and presenting the results of their work to broad communities. The hope is that scientific visualization can provide equal assistance to students trying to learn science. The philosophy underlying this approach links learning with practice. Hence, studen...

  3. Jungle Photos: Inspiration, Education, Conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger Harris

    This gallery provides photographs and information on natural history, ecology, and conservation; its mission is to inspire people to support wilderness conversation and education. The gallery emphasizes the Amazon region of South America, the Galapagos Islands, and Africa. The collections feature images of plants and animals, people, scenery, environmental impacts such as deforestation, satellite imagery, and many other subjects. Each collection includes a teacher's page with quizzes, lesson plans, and links to other resources. The site also features an online forum and a Wiki where users can contribute their own content.

  4. Supersymmetry Inspired QCD Beta Function

    CERN Document Server

    Ryttov, Thomas A

    2008-01-01

    We propose an all orders beta function for ordinary Yang-Mills theories with or without fermions inspired by the Novikov-Shifman-Vainshtein-Zakharov beta function of N=1 supersymmetric gauge theories. The beta function allows us to bound the conformal window. When restricting to one adjoint Weyl fermion we show how the proposed beta function matches the one of supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. The running of the pure Yang-Mills coupling is computed and the deviation from the two loop result is presented. We then compare the deviation with the one obtained from lattice data also with respect to the two loop running.

  5. A Dedicated Binding Mechanism for the Visual Control of Movement

    OpenAIRE

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Franklin, David W.; Zatka-Haas, Peter; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    The human motor system is remarkably proficient in the online control of visually guided movements, adjusting to changes in the visual scene within 100 ms [1–3]. This is achieved through a set of highly automatic processes [4] translating visual information into representations suitable for motor control [5, 6]. For this to be accomplished, visual information pertaining to target and hand need to be identified and linked to the appropriate internal representations during the movement. Mean...

  6. Representational pseudoneglect: lateralised biases in attentional orienting in the absence of vision in healthy ageing participants.

    OpenAIRE

    Brooks, Joanna Louise

    2012-01-01

    Pseudoneglect is the tendency to be biased towards the left side of space in tasks of a spatial nature. A non-visual form of the bias referred to as ‘representational pseudoneglect’ has been observed when people generate a mental representation of a stimulus in the complete absence of visual input - participants pay more attention to the left-hand side of the mental representation. The aim of this thesis was to advance our understanding of representational pseudoneglect by ...

  7. Representational Inquiry Competences in Science Games

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnussen, Rikke

    2009-01-01

    This chapter concerns the enactment of competences in a particular science learning game Homicide, which is played in lower secondary schools. Homicide is a forensic investigation game in which pupils play police experts solving criminal cases in the space of one week. The game is designed to support work with genuine scientific inquiry and to meet the seventh- to tenth grade curriculum objectives for science and Danish education in Danish schools. This paper comprises a presentation of the results of a long-term empirical study done of four school classes who have played the game. The chapter includes studies of how students construct visual representations of the cases they investigate and how they use these representations to establish hypotheses and evidence. The term ‘Representational Inquiry Competences' is developed; it refers to the students' ability to construct, productively use, transform and criticize visual representations as an integrated part of conducting an inquiry in the science game

  8. Guard Cell and Tropomyosin Inspired Chemical Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacquelyn K.S. Nagel

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Sensors are an integral part of many engineered products and systems. Biological inspiration has the potential to improve current sensor designs as well as inspire innovative ones. This paper presents the design of an innovative, biologically-inspired chemical sensor that performs “up-front” processing through mechanical means. Inspiration from the physiology (function of the guard cell coupled with the morphology (form and physiology of tropomyosin resulted in two concept variants for the chemical sensor. Applications of the sensor design include environmental monitoring of harmful gases, and a non-invasive approach to detect illnesses including diabetes, liver disease, and cancer on the breath.

  9. Neural pathways for visual speech perception

    OpenAIRE

    Bernstein, Lynne E.; Liebenthal, Einat

    2014-01-01

    This paper examines the questions, what levels of speech can be perceived visually, and how is visual speech represented by the brain? Review of the literature leads to the conclusions that every level of psycholinguistic speech structure (i.e., phonetic features, phonemes, syllables, words, and prosody) can be perceived visually, although individuals differ in their abilities to do so; and that there are visual modality-specific representations of speech qua speech in higher-level vision bra...

  10. Augmented Segmentation and Visualization for Presentation Videos

    OpenAIRE

    Haubold, Alexander; Kender, John R.

    2005-01-01

    We investigate methods of segmenting, visualizing, and indexing presentation videos by separately considering audio and visual data. The audio track is segmented by speaker, and augmented with key phrases which are extracted using an Automatic Speech Recognizer (ASR). The video track is segmented by visual dissimilarities and augmented by representative key frames. An interactive user interface combines a visual representation of audio, video, text, and key frames, and allow...

  11. Visualizing causality in context using animation

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Miao

    2008-01-01

    Visualizing causality is one of the most difficult problems in information visualization. In particular, visualizing causal relations within existing representations (termed causal overlay) remains to be explored. The approach of a visual causal vector (VCV) holds promise as a perceptually efficient causal overlay technique. This thesis describes an empirical investigation of two initial issues of this technique: how to elicit and avoid causal impression and how to represent the strength of t...

  12. Knowledge Representations for Planning Manipulation Tasks

    OpenAIRE

    Zacharias, Franziska

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, the capability map, a novel general representation of the kinematic capabilities of a robot arm, is introduced. The capability map allows to determine how well regions of the workspace are reachable for the end effector in different orientations. It is a representation that can be machine processed as well as intuitively visualized for the human. The capability map and the derived algorithms are a valuable source of information for high- and low-level planning processes. T...

  13. Visualizing abstract objects and relations

    CERN Document Server

    Kamada, Tomihisa

    1989-01-01

    Pictorial representations are very useful for humans to understand complicated relations or structures. This is the reason that the user interface of information systems is strongly required to visualize many kinds of information in a wide variety of graphical forms. At present, however, only some very specialized visualization techniques have been developed probably because the generality in the visualization has not been appreciated correctly. This book presents a visualization framework for translating abstract objects and relations, typically represented in textual forms, into pictorial re

  14. Toward Turing's A-type Unorganised Machines in an Unconventional Substrate: a Dynamic Representation in Compartmentalised Excitable Chemical Media

    OpenAIRE

    Bull, Larry; Holley, Julian; Costello, Ben De Lacy; Adamatzky, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Turing presented a general representation scheme by which to achieve artificial intelligence - unorganised machines. Significantly, these were a form of discrete dynamical system and yet such representations remain relatively unexplored. Further, at the same time as also suggesting that natural evolution may provide inspiration for search mechanisms to design machines, he noted that mechanisms inspired by the social aspects of learning may prove useful. This paper presents i...

  15. Computer aided surface representation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barnhill, R.E.

    1990-02-19

    The central research problem of this project is the effective representation, computation, and display of surfaces interpolating to information in three or more dimensions. If the given information is located on another surface, then the problem is to construct a surface defined on a surface''. Sometimes properties of an already defined surface are desired, which is geometry processing''. Visualization of multivariate surfaces is possible by means of contouring higher dimensional surfaces. These problems and more are discussed below. The broad sweep from constructive mathematics through computational algorithms to computer graphics illustrations is utilized in this research. The breadth and depth of this research activity makes this research project unique.

  16. Using 3D in Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, Jo; Kirschenbauer, Sabine

    2005-01-01

    The notion of three-dimensionality is applied to five stages of the visualization pipeline. While 3D visulization is most often associated with the visual mapping and representation of data, this chapter also identifies its role in the management and assembly of data, and in the media used to display 3D imagery. The extra cartographic degree of freedom offered by using 3D is explored and offered as a motivation for employing 3D in visualization. The use of VR and the construction of virtual environments exploit navigational and behavioral realism, but become most usefil when combined with abstracted representations embedded in a 3D space. The interactions between development of geovisualization, the technology used to implement it and the theory surrounding cartographic representation are explored. The dominance of computing technologies, driven particularly by the gaming industry is discussed with particular reference to the 3D geovisualization.

  17. Veto Studies for LIGO Inspiral Triggers

    OpenAIRE

    Christensen, Nelson

    2005-01-01

    LIGO recently conducted its third scientific data run, S3. Here we summarize the veto and data quality studies conducted by the LIGO Scientific Collaboration in connection with the search for binary inspiral signals in the S3 data. LIGO's interferometer channels and physical environmental monitors were monitored, and events in these channels coincident with inspiral triggers were examined.

  18. Bio-inspired silicon-based materials

    CERN Document Server

    Zelisko, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The contributed volume addresses a wide range of topics including, but not limited to, biotechnology, synthetic chemistry, polymer chemistry and materials chemistry. The book will serve as a specialized review of the field of biologically inspired silicon-based structures. Researchers studying biologically inspired silicon materials chemistry will find this volume invaluable.

  19. Geometric Algebra Model of Distributed Representations

    CERN Document Server

    Patyk, Agnieszka

    2010-01-01

    Formalism based on GA is an alternative to distributed representation models developed so far --- Smolensky's tensor product, Holographic Reduced Representations (HRR) and Binary Spatter Code (BSC). Convolutions are replaced by geometric products, interpretable in terms of geometry which seems to be the most natural language for visualization of higher concepts. This paper recalls the main ideas behind the GA model and investigates recognition test results using both inner product and a clipped version of matrix representation. The influence of accidental blade equality on recognition is also studied. Finally, the efficiency of the GA model is compared to that of previously developed models.

  20. Maitotoxin: An Inspiration for Synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolaou, K C; Aversa, Robert J

    2011-04-01

    Maitotoxin holds a special place in the annals of natural products chemistry as the largest and most toxic secondary metabolite known to date. Its fascinating, ladder-like, polyether molecular structure and diverse spectrum of biological activities elicited keen interest from chemists and biologists who recognized its uniqueness and potential as a probe and inspiration for research in chemistry and biology. Synthetic studies in the area benefited from methodologies and strategies that were developed as part of chemical synthesis programs directed toward the total synthesis of some of the less complex members of the polyether marine biotoxin class, of which maitotoxin is the flagship. This account focuses on progress made in the authors' laboratories in the synthesis of large maitotoxin domains with emphasis on methodology development, strategy design, and structural comparisons of the synthesized molecules with the corresponding regions of the natural product. The article concludes with an overview of maitotoxin's biological profile and future perspectives. PMID:21709816

  1. [Nikola Tesla: flashes of inspiration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarejo-Galende, Albero; Herrero-San Martín, Alejandro

    2013-01-16

    Nikola Tesla (1856-1943) was one of the greatest inventors in history and a key player in the revolution that led to the large-scale use of electricity. He also made important contributions to such diverse fields as x-rays, remote control, radio, the theory of consciousness or electromagnetism. In his honour, the international unit of magnetic induction was named after him. Yet, his fame is scarce in comparison with that of other inventors of the time, such as Edison, with whom he had several heated arguments. He was a rather odd, reserved person who lived for his inventions, the ideas for which came to him in moments of inspiration. In his autobiography he relates these flashes with a number of neuropsychiatric manifestations, which can be seen to include migraine auras, synaesthesiae, obsessions and compulsions. PMID:23307357

  2. Collide@CERN: sharing inspiration

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Late last year, Julius von Bismarck was appointed to be CERN's first "artist in residence" after winning the Collide@CERN Digital Arts award. He’ll be spending two months at CERN starting this March but, to get a flavour of what’s in store, he visited the Organization last week for a crash course in its inspiring activities.   Julius von Bismarck, taking a closer look... When we arrive to interview German artist Julius von Bismarck, he’s being given a presentation about antiprotons’ ability to kill cancer cells. The whiteboard in the room contains graphs and equations that might easily send a non-scientist running, yet as Julius puts it, “if I weren’t interested, I’d be asleep”. Given his numerous questions, he must have been fascinated. “This ‘introduction’ week has been exhilarating,” says Julius. “I’ve been able to interact ...

  3. Decrypting SO(10-inspired leptogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Di Bari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Encouraged by the recent results from neutrino oscillation experiments, we perform an analytical study of SO(10-inspired models and leptogenesis with hierarchical right-handed (RH neutrino spectrum. Under the approximation of negligible misalignment between the neutrino Yukawa basis and the charged lepton basis, we find an analytical expression for the final asymmetry directly in terms of the low energy neutrino parameters that fully reproduces previous numerical results. This expression also shows that it is possible to identify an effective leptogenesis phase for these models. When we also impose the wash-out of a large pre-existing asymmetry NB?Lp,i, the strong thermal (ST condition, we derive analytically all those constraints on the low energy neutrino parameters that characterise the ST-SO(10-inspired leptogenesis solution, confirming previous numerical results. In particular we show why, though neutrino masses have to be necessarily normally ordered, the solution implies an analytical lower bound on the effective neutrino-less double beta decay neutrino mass, mee?8 meV, for NB?Lp,i=10?3, testable with next generation experiments. This, in combination with an upper bound on the atmospheric mixing angle, necessarily in the first octant, forces the lightest neutrino mass within a narrow range m1?(10–30 meV (corresponding to ?imi?(75–125 meV. We also show why the solution could correctly predict a non-vanishing reactor neutrino mixing angle and requires the Dirac phase to be in the fourth quadrant, implying sin?? (and JCP negative as hinted by current global analyses. Many of the analytical results presented (expressions for the orthogonal matrix, RH neutrino mixing matrix, masses and phases can have applications beyond leptogenesis.

  4. Switchable bio-inspired adhesives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroner, Elmar

    2015-03-01

    Geckos have astonishing climbing abilities. They can adhere to almost any surface and can run on walls and even stick to ceilings. The extraordinary adhesion performance is caused by a combination of a complex surface pattern on their toes and the biomechanics of its movement. These biological dry adhesives have been intensely investigated during recent years because of the unique combination of adhesive properties. They provide high adhesion, allow for easy detachment, can be removed residue-free, and have self-cleaning properties. Many aspects have been successfully mimicked, leading to artificial, bio-inspired, patterned dry adhesives, and were addressed and in some aspects they even outperform the adhesion capabilities of geckos. However, designing artificial patterned adhesion systems with switchable adhesion remains a big challenge; the gecko's adhesion system is based on a complex hierarchical surface structure and on advanced biomechanics, which are both difficult to mimic. In this paper, two approaches are presented to achieve switchable adhesion. The first approach is based on a patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) polymer, where adhesion can be switched on and off by applying a low and a high compressive preload. The switch in adhesion is caused by a reversible mechanical instability of the adhesive silicone structures. The second approach is based on a composite material consisting of a Nickel- Titanium (NiTi) shape memory alloy and a patterned adhesive PDMS layer. The NiTi alloy is trained to change its surface topography as a function of temperature, which results in a change of the contact area and of alignment of the adhesive pattern towards a substrate, leading to switchable adhesion. These examples show that the unique properties of bio-inspired adhesives can be greatly improved by new concepts such as mechanical instability or by the use of active materials which react to external stimuli.

  5. A neuromorphic model for achromatic and chromatic surface representation of natural images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Simon; Grossberg, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This study develops a neuromorphic model of human lightness perception that is inspired by how the mammalian visual system is designed for this function. It is known that biological visual representations can adapt to a billion-fold change in luminance. How such a system determines absolute lightness under varying illumination conditions to generate a consistent interpretation of surface lightness remains an unsolved problem. Such a process, called 'anchoring' of lightness, has properties including articulation, insulation, configuration, and area effects. The model quantitatively simulates such psychophysical lightness data, as well as other data such as discounting the illuminant, and lightness constancy and contrast effects. The model retina embodies gain control at retinal photoreceptors, and spatial contrast adaptation at the negative feedback circuit between mechanisms that model the inner segment of photoreceptors and interacting horizontal cells. The model can thereby adjust its sensitivity to input intensities ranging from dim moonlight to dazzling sunlight. A new anchoring mechanism, called the Blurred-Highest-Luminance-As-White rule, helps simulate how surface lightness becomes sensitive to the spatial scale of objects in a scene. The model is also able to process natural color images under variable lighting conditions, and is compared with the popular RETINEX model. PMID:15288898

  6. Acquiring Visual Classifiers from Human Imagination

    OpenAIRE

    Vondrick, Carl; Pirsiavash, Hamed; Oliva, Aude; Torralba, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    The human mind can remarkably imagine objects that it has never seen, touched, or heard, all in vivid detail. Motivated by the desire to harness this rich source of information from the human mind, this paper investigates how to extract classifiers from the human visual system and leverage them in a machine. We introduce a method that, inspired by well-known tools in human psychophysics, estimates the classifier that the human visual system might use for recognition, but in ...

  7. Visualization in Medieval Alchemy

    OpenAIRE

    Barbara Obrist

    2003-01-01

    This paper explores major trends in visualization of medieval theories of natural and artificial transformation of substances in relation to their philosophical and theological bases. The function of pictorial forms is analyzed in terms of the prevailing conceptions of science and methods of transmitting knowledge. The documents under examination date from the thirteenth to the fifteenth century. In these, pictorial representations include lists and tables, geometrical figures, depictions of ...

  8. Visual Analysis of Behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Shaogang

    2011-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive treatment of visual analysis of behaviour from computational-modelling and algorithm-design perspectives. This title: covers learning-group activity models, unsupervised behaviour profiling, hierarchical behaviour discovery, learning behavioural context, modelling rare behaviours, and 'man-in-the-loop' active learning; examines multi-camera behaviour correlation, person re-identification, and 'connecting-the-dots' for abnormal behaviour detection; discusses Bayesian information criterion, Bayesian networks, 'bag-of-words' representation, canonical correlation

  9. The GEANT4 Visualization System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Geant4 Visualization System is a multi-driver graphics system designed to serve the Geant4 Simulation Toolkit. It is aimed at the visualization of Geant4 data, primarily detector descriptions and simulated particle trajectories and hits. It can handle a variety of graphical technologies simultaneously and interchangeably, allowing the user to choose the visual representation most appropriate to requirements. It conforms to the low-level Geant4 abstract graphical user interfaces and introduces new abstract classes from which the various drivers are derived and that can be straightforwardly extended, for example, by the addition of a new driver. It makes use of an extendable class library of models and filters for data representation and selection. The Geant4 Visualization System supports a rich set of interactive commands based on the Geant4 command system. It is included in the Geant4 code distribution and maintained and documented like other components of Geant4

  10. Why the verbal may be experienced as visual.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fedrová, Stanislava; Jedli?ková, Alice

    Newcastle upon Tyne : Cambridge Scholars publishing, 2010 - (Dadejík, O.; Stejskal, J.), s. 76-88 ISBN 978-1-4438-2428-6 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z90560517 Keywords : verbal representation * visual representation * visuality * multisensoriality * description * experientiality * intermediality * intertextuality * mental imagery Subject RIV: AJ - Letters, Mass-media, Audiovision

  11. AER synthetic generation in hardware for bio-inspired spiking systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares-Barranco, Alejandro; Linares-Barranco, Bernabe; Jimenez-Moreno, Gabriel; Civit-Balcells, Anton

    2005-06-01

    Address Event Representation (AER) is an emergent neuromorphic interchip communication protocol that allows for real-time virtual massive connectivity between huge number neurons located on different chips. By exploiting high speed digital communication circuits (with nano-seconds timings), synaptic neural connections can be time multiplexed, while neural activity signals (with mili-seconds timings) are sampled at low frequencies. Also, neurons generate 'events' according to their activity levels. More active neurons generate more events per unit time, and access the interchip communication channel more frequently, while neurons with low activity consume less communication bandwidth. When building multi-chip muti-layered AER systems it is absolutely necessary to have a computer interface that allows (a) to read AER interchip traffic into the computer and visualize it on screen, and (b) convert conventional frame-based video stream in the computer into AER and inject it at some point of the AER structure. This is necessary for test and debugging of complex AER systems. This paper addresses the problem of converting, in a computer, a conventional frame-based video stream into the spike event based representation AER. There exist several proposed software methods for synthetic generation of AER for bio-inspired systems. This paper presents a hardware implementation for one method, which is based on Linear-Feedback-Shift-Register (LFSR) pseudo-random number generation. The sequence of events generated by this hardware, which follows a Poisson distribution like a biological neuron, has been reconstructed using two AER integrator cells. The error of reconstruction for a set of images that produces different traffic loads of event in the AER bus is used as evaluation criteria. A VHDL description of the method, that includes the Xilinx PCI Core, has been implemented and tested using a general purpose PCI-AER board. This PCI-AER board has been developed by authors, and uses a Spartan II 200 FPGA. This system for AER Synthetic Generation is capable of transforming frames of 64x64 pixels, received through a standard computer PCI bus, at a frame rate of 25 frames per second, producing spike events at a peak rate of 107 events per second.

  12. Visual Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... with the brain, making vision impossible. What Is Visual Impairment? Many people have some type of visual problem ... could from 200 feet away. Continue What Causes Visual Impairment? People rarely lose their eyesight during their teen ...

  13. Visualization and Simulation in Scheduling

    OpenAIRE

    C?apek, R.

    2008-01-01

    This paper deals with the representation of scheduling results and it introduces a new tool for visualization and simulation in time scheduling called VISIS. The purpose of this tool is to provide an environment for visualization, e.g. in production line scheduling. The simulation also proposes a way to simulate the influence of a schedule on a user defined system, e.g. for designing filters in digital signal processing. VISIS arises from representing scheduling results using the well-known G...

  14. VACS : Visual Analytics Suite for Cyber Security - Visual Exploration of Cyber Security Datasets

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Fabian; Keim, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Visual exploration of cyber security datasets is an important and highly relevant field of research. To address the cyber security challenge of the VAST Challenge 2013, we utilized our novel Visual Analytics Suite for Cyber Security (VACS) to visually explore the given datasets using a combination of different visual representations. VACS primarily provides a dashboard view, host-based thumbnail overview and a querying interface to retrieve and drill down to investigate s...

  15. Contested Urbanism : Struggles About Representation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    PlØger, John

    2010-01-01

    Iconic architecture plays a crucial role in cities' interurban competition. This is also the case with Copenhagen which has used iconic architecture as part of its boosterism to gain investment, to increase tourism and to attract the creative class. This battle over the symbolic representation of city dynamism, architectural identity and market competitiveness is expressed in discourses and visual signs in space—be it cyberspace, on location, in newspapers or debates. The articulation of representations and meaning can produce conflicts which show the voids, ruptures, and rational generatives at play. This article will exemplify how actors' use of a specific spatial dispositif of visibility and legibility may be intertwined with particular discourses on community, architectural heritage and identity of place. Two cases are chosen, the first concerns resistance towards high-rise buildings and the second concerns a current debate about the development of a 'metropol-zone'. Both cases concern Copenhagen. The signifying dispositifs (content, argument, rationality) in each case will be identified and the paper will emphasise how certain dispositifs of the visible and the arguable become strategically intertwined through symbolic, visual and virtual representations of the wrongs of current urban planning

  16. Large-scale functional models of visual cortex for remote sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brumby, Steven P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kenyon, Garrett [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rasmussen, Craig E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Swaminarayan, Sriram [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bettencourt, Luis [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Landecker, Will [PORTLAND STATE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    Neuroscience has revealed many properties of neurons and of the functional organization of visual cortex that are believed to be essential to human vision, but are missing in standard artificial neural networks. Equally important may be the sheer scale of visual cortex requiring {approx}1 petaflop of computation. In a year, the retina delivers {approx}1 petapixel to the brain, leading to massively large opportunities for learning at many levels of the cortical system. We describe work at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to develop large-scale functional models of visual cortex on LANL's Roadrunner petaflop supercomputer. An initial run of a simple region VI code achieved 1.144 petaflops during trials at the IBM facility in Poughkeepsie, NY (June 2008). Here, we present criteria for assessing when a set of learned local representations is 'complete' along with general criteria for assessing computer vision models based on their projected scaling behavior. Finally, we extend one class of biologically-inspired learning models to problems of remote sensing imagery.

  17. Capturing lived experiences in movement educational contexts through videographic participation and visual narratives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DegerbØl, Stine Mikés; Svendler Nielsen, Charlotte

    This paper explores and reflects upon possibilities and challenges of using “videographic participation” (Svendler Nielsen 2009a) as a research method combining filmic ethnography (Møhl 2003) and phenomenology (van Manen 1990; Todres 2007) in movement educational contexts. The research method helps visualizing and communicating the meaning-making of the participants and emphasizes the role of the researcher’s embodied involvement when ‘looking for lived experiences’. The paper exemplifies the use of videographic participation and presents (audio)visual narratives from two educational contexts: children in a primary school participating in a collaboration with a professional dance company and youngsters ages 18-26 doing contemporary circus training. Both studies use film as a knowledge creating practice (Møhl 2003) in combination with a hermeneutic-phenomenological analysis (van Manen 1990) to cast light on ways of understanding embodied learning. The use of videographic participation in the two contexts of educational practice are explored, compared and discussed. On an overall methodological level it is discussed how it is possible to capture lived experiences in fields of movement education by use of videographic participation and what the challenges of ‘looking for lived experiences’ in movement can be. Inspired by Performative Social Science (Jones et al. 2008; Gergen and Jones 2008) the paper exemplifies and discusses (re)presentation of research data in artistic forms by highlighting the question of how meaning-making of the participants can be captured and disseminated through (audio)visual narratives.

