WorldWideScience

Sample records for infarction risk score

  1. [Risk stratification in pre-hospital management of myocardial infarction with ST elevation: value of a risk score profile].

    Zeller, M; Ravisy, J; Beer, J C; Laurent, Y; Janin-Manificat, L; Cabrita, B; L'Huillier, I; Wolf, J E; Freysz, M; Cottin, Y

    2005-11-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate new tools of risk stratification in an unselected population of myocardial infarction (MI), usable in a pre-hospital situation, and to compare the risk profile of these patients with those of other clinical trials or myocardial infarction registries. The risk scores of death at 30 days (TIMI score and TIMI risk index) based on data available in the context of coronary emergencies, were applied to the population base of the MI observatory of myocardial infarction in the Côte d'Or (RICO). The risk profile was expressed by the smoothed graph of frequency distribution of each score. The TIMI score applied to the RICO population had a high discriminating power (c = 0.80) for mortality whereas TIMI risk index was less powerful (c = 0.57). The risk profile of the RICO population was comparable to that of InTIME II, ASSENT 2 and the NRMI with reperfusion registry. The NRMI without reperfusion and the MAGIC studies had different profiles characterised by a shift in the graph towards high risk patients. The authors conclude that risk stratification scores, like the TIMI score, are valuable tools for early triage in the management of MI patients. The risk profiles allow comparative analysis of risk levels of populations notably with respect to other registries and also with respect to randomised clinical trials. PMID:16379110

  2. An Asian validation of the TIMI risk score for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    Sharmini Selvarajah

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Risk stratification in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI is important, such that the most resource intensive strategy is used to achieve the greatest clinical benefit. This is essential in developing countries with wide variation in health care facilities, scarce resources and increasing burden of cardiovascular diseases. This study sought to validate the Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction (TIMI risk score for STEMI in a multi-ethnic developing country. METHODS: Data from a national, prospective, observational registry of acute coronary syndromes was used. The TIMI risk score was evaluated in 4701 patients who presented with STEMI. Model discrimination and calibration was tested in the overall population and in subgroups of patients that were at higher risk of mortality; i.e., diabetics and those with renal impairment. RESULTS: Compared to the TIMI population, this study population was younger, had more chronic conditions, more severe index events and received treatment later. The TIMI risk score was strongly associated with 30-day mortality. Discrimination was good for the overall study population (c statistic 0.785 and in the high risk subgroups; diabetics (c statistic 0.764 and renal impairment (c statistic 0.761. Calibration was good for the overall study population and diabetics, with χ2 goodness of fit test p value of 0.936 and 0.983 respectively, but poor for those with renal impairment, χ2 goodness of fit test p value of 0.006. CONCLUSIONS: The TIMI risk score is valid and can be used for risk stratification of STEMI patients for better targeted treatment.

  3. A genetic risk score of 45 coronary artery disease risk variants associates with increased risk of myocardial infarction in 6041 Danish individuals

    Krarup, N T; Borglykke, A; Allin, K H;

    2015-01-01

    CAD. METHODS: Genotype was available from 6041 Danes. An unweighted GRS was constructed by making a summated score of the 45 known genetic CAD risk variants. Registries provided information (mean follow-up = 11.6 years) on CAD (n = 374) and MI (n = 124) events. Cox proportional hazard estimates with......BACKGROUND: In Europeans, 45 genetic risk variants for coronary artery disease (CAD) have been identified in genome-wide association studies. We constructed a genetic risk score (GRS) of these variants to estimate the effect on incidence and clinical predictability of myocardial infarction (MI) and...... age as time scale was adjusted for sex, BMI, type 2 diabetes mellitus and smoking status. Analyses were also stratified either by sex or median age (below or above 45 years of age). We estimated GRS contribution to MI prediction by assessing net reclassification index (NRI) and integrated...

  4. Comparison of Different Risk Scores for Predicting Contrast Induced Nephropathy and Outcomes After Primary Percutaneous Coronary Intervention in Patients With ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction.

    Liu, Yuan-Hui; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Ying-Ling; He, Peng-Cheng; Yu, Dan-Qing; Li, Li-Wen; Xie, Nian-Jin; Guo, Wei; Tan, Ning; Chen, Ji-Yan

    2016-06-15

    Accurate risk stratification for contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is important for patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PPCI). We aimed to compare the prognostic value of validated risk scores for CIN. We prospectively enrolled 422 consecutive patients with STEMI undergoing PPCI. Mehran; Gao; Chen; age, serum creatinine (SCr), or glomerular filtration rate, and ejection fraction (ACEF or AGEF); and Global Registry for Acute Coronary Events risk scores were calculated for each patient. The prognostic accuracy of the 6 scores for CIN, and in-hospital and 3-year all-cause mortality and major adverse clinical events (MACEs), was assessed using the c-statistic for discrimination and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test for calibration. CIN was defined as either CIN-narrow (increase in SCr ≥0.5 mg/dl) or CIN broad (≥0.5 mg/dl and/or a ≥25% increase in baseline SCr). All risk scores had relatively high predictive values for CIN-narrow (c-statistic: 0.746 to 0.873) and performed well for prediction of in-hospital death (0.784 to 0.936), MACEs (0.685 to 0.763), and 3-year all-cause mortality (0.655 to 0.871). The ACEF and AGEF risk scores had better discrimination and calibration for CIN-narrow and in-hospital outcomes. However, all risk score exhibited low predictive accuracy for CIN-broad (0.555 to 0.643) and 3-year MACEs (0.541 to 0.619). In conclusion, risk scores for predicting CIN perform well in stratifying the risk of CIN-narrow, in-hospital death or MACEs, and 3-year all-cause mortality in patients with STEMI undergoing PPCI. The ACEF and AGEF risk scores appear to have greater prognostic value. PMID:27161818

  5. Coronary artery calcium scoring in myocardial infarction

    Background. The aim of this study was to evaluate coronary artery calcium scoring and the assessment of the risk factors in patients with myocardial infarction (MI). Methods. During the period of three years, 27 patients with MI were analyzed. The average age of patients was 66.1 years (46 to 81). Coronary arteries calcium was evaluated by multi row detector computed tomography (MTDC) Somatom Volume Zoom Siemens, and, retrospectively by ECG gating data acquisition. Semi automated calcium quantification to calculate Agatston calcium score (CS) was performed with 4 x 2.5 mm collimation, using 130 ml of contrast medium, injected with an automatic injector, with the flow rate of 4 ml/sec. The delay time was determined empirically. At the same time several risk factors were evaluated. Results. Out of 27 patients with MI, 3 (11.1%) patients had low CS (10- 100), 5 (18.5%) moderate CS (101- 499), and 19 (70.4%) patients high CS (>500). Of risk factors, smoking was confirmed in 17 (63.0%), high blood pressure (HTA) in 10 (57.0%), diabetes mellitus in 7 (25.9%), positive family history in 5 (18.5%), pathological lipids in 5 (18.5%), alcohol abuse in 4 (1.8%) patients. Six (22.2%) patients had symptoms of angina pectoris. Conclusions. The research showed high correlation of MI and high CS (>500). Smoking, HTA, diabetes mellitus, positive family history and hypercholesterolemia are significant risk factors. Symptoms are relatively poor in large number of patients. (author)

  6. Dynamic TIMI Risk Score for STEMI

    Amin, Sameer T.; Morrow, David A.; Braunwald, Eugene; Sloan, Sarah; Contant, Charles; Murphy, Sabina; Antman, Elliott M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although there are multiple methods of risk stratification for ST‐elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), this study presents a prospectively validated method for reclassification of patients based on in‐hospital events. A dynamic risk score provides an initial risk stratification and reassessment at discharge. Methods and Results The dynamic TIMI risk score for STEMI was derived in ExTRACT‐TIMI 25 and validated in TRITON‐TIMI 38. Baseline variables were from the original TIMI ris...

  7. Prognostic Value of TIMI Score versus GRACE Score in ST-segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    Luis C. L. Correia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: The TIMI Score for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI was created and validated specifically for this clinical scenario, while the GRACE score is generic to any type of acute coronary syndrome. Objective: Between TIMI and GRACE scores, identify the one of better prognostic performance in patients with STEMI. Methods: We included 152 individuals consecutively admitted for STEMI. The TIMI and GRACE scores were tested for their discriminatory ability (C-statistics and calibration (Hosmer-Lemeshow in relation to hospital death. Results: The TIMI score showed equal distribution of patients in the ranges of low, intermediate and high risk (39 %, 27 % and 34 %, respectively, as opposed to the GRACE Score that showed predominant distribution at low risk (80 %, 13 % and 7%, respectively. Case-fatality was 11%. The C-statistics of the TIMI score was 0.87 (95%CI = 0.76 to 0.98, similar to GRACE (0.87, 95%CI = 0.75 to 0.99 - p = 0.71. The TIMI score showed satisfactory calibration represented by χ2 = 1.4 (p = 0.92, well above the calibration of the GRACE score, which showed χ2 = 14 (p = 0.08. This calibration is reflected in the expected incidence ranges for low, intermediate and high risk, according to the TIMI score (0 %, 4.9 % and 25 %, respectively, differently to GRACE (2.4%, 25% and 73%, which featured middle range incidence inappropriately. Conclusion: Although the scores show similar discriminatory capacity for hospital death, the TIMI score had better calibration than GRACE. These findings need to be validated populations of different risk profiles.

  8. Serum Iron Concentration, but Not Hemoglobin, Correlates with TIMI Risk Score and 6-Month Left Ventricular Performance after Primary Angioplasty for Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Ching-Hui Huang; Chia-Chu Chang; Chen-Ling Kuo; Ching-Shan Huang; Tzai-Wen Chiu; Chih-Sheng Lin; Chin-San Liu

    2014-01-01

    Objective Anemia is associated with high mortality and poor prognosis after acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Increased red cell distribution width (RDW) is a strong independent predictor for adverse outcomes in ACS. The common underlying mechanism for anemia and increased RDW value is iron deficiency. It is not clear whether serum iron deficiency without anemia affects left ventricular (LV) performance after primary angioplasty for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We investigated the prognost...

  9. Escore TIMI no infarto agudo do miocárdio conforme níveis de estratificação de prognóstico Score TIMI en el infarto agudo de miocardio según niveles de estratificación de pronóstico TIMI risk score for acute myocardial infarction according to prognostic stratification

    Jaqueline Locks Pereira

    2009-08-01

    hospitalaria postinfarto fue de un 17,5%. En el grupo de bajo riesgo no hubo óbito. La mortalidad fue del 8,1% en el grupo de medio riesgo y de un 55,6% en el de alto riesgo. El riesgo de muerte para casos de alto riesgo fue 14,1 veces mayor con relación a los casos de medio y bajo riesgo (IC95% = 4,4 a 44,1 y pBACKGROUND: The TIMI (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction risk score is derived from clinical trial involving patients who are eligible for fibrinolysis. As the risk profiles of these cases differ from those found in non-selected populations, it is important to review the applicability of the score in usual clinical conditions. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the management and clinical evolution of hospital inpatients with acute myocardial infarction, according to risk stratification by the TIMI score. METHODS: We evaluated, retrospectively, 103 cases of acute myocardial infarction with ST-segment elevation admitted to the Hospital Nossa Senhora da Conceição - Tubarão, in 2004 and 2005. The cases were analyzed in three risk groups according to the TIMI score. RESULTS: The hospital mortality after infarction was 17.5%. In the low-risk group there was no death. The mortality was 8.1% in the medium risk group and 55.6% in the high-risk group. The risk of death in cases of high risk was 14.1 times higher than in the cases of medium and low risk (95% CI = 4.4 to 44.1 and p <0.001. The chance of receiving fibrinolytic was 50% lower in the high-risk group in relation to the low risk group (95% CI = 0.27 to 0.85, p = 0.004. CONCLUSION: There was a progressive increase in mortality and incidence of in-hospital complications according to the stratification by the TIMI score. High risk patients received thrombolytic less frequently than the patients at low risk.

  10. Greek stroke score, Siriraj score and allen score in clinical diagnosis of intracerebral hemorrhage and infarct: Validation and comparison study

    Soman Aamod

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To compare Greek stroke score with available previous two stroke scores for the diagnosis of cerebral ischemia and hemorrhage in acute stroke patients, and validate the Greek stroke score. SETTING: A tertiary hospital in India. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a prospective study acute stroke patients were evaluated with Greek stroke score, Allen score and Siriraj stroke score. Comparability (Kappa Statistics and validity (sensitivity, specificity, negative predictive value and positive predictive value of the Greek stroke score and previous scores were tested. RESULT: Out of the 91 patients enrolled in the study, 47 patients had cerebral infarction and 44 patients had hemorrhage by CT scan. Allen score was uncertain / equivocal in 39 patients, Siriraj Stroke score in 22 and Greek stroke score in 47 patients. Sensitivity, Specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value for Allen score were 0.5(95% CI:0.34,0.58, 0.94(95% CI:0.86,0.98, 0.81(95% CI:0.56,0.95, 0.78(95% CI: 0.71,0.81 for Siriraj score were 0.75(95% CI: 0.63,0.84, 0.81(95% CI: 0.71,0.89, 0.77(95% CI: 0.65,0.86, 0.78(95% CI 0.69,0.86 and for Greek Score were 0.42(95% CI: 0.23,0.53, 0.93(95% CI: 0.87,0.98, 0.71(95% CI:0.39,0.91, 0.81(95% CI:0.75,0.85 respectively. Greek stroke score was compared with previous scores using kappa statistics which revealed substantial strength of agreement between the Allen Score for certain results. CONCLUSION: The overall comparability of Greek stroke score and Allen score was better as compared to Greek stroke score and Siriraj stroke score. Greek Stroke score was more specific in diagnosing hemorrhage as compared to Siriraj score. However, all these stroke scores lack accuracy hence could not be applied safely to guide the physician in management of stroke.

  11. Weak Prediction Power of the Framingham Risk Score for Coronary Artery Disease in Nonagenarians

    Josef Yayan

    2014-01-01

    Background Coronary artery disease (CAD) is caused by an acute myocardial infarction and is still feared as a life-threatening heart disease worldwide. In order to identify patients at high risk for CAD, previous studies have proposed various risk assessment scores for the prevention of CAD. The most commonly used risk assessment score for CAD worldwide is the Framingham Risk Score (FRS). The FRS is used for middle-aged people; hence, its appropriateness has not been demonstrated to predict t...

  12. Development of a cardiovascular risk score for use in low- and middle-income countries

    Summary measures of cardiovascular risk have long been used in public health, but few include nutritional predictors despite extensive evidence linking diet and heart disease. Study objectives were to develop and validate a novel risk score in a case-control study of myocardial infarction (MI) condu...