  18. Orienting Attention to Sound Object Representations Attenuates Change Deafness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, Kristina C.; Alain, Claude

    2012-01-01

    According to the object-based account of attention, multiple objects coexist in short-term memory (STM), and we can selectively attend to a particular object of interest. Although there is evidence that attention can be directed to visual object representations, the assumption that attention can be oriented to sound object representations has yet…

  19. Saliency Detection Using Sparse and Nonlinear Feature Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Shahzad Anwar; Qingjie Zhao; Muhammad Farhan Manzoor; Saqib Ishaq Khan

    2014-01-01

    An important aspect of visual saliency detection is how features that form an input image are represented. A popular theory supports sparse feature representation, an image being represented with a basis dictionary having sparse weighting coefficient. Another method uses a nonlinear combination of image features for representation. In our work, we combine the two methods and propose a scheme that takes advantage of both sparse and nonlinear feature representation. To this end, we use independ...

  20. Bio-inspired computation in telecommunications

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Xin-She; Ting, TO

    2015-01-01

    Bio-inspired computation, especially those based on swarm intelligence, has become increasingly popular in the last decade. Bio-Inspired Computation in Telecommunications reviews the latest developments in bio-inspired computation from both theory and application as they relate to telecommunications and image processing, providing a complete resource that analyzes and discusses the latest and future trends in research directions. Written by recognized experts, this is a must-have guide for researchers, telecommunication engineers, computer scientists and PhD students.

  1. Modulation of visual responses in the superior temporal sulcus by audio-visual congruency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NikosKLogothetis

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Our ability to identify or recognize visual objects is often enhanced by evidence provided by other sensory modalities. Yet, where and how visual object processing benefits from the information received by the other senses remains unclear. One candidate region is the temporal lobe, which features neural representations of visual objects, and in which previous studies have provided evidence for multisensory influences on neural responses. In the present study we directly tested whether visual representations in the lower bank of the superior temporal sulcus (STS benefit from acoustic information. To this end, we recorded neural responses in alert monkeys passively watching audio-visual scenes, and quantified the impact of simultaneously presented sounds on responses elicited by the presentation of naturalistic visual scenes. Using methods of stimulus decoding and information theory, we then asked whether the responses of STS neurons become more reliable and informative in multisensory contexts. Our results demonstrate that STS neurons are indeed sensitive to the modality composition of the sensory stimulus. Importantly, information provided by STS neurons’ responses about the particular visual stimulus being presented was highest during congruent audio-visual and unimodal visual stimulation, but was reduced during incongruent bimodal stimulation. Together, these findings demonstrate that higher visual representations in the STS not only convey information about the visual input but also depend on the acoustic context of a visual scene.

  2. Fracture Mechanics: Inspirations from Nature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Taylor

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In Nature there are many examples of materials performing structural functions. Nature requires materials which are stiff and strong to provide support against various forces, including self-weight, the dynamic forces involved in movement, and external loads such as wind or the actions of a predator. These materials and structures have evolved over millions of years; the science of Biomimetics seeks to understand Nature and, as a result, to find inspiration for the creation of better engineering solutions. There has been relatively little fundamental research work in this area from a fracture mechanics point of view. Natural materials are quite brittle and, as a result, they have evolved several interesting strategies for preventing failure by crack propagation. Fatigue is also a major problem for many animals and plants. In this paper, several examples will be given of recent work in the Bioengineering Research Centre at Trinity College Dublin, investigating fracture and fatigue in such diverse materials as bamboo, the legs and wings of insects, and living cells.

  3. Future scenarios to inspire innovation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Smedt, Peter; Borch, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, accelerated by the economic and financial crisis, complex global issues have moved to the forefront of policy-making. These grand challenges require policy-makers to address a variety of interrelated issues, which are built upon yet uncoordinated and dispersed bodies of knowledge. Due to the social dynamics of innovation, new socio-technical subsystems are emerging, however there is lack of exploitation of novel ideas and sustainable solutions to address these grand challenges. In this paper we argue that issues of how knowledge is represented can have a part in this lack of exploitation. For example, when drivers of change are not only multiple but also mutable, it is not sensible to extrapolate the future from data and relationships of the past. This paper investigates ways in which futures thinking can be used as a tool for inspiring actions and structures that address the grand challenges. By analyzing several scenario cases, elements of good practices and principles on how to strengthen innovation systems through future scenarios are identified. This is needed because innovation itself needs to be oriented along more sustainable pathways enabling transformations of socio-technical systems. © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Inspired at a book fair

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2012-01-01

    During the Frankfurt book fair last October, the CERN stand drew quite the crowd. Director-General Rolf Heuer was there to promote CERN’s mission and the "LHC: the Large Hadron Collider" book. He met a lot of visitors and for one of them there was also a nice follow-up…   Marcus and his father visiting the LINAC facility. Fifteen year-old Marcus lives in Lauterecken near Frankfurt. The popular book fair last autumn was for him a nice opportunity to get in touch with the CERN environment. Inspired by the stand and what the CERN people were describing, he started to ask more and more questions… So many, that Rolf Heuer decided to invite him to come to CERN and find out some of the answers for himself. A few weeks later, while recovering from an exciting visit to the ATLAS underground cavern and other CERN installations with a cup of tea in Restaurant 1, Marcus shared his enthusiasm about the Organization: “When I was younger, my moth...

  5. Hybrid coding of visual content and local image features

    OpenAIRE

    Baroffio, Luca; Cesana, Matteo; Redondi, Alessandro; Tagliasacchi, Marco; Tubaro, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Distributed visual analysis applications, such as mobile visual search or Visual Sensor Networks (VSNs) require the transmission of visual content on a bandwidth-limited network, from a peripheral node to a processing unit. Traditionally, a Compress-Then-Analyze approach has been pursued, in which sensing nodes acquire and encode the pixel-level representation of the visual content, that is subsequently transmitted to a sink node in order to be processed. This approach might...

  6. Automatic and strategic effects in the guidance of attention by working memory representations

    OpenAIRE

    Carlisle, Nancy B.; Woodman, Geoffrey F.

    2010-01-01

    Theories of visual attention suggest that working memory representations automatically guide attention toward memory-matching objects. Some empirical tests of this prediction have produced results consistent with working memory automatically guiding attention. However, others have shown that individuals can strategically control whether working memory representations guide visual attention. Previous studies have not independently measured automatic and strategic contributions to the interacti...

  7. Engaging Students through Astronomically Inspired Music

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehouse, M.

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes a lesson outline in which astronomically inspired musical compositions are used to teach astronomical concepts via an introductory activity, close listening, and critical/creative reflection.

  8. Biologically inspired toys using artificial muscles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Cohen, Y.

    2001-01-01

    Recent developments in electroactive polymers, so-called artificial muscles, could one day be used to make bionics possible. Meanwhile, as this technology evolves novel mechanisms are expected to emerge that are biologically inspired.

  9. Deep learning of orthographic representations in baboons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannagan, Thomas; Ziegler, Johannes C; Dufau, Stéphane; Fagot, Joël; Grainger, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    What is the origin of our ability to learn orthographic knowledge? We use deep convolutional networks to emulate the primate's ventral visual stream and explore the recent finding that baboons can be trained to discriminate English words from nonwords. The networks were exposed to the exact same sequence of stimuli and reinforcement signals as the baboons in the experiment, and learned to map real visual inputs (pixels) of letter strings onto binary word/nonword responses. We show that the networks' highest levels of representations were indeed sensitive to letter combinations as postulated in our previous research. The model also captured the key empirical findings, such as generalization to novel words, along with some intriguing inter-individual differences. The present work shows the merits of deep learning networks that can simulate the whole processing chain all the way from the visual input to the response while allowing researchers to analyze the complex representations that emerge during the learning process. PMID:24416300

  10. EXPRESSION-INDEPENDENT FACE RECOGNITION USING BIOLOGICALLY INSPIRED FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    REZA EBRAHIMPOUR

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an effective two-dimensional Expression-Independent face recognition method, based on features inspired by thehuman’s visual ventral stream. A feature set is extracted by means of a feed-forward model, which contains illumination and view invariantC2 features from all images in the dataset. Then, these C2 feature vectors which derived from a cortex-like mechanism passed to a standard Nearest Neighbor classifier. We evaluated the proposed approach on JAFEE database. The results show that this model is an efficient and high accurate face recognition algorithm that is robust to facial expressions. Experiments indicate that the proposed approach maintains high recognition rate and outperforms the other alternative methods such as PCA and 2DPCA. The improvement in performance than PCA and 2DPCA based methods is about 5% and 4.5% respectively.

  11. Propulsive performance of oscillating batoid-inspired fins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, Daniel; Rein-Weston, Daphne; Dewey, Peter; Green, Melissa; Smits, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    Thrust producing ray-like pectoral fins were actuated to drive a low friction carriage through a stationary tow tank. A DC servo motor powered a gear train that produced a traveling wave motion along the chord of the fin. The amplitude of the traveling wave increased linearly along the span from root to tip. A digital optical encoder attached to the carriage tracked the position and velocity as it was propelled through the water by the oscillating fin. Velocity profiles were acquired from trials using different planforms inspired by members of the eagle ray family, as well as an idealized elliptical fin. Traveling wave frequency and wavelength were varied to investigate the propulsive performance of different gaits. Preliminary flow visualization was also performed to describe the structure of the wakes generated by the various planform geometries and locomotory gaits.

  12. Arbitrary waveform generator biologically inspired

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A system biologically inspired that produces arbitrary analog signals is studied. • The proposed system is based in the BVAM biological model. • The system is analyzed with a discrete equivalent system defined by a Poincaré map. • The operation regimes of the system are identified changing the control parameter. • The system functionality is shown by the simulations obtained from SIMULINK™. -- Abstract: This work shows and analyzes a system that produces arbitrary waveforms, which is a simplification, based on spatial discretization, of the BVAM model proposed by Barrio et al. in 1999 [1] to model the biological pattern formation. Since the analytical treatment of non-linear terms of this system is often prohibitive, its dynamic has been analyzed using a discrete equivalent system defined by a Poincaré map. In this analysis, the bifurcation diagrams and the Lyapunov exponent are the tools used to identify the different operating regimes of the system and to provide evidence of the periodicity and randomness of the generated waveforms. Also, it is shown that the analyzed system presents the period doubling phenomenon, the values of its bifurcation points are related by the Feigenbaum constant and they converge to the onset of chaos. It is shown that, the analyzed system can be electronically implemented using operational amplifiers to produce arbitrary waveforms when varying a single control parameter. The functionality and behavior of the ideal electronic implementation of the analyzed system is shown by the simulations obtained from the MatLab–Simulink™ toolbox. Finally, some problems related to a real electronic implementation are discussed. This paper gives a brief overview of how ideas from biology can be used to design new systems that produce arbitrary waveforms

  13. A Visual Information Retrieval Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jin

    2000-01-01

    Discussion of visualization for information retrieval, that transforms unseen internal semantic representation of a document collection into visible geometric displays, focuses on DARE (Distance Angle Retrieval Environment). Highlights include expression of information need; interpretation and manipulation of information retrieval models; ranking…

  14. Observations and Measurements Design Patterns within INSPIRE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleidt, K.; Cox, S.; Grellet, S.; Lowe, D.; Lutz, M.; Portele, C.; Sarretta, A.; Ventouras, S.

    2012-04-01

    Several INSPIRE spatial data themes have been specified so that their scope, in addition to classical geographic information, includes measured, modelled or simulated data. The FprEN ISO 19156 standard on Observations and Measurements (O&M) was designed for the explicit purpose of creating application schemas for such data, and thus shall be used in INSPIRE as a basis for developing data models for these themes. The following INSPIRE themes have identified O&M as integrally relevant to their thematic domain and are including elements of O&M in their data specifications: • Geology • Oceanographic geographical features • Atmospheric conditions and Meteorological geographical features • Environmental monitoring facilities • Soil In addition to these themes, several other INSPIRE themes have been identified to which observational information, while not at the core of the data specification, is relevant. Some examples of this are the INSPIRE theme "Species distribution", where primary occurrence data could be provided together with the aggregate distribution, as well as "Industrial and production facilities", where the provision of emissions data on such facilities would be useful for various environmental reporting obligations. While the O&M standard provides a generic framework for the provision of measurement data, it is also kept very abstract, and there are many ways of implementing the core structures in specific application schemas. In order to assure the consistent application of the O&M classes and properties across different INSPIRE themes, a cross-thematic working group on the use of O&M in INSPIRE has been convened. This group has analysed the requirements towards O&M within INSPIRE, identified the types of O&M design patterns required in INSPIRE and developed both additional classes identified as necessary within INSPIRE as well as guidelines detailing how this standard is to be used within INSPIRE. Some examples for these additional classes are: • the ObservationCollection class (which was included in O&M v1.0, but has been removed in the final version of FprEN ISO 19156), that serves as a container for semantically grouping multiple observations; • the ObservableProperty class, that provides structures for the definition of complex observed properties including statistical qualifiers and constraints; • the ObservingCapabilities class for providing information about the types of measurements that a facility or instrument can make in a way that reflects the semantics of the actual Observations; • the further specialization of the OM_Process (with identifier, responsible party, etc.) class that is primarily empty within the O&M concept. These additional classes and guidelines can be used by the various INSPIRE themes that integrate or reference the O&M standard, as well as for other specifications that are created outside of the INSPIRE process and extend existing INSPIRE specifications with the use of O&M. The INSPIRE O&M guidelines also contain generic analysis which may be of interest when evaluating how and whether to apply O&M to a particular domain. The results of this work will be presented.

  15. The importance of visual features in generic vs. specialized object recognition: a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghodrati, Masoud; Rajaei, Karim; Ebrahimpour, Reza

    2014-01-01

    It is debated whether the representation of objects in inferior temporal (IT) cortex is distributed over activities of many neurons or there are restricted islands of neurons responsive to a specific set of objects. There are lines of evidence demonstrating that fusiform face area (FFA-in human) processes information related to specialized object recognition (here we say within category object recognition such as face identification). Physiological studies have also discovered several patches in monkey ventral temporal lobe that are responsible for facial processing. Neuronal recording from these patches shows that neurons are highly selective for face images whereas for other objects we do not see such selectivity in IT. However, it is also well-supported that objects are encoded through distributed patterns of neural activities that are distinctive for each object category. It seems that visual cortex utilize different mechanisms for between category object recognition (e.g., face vs. non-face objects) vs. within category object recognition (e.g., two different faces). In this study, we address this question with computational simulations. We use two biologically inspired object recognition models and define two experiments which address these issues. The models have a hierarchical structure of several processing layers that simply simulate visual processing from V1 to aIT. We show, through computational modeling, that the difference between these two mechanisms of recognition can underlie the visual feature and extraction mechanism. It is argued that in order to perform generic and specialized object recognition, visual cortex must separate the mechanisms involved in within category from between categories object recognition. High recognition performance in within category object recognition can be guaranteed when class-specific features with intermediate size and complexity are extracted. However, generic object recognition requires a distributed universal dictionary of visual features in which the size of features does not have significant difference. PMID:25202259

  16. Disambiguating multi-modal scene representations using perceptual grouping constraints.

    OpenAIRE

    Pugeault, Nicolas; Wörgötter, Florentin; Krüger, Norbert

    2010-01-01

    In its early stages, the visual system suffers from a lot of ambiguity and noise that severely limits the performance of early vision algorithms. This article presents feedback mechanisms between early visual processes, such as perceptual grouping, stereopsis and depth reconstruction, that allow the system to reduce this ambiguity and improve early representation of visual information. In the first part, the article proposes a local perceptual grouping algorithm that - in addition to commonly...

  17. Learning image representations equivariant to ego-motion

    OpenAIRE

    Jayaraman, Dinesh; Grauman, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how images of objects and scenes behave in response to specific ego-motions is a crucial aspect of proper visual development, yet existing visual learning methods are conspicuously disconnected from the physical source of their images. We propose to exploit proprioceptive motor signals to provide unsupervised regularization in convolutional neural networks to learn visual representations from egocentric video. Specifically, we enforce that our learned features ...

  18. Visualization of Mined Pattern and Its Human Aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Jain, Ratnesh Kumar; Kasana, Dr R S

    2009-01-01

    Researchers got success in mining the Web usage data effectively and efficiently. But representation of the mined patterns is often not in a form suitable for direct human consumption. Hence mechanisms and tools that can represent mined patterns in easily understandable format are utilized. Different techniques are used for pattern analysis, one of them is visualization. Visualization can provide valuable assistance for data analysis and decision making tasks. In the data visualization process, technical representations of web pages are replaced by user attractive text interpretations. Experiments with the real world problems showed that the visualization can significantly increase the quality and usefulness of web log mining results. However, how decision makers perceive and interact with a visual representation can strongly influence their understanding of the data as well as the usefulness of the visual presentation. Human factors therefore contribute significantly to the visualization process and should p...

  19. Carpe Diem: Seizing the Common Core with Visual Thinking Strategies in the Visual Arts Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Mary; Unrath, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    This article demonstrates how Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) art discussions and subsequent, inspired artmaking can help reach the goals of the Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts & Literacy in History/Social Studies, Science, & Technical Subjects (CCSS-ELA). The authors describe how this was achieved in a remedial…

  20. Visualizing structures of speech expressiveness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herbelin, Bruno; Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2008-01-01

    Speech is both beautiful and informative. In this work, a conceptual study of the speech, through investigation of the tower of Babel, the archetypal phonemes, and a study of the reasons of uses of language is undertaken in order to create an artistic work investigating the nature of speech. The Babel myth speaks about distance created when aspiring to the heaven as the reason for language division. Meanwhile, Locquin states through thorough investigations that only a few phonemes are present throughout history. Our interpretation is that a system able to recognize archetypal phonemes through vowels and consonants, and which converts the speech energy into visual particles that form complex visual structures, provides us with a mean to present the expressiveness of speech into a visual mode. This system is presented in an artwork whose scenario is inspired from the reasons of language. The artwork is presented at the Re:New festival in May 2008.

  1. Kittens! Inspired by Kittens! Undergraduate Theorists Inspired by YouTube

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Diane Downer; Lewis, Mark; Peterson, Sarah; Griggs, Samantha; Grubb, Gina; Singer, Nicole; Fried, Simone; Krone, Elizabeth; Elko, Leigh; Narang, Jasmine

    2010-01-01

    A professor and students in an undergraduate honors research seminar were inspired to playfully link old and contemporary literacy theories to a 2.0 media artifact, the popular YouTube video Kittens! Inspired by Kittens! (KIbK) starring 6 year-old Maddie. In this article KIbK is theorized drawing on frames of school-based reading instruction,…

  2. Semantic representation and naming in young children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGregor, Karla K; Friedman, Rena M; Reilly, Renée M; Newman, Robyn M

    2002-04-01

    Children's semantic representations and semantic naming errors were the focus of this study. In Experiment 1, 25 normally developing children (mean age = 5 years 4 months) named, drew, and defined 20 age-appropriate objects. The results suggested that functional and physical properties are core aspects of object representations in the semantic lexicon and that these representations are often organized and accessed according to a taxonomic hierarchy. Results of a new procedure, comparative picture naming/picture drawing, suggested that the degree of knowledge in the semantic lexicon makes words more or less vulnerable to retrieval failure. Most semantic naming errors were associated with limited semantic knowledge, manifested as either lexical gaps or fragile representations. Comparison of definitions for correctly named and semantically misnamed objects provided converging evidence for this conclusion. In Experiment 2, involving 16 normally developing children (mean age = 5 years 5 months), the comparative picture naming/picture drawing results were replicated with a stimulus set that allowed a priori matching of the visual complexity of items drawn from correct and semantic error pools. Discussion focuses on the dynamic nature of semantic representations and the relation between semantic representation and naming during a period of slow mapping. The value of comparative picture naming/picture drawing as a new method for exploring children's semantic representations is emphasized. PMID:12003515

  3. The Trade-offs with Space Time Cube Representation of Spatiotemporal Patterns

    OpenAIRE

    Kristensson, Per Ola; Dahlback, Nils; Anundi, Daniel; Bjornstad, Marius; Gillberg, Hanna; Haraldsson, Jonas; Martensson, Ingrid; Nordvall, Matttias; Stahl, Josefin

    2007-01-01

    Space time cube representation is an information visualization technique where spatiotemporal data points are mapped into a cube. Fast and correct analysis of such information is important in for instance geospatial and social visualization applications. Information visualization researchers have previously argued that space time cube representation is beneficial in revealing complex spatiotemporal patterns in a dataset to users. The argument is based on the fact that both t...

  4. Signal detection of salient visual features by the early visual pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesica, Nicholas; Stanley, Garrett

    2005-01-01

    The role of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) of the thalamus in visual encoding remains an open question. Visual stimulation of the LGN produces two distinct types of responses: tonic and burst. It has been suggested that these two modes of response could serve to transmit high fidelity features of the visual world (tonic) or robustly detect salient features of the visual world (burst). Here, we use a combination of experimental and simulated LGN responses to natural scene movies to investigate the specificity of burst generation, and their role in signaling salient features of the visual scene. LGN responses to excitatory stimulus features were simulated with and without bursts and analyzed using signal detection theory. We find that bursts enhance detection of the onset of excitatory features as compared to purely tonic firing, and that algorithms inspired by this type of framework can enhance the transmission of visual information in situations with limited bandwidth. PMID:17282205

  5. Neuro-inspired smart image sensor: analog Hmax implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paindavoine, Michel; Dubois, Jérôme; Musa, Purnawarman

    2015-03-01

    Neuro-Inspired Vision approach, based on models from biology, allows to reduce the computational complexity. One of these models - The Hmax model - shows that the recognition of an object in the visual cortex mobilizes V1, V2 and V4 areas. From the computational point of view, V1 corresponds to the area of the directional filters (for example Sobel filters, Gabor filters or wavelet filters). This information is then processed in the area V2 in order to obtain local maxima. This new information is then sent to an artificial neural network. This neural processing module corresponds to area V4 of the visual cortex and is intended to categorize objects present in the scene. In order to realize autonomous vision systems (consumption of a few milliwatts) with such treatments inside, we studied and realized in 0.35?m CMOS technology prototypes of two image sensors in order to achieve the V1 and V2 processing of Hmax model.

  6. Seq2Logo: a method for construction and visualization of amino acid binding motifs and sequence profiles including sequence weighting, pseudo counts and two-sided representation of amino acid enrichment and depletion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Martin Christen FrØlund; Nielsen, Morten

    2012-01-01

    Seq2Logo is a web-based sequence logo generator. Sequence logos are a graphical representation of the information content stored in a multiple sequence alignment (MSA) and provide a compact and highly intuitive representation of the position-specific amino acid composition of binding motifs, active sites, etc. in biological sequences. Accurate generation of sequence logos is often compromised by sequence redundancy and low number of observations. Moreover, most methods available for sequence logo generation focus on displaying the position-specific enrichment of amino acids, discarding the equally valuable information related to amino acid depletion. Seq2logo aims at resolving these issues allowing the user to include sequence weighting to correct for data redundancy, pseudo counts to correct for low number of observations and different logotype representations each capturing different aspects related to amino acid enrichment and depletion. Besides allowing input in the format of peptides and MSA, Seq2Logo accepts input as Blast sequence profiles, providing easy access for non-expert end-users to characterize and identify functionally conserved/variable amino acids in any given protein of interest. The output from the server is a sequence logo and a PSSM. Seq2Logo is available at http://www.cbs.dtu.dk/biotools/Seq2Logo (14 May 2012, date last accessed).

  7. An Adaptive Quantum-inspired Differential Evolution Algorithm for 0-1 Knapsack Problem

    CERN Document Server

    Hota, Ashish Ranjan

    2011-01-01

    Differential evolution (DE) is a population based evolutionary algorithm widely used for solving multidimensional global optimization problems over continuous spaces. However, the design of its operators makes it unsuitable for many real-life constrained combinatorial optimization problems which operate on binary space. On the other hand, the quantum inspired evolutionary algorithm (QEA) is very well suitable for handling such problems by applying several quantum computing techniques such as Q-bit representation and rotation gate operator, etc. This paper extends the concept of differential operators with adaptive parameter control to the quantum paradigm and proposes the adaptive quantum-inspired differential evolution algorithm (AQDE). The performance of AQDE is found to be significantly superior as compared to QEA and a discrete version of DE on the standard 0-1 knapsack problem for all the considered test cases.

  8. An Inquiry into the Nature of Uncle Joe's Representation and Meaning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muffoletto, Robert

    2001-01-01

    Addresses a "critical" or "reflective" visual literacy. Situates visual representations and their interpretation (the construction of meaning) within a context that raises questions about benefit and power. Explores four main topics: the image as text; analysis and meaning construction; visual literacy as a liberatory practice; and implications…

  9. A hybrid quantum-inspired genetic algorithm for multiobjective flow shop scheduling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bin-Bin; Wang, Ling

    2007-06-01

    This paper proposes a hybrid quantum-inspired genetic algorithm (HQGA) for the multiobjective flow shop scheduling problem (FSSP), which is a typical NP-hard combinatorial optimization problem with strong engineering backgrounds. On the one hand, a quantum-inspired GA (QGA) based on Q-bit representation is applied for exploration in the discrete 0-1 hyperspace by using the updating operator of quantum gate and genetic operators of Q-bit. Moreover, random-key representation is used to convert the Q-bit representation to job permutation for evaluating the objective values of the schedule solution. On the other hand, permutation-based GA (PGA) is applied for both performing exploration in permutation-based scheduling space and stressing exploitation for good schedule solutions. To evaluate solutions in multiobjective sense, a randomly weighted linear-sum function is used in QGA, and a nondominated sorting technique including classification of Pareto fronts and fitness assignment is applied in PGA with regard to both proximity and diversity of solutions. To maintain the diversity of the population, two trimming techniques for population are proposed. The proposed HQGA is tested based on some multiobjective FSSPs. Simulation results and comparisons based on several performance metrics demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed HQGA. PMID:17550113

  10. Method matters: Systematic effects of testing procedure on visual working memory sensitivity

    OpenAIRE

    Makovski, Tal; Watson, Leah M.; Koutstaal, Wilma; Jiang, Yuhong V.

    2010-01-01

    Visual working memory (WM) is traditionally considered a robust form of visual representation that survives changes in object motion, observer's position, and other visual transients. This study presents data that are inconsistent with the traditional view. We show that memory sensitivity is dramatically influenced by small variations in the testing procedure, supporting the idea that representations in visual WM are susceptible to interference from testing. In this study, participants were s...

  11. Understanding visualization: a formal approach using category theory and semiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Paul; Faith, Joe; Rossiter, Nick

    2013-06-01

    This paper combines the vocabulary of semiotics and category theory to provide a formal analysis of visualization. It shows how familiar processes of visualization fit the semiotic frameworks of both Saussure and Peirce, and extends these structures using the tools of category theory to provide a general framework for understanding visualization in practice, including: Relationships between systems, data collected from those systems, renderings of those data in the form of representations, the reading of those representations to create visualizations, and the use of those visualizations to create knowledge and understanding of the system under inspection. The resulting framework is validated by demonstrating how familiar information visualization concepts (such as literalness, sensitivity, redundancy, ambiguity, generalizability, and chart junk) arise naturally from it and can be defined formally and precisely. This paper generalizes previous work on the formal characterization of visualization by, inter alia, Ziemkiewicz and Kosara and allows us to formally distinguish properties of the visualization process that previous work does not. PMID:23559513

  12. Visualization of Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P. W.; Strelitz, R. A.

    2012-12-01

    The output of a simulation is best comprehended through the agency and methods of visualization, but a vital component of good science is knowledge of uncertainty. While great strides have been made in the quantification of uncertainty, especially in simulation, there is still a notable gap: there is no widely accepted means of simultaneously viewing the data and the associated uncertainty in one pane. Visualization saturates the screen, using the full range of color, shadow, opacity and tricks of perspective to display even a single variable. There is no room in the visualization expert's repertoire left for uncertainty. We present a method of visualizing uncertainty without sacrificing the clarity and power of the underlying visualization that works as well in 3-D and time-varying visualizations as it does in 2-D. At its heart, it relies on a principal tenet of continuum mechanics, replacing the notion of value at a point with a more diffuse notion of density as a measure of content in a region. First, the uncertainties calculated or tabulated at each point are transformed into a piecewise continuous field of uncertainty density . We next compute a weighted Voronoi tessellation of a user specified N convex polygonal/polyhedral cells such that each cell contains the same amount of uncertainty as defined by . The problem thus devolves into minimizing . Computation of such a spatial decomposition is O(N*N ), and can be computed iteratively making it possible to update easily over time as well as faster. The polygonal mesh does not interfere with the visualization of the data and can be easily toggled on or off. In this representation, a small cell implies a great concentration of uncertainty, and conversely. The content weighted polygons are identical to the cartogram familiar to the information visualization community in the depiction of things voting results per stat. Furthermore, one can dispense with the mesh or edges entirely to be replaced by symbols or glyphs at the generating points (effectively the center of the polygon). This methodology readily admits to rigorous statistical analysis using standard components found in R and thus entirely compatible with the visualization package we use (Visit and/or ParaView), the language we use (Python) and the UVCDAT environment that provides the programmer and analyst workbench. We will demonstrate the power and effectiveness of this methodology in climate studies. We will further argue that our method of defining (or predicting) values in a region has many advantages over the traditional visualization notion of value at a point.

  13. The Role of the Human Extrastriate Visual Cortex in Mirror Symmetry Discrimination: A TMS-Adaptation Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Zaira; Mattavelli, Giulia; Papagno, Costanza; Herbert, Andrew; Silvanto, Juha

    2011-01-01

    The human visual system is able to efficiently extract symmetry information from the visual environment. Prior neuroimaging evidence has revealed symmetry-preferring neuronal representations in the dorsolateral extrastriate visual cortex; the objective of the present study was to investigate the necessity of these representations in symmetry…

  14. Eye fixation determined by the visual shape and semantic matches in language-mediated visual search

    OpenAIRE

    Shi, Lei

    2007-01-01

    When participants are presented simultaneously a visual display with spoken input, eye fixation could be determined by a match between representations from spoken input and visual objects. Previous studies found that eye fixation on the semantic-related object and the shape competitor could be determined by the semantic match and the visual match (Huettig & Altmann, 2007). However, two matches could not be substituted by each other. Huettig and McQueen (2007) claimed the co-existence of the v...

  15. Data visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Azzam, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    Do you communicate data and information to stakeholders? In Part 1, we introduce recent developments in the quantitative and qualitative data visualization field and provide a historical perspective on data visualization, its potential role in evaluation practice, and future directions. Part 2 delivers concrete suggestions for optimally using data visualization in evaluation, as well as suggestions for best practices in data visualization design. It focuses on specific quantitative and qualitative data visualization approaches that include data dashboards, graphic recording, and geographic information systems (GIS). Readers will get a step-by-step process for designing an effective data dashboard system for programs and organizations, and various suggestions to improve their utility.

  16. Scientific Visualizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientific Visualizations is part of the Learning Center and Prism project at the University of Washington. The Scientific Visualizations active page will highlight new tools and techniques used in the field of building visualizations. It will provide examples of environmental visualizations, links, news and events related to using visualizations in education and research. Users may also follow links to several other active pages that are part of this project such as ocean productivity, Big Beef Creek (a field station that offers a unique opportunity for teaching in fisheries), remote sensing and GIS and mapping.

  17. Visual imagery without visual perception?

    OpenAIRE

    Helder Bértolo

    2005-01-01

    The question regarding visual imagery and visual perception remain an open issue. Many studies have tried to understand if the two processes share the same mechanisms or if they are independent, using different neural substrates. Most research has been directed towards the need of activation of primary visual areas during imagery. Here we review some of the works providing evidence for both claims. It seems that studying visual imagery in blind subjects can be us...

  18. How visual is visual culture

    OpenAIRE

    Sonesson, Go?ran

    2007-01-01

    If we admit that, with the exception of language, human perception is predominantly visual, it is reasonable to think that all phenomena conveyed by the visual senses have something in common, but then visual semiotics/visual culture will comprehend much more than painting, sculpture, and architecture. The double coding hypotheses of cognitive psychology, as well as Lessing’s classical opposition between language and painting, tell us something about this basic opposition. But to understand...

  19. Visualization in Medieval Alchemy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Obrist

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores major trends in visualization of medieval theories of natural and artificial transformation of substances in relation to their philosophical and theological bases. The function of pictorial forms is analyzed in terms of the prevailing conceptions of science and methods of transmitting knowledge. The documents under examination date from the thirteenth to the fifteenth century. In these, pictorial representations include lists and tables, geometrical figures, depictions of furnaces and apparatus, and figurative elements mainly from the vegetable and animal realms. An effort is made to trace the earliest evidence of these differing pictorial types.

  20. Learning Deep Face Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Haoqiang; Cao, Zhimin; Jiang, Yuning; Yin, Qi; Doudou, Chinchilla

    2014-01-01

    Face representation is a crucial step of face recognition systems. An optimal face representation should be discriminative, robust, compact, and very easy-to-implement. While numerous hand-crafted and learning-based representations have been proposed, considerable room for improvement is still present. In this paper, we present a very easy-to-implement deep learning framework for face representation. Our method bases on a new structure of deep network (called Pyramid CNN). T...

  1. Report on the First National Conference on Knowledge Representation and Inference in Sanskrit

    OpenAIRE

    Briggs, Rick

    1987-01-01

    This report is a review of the First National Conference on Knowledge Representation and Inference in Sanskrit, Bangalore, India, 20 through 22 December, 1986. The conference was inspired by an article that appeared in the Spring 1987 issue of AI Magazine -- "Knowledge Representation in Sanskrit and Artificial Intelligence." A working group has been created to pursue the goals of the conference and to possibly arrange another conference for 1987 and 1988.

  2. Women and the Discourses of the Visual: Where Are Women in This Picture?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condron, Linda; And Others

    The place of women in the existing and emergent discourses of the visual and spatial is explored. When gender and the visual-spatial emerge together, the visual and spatial are almost always associated with the masculine perspective. The social construction of women is tied to visual-spatial representations in diverse domains. Within the…

  3. Visual Language in Visual Communication

    OpenAIRE

    Jia Wang

    2009-01-01

    In visual communication the design information is mainly communicated by visual language, the correct use of which is the standard of evaluation of a graphic design composition. Therefore it is necessary to understand and percept visual language properly. It will be helpful for viewers to percept the desired information from the designer as well as the significance within the work.

  4. Modelling and visualizing morphology in the fungus Alternaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taralova, Ekaterina H; Schlecht, Joseph; Barnard, Kobus; Pryor, Barry M

    2011-11-01

    Alternaria is one of the most cosmopolitan fungal genera encountered and impacts humans and human activities in areas of material degradation, phytopathology, food toxicology, and respiratory disease. Contemporary methods of taxon identification rely on assessments of morphology related to sporulation, which are critical for accurate diagnostics. However, the morphology of Alternaria is quite complex, and precise characterization can be laborious, time-consuming, and often restricted to experts in this field. To make morphology characterization easier and more broadly accessible, a generalized statistical model was developed for the three-dimensional geometric structure of the sporulation apparatus. The model is inspired by the widely used grammar-based models for plants, Lindenmayer-systems, which build structure by repeated application of rules for growth. Adjusting the parameters of the underlying probability distributions yields variations in the morphology, and thus the approach provides an excellent tool for exploring the morphology of Alternaria under different assumptions, as well as understanding how it is largely the consequence of local rules for growth. Further, different choices of parameters lead to different model groups, which can then be visually compared to published descriptions or microscopy images to validate parameters for species-specific models. The approach supports automated analysis, as the models can be fit to image data using statistical inference, and the explicit representation of the geometry allows the accurate computation of any morphological quantity. Furthermore, because the model can encode the statistical variation of geometric parameters for different species, it will allow automated species identification from microscopy images using statistical inference. In summary, the approach supports visualization of morphology, automated quantification of phenotype structure, and identification based on form. PMID:22036294

  5. Mapping the recent past: Visualization of online news archives

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Xin

    2007-01-01

    This thesis is about studying online news archives through design and visual representation. For the design work, I have chosen to focus on a case study: the archives of BBC online news. Two experiments were carried out: a quantitative data visualization of news coverage by country, and a set of visualizations of the textual contents of the news articles. This thesis is an exploration of the subject of information visualization from a graphic designer’s point of view. The field of infor...

  6. The Importance of Visual Features in Generic versus Specialized Object Recognition: A Computational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Ebrahimpour

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available It is debated whether the representation of objects in inferior temporal (IT cortex is distributed over activities of many neurons or there are restricted islands of neurons responsive to a specific set of objects. There are lines of evidence demonstrating that fusiform face area (FFA-in human processes information related to specialized object recognition (here we say within category object recognition such as face identification. Physiological studies have also discovered several patches in monkey ventral temporal lobe that are responsible for facial processing. Neuronal recording from these patches shows that neurons are highly selective for face images whereas for other objects we do not see such selectivity in IT. However, it is also well-supported that objects are encoded through distributed patterns of neural activities that are distinctive for each object category. It seems that visual cortex utilize different mechanisms for between category object recognition (e.g. face vs. non-face objects versus within category object recognition (e.g. two different faces. In this study, we address this question with computational simulations. We use two biologically inspired object recognition models (one proposed in our group and define two experiments which address these issues. The models have a hierarchical structure of several processing layers that simply simulate visual processing from V1 to aIT. We show, through computational modeling, that the difference between these two mechanisms of recognition can underlie the visual feature and extraction mechanism. It is argued that in order to perform generic and specialized object recognition, visual cortex must separate the mechanisms involved in within category from between categories object recognition. High recognition performance in within category object recognition can be guaranteed when class-specific features with intermediate size and complexity are extracted. However, generic object recognition requires

  7. Solar Image Analysis and Visualization

    CERN Document Server

    Ireland, J

    2009-01-01

    This volume presents a selection of papers on the state of the art of image enhancement, automated feature detection, machine learning, and visualization tools in support of solar physics that focus on the challenges presented by new ground-based and space-based instrumentation. The articles and topics were inspired by the Third Solar Image Processing Workshop, held at Trinity College Dublin, Ireland but contributions from other experts have been included as well. This book is mainly aimed at researchers and graduate students working on image processing and compter vision in astronomy and solar physics.

  8. Visual Analysis of Weblog Content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory, Michelle L.; Payne, Deborah A.; McColgin, Dave; Cramer, Nick O.; Love, Douglas V.

    2007-03-26

    In recent years, one of the advances of the World Wide Web is social media and one of the fastest growing aspects of social media is the blogosphere. Blogs make content creation easy and are highly accessible through web pages and syndication. With their growing influence, a need has arisen to be able to monitor the opinions and insight revealed within their content. In this paper we describe a technical approach for analyzing the content of blog data using a visual analytic tool, IN-SPIRE, developed by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. We highlight the capabilities of this tool that are particularly useful for information gathering from blog data.

  9. A Neuro-Inspired Spike-Based PID Motor Controller for Multi-Motor Robots with Low Cost FPGAs

    OpenAIRE

    Anton Civit-Balcells; Rafael Paz-Vicente; Dominguez-morales, Manuel J.; Alejandro Linares-Barranco; Gabriel Jimenez-Moreno; Angel Jimenez-Fernandez

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a neuro-inspired spike-based close-loop controller written in VHDL and implemented for FPGAs. This controller has been focused on controlling a DC motor speed, but only using spikes for information representation, processing and DC motor driving. It could be applied to other motors with proper driver adaptation. This controller architecture represents one of the latest layers in a Spiking Neural Network (SNN), which implements a bridge between robotics actuators and s...

  10. Inspired by Athletes, Myths, and Poets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melvin, Samantha

    2010-01-01

    Tales of love and hate, of athleticism, heroism, devotion to gods and goddesses that influenced myth and culture are a way of sharing ancient Greece's rich history. In this article, the author describes how her students created their own Greek-inspired clay vessels as artifacts of their study. (Contains 6 online resources.)

  11. Astrophysical constrains on Ungravity inspired models

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolami, O; Santos, P

    2009-01-01

    We use stellar dynamics arguments to constrain the relevant parameters of ungravity inspired models. We show that resulting bounds do constrain the parameters of the theory of unparticles, as far as its energy scale is higher than $\\Lambda_U > 1 TeV$ and $d_U$ is close to unity.

  12. Water Treatment Technologies Inspire Healthy Beverages

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Mike Johnson, a former technician at Johnson Space Center, drew on his expertise as a wastewater engineer to create a line of kombucha-based probiotic drinks. Unpeeled Inc., based in Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, employs 12 people and has sold more than 6 million units of its NASA-inspired beverage.

  13. Great Quotes To Inspire Great Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    benShea, Noah

    This book provides a collection of quotes designed to offer support and inspiration to teachers as they face the daily emotional, spiritual, intellectual, and physical challenges of their professional and personal lives. The book's 26 sections focus on: the art of teaching; adversity; behavior; character; children; collaboration and teamwork;…

  14. $SO(10)$ inspired extended GMSB models

    CERN Document Server

    Jelinski, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Influence of messenger-matter superpotential interactions on the renormalization of Yukawa couplings in the context of extended GMSB models is analysed. We present a convenient method for treating decoupling of messengers and related redefinition of MSSM fields. Discussed approach is used to study top-bottom-tau Yukawa unification within specific $SO(10)$ inspired GUT model.

  15. Biologically Inspired Nanomaterials: A Conference Report

    OpenAIRE

    Demirel, Melik; Parikh, Atul; Crespi, Vincent; Reed, Scott

    2007-01-01

    The understanding of the nanoscale physical properties of biomolecules and biomaterials will ultimately promote the research in the biological sciences. In this review, we focused on theory, simulation, and experiments involving nanoscale materials inspired by biological systems. Specifically, self-assembly in living and synthetic materials, bio-functionalized nanomaterials and probing techniques that use nanomaterials are discussed.

  16. Basket Weaving Inspired by the Gullah

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Rita

    2010-01-01

    Many different cultures created and used the basket not only for utilitarian purposes, but also for ceremonial uses. In this article, the author describes an eighth-grade project inspired by the basket making of the Gullah people, who live along the coast of South Carolina, Georgia and Florida.

  17. Bio-Inspired Self-Cleaning Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kesong; Jiang, Lei

    2012-08-01

    Self-cleaning surfaces have drawn a lot of interest for both fundamental research and practical applications. This review focuses on the recent progress in mechanism, preparation, and application of self-cleaning surfaces. To date, self-cleaning has been demonstrated by the following four conceptual approaches: (a) TiO2-based superhydrophilic self-cleaning, (b) lotus effect self-cleaning (superhydrophobicity with a small sliding angle), (c) gecko setae-inspired self-cleaning, and (d) underwater organisms-inspired antifouling self-cleaning. Although a number of self-cleaning products have been commercialized, the remaining challenges and future outlook of self-cleaning surfaces are also briefly addressed. Through evolution, nature, which has long been a source of inspiration for scientists and engineers, has arrived at what is optimal. We hope this review will stimulate interdisciplinary collaboration among material science, chemistry, biology, physics, nanoscience, engineering, etc., which is essential for the rational design and reproducible construction of bio-inspired multifunctional self-cleaning surfaces in practical applications.

  18. Solar System Visualization (SSV) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd, Jessida L.

    2005-01-01

    The Solar System Visualization (SSV) project aims at enhancing scientific and public understanding through visual representations and modeling procedures. The SSV project's objectives are to (1) create new visualization technologies, (2) organize science observations and models, and (3) visualize science results and mission Plans. The SSV project currently supports the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER) mission, the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO), and Cassini. In support of the these missions, the SSV team has produced pan and zoom animations of large mosaics to reveal details of surface features and topography, created 3D animations of science instruments and procedures, formed 3-D anaglyphs from left and right stereo pairs, and animated registered multi-resolution mosaics to provide context for microscopic images.

  19. Dictionary learning in visual computing

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    The last few years have witnessed fast development on dictionary learning approaches for a set of visual computing tasks, largely due to their utilization in developing new techniques based on sparse representation. Compared with conventional techniques employing manually defined dictionaries, such as Fourier Transform and Wavelet Transform, dictionary learning aims at obtaining a dictionary adaptively from the data so as to support optimal sparse representation of the data. In contrast to conventional clustering algorithms like K-means, where a data point is associated with only one cluster c

  20. Educations of Vision - relational strategies in visual culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illeris, Helene

    2004-01-01

    The article is divided into three parts. Through examples from twentieth century Scandinavian visual arts education the first part ?Epistemological inquiries? discusses how the historical and social construction of dominant modern strategies of vision has occurred. The second part ?Experimentalist redescriptions? employs poststructuralist and feminist thinking about visual culture in an attempt to explore alternative understandings of visual education. In the final part ?Educations of vision in late modernity? socialization and self creation are proposed as two different, but supplementary, educational functions which contemporary visual education inspired by epistemological and experimentalist approaches should aim to fulfill.

  1. Visual imagery without visual perception?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helder Bértolo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The question regarding visual imagery and visual perception remain an open issue. Many studies have tried to understand if the two processes share the same mechanisms or if they are independent, using different neural substrates. Most research has been directed towards the need of activation of primary visual areas during imagery. Here we review some of the works providing evidence for both claims. It seems that studying visual imagery in blind subjects can be used as a way of answering some of those questions, namely if it is possible to have visual imagery without visual perception. We present results from the work of our group using visual activation in dreams and its relation with EEG?s spectral components, showing that congenitally blind have visual contents in their dreams and are able to draw them; furthermore their Visual Activation Index is negatively correlated with EEG alpha power. This study supports the hypothesis that it is possible to have visual imagery without visual experience.

  2. Digital search trees and chaos game representation

    OpenAIRE

    Ce?nac, Peggy; Chauvin, Brigitte; Ginouillac, Ste?phane; Pouyanne, Nicolas

    2009-01-01

    Abstract In this paper, we consider a possible representation of a DNA sequence in a quaternary tree, in which one can visualize repetitions of subwords (seen as suffixes of subsequences). The CGR-tree turns a sequence of letters into a Digital Search Tree (DST), obtained from the suffixes of the reversed sequence. Several results are known concerning the height, the insertion depth for DST built from independent successive random sequences having the same distribution. Here...

  3. Blind Audiovisual Source Separation Using Sparse Representations

    OpenAIRE

    Llagostera Casanovas, Anna; Monaci, Gianluca; Vandergheynst, Pierre

    2007-01-01

    In this work we present a method to jointly separate active audio and visual structures on a given mixture. Blind Audiovisual Source Separation is achieved exploiting the coherence between a video signal and a one-microphone audio track. The efficient representation of audio and video sequences allows to build relationships between correlated structures on both modalities. Video structures exhibiting strong correlations with the audio signal and that are spatially close are grouped usin...

  4. Pathway Preserving Representation of Metabolic Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Lambert, Antoine; Dubois, Jonathan; Bourqui, Romain

    2011-01-01

    Improvements in biological data acquisition and genomes sequencing now allow to reconstruct entire metabolic networks of many living organisms. The size and complexity of these networks prohibit manual drawing and thereby urge the need of dedicated visualization techniques. An ef?cient representation of such a network should preserve the topological information of metabolic pathways while respecting biological drawing conventions. These constraints complicate the automatic generation of suc...

  5. Role of homeostasis in learning sparse representations

    OpenAIRE

    Perrinet, Laurent

    2010-01-01

    Neurons in the input layer of primary visual cortex in primates develop edge-like receptive fields. One approach to understanding the emergence of this response is to state that neural activity has to efficiently represent sensory data with respect to the statistics of natural scenes. Furthermore, it is believed that such an efficient coding is achieved using a competition across neurons so as to generate a sparse representation, that is, where a relatively small number of n...

  6. Using the INSPIRAL program to search for gravitational waves from low-mass binary inspiral

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The INSPIRAL program is the LIGO Scientific Collaboration's computational engine for the search for gravitational waves from binary neutron stars and sub-solar mass black holes. We describe how this program, which makes use of the FINDCHIRP algorithm, is integrated into a sophisticated data analysis pipeline that was used in the search for low-mass binary inspirals in data taken during the second LIGO science run

  7. Graph-based clustering and data visualization algorithms

    CERN Document Server

    Vathy-Fogarassy, Ágnes

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a data visualization technique that combines graph-based topology representation and dimensionality reduction methods to visualize the intrinsic data structure in a low-dimensional vector space. The application of graphs in clustering and visualization has several advantages. A graph of important edges (where edges characterize relations and weights represent similarities or distances) provides a compact representation of the entire complex data set. This text describes clustering and visualization methods that are able to utilize information hidden in these graphs, based on

  8. Configuration space representation in parallel coordinates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiorini, Paolo; Inselberg, Alfred

    1989-01-01

    By means of a system of parallel coordinates, a nonprojective mapping from R exp N to R squared is obtained for any positive integer N. In this way multivariate data and relations can be represented in the Euclidean plane (embedded in the projective plane). Basically, R squared with Cartesian coordinates is augmented by N parallel axes, one for each variable. The N joint variables of a robotic device can be represented graphically by using parallel coordinates. It is pointed out that some properties of the relation are better perceived visually from the parallel coordinate representation, and that new algorithms and data structures can be obtained from this representation. The main features of parallel coordinates are described, and an example is presented of their use for configuration space representation of a mechanical arm (where Cartesian coordinates cannot be used).

  9. The Inspiration of Hope in Substance Abuse Counseling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehn, Corinne; Cutcliffe, John R.

    2012-01-01

    This study used a grounded theory method to explore how counselors inspire hope in clients struggling with substance abuse. Findings from 10 participants revealed that hope inspiration occurred in 3 phases and consisted of several categories of hope-inspiring processes. Implications for counseling practice, counselor education, and research are…

  10. Visual Analysis of Complex Networks and Community Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bin; Ye, Qi; Wang, Yi; Bi, Ran; Suo, Lijun; Hu, Deyong; Yang, Shengqi

    Many real-world domains can be represented as complex networks.A good visualization of a large and complex network is worth more than millions of words. Visual depictions of networks, which exploit human visual processing, are more prone to cognition of the structure of such complex networks than the computational representation. We star by briefly introducing some key technologies of network visualization, such as graph drawing algorithm and community discovery methods. The typical tools for network visualization are also reviewed. A newly developed software framework JSNVA for network visual analysis is introduced. Finally,the applications of JSNVA in bibliometric analysis and mobile call graph analysis are presented.