  13. Difference in MRI findings and risk factors between multiple infarction without dementia and multi-infarct dementia

    MRI findings and risk factors for vascular dementia were evaluated with multi-variate analysis in 96 multi-infarct patients without dementia and 40 multi-infarct patients with dementia (MID). Only subjects with small infarcts in the territory of the perforator artery or deep white matter were studied. The diagnosis of MID was diagnosed according to DMS-III criteria and Hachinski's ischemia score. Location and area of patchy high-intensity areas including small infarcts, the degree of periventricular high intensity (PVH), and the degree of brain atrophy were examined with MR images. Independent variables were: history of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, other complications; systolic and diastolic blood pressure, atherosclerotic index, hematocrit, history of smoking, level of education, and activities of daily life (ADL). Hayashi's quantification method II was used to analyze the data. The most significant correlation was found between history of hypertension and dementia (partial correlation coefficient: 0.39). Significant correlations were also found between ADL and dementia (0.32), between thalamic infarction and dementia (0.31), and between PVH and dementia (0.27). Age, brain atrophy index, and history of diabetes mellitus contributed little to dementia. The contribution to dementia did not differ significantly between right and left patchy high-intensity areas on MR images. Location of infarcts, except for bilateral thalamic infarcts and large PVH, contributed little to dementia. Thus it would be difficult to base a prediction of the prevalence of vascular dementia on MRI findings. However, both hypertention and ADL contribute to vascular dementia and both are treatable, which may be significant for the prevention of dementia. (author)

  14. ECG scores for a triage of patients with acute myocardial infarction transported by the emergency medical system.

    Zalenski, R J; Grzybowski, M; Ross, M A; Blaustein, N; Bock, B

    2000-01-01

    Prehospital triage of cardiac patients for bypass from community hospitals to cardiac centers may improve survival. This article determines if electrocardiogram (ECG)-based scoring triage methods (Aldrich MI scoring, QRS distortion, and the TIMI classification) and location of infarct (via 12 lead ECG) are associated with mortality before and after adjusting for age, sex, and race. It is a retrospective study of 291 AMI adult patients transported by ambulance to community hospitals or cardiac centers. Patients with an ED chief complaint of chest pain or dyspnea, presence of MI as defined by ECG findings of 0.1 mV of ST segment elevation in two leads or positive CPK-MB were eligible for the study. The primary outcome variable was 2-year mortality as determined with a metropolitan Detroit tri-county death index. Logistic regression was used to calculate the unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (with 95% CIs) of the predictor variables with mortality. Of the initial population selected for the study (n = 291), 229 patients were eligible for the analysis. The mean age was 66 years (SD of 14.4) with 63.8% being male and 54% being white. The overall mortality point estimate was 21.3% (95% CI of 15.2 to 27.3%). Aldrich scores and QRS distortion (yes/no) were not associated with mortality. Patients classified as a "high risk" for AMI per TIMI status were almost 3 times more likely to die than those at "low risk" and reached borderline statistical significance (P = .06) after adjusting for the covariates. Having an anterior infarct, as opposed to an inferior infarct, was significantly associated with death before and after adjusting for the covariates (Unadjusted OR = 2.6, Adjusted OR = 2.8). Properly training emergency medical system professionals in this area may prove useful for identifying higher risk AMI patients in the prehospital setting. PMID:11265729

  15. Distribution of brain infarction in children with tuberculous meningitis and correlation with outcome score at 6 months

    Andronikou, Savvas [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Radiology, Tygerberg Hospital, P.O. Box 19063, Tygerberg (South Africa); Wilmshurst, Jo; Hatherill, Mark [University of Cape Town, Pediatric Neurology, Red Cross Children' s Hospital, School of Child and Adolescent Health, Cape Town (South Africa); VanToorn, Ronald [University of Stellenbosch, Department of Pediatric Neurology, Tygerberg Hospital, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2006-12-15

    Prognostic indicators for tuberculous meningitis (TBM) offer realistic expectations for parents of affected children. Infarctions affecting the basal ganglia are associated with a poor outcome. To correlate the distribution of infarction in children with TBM on CT with an outcome score (OS). CT brain scans in children with TBM were retrospectively reviewed and the distribution of infarctions recorded. The degree of correlation with OS at 6 months was determined. There was a statistically significant association between all sites of infarction (P = 0.0001-0.001), other than hemispheric (P = 0.35), and outcome score. There was also a statistically significant association between all types of infarction (P = 0.0001-0.02), other than hemispheric (P = 0.05), and overall poor outcome. The odds ratio for poor outcome with bilateral basal ganglia and internal capsule infarction was 12. The odds ratio for poor outcome with 'any infarction' was 4.91 (CI 2.24-10.74), with 'bilateral infarctions' 8.50 (CI 2.49-28.59), with basal ganglia infarction 5.73 (CI 2.60-12.64), and for hemispheric infarction 2.30 (CI 1.00-5.28). Infarction is associated with a poor outcome unless purely hemispheric. MRI diffusion-weighted imaging was not part of this study, but is likely to play a central role in detecting infarctions not demonstrated by CT. (orig.)

  16. Distribution of brain infarction in children with tuberculous meningitis and correlation with outcome score at 6 months

    Prognostic indicators for tuberculous meningitis (TBM) offer realistic expectations for parents of affected children. Infarctions affecting the basal ganglia are associated with a poor outcome. To correlate the distribution of infarction in children with TBM on CT with an outcome score (OS). CT brain scans in children with TBM were retrospectively reviewed and the distribution of infarctions recorded. The degree of correlation with OS at 6 months was determined. There was a statistically significant association between all sites of infarction (P = 0.0001-0.001), other than hemispheric (P = 0.35), and outcome score. There was also a statistically significant association between all types of infarction (P = 0.0001-0.02), other than hemispheric (P = 0.05), and overall poor outcome. The odds ratio for poor outcome with bilateral basal ganglia and internal capsule infarction was 12. The odds ratio for poor outcome with 'any infarction' was 4.91 (CI 2.24-10.74), with 'bilateral infarctions' 8.50 (CI 2.49-28.59), with basal ganglia infarction 5.73 (CI 2.60-12.64), and for hemispheric infarction 2.30 (CI 1.00-5.28). Infarction is associated with a poor outcome unless purely hemispheric. MRI diffusion-weighted imaging was not part of this study, but is likely to play a central role in detecting infarctions not demonstrated by CT. (orig.)

  17. MODELING CREDIT RISK THROUGH CREDIT SCORING

    Adrian Cantemir CALIN; Oana Cristina POPOVICI

    2014-01-01

    Credit risk governs all financial transactions and it is defined as the risk of suffering a loss due to certain shifts in the credit quality of a counterpart. Credit risk literature gravitates around two main modeling approaches: the structural approach and the reduced form approach. In addition to these perspectives, credit risk assessment has been conducted through a series of techniques such as credit scoring models, which form the traditional approach. This paper examines the evolution of...

  18. Developing points-based risk-scoring systems in the presence of competing risks.

    Austin, Peter C; Lee, Douglas S; D'Agostino, Ralph B; Fine, Jason P

    2016-09-30

    Predicting the occurrence of an adverse event over time is an important issue in clinical medicine. Clinical prediction models and associated points-based risk-scoring systems are popular statistical methods for summarizing the relationship between a multivariable set of patient risk factors and the risk of the occurrence of an adverse event. Points-based risk-scoring systems are popular amongst physicians as they permit a rapid assessment of patient risk without the use of computers or other electronic devices. The use of such points-based risk-scoring systems facilitates evidence-based clinical decision making. There is a growing interest in cause-specific mortality and in non-fatal outcomes. However, when considering these types of outcomes, one must account for competing risks whose occurrence precludes the occurrence of the event of interest. We describe how points-based risk-scoring systems can be developed in the presence of competing events. We illustrate the application of these methods by developing risk-scoring systems for predicting cardiovascular mortality in patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction. Code in the R statistical programming language is provided for the implementation of the described methods. © 2016 The Authors. Statistics in Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:27197622

  19. Leukocytosis: a risk factor for myocardial infarction

    Kotla SK

    2012-01-01

    Suman K KotlaDepartment of Internal Medicine, Memorial Medical Center, Johnstown, PA, USAAbstract: Myocardial infarction commonly results from atherosclerotic lesions in the coronary arteries. Approximately 5% of patients with acute myocardial infarction do not have atherosclerotic disease. In this case report, we present an unusual leukostatic complication in a patient with acute myeloblastic leukemia and extreme hyperleukocytosis who presented with an acute myocardial infarction that resolv...

  20. A new scoring system to stratify risk in unstable angina

    Salzberg Simón

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We performed this study to develop a new scoring system to stratify different levels of risk in patients admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of unstable angina (UA, which is a complex syndrome that encompasses different outcomes. Many prognostic variables have been described but few efforts have been made to group them in order to enhance their individual predictive power. Methods In a first phase, 473 patients were prospectively analyzed to determine which factors were significantly associated with the in-hospital occurrence of refractory ischemia, acute myocardial infarction (AMI or death. A risk score ranging from 0 to 10 points was developed using a multivariate analysis. In a second phase, such score was validated in a new sample of 242 patients and it was finally applied to the entire population (n = 715. Results ST-segment deviation on the electrocardiogram, age ≥ 70 years, previous bypass surgery and troponin T ≥ 0.1 ng/mL were found as independent prognostic variables. A clear distinction was shown among categories of low, intermediate and high risk, defined according to the risk score. The incidence of the triple end-point was 6 %, 19.2 % and 44.7 % respectively, and the figures for AMI or death were 2 %, 11.4 % and 27.6 % respectively (p Conclusions This new scoring system is simple and easy to achieve. It allows a very good stratification of risk in patients having a clinical diagnosis of UA. They may be divided in three categories, which could be of help in the decision-making process.

  1. Smoking and risk of myocardial infarction in women and men

    Prescott, E; Hippe, M; Schnohr, P;

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare risk of myocardial infarction associated with smoking in men and women, taking into consideration differences in smoking behaviour and a number of potential confounding variables. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study with follow up of myocardial infarction. SETTING: Pooled data....... Compared with non-smokers, female current smokers had a relative risk of myocardial infarction of 2.24 (range 1.85-2.71) and male smokers 1.43 (1.26-1.62); ratio 1.57 (1.25-1.97). Relative risk of myocardial infarction increased with tobacco consumption in both men and women and was higher in inhalers than...... in non-inhalers. The risks associated with smoking, measured by both current and accumulated tobacco exposure, were consistently higher in women than in men and did not depend on age. This sex difference was not affected by adjustment for arterial blood pressure, total and high density lipoprotein...

  2. A clinical and echocardiographic score for assigning risk of major events after dobutamine echocardiograms

    T. Marwick; L. Case (Laura); D. Poldermans (Don); H. Boersma (Eric); J.J. Bax (Jeroen); T. Sawada (Takahiro); J.D. Thomas (James)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractObjectives We sought to develop and validate a risk score combining both clinical and dobutamine echocardiographic (DbE) features in 4,890 patients who underwent DbE at three expert laboratories and were followed for death or myocardial infarction for up to five years. Background In cont

  3. Clopidogrel discontinuation after myocardial infarction and risk of thrombosis

    Charlot, Mette; Nielsen, Lars Hougaard; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Olsen, Anne-Marie S; Hansen, Morten Lock; Hansen, Peter Riis; Madsen, Jan Kyst; Køber, Lars; Gislason, Gunnar H; Torp-Pedersen, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The benefit of extending clopidogrel treatment beyond the 12-month period recommended in current guidelines after myocardial infarction (MI) is debated. We analysed the risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes after discontinuation of 12 months of clopidogrel treatment.......The benefit of extending clopidogrel treatment beyond the 12-month period recommended in current guidelines after myocardial infarction (MI) is debated. We analysed the risk of adverse cardiovascular outcomes after discontinuation of 12 months of clopidogrel treatment....

  4. 急性ST段抬高型心肌梗死患者心型脂肪酸结合蛋白水平与GRACE危险评分的相关性研究%Relationship between Heart-type Fatty Acid-binding Protein and GRACE Risk Score in Patients with Acute ST-elevation Myocardial Infarction

    魏庆民; 周彬; 王晓纲; 樊延明; 王爱平; 刘翠华

    2013-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between heart - type fatty acid - binding protein ( H - FABP ) level and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events ( GRACE ) risk score in patients with acute ST - elevation myocardial infarction ( STEMI ). Methods From April 2010 to December 2011 , 60 STEM patients admitted to our hospital within 2 hours of symptom onset were enrolled in this study. Twelve hours after admission, blood samples were obtained for H - FABP measurement every two hours. Then, H - FABP peak values were found. The baseline data were recorded and the GRACE risk score were calculated. The Pearson's correlation analysis were used to analyze the relationship between the H - FABP peak value and GRACE risk score. Results The peak value of H - FABP was ( 59. 4 ± 23. 1 ) μg/L, which occmed 4~8 hours after admission. It was positively correlated with GRACE risk score in these patients ( r = 0.701 , P<0. 05 ). Conclusion H -FABP peak value is directly relevant with GRACE risk score in STEMI patients. Measurement of H - FABP level can provide additional risk stratification information in these patients.%目的 探讨急性ST段抬高型心肌梗死(STEMI)患者血浆心型脂肪酸结合蛋白(H-FABP)的峰值水平与全球急性冠状动脉事件注册(GRACE)风险评分的相关性.方法 选择2010年4月-2011年12月我科收治的发病2 h内的STEMI患者60例,于患者发病后2、4、6、8、10、12 h采血,检测H-FABP水平,找出其峰值.记录患者的基线资料,计算GRACE风险评分,对GRACE评分和H-FABP的峰值水平进行Pearson直线相关分析.结果 H-FABP的达峰时间为4~8 h,平均峰值为(59.4±23.1)μg/L;STEMI患者H-FABP峰值水平与GRACE危险评分呈正相关(r=0.701,P<0.05).结论 STEMI的H-FABP峰值水平与GRACE评分相关,检测H-FABP峰值水平可以为STEMI患者的危险分层提供参考.