  11. Comparative Visualization of Climate Simulation Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röber, Niklas; Meier-Fleischer, Karin; Böttinger, Michael

    2014-05-01

    Visualization is the process of transforming abstract (scientific) data into a graphical representation, to aid in the understanding of the information contained within the data. Climate data sets are typically quite large, time varying, and consist of many different variables that are sampled on an underlying grid. A variety of different climate models - and sub models - are developed to simulate the climate system and its components, such as the physics of the atmosphere and the ocean, marine biogeochemical processes and the land biosphere. Visualization software is used to assist in the process of visualization and data analysis by transforming the abstract numerical information into a graphical illustration. Different approaches exist in the design of visualization software and for the process of visualization itself, depending on the type and nature of the data as well as on the visualization goal. In addition to a large high performance compute cluster that is exclusively used for climate simulations, the German Climate Computing Centre (DKRZ) also hosts a dedicated visualization cluster for post-processing, data analysis and visualization. On this visualization server, a variety of software is installed to assist the user in the data visualization task. Amongst others, the software stack includes Avizo Green, CDO, NCL, Paraview and SimVis. Each tool has its own strengths and weaknesses, and is selected by the user with regard to the visualization goal. While Avizo Green is great for visualizing the data out of the box, SimVis and Paraview are better suited for an interactive and explorative data analysis. This PICO presentation uses several different visualization solutions - among them Avizo Green, NCL, Paraview and SimVis - to analyze and visualize the same climate data set. We will thereby explicitly focus on each software's strengths, and not highlight its weaknesses. This PICO interactively shows that - depending on the visualization tool used - not only are different visualizations created, but also different visualization stories can be told.

  12. Accessing embodied object representations from vision: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matheson, Heath; White, Nicole; McMullen, Patricia

    2015-05-01

    Theories of embodied cognition (EC) propose that object concepts are represented by reactivations of sensorimotor experiences of different objects. Abundant research from linguistic paradigms provides support for the notion that sensorimotor simulations are involved in cognitive tasks like comprehension. However, it is unclear whether object concepts, as accessed from the visual presentation of objects, are embodied. In the present article we review a large body of visual cognitive research that addresses 5 main predictions of the theory of EC. First, EC accounts predict that visual presentation of manipulable objects, but not nonmanipulable objects, should activate motor representations. Second, EC predicts that sensorimotor activity is necessary to perform visual-cognitive tasks such as object naming. Third, EC posits the existence of distinct neural ensembles that integrate information from action and vision. Fourth, EC predicts that relationships between visual and motor activity change throughout development. Fifth, EC predicts that the visual presentation of objects or actions should prime performance cross-modally. We summarize findings from neuroimaging, neuropsychology, neurophysiology, development, and behavioral paradigms. We show that while much of the research published so far demonstrates that there is a relationship between visual and motoric representations, there is no evidence supporting a strong form of EC. We conclude that sensorimotor simulations may not be required to perform visual cognitive tasks and highlight a number of directions for future research that could provide strong support for EC in visual cognitive paradigms. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:25314679

  13. The visual language of technique

    CERN Document Server

    2015-01-01

    Volume 1 : The book is inspired by the first seminar in a cycle connected to the celebrations of the 150th anniversary of the Politecnico di Milano (May 2013). "Dealing with the Image. Ivory Towers and Virtual Bridges" was the motto of this meeting, aiming to stimulate a discussion among engineers, designers and architects, all of whom are traditionally involved in the use of the Image as a specialized language supporting their work, their research activities, and their educational tasks. The volume also includes essays and contributions of invited or interviewed authors from other disciplines, namely Philosophy, Mathematics and Semiotics, together with articles from the poster session and a report from the round table. According to Regis Debray, in the present "Visual Age", which he has significantly defined as a "Video-Sphere", all the information tends to be processed and controlled by means of visual devices. This occurs especially in the various branches of many technical studies and activities, one of ...

  14. Destination visual image and expectation of experiences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ye, H.; Tussyadiah, Iis

    2011-01-01

    A unique experience is the essence of tourism sought by tourists. The most effective way to communicate the notion of a tourism experience at a destination is to provide visual cues that stimulate the imagination and connect with potential tourists in a personal way. This study aims at understanding how a visual image is relevant to the expectation of experiences by deconstructing images of a destination and interpreting visitors' perceptions of these images and the experiences associated with them. The results suggest that tourists with different understandings of desirable experiences found different contents and notions of images inspired them to visit a destination. Several managerial implications are discussed. © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC.

  15. A Novel Quantum Inspired Cuckoo Search Algorithm for Bin Packing Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdesslem Layeb

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Bin Packing Problem (BPP is one of the most known combinatorial optimization problems. This problem consists to pack a set of items into a minimum number of bins. There are several variants of this problem; the most basic problem is the one-dimensional bin packing problem (1-BPP. In this paper, we present a new approach based on the quantum inspired cuckoo search algorithm to deal with the 1-BPP problem. The contribution consists in defining an appropriate quantum representation based on qubit representation to represent bin packing solutions. The second contribution is proposition of a new hybrid quantum measure operation which uses first fit heuristic to pack no filled objects by the standard measure operation. The obtained results are very encouraging and show the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  16. Early ERP signature of hearing impairment in visual rhyme judgment

    OpenAIRE

    ElisabetClasson; MikaelJohansson

    2013-01-01

    Postlingually acquired hearing impairment is associated with changes in the representation of sound in semantic long-term memory. An indication of this is the lower performance on visual rhyme judgment tasks in conditions where phonological and orthographic cues mismatch, requiring high reliance on phonological representations. In this study, event-related potentials (ERPs) were used for the first time to investigate the neural correlates of phonological processing in visual rhyme judgments i...

  17. Semantic Web Data Visualization with Graph Style Sheets

    OpenAIRE

    Pietriga, Emmanuel

    2006-01-01

    Visual paradigms such as node-link diagrams are well suited to the representation of Semantic Web data encoded with the Resource Description Framework (RDF), whose data model can be seen as a directed labeled graph. However, these representations are not fully satisfying: diagrams can quickly become big and over-cluttered, making them hard to understand. This problem can be partly ad- dressed by visually transforming the graphs: filtering information, providing alternative layouts for specifi...

  18. A Visual Language for Web Querying and Reasoning

    OpenAIRE

    Kraus, Michael; Bry, Franc?ois; Kitagawa, Kazuhiro

    2003-01-01

    As XML is increasingly being used to represent information on the Web, query and reasoning languages for such data are needed. This article argues that in contrast to the navigational approach taken in particular by XPath and XQuery, a positional approach as used in the language Xcerpt is better suited for a straightforward visual representation. The constructs of the pattern- and rule-based query language Xcerpt are introduced and it is shown how the visual representation visXcerpt renders t...

  19. A dedicated binding mechanism for the visual control of movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichenbach, Alexandra; Franklin, David W; Zatka-Haas, Peter; Diedrichsen, Jörn

    2014-03-31

    The human motor system is remarkably proficient in the online control of visually guided movements, adjusting to changes in the visual scene within 100 ms [1-3]. This is achieved through a set of highly automatic processes [4] translating visual information into representations suitable for motor control [5, 6]. For this to be accomplished, visual information pertaining to target and hand need to be identified and linked to the appropriate internal representations during the movement. Meanwhile, other visual information must be filtered out, which is especially demanding in visually cluttered natural environments. If selection of relevant sensory information for online control was achieved by visual attention, its limited capacity [7] would substantially constrain the efficiency of visuomotor feedback control. Here we demonstrate that both exogenously and endogenously cued attention facilitate the processing of visual target information [8], but not of visual hand information. Moreover, distracting visual information is more efficiently filtered out during the extraction of hand compared to target information. Our results therefore suggest the existence of a dedicated visuomotor binding mechanism that links the hand representation in visual and motor systems. PMID:24631246

  20. Visualization Software for Molecular Assemblies

    OpenAIRE

    Goddard, Thomas D; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    Software for viewing three-dimensional models and maps of viruses, ribosomes, filaments and other molecular assemblies is advancing on many fronts. New developments include molecular representations that offer better control over level of detail, lighting that improves the perception of depth, and two-dimensional projections that simplify data interpretation. Programmable graphics processors offer quality, speed and visual effects not previously possible, while 3D printers, haptic interaction...

  1. The Communication Of Visual Imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Mark A.

    1983-10-01

    The ability to electronically collect, compile, and translate large arrays of statistical information into animated visual character representations provides a new dimension for processing and communicating information. Interfacing remote sensing instrumentation and electronic digital recording devices with computerized image processing techniques make it possible to produce computer generated videographic animated simulation models from remotely sensed information. This electronic graphic format creates a new multidimensional approach for exploring and enhancing the process of communicating information.

  2. Neurobiologically Inspired Control of Engineered Flapping Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Chung, Soon-Jo; Stoner, Jeremiah R

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a new control approach and dynamic model for engineered flapping flight with many interacting degrees of freedom. This paper explores the applications of neurobiologically inspired control systems in the form of Central Pattern Generators (CPG) to control flapping flight dynamics. A rigorous mathematical and control theoretic framework to design complex three dimensional wing motions is presented based on phase synchronization and Hopf bifurcation. In particular, we show that tailless aircraft alternating between flapping and gliding can be effectively stabilized by smooth wing motions driven by the CPG network. Furthermore, a novel robotic testbed has been developed to emulate the flight of bats. This model has shoulder and leg joints totaling ten control variables of wing properties. Results of wind tunnel experiments and numerical simulation of CPG-based flight control validate the effectiveness of the proposed neurobiologically inspired control approach.

  3. Representation Sharing for Prolog

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen, Phuong-Lan

    2011-01-01

    Representation sharing can reduce the memory footprint of a program by sharing one representation between duplicate terms. The most common implementation of representation sharing in functional programming systems is known as hash-consing. In the context of Prolog, representation sharing has been given little attention. Some current techniques that deal with representation sharing are reviewed. The new contributions are: (1) an easy implementation of {\\em input sharing} for {\\em findall/3}; (2) a description of a {\\em sharer} module that introduces representation sharing at runtime. Their realization is shown in the context of the WAM as implemented by hProlog. Both can be adapted to any WAM-like Prolog implementation. The sharer works independently of the garbage collector, but it can be made to cooperate with the garbage collector. Benchmark results show that the sharer has a cost comparable to the heap garbage collector, that its effectiveness is highly application dependent, and that its policy must be tu...

  4. Autobiography: Inspiring new visions of teacher learning

    OpenAIRE

    Irene Simon

    2006-01-01

    Abstract: The purpose of this article is to broaden the tradition of autobiography by using it as a way in which teachers can identify sources of inspiration in their educational experience. In the process, my aim is to make explicit the links between autobiography, learning and meta learning. Extending autobiographical inquiry to include different levels at which learning takes place serves to highlight the importance not only of the individual context of learning (the private self), but als...

  5. Hamiltonian Hydrodynamics and Irrotational Binary Inspiral

    OpenAIRE

    Markakis, Charalampos M.

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational waves from neutron-star and black-hole binaries carry valuable information on their physical properties and probe physics inaccessible to the laboratory. Although development of black-hole gravitational-wave templates in the past decade has been revolutionary, the corresponding work for double neutron-star systems has lagged. Neutron stars can be well-modelled as simple barotropic fluids during the part of binary inspiral most relevant to gravitational wave ast...

  6. Tidal interaction in binary black hole inspiral

    OpenAIRE

    Price, Richard H.; Whelan, John T.

    2001-01-01

    In rotating viscous fluid stars, tidal torque leads to an exchange of spin and orbital angular momentum. The horizon of a black hole has an effective viscosity that is large compared to that of stellar fluids, and an effective tidal torque may lead to important effects in the strong field interaction at the endpoint of the inspiral of two rapidly rotating holes. In the most interesting case both holes are maximally rotating and all angular momenta (orbital and spins) are ali...

  7. Sea-cucumber skin inspires new material

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS; )

    2008-03-06

    Scientists have long been amazed by the skin of a sea cucumber, which can switch from stiff to floppy, or vice versa, in mere seconds in order to help the animal defend itself against predators. Inspired by this quick-change act, researchers have developed a new material that can also switch between rigid and flexible states. They hope that this material, or one like it, might someday be used as part of medical devices that are implanted inside the body.

  8. Membrane computing: traces, neural inspired models, controls

    OpenAIRE

    Ionescu, Armand-Mihai

    2008-01-01

    Membrane Computing:Traces, Neural Inspired Models, ControlsAutor: Armand-Mihai IonescuDirectores: Dr. Victor Mitrana (URV)Dr. Takashi Yokomori (Universidad Waseda, Japón)Resumen Castellano:El presente trabajo está dedicado a una área muy activa del cálculo natural (que intenta descubrir la odalidad en la cual la naturaleza calcula, especialmente al nivel biológico), es decir el cálculo con membranas, y más preciso, a los modelos de membranas inspirados de la funcionalidad biológica de...

  9. Exactly Solvable SFT Inspired Phantom Model

    OpenAIRE

    Aref Eva, I. Ya; Koshelev, A. S.; Vernov, S. Yu

    2004-01-01

    An exact solution to the Friedmann equations with a string inspired phantom scalar matter field is constructed and the absence of the "Big Rip" singularity is shown explicitly. The notable features of the concerned model are a ghost sign of the kinetic term and a special polynomial form of the effective tachyon potential. The constructed solution is stable with respect to small fluctuations of the initial conditions and special deviations of the form of the potential.

  10. Liquid crystal assemblies in biologically inspired systems

    OpenAIRE

    Safinya, Cyrus R.; Deek, Joanna; Beck, Roy; Jones, Jayna B.; Leal, Cecilia; Ewert, Kai K.; Li, Youli

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, which is part of a collection in honor of Noel Clark's remarkable career on liquid crystal and soft matter research, we present examples of biologically inspired systems, which form liquid crystal (LC) phases with their LC nature impacting biological function in cells or being important in biomedical applications. One area focuses on understanding network and bundle formation of cytoskeletal polyampholytes (filamentous-actin, microtubules, and neurofilaments). Here, we describe...

  11. A biologically inspired model for transshipment problem

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Cai; Yan, Chao; Wei, Daijun; Hu, Yong; Mahadevan, Sankaran; Deng, Yong

    2014-01-01

    Transshipment problem is one of the basic operational research problems. In this paper, our first work is to develop a biologically inspired mathematical model for a dynamical system, which is first used to solve minimum cost flow problem. It has lower computational complexity than Physarum Solver. Second, we apply the proposed model to solve the traditional transshipment problem. Compared with the conditional methods, experiment results show the provided model is simple, ef...

  12. Origami-inspired Deployable Mechanical Metamaterials

    OpenAIRE

    Eidini, Maryam; Paulino, Glaucio H.

    2015-01-01

    Creating complex spatial objects from a flat sheet of material using origami folding techniques has attracted attention in science and engineering. In the present work, we introduce a class of cellular origami-inspired mechanical metamaterials. These materials, depending on the geometry, exhibit both negative and positive in-plane Poisson's ratios under extension. Moreover, simple bending experiments as well as eigen-value analysis of the patterns reveal that the materials p...

  13. Visual Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felten, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Living in an image-rich world does not mean students (or faculty and administrators) naturally possess sophisticated visual literacy skills, just as continually listening to an iPod does not teach a person to critically analyze or create music. Instead, "visual literacy involves the ability to understand, produce, and use culturally significant…

  14. Biologically inspired coupled antenna beampattern design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We propose to design a small-size transmission-coupled antenna array, and corresponding radiation pattern, having high performance inspired by the female Ormia ochracea's coupled ears. For reproduction purposes, the female Ormia is able to locate male crickets' call accurately despite the small distance between its ears compared with the incoming wavelength. This phenomenon has been explained by the mechanical coupling between the Ormia's ears, which has been modeled by a pair of differential equations. In this paper, we first solve these differential equations governing the Ormia ochracea's ear response, and convert the response to the pre-specified radio frequencies. We then apply the converted response of the biological coupling in the array factor of a uniform linear array composed of finite-length dipole antennas, and also include the undesired electromagnetic coupling due to the proximity of the elements. Moreover, we propose an algorithm to optimally choose the biologically inspired coupling for maximum array performance. In our numerical examples, we compute the radiation intensity of the designed system for binomial and uniform ordinary end-fire arrays, and demonstrate the improvement in the half-power beamwidth, sidelobe suppression and directivity of the radiation pattern due to the biologically inspired coupling.

  15. Gravitational radiation, inspiraling binaries, and cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernoff, David F.; Finn, Lee S.

    1993-01-01

    We show how to measure cosmological parameters using observations of inspiraling binary neutron star or black hole systems in one or more gravitational wave detectors. To illustrate, we focus on the case of fixed mass binary systems observed in a single Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO)-like detector. Using realistic detector noise estimates, we characterize the rate of detections as a function of a threshold SNR Rho(0), H0, and the binary 'chirp' mass. For Rho(0) = 8, H0 = 100 km/s/Mpc, and 1.4 solar mass neutron star binaries, the sample has a median redshift of 0.22. Under the same assumptions but independent of H0, a conservative rate density of coalescing binaries implies LIGO will observe about 50/yr binary inspiral events. The precision with which H0 and the deceleration parameter q0 may be determined depends on the number of observed inspirals. For fixed mass binary systems, about 100 observations with Rho(0) = 10 in the LIGO will give H0 to 10 percent in an Einstein-DeSitter cosmology, and 3000 will give q0 to 20 percent. For the conservative rate density of coalescing binaries, 100 detections with Rho(0) = 10 will require about 4 yrs.

  16. Biologically inspired coupled antenna beampattern design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akçakaya, Murat; Nehorai, Arye

    2010-12-01

    We propose to design a small-size transmission-coupled antenna array, and corresponding radiation pattern, having high performance inspired by the female Ormia ochracea's coupled ears. For reproduction purposes, the female Ormia is able to locate male crickets' call accurately despite the small distance between its ears compared with the incoming wavelength. This phenomenon has been explained by the mechanical coupling between the Ormia's ears, which has been modeled by a pair of differential equations. In this paper, we first solve these differential equations governing the Ormia ochracea's ear response, and convert the response to the pre-specified radio frequencies. We then apply the converted response of the biological coupling in the array factor of a uniform linear array composed of finite-length dipole antennas, and also include the undesired electromagnetic coupling due to the proximity of the elements. Moreover, we propose an algorithm to optimally choose the biologically inspired coupling for maximum array performance. In our numerical examples, we compute the radiation intensity of the designed system for binomial and uniform ordinary end-fire arrays, and demonstrate the improvement in the half-power beamwidth, sidelobe suppression and directivity of the radiation pattern due to the biologically inspired coupling. PMID:21068470

  17. Widespread correlation patterns of fMRI signal across visual cortex reflect eccentricity organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcaro, Michael J; Honey, Christopher J; Mruczek, Ryan E B; Kastner, Sabine; Hasson, Uri

    2015-01-01

    The human visual system can be divided into over two-dozen distinct areas, each of which contains a topographic map of the visual field. A fundamental question in vision neuroscience is how the visual system integrates information from the environment across different areas. Using neuroimaging, we investigated the spatial pattern of correlated BOLD signal across eight visual areas on data collected during rest conditions and during naturalistic movie viewing. The correlation pattern between areas reflected the underlying receptive field organization with higher correlations between cortical sites containing overlapping representations of visual space. In addition, the correlation pattern reflected the underlying widespread eccentricity organization of visual cortex, in which the highest correlations were observed for cortical sites with iso-eccentricity representations including regions with non-overlapping representations of visual space. This eccentricity-based correlation pattern appears to be part of an intrinsic functional architecture that supports the integration of information across functionally specialized visual areas. PMID:25695154

  18. Unifying Geometrical Representations of Gauge Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsid, Scott; Serna, Mario

    2015-01-01

    We unify three approaches within the vast body of gauge-theory research that have independently developed distinct representations of a geometrical surface-like structure underlying the vector-potential. The three approaches that we unify are: those who use the compactified dimensions of Kaluza-Klein theory, those who use Grassmannian models (also called gauge theory embedding or models) to represent gauge fields, and those who use a hidden spatial metric to replace the gauge fields. In this paper we identify a correspondence between the geometrical representations of the three schools. Each school was mostly independently developed, does not compete with other schools, and attempts to isolate the gauge-invariant geometrical surface-like structures that are responsible for the resulting physics. By providing a mapping between geometrical representations, we hope physicists can now isolate representation-dependent physics from gauge-invariant physical results and share results between each school. We provide visual examples of the geometrical relationships between each school for electric and magnetic fields. We highlight a first new result: in all three representations a static electric field (electric field from a fixed ring of charge or a sphere of charge) has a hidden gauge-invariant time dependent surface that is underlying the vector potential.

  19. NodeTrix: Hybrid Representation for Analyzing Social Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Henry, Nathalie; Fekete, Jean-Daniel; McGuffin, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The need to visualize large social networks is growing as hardware capabilities make analyzing large networks feasible and many new data sets become available. Unfortunately, the visualizations in existing systems do not satisfactorily answer the basic dilemma of being readable both for the global structure of the network and also for detailed analysis of local communities. To address this problem, we present NodeTrix, a hybrid representation for networks that combines the a...

  20. Digital Art Wonderland Creative Techniques for Inspirational Journaling and Beautiful Blogging

    CERN Document Server

    Sullins, Angi

    2011-01-01

    Headline: Set out on a digital adventure!Come inside Digital Art Wonderland where digital art and art journaling embark together on a luscious visual journey. The daring crew of Angi Sullins and Silas Toball give you a personal tour through a digital art journaling world, showing you how to make your own wonderous creations through instruction, design concepts and lots of inspiration.In Digital Art Wonderland, you'll find:- 8 tutorials with techniques, tricks and trips for the intermediate Adobe Photoshop user to enhance physical art as well as create digital art from scratch.- Instructions a

  1. A 3D texture-based octree volume visualization algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Boada, Imma; Navazo, Isabel; Scopigno, Roberto

    2000-01-01

    We present a 3D texture based Octree Volume Visualization algorithm that combines 3D texture hardware and hierarchical representation of data sets to obtain multiresolution renderings of very large data sets. The algortihm exploits advantages of both octree representation and 3D texture hardware. The basis of the algorithm is to take advantage of nearly iso-valued areas of the volume and regions of no interest to compute a more synthetical volume texture representation. A new volume-texture a...

  2. A toolbox for representational similarity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nili, Hamed; Wingfield, Cai; Walther, Alexander; Su, Li; Marslen-Wilson, William; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus

    2014-04-01

    Neuronal population codes are increasingly being investigated with multivariate pattern-information analyses. A key challenge is to use measured brain-activity patterns to test computational models of brain information processing. One approach to this problem is representational similarity analysis (RSA), which characterizes a representation in a brain or computational model by the distance matrix of the response patterns elicited by a set of stimuli. The representational distance matrix encapsulates what distinctions between stimuli are emphasized and what distinctions are de-emphasized in the representation. A model is tested by comparing the representational distance matrix it predicts to that of a measured brain region. RSA also enables us to compare representations between stages of processing within a given brain or model, between brain and behavioral data, and between individuals and species. Here, we introduce a Matlab toolbox for RSA. The toolbox supports an analysis approach that is simultaneously data- and hypothesis-driven. It is designed to help integrate a wide range of computational models into the analysis of multichannel brain-activity measurements as provided by modern functional imaging and neuronal recording techniques. Tools for visualization and inference enable the user to relate sets of models to sets of brain regions and to statistically test and compare the models using nonparametric inference methods. The toolbox supports searchlight-based RSA, to continuously map a measured brain volume in search of a neuronal population code with a specific geometry. Finally, we introduce the linear-discriminant t value as a measure of representational discriminability that bridges the gap between linear decoding analyses and RSA. In order to demonstrate the capabilities of the toolbox, we apply it to both simulated and real fMRI data. The key functions are equally applicable to other modalities of brain-activity measurement. The toolbox is freely available to the community under an open-source license agreement (http://www.mrc-cbu.cam.ac.uk/methods-and-resources/toolboxes/license/). PMID:24743308

  3. Spontaneous object and movement representations in 4-month-old human infants and albino Swiss mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langus, Alan; Saksida, Amanda; Braida, Daniela; Martucci, Roberta; Sala, Mariaelvina; Nespor, Marina

    2015-04-01

    Can young infants decompose visual events into independent representations of objects and movements? Previous studies suggest that human infants may be born with the notion of objects but there is little evidence for movement representations during the first months of life. We devised a novel Rapid Visual Recognition Procedure to test whether the nervous system is innately disposed for the conceptual decomposition of visual events. We show that 4-month-old infants can spontaneously build object and movement representations and recognize these in partially matching test events. Also albino Swiss mice that were tested on a comparable procedure could spontaneously build detailed mental representations of moving objects. Our results dissociate the ability to conceptually decompose physical events into objects and spatio-temporal relations from various types of human and non-human specific experience, and suggest that the nervous system is genetically predisposed to anticipate the representation of objects and movements in both humans and non-human species. PMID:25615902

  4. On Majorana Representations of A 6 and A 7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, A. A.

    2011-10-01

    The Majorana representations of groups were introduced in Ivanov (The Monster Group and Majorana Involutions, 2009) by axiomatising some properties of the 2 A-axial vectors of the 196 884-dimensional Monster algebra, inspired by the sensational classification of such representations for the dihedral groups achieved by Sakuma (Int Math Res Notes, 2007). This classification took place in the heart of the theory of Vertex Operator Algebras and expanded earlier results by Miyamoto (J Alg 268:653-671, 2003). Every subgroup G of the Monster which is generated by its intersection with the conjugacy class of 2 A-involutions possesses the (possibly unfaithful) Majorana representation obtained by restricting to G the action of the Monster on its algebra. This representation of G is said to be based on an embedding of G in the Monster. So far the Majorana representations have been classified for the groups G isomorphic to the symmetric group S 4 of degree 4 (Ivanov et al. in J Alg 324:2432-2463, 2010), the alternating group A 5 of degree 5 (Ivanov AA, Seress Á in Majorana Representations of A 5, 2010), and the general linear group GL 3(2) in dimension 3 over the field of two elements (Ivanov AA, Shpectorov S in Majorana Representations of L 3(2), 2010). All these representations are based on embeddings in the Monster of either the group G itself or of its direct product with a cyclic group of order 2. The dimensions and shapes of these representations are given in the following table: "What is our life? A game!" (A.S. Pushkin, "The Queen of Spades")

  5. Neural Networks For Visual Telephony

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, A. M.; Alspector, J.; Huang, P.; Hsing, T. R.

    1988-10-01

    By considering how an image is processed by the eye and brain, we may find ways to simplify the task of transmitting complex video images over a telecommunication channel. Just as the retina and visual cortex reduce the amount of information sent to other areas of the brain, electronic systems can be designed to compress visual data, encode features, and adapt to new scenes for video transmission. In this talk, we describe a system inspired by models of neural computation that may, in the future, augment standard digital processing techniques for image compression. In the next few years it is expected that a compact low-cost full motion video telephone operating over an ISDN basic access line (144 KBits/sec) will be shown to be feasible. These systems will likely be based on a standard digital signal processing approach. In this talk, we discuss an alternative method that does not use standard digital signal processing but instead uses eletronic neural networks to realize the large compression necessary for a low bit-rate video telephone. This neural network approach is not being advocated as a near term solution for visual telephony. However, low bit rate visual telephony is an area where neural network technology may, in the future, find a significant application.

  6. Letter-Matrix of Compact Representation of two-Dimensional Data Multitude for Visualization of Modal Parameters' Time-History With Implication to Seismic Survey of Life-Time and Characteristics of Excited Modal States of a Wide Range of Dynamic Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaurov, D.

    2013-12-01

    The PSWT technique assumes definition of modal parameters on the basis of modal differential equation by processing of a segment of seismic response with stationary properties by a set of modulate functions. Thus, calculating necessary convolution integrals in the limits of the time-window with a modulate function and its claimed derivatives fixed within the window with zero values on its edges and having a limited transparent spectral window, a system of algebraic equation regard to looking for parameters can be formed. Leading correct conception of moving window analysis, total parametric scanning of the records in both time and frequency domains when the time-window should be moving by a certain step while varying its width in some boundaries that corresponds to shifting the spectral window in frequency domain allowing to find dominant filtration of the fundamental mode, should be proceeded. Revealed time segments with steady series of parameters' estimations are evidence of stationary of the modal state and that trial estimations are true, otherwise, non-stationary of dynamic properties and, or ill-filtration on some segments are the cause of the series of estimations to be dispersed. Final numeric output of the scanning require a vast storage paper space and it is time consuming of its graphic representation and interpretation. But the following idea allows the representation to be a completely formalized one. Thus, the numeric multitude of estimations should be grouping for each parameter and represented by corresponding compact symbolic, letter fields. Symbolic conform representation can be accomplished by assuming a quantum symbolic scale limited by accepted set of 53 symbols: +ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789!?#$%&@(/{})*- which is coherent to appropriate domain of continuous numeric measure scale of each parameter estimations' multitude. A certain step is admitted for quantization, and a respective symbol is assigned in sequence to each quantum unit. All numbers which fall within particular unit of the scale should be represented by the unit's symbol, numbers out of scale by + -. Therefore, the output would be a Letter-Matrix of Parametric Scanning of Seismogram, accompanying with deciphering formula, the means of visualization of life-time of stationary states. Zaurov 1977, 1994, 2011.

  7. Inscriptions Becoming Representations in Representational Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, Richard; Suthers, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    We analyze the interaction of 3 students working on mathematics problems over several days in a virtual math team. Our analysis traces out how successful collaboration in a later session is contingent upon the work of prior sessions and shows how the development of representational practices is an important aspect of these participants' problem…

  8. A Core Knowledge Architecture of Visual Working Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Justin N.

    2011-01-01

    Visual working memory (VWM) is widely thought to contain specialized buffers for retaining spatial and object information: a "spatial-object architecture." However, studies of adults, infants, and nonhuman animals show that visual cognition builds on core knowledge systems that retain more specialized representations: (1) spatiotemporal…

  9. Meet the 'entangled' fieldworker - Distorted (re)presentations in tourism research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Trandberg

    Tourism research has recently been informed by non-representational theories to highlight the socio-material, embodied and heterogeneous composition of tourist experiences. These advances have contributed to further reflexivity and called for novel ways to animate representations. On this background, this paper develops the notion ‘distorted representation’ to illustrate that blurred and obscure photos can in fact be intelligible and sensible in understanding tourism. Through an exploration of the overwhelmed and unintended practices of visual fieldwork, distorted representation illustrates how photographic materialities, performativities and sensations contribute to new tourism knowledges. While highlighting the potential of distorted representation, the paper posits a cautionary note in regards to the influential role of academic journals in determining the qualities of visual data. The paper exemplifies distorted representation through three impressionistic tales derived from ethnographic research on the European rail travel phenomenon, InterRail.

  10. Visual cognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, S.

    1985-01-01

    This book consists of essays covering issues in visual cognition presenting experimental techniques from cognitive psychology, methods of modeling cognitive processes on computers from artificial intelligence, and methods of studying brain organization from neuropsychology. Topics considered include: parts of recognition; visual routines; upward direction; mental rotation, and discrimination of left and right turns in maps; individual differences in mental imagery, computational analysis and the neurological basis of mental imagery: componental analysis.

  11. Cortical networks for visual self-recognition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper briefly reviews recent developments regarding the brain mechanisms of visual self-recognition. A special cognitive mechanism for visual self-recognition has been postulated based on behavioral and neuropsychological evidence, but its neural substrate remains controversial. Recent functional imaging studies suggest that multiple cortical mechanisms play self-specific roles during visual self-recognition, reconciling the existing controversy. Respective roles for the left occipitotemporal, right parietal, and frontal cortices in symbolic, visuospatial, and conceptual aspects of self-representation have been proposed. (author)

  12. Visualizing the ATLAS Inner Detector with Atlantis

    CERN Document Server

    Taylor, G

    2005-01-01

    Atlantis is a general-purpose event display programme developed to provide an interactive visual investigation of the highly complex high-energy physics events that will be recorded by the ATLAS detector at CERN's LHC. It will be used as a tool to visually investigate data from the ATLAS Inner Detector, to study the performance of pattern recognition and track reconstruction algorithms, and to examine track-to-hit associations. It also provides visual representations of the secondary vertices produced by the decay of short-lived particles.

  13. Visualizing the ATLAS Inner Detector with Atlantis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atlantis is a general-purpose event display programme developed to provide an interactive visual investigation of the highly complex high-energy physics events that will be recorded by the ATLAS detector at CERN's LHC. It will be used as a tool to visually investigate data from the ATLAS Inner Detector, to study the performance of pattern recognition and track reconstruction algorithms, and to examine track-to-hit associations. It also provides visual representations of the secondary vertices produced by the decay of short-lived particles

  14. Audio-visual interactions in environment assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preis, Anna; Koci?ski, J?drzej; Hafke-Dys, Honorata; Wrzosek, Ma?gorzata

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to examine how visual and audio information influences audio-visual environment assessment. Original audio-visual recordings were made at seven different places in the city of Pozna?. Participants of the psychophysical experiments were asked to rate, on a numerical standardized scale, the degree of comfort they would feel if they were in such an environment. The assessments of audio-visual comfort were carried out in a laboratory in four different conditions: (a) audio samples only, (b) original audio-visual samples, (c) video samples only, and (d) mixed audio-visual samples. The general results of this experiment showed a significant difference between the investigated conditions, but not for all the investigated samples. There was a significant improvement in comfort assessment when visual information was added (in only three out of 7 cases), when conditions (a) and (b) were compared. On the other hand, the results show that the comfort assessment of audio-visual samples could be changed by manipulating the audio rather than the video part of the audio-visual sample. Finally, it seems, that people could differentiate audio-visual representations of a given place in the environment based rather of on the sound sources' compositions than on the sound level. Object identification is responsible for both landscape and soundscape grouping. PMID:25863510

  15. Graphical Representation of Complex Solutions of the Quadratic Equation in the "xy" Plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Todd

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a visual representation of complex solutions of quadratic equations in the xy plane. Rather than moving to the complex plane, students are able to experience a geometric interpretation of the solutions in the xy plane. I am also working on these types of representations with higher order polynomials with some success.

  16. Quick data evaluation inspired by human vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinert, Dieter

    2014-05-01

    In environmental monitoring, small differences are expected in data allowing the discrimination of harmless from dangerous, e.g. discern passing trucks from an earth quake. For conventional data analysis it is a challenging problem to identify these signals in noisy data. Electronic data processing consumes extra time, or much energy when processed in parallel. This is not suitable for quick automatic decisions nor useful in nearly autonomous systems with very low energy budget. This paper presents methods inspired by human vision, applied to quickly determine the content of signals collected by a monitoring system. It is shown that the system is capable to distinguish different signals, using a simple filter-set.

  17. Wormhole inspired by non-commutative geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Rahaman, Farook; Karmakar, Sreya; Ray, Saibal

    2014-01-01

    In the present work we search for a new wormhole solution inspired by noncommutative geometry with the additional condition of allowing conformal Killing vectors (CKV). A special aspect of noncommutative geometry is that it replaces point-like structures of gravitational sources with smeared objects under Gaussian distribution. However, the purpose of this paper is to obtain wormhole solutions with noncommutative geometry as a background where we consider a point-like structure of gravitational object without smearing effect. It is found through this investigation that wormhole solutions exist in this Lorentzian distribution with viable physical properties.

  18. Exactly Solvable SFT Inspired Phantom Model

    CERN Document Server

    Aref'eva, I Ya; Vernov, S Y

    2004-01-01

    We construct an exact analytic solution to the Friedman equations with a stringy inspired scalar matter and show explicitly an absence of the "Big Rip" singularity. The notable feature of this model is a wrong sign of the kinetic term and a special polynomial form of the effective tachyon potential. The method developed in the five-dimensional brane-world scenario is used. We show that the solution is stable with respect to small fluctuations of the initial conditions and present corresponding phase portraits.

  19. Cognition Inspired Object Oriented Knowledge Warehouse Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xixu Fu

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available An adaptive knowledge system needs massive knowledge. But massive knowledge can handicap the speed of searching and reasoning. Good structure can considerably enhance the expressive power and efficiency of a knowledge system. Inspired by the structure of human memory and data warehouse, object-oriented warehouse architecture of knowledge based on the 3-World model was advanced after exploring the essence of knowledge and cognition. Great amount of conceptual and nonconceptual knowledge can be well handled with this architecture. System using the architecture can be more adaptable with different tasks.

  20. The "Biologically-Inspired Computing" Column

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinchey, Mike

    2007-01-01

    Self-managing systems, whether viewed from the perspective of Autonomic Computing, or from that of another initiative, offers a holistic vision for the development and evolution of biologically-inspired computer-based systems. It aims to bring new levels of automation and dependability to systems, while simultaneously hiding their complexity and reducing costs. A case can certainly be made that all computer-based systems should exhibit autonomic properties [6], and we envisage greater interest in, and uptake of, autonomic principles in future system development.

  1. Innovative Outreach Programs Inspire Interest in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawthorne Allen, Alice; Lauderman, Julie

    2015-04-01

    The NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium has given Concord University financial support to develop, acquire materials for, and implement an outreach program in physics and astronomy that will provide hands-on learning opportunities related to outer space and to inspire interest in science. Using materials purchased with these funds, we have developed successful outreach programs related to the electromagnetic spectrum, the launching of objects into space, and the challenges of building objects in space. The success of these outreach projects in our rural region of southern West Virginia will be presented. Supported by NASA West Virginia Space Grant Consortium Extension and Public Outreach Grant.

  2. Metamaterial-Inspired Efficient Electrically Small Antenna

    OpenAIRE

    ERENTOK, Aycan; Ziolkowski, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    Planar two-dimensional (2D) and volumetric three-dimensional (3D) metamaterial-inspired efficient electrically-small antennas that are easy to design; are easy and inexpensive to build; and are easy to test; are reported, i.e., the EZ antenna systems. The proposed 2D and 3D electrical- and magnetic-based EZ antennas are shown to be naturally matched to a 50 source, i.e., without the introduction of a matching network. It is demonstrated numerically that these EZ antennas have high radiation e...

  3. How Pictorial Knowledge Representations Mediate Collaborative Knowledge Construction in Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naykki, Piia; Jarvela, Sanna

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the process of collaborative knowledge construction when technology and pictorial knowledge representations are used for visualizing individual and groups' shared ideas. The focus of the study is on how teacher-students contribute to the group's collaborative knowledge construction and use each other's ideas and tools as an…

  4. With Age Comes Representational Wisdom in Social Signals

    OpenAIRE

    Van rijsbergen, Nicola; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Rousselet, Guillaume a; Schyns, Philippe g

    2014-01-01

    •We model mental representations of age in young and old participants•Young participants dichotomize age into young (like them) and old (everyone else)•Old participants faithfully represent visual features of aging•Inhomogeneous dark marking in the skin around the nose predicts perceived age

  5. Insect-Inspired Flight Control for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakoor, Sarita; Stange, G.; Srinivasan, M.; Chahl, Javaan; Hine, Butler; Zornetzer, Steven

    2005-01-01

    Flight-control and navigation systems inspired by the structure and function of the visual system and brain of insects have been proposed for a class of developmental miniature robotic aircraft called "biomorphic flyers" described earlier in "Development of Biomorphic Flyers" (NPO-30554), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 11 (November 2004), page 54. These form a subset of biomorphic explorers, which, as reported in several articles in past issues of NASA Tech Briefs ["Biomorphic Explorers" (NPO-20142), Vol. 22, No. 9 (September 1998), page 71; "Bio-Inspired Engineering of Exploration Systems" (NPO-21142), Vol. 27, No. 5 (May 2003), page 54; and "Cooperative Lander-Surface/Aerial Microflyer Missions for Mars Exploration" (NPO-30286), Vol. 28, No. 5 (May 2004), page 36], are proposed small robots, equipped with microsensors and communication systems, that would incorporate crucial functions of mobility, adaptability, and even cooperative behavior. These functions are inherent to biological organisms but are challenging frontiers for technical systems. Biomorphic flyers could be used on Earth or remote planets to explore otherwise difficult or impossible to reach sites. An example of an exploratory task of search/surveillance functions currently being tested is to obtain high-resolution aerial imagery, using a variety of miniaturized electronic cameras. The control functions to be implemented by the systems in development include holding altitude, avoiding hazards, following terrain, navigation by reference to recognizable terrain features, stabilization of flight, and smooth landing. Flying insects perform these and other functions remarkably well, even though insect brains contains fewer than 10(exp -4) as many neurons as does the human brain. Although most insects have immobile, fixed-focus eyes and lack stereoscopy (and hence cannot perceive depth directly), they utilize a number of ingenious strategies for perceiving, and navigating in, three dimensions. Despite their lack of stereoscopy, insects infer distances to potential obstacles and other objects from image motion cues that result from their own motions in the environment. The concept of motion of texture in images as a source of motion cues is denoted generally as the concept of optic or optical flow. Computationally, a strategy based on optical flow is simpler than is stereoscopy for avoiding hazards and following terrain. Hence, this strategy offers the potential to design vision-based control computing subsystems that would be more compact, would weigh less, and would demand less power than would subsystems of equivalent capability based on a conventional stereoscopic approach.

  6. Inspiration Inducement of Pianists in a Subconsciousness Background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changkui Wang

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Inspiration thinking of pianists lies under their deep thought, and is a product of mutual interaction between consciousness and subconsciousness, closely connected with living experiences, musical environment, and psychological environment of a subject. Piano music, literature poetry, internal rhythm, external rhythm, Nature, environment and impression are significant induction factors to lead inspiration thinking of pianists, while arduous practice, gifted perception, tough exploration and smart capture are preconditions of inspiration happening in pianists.

  7. What inspires South African student teachers for their future profession?

    OpenAIRE

    Charl Wolhuter; Hannes van der Walt; Ferdinand Potgieter; Louisa Meyer; Thapelo Mamiala

    2012-01-01

    The need for an inspired professional teacher corps to haul South African school education out of its current low level of quality was the driving force behind this project. Its aim was to determine what counted as sources of inspiration for student teachers and hence for future teachers. Based on a conceptual-theoretical study, a questionnaire that could probe student teachers' sources of inspiration was completed by a sample of student teachers (n = 1,683). A factor analysis of their respon...

  8. Generic, Long, High Mass Ratio Binary Black Hole Inspiral Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Aaron; Lewis, Adam; Pfeiffer, Harald; SXS Collaboration

    2015-04-01

    We present for the first time high mass ratio (q = 5 and q = 7), long (40 - 50 pericenter passages), eccentric and precessing binary black hole inspirals. These inspirals are well suited for comparison to both analytic Post-Newtonian theory and to the motion of a small mass around a central black hole with gravitational self-force corrections. We discuss the properties of these inspirals, our initial comparisons, and future directions.

  9. Reading pictograms and signs - the need for visual literacy

    OpenAIRE

    Fonseca, Regina Siza Vieira Salgado

    2011-01-01

    Reading pictograms and signs – the need for visual literacy is a study of the impact pictorial signs have on the social and physical environment, and, by extension, on media and visual culture. From the many possibilities that the field of visual representation has to offer, the pictogram – an iconic sign that represents complex facts without resorting to words – is singled out for its distinctive characteristics. Indeed, the pictogram is a unique type of sign for being omnipresent, cla...

  10. Pair Analytics: Capturing Reasoning Processes in Collaborative Visual Analytics

    OpenAIRE

    Arias-herna?ndez, Richard; Kaastra, L.; Green, Tera Marie; Fisher, Brian D.

    2011-01-01

    Studying how humans interact with abstract, visual representations of massive amounts of data provides knowledge about how cognition works in visual analytics. This knowledge provides guidelines for cognitive-aware design and evaluation of visual analytic tools. Different methods have been used to capture and conceptualize these processes including protocol analysis, experiments, cognitive task analysis, and field studies. In this article, we introduce Pair Analytics: a method for capturing r...

  11. Spatially Continuous Change of Abstraction in Molecular Visualization

    OpenAIRE

    Lueks, Wouter; Viola, Ivan; Van Der Zwan, Matthew; Bekker, Henk; Isenberg, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Based on an approach for the temporal change of abstraction in molecular visualization we describe how to achieve a spatially explicit control of abstraction. This allows us to depict different abstraction stages of a single molecule in a single still-image visualization. This approach works best for long, linear molecules with repeating substructures that allow viewers to visually compare the continuous representational changes of these parts.

  12. Coverage, Continuity and Visual Cortical Architecture

    CERN Document Server

    Keil, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The primary visual cortex of many mammals contains a continuous representation of visual space, with an aperiodic map of orientation preferences superimposed. It was recently found that orientation preference maps (OPMs) obey statistical laws which are apparently invariant among species widely separated in eutherian evolution. Here, we ask whether one of the most prominent models for the optimization of cortical maps, the elastic net (EN) model can reproduce these universal statistics. The EN model generates representations which optimally trade off stimulus space coverage and map continuity. While this model has been used in numerous numerical studies, no analytical results about its optimal solutions have been obtained so far. We present a mathematical approach to analytically calculate the optimal cortical representations predicted by the EN model for the joint mapping of stimulus position and orientation. We find that in all previously studied regimes, optimal OPM layouts are perfectly periodic. An unbias...

  13. A review of uncertainty visualization within the IPCC reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nocke, Thomas; Reusser, Dominik; Wrobel, Markus

    2015-04-01

    Results derived from climate model simulations confront non-expert users with a variety of uncertainties. This gives rise to the challenge that the scientific information must be communicated such that it can be easily understood, however, the complexity of the science behind is still incorporated. With respect to the assessment reports of the IPCC, the situation is even more complicated, because heterogeneous sources and multiple types of uncertainties need to be compiled together. Within this work, we systematically (1) analyzed the visual representation of uncertainties in the IPCC AR4 and AR5 reports, and (2) executed a questionnaire to evaluate how different user groups such as decision-makers and teachers understand these uncertainty visualizations. Within the first step, we classified visual uncertainty metaphors for spatial, temporal and abstract representations. As a result, we clearly identified a high complexity of the IPCC visualizations compared to standard presentation graphics, sometimes even integrating two or more uncertainty classes / measures together with the "certain" (mean) information. Further we identified complex written uncertainty explanations within image captions even within the "summary reports for policy makers". In the second step, based on these observations, we designed a questionnaire to investigate how non-climate experts understand these visual representations of uncertainties, how visual uncertainty coding might hinder the perception of the "non-uncertain" data, and if alternatives for certain IPCC visualizations exist. Within the talk/poster, we will present first results from this questionnaire. Summarizing, we identified a clear trend towards complex images within the latest IPCC reports, with a tendency to incorporate as much as possible information into the visual representations, resulting in proprietary, non-standard graphic representations that are not necessarily easy to comprehend on one glimpse. We conclude that further translation is required to (visually) present the IPCC results to non-experts, providing tailored static and interactive visualization solutions for different user groups.

  14. Bio-inspired color image enhancement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meylan, Laurence; Susstrunk, Sabine

    2004-06-01

    Capturing and rendering an image that fulfills the observer's expectations is a difficult task. This is due to the fact that the signal reaching the eye is processed by a complex mechanism before forming a percept, whereas a capturing device only retains the physical value of light intensities. It is especially difficult to render complex scenes with highly varying luminances. For example, a picture taken inside a room where objects are visible through the windows will not be rendered correctly by a global technique. Either details in the dim room will be hidden in shadow or the objects viewed through the window will be too bright. The image has to be treated locally to resemble more closely to what the observer remembers. The purpose of this work is to develop a technique for rendering images based on human local adaptation. We take inspiration from a model of color vision called Retinex. This model determines the perceived color given spatial relationships of the captured signals. Retinex has been used as a computational model for image rendering. In this article, we propose a new solution inspired by Retinex that is based on a single filter applied to the luminance channel. All parameters are image-dependent so that the process requires no parameter tuning. That makes the method more flexible than other existing ones. The presented results show that our method suitably enhances high dynamic range images.

  15. Autobiography: Inspiring new visions of teacher learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Simon

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: The purpose of this article is to broaden the tradition of autobiography by using it as a way in which teachers can identify sources of inspiration in their educational experience. In the process, my aim is to make explicit the links between autobiography, learning and meta learning. Extending autobiographical inquiry to include different levels at which learning takes place serves to highlight the importance not only of the individual context of learning (the private self, but also the possibility of learning and constructing meaning from autobiography in dialogue with others. This article identifies four levels of learning-how-to-learn from autobiography. These levels are: 1. learning from autobiographical writing; 2. learning through intergenerational dialogues; 3. developmental learning through the career stages; and 4. whole group co-constructive learning. My ultimate goal is two fold. Firstly, to use these levels of learning to identify operational definitions of inspiration based on significant events and experiences in teacher’s personal stories. Secondly to identify a meta research orientation for linking autobiography with learning and meta-learning.

  16. Learning deep hierarchical visual feature coding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Hanlin; Thome, Nicolas; Cord, Matthieu; Lim, Joo-Hwee

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a hybrid architecture that combines the image modeling strengths of the bag of words framework with the representational power and adaptability of learning deep architectures. Local gradient-based descriptors, such as SIFT, are encoded via a hierarchical coding scheme composed of spatial aggregating restricted Boltzmann machines (RBM). For each coding layer, we regularize the RBM by encouraging representations to fit both sparse and selective distributions. Supervised fine-tuning is used to enhance the quality of the visual representation for the categorization task. We performed a thorough experimental evaluation using three image categorization data sets. The hierarchical coding scheme achieved competitive categorization accuracies of 79.7% and 86.4% on the Caltech-101 and 15-Scenes data sets, respectively. The visual representations learned are compact and the model's inference is fast, as compared with sparse coding methods. The low-level representations of descriptors that were learned using this method result in generic features that we empirically found to be transferrable between different image data sets. Further analysis reveal the significance of supervised fine-tuning when the architecture has two layers of representations as opposed to a single layer. PMID:25420244

  17. From Idea to Organizational Practice : Institutionalizing Innovative Ideas Through Visualization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Renate E.; Jancsary, Dennis

    How do visualization and visual forms of communication influence the process of transforming a novel idea into established organizational practice? In this paper, we build theory with regard to the role of visuals in manifesting and giving form to an innovative idea as it proceeds through various stages of institutionalization. Ideas become institutionalized not merely through widespread diffusion in a cognitive-discursive form but eventually through their translation into concrete activities and transformation into specific patterns of organizational practice. We argue that visualization plays a pivotal and unique role in this process. Visualization bridges the ideational with the practical realm by providing representations of ideas, connecting them to existing knowledge, and illustrating the specific actions that instantiate them. Similar to verbal discourse, and often in tandem, visual representations diffuse more rapidly and further than the practices themselves. Consolidating the relationship between abstract ideas and specific practice, such visual or multi-modal representations facilitate the implementation of novel ideas, reinforce particular translations, and imbue associated organizational practice with legitimacy – and thus solidify the coupling of innovative ideas and organizational practice. Extending existing research, we develop a set of propositions linking dimensions of visuality and visualization to the different stages of institutionalization in order to explain the institutional trajectory of new ideas. Our analysis advances insight into a core dimension of institutionalization: the transformation of an idea into practice.