  5. Value of the SYNTAX score for periprocedural myocardial infarction according to WHO and the third universal definition of myocardial infarction: insights from the TWENTE trial

    Tandjung, K.; Lam, M.K.; Sen, H.; Man, de F.H.; Louwerenburg, H.; Stoel, M.; Houwelingen, van G.; Linssen, G.; Palen, van der J.; Doggen, C.J.M.; Birgelen, von C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The SYNTAX score is a tool to quantify the complexity of coronary artery disease. We investigated the relation between the SYNTAX score and the occurrence of a periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI) according to the historical definition of the World Health Organization (WHO) and the recen

  6. Cancer risk of patients discharged with acute myocardial infarct

    Dreyer, L; Olsen, J H

    1998-01-01

    We studied whether common shared environmental or behavioral risk factors, other than tobacco smoking, underlie both atherosclerotic diseases and cancer. We identified a group of 96,891 one-year survivors of acute myocardial infarct through the Danish Hospital Discharge Register between 1977 and...... acute myocardial infarct patients were similar to those of the general population, as were the rates for hormone-related cancers, including endometrial and postmenopausal breast cancers. We found a moderate increase in the risk for tobacco-related cancers, which was strongest for patients with early...... onset of acute myocardial infarct and for female patients. Overall, there do not seem to be major shared environmental or behavioral risk factors for acute myocardial infarct and cancers, except for smoking, and there seems to be no common inherited susceptibility to the development of these diseases....

  7. Risk of Ovarian Cancer Relapse Score

    Rizzuto, Ivana; Stavraka, Chara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Borley, Jane; Hopkins, Thomas Glass; Gabra, Hani; Ghaem-Maghami, Sadaf; Huson, Les; Blagden, Sarah P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to construct a prognostic index that predicts risk of relapse in women who have completed first-line treatment for ovarian cancer (OC). Methods A database of OC cases from 2000 to 2010 was interrogated for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, grade and histological subtype of cancer, preoperative and posttreatment CA-125 level, presence or absence of residual disease after cytoreductive surgery and on postchemotherapy computed tomography scan, and time to progression and death. The strongest predictors of relapse were included into an algorithm, the Risk of Ovarian Cancer Relapse (ROVAR) score. Results Three hundred fifty-four cases of OC were analyzed to generate the ROVAR score. Factors selected were preoperative serum CA-125, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage and grade of cancer, and presence of residual disease at posttreatment computed tomography scan. In the validation data set, the ROVAR score had a sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 61%, respectively. The concordance index for the validation data set was 0.91 (95% confidence interval, 0.85-0.96). The score allows patient stratification into low (0.67) probability of relapse. Conclusions The ROVAR score stratifies patients according to their risk of relapse following first-line treatment for OC. This can broadly facilitate the appropriate tailoring of posttreatment care and support. PMID:25647256

  8. Value of the SYNTAX score for periprocedural myocardial infarction according to WHO and the third universal definition of myocardial infarction: insights from the TWENTE trial

    Tandjung, K.; Lam, M. K.; Sen, H.; Man, de, J.G.; Louwerenburg, H.; Stoel, M.; Houwelingen, van, J.C.; Linssen, G; Palen, van der, J.; Doggen, C.J.M.; Birgelen, von, C.

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The SYNTAX score is a tool to quantify the complexity of coronary artery disease. We investigated the relation between the SYNTAX score and the occurrence of a periprocedural myocardial infarction (PMI) according to the historical definition of the World Health Organization (WHO) and the recently updated universal definition of MI.Methods and results: The SYNTAX score was calculated in 1,243 patients enrolled in TWENTE, a randomised trial which assessed second-generation drug-eluting st...

  9. Class of Antiretroviral Drugs and the Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    Friis-Møller, Nina; Reiss, P; Sabin, CA;

    2007-01-01

    cumulative exposure to protease inhibitors and nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors with the risk of myocardial infarction. METHODS: We analyzed data collected through February 2005 from our prospective observational study of 23,437 patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus. The...... incidence rates of myocardial infarction during the follow-up period were calculated, and the associations between myocardial infarction and exposure to protease inhibitors or nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitors were determined. RESULTS: Three hundred forty-five patients had a myocardial...... other drug class and established cardiovascular risk factors (excluding lipid levels), the relative rate of myocardial infarction per year of protease-inhibitor exposure was 1.16 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.10 to 1.23), whereas the relative rate per year of exposure to nonnucleoside reverse...

  10. Correlation between Timi Risk Score and Clinical Outcome in Patients with Unstable Angina Pectoris

    Savovic Zorica

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Given Taking that the TIMI score is a major predictor of MACE, this study aimed to determine the value of the TIMI risk score in predicting poor outcomes (death, myocardial infarction, recurrent pain in patients presenting with unstable angina pectoris in short-term observation. A total of 107 patients with APns were examined at the Clinical Centre Kragujevac and were included in the investigation. The TIMI score was determined on the first day of hospitalization. During hospitalization, the following factors were also observed: troponin, ECG evolution, further therapy (pharmacologic therapy and/or emergency PCI or CABG, age, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia. The low-risk group (TIMI 0 - 2 included 30.8% of patients, whereas 47.6% of patients were in the intermediate-risk group (TIMI 3 - 4, and 21.5% of patients were in the high-risk group (TIMI 5 - 7. Good outcomes (without adverse event and poor outcomes (death, myocardial infarction, and recurring chest pain were dependent on the TIMI risk score. The increase in TIMI risk score per one unit increased the risk of a poor outcome by 54%. Troponin and TIMI risk score were positively correlated. Our results suggest that the TIMI risk score may be a reliable predictor of a poor outcome (MACE during the short-term observation of patients with APns. Moreover, patients identified as high-risk benefit from early invasive PCI, enoxaparin and Gp IIb/IIIa inhibitors. Th us, routine use of the TIMI risk score at admission may reduce the number of patients not recognized as high-risk.

  11. Plasma HDL cholesterol and risk of myocardial infarction: a mendelian randomisation study

    Voight, Benjamin F; Peloso, Gina M; Orho-Melander, Marju; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Barbalic, Maja; Jensen, Majken K; Hindy, George; Hólm, Hilma; Ding, Eric L; Johnson, Toby; Schunkert, Heribert; Samani, Nilesh J; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Thompson, John F; Li, Mingyao; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Musunuru, Kiran; Pirruccello, James P; Saleheen, Danish; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre FR; Schillert, Arne; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Anand, Sonia; Engert, James C; Morgan, Thomas; Spertus, John; Stoll, Monika; Berger, Klaus; Martinelli, Nicola; Girelli, Domenico; McKeown, Pascal P; Patterson, Christopher C; Epstein, Stephen E; Devaney, Joseph; Burnett, Mary-Susan; Mooser, Vincent; Ripatti, Samuli; Surakka, Ida; Nieminen, Markku S; Sinisalo, Juha; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Perola, Markus; Havulinna, Aki; de Faire, Ulf; Gigante, Bruna; Ingelsson, Erik; Zeller, Tanja; Wild, Philipp; de Bakker, Paul I W; Klungel, Olaf H; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Peters, Bas J M; de Boer, Anthonius; Grobbee, Diederick E; Kamphuisen, Pieter W; Deneer, Vera H M; Elbers, Clara C; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Hofker, Marten H; Wijmenga, Cisca; Verschuren, WM Monique; Boer, Jolanda MA; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Rasheed, Asif; Frossard, Philippe; Demissie, Serkalem; Willer, Cristen; Do, Ron; Ordovas, Jose M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L; Daly, Mark J; Guiducci, Candace; Burtt, Noël P; Surti, Aarti; Gonzalez, Elena; Purcell, Shaun; Gabriel, Stacey; Marrugat, Jaume; Peden, John; Erdmann, Jeanette; Diemert, Patrick; Willenborg, Christina; König, Inke R; Fischer, Marcus; Hengstenberg, Christian; Ziegler, Andreas; Buysschaert, Ian; Lambrechts, Diether; Van de Werf, Frans; Fox, Keith A; El Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Rubin, Diana; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Schreiber, Stefan; Schäfer, Arne; Danesh, John; Blankenberg, Stefan; Roberts, Robert; McPherson, Ruth; Watkins, Hugh; Hall, Alistair S; Overvad, Kim; Rimm, Eric; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Cupples, L Adrienne; Reilly, Muredach P; Melander, Olle; Mannucci, Pier M; Ardissino, Diego; Siscovick, David; Elosua, Roberto; Stefansson, Kari; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; Rader, Daniel J; Peltonen, Leena; Schwartz, Stephen M; Altshuler, David; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background High plasma HDL cholesterol is associated with reduced risk of myocardial infarction, but whether this association is causal is unclear. Exploiting the fact that genotypes are randomly assigned at meiosis, are independent of non-genetic confounding, and are unmodified by disease processes, mendelian randomisation can be used to test the hypothesis that the association of a plasma biomarker with disease is causal. Methods We performed two mendelian randomisation analyses. First, we used as an instrument a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the endothelial lipase gene (LIPG Asn396Ser) and tested this SNP in 20 studies (20 913 myocardial infarction cases, 95 407 controls). Second, we used as an instrument a genetic score consisting of 14 common SNPs that exclusively associate with HDL cholesterol and tested this score in up to 12 482 cases of myocardial infarction and 41 331 controls. As a positive control, we also tested a genetic score of 13 common SNPs exclusively associated with LDL cholesterol. Findings Carriers of the LIPG 396Ser allele (2·6% frequency) had higher HDL cholesterol (0·14 mmol/L higher, p=8×10−13) but similar levels of other lipid and non-lipid risk factors for myocardial infarction compared with non-carriers. This difference in HDL cholesterol is expected to decrease risk of myocardial infarction by 13% (odds ratio [OR] 0·87, 95% CI 0·84–0·91). However, we noted that the 396Ser allele was not associated with risk of myocardial infarction (OR 0·99, 95% CI 0·88–1·11, p=0·85). From observational epidemiology, an increase of 1 SD in HDL cholesterol was associated with reduced risk of myocardial infarction (OR 0·62, 95% CI 0·58–0·66). However, a 1 SD increase in HDL cholesterol due to genetic score was not associated with risk of myocardial infarction (OR 0·93, 95% CI 0·68–1·26, p=0·63). For LDL cholesterol, the estimate from observational epidemiology (a 1 SD increase in LDL cholesterol

  12. Risk assessment in patients with acute myocardial infarction treated with thrombolysis

    Samad, Bassem Abdel

    1999-01-01

    Risk stratification in patients with acute myocardial infarction is essential for guiding the clinical decision concerning management. Thrombolytic therapy and other new management policies have led to a significant reduction in mortality from myocardial infarction. Several clinical variables and non-invasive methods have been shown in post-infarction studies to provide independent prognostic information. However, risk stratification of patients with myocardial infarction ...

  13. Computational Issues Associated with Automatic Calculation of Acute Myocardial Infarction Scores

    Destro-Filho, J. B.; Machado, S. J. S.; Fonseca, G. T.

    2008-12-01

    This paper presents a comparison among the three principal acute myocardial infarction (AMI) scores (Selvester, Aldrich, Anderson-Wilkins) as they are automatically estimated from digital electrocardiographic (ECG) files, in terms of memory occupation and processing time. Theoretical algorithm complexity is also provided. Our simulation study supposes that the ECG signal is already digitized and available within a computer platform. We perform 1000 000 Monte Carlo experiments using the same input files, leading to average results that point out drawbacks and advantages of each score. Since all these calculations do not require either large memory occupation or long processing, automatic estimation is compatible with real-time requirements associated with AMI urgency and with telemedicine systems, being faster than manual calculation, even in the case of simple costless personal microcomputers.

  14. Myocardial infarction in the conscious dog: three dimensional mapping of infarct, collateral flow and region at risk

    Myocardial infarcts were examined in dogs to determine the spatial distribution of infarction in the region at risk and the relation between infarction and collateral blood flow. Permanent occlusion of the left circumflex (LC) coronary artery at a constant site was made in 27 conscious dogs that were sacrificed 2 days later. The anatomic region at risk was defined by postmortem coronary arteriography as the volume of the occluded LC coronary bed. The masses of the left ventricle (LV), infarct (I) and risk region (R) were calculated from planimetered areas of weighted bread-loaf sections of LV. Infarct size was directly related to the mass of the risk region (I = 0.53 R - 9.87; r = 0.97; p < 0.001). There was no infarction when R was less than about 20 g or 20% of the LV. The infarcts were mainly subendocardial and tapered from base to apex of the LV; 34% of the risk region became infarcted at the base compared with 22% at the apex. In all dogs, a significant rim of noninfarcted myocardium was identified at lateral aspects of the risk region, even at the endocardial surface. Using 9-μ radioactive microspheres, initial postocclusion flow at the margin of the infarct, but well within the risk region, was higher than at the center, and outer flows were higher than inner flows. Postocclusion flow was even higher in the noninfarcted rim within the risk region, but was still significantly less than flow to normal, nonrisk areas. Collateral flows throughout the risk region increased during the first hour after occlusion, and were even higher at 2 days.Epicardially and laterally within the anatomic risk region there is a substantial amount of tissue that does not infarct despite initally reduced blood flow

  15. [Cognitive structure and risk of myocardial infarct].