  18. Biochemistry Instructors' Views toward Developing and Assessing Visual Literacy in Their Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Holme, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Biochemistry instructors are inundated with various representations from which to choose to depict biochemical phenomena. Because of the immense amount of visual know-how needed to be an expert biochemist in the 21st century, there have been calls for instructors to develop biochemistry students' visual literacy. However, visual literacy has…

  19. Spatiotemporal object continuity in human ventral visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Do-Joon; Turk-Browne, Nicholas B; Flombaum, Jonathan I; Kim, Min-Shik; Scholl, Brian J; Chun, Marvin M

    2008-07-01

    Coherent visual experience requires that objects be represented as the same persisting individuals over time and motion. Cognitive science research has identified a powerful principle that guides such processing: Objects must trace continuous paths through space and time. Little is known, however, about how neural representations of objects, typically defined by visual features, are influenced by spatiotemporal continuity. Here, we report the consequences of spatiotemporally continuous vs. discontinuous motion on perceptual representations in human ventral visual cortex. In experiments using both dynamic occlusion and apparent motion, face-selective cortical regions exhibited significantly less activation when faces were repeated in continuous vs. discontinuous trajectories, suggesting that discontinuity caused featurally identical objects to be represented as different individuals. These results indicate that spatiotemporal continuity modulates neural representations of object identity, influencing judgments of object persistence even in the most staunchly "featural" areas of ventral visual cortex. PMID:18591658

  20. Representations and Relations.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ko?átko, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 21, ?. 3 (2014), s. 282-302. ISSN 1335-0668 Institutional support: RVO:67985955 Keywords : representation * proposition * truth-conditions * belief-ascriptions * reference * externalism * fiction Subject RIV: AA - Philosophy ; Religion

  1. Polynomial representations of GLn

    CERN Document Server

    Green, James A; Erdmann, Karin

    2007-01-01

    The first half of this book contains the text of the first edition of LNM volume 830, Polynomial Representations of GLn. This classic account of matrix representations, the Schur algebra, the modular representations of GLn, and connections with symmetric groups, has been the basis of much research in representation theory. The second half is an Appendix, and can be read independently of the first. It is an account of the Littelmann path model for the case gln. In this case, Littelmann's 'paths' become 'words', and so the Appendix works with the combinatorics on words. This leads to the repesentation theory of the 'Littelmann algebra', which is a close analogue of the Schur algebra. The treatment is self- contained; in particular complete proofs are given of classical theorems of Schensted and Knuth.

  2. Polynomial representations of GLN

    CERN Document Server

    Green, James A

    1980-01-01

    The first half of this book contains the text of the first edition of LNM volume 830, Polynomial Representations of GLn. This classic account of matrix representations, the Schur algebra, the modular representations of GLn, and connections with symmetric groups, has been the basis of much research in representation theory. The second half is an Appendix, and can be read independently of the first. It is an account of the Littelmann path model for the case gln. In this case, Littelmann's 'paths' become 'words', and so the Appendix works with the combinatorics on words. This leads to the repesentation theory of the 'Littelmann algebra', which is a close analogue of the Schur algebra. The treatment is self- contained; in particular complete proofs are given of classical theorems of Schensted and Knuth.

  3. Contacts de langues et representations (Language Contacts and Representations).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthey, Marinette, Ed.

    1997-01-01

    Essays on language contact and the image of language, entirely in French, include: "Representations 'du' contexte et representations 'en' contexte? Eleves et enseignants face a l'apprentissage de la langue" ("Representations 'of' Context or Representations 'in' Context? Students and Teachers Facing Language Learning" (Laurent Gajo); "Le crepuscule…

  4. Knowledge Representations for Planning Manipulation Tasks

    CERN Document Server

    Zacharias, Franziska

    2012-01-01

    In this book, the capability map, a novel general representation of the kinematic capabilities of a robot arm, is introduced. The capability map allows to determine how well regions of the workspace are reachable for the end effector in different orientations. It is a representation that can be machine processed as well as intuitively visualized for the human. The capability map and the derived algorithms are a valuable source of information for high- and low-level planning processes. The versatile applicability of the capability map is shown by examples from several distinct application domains. In human-robot interaction, a bi-manual interface for tele-operation is objectively evaluated. In low-level geometric planning, more human-like motion is planned for a humanoid robot while also reducing the computation time. And in high-level task reasoning, the suitability of a robot for a task is evaluated.    

  5. Concurrent data representation synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkins, Peter; Aiken, Alex; Fisher, Kathleen; Rinard, Martin C.; Sagiv, Mooly

    2012-01-01

    We describe an approach for synthesizing data representations for concurrent programs. Our compiler takes as input a program written using concurrent relations and synthesizes a representation of the relations as sets of cooperating data structures as well as the placement and acquisition of locks to synchronize concurrent access to those data structures. The resulting code is correct by construction: individual relational operations are implemented correctly and the aggregate set of operatio...

  6. Data representation synthesis

    OpenAIRE

    Hawkins, Peter; Aiken, Alex; Fisher, Kathleen; Rinard, Martin C.; Sagiv, Mooly

    2011-01-01

    We consider the problem of specifying combinations of data structures with complex sharing in a manner that is both declarative and results in provably correct code. In our approach, abstract data types are specified using relational algebra and functional dependencies. We describe a language of decompositions that permit the user to specify different concrete representations for relations, and show that operations on concrete representations soundly implement their relational specification. ...

  7. Function, anticipation, representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickhard, Mark. H.

    2001-06-01

    Function emerges in certain kinds of far-from-equilibrium systems. One important kind of function is that of interactive anticipation, an adaptedness to temporal complexity. Interactive anticipation is the locus of the emergence of normative representational content, and, thus, of representation in general: interactive anticipation is the naturalistic core of the evolution of cognition. Higher forms of such anticipation are involved in the subsequent macro-evolutionary sequence of learning, emotions, and reflexive consciousness.

  8. Representations of Elizabeth I

    OpenAIRE

    Cobb, Helen Anne

    1990-01-01

    This thesis looks at three themes in representations of the Queen in Elizabethan literature. They are: the problem of representing a female ruler; the relation between the cult of Elizabeth and the cult of the Virgin Mary; and representations of Elizabeth as Cynthia, the moon-goddess. These topics are seen as focal points for problematic issues in panegyric.The first part of the thesis looks at the problem of reconciling the "masculine" virtues of the ideal ruler with ideal "fe...

  9. Spiralet Sparse Representation

    OpenAIRE

    Moghaddam, Reza Farrahi; Cheriet, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    This is the first report on Working Paper WP-RFM-14-01. The potential and capability of sparse representations is well-known. However, their (multivariate variable) vectorial form, which is completely fine in many fields and disciplines, results in removal and filtering of important "spatial" relations that are implicitly carried by two-dimensional [or multi-dimensional] objects, such as images. In this paper, a new approach, called spiralet sparse representation, is propose...

  10. Visual cognition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinker, S.

    1985-01-01

    This collection of research papers on visual cognition first appeared as a special issue of Cognition: International Journal of Cognitive Science. The study of visual cognition has seen enormous progress in the past decade, bringing important advances in our understanding of shape perception, visual imagery, and mental maps. Many of these discoveries are the result of converging investigations in different areas, such as cognitive and perceptual psychology, artificial intelligence, and neuropsychology. This volume is intended to highlight a sample of work at the cutting edge of this research area for the benefit of students and researchers in a variety of disciplines. The tutorial introduction that begins the volume is designed to help the nonspecialist reader bridge the gap between the contemporary research reported here and earlier textbook introductions or literature reviews.

  11. [The fragmentation of representational space in schizophrenia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plagnol, A; Oïta, M; Montreuil, M; Granger, B; Lubart, T

    2003-01-01

    Existent neurocognitive models of schizophrenia converge towards a core of impairments involving working memory, context processing, action planning, controlled and intentional processing. However, the emergence of this core remains itself difficult to explain and more specific hypotheses do not explain the heterogeneity of schizophrenia. To overcome these limits, we propose a new paradigm based on representational theory from cognitive science. Some recent developments of this theory enable us to describe a subjective universe as a representational space which is displayed from memory. We outline a conceptual framework to construct such a representational space from analogical -representations that can be activated in working memory and are connected to a network of symbolic structures. These connections are notably made through an analytic process of the analogical fragments, which involves the attentional focus. This framework allows us to define rigorously some defense processes in response to traumatic tensions that are expressed on the representational space. The fragmentation of representational space is a consequence of a defensive denial based on an impairment of the analytic process. The fragmentation forms some parasitic areas in memory which are excluded from the main part of the representational space and disturb information processing. The key clinical concepts of paranoid syndromes can be defined in this conceptual framework: mental automatism, delusional intuition, acute destructuration, psychotic dissociation, and autistic withdrawal. We show that these syndromes imply each other, which in return increases the fragmentation of the representational space. Some new concepts emerge naturally in this framework, such as the concept of "suture" which is defined as a link between a parasitic area and the main representational space. Schizophrenia appears as a borderline case of fragmentation of the representational space. This conceptual framework is compatible with numerous etiological factors. Multiple clinical forms can be differentiated in accordance with the persistence of parasitic areas, the degree of fragmentation, and the formation of sutures. We use this approach to account for an empirical study concerning the analysis of analogical representations in schizophrenia. We used the Parallel Visual Information Processing Test (PVIPT) which assesses the analysis of interfering visual information. Subjects were asked to connect several small geometric figures printed on a transparency. The transparency was displayed above four photographs which were the interfering material. Then, subjects completed three tasks concerning the photographs: a recognition task, a recall task, and an affective qualification task. Using a case-by-case study, this test allows us to access the defense processes of the subjects, which is not possible with the usual methods in cognitive psychopathology. Twelve clinically-stable schizophrenic subjects participated in the study which also included a self-assessment of alexithymia by the Toronto Alexithymia Scale. We obtained 2 main results: (a) creation of items in recall or false recognition by 8 subjects, and (b) lack of the usual -negative correlations between the alexithymia score and the recall, recognition and affective qualification scores in the PVIPT. These 2 results contrast with what has been previously observed for alexithymia using the same methodology. The result (a) confirms an interfering activation in schizophrenic memory, which can be interpreted in our framework as indicative of parasitic areas. The creation of items suggests the formation of sutures between the semantic content of photographs and some delusional fragments. The result (b) suggests that the apparent alexithymia in schizophrenia is a defense against interfering activation in parasitic areas. We underline the interest of individual protocols to exhibit the dynamic interplay between an interfering activity in memory and a defensive flattening of affects. PMID:14615689

  12. Visualizing Topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephen Reynolds

    2006-01-01

    Topographic maps that display three-dimensional landscapes on two-dimensional surfaces can offer a great deal of spatial information in minimal space. However, it is often difficult for people to interpret the features on a topographic map. This interactive feature adapted from Stephen Reynolds's 'Visualizing Topography' website offers color-enhanced and three-dimensional visualizations to help interpret two-dimensional topographic maps. Users can introduce shading, tilt, and rotate the maps to better see the three dimensional feature being represented by the map.

  13. Visualizing Earthquakes at Convergent Plate Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cara Harwood

    This screenshot shows the Fiji subduction zone, one of the featured convergent margins in this visualization. The visualization shows how earthquakes at this margin occur at depth, and define the slope of the subducting plate. This visualization also includes other examples of subduction zones and continental convergent margins (Himalayas). Click the image to enlarge or view the MP4 movie (MP4 Video 30.3MB Dec20 11). The purpose of this activity is to introduce students to the distribution and characteristics of earthquakes associated with convergent plate boundaries. Students will learn about how the magnitude and distribution of earthquakes at convergent boundaries are related to processes that occur at these boundaries and to the geometry and position of the two converging plates. Because the depth of earthquakes can be difficult for students to visualize in 2D representations, this activity allows students to visualize the 3D distribution of earthquakes within Earth's surface, which is essential for understanding how different types of earthquakes occur in different tectonic settings. Locations featured in the visualization include the Chile-Peru Subduction Zone, the Aleutian Islands, the Fiji Subeuction Zone, and the Himalayas. Talking points and questions are included to use this visualization as part of an interactive lecture. In addition to playing back the visualization, instructors can also download the visualization software and data set and explore it themselves.

  14. Advanced textural representation of materials appearance.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Haindl, Michal; Filip, Ji?í

    New York : ACM, 2011 - (Sander, P.), s. 1-84 ISBN 978-1-4503-1135-9. [SIGGRAPH Asia 2011. Hong Kong (CN), 12.12.2011-15.12.2011] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA102/08/0593; GA ?R GAP103/11/0335 Grant ostatní: CESNET(CZ) 387/2010 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : visual texture * Bidirectional Texture Function * materials appearance Subject RIV: BD - Theory of Information http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2012/RO/haindl-advanced textural representation of materials appearance.pdf

  15. Bio-inspired flapping UAV design: a university perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jae-Hung; Lee, Jun-Seong; Kim, Dae-Kwan

    2009-03-01

    Bio-inspired design to make artificial flappers fly does not just imitate biological systems as closely as possible, but also transferring the flappers' own functionalities to engineering solutions. This paper summarizes some key technical issues and the states-of-art of bio-inspired design of flapping UAVs with an introduction to authors' recent research results in this field.

  16. Inspiration Inducement of Pianists in a Subconsciousness Background

    OpenAIRE

    Changkui Wang

    2009-01-01

    Inspiration thinking of pianists lies under their deep thought, and is a product of mutual interaction between consciousness and subconsciousness, closely connected with living experiences, musical environment, and psychological environment of a subject. Piano music, literature poetry, internal rhythm, external rhythm, Nature, environment and impression are significant induction factors to lead inspiration thinking of pianists, while arduous practice, gifted perception, tough exploration and ...

  17. Modelling Cell Cycle using Different Levels of Representation

    CERN Document Server

    Basuki, Thomas Anung; Carvalho, Rafael V; 10.4204/EPTCS.11.4

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the behaviour of biological systems requires a complex setting of in vitro and in vivo experiments, which attracts high costs in terms of time and resources. The use of mathematical models allows researchers to perform computerised simulations of biological systems, which are called in silico experiments, to attain important insights and predictions about the system behaviour with a considerably lower cost. Computer visualisation is an important part of this approach, since it provides a realistic representation of the system behaviour. We define a formal methodology to model biological systems using different levels of representation: a purely formal representation, which we call molecular level, models the biochemical dynamics of the system; visualisation-oriented representations, which we call visual levels, provide views of the biological system at a higher level of organisation and are equipped with the necessary spatial information to generate the appropriate visualisation. We choose Spati...

  18. Inspiring future experimental scientists through questions related to colour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairchild, Mark D.; Melgosa, Manuel

    2014-07-01

    In general, it can be stated that unfortunately in most countries the number of students interested in traditional scientific disciplines (e.g. physics, chemistry, biology, mathematics, etc.) for his/her future professional careers has considerably decreased during the past years. It is likely that among the reasons of this trend we can find that many students feel that these disciplines are particularly difficult, complex, abstract, and even boring, while they consider applied sciences (e.g. engineering) as much more attractive options to them. Here we aim to attract people of very different ages to traditional scientific disciplines, and promote scientific knowledge, using a set of colour questions related to everyday experiences. From our answers to these questions we hope that people can understand and learn science in a rigorous, relaxed and amusing way, and hopefully they will be inspired to continue exploring on their own. Examples of such colour questions can be found at the free website http://whyiscolor.org from Mark D. Fairchild. For a wider dissemination, most contents of this website have been recently translated into Spanish language by the authors, and published in the book entitled "La tienda de las curiosidades sobre el color" (Editorial University of Granada, Spain, ISBN: 9788433853820). Colour is certainly multidisciplinary, and while it can be said that it is mainly a perception, optics is a key discipline to understand colour stimuli and phenomena. The classical first approach in colour science as the result of the interaction of light, objects, and the human visual system will be also reviewed.

  19. Compact stars in Eddington inspired gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Pani, Paolo; Delsate, Terence

    2011-01-01

    A new, Eddington inspired theory of gravity was recently proposed by Banados and Ferreira. It is equivalent to General Relativity in vacuum, but differs from it inside matter. This viable, one parameter theory was shown to avoid cosmological singularities and turns out to lead to many other exciting new features that we report here. First, for a positive coupling parameter, the field equations have a dramatic impact on the collapse of dust, and do not lead to singularities. We further find that the theory supports stable, compact pressureless stars made of perfect fluid, which provide interesting models of self-gravitating dark matter. Finally, we show that the mere existence of relativistic stars imposes a strong, near optimal constraint on the coupling parameter, which can even be improved by observations of the moment of inertia of the double pulsar.

  20. Aurelia aurita bio-inspired tilt sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quickly expanding field of mobile robots, unmanned underwater vehicles, and micro-air vehicles urgently needs a cheap and effective means for measuring vehicle inclination. Commonly, tilt or inclination has been mathematically derived from accelerometers; however, there is inherent error in any indirect measurement. This paper reports a bio-inspired tilt sensor that mimics the natural balance organ of jellyfish, called the ‘statocyst’. Biological statocysts from the species Aurelia aurita were characterized by scanning electron microscopy to investigate the morphology and size of the natural sensor. An artificial tilt sensor was then developed by using printed electronics that incorporates a novel voltage divider concept in conjunction with small surface mount devices. This sensor was found to have minimum sensitivity of 4.21° with a standard deviation of 1.77°. These results open the possibility of developing elegant tilt sensor architecture for both air and water based platforms. (paper)

  1. What is Mathematics? Perspectives inspired by anthropology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    HØyrup, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The paper discusses the question “what is mathematics” from a point of view inspired by anthropology. In this perspective, the character of mathematical thinking and argument is strongly affected – almost essentially determined, indeed – by the dynamics of the specific social, mostly professional environments by which it is carried. Environments where future practitioners are taught as apprentices produce an approach different from that resulting from teaching in a school – the latter inviting to intra-mathematical explanation in a way the former does not. Moreover, once the interaction with the early classical Greek philosophical quest for causes and general explanations had caused mathematical explanation to become an autonomous endeavour in the shape of explicit proof and deductivity, proof and deductivity presented themselves as options – sometimes exploited, sometimes not – even in the teaching of mathematics for practitioners.

  2. Bio-inspired Ant Algorithms: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangita Roy

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Ant Algorithms are techniques for optimizing which were coined in the early 1990’s by M. Dorigo. The techniques were inspired by the foraging behavior of real ants in the nature. The focus of ant algorithms is to find approximate optimized problem solutions using artificial ants and their indirect decentralized communications using synthetic pheromones. In this paper, at first ant algorithms are described in details, then transforms to computational optimization techniques: the ACO metaheuristics and developed ACO algorithms. A comparative study of ant algorithms also carried out, followed by past and present trends in AAs applications. Future prospect in AAs also covered in this paper. Finally a comparison between AAs with well-established machine learning techniques were focused, so that combining with machine learning techniques hybrid, robust, novel algorithms could be produces for outstanding result in future.

  3. Integrated bio-inspired fluidic imaging system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Frank S.; Johnson, Daniel; Cho, Sung Hwan; Qiao, Wen; Arianpour, Ashkan; Francis, Cameron S.; Kim, Nam-Hyong; Lo, Yu-Hwa

    2010-02-01

    We developed a new type of optical lens device that can change its curvature like crystalline lens in human eye. The curvature changing capability of the lens allows for a tremendous tuning range in its optical power and subsequently enables miniaturized imaging systems that can perform autofocus, optical zoom, and other advanced functions. In this paper, we study the physical properties of bio-inspired fluidic lenses and demonstrate the optical functionality through miniaturized optical systems constructed with such lenses. We report an auto-focusing optical system that can turn from a camera to a microscope, and demonstrate more than 4X optical zoom with a very short total track length. Finally, we demonstrate the benefits of fluidic lens zoom camera through minimally invasive gallbladder removal surgery.

  4. Bio-inspired networks for optoelectronic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bing; Huang, Yuanlin; Li, Ruopeng; Peng, Qiang; Luo, Junyi; Pei, Ke; Herczynski, Andrzej; Kempa, Krzysztof; Ren, Zhifeng; Gao, Jinwei

    2014-11-01

    Modern optoelectronics needs development of new materials characterized not only by high optical transparency and electrical conductivity, but also by mechanical strength, and flexibility. Recent advances employ grids of metallic micro- and nanowires, but the overall performance of the resulting material composites remains unsatisfactory. In this work, we propose a new strategy: application of natural scaffoldings perfected by evolution. In this context, we study two bio-inspired networks for two specific optoelectronic applications. The first network, intended for solar cells, light sources and similar devices, has a quasi-fractal structure and is derived directly from a chemically extracted leaf venation system. The second network is intended for touch screens and flexible displays, and is obtained by metalizing a spider’s silk web. We demonstrate that each of these networks attain an exceptional optoelectonic and mechanical performance for its intended purpose, providing a promising direction in the development of more efficient optoelectronic devices.

  5. Bio-inspired odor-based navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Maynard J., III; Vasquez, Juan R.

    2006-05-01

    The ability of many insects, especially moths, to locate either food or a member of the opposite sex is an amazing achievement. There are numerous scenarios where having this ability embedded into ground-based or aerial vehicles would be invaluable. This paper presents results from a 3-D computer simulation of an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) autonomously tracking a chemical plume to its source. The simulation study includes a simulated dynamic chemical plume, 6-degree of freedom, nonlinear aircraft model, and a bio-inspired navigation algorithm. The emphasis of this paper is the development and analysis of the navigation algorithm. The foundation of this algorithm is a fuzzy controller designed to categorize where in the plume the aircraft is located: coming into the plume, in the plume, exiting the plume, or out of the plume.

  6. Tough, bio-inspired hybrid materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munch, Etienne; Launey, Maximimilan E.; Alsem, Daan H.; Saiz, Eduardo; Tomsia, Antoni P.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-10-06

    The notion of mimicking natural structures in the synthesis of new structural materials has generated enormous interest but has yielded few practical advances. Natural composites achieve strength and toughness through complex hierarchical designs extremely difficult to replicate synthetically. Here we emulate Nature's toughening mechanisms through the combination of two ordinary compounds, aluminum oxide and polymethylmethacrylate, into ice-templated structures whose toughness can be over 300 times (in energy terms) that of their constituents. The final product is a bulk hybrid ceramic material whose high yield strength and fracture toughness ({approx}200 MPa and {approx}30 MPa{radical}m) provide specific properties comparable to aluminum alloys. These model materials can be used to identify the key microstructural features that should guide the synthesis of bio-inspired ceramic-based composites with unique strength and toughness.

  7. Biologically Inspired Mushroom-Shaped Adhesive Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heepe, Lars; Gorb, Stanislav N.

    2014-07-01

    Adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon with great importance in technology, in our everyday life, and in nature. In this article, we review physical interactions that resist the separation of two solids in contact. By using examples of biological attachment systems, we summarize and categorize various principles that contribute to the so-called gecko effect. Emphasis is placed on the contact geometry and in particular on the mushroom-shaped geometry, which is observed in long-term biological adhesive systems. Furthermore, we report on artificial model systems with this bio-inspired geometry and demonstrate that surface microstructures with this geometry are promising candidates for technical applications, in which repeatable, reversible, and residue-free adhesion under different environmental conditions—such as air, fluid, and vacuum—is required. Various applications in robotic systems and in industrial pick-and-place processes are discussed.

  8. Hamiltonian Hydrodynamics and Irrotational Binary Inspiral

    CERN Document Server

    Markakis, Charalampos M

    2014-01-01

    Gravitational waves from neutron-star and black-hole binaries carry valuable information on their physical properties and probe physics inaccessible to the laboratory. Although development of black-hole gravitational-wave templates in the past decade has been revolutionary, the corresponding work for double neutron-star systems has lagged. Neutron stars can be well-modelled as simple barotropic fluids during the part of binary inspiral most relevant to gravitational wave astronomy, but the crucial geometric and mathematical consequences of this simplification have remained computationally unexploited. In particular, Carter and Lichnerowicz have described barotropic fluid motion via classical variational principles as conformally geodesic. Moreover, Kelvin's circulation theorem implies that initially irrotational flows remain irrotational. Applied to numerical relativity, these concepts lead to novel Hamiltonian or Hamilton-Jacobi schemes for evolving relativistic fluid flows. Hamiltonian methods can conserve ...

  9. Detection Strategies for Extreme Mass Ratio Inspirals

    CERN Document Server

    Cornish, N J

    2008-01-01

    The capture of compact stellar remnants by galactic black holes provides a unique laboratory for exploring the near horizon geometry of the Kerr spacetime. The gravitational radiation produced by these Extreme Mass Ratio Inspirals (EMRIs) encodes a detailed map of the black hole geometry, and the detection and characterization of these signals is a major science driver for the LISA observatory. The waveforms produced are very complex, and the signals need to be coherently tracked for hundreds to thousands of cycles to produce a detection, making EMRI signals one of the most challenging data analysis problems in all of gravitational wave astronomy. Estimates for the number of templates required to perform an optimal matched-filter search for these signals are astronomically large, and far out of reach of current computational resources. Here a sub-optimal, hierarchical approach to the EMRI detection problem is developed that employs a directed-stochastic search technique. The algorithm, dubbed Metropolis Hasti...

  10. Bio-inspired speed detection and discrimination

    CERN Document Server

    Cerda, Mauricio; Girau, Bernard

    2009-01-01

    In the field of computer vision, a crucial task is the detection of motion (also called optical flow extraction). This operation allows analysis such as 3D reconstruction, feature tracking, time-to-collision and novelty detection among others. Most of the optical flow extraction techniques work within a finite range of speeds. Usually, the range of detection is extended towards higher speeds by combining some multiscale information in a serial architecture. This serial multi-scale approach suffers from the problem of error propagation related to the number of scales used in the algorithm. On the other hand, biological experiments show that human motion perception seems to follow a parallel multiscale scheme. In this work we present a bio-inspired parallel architecture to perform detection of motion, providing a wide range of operation and avoiding error propagation associated with the serial architecture. To test our algorithm, we perform relative error comparisons between both classical and proposed techniqu...

  11. A superstring-inspired standard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis is presented of an E8 x E8 superstring-inspired ten-dimensional supergravity model following from compactification on a particular Calabi-Yau manifold which gives rise to three generations. The multiplet structure and discrete symmetries after compactification are determined. It is shown that the model has flat directions which allow for breaking of the gauge group to the standard SU(3) x SU(2) x U(1) model at a high scale. The resulting low-energy theory has a realistic spectrum and, remarkably, the discrete symmetries predict a reasonable structure for the Kobayashi-Maskawa mixing matrix. Without unnatural adjustments, proton decay is inhibited and neutrino masses consistent with experimental limits are obtained. (orig.)

  12. CERN Inspires Art in Major New Exhibition

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    Signatures of the Invisible, an exhibition inspired by CERN, opened at the Atlantis Gallery in London on Thursday, 1 March before going on a world tour. The fruit of a close collaboration between CERN and the London Institute, the exhibition brings together works from many leading European contemporary artists. White wooden boxes on a grey floor... the lids opened, unveiling brilliant white light from a bunch of optical fibres carefully stuck together in the shape of a square. Another holds a treasure of lead glass surrounded by enigmatic black mirrors. What's it all about? Signatures of the Invisible, that's what, a joint project organised by the London Institute, one of the world's largest college of art, and our Laboratory. Damien Foresy from the EST workshop putting finishing touches to the spinning tops of French artist Jérôme Basserode. Monica Sand's boxes are just one of the many works based around materials used in particle detection at CERN that was admired at the opening o...

  13. Quad Tree-based Level-of-details Representation of Digital Globe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhir Porwal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional visualization of the geographic data using a digital globe model has been an integral part of a modern GIS system. The visualization of the digital globe model presents many challenges not found in traditional terrain visualization system. The representation of the digital earth (globe model is important to efficiently render the geographical data without any distortion either at equator or Polar Regions. This paper presents a uniform scheme for efficient quad tree based level-of-details (LOD representation of the digital globe to minimize the distortion at Polar Regions and meets the requirement of fast frame rate rendering.

  14. NASA Missions Inspire Online Video Games

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Fast forward to 2035. Imagine being part of a community of astronauts living and working on the Moon. Suddenly, in the middle of just another day in space, a meteorite crashes into the surface of the Moon, threatening life as you know it. The support equipment that provides oxygen for the entire community has been compromised. What would you do? While this situation is one that most people will never encounter, NASA hopes to place students in such situations - virtually - to inspire, engage, and educate about NASA technologies, job opportunities, and the future of space exploration. Specifically, NASA s Learning Technologies program, part of the Agency s Office of Education, aims to inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in the science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) disciplines through interactive technologies. The ultimate goal of these educational programs is to support the growth of a pool of qualified scientific and technical candidates for future careers at places like NASA. STEM education has been an area of concern in the United States; according to the results of the 2009 Program for International Student Assessment, 23 countries had higher average scores in mathematics literacy than the United States. On the science literacy scale, 18 countries had higher average scores. "This is part of a much bigger picture of trying to grow skilled graduates for places like NASA that will want that technical expertise," says Daniel Laughlin, the Learning Technologies project manager at Goddard Space Flight Center. "NASA is trying to increase the number of students going into those fields, and so are other government agencies."

  15. Bio-Inspired Political Systems. Opening a Field

    CERN Document Server

    Mezza-Garcia, Nathalie

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we highlight the scopes of engineering bio-inspired political systems, which are political systems based on the properties of life that self-organize the increasing complexity of human social systems. We describe bio-inspired political systems and conjecture about various ways to get to them, most notably, metaheuristics, modeling and simulation and complexified topologies. Bio-inspired political systems operate with nature-based dynamics, inspired on the knowledge that has been acquired about complexity from natural social systems and life. Bio-inspired political systems are presented as the best alternative for organizing human sociopolitical interactions as computation and microelectronics-based technology profoundly modify the ways in which humans decide. Therefore, weakening classical political systems. For instance, dwindling top-down power structures, modifying the notion of geographical spatiality and augmenting the political granularity. We also argue that, more than a new theoretical p...

  16. Representation Discovery using Harmonic Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Mahadevan, Sridhar

    2008-01-01

    Representations are at the heart of artificial intelligence (AI). This book is devoted to the problem of representation discovery: how can an intelligent system construct representations from its experience? Representation discovery re-parameterizes the state space - prior to the application of information retrieval, machine learning, or optimization techniques - facilitating later inference processes by constructing new task-specific bases adapted to the state space geometry. This book presents a general approach to representation discovery using the framework of harmonic analysis, in particu

  17. Finding the best visualization of an ontology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabritius, Christina Valentin; Madsen, Nadia Lyngaa

    2004-01-01

    An ontology is a classification model for a given domain. In information retrieval ontologies are used to perform broad searches. An ontology can be visualized as nodes and edges. Each node represents an element and each edge a relation between a parent and a child element. Working with an ontology becomes easier with a visual representation. An idea is to use the expressive power that a 3D representation to provide visualization for the user. In this paper we propose a new method for positioning the elements of the visualized concept lattice in the 3D world based on Operations Research (OR) methods. One method uses a discrete location model to create an initial solution and we propose heuristic methods to further improve the visual result. We evaluate the visual results according to our success criteria and the feedback from users. Running times of the heuristic indicate that an improved version should be feasible for on-line processing and what-if analysis of ontologies.

  18. Visual Long-Term Memory Has the Same Limit on Fidelity as Visual Working Memory

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, George Angelo; Brady, Timothy Francis; Konkle, Talia A.; Gill, Jonathan; Oliva, Aude

    2013-01-01

    Visual long-term memory can store thousands of objects with surprising visual detail, but just how detailed are these representations, and how can one quantify this fidelity? Using the property of color as a case study, we estimated the precision of visual information in long-term memory, and compared this with the precision of the same information in working memory. Observers were shown real-world objects in random colors and were asked to recall the colors after a delay. We quantified two p...

  19. Picturing Christ’s childhood: Some examples of a rare iconographic theme inspired by the infancy gospels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fundi? Leonela

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article examines Byzantine wall paintings dated to the thirteenth and fourteenth century depicting a rare iconographic theme of Jesus’s childhood inspired by the Infancy Gospels. The iconography shows the Virgin Mary leading the child Jesus by the hand. The child is depicted holding different objects, such as a writing tablet, an unfurled scroll, or a wicker basket filled with flowers or fruits. Several of the scenes under examination have been hitherto misidentified or altogether unknown. In addition to this, the article interprets these representations in a broader iconographic context and addresses the possible origin of the theme.

  20. Vector coherent state representations, induced representations and geometric quantization: I. Scalar coherent state representations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coherent state theory is shown to reproduce three categories of representations of the spectrum generating algebra for an algebraic model: (i) classical realizations which are the starting point for geometric quantization, (ii) induced unitary representations corresponding to prequantization and (iii) irreducible unitary representations obtained in geometric quantization by choice of a polarization. These representations establish an intimate relation between coherent state theory and geometric quantization in the context of induced representations. (author)

  1. Principles of Information Visualization for Business Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioan I. ANDONE

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In the era of data-centric-science, a large number of visualization tools have been created to help researchers understand increasingly rich business databases. Information visualization is a process of constructing a visual presentation of business quantitative data, especially prepared for managerial use. Interactive information visualization provide researchers with remarkable tools for discovery and innovation. By combining powerful data mining methods with user-controlled interfaces, users are beginning to benefit from these potent telescopes for high-dimensional spaces. They can begin with an overview, zoom in on areas of interest, filter out unwanted items, and then click for details-on-demand. With careful design and efficient algorithms, the dynamic queries approach to data exploration can provide 100 msec updates even for million-record databases. Visualizations of business information are therefore widely used in actually business decision support systems, and by business researchers also. Visual user interfaces called dashboards are tools for reporting the status of a company and its business environment to facilitate business intelligence and performance management activities. In this study, we examine the research on concepts, and the principles of business information visualization, because we hope to be using correctly by business Ph.D. students in their researches. Visual representations are likely to improve business managers, and business researchers efficiency, offer new insights, and encouraging comparisons.

  2. Visualizing Earthquakes at Divergent Plate Margins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cara Harwood

    This screenshot from the visualization shows both continental rift zones, and ocean spreading centers, both types of divergent plate boundaries. The visualization shows how earthquakes at all types of divergent margins are shallow and have a low-magnitude. Click the image to enlarge or view the MP4 movie (MP4 Video 79.3MB Aug22 11).The purpose of this activity is to introduce students to the distribution and characteristics of earthquakes associated with divergent plate boundaries. Students will learn about how the magnitude and distribution of earthquakes at divergent boundaries are related to processes that occur at these boundaries and to the geometry and position of the two diverging plates. Because the depth of earthquakes can be difficult for students to visualize in 2D representations, this activity allows students to visualize the 3D distribution of earthquakes within Earth's surface, which is essential for understanding how different types of earthquakes occur in different tectonic settings. Locations featured in the visualization include the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, the East Pacific Rise, and the East African Rift Zone. Talking points and questions are included to facilitate using this visualization as part of an interactive lecture. In addition to playing back the visualization, instructors can also download the visualization software and data set and explore it themselves.

  3. Promoting Visualization Skills through Deconstruction Using Physical Models and a Visualization Activity Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiltz, Holly Kristine

    Visualization skills are important in learning chemistry, as these skills have been shown to correlate to high ability in problem solving. Students' understanding of visual information and their problem-solving processes may only ever be accessed indirectly: verbalization, gestures, drawings, etc. In this research, deconstruction of complex visual concepts was aligned with the promotion of students' verbalization of visualized ideas to teach students to solve complex visual tasks independently. All instructional tools and teaching methods were developed in accordance with the principles of the theoretical framework, the Modeling Theory of Learning: deconstruction of visual representations into model components, comparisons to reality, and recognition of students' their problemsolving strategies. Three physical model systems were designed to provide students with visual and tangible representations of chemical concepts. The Permanent Reflection Plane Demonstration provided visual indicators that students used to support or invalidate the presence of a reflection plane. The 3-D Coordinate Axis system provided an environment that allowed students to visualize and physically enact symmetry operations in a relevant molecular context. The Proper Rotation Axis system was designed to provide a physical and visual frame of reference to showcase multiple symmetry elements that students must identify in a molecular model. Focus groups of students taking Inorganic chemistry working with the physical model systems demonstrated difficulty documenting and verbalizing processes and descriptions of visual concepts. Frequently asked student questions were classified, but students also interacted with visual information through gestures and model manipulations. In an effort to characterize how much students used visualization during lecture or recitation, we developed observation rubrics to gather information about students' visualization artifacts and examined the effect instructors' modeled visualization artifacts had on students. No patterns emerged from the passive observation of visualization artifacts in lecture or recitation, but the need to elicit visual information from students was made clear. Deconstruction proved to be a valuable method for instruction and assessment of visual information. Three strategies for using deconstruction in teaching were distilled from the lessons and observations of the student focus groups: begin with observations of what is given in an image and what it's composed of, identify the relationships between components to find additional operations in different environments about the molecule, and deconstructing steps of challenging questions can reveal mistakes. An intervention was developed to teach students to use deconstruction and verbalization to analyze complex visualization tasks and employ the principles of the theoretical framework. The activities were scaffolded to introduce increasingly challenging concepts to students, but also support them as they learned visually demanding chemistry concepts. Several themes were observed in the analysis of the visualization activities. Students used deconstruction by documenting which parts of the images were useful for interpretation of the visual. Students identified valid patterns and rules within the images, which signified understanding of arrangement of information presented in the representation. Successful strategy communication was identified when students documented personal strategies that allowed them to complete the activity tasks. Finally, students demonstrated the ability to extend symmetry skills to advanced applications they had not previously seen. This work shows how the use of deconstruction and verbalization may have a great impact on how students master difficult topics and combined, they offer students a powerful strategy to approach visually demanding chemistry problems and to the instructor a unique insight to mentally constructed strategies.

  4. Additive and polynomial representations

    CERN Document Server

    Krantz, David H; Suppes, Patrick

    1971-01-01

    Additive and Polynomial Representations deals with major representation theorems in which the qualitative structure is reflected as some polynomial function of one or more numerical functions defined on the basic entities. Examples are additive expressions of a single measure (such as the probability of disjoint events being the sum of their probabilities), and additive expressions of two measures (such as the logarithm of momentum being the sum of log mass and log velocity terms). The book describes the three basic procedures of fundamental measurement as the mathematical pivot, as the utiliz

  5. Software tangible: metáforas, representaciones visuales y actividades de apoyo didáctico para la enseñanza en construcción de software / Tangible software: metaphors, visual representations and didactic support activities for teaching in software construction / Software tangível: metáforas, representações visuais e atividades de apoio didático para o ensino em construção de software

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Luis Carlos, Díaz Chaparro; Miguel Eduardo, Torres Moreno; José Hernando, Hurtado Rojas; Germán Alberto, Chavarro Flórez; Edgar Enrique, Ruiz García.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Resumo Introdução. Desde a experiência no processo de ensino aprendizagem dos primeiros níveis de análises, desenho, construção e execução de algoritmos se detectou que realmente é complicado ilustrar e compreender conceitos de caráter intangível. Resulta ser uma meta para os professores gerar analo [...] gias ou outro tipo de ajudas conceituais que de alguma maneira contribuam à imaginação ou abstração que devem fundar os estudantes no momento de entender os conceitos básicos de programação. Objetivo. Definir um conjunto de representações visuais e metáforas que permitam estabelecer uma base para o desenvolvimento de materiais didáticos, aplicações de software e atividades pertinentes que brindem suporte ao ensino e aprendizagem em programação. Materiais e métodos. Com base em algumas teorias da área da pedagogia e a revisão de projetos semelhantes, definiram-se várias propostas de representação, metáforas e atividades de aprendizagem significativa, a partir de uma primeira seleção de conceitos de programação. Resultados. Compartilharam-se experiências docentes e se formalizaram várias atividades que foram desenvolvidas diretamente em classe por parte dos professores envolvidos na linha de trabalho denominada Software Tangível. Gerou-se e se utilizou um conjunto de instrumentos físicos e ferramentas de software de apoio didático relacionadas e integradas sob uma consistente definição de representações visuais comuns. Conclusão. O uso das representações visuais, metáforas, instrumentos e atividades de aprendizagem significativa permite apoiar a geração das abstrações necessárias que contribuem a compreender os conceitos intangíveis próprios da programação e execução de algoritmos. Abstract in spanish Resumen Introducción. Desde la experiencia en el proceso de enseñanza aprendizaje de los primeros niveles de análisis, diseño, construcción y ejecución de algoritmos se ha detectado que realmente es complicado ilustrar y comprender conceptos de carácter intangible. Resulta ser un reto para los profe [...] sores generar analogías u otro tipo de ayudas conceptuales que de alguna manera aporten a la imaginación o abstracción que deben fundar los estudiantes en el momento de entender los conceptos básicos de programación. Objetivo. Definir un conjunto de representaciones visuales y metáforas que permitan establecer una base para el desarrollo de materiales didácticos, aplicaciones de software y actividades pertinentes que brinden soporte a la enseñanza y aprendizaje en programación. Materiales y métodos. Con base en algunas teorías del área de la pedagogía y la revisión de proyectos semejantes, se definieron varias propuestas de representación, metáforas y actividades de aprendizaje significativo, a partir de una primera selección de conceptos de programación. Resultados. Se compartieron experiencias docentes y se formalizaron varias actividades que fueron desarrolladas directamente en clase por parte de los profesores involucrados en la línea de trabajo denominada Software Tangible. Se generó y se utilizó un conjunto de instrumentos físicos y herramientas de software de apoyo didáctico relacionadas e integradas bajo una consistente definición de representaciones visuales comunes. Conclusión. El uso de las representaciones visuales, metáforas, instrumentos y actividades de aprendizaje significativo permite apoyar la generación de las abstracciones necesarias que contribuyen a comprender los conceptos intangibles propios de la programación y ejecución de algoritmos. Abstract in english Abstract Introduction. From the experience in the teachinglearning process of the first levels of analysis, design, construction and execution of algorithms, the difficulty of illustrating and understanding intangible concepts has been detected. Generating analogies or other kinds of conceptual reso [...] urces to contribute to the imagination or the abstraction students require to understand the basic elements of programming, turn

  6. Bag-of-visual-ngrams for histopathology image classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Monroy, A. Pastor; Montes-y-Gómez, Manuel; Escalante, Hugo Jair; Cruz-Roa, Angel; González, Fabio A.

    2013-11-01

    This paper describes an extension of the Bag-of-Visual-Words (BoVW) representation for image categorization (IC) of histophatology images. This representation is one of the most used approaches in several high-level computer vision tasks. However, the BoVW representation has an important limitation: the disregarding of spatial information among visual words. This information may be useful to capture discriminative visual-patterns in specific computer vision tasks. In order to overcome this problem we propose the use of visual n-grams. N-grams based-representations are very popular in the field of natural language processing (NLP), in particular within text mining and information retrieval. We propose building a codebook of n-grams and then representing images by histograms of visual n-grams. We evaluate our proposal in the challenging task of classifying histopathology images. The novelty of our proposal lies in the fact that we use n-grams as attributes for a classification model (together with visual-words, i.e., 1-grams). This is common practice within NLP, although, to the best of our knowledge, this idea has not been explored yet within computer vision. We report experimental results in a database of histopathology images where our proposed method outperforms the traditional BoVWs formulation.

  7. A sparse representation of gravitational waves from precessing compact binaries

    CERN Document Server

    Blackman, Jonathan; Galley, Chad R; Tiglio, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Many relevant applications in gravitational wave physics share a significant common problem: the seven-dimensional parameter space of gravitational waveforms from precessing compact binary inspirals and coalescences is large enough to prohibit covering the space of waveforms with sufficient density. We find that by using the reduced basis method together with a parametrization of waveforms based on their phase and precession, we can construct ultra-compact yet high-accuracy representations of this large space. As a demonstration, we show that less than $100$ judiciously chosen precessing inspiral waveforms are needed for $200$ cycles, mass ratios from $1$ to $10$ and spin magnitudes $\\le 0.9$. In fact, using only the first $10$ reduced basis waveforms yields a maximum mismatch of $0.016$ over the whole range of considered parameters. We test whether the parameters selected from the inspiral regime result in an accurate reduced basis when including merger and ringdown; we find that this is indeed the case in t...

  8. Representation of central and peripheral vision in the primate cerebral cortex: Insights from studies of the marmoset brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, H-H; Chaplin, T A; Rosa, M G P

    2015-04-01

    How the visual field is represented by neurons in the cerebral cortex is one of the most basic questions in visual neuroscience. However, research to date has focused heavily on the small part of the visual field within, and immediately surrounding the fovea. Studies on the cortical representation of the full visual field in the primate brain are still scarce. We have been investigating this issue with electrophysiological and anatomical methods, taking advantage of the small and lissencephalic marmoset brain, which allows easy access to the representation of the full visual field in many cortical areas. This review summarizes our main findings to date, and relates the results to a broader question: is the peripheral visual field processed in a similar manner to the central visual field, but with lower spatial acuity? Given the organization of the visual cortex, the issue can be addressed by asking: (1) Is visual information processed in the same way within a single cortical area? and (2) Are different cortical areas specialized for different parts of the visual field? The electrophysiological data from the primary visual cortex indicate that many aspects of spatiotemporal computation are remarkably similar across the visual field, although subtle variations are detectable. Our anatomical and electrophysiological studies of the extrastriate cortex, on the other hand, suggest that visual processing in the far peripheral visual field is likely to involve a distinct network of specialized cortical areas, located in the depths of the calcarine sulcus and interhemispheric fissure. PMID:25242578

  9. Visualizing Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    Reality Capture Technologies, Inc. is a spinoff company from Ames Research Center. Offering e-business solutions for optimizing management, design and production processes, RCT uses visual collaboration environments (VCEs) such as those used to prepare the Mars Pathfinder mission.The product, 4-D Reality Framework, allows multiple users from different locations to manage and share data. The insurance industry is one targeted commercial application for this technology.

  10. Flow visualization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flow visualization techniques are reviewed, with particular attention given to those applicable to liquid helium flows. Three techniques capable of obtaining qualitative and quantitative measurements of complex 3D flow fields are discussed including focusing schlieren, particle image volocimetry, and holocinematography (HCV). It is concluded that the HCV appears to be uniquely capable of obtaining full time-varying, 3D velocity field data, but is limited to the low speeds typical of liquid helium facilities. 8 refs

  11. Visualizing Transformation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pia

    Transformation, defined as the step of extracting, arranging and simplifying data into visual form (M. Neurath, 1974), was developed in connection with ISOTYPE (International System Of TYpographic Picture Education) and might well be the most important legacy of Isotype to the field of graphic design. Recently transformation has attracted renewed interest because of the book ‘The Transformer’ written by Robin Kinross and Marie Neurath. My on-going research project, summarized in this paper, identifies and depicts the essential principles of data visualization underlying the process of transformation with reference to Marie Neurath’s sketches on the Bilston Project. The material has been collected at the Otto and Marie Neurath Collection housed at the University of Reading, UK. By using data visualization as a research method to look directly into the process of transformation the project elaborates on previous revisions of the concept of transformation (Macdonald-Ross & Waller, 1974; Kinross, 1979, Kinross & Marie Neurath, 2009). The inquiry method I have used is unusual in the way the material has been organized, by “rewinding” transformation (as explained later in the paper), using the finished charts as a starting point and then going back to the beginning; furthermore this inquiry presents a novel approach to clarifying the process by designing symbols and diagrams. It will be demonstrated that transformation offers an improved approach to data visualization. The message in the chart is not preformed, but formed through the process of transformation; this means that the purpose of transformation is not the styling of charts with pictograms but rather creating a meaningful message. The contribution of this paper is an elaborated understanding of the process of transformation and a demonstration of the adoption of a research-through-design method.

  12. Testing learners' attitudes - visual components of texts as bridges or barriers to learning

    OpenAIRE

    Christine Anthonissen; Monica Kirsten

    2011-01-01

    This article considers how visual images in texts may enhance or inhibit language learning. It draws on Kress and Van Leeuwen’s (1996) work on the grammar of visual design, recognising that visual images form part of a powerful semiotic system that carries representational and connotative meanings in a manner comparable to that of words, sentences and larger textual units. It takes note of the ways in which new technologies have introduced more visual material in printed texts than was avai...

  13. Visualizing Dynamics –The Perception of Spatiotemporal Data in 2D and 3D

    OpenAIRE

    Kjellin, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    In many command and control situations the understanding of dynamic events is crucial. With today’s development of hard- and software architecture, we have the possibility to visualize data in two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) images. The aim of this thesis is therefore to investigate different approaches to visualizing dynamic events. The visualization techniques investigated include 2D animation and time representations as markings on a 2D map. In 3D the visualization techni...

  14. INSPIRE: A new scientific information system for HEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of high-energy physics (HEP) information systems has been jointly analyzed by the libraries of CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. As a result, the four laboratories have started the INSPIRE project - a new platform built by moving the successful SPIRES features and content, curated at DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, into the open-source CDS Invenio digital library software that was developed at CERN. INSPIRE will integrate current acquisition workflows and databases to host the entire body of the HEP literature (about one million records), aiming to become the reference HEP scientific information platform worldwide. It will provide users with fast access to full text journal articles and preprints, but also material such as conference slides and multimedia. INSPIRE will empower scientists with new tools to discover and access the results most relevant to their research, enable novel text- and data-mining applications, and deploy new metrics to assess the impact of articles and authors. In addition, it will introduce the 'Web 2.0' paradigm of user-enriched content in the domain of sciences, with community-based approaches to scientific publishing. INSPIRE represents a natural evolution of scholarly communication built on successful community-based information systems, and it provides a vision for information management in other fields of science. Inspired by the needs of HEP, we hope that the INSPIRE project will be inspiring for other communities.or other communities.

  15. INSPIRE: A new scientific information system for HEP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, R.; Raae, L.

    2010-04-01

    The status of high-energy physics (HEP) information systems has been jointly analyzed by the libraries of CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. As a result, the four laboratories have started the INSPIRE project - a new platform built by moving the successful SPIRES features and content, curated at DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, into the open-source CDS Invenio digital library software that was developed at CERN. INSPIRE will integrate current acquisition workflows and databases to host the entire body of the HEP literature (about one million records), aiming to become the reference HEP scientific information platform worldwide. It will provide users with fast access to full text journal articles and preprints, but also material such as conference slides and multimedia. INSPIRE will empower scientists with new tools to discover and access the results most relevant to their research, enable novel text- and data-mining applications, and deploy new metrics to assess the impact of articles and authors. In addition, it will introduce the "Web 2.0" paradigm of user-enriched content in the domain of sciences, with community-based approaches to scientific publishing. INSPIRE represents a natural evolution of scholarly communication built on successful community-based information systems, and it provides a vision for information management in other fields of science. Inspired by the needs of HEP, we hope that the INSPIRE project will be inspiring for other communities.