    Günther, C; Günther, R; Reinhardt, F; Meissner, D; Dresler, F; Guhr, R; Hubl, W; Keil, J; Schüttig, R

    1990-08-01

    In a psychophysiological experiment with 18 patients with cardiovascular disorders but without infarction we proved the influence of habituallized cognitive structures on reactivity under mental load. We used the concepts of different causal attribution (Explanatory style: Peterson and Seligman) and psychic regulation of activity and action (Activity style: Günther). It can be shown that patients with pessimistic explanatory style as well as with diffuse psychic activity control show coronary-prone reaction patterns under load (indicators: cortisol and triglycerids in serum). PMID:2267852

  16. Combination antiretroviral therapy and the risk of myocardial infarction

    Friis-Moller, N; Sabin, CA; Weber, R; Monforte, AD; El-Sadr, WM; Reiss, P; Thiebaut, R; Morfeldt, L; De Wit, S; Pradier, C; Calvo, G; Law, MG; Kirk, O; Phillips, AN; Lundgren, JD; Lundgren, JD; Weber, R; Monteforte, AD; Bartsch, G; Reiss, P; Dabis, F; Morfeldt, L; De Wit, S; Pradier, C; Calvo, G; Law, MG; Kirk, O; Phillips, AN; Houyez, F; Loeliger, E; Tressler, R; Weller, I.; Friis-Moller, N; Sabin, CA; Sjol, A; Lundgren, JD; Sawitz, A; Rickenbach, M; Pezzotti, P; Krum, E; Meester, R; Lavignolle, V.; Sundstrom, A; Poll, B; Fontas, E; Torres, F; Petoumenos, K; Kjaer, J; Hammer, S; Neaton, J; Sjol, A; de Wolf, F; van der Ven, E; Zaheri, S; Van Valkengoed, L; Meester, R; Bronsveld, W; Weigel, H; Brinkman, K; Frissen, P; ten Veen, J; Hillbrand, M; Schieveld, S; Mulder, J; van Gorp, E; Meenhorst, P; Danner, S; Claessen, F; Perenboom, R; Schattenkerk, JKE; Godfried, M; Lange, J; Lowe, S; van der Meer, J; Nellen, F; Pogany, K; van der Poll, T; Reiss, R; Ruys, T; Wit, F; Richter, C; van Leusen, R; Vriesendorp, R; Jeurissen, F; Kauffmann, R; Koger, E; Brevenboer, B; Sprenger, HG; Law, G; ten Kate, RW; Leemhuis, M; Schippers, E; Schrey, G; van der Geest, S; Verbon, A; Koopmans, P; Keuter, M; Telgt, D; van der Ven, A; van der Ende, Marchina E.; Gyssens, I.; de Marie, S; Juttmann, J; van der Heul, C; Schneider, M; Borleffs, J; Hoepelman, I.; Jaspers, C; Matute, A; Schurink, C; Blok, W; Salamon, R; Beylot, J; Dupon, M; Le Bras, M; Pellegrin, JL; Ragnaud, JM; Dabis, F; Chene, G; Jacqmin-Gadda, H; Rhiebaut, R; Lawson-Ayayi, S; Lavignolle, V.; Balestre, E; Blaizeau, MJ; Decoin, M; Formaggio, AM; Delveaux, S; Labarerre, S; Uwamaliya, B; Vimard, E; Merchadou, L; Palmer, G; Touchard, D; Dutoit, D; Pereira, F; Boulant, B; Beylot, J; Morlat, P; Bonarek, M; Bonnet, F; Coadou, B; Gelie, P; Jaubert, D; Nouts, C; Lacoste, D; Dupon, M; Dutronc, H; Cipriano, G; Lafarie, S; Chossat, I.; Lacut, JY; Leng, B; Pellegrin, JL; Mercie, P; Viallard, JF; Faure, I.; Rispal, P; Cipriano, C; Tchamgoue, S; Le Bras, M; Djossou, F; Malvy, D; Pivetaud, JP; Ragnaud, JM; Chambon, D; De La Taille, C; Galperine, T; Lafarie, S; Neau, D; Ochoa, A; Beylot, C; Doutre, MS; Bezian, JH; Moreau, JF; Taupin, JL; Conri, C; Constans, J; Couzigou, P; Castera, L; Fleury, H; Lafon, ME; Masquelier, B; Pellegrin, I.; Trimoulet, P; Moreau, F; Mestre, C; Series, C; Taytard, A; Law, M; Petoumenos, K; Bal, J; Mijch, A; Watson, K; Roth, N; Wood, H; Austin, D; Gowers, A; Baker, B; McFarlane, R; Carr, A; Cooper, D; Chuah, J; Fankhauser, W; Mallal, S; Skett, J; Calvo, G; Torres, F; Mateau, S; Domingo, P; Sambeat, MA; Gatell, J; Del Cacho, E; Cadafalch, J; Fuster, M; Codina, C; Sirera, G; Vaque, A; Clumeck, N; De Wit, S; Gerard, M; Hildebrand, M; Kabeya, K; Konopnicki, D; Payen, MC; Poll, B; Van Laethem, Y; Neaton, J; Bartsch, G; El-Sadr, WM; Krum, E; Thompson, G; Wentworth, D; Luskin-Hawk, R; Telzak, E; El-Sadr, WM; Abrams, DI; Cohn, D; Markowitz, N; Arduino, R; Mushatt, D; Friedland, G; Perez, G; Tedaldi, E; Fisher, E; Gordin, F; Crane, LR; Sampson, J; Baxter, J; Kirk, O; Mocroft, A; Phillips, AN; Lundgren, JD; Vetter, N; Clumeck, N; Hermans, P; Colebunders, R; Machala, L; Nielsen, J; Benfield, T; Gerstoft, J; Katzenstein, T; Roge, B; Skinhoj, P; Pedersen, C; Katlama, C; Viard, JP; Saint-Marc, T; Vanhems, P; Pradier, C; Dietrich, M; Manegold, C; van Lunzen, J; Miller, V.; Staszewski, S; Bieckel, M; Goebel, FD; Salzberger, B; Rockstroh, J; Kosmidis, J; Gargalianos, P; Sambatakou, H; Perdios, J; Panos, G; Karydis, I.; Filandras, A; Banhegyi, D; Mulcahy, F; Yust, I.; Turner, D; Pollack, S; Ben-Ishai, Z; Bentwich, Z; Maayan, S; Vella, S; Chiesi, A; Arici, C; Pristera, R; Mazzotta, F; Gabbuti, A; Esposito, R; Bedini, A; Chirianni, A; Montesarchio, E; Vullo, V.; Santopadre, P; Narciso, P; Antinori, A; Franci, P; Zaccarelli, M; Lazzarin, A; Finazzi, R; Monforte, VO; Hemmer, R; Staub, T; Reiss, P; Bruun, J; Maeland, A; Ormaasen, V.; Knysz, B; Gasiorowski, J; Horban, A; Prokopowicz, D; Boron-Kaczmarska, A; Pnyka, M; Beniowski, M; Trocha, H; Antunes, F; Mansinho, K; Proenca, R; Gonzalez-Lahoz, J; Diaz, B; Garcia-Benayas, T; Martin-Carbonero, L; Soriano, V.; Clotet, B; Jou, A; Conejero, J; Tural, C; Gatell, JM; Miro, JM; Blaxhult, A; Heidemann, B; Pehrson, P; Ledergerber, B; Weber, R; Francioli, P; Telenti, A; Hirschel, B; Soravia-Dunand, V.; Furrer, H; Fisher, M; Brettle, R; Barton, S; Johnson, AM; Mercey, D; Loveday, C; Johnson, MA; Pinching, A; Parkin, J; Weber, J; Scullard, G; Morfeldt, L; Thulin, G; Sunstrom, A; Akerlund, B; Koppel, K; Karlsson, A; Flamholc, L; Hakangard, C; Monforte, AD; Pezzotti, P; Moroni, M; Monforte, AD; Cargnel, A; Merli, S; Vigevani, GM; Pastecchia, C; Lazzarin, A; Novati, R; Caggese, L; Moioli, C; Mura, MS; Mannazzu, M; Suter, F; Arici, C; Manconi, PE; Piano, P; Mazzotta, F; Lo Caputo, S; Poggio, A; Bottari, G; Pagano, G; Alessandrini, A

    2003-01-01

    Background: It remains controversial whether exposure to combination antiretroviral treatment increases the risk of myocardial infarction. Methods: In this prospective observational study, we enrolled 23,468 patients from 11 previously established cohorts from December 1999 to April 2001 and collect

  17. Class of Antiretroviral Drugs and the Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously demonstrated an association between combination antiretroviral therapy and the risk of myocardial infarction. It is not clear whether this association differs according to the class of antiretroviral drugs. We conducted a study to investigate the association of...

  18. Plasma HDL cholesterol and risk of myocardial infarction

    Voight, Benjamin F; Peloso, Gina M; Orho-Melander, Marju;

    2012-01-01

    High plasma HDL cholesterol is associated with reduced risk of myocardial infarction, but whether this association is causal is unclear. Exploiting the fact that genotypes are randomly assigned at meiosis, are independent of non-genetic confounding, and are unmodified by disease processes......, mendelian randomisation can be used to test the hypothesis that the association of a plasma biomarker with disease is causal....

  19. Prognostic Importance of Cardiovascular Risk Factors in Myocardial Infarction Patients

    Monhart, Z.; Grünfeldová, H.; Zvárová, Jana; Janský, P.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 122, č. 2 (2010), e253. ISSN 0009-7322. [World Congress of Cardiology. 16.06.2010-19.06.2010, Beijing] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : cardiology * risk factors * myocardioal infarction Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  20. Postoperative myocardial infarction and cardiac death. Predictive value of dipyridamole-thallium imaging and five clinical scoring systems based on multifactorial analysis

    Lette, J.; Waters, D.; Lassonde, J.; Dube, S.; Heyen, F.; Picard, M.; Morin, M. (Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital, Montreal (Canada))

    1990-01-01

    Sixty-six patients unable to complete a standard preoperative exercise test because of physical limitations were studied to determine the predictive value of individual clinical parameters, of clinical scoring systems based on multifactorial analysis, and of dipyridamole-thallium imaging before major general and vascular surgery. Study endpoints were limited to postoperative myocardial infarction or cardiac death before hospital discharge. There were nine postoperative cardiac events (seven deaths and two nonfatal infarctions). There was no statistical correlation between cardiac events and preoperative clinical descriptors, including individual clinical parameters, the Dripps-American Surgical Association score, the Goldman Cardiac Risk Index score, the Detsky Modified Cardiac Risk Index score, Eagle's clinical markers of low surgical risk, and the probability of postoperative events as determined by Cooperman's equation. There were no cardiac events in 30 patients with normal dipyridamole-thallium scans or in nine patients with fixed myocardial perfusion defects. Of 21 patients with reversible perfusion defects who underwent surgery, nine had a postoperative cardiac event (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 43%). In the six other patients with reversible defects, preoperative angiography showed severe coronary disease or cardiomyopathy. Thus in patients unable to complete a standard exercise stress test, postoperative outcome cannot be predicted clinically before major general and vascular surgery, whereas dipyridamole-thallium imaging successfully identified all patients who sustained a postoperative cardiac event.

  1. Postoperative myocardial infarction and cardiac death. Predictive value of dipyridamole-thallium imaging and five clinical scoring systems based on multifactorial analysis

    Sixty-six patients unable to complete a standard preoperative exercise test because of physical limitations were studied to determine the predictive value of individual clinical parameters, of clinical scoring systems based on multifactorial analysis, and of dipyridamole-thallium imaging before major general and vascular surgery. Study endpoints were limited to postoperative myocardial infarction or cardiac death before hospital discharge. There were nine postoperative cardiac events (seven deaths and two nonfatal infarctions). There was no statistical correlation between cardiac events and preoperative clinical descriptors, including individual clinical parameters, the Dripps-American Surgical Association score, the Goldman Cardiac Risk Index score, the Detsky Modified Cardiac Risk Index score, Eagle's clinical markers of low surgical risk, and the probability of postoperative events as determined by Cooperman's equation. There were no cardiac events in 30 patients with normal dipyridamole-thallium scans or in nine patients with fixed myocardial perfusion defects. Of 21 patients with reversible perfusion defects who underwent surgery, nine had a postoperative cardiac event (sensitivity, 100%; specificity, 43%). In the six other patients with reversible defects, preoperative angiography showed severe coronary disease or cardiomyopathy. Thus in patients unable to complete a standard exercise stress test, postoperative outcome cannot be predicted clinically before major general and vascular surgery, whereas dipyridamole-thallium imaging successfully identified all patients who sustained a postoperative cardiac event

  2. Risk stratification with the risk chart from the European Society of Hypertension compared with SCORE in the general population

    Sehestedt, Thomas; Jeppesen, Jørgen; Hansen, Tine W;

    2009-01-01

    SCORE is based on traditional risk factors. We wanted to compare the predictive performance of the two charts. METHODS: In a Danish population sample of 1344 individuals aged 41, 51, 61 and 71 years without known diabetes, prior stroke or myocardial infarction, not receiving cardiovascular, antidiabetic......OBJECTIVE: The risk chart from the European Society of Hypertension (ESH) and Systemic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) from the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) are equally recommended tools for risk stratification. However, ESH risk chart recommends measuring subclinical organ damage, whereas......: During the following 12.8 years cardiovascular death and CEP occurred in 71 and 132 patients, respectively. Forty-two percent had unrecognized hypertension. The sizes and characteristics of the populations in the different risk categories of the charts varied considerably as ESH risk chart allocated 368...

  3. Risk stratification for ST segment elevation myocardial infarction in the era of primary percutaneous coronary intervention

    Richard; A; Brogan; Christopher; J; Malkin; Philip; D; Batin; Alexander; D; Simms; James; M; McLenachan; Christopher; P; Gale

    2014-01-01

    Acute coronary syndromes presenting with ST elevation are usually treated with emergency reperfusion/revascularisation therapy. In contrast current evidence and national guidelines recommend risk stratification for non ST segment elevation myocardial infarction(NSTEMI) with the decision on revascularisation dependent on perceived clinical risk. Risk stratification for STEMI has no recommendation. Statistical risk scoring techniques in NSTEMI have been demonstrated to improve outcomes however their uptake has been poor perhaps due to questions over their discrimination and concern for application to individuals who may not have been adequately represented in clinical trials. STEMI is perceived to carry sufficient risk to warrant emergency coronary intervention [by primary percutaneous coronary intervention(PPCI)] even if this results in a delay to reperfusion with immediate thrombolysis. Immediate thrombolysis may be as effective in patients presenting early, or at low risk, but physicians are poor at assessing clinical and procedural risks and currently are not required to consider this. Inadequate data on risk stratification in STEMI inhibits the option of immediate fibrinolysis, which may be cost-effective. Currently the mode of reperfusion for STEMI defaults to emergency angiography and percutaneous coronary intervention ignoring alternative strategies. This review article examines the current risk scores and evidence base for risk stratification for STEMI patients. The requirements for an ideal STEMI risk score are discussed.

  4. Building a Patient-Specific Risk Score with a Large Database of Discharge Summary Reports.

    Qu, Zhi; Zhao, Lue Ping; Ma, Xiemin; Zhan, Siyan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND There is increasing interest in clinical research with electronic medical data, but it often faces the challenges of heterogeneity between hospitals. Our objective was to develop a single numerical score for characterizing such heterogeneity via computing inpatient mortality in treating acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients based on diagnostic information recorded in the database of Discharge Summary Reports (DSR). MATERIAL AND METHODS Using 4 216 135 DSRs of 49 tertiary hospitals from 2006 to 2010 in Beijing, more than 200 secondary diagnoses were identified to develop a risk score for AMI (n=50 531). This risk score was independently validated with 21 571 DSRs from 65 tertiary hospitals in 2012. The c-statistics of new risk score was computed as a measure of discrimination and was compared with the Charlson comorbidity index (CCI) and its adaptions for further validation. RESULTS We finally identified and weighted 22 secondary diagnoses using a logistic regression model. In the external validation, the novel risk score performed better than the widely used CCI in predicting in-hospital mortality of AMI patients (c-statistics: 0.829, 0.832, 0.824 vs. 0.775, 0.773, and 0.710 in training, testing, and validating dataset, respectively). CONCLUSIONS The new risk score developed from DSRs outperform the existing administrative data when applied to healthcare data from China. This risk score can be used for adjusting heterogeneity between hospitals when clinical data from multiple hospitals are included. PMID:27318825

  5. Clinical use of the combined Sclarovsky Birnbaum Severity and Anderson Wilkins Acuteness scores from the pre-hospital ECG in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction

    Fakhri, Yama; Schoos, Mikkel M; Clemmensen, Peter;

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the electrocardiographic changes during an evolving ST segment elevation myocardial infarction and discusses associated electrocardiographic scores and the potential use of these indices in clinical practice, in particular the ECG scores developed by Anderson and Wilkins...