  16. INSPIRE: A new scientific information system for HEP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ivanov, R; Raae, L, E-mail: Radoslav.Ivanov@cern.c, E-mail: Lars.Christian.Raae@cern.c [European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN CH-1211, Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2010-04-01

    The status of high-energy physics (HEP) information systems has been jointly analyzed by the libraries of CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC. As a result, the four laboratories have started the INSPIRE project - a new platform built by moving the successful SPIRES features and content, curated at DESY, Fermilab and SLAC, into the open-source CDS Invenio digital library software that was developed at CERN. INSPIRE will integrate current acquisition workflows and databases to host the entire body of the HEP literature (about one million records), aiming to become the reference HEP scientific information platform worldwide. It will provide users with fast access to full text journal articles and preprints, but also material such as conference slides and multimedia. INSPIRE will empower scientists with new tools to discover and access the results most relevant to their research, enable novel text- and data-mining applications, and deploy new metrics to assess the impact of articles and authors. In addition, it will introduce the 'Web 2.0' paradigm of user-enriched content in the domain of sciences, with community-based approaches to scientific publishing. INSPIRE represents a natural evolution of scholarly communication built on successful community-based information systems, and it provides a vision for information management in other fields of science. Inspired by the needs of HEP, we hope that the INSPIRE project will be inspiring for other communities.

  17. Graph-representation of oxidative folding pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaján László

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The process of oxidative folding combines the formation of native disulfide bond with conformational folding resulting in the native three-dimensional fold. Oxidative folding pathways can be described in terms of disulfide intermediate species (DIS which can also be isolated and characterized. Each DIS corresponds to a family of folding states (conformations that the given DIS can adopt in three dimensions. Results The oxidative folding space can be represented as a network of DIS states interconnected by disulfide interchange reactions that can either create/abolish or rearrange disulfide bridges. We propose a simple 3D representation wherein the states having the same number of disulfide bridges are placed on separate planes. In this representation, the shuffling transitions are within the planes, and the redox edges connect adjacent planes. In a number of experimentally studied cases (bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor, insulin-like growth factor and epidermal growth factor, the observed intermediates appear as part of contiguous oxidative folding pathways. Conclusions Such networks can be used to visualize folding pathways in terms of the experimentally observed intermediates. A simple visualization template written for the Tulip package http://www.tulip-software.org/ can be obtained from V.A.

  18. Lunabotics Mining Competition: Inspiration Through Accomplishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Lunabotics Mining Competition is designed to promote the development of interest in space activities and STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) fields. The competition uses excavation, a necessary first step towards extracting resources from the regolith and building bases on the moon. The unique physical properties of lunar regolith and the reduced 1/6th gravity, vacuum environment make excavation a difficult technical challenge. Advances in lunar regolith mining have the potential to significantly contribute to our nation's space vision and NASA space exploration operations. The competition is conducted annually by NASA at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. The teams that can use telerobotic or autonomous operation to excavate a lunar regolith geotechnical simulant, herein after referred to as Black Point-1 (or BP-1) and score the most points (calculated as an average of two separate 10-minute timed competition attempts) will eam points towards the Joe Kosmo Award for Excellence and the scores will reflect ranking in the on-site mining category of the competition. The minimum excavation requirement is 10.0 kg during each competition attempt and the robotic excavator, referred to as the "Lunabot", must meet all specifications. This paper will review the achievements of the Lunabotics Mining Competition in 2010 and 2011, and present the new rules for 2012. By providing a framework for robotic design and fabrication, which culminates in a live competition event, university students have been able to produce sophisticated lunabots which are tele-operated. Multi-disciplinary teams are encouraged and the extreme sense of accomplishment provides a unique source of inspiration to the participating students, which has been shown to translate into increased interest in STEM careers. Our industrial sponsors (Caterpillar, Newmont Mining, Harris, Honeybee Robotics) have all stated that there is a strong need for skills in the workforce related to robotics and automated machines. In 2010, 22 United States (US) universities competed, and in May 2011 the competition was opened to international participation, with 46 Universities attending. There were 12 international teams and 34 US teams. This combined total directly inspired an estimated 544 university students. More students and the public were engaged via internet broadcasting and social networking media. This is expected to be of value for actual future space missions, as knowledge is gained from testing many innovative prototypes in simulated lunar regolith. More information is available at www.nasa.gov/lunabotics/.

  19. Perceptual similarity of visual patterns predicts the similarity of their dynamic neural activation patterns measured with MEG

    OpenAIRE

    Wardle, Susan G.; Kriegeskorte, Nikolaus; Khaligh-Razavi, Seyed-Mahdi; Carlson, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Perceptual similarity is a cognitive judgment that represents the end-stage of a complex cascade of hierarchical processing throughout visual cortex. Although it is intuitive that visual objects that appear similar may share similar underlying patterns of neural activation, a direct mapping between perceptual similarity and representational distance has not been demonstrated. Here we explore the relationship between the human brain's time-varying representation of visual pat...

  20. Digital media Experiences for Visual Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buhl, Mie

    2013-01-01

    Visual learning is a topic for didactic studies in all levels of educaion, brought about by an increasing use of digital meida- digital media give rise to discussions of how learning expereienes come about from various media ressources that generate new learning situations. new situations call for new tools and new theoretical approaches with which to understand them. the article argues that the current phase of social practices and technological development makes it difficult to disitnguish between experience with digital media and mediated experiences, because of the use of renegotiation og both possibilites of technology and the nature of the content it facilitates. the discussion comes in three parts: 1. the alteration of visual representations in contemporary teaching and learning brought about by digital interfaces, 2. the functions af visual experience in learning processes brought about by the nature of diverse digital artefacts, 3. the learning potentials in using mobils devices for integrating thebody in visual perception processes.

  1. Using Jquery with Snort to Visualize Intrusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alaa El - Din Riad

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The explosive growth of malicious activities on worldwide communication networks, such as the Internet, has highlighted the need for efficient intrusion detection systems. The efficiency of traditional intrusion detection systems is limited by their inability to effectively relay relevant information due to their lack of interactive / immersive technologies. Visualized information is a technique that can encode large amounts of complex interrelated data, being at the same time easily quantified, manipulated, and processed by a human user. Authors have found that the representations can be quite effective at conveying the needed information and resolving the relationships extremely rapidly. To facilitate the creation of novel visualizations this paper presents a new framework that is designed with using data visualization technique by using Jquery Php for analysis and visualizes snort result data for user.

  2. Visual perception and imagery: a new molecular hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bókkon, I

    2009-05-01

    Here, we put forward a redox molecular hypothesis about the natural biophysical substrate of visual perception and visual imagery. This hypothesis is based on the redox and bioluminescent processes of neuronal cells in retinotopically organized cytochrome oxidase-rich visual areas. Our hypothesis is in line with the functional roles of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in living cells that are not part of haphazard process, but rather a very strict mechanism used in signaling pathways. We point out that there is a direct relationship between neuronal activity and the biophoton emission process in the brain. Electrical and biochemical processes in the brain represent sensory information from the external world. During encoding or retrieval of information, electrical signals of neurons can be converted into synchronized biophoton signals by bioluminescent radical and non-radical processes. Therefore, information in the brain appears not only as an electrical (chemical) signal but also as a regulated biophoton (weak optical) signal inside neurons. During visual perception, the topological distribution of photon stimuli on the retina is represented by electrical neuronal activity in retinotopically organized visual areas. These retinotopic electrical signals in visual neurons can be converted into synchronized biophoton signals by radical and non-radical processes in retinotopically organized mitochondria-rich areas. As a result, regulated bioluminescent biophotons can create intrinsic pictures (depictive representation) in retinotopically organized cytochrome oxidase-rich visual areas during visual imagery and visual perception. The long-term visual memory is interpreted as epigenetic information regulated by free radicals and redox processes. This hypothesis does not claim to solve the secret of consciousness, but proposes that the evolution of higher levels of complexity made the intrinsic picture representation of the external visual world possible by regulated redox and bioluminescent reactions in the visual system during visual perception and visual imagery. PMID:19428983

  3. Appendix VII: Knowledge representation and modeling at GRS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge representation as a scientific domain has gained strong momentum, particularly in view of the 'Semantic Net' proposed by Tim Berners-Lee (the 'father' of the Internet) as the next 'intelligent' Internet. Several methods such as Topic Maps, Concept Maps or Ontologies are available, differing in the degree of formalization. In general, they offer a systematic approach to knowledge representation and a controlled vocabulary set up by experts to describe the domain as well as visualization and search facilities to navigate the maps. In more formal cases such as ontologies, the domain may be 'understood' by machines to e.g. draw inferences or check consistency

  4. Advances in bio-inspired computing for combinatorial optimization problems

    CERN Document Server

    Pintea, Camelia-Mihaela

    2013-01-01

    Advances in Bio-inspired Combinatorial Optimization Problems' illustrates several recent bio-inspired efficient algorithms for solving NP-hard problems.Theoretical bio-inspired concepts and models, in particular for agents, ants and virtual robots are described. Large-scale optimization problems, for example: the Generalized Traveling Salesman Problem and the Railway Traveling Salesman Problem, are solved and their results are discussed.Some of the main concepts and models described in this book are: inner rule to guide ant search - a recent model in ant optimization, heterogeneous sensitive a

  5. INSPIRE - The Next-Generation HEP Information System

    CERN Document Server

    Holtkamp, Annette

    2010-01-01

    CERN, DESY, Fermilab and SLAC have joined forces to build INSPIRE, the next-generation HEP information platform offering innovative tools for information discovery and communication. Representing a natural community-based evolution of SPIRES, INSPIRE provides fast access to the entire body of HEP literature. As a subject repository it will host fulltexts of preprints, Open Access journal articles and supplementary material like conference slides and multimedia, enabling novel text- and data mining applications. In the spirit of Web2.0 INSPIRE will also supply tools for collaboration and user-enriched content.

  6. Moment graphs and representations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jantzen, Jens Carsten

    2012-01-01

    Moment graphs and sheaves on moment graphs are basically combinatorial objects that have be used to describe equivariant intersectiion cohomology. In these lectures we are going to show that they can be used to provide a direct link from this cohomology to the representation theory of simple Lie algebras and of simple algebraic groups. The first section contains some background on equivariant cohomology.

  7. Biologically Inspired Purification and Dispersion of SWCNTs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feeback, Daniel L.; Clarke, Mark S.; Nikolaev, Pavel

    2009-01-01

    A biologically inspired method has been developed for (1) separating single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from other materials (principally, amorphous carbon and metal catalysts) in raw production batches and (2) dispersing the SWCNTs as individual particles (in contradistinction to ropes and bundles) in suspension, as required for a number of applications. Prior methods of purification and dispersal of SWCNTs involve, variously, harsh physical processes (e.g., sonication) or harsh chemical processes (e.g., acid reflux). These processes do not completely remove the undesired materials and do not disperse bundles and ropes into individual suspended SWCNTs. Moreover, these processes cut long SWCNTs into shorter pieces, yielding typical nanotube lengths between 150 and 250 nm. In contrast, the present method does not involve harsh physical or chemical processes. The method involves the use of biologically derived dispersal agents (BDDAs) in an aqueous solution that is mechanically homogenized (but not sonicated) and centrifuged. The dense solid material remaining after centrifugation is resuspended by vortexing in distilled water, yielding an aqueous suspension of individual, separated SWCNTs having lengths from about 10 to about 15 microns.

  8. Marvel and DC Characters Inspired by Arachnids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elidiomar Ribeiro Da-Silva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This article compares arachnid-based Marvel and DC comics characters. The composition of a comic book character often has interesting ‘real-life’ influences. Given the strong connection between arachnids (especially spiders, scorpions and mites, all belonging to the zoological class Arachnida and human beings it is not surprising that they have inspired many fictional characters.We recorded 84 Marvel Comics characters and 40 DC Comics characters, detailed in the dataset that accompanies the article (Da-Silva 2014. Most characters have been created recently, since the 1990s. Marvel has significantly more arachnid characters than DC. As for taxonomic classification, the characters were based mostly on spiders (zoological order Araneae. Of the total characters, the majority are human beings, but an overwhelming number have at least some typical arachnid features. Villains (60.91% of total are significantly more numerous, considering the sum of the two publishers. Arachnids have bad reputation for being dangerous (Thorp and Woodson 1976; Ruppert and Barnes 1996. Since the public usually considers spiders, scorpions and mites “harmful” in general, we expected a larger contingent of villains. However, there was no statistical difference between the amount of villains and heroes in Marvel characters. It did not happen probably due to the success of one character: the Amazing Spider-Man.

  9. SU(5)-inspired double beta decay

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca, Renato M

    2015-01-01

    The short-range part of the neutrinoless double beta amplitude is generated via the exchange of exotic particles, such as charged scalars, leptoquarks and/or diquarks. In order to give a sizeable contribution to the total decay rate, the masses of these exotics should be of the order of (at most) a few TeV. Here, we argue that these exotics could be the "light" (i.e weak-scale) remnants of some $B-L$ violating variants of $SU(5)$. We show that unification of the standard model gauge couplings, consistent with proton decay limits, can be achieved in such a setup without the need to introduce supersymmetry. Since these non-minimal $SU(5)$-inspired models violate $B-L$, they generate Majorana neutrino masses and therefore make it possible to explain neutrino oscillation data. The "light" coloured particles of these models can potentially be observed at the LHC, and it might be possible to probe the origin of the neutrino masses with $\\Delta L=2$ violating signals. As particular realizations of this idea, we pres...

  10. String field theory inspired phantom model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An exact solution to the Friedmann equations with a stringy inspired phantom field is constructed. The Universe is considered as a slowly decaying D3-brane, which is described in the string field theory framework. The notable features of the concerned exactly solvable stringy dark energy (DE) model are a ghost sign of the kinetic term and a special polynomial form of the effective tachyon potential. Cosmological consequences of adding the cold dark matter (CDM) to this model are investigated as well. Solutions with large initial value of the CDM energy density attracted by the exact solution without the CDM are constructed numerically. In contrast to the ACDM model the Hubble parameter in our model is not a monotonic function of time. For specific initial data the DE state parameter UJDE is also not monotonic function of time. For these cases there are two separate domains of time where U'DE being less than - 1 is close to - 1. Stability conditions, under which the constructed solution is stable with respect to small fluctuations of the initial conditions, including the CDM energy density, are found. Keywords: string field theory, cosmology, tachyon, phantom, dark energy, cold dark matter, Big Rip (authors)

  11. Biology-inspired Architecture for Situation Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kennie H.; Lodding, Kenneth N.; Olariu, Stephan; Wilson, Larry; Xin, Chunsheng

    2006-01-01

    Situation Management is a rapidly developing science combining new techniques for data collection with advanced methods of data fusion to facilitate the process leading to correct decisions prescribing action. Current research focuses on reducing increasing amounts of diverse data to knowledge used by decision makers and on reducing time between observations, decisions and actions. No new technology is more promising for increasing the diversity and fidelity of observations than sensor networks. However, current research on sensor networks concentrates on a centralized network architecture. We believe this trend will not realize the full potential of situation management. We propose a new architecture modeled after biological ecosystems where motes are autonomous and intelligent, yet cooperate with local neighborhoods. Providing a layered approach, they sense and act independently when possible, and cooperate with neighborhoods when necessary. The combination of their local actions results in global effects. While situation management research is currently dominated by military applications, advances envisioned for industrial and business applications have similar requirements. NASA has requirements for intelligent and autonomous systems in future missions that can benefit from advances in situation management. We describe requirements for the Integrated Vehicle Health Management program where our biology-inspired architecture provides a layered approach and decisions can be made at the proper level to improve safety, reduce costs, and improve efficiency in making diagnostic and prognostic assessments of the structural integrity, aerodynamic characteristics, and operation of aircraft.

  12. Supersymmetry breaking in superstring-inspired models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We study one-loop corrections to a four-dimensional field-theory model, including nonperturbative supersymmetry breaking by gaugino condensation, suggested by a particular compactification of the zero-slope limit of a ten-dimensional superstring theory. We find that, unless the vacuum energy is unbounded from below, it vanishes at the minimum of the effective one-loop-corrected potential. If there is a vacuum with broken supersymmetry, it remains degenerate in one direction and the scales of the effective theory are obtained at one loop in terms of only one (discrete) parameter which remains undetermined. One-loop corrections from the effective theory at scales below ?/sub c/, where hidden gaugino condensation occurs, generate no soft supersymmetry breaking in the observable sector. The analysis of one-loop effects from scales above ?/sub c/ suggests that no soft supersymmetry-breaking terms are generated in the gauge-nonsinglet scalar sector, while if gaugino masses m/sub g/ are generated they are related to the gravitino mass m/sub g/ by m/sub m/ = O(1--100)m3/sub G/16?2m2/sub p/. We discuss possibilities for a viable gauge hierarchy and the generalization of our results to other superstring-inspired models

  13. Detection strategies for extreme mass ratio inspirals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The capture of compact stellar remnants by galactic black holes provides a unique laboratory for exploring the near-horizon geometry of the Kerr spacetime, or possible departures from general relativity if the central cores prove not to be black holes. The gravitational radiation produced by these extreme mass ratio inspirals (EMRIs) encodes a detailed map of the black hole geometry, and the detection and characterization of these signals is a major scientific goal for the LISA mission. The waveforms produced are very complex, and the signals need to be coherently tracked for tens of thousands of cycles to produce a detection, making EMRI signals one of the most challenging data analysis problems in all of gravitational wave astronomy. Estimates for the number of templates required to perform an exhaustive grid-based matched-filter search for these signals are astronomically large, and far out of reach of current computational resources. Here I describe an alternative approach that employs a hybrid between genetic algorithms and Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques, along with several time-saving techniques for computing the likelihood function. This approach has proven effective at the blind extraction of relatively weak EMRI signals from simulated LISA data sets.

  14. Detection strategies for extreme mass ratio inspirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornish, Neil J.

    2011-05-01

    The capture of compact stellar remnants by galactic black holes provides a unique laboratory for exploring the near-horizon geometry of the Kerr spacetime, or possible departures from general relativity if the central cores prove not to be black holes. The gravitational radiation produced by these extreme mass ratio inspirals (EMRIs) encodes a detailed map of the black hole geometry, and the detection and characterization of these signals is a major scientific goal for the LISA mission. The waveforms produced are very complex, and the signals need to be coherently tracked for tens of thousands of cycles to produce a detection, making EMRI signals one of the most challenging data analysis problems in all of gravitational wave astronomy. Estimates for the number of templates required to perform an exhaustive grid-based matched-filter search for these signals are astronomically large, and far out of reach of current computational resources. Here I describe an alternative approach that employs a hybrid between genetic algorithms and Markov chain Monte Carlo techniques, along with several time-saving techniques for computing the likelihood function. This approach has proven effective at the blind extraction of relatively weak EMRI signals from simulated LISA data sets.

  15. Metamaterial-Inspired Efficient Electrically Small Antenna

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erentok, Aycan; Ziolkowski, R. W.

    2008-01-01

    Planar two-dimensional (2D) and volumetric three-dimensional (3D) metamaterial-inspired efficient electrically-small antennas that are easy to design; are easy and inexpensive to build; and are easy to test; are reported, i.e., the EZ antenna systems. The proposed 2D and 3D electrical- and magnetic-based EZ antennas are shown to be naturally matched to a 50 source, i.e., without the introduction of a matching network. It is demonstrated numerically that these EZ antennas have high radiation efficiencies with very good impedance matching between the source and the antenna and, hence, that they have high overall efficiencies. The reported 2D and 3D EZ antenna designs are linearly scalable to a wide range of frequencies and yet maintain their easy-to-build characteristics. Several versions of the 2D EZ antennas were fabricated and tested. The measurement results confirm the performance predictions. The EZ antennas systems may provide attractive alternatives to existing electrically-small antennas.

  16. Viscous pumping inspired by flexible propulsion

    CERN Document Server

    Arco, Roger M; Lauga, Eric; Zenit, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Fluid-suspended microorganisms have evolved different swimming and feeding strategies in order to cope with an environment dominated by viscous effects. For instance ciliated organisms rely on the collective motion of flexible appendices to move and feed. By performing a non-reciprocal motion, flexible filaments can produce a net propulsive force, or pump fluid, in the absence of inertia. Inspired by such fundamental concept, we propose a strategy to produce macroscopic pumping and mixing in creeping flow. We measure experimentally the net motion of a Newtonian viscous fluid induced by the reciprocal motion of a flapper. When the flapper is rigid no net motion is induced. In contrast, when the flapper is made of a flexible material, a net fluid pumping is measured. We quantify the effectiveness of this pumping strategy and show that optimal pumping is achieved when the length of the flapper is on the same order as the elasto-hydrodynamic penetration length. We finally discuss the possible applications of flex...

  17. Liquid crystal assemblies in biologically inspired systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safinya, Cyrus R.; Deek, Joanna; Beck, Roy; Jones, Jayna B.; Leal, Cecilia; Ewert, Kai K.; Li, Youli

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, which is part of a collection in honor of Noel Clark's remarkable career on liquid crystal and soft matter research, we present examples of biologically inspired systems, which form liquid crystal (LC) phases with their LC nature impacting biological function in cells or being important in biomedical applications. One area focuses on understanding network and bundle formation of cytoskeletal polyampholytes (filamentous-actin, microtubules, and neurofilaments). Here, we describe studies on neurofilaments (NFs), the intermediate filaments of neurons, which form open network nematic liquid crystal hydrogels in axons. Synchrotron small-angle-x-ray scattering studies of NF-protein dilution experiments and NF hydrogels subjected to osmotic stress show that neurofilament networks are stabilized by competing long-range repulsion and attractions mediated by the neurofilament's polyampholytic sidearms. The attractions are present both at very large interfilament spacings, in the weak sidearm-interpenetrating regime, and at smaller interfilament spacings, in the strong sidearm-interpenetrating regime. A second series of experiments will describe the structure and properties of cationic liposomes (CLs) complexed with nucleic acids (NAs). CL-NA complexes form liquid crystalline phases, which interact in a structure-dependent manner with cellular membranes enabling the design of complexes for efficient delivery of nucleic acid (DNA, RNA) in therapeutic applications. PMID:24558293

  18. Effect of inspiration on airway dimensions measured in maximal inspiration CT images of subjects without airflow limitation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jens; Wille, Mathilde M.W.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the effect of inspiration on airway dimensions measured in voluntary inspiration breath-hold examinations. METHODS: 961 subjects with normal spirometry were selected from the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial. Subjects were examined annually for five years with low-dose CT. Automated software was utilized to segment lungs and airways, identify segmental bronchi, and match airway branches in all images of the same subject. Inspiration level was defined as segmented total lung volume (TLV) divided by predicted total lung capacity (pTLC). Mixed-effects models were used to predict relative change in lumen diameter (ALD) and wall thickness (AWT) in airways of generation 0 (trachea) to 7 and segmental bronchi (R1-R10 and L1-L10) from relative changes in inspiration level. RESULTS: Relative changes in ALD were related to relative changes in TLV/pTLC, and this distensibility increased with generation (p?inspire more deeply prior to imaging have larger ALD and smaller AWT. This effect is more pronounced in higher-generation airways. Therefore, adjustment of inspiration level is necessary to accurately assess airway dimensions. KEY POINTS: • Airway lumen diameter increases and wall thickness decreases with inspiration • The effect of inspiration is greater in higher-generation (more peripheral) airways • Airways of generation 5 and beyond are as distensible as lung parenchyma • Airway dimensions measured from CT should be adjusted for inspiration level.

  19. Adapting models of visual aesthetics for personalized content creation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liapis, Antonios; Yannakakis, Georgios N.

    2012-01-01

    This paper introduces a search-based approach to personalized content generation with respect to visual aesthetics. The approach is based on a two-step adaptation procedure where (1) the evaluation function that characterizes the content is adjusted to match the visual aesthetics of users and (2) the content itself is optimized based on the personalized evaluation function. To test the efficacy of the approach we design fitness functions based on universal properties of visual perception, inspired by psychological and neurobiological research. Using these visual properties we generate aesthetically pleasing 2D game spaceships via neuroevolutionary constrained optimization and evaluate the impact of the designed visual properties on the generated spaceships. The offline generated spaceships are used as the initial population of an interactive evolution experiment in which players are asked to choose spaceships according to their visual taste: the impact of the various visual properties is adjusted based on player preferences and new content is generated online based on the updated computational model of visual aesthetics of the player. Results are presented which show the potential of the approach in generating content which is based on subjective criteria of visual aesthetics.

  20. Bio-inspired UAV routing, source localization, and acoustic signature classification for persistent surveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burman, Jerry; Hespanha, Joao; Madhow, Upamanyu; Pham, Tien

    2011-06-01

    A team consisting of Teledyne Scientific Company, the University of California at Santa Barbara and the Army Research Laboratory* is developing technologies in support of automated data exfiltration from heterogeneous battlefield sensor networks to enhance situational awareness for dismounts and command echelons. Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) provide an effective means to autonomously collect data from a sparse network of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) that cannot communicate with each other. UAVs are used to reduce the system reaction time by generating autonomous collection routes that are data-driven. Bio-inspired techniques for search provide a novel strategy to detect, capture and fuse data. A fast and accurate method has been developed to localize an event by fusing data from a sparse number of UGSs. This technique uses a bio-inspired algorithm based on chemotaxis or the motion of bacteria seeking nutrients in their environment. A unique acoustic event classification algorithm was also developed based on using swarm optimization. Additional studies addressed the problem of routing multiple UAVs, optimally placing sensors in the field and locating the source of gunfire at helicopters. A field test was conducted in November of 2009 at Camp Roberts, CA. The field test results showed that a system controlled by bio-inspired software algorithms can autonomously detect and locate the source of an acoustic event with very high accuracy and visually verify the event. In nine independent test runs of a UAV, the system autonomously located the position of an explosion nine times with an average accuracy of 3 meters. The time required to perform source localization using the UAV was on the order of a few minutes based on UAV flight times. In June 2011, additional field tests of the system will be performed and will include multiple acoustic events, optimal sensor placement based on acoustic phenomenology and the use of the International Technology Alliance (ITA) Sensor Network Fabric (IBM).