  6. A detailed family history of myocardial infarction and risk of myocardial infarction

    Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Petersen, Jonathan Aavang; Bundgård, Henning;

    2015-01-01

    established a nationwide cohort of persons born between 1930 and 1992 with identifiable first- or second-degree relatives. Incident MIs in both cohort members and relatives aged ≥20 years were identified. We calculated incidence rate ratios (IRRs) for MI by family history of MI, by Poisson regression. In 4...... cardiovascular medications. CONCLUSION: A detailed family history, particularly number of affected first- and second-degree relatives, contributes meaningfully to risk assessment, especially in middle-aged persons. Future studies should test for potential improvement of risk algorithm prediction using detailed......BACKGROUND: Family history of myocardial infarction (MI) is an independent risk factor for MI. Several genetic variants are associated with increased risk of MI and family history of MI in a first-degree relative doubles MI risk. However, although family history of MI is not a simple dichotomous...

  7. Development and validation of risk score model for acute myocardial infarction in China:prognostic value thereof for in hospital major adverse cardiac events and evaluation of revascularization%急性冠脉综合征住院风险评分及其对血运重建的评价

    吴小凡; 任芳; 骆景光; 吕树铮; 陈韵岱; 潘伟琪; 宋现涛; 李晶; 刘欣; 王羲之; 张丽洁

    2008-01-01

    Objective To develop a simple risk score model of in-hospital major adverse cardiac events(MACE)including all-cause mortality,new or recurrent myocardial infarction(MI).and evaluate the efficacy about revascularization on patients with different risk.Methods The basic characteristics,diagnosis,therapy,and in-hospital outcomes of 1512 ACS patients from G10bal Registry of Acute Coronary Events(GRACE)study of China were collected to develop a risk score model by multivariable stepwise logistic regression.The goodness-of-fit test and discriminafive power of the final model were assessed respectively.The best cut-off value for the risk score was used to assess the impact of revascularization for ST-elevation Ml(STEMI)and non-ST elevation acute coronary artery syndrome(NSTEACS)on in-hospital outcomes.Results (1)The following 6 independent risk factors accounted for about 92.5%of the prognostic information:age≥80 years(4 points),SBP≤90 mm Hg(6 points),DBP≥90 mm Hg(2points),KiHip Ⅱ(3 points),KillipⅢorⅣ(9 points),cardiac arrest during presentation(4 points),ST-segment elevation(3 points)or depression(5 points)or combination of elevation and depression(4points)on electrocardiogram at presentation.(2)CHIEF risk model was excellent with Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test of 0.673 and c statistics of 0.776.(3)1301 ACS patients previously enrolled in GRACE study were divided into 2 groups with the best cut-0frvalue of 5.5 points.The impact of revascularizafion on the in-hospital MACE of the higber risk subsets was stronger than that of the lower risk subsets both in STEMI[OR(95%CI)=0.32(0.11,0.94),x2=5.39,P=0.02]and NSTEACS[OR(95%CI)=0.32(0.06,0.94),×2=4.17,P=0.04]population.However,beth STEMI(61.7%vs 78.3%,P=0.000)and NSTEACS(42.0%vs 62.3%.P=0.000)patients with the risk scores more than 5.5 points had lower revascularization mtes.Condusion The risk score provides excellent abillty to predict in-hospital death or (re)MI quantitatively and accurately.The patients

  8. Risk of stroke after acute myocardial infarction among Chinese

    2001-01-01

    @@Following an acute myocardial infarction (AMI), patients have an increased risk of stroke. Estimates of risk are mainly derived from AMI treatment trials or secondary prevention studies. The reported incidence of stroke in Caucasians in the early phase after AMI ranged from 0.5% to 2.5%.1-3 Similar assessment of risk in the Chinese population is lacking. As thrombolytic therapy becomes standard treatment for AMI, there is concern that there may be an increase in haemorrhagic stroke complicating AMI treatment, especially since haemorrhagic stroke is more common in Asian populations.

  9. Risk factors and outcomes of acute renal infarction

    Yang, Jihyun; Lee, Jun Yong; Na, Young Ju; Lim, Sung Yoon; Kim, Myung-Gyu; Jo, Sang-Kyung; Cho, Wonyong

    2016-01-01

    Background Renal infarction (RI) is an uncommon disease that is difficult to diagnose. As little is known about clinical characteristics of this disease, we investigated its underlying risk factors and outcomes. Methods We performed a retrospective single-center study of 89 patients newly diagnosed with acute RI between January 2002 and March 2015 using imaging modalities. Clinical features, possible etiologies, and long-term renal outcome data were reviewed. Results The patients' mean age wa...

  10. Evaluation of risk scores derived from the health family tree program.

    Jiang, Yuling; Staes, Catherine J; Adams, Ted D; Hunt, Steven C

    2009-01-01

    Family health history is an independent risk factor for certain diseases. The Health Family Tree (HFT) was developed and used to document and assess family health history from the families of high school students since 1980. While the risk algorithm of the HFT was initially validated, 20 years of use as a public health tool in the community provides an extremely large dataset for more rigorous validation. A retrospective cohort study was used with the events before the "cut-off" year as the baseline and the events after the "cut-off" year as the follow-up. Baseline data were used in the algorithm to calculate the Family History Score (FHS). Cox proportional hazards model was used to test the dose-response nature of the FHS for predicting incident events. An FHS >/=1 was determined to be a significant predictor for future development of diabetes, myocardial infarction, and early onset of myocardial infarction. PMID:20351866

  11. Genetic Risk Score Predicts Late-Life Cognitive Impairment

    Mariegold E. Wollam

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. A family history of Alzheimer’s disease is a significant risk factor for its onset, but the genetic risk associated with possessing multiple risk alleles is still poorly understood. Methods. In a sample of 95 older adults (Mean age = 75.1, 64.2% female, we constructed a genetic risk score based on the accumulation of risk alleles in BDNF, COMT, and APOE. A neuropsychological evaluation and consensus determined cognitive status (44 nonimpaired, 51 impaired. Logistic regression was performed to determine whether the genetic risk score predicted cognitive impairment above and beyond that associated with each gene. Results. An increased genetic risk score was associated with a nearly 4-fold increased risk of cognitive impairment (OR = 3.824, P = .013 when including the individual gene polymorphisms as covariates in the model. Discussion. A risk score combining multiple genetic influences may be more useful in predicting late-life cognitive impairment than individual polymorphisms.

  12. Migraine with aura and risk of silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities: an MRI study.

    Gaist, David; Garde, Ellen; Blaabjerg, Morten; Nielsen, Helle H; Krøigård, Thomas; Østergaard, Kamilla; Møller, Harald S; Hjelmborg, Jacob; Madsen, Camilla G; Iversen, Pernille; Kyvik, Kirsten O; Siebner, Hartwig R; Ashina, Messoud

    2016-07-01

    A small number of population-based studies reported an association between migraine with aura and risk of silent brain infarcts and white matter hyperintensities in females. We investigated these relations in a population-based sample of female twins. We contacted female twins ages 30-60 years identified through the population-based Danish Twin Registry. Based on questionnaire responses, twins were invited to participate in a telephone-based interview conducted by physicians. Headache diagnoses were established according to the International Headache Society criteria. Cases with migraine with aura, their co-twins, and unrelated migraine-free twins (controls) were invited to a brain magnetic resonance imaging scan performed at a single centre. Brain scans were assessed for the presence of infarcts, and white matter hyperintensities (visual rating scales and volumetric analyses) blinded to headache diagnoses. Comparisons were based on 172 cases, 34 co-twins, and 139 control subjects. Compared with control subjects, cases did not differ with regard to frequency of silent brain infarcts (four cases versus one control), periventricular white matter hyperintensity scores [adjusted mean difference (95% confidence interval): -0.1 (-0.5 to 0.2)] or deep white matter hyperintensity scores [adjusted mean difference (95% confidence interval): 0.1 (-0.8 to 1.1)] assessed by Scheltens' scale. Cases had a slightly higher total white matter hyperintensity volume compared with controls [adjusted mean difference (95% confidence interval): 0.17 (-0.08 to 0.41) cm(3)] and a similar difference was present in analyses restricted to twin pairs discordant for migraine with aura [adjusted mean difference 0.21 (-0.20 to 0.63)], but these differences did not reach statistical significance. We found no evidence of an association between silent brain infarcts, white matter hyperintensities, and migraine with aura. PMID:27190013

  13. Polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder predict creativity

    Power, R.A.; Steinberg, S.; Bjornsdottir, G.; Rietveld, C.A.; Abdellaoui, A.; Nivard, M.M.; Johannesson, M.; Galesloot, T.E.; Hottenga, J.J.; Willemsen, G.; Cesarini, D.; Benjamin, D.J.; Magnusson, P.K.; Ullen, F.; Tiemeier, H.; Hofman, A.; Rooij, F.J. van; Walters, G.B.; Sigurdsson, E.; Thorgeirsson, T.E.; Ingason, A.; Helgason, A.; Kong, A.; Kiemeney, B.; Koellinger, P.; Boomsma, D.I.; Gudbjartsson, D.; Stefansson, H.; Stefansson, K.

    2015-01-01

    We tested whether polygenic risk scores for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder would predict creativity. Higher scores were associated with artistic society membership or creative profession in both Icelandic (P = 5.2 x 10(-6) and 3.8 x 10(-6) for schizophrenia and bipolar disorder scores, respectiv

  14. New risk markers may change the HeartScore risk classification significantly in one-fifth of the population

    Olsen, M H; Hansen, T W; Christensen, M K;

    2008-01-01

    The study aim was to determine whether urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (Nt-proBNP) added to risk prediction based on HeartScore and history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease. A Danish population sam......CRP in subjects with low-moderate risk and UACR and Nt-proBNP in subjects with known diabetes of cardiovascular disease changed HeartScore risk classification significantly in 19% of the population.......The study aim was to determine whether urine albumin/creatinine ratio (UACR), high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) or N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (Nt-proBNP) added to risk prediction based on HeartScore and history of diabetes or cardiovascular disease. A Danish population...... sample of 2460 individuals was divided in three groups: 472 subjects receiving cardiovascular medication or having history of diabetes, prior myocardial infarction or stroke, 559 high-risk subjects with a 10-year risk of cardiovascular death above 5% as estimated by HeartScore, and 1429 low-moderate risk...

  15. Evaluation of Cardiovascular Risk Scores Applied to NASA's Astronant Corps

    Jain, I.; Charvat, J. M.; VanBaalen, M.; Lee, L.; Wear, M. L.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk prediction, this analysis evaluates and compares the applicability of multiple CVD risk scores to the NASA Astronaut Corps which is extremely healthy at selection.

  16. Credit scores, cardiovascular disease risk, and human capital.

    Israel, Salomon; Caspi, Avshalom; Belsky, Daniel W; Harrington, HonaLee; Hogan, Sean; Houts, Renate; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Sanders, Seth; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2014-12-01

    Credit scores are the most widely used instruments to assess whether or not a person is a financial risk. Credit scoring has been so successful that it has expanded beyond lending and into our everyday lives, even to inform how insurers evaluate our health. The pervasive application of credit scoring has outpaced knowledge about why credit scores are such useful indicators of individual behavior. Here we test if the same factors that lead to poor credit scores also lead to poor health. Following the Dunedin (New Zealand) Longitudinal Study cohort of 1,037 study members, we examined the association between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and the underlying factors that account for this association. We find that credit scores are negatively correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Variation in household income was not sufficient to account for this association. Rather, individual differences in human capital factors—educational attainment, cognitive ability, and self-control—predicted both credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk and accounted for ∼45% of the correlation between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk. Tracing human capital factors back to their childhood antecedents revealed that the characteristic attitudes, behaviors, and competencies children develop in their first decade of life account for a significant portion (∼22%) of the link between credit scores and cardiovascular disease risk at midlife. We discuss the implications of these findings for policy debates about data privacy, financial literacy, and early childhood interventions. PMID:25404329

  17. Does retirement reduce the risk of myocardial infarction?

    Olesen, Kasper; Rugulies, Reiner; Rod, Naja Hulvej;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Recent studies have suggested that retirement may have beneficial effects on health outcomes. In this study we examined whether the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) was reduced following retirement in a Danish population sample. METHODS: Participants were 617 511 Danish workers, born...... adjusting for age, sex, income, occupational position, education, cohabitation and immigrant status. The participants were followed for up to 7 years. RESULTS: Of the study population, 3% were diagnosed with MI during follow-up. Retirement was associated with a modestly higher risk of MI with a hazard ratio...... of 1.11 (95% confidence interval: 1.06, 1.16) when comparing retirees with active workers of the same age. CONCLUSIONS: This study does not support the hypothesis that retirement reduces risk of MI. On the contrary, we find that retirement is associated with a modestly increased risk of MI....

  18. Incidence of cardiovascular events after kidney transplantation and cardiovascular risk scores: study protocol

    Lorenzo-Aguiar Dolores

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD is the major cause of death after renal transplantation. Not only conventional CVD risk factors, but also transplant-specific risk factors can influence the development of CVD in kidney transplant recipients. The main objective of this study will be to determine the incidence of post-transplant CVD after renal transplantation and related factors. A secondary objective will be to examine the ability of standard cardiovascular risk scores (Framingham, Regicor, SCORE, and DORICA to predict post-transplantation cardiovascular events in renal transplant recipients, and to develop a new score for predicting the risk of CVD after kidney transplantation. Methods/Design Observational prospective cohort study of all kidney transplant recipients in the A Coruña Hospital (Spain in the period 1981-2008 (2059 transplants corresponding to 1794 patients. The variables included will be: donor and recipient characteristics, chronic kidney disease-related risk factors, pre-transplant and post-transplant cardiovascular risk factors, routine biochemistry, and immunosuppressive, antihypertensive and lipid-lowering treatment. The events studied in the follow-up will be: patient and graft survival, acute rejection episodes and cardiovascular events (myocardial infarction, invasive coronary artery therapy, cerebral vascular events, new-onset angina, congestive heart failure, rhythm disturbances and peripheral vascular disease. Four cardiovascular risk scores were calculated at the time of transplantation: the Framingham score, the European Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE equation, and the REGICOR (Registre Gironí del COR (Gerona Heart Registry, and DORICA (Dyslipidemia, Obesity, and Cardiovascular Risk functions. The cumulative incidence of cardiovascular events will be analyzed by competing risk survival methods. The clinical relevance of different variables will be calculated using the ARR (Absolute Risk

  19. RISKS MANAGEMENT. A PROPENSITY SCORE APPLICATION

    Constangioara Alexandru

    2008-01-01

    Risk management is relatively unexplored in Romania. Although Romanian specialists dwell on theoretical aspects such as the risks classification and the important distinction between risks and uncertainty the practical relevance of the matter is outside existing studies. Present paper uses a dataset of consumer data to build a propensity scorecard based on relevant quantitative modeling.

  20. RISKS MANAGEMENT. A PROPENSITY SCORE APPLICATION

    Constangioara Alexandru

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Risk management is relatively unexplored in Romania. Although Romanian specialists dwell on theoretical aspects such as the risks classification and the important distinction between risks and uncertainty the practical relevance of the matter is outside existing studies. Present paper uses a dataset of consumer data to build a propensity scorecard based on relevant quantitative modeling.

  1. [Assessment of cardiovascular risk in hypertensive patients: comparison among scores].

    Del Colle, Sara; Rabbia, Franco; Mulatero, Paolo; Veglio, Franco

    2004-09-01

    At present, a correct and thorough risk evaluation represents the best prognostic and therapeutic approach for hypertensive patients. Recent European and American guidelines recommend a global stratification of the cardiovascular risk of hypertensive patients, based on the evaluation of risk factors, organ damage, and the clinical conditions associated with hypertension. A similar approach uses numerical risk scores that transform the percentage risk, calculated from large populations, into absolute values. These scores have been calculated by different research groups and scientific organizations with the aim of better defining the real risk of a given population over time. Many of these risk scores have been conceived by American and European scientific groups on the basis of the epidemiology of different risk variables in the respective populations; in general, north American hypertensives are exposed to a higher cardiovascular risk compared to Europeans and some European countries have a higher risk than others. The present review underlines the pivotal role of a correct risk evaluation of hypertension as reported in the guidelines. We briefly analyze the principal studies on risk scores: we compare the advantages and disadvantages of the different scores, as well as the similarities and differences, in order to demonstrate not only their utility, but also the possible equivalence of the different parameters considered. PMID:15568607

  2. Evaluation of acute myocardial infarction by 201Tl single-photon emission computed tomography using scoring system

    In 36 patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) 201Tl single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) examinations were performed in a relatively early phase of AMI. The short and long axis views of the left ventricle (LV) were divided into 6 segments. Images of each segment were assigned scores (segmental scores) based on a visual evaluation of the extent of 201Tl accumulations. SPECT scores were compared with max GOT, max LDT, max CPK and max CK-MB, Killip classification and Forrester hemodynamic subset on admission, and LV ejection fraction (LVEF). Segmental scores were compared with LV wall motion evaluated by left ventriculography. The results are as follows: There were significant correlations between SPECT scores and max GOT, max LDH, max CPK and max CK-MB. SPECT scores in patients with Killip group III were significantly higher than in patients with Killip group I+II. However, no significant differences in max GOT, max LDH, max CPK and max CK-MB were observed between patients with Killip group III and those with Killip group I+II. SPECT scores were significantly higher in patients with Forrester group III+IV than in patients with Forrester group I+II. Segmental scores in segments evaluated as akinesis, dyskinesis and aneurysm by left ventriculography were significantly higher than those evaluated as hypokinesis or normal. Segmental scores in segments evaluated as hypokinesis were significantly high in comparison with normal segments. Significant correlations were observed between LVEF and SPECT scores. However, LVEF correlated poorly with max GOT, max LDH and max CPK, and no significant correlation was observed between LVEF and max CK-MB. SPECT examinations were performed in 11 patients in both the acute and chronic phase of AMI. SPECT scores in the chronic phase did not change in 4 patients, decreased in 5, increased in 2. These results suggest that SPECT scores and segmental scores can be useful indices in the evaluation of AMI. (J.P.N.)

  3. Risk Stratification and Management of Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI)

    Peleška, Jan; Grünfeldová, H.; Faltus, Václav; Monhart, Z.; Ryšavá, D.; Velimský, T.; Ballek, L.; Hubač, J.; Tomečková, Marie; Janský, P.

    Timisoara: Cardiology Clinic of the Emergency County Hospital, 2007. s. 28-29. [International Workshop on the Risk Stratification in Patients with Ischemic Heart Disease. 12.04.2007-13.04.2007, Timisoara] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : pilot registry of acute myocardial infarction * risk stratification in acute myocardial infarction * effects of pharmacotherapy in acute myocardial infarction Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research

  4. Chronic myocardial infarction detection and characterization during coronary artery calcium scoring acquisitions.

    Rodríguez-Granillo, Gastón A

    2012-01-05

    Hypoenhanced regions on multidetector CT (MDCT) coronary angiography correlate with myocardial hyperperfusion. In addition to a limited capillary density, chronic myocardial infarction (MI) commonly contains a considerable amount of adipose tissue.

  5. Does simplicity compromise accuracy in ACS risk prediction? A retrospective analysis of the TIMI and GRACE risk scores.

    Krishna G Aragam

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI risk scores for Unstable Angina/Non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (UA/NSTEMI and ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI and the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE risk scores for in-hospital and 6-month mortality are established tools for assessing risk in Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS patients. The objective of our study was to compare the discriminative abilities of the TIMI and GRACE risk scores in a broad-spectrum, unselected ACS population and to assess the relative contributions of model simplicity and model composition to any observed differences between the two scoring systems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: ACS patients admitted to the University of Michigan between 1999 and 2005 were divided into UA/NSTEMI (n = 2753 and STEMI (n = 698 subpopulations. The predictive abilities of the TIMI and GRACE scores for in-hospital and 6-month mortality were assessed by calibration and discrimination. There were 137 in-hospital deaths (4%, and among the survivors, 234 (7.4% died by 6 months post-discharge. In the UA/NSTEMI population, the GRACE risk scores demonstrated better discrimination than the TIMI UA/NSTEMI score for in-hospital (C = 0.85, 95% CI: 0.81-0.89, versus 0.54, 95% CI: 0.48-0.60; p<0.01 and 6-month (C = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.76-0.83, versus 0.56, 95% CI: 0.52-0.60; p<0.01 mortality. Among STEMI patients, the GRACE and TIMI STEMI scores demonstrated comparably excellent discrimination for in-hospital (C = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.78-0.90 versus 0.83, 95% CI: 0.78-0.89; p = 0.83 and 6-month (C = 0.72, 95% CI: 0.63-0.81, versus 0.71, 95% CI: 0.64-0.79; p = 0.79 mortality. An analysis of refitted multivariate models demonstrated a marked improvement in the discriminative power of the TIMI UA/NSTEMI model with the incorporation of heart failure and hemodynamic variables. Study limitations included unaccounted for confounders inherent to observational, single institution

  6. Strain Echocardiography Improves Risk Prediction of Ventricular Arrhythmias After Myocardial Infarction

    Haugaa, Kristina H; Grenne, Bjørnar L; Eek, Christian H;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that strain echocardiography might improve arrhythmic risk stratification in patients after myocardial infarction (MI).......The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that strain echocardiography might improve arrhythmic risk stratification in patients after myocardial infarction (MI)....

  7. Alcohol Intake, Myocardial Infarction, Biochemical Risk Factors, and Alcohol Dehydrogenase Genotypes

    Tolstrup, Janne Schurmann; Grønbæk, Morten; nordestgaard, børge

    2009-01-01

      Background- The risk of myocardial infarction is lower among light-to-moderate alcohol drinkers compared with abstainers. We tested associations between alcohol intake and risk of myocardial infarction and risk factors and whether these associations are modified by variations in alcohol...... dehydrogenases. Methods and Results- We used information on 9584 men and women from the Danish general population in the Copenhagen City Heart Study. During follow-up, from 1991 to 2007, 663 incident cases of myocardial infarction occurred. We observed that increasing alcohol intake was associated with...... of myocardial infarction or with any of the cardiovascular biochemical risk factors, and there was no indication that associations between alcohol intake and myocardial infarction and between alcohol intake and risk factors were modified by genotypes. Conclusions- Increasing alcohol intake is...

  8. Estimating Operational Risk for Hedge Funds: The ?-Score

    Stephen Brown; William Goetzmann; Bing Liang; Christopher Schwarz

    2008-01-01

    Using a complete set of the SEC filing information on hedge funds (Form ADV) and the TASS data, we develop a quantitative model called the ?-Score to measure hedge fund operational risk. The ?-Score is related to conflict of interest issues, concentrated ownership, and reduced leverage in the ADV data. With a statistical methodology, we further relate the ?-Score to readily available information such as fund performance, volatility, size, age, and fee structures. Finally, we demonstrate that ...

  9. Risk factors in young patients of acute myocardial infarction

    Background: Ischemic heart disease is a leading cause of death throughout the world. CAD has been recognized among younger age group more frequently in recent years. Very limited data is available regarding the prevalence of various risk factors in our younger patients that is why this study was planed. Objectives of the study were to look for the risk factors most prevalent in our young patient of first Acute Myocardial Infarction. And to also look for the number of Risk Factors present in each patient. Methods: We studied 100 consecutive patients from 16-45 years of age presenting with first acute MI. Twelve risk factors were studied namely, gender, family history of premature CAD, smoking hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, obesity, mental stress (type A personality), alcohol, oral contraceptive pills (OCPs), physical activity, and diet. We divided the patients into two groups. Group A with patients 35 years of age or less and group B with patients 36-45 years of age. All risk factors were compared in both the groups. Results: Smoking, diabetes mellitus, dyslipidemia and hypertension were statistically different between the two groups. Frequency wise risk factors were lined up as male sex (91%) Diet (66%), Dyslipidemia (62%), smoking (46%), Type A personality(46%), family history (32%), diabetes mellitus (28%), sedentary lifestyle (26%), hypertension (22%), obesity (17%), alcohol (3%), and OCPs (0%) Most of the patients that is 94% had 3 or more risk factors. Conclusion: Smoking, hypertension, diabetes and dyslipidemia are the major modifiable risk factors in our young adults. If a young male who is smoker or a young female who is diabetic, presents in emergency room with chest pain, always suspect coronary artery disease. Other conventional risk factors are also prevalent but alcohol and OCPs are not a major health problem for us. (author)

  10. Augmentation index is associated with coronary revascularization in patients with high Framingham risk scores: a hospital-based observational study

    Choi, JoonHyouk; Kim, Song-Yi; Joo, Seung-Jae; Kim, Ki-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Background This study analyzed PWAs in patients with high Framingham risk scores to determine whether PWA is predictive of coronary artery disease (CAD) severity and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) treatment. Methods In total, 310 patients were screened due to suspected CAD; 78 were excluded due to PCI history (32), atrial fibrillation (11), or acute myocardial infarction (35). The augmentation index (AIx) was analyzed immediately before coronary angiography. PCI was performed in 73 ...

  11. Risk score for contrast induced nephropathy following percutaneous coronary intervention

    Contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) is an important cause of acute renal failure. Identification of risk factors of CIN and creating a simple risk scoring for CIN after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is important. A prospective single center study was conducted in Kuwait chest disease hospital. All patients admitted to chest disease hospital for PCI from March to May 2005 were included in the study. Total of 247 patients were randomly assigned for the development dataset and 100 for the validation set using the simple random method. The overall occurrence of CIN in the development set was 5.52%. Using multivariate analysis; basal Serum creatinine, shock, female gender, multivessel PCI, and diabetes mellitus were identified as risk factors. Scores assigned to different variables yielded basal creatinine > 115 micron mol/L with the highest score(7), followed by shock (3), female gender, multivessel PCI and diabetes mellitus had the same score (2). Patients were further risk stratified into low risk score (12). The developed CIN model demonstrated good discriminative power in the validation population. In conclusion, use of a simple risk score for CIN can predict the probability of CIN after PCI; this however needs further validation in larger multicenter trials. (author)

  12. Stroke Risk Predictor Scoring Systems in Atrial Fibrillation

    Tze-Fan Chao, M.D; Shih-Ann Chen, M.D.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available An effective risk stratification which could help us identify high-risk patients who should take oral anticoagulants (OACs is the key step for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation (AF. Several scoring systems were available to estimate the risk of stroke in AF, including CHADS2, CHA2DS2-VASc, R2CHADS2 and ATRIA scores, which were constituted of different clinical risk factors. Recently, several new OACs (NOACs were demonstrated to be at least as effective as warfarin in stroke prevention and were much safer regarding the risk of intra-cranial hemorrhage. In the era of NOACs, the roles of scoring schemes have shifted to identify patinets with a truly low-risk of thromboembolic events, in whom OACs were not recommended. The CHA2DS2-VASc score is powerful in selecting “truly low-risk” patients who are not necessary to receive anticoagulation therapies. Whether the new-emerging scoring systems, R2CHADS2 and ATRIA scores, could further improve the stroke prediction in AF deserves a further study.

  13. Cardiovascular risk assessment in Italy: the CUORE Project risk score and risk chart

    Simona Giampaoli

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available

    Aim: Risk charts and risk score, based on the global absolute risk, are key tools for CVD risk assessment. When applied to the population from which they derive, they provide the best estimate of CVD risk. That is why the CUORE Project has among its objectives the assessment of the Italian population’s cardiovascular risk, identifying the model for the prediction of coronary and cerebrovascular events in 10 years.

    Methods: Data fromdifferent cohorts enrolled in the North, Centre and South of Italy between the 1980s and the 1990s were used. From the 7,056 men and 12,574 women aged 35-69 years, free of cardiovascular disease at base-line and followed up for a mean time of 10 years for total and cause-specific mortality and non fatal cerebrovascular and coronary events, 894 major cardiovascular events (596 coronary and 298 cerebrovascular were identified and validated. To assess 10-year cardiovascular risk, the risk score and risk chart were developed for men and women separately, considering the first major coronary or cerebrovascular event as the endpoint.

    Results: The risk score is applied tomen andwomen aged 35-69 years and includes age, systolic blood pressure, total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, smoking habit, diabetes and hypertension treatment using continuous values when possible. The risk chart is applied to persons aged 40-69 years and includes the same risk factors as risk score, except for HDL-cholesterol and hypertension treatment, and uses categorical values for all variables.

    Conclusions: The risk score and risk chart are easy-to-use tools which enable general practitioners and specialists to achieve an objective evaluation of the absolute global cardiovascular risk of middle-aged persons in primary prevention.

  14. Sex dependent risk factors for mortality after myocardial infarction: individual patient data meta-analysis

    Loo,, K.K.; Heuvel, van den, E.P.J.; Schoevers, RA; Anselmino, M.; Carney, RM; Denollet, J; Doyle, F.; Freedland, KE; Grace, SL; Hosseini, Sh; Parakh, K; Pilote, L.; C. Rafanelli; Roest, AM; SATO, H

    2014-01-01

    Background: Although a number of risk factors are known to predict mortality within the first years after myocardial infarction, little is known about interactions between risk factors, whereas these could contribute to accurate differentiation of patients with higher and lower risk for mortality. This study explored the effect of interactions of risk factors on all-cause mortality in patients with myocardial infarction based on individual patient data meta-analysis. Methods: Prospective data...

  15. PREVALENCE AND RISK FACTORS OF ASYMPTOMATIC CEREBRAL INFARCTION

    R. R. Zhetishev

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Acute stroke manifesting as focal neurological deficit is a leading cause of death and disability. Of interest is the problem of asymptomatic cerebral infarctions (AСI, in which there is focal medullary involvement unaccompanied by the development of focal symptoms. The role of AСI as a marker for the progression of vascular dementia and for the further development of symptomatic stroke has not been adequately explored. There are current instrumental (neuroimaging criteria for diagnosing AСI. An update on the risk factors of AСI and their association with the further course of cerebrovascular involvement is analyzed. The results of a number of prospective studies conducted in the countries of Asia and Europe to investigate risk factors for AСI and their prognostic value are considered in detail. There is a relationship between hypertension, blood pressure instability, type 2 diabetes mellitus, some other factors, and a significantly increased risk for AСI. Based on the results of analyzing the data available in the literature, the authors demonstrate the association of prior AСI with the higher rates of progressive vascular cognitive impairments. A correlation is shown between prior AСI and an increased risk for further development of ischemic stroke accompanied by its clinical symptoms, which leads to disability. It is suggested that it is advisable to implement measures for secondary cardiovascular disease prevention, including the administration of antiaggregatory and antihypertensive agents, in patients with AСI. 

  16. Time course of lesion development in patients with acute brain stem infarction and correlation with NIHSS score

    Background and purpose: diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is highly sensitive in detecting acute supratentorial cerebral ischemia and Diffusion Weighted Imaging (DWI) lesion size has been shown to correlate strongly with the neurologic deficit in middle cerebral artery territory stroke. However, data concerning infratentorial strokes are rare. We examined the size and evolution of acute brain stem ischemic lesions and their relationship to neurological outcome. Methods: brain stem infarctions of 11 patients were analyzed. We performed DWI in all patients and in 7/11 patients within 24 h, T2W sequences within the first 2 weeks (10/11 patients) and follow-up MRI (MR2) within 3-9 months (median 4.8 months) later (12/12 patients). Lesion volumes were compared with early and follow-up neurologic deficit as determined by National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score. Results: the relative infarct volumes--with MR2 lesion size set to 100%--decreased over the time (P<0.02) with a mean shrinking factor of 3.3 between DWI (MR0) and the follow-up MRT (P<0.02), and 1.6 between early T2W (MR1) and MR2 (P<0.04). The mean DWI volume size (MR0) was larger than the early T2W (P<0.02). Although neurological outcome was good in all patients (mean NIHSS score of 1.3 at follow-up), early NIHSS and follow-up NIHSS scores were strongly correlated (r=0.9, P<0.00). NIHSS score at follow-up was highly correlated with lesion size of DWI (MR0; r=0.71, P<0.04) and T2W of MR1 (r=0.86, P<0.001). Conclusions: in this study, we saw a shrinking of the brain stem infarct volume according to clinical improvement of patients. Great extension of restricted diffusion in the acute stage does not necessarily implicate a large resulting infarction or a bad clinical outcome

  17. Clinical use of the combined Sclarovsky Birnbaum Severity and Anderson Wilkins Acuteness scores from the pre-hospital ECG in ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction.

    Fakhri, Yama; Schoos, Mikkel M; Clemmensen, Peter; Sejersten, Maria

    2014-01-01

    This review summarizes the electrocardiographic changes during an evolving ST segment elevation myocardial infarction and discusses associated electrocardiographic scores and the potential use of these indices in clinical practice, in particular the ECG scores developed by Anderson and Wilkins estimating the acuteness of myocardial ischemia and Sclarovsky-Birnbaum's grades of ischemia evaluating the severity of ongoing ischemia. PMID:24792905

  18. The high-risk myocardial infarction database initiative.

    Dickstein, Kenneth; Bebchuk, Judith; Wittes, Janet

    2012-01-01

    Coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality. Four randomized, controlled, double-blind clinical trials--VALIANT, EPHESUS, OPTIMAAL, and CAPRICORN evaluated pharmacologic intervention in a total of 28,771 high-risk patients following acute MI complicated with signs of heart failure or evidence of left ventricular dysfunction. The demographic profiles of the 4 study cohorts were similar. The High-Risk MI Database Initiative constructed a common database by merging the data captured by these 4 large trials. The merged data set did not contain the randomized study treatment, so no comparisons could be made between the agents investigated. A total of more than 17,600 subjects experienced a cardiovascular end point. Approximately 5100 deaths occurred, and more than 15,700 subjects experienced a hospitalization. The primary objectives of this initiative were to use this large database to define more precisely the prognostic profile of this high-risk population, to perform rigorous, adequately-sized, subset analyses, to provide epidemiologic information and event rate estimation based on baseline demographics. The methodological challenges and limitations of such an analyses are discussed. It is proposed that some thoughtful foresight and planning could enable us to use the large number of clinical events that accrue during randomized clinical trials to address questions of scientific and clinical interest. PMID:22226005

  19. IS OPIUM ADDICTION A RISK FACTOR FOR ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION?

    "S. M. Sadr Bafghi

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available There is a misconception among our people that opioids may prevent or have ameliorating effects in the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. In this study we evaluated 556 consecutive male patients hospitalized due to acute myocardial infarction (MI in city of Yazd, from May 2000 to October 2001 and compared the characteristics of opium addicts to non opium users. Prevalence of opium addiction in MI patients was 19% in comparison with 2-2.8% in general population. There were not any differences in prevalence of traditional risk factors between opium users and non-users. Overall, in-hospital mortality was 18.6 percent among opium users and 6.2 percent among non-opium users (unadjusted odd ratio, 1.3; 95% confidence interval, 0.7 to 2.7, P = 0.2. After adjustment for the differences in the baseline features (age and other risk factors, odds ratio increased to 2.2 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.9 to 5.1. It seems that opium addiction may work as a risk factor in cardiovascular disease.

  20. Multivariate Analysis of Risk Factors of Cerebral Infarction in 439 Patients Undergoing Thoracic Endovascular Aneurysm Repair

    Kanaoka, Yuji; Ohki, Takao; Maeda, Koji; Baba, Takeshi; Fujita, Tetsuji

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of the study is to identify the potential risk factors of cerebral infarction associated with thoracic endovascular aneurysm repair (TEVAR). TEVAR was developed as a less invasive surgical alternative to conventional open repair for thoracic aortic aneurysm treatment. However, outcomes following TEVAR of aortic and distal arch aneurysms remain suboptimal. Cerebral infarction is a major concern during the perioperative period. We included 439 patients who underwent TEVAR of aortic aneurysms at a high-volume teaching hospital between July 2006 and June 2013. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to identify perioperative cerebral infarction risk factors. Four patients (0.9%) died within 30 days of TEVAR; 17 (3.9%) developed cerebral infarction. In univariate analysis, history of ischemic heart disease and cerebral infarction and concomitant cerebrovascular disease were significantly associated with cerebral infarction. “Shaggy aorta” presence, left subclavian artery coverage, carotid artery debranching, and pull-through wire use were identified as independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. In multivariate analysis, history of ischemic heart disease (odds ratio [OR] 6.49, P = 0.046) and cerebral infarction (OR 43.74, P = 0.031), “shaggy aorta” (OR 30.32, P < 0.001), pull-through wire use during surgery (OR 7.196, P = 0.014), and intraoperative blood loss ≥800 mL (OR 24.31, P = 0.017) were found to be independent risk factors of cerebral infarction. This study identified patient- and procedure-related risk factors of cerebral infarction following TEVAR. These results indicate that patient outcomes could be improved through the identification and management of procedure-related risk factors. PMID:27082585

  1. A case-control study of physical activity patterns and risk of non-fatal myocardial infarction

    Gong Jian

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The interactive effects of different types of physical activity on cardiovascular disease (CVD risk have not been fully considered in previous studies. We aimed to identify physical activity patterns that take into account combinations of physical activities and examine the association between derived physical activity patterns and risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI. Methods We examined the relationship between physical activity patterns, identified by principal component analysis (PCA, and AMI risk in a case-control study of myocardial infarction in Costa Rica (N=4172, 1994-2004. The component scores derived from PCA and total METS were used in natural cubic spline models to assess the association between physical activity and AMI risk. Results Four physical activity patterns were retained from PCA that were characterized as the rest/sleep, agricultural job, light indoor activity, and manual labor job patterns. The light indoor activity and rest/sleep patterns showed an inverse linear relation (P for linearity=0.001 and a U-shaped association (P for non-linearity=0.03 with AMI risk, respectively. There was an inverse association between total activity-related energy expenditure and AMI risk but it reached a plateau at high levels of physical activity (P for non-linearity=0.01. Conclusions These data suggest that a light indoor activity pattern is associated with reduced AMI risk. PCA provides a new approach to investigate the relationship between physical activity and CVD risk.

  2. Short-term prognosis and risk factors of ventricular septal rupture following acute myocardial infarction

    胡小莹

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the short-term prognosis and risk factors of ventricular septal rupture(VSR)following acute myocardial infarction(AMI).Methods A total of 70 consecutive VSR patients following AMI hospitalized in

  3. Short-term prognosis and risk factors of ventricular septal rupture following acute myocardial infarction

    胡小莹

    2013-01-01

    Objective To analyze the short-term prognosis and risk factors of ventricular septal rupture(VSR)following acute myocardial infarction(AMI).Methods A total of 70 consecutive VSR patients following AMI

  4. Acute Myocardial Infarction: The First Manifestation of Ischemic Heart Disease and Relation to Risk Factors

    Manfroi Waldomiro Carlos

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between cardiovascular risk factors and acute myocardial infarction as the first manifestation of ischemic heart disease, correlating them with coronary angiographic findings. METHODS: We carried out a cross-sectional study of 104 patients with previous acute myocardial infarction, who were divided into 2 groups according to the presence or absence of angina prior to acute myocardial infarction. We assessed the presence of angina preceding acute myocardial infarction and risk factors, such as age >55 years, male sex, smoking, systemic arterial hypertension, lipid profile, diabetes mellitus, obesity, sedentary lifestyle, and familial history of ischemic heart disease. On coronary angiography, the severity of coronary heart disease and presence of left ventricular hypertrophy were assessed. RESULTS: Of the 104 patients studied, 72.1% were males, 90.4% were white, 73.1% were older than 55 years, and 53.8% were hypertensive. Acute myocardial infarction was the first manifestation of ischemic heart disease in 49% of the patients. The associated risk factors were systemic arterial hypertension (RR=0.19; 95% CI=0.06-0.59; P=0.04 and left ventricular hypertrophy (RR=0.27; 95% CI=0,.8-0.88; P=0.03. The remaining risk factors were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Prevalence of acute myocardial infarction as the first manifestation of ischemic heart disease is high, approximately 50%. Hypertensive individuals more frequently have symptoms preceding acute myocardial infarction, probably due to ventricular hypertrophy associated with high blood pressure levels.

  5. A Soft Intelligent Risk Evaluation Model for Credit Scoring Classification

    Mehdi Khashei

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Risk management is one of the most important branches of business and finance. Classification models are the most popular and widely used analytical group of data mining approaches that can greatly help financial decision makers and managers to tackle credit risk problems. However, the literature clearly indicates that, despite proposing numerous classification models, credit scoring is often a difficult task. On the other hand, there is no universal credit-scoring model in the literature that can be accurately and explanatorily used in all circumstances. Therefore, the research for improving the efficiency of credit-scoring models has never stopped. In this paper, a hybrid soft intelligent classification model is proposed for credit-scoring problems. In the proposed model, the unique advantages of the soft computing techniques are used in order to modify the performance of the traditional artificial neural networks in credit scoring. Empirical results of Australian credit card data classifications indicate that the proposed hybrid model outperforms its components, and also other classification models presented for credit scoring. Therefore, the proposed model can be considered as an appropriate alternative tool for binary decision making in business and finance, especially in high uncertainty conditions.

  6. Risk Factors for Senile Corneal Arcus in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Mirnaghi Moosavi; Ahmad Sareshtedar; Siamak Zarei-Ghanavati; Mehran Zarei-Ghanavati; Nazanin Ramezanfar

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the association between senile corneal arcus and atherosclerosis risk factors in patients with recent acute myocardial infarction. Methods: In this cross sectional study, atherosclerosis risk factors including fasting blood sugar, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were measured in 165 patients with recent (less than three months′ duration) acute myocardial infarction. Slitlamp examination was performed to detect corneal arcus. Associations between senile co...

  7. Risk Factors for Senile Corneal Arcus in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Moosavi, Mirnaghi; Sareshtedar, Ahmad; Zarei-Ghanavati, Siamak; Zarei-Ghanavati, Mehran; Ramezanfar, Nazanin

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the association between senile corneal arcus and atherosclerosis risk factors in patients with recent acute myocardial infarction. Methods In this cross sectional study, atherosclerosis risk factors including fasting blood sugar, total cholesterol and triglyceride levels were measured in 165 patients with recent (less than three months’ duration) acute myocardial infarction. Slitlamp examination was performed to detect corneal arcus. Associations between senile corneal ...

  8. C-Reactive protein predicts acute myocardial infarction during high-risk noncardiac and vascular surgery

    Oscar M. Martins; Fonseca, Vicente F; Ivan Borges; Vaierio Martins; Vera Lucia Portal; Lucia Campos Pellanda

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein predicts cardiovascular events in a wide range of clinical contexts. However, the role of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as a predictive marker for perioperative acute myocardial infarction during noncardiac surgery is not yet clear. The present study investigated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels as predictors of acute myocardial infarction risk in patients undergoing high-risk noncardiac surgery. METHODS: This concurrent cohort s...

  9. Prediction of coronary heart disease : a comparison between the Copenhagen risk score and the Framingham risk score applied to a Dutch population

    de Visser, CL; Bilo, HJG; Thomsen, TF; Groenier, KH; Meyboom-De Jong, B

    2003-01-01

    Objectives. To compare the estimation of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk by the Framingham risk score (FRS) and the Copenhagen risk score (CRS) using Dutch population data. Design. Comparison of CHD risk estimates from FRS and CRS. CHD risk-estimations for each separate risk factor. Setting. Urk,

  10. The fracture risk assessment tool (FRAX® score in subclinical hyperthyroidism

    Polovina Snežana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX® score is the 10-year estimated risk calculation tool for bone fracture that includes clinical data and hip bone mineral density measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry (DXA. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to elucidate the ability of the FRAX® score in discriminating between bone fracture positive and negative pre- and post-menopausal women with subclinical hyperthyroidism. Methods. The bone mineral density (by DXA, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH level, free thyroxine (fT4 level, thyroid peroxidase antibodies (TPOAb titre, osteocalcin and beta-cross-laps were measured in 27 pre- and post-menopausal women with newly discovered subclinical hyperthyroidism [age 58.85 ± 7.83 years, body mass index (BMI 27.89 ± 3.46 kg/m2, menopause onset in 46.88 ± 10.21 years] and 51 matched euthyroid controls (age 59.69 ± 5.72 years, BMI 27.68 ± 4.66 kg/m2, menopause onset in 48.53 ± 4.58 years. The etiology of subclinical hyperthyroisims was autoimmune thyroid disease or toxic goiter. FRAX® score calculation was performed in both groups. Results. In the group with subclinical hyperthyroidism the main FRAX® score was significantly higher than in the controls (6.50 ± 1.58 vs 4.35 ± 1.56 respectively; p = 0.015. The FRAX® score for hip was also higher in the evaluated group than in the controls (1.33 ± 3.92 vs 0.50 ± 0.46 respectively; p = 0.022. There was no correlations between low TSH and fracture risk (p > 0.05. The ability of the FRAX® score in discriminating between bone fracture positive and negative pre- and postmenopausal female subjects (p < 0.001 is presented by the area under the curve (AUC plotted via ROC analysis. The determined FRAX score cut-off value by this analysis was 6%, with estimated sensitivity and specificity of 95% and 75.9%, respectively. Conclusion. Pre- and postmenopausal women with subclinical hyperthyroidism have higher FRAX® scores and thus

  11. Weak prediction power of the Framingham Risk Score for coronary artery disease in nonagenarians.

    Josef Yayan

    Full Text Available Coronary artery disease (CAD is caused by an acute myocardial infarction and is still feared as a life-threatening heart disease worldwide. In order to identify patients at high risk for CAD, previous studies have proposed various risk assessment scores for the prevention of CAD. The most commonly used risk assessment score for CAD worldwide is the Framingham Risk Score (FRS. The FRS is used for middle-aged people; hence, its appropriateness has not been demonstrated to predict the likelihood of CAD occurrence in very elderly people. This article examines the possible predictive value of FRS for CAD in very elderly people over 90 years of age.Data on all patients over 90 years of age who received a cardiac catheter were collected from hospital charts from the Department of Internal Medicine, Saarland University Medical Center, and HELIOS Hospital Wuppertal, Witten/Herdecke University Medical Center, Germany, within a study period from 2004 to 2013. The FRSs and cardiovascular risk profiles of patients over 90 years of age with and without CAD after cardiac catheterization were compared.One hundred and seventy-five (91.15%, mean age 91.51±1.80 years, 74 females [42.29%]; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.87-0.95 of a total 192 of the very elderly patients were found to have CAD. Based on the results of our study, the FRS seems to provide weak predictive ability for CAD in very elderly people (P = 0.3792.We found weak prediction power of FRS for CAD in nonagenarians.

  12. Framingham risk score with cardiovascular events in chronic kidney disease.

    Szu-Chia Chen

    Full Text Available The Framingham Risk Score (FRS was developed to predict coronary heart disease in various populations, and it tended to under-estimate the risk in chronic kidney disease (CKD patients. Our objectives were to determine whether FRS was associated with cardiovascular events, and to evaluate the role of new risk markers and echocardiographic parameters when they were added to a FRS model. This study enrolled 439 CKD patients. The FRS is used to identify individuals categorically as "low" (4.7 cm, left ventricular hypertrophy or left ventricular ejection fraction<50% to the FRS model significantly improves the predictive values for cardiovascular events. In CKD patients, "high" risk categorized by FRS predicts cardiovascular events. Novel biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters provide additional predictive values for cardiovascular events. Future study is needed to assess whether risk assessment enhanced by using these biomarkers and echocardiographic parameters might contribute to more effective prediction and better care for patients.

  13. Coordinating perioperative care for the 'high risk' general surgical patient using risk prediction scoring.

    Hafiz, Shaziz; Lees, Nicholas Peter

    2016-01-01

    Identifying 'high risk' (> 5% mortality score) emergency general surgical patients early, allows appropriate perioperative care to be allocated by securing critical care beds and ensuring the presence of senior surgeons and senior anesthetists intraoperatively. Scoring systems can be used to predict perioperative risk and coordinate resources perioperatively. Currently it is unclear which estimate of risk correlates with current resource deployment. A retrospective study was undertaken assessing the relationship between deployment of perioperative resources: senior surgeon, senior anesthetist and critical care bed. The study concluded that almost all high risk patients with high POSSUM mortality and morbidity scores had a consultant senior surgeon present intraoperatively. Critically unwell patients with higher operative severity and perioperative morbidity scores received higher care (HDU/ICU) beds postoperatively, ensuring that they received appropriate care if their condition deteriorated. Therefore POSSUM scoring should be used perioperatively in emergency cases to coordinate appropriate perioperative care for high risk general surgical patients. PMID:26901929

  14. Relationship between framingham risk score and coronary artery calcium score in asymptomatic Korean individuals

    Heo, So Young; Park, Noh Hyuck; Park, Chan Sub; Seong, Su Ok [Dept. of Radiology, Myongji Hospital, Seonam University College of Medicine, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    We explored the association between Framingham risk score (FRS) and coronary artery calcium score (CACS) in asymptomatic Korean individuals. We retrospectively analyzed 2216 participants who underwent routine health screening and CACS using the 64-slice multidetector computed tomography between January 2010 and June 2014. Relationship between CACS and FRS, and factors associated with discrepancy between CACS and FRS were analyzed. CACS and FRS were positively correlated (p < 0.0001). However, in 3.7% of participants with low coronary event risk and high CACS, age, male gender, smoker, hypertension, total cholesterol, diabetes mellitus, and body mass index (BMI; ≥ 35) were associated with the discrepancy. In the diagnostic prediction model for discrepancy, the receiver operating characteristic curve including factors associated with FRS, diastolic blood pressure (≥ 75 mm Hg), diabetes mellitus, and BMI (≥ 35) showed that the area under the curve was 0.854 (95% confidence interval, 0.819–0.890), indicating good sensitivity. Diabetes mellitus or obesity (BMI ≥ 35) compensate for the weakness of FRS and may be potential indicators for application of CACS in asymptomatic Koreans with low coronary event risk.

  15. Risk factors for acute myocardial infarction in Central India: A case-control study

    Zodpey, Sanjay P.; Sunanda N Shrikhande; Negandhi, Himanshu N; Suresh N Ughade; Joshi, Prashant P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerosis is a multi-factorial disease involving the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Studies highlighting the public health importance of risk factors like chronic infections causing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the Indian context are scarce. This study was undertaken to study the association of socio-demographic and life-style factors with acute myocardial infarction in central India. Materials and Methods: The cases and controls were group-matched f...

  16. Risk Factors for Acute Myocardial Infarction in Central India: A Case-Control Study

    Zodpey, Sanjay P.; Sunanda N Shrikhande; Negandhi, Himanshu N; Suresh N Ughade; Joshi, Prashant P.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerosis is a multi-factorial disease involving the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Studies highlighting the public health importance of risk factors like chronic infections causing acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in the Indian context are scarce. This study was undertaken to study the association of socio-demographic and life-style factors with acute myocardial infarction in central India. Materials and Methods: The cases and controls were group-matched f...

  17. Automated Risk Identification of Myocardial Infarction Using Relative Frequency Band Coefficient (RFBC) Features from ECG

    Bakul, Gohel; Tiwary, U.S

    2010-01-01

    Various structural and functional changes associated with ischemic (myocardial infarcted) heart cause amplitude and spectral changes in signals obtained at different leads of ECG. In order to capture these changes, Relative Frequency Band Coefficient (RFBC) features from 12-lead ECG have been proposed and used for automated identification of myocardial infarction risk. RFBC features reduces the effect of subject variabilty in body composition on the amplitude dependent features. The proposed ...

  18. Comparison of Calipers for Matching on the Disease Risk Score.

    Connolly, John G; Gagne, Joshua J

    2016-05-15

    Previous studies have compared calipers for propensity score (PS) matching, but none have considered calipers for matching on the disease risk score (DRS). We used Medicare claims data to perform 3 cohort studies of medication initiators: a study of raloxifene versus alendronate in 1-year nonvertebral fracture risk, a study of cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors versus nonselective nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medications in 6-month gastrointestinal bleeding, and a study of simvastatin + ezetimibe versus simvastatin alone in 6-month cardiovascular outcomes. The study periods for each cohort were 1998 through 2005, 1999 through 2002, and 2004 through 2005, respectively. In each cohort, we calculated 1) a DRS, 2) a prognostic PS which included the DRS as the independent variable in a PS model, and 3) the PS for each patient. We then nearest-neighbor matched on each score in a variable ratio and a fixed ratio within 8 calipers based on the standard deviation of the logit and the natural score scale. When variable ratio matching on the DRS, a caliper of 0.05 on the natural scale performed poorly when the outcome was rare. The prognostic PS did not appear to offer any consistent practical benefits over matching on the DRS directly. In general, logit-based calipers or calipers smaller than 0.05 on the natural scale performed well when DRS matching in all examples. PMID:27037270

  19. A risk scoring system for prediction of haemorrhagic stroke.

    Zodpey, S P; Tiwari, R R

    2005-01-01

    The present pair-matched case control study was carried out at Government Medical College Hospital, Nagpur, India, a tertiary care hospital with the objective to devise and validate a risk scoring system for prediction of hemorrhagic stroke. The study consisted of 166 hospitalized CT scan proved cases of hemorrhagic stroke (ICD 9, 431-432), and a age and sex matched control per case. The controls were selected from patients who attended the study hospital for conditions other than stroke. On conditional multiple logistic regression five risk factors- hypertension (OR = 1.9. 95% Cl = 1.5-2.5). raised scrum total cholesterol (OR = 2.3, 95% Cl = 1.1-4.9). use of anticoagulants and antiplatelet agents (OR = 3.4, 95% Cl =1.1-10.4). past history of transient ischaemic attack (OR = 8.4, 95% Cl = 2.1- 33.6) and alcohol intake (OR = 2.1, 95% Cl = 1.3-3.6) were significant. These factors were ascribed statistical weights (based on regression coefficients) of 6, 8, 12, 21 and 8 respectively. The nonsignificant factors (diabetes mellitus, physical inactivity, obesity, smoking, type A personality, history of claudication, family history of stroke, history of cardiac diseases and oral contraceptive use in females) were not included in the development of scoring system. ROC curve suggested a total score of 21 to be the best cut-off for predicting haemorrhag stroke. At this cut-off the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictivity and Cohen's kappa were 0.74, 0.74, 0.74 and 0.48 respectively. The overall predictive accuracy of this additive risk scoring system (area under ROC curve by Wilcoxon statistic) was 0.79 (95% Cl = 0.73-0.84). Thus to conclude, if substantiated by further validation, this scorincy system can be used to predict haemorrhagic stroke, thereby helping to devise effective risk factor intervention strategy. PMID:16479901

  20. Atherosclerotic Risk Factors and Their Association With Hospital Mortality Among Patients With First Myocardial Infarction (from the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction)

    Canto, John G.; Kiefe, Catarina I.; Rogers, William J.; Peterson, Eric D.; Frederick, Paul D.; French, William J.; Gibson, C. Michael; Pollack, Charles V; Ornato, Joseph P.; Zalenski, Robert J.; Penney, Jan; Tiefenbrunn, Alan J.; Greenland, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have examined associations between atherosclerotic risk factors and short-term mortality after first myocardial infarction (MI). Histories of 5 traditional atherosclerotic risk factors at presentation (diabetes, hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, and family history of premature heart disease) and hospital mortality were examined among 542,008 patients with first MIs in the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction (1994 to 2006). On initial MI presentation, history of hypertens...

  1. Myocardial infarct death, the population at risk, and temperature habituation

    Frost, David B.; Auliciems, Andris

    1993-03-01

    Daily myocardial infarct deaths from Brisbane, 29°28' S, and Montreal, 45°30' N, were used to derive a “pool of susceptible individuals”. Pool size had no effect on the minimum death temperature but large pools increased the value of the acceleration temperature in Brisbane and the maximum death temperature in Montreal. Moderately sized pools in Montreal appeared to produce reduced death rates in cold conditions from both cold avoidance and habituation. A generalized relationship between temperature and myocardial infarct death is postulated.

  2. C-Reactive protein predicts acute myocardial infarction during high-risk noncardiac and vascular surgery

    Oscar M. Martins

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High-sensitivity C-reactive protein predicts cardiovascular events in a wide range of clinical contexts. However, the role of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein as a predictive marker for perioperative acute myocardial infarction during noncardiac surgery is not yet clear. The present study investigated high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels as predictors of acute myocardial infarction risk in patients undergoing high-risk noncardiac surgery. METHODS: This concurrent cohort study included patients aged >50 years referred for high-risk noncardiac surgery according to American Heart Association/ACC 2002 criteria. Patients with infections were excluded. Electrocardiograms were performed, and biomarkers (Troponin I or T and/or total creatine phosphokinase and the MB fraction (CPK-T/MB were evaluated on the first and fourth days after surgery. Patients were followed until discharge. Baseline high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels were compared between patients with and without acute myocardial infarction. RESULTS: A total of 101 patients undergoing noncardiac surgery, including 33 vascular procedures (17 aortic and 16 peripheral artery revascularizations, were studied. Sixty of the patients were men, and their mean age was 66 years. Baseline levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein were higher in the group with perioperative acute myocardial infarction than in the group with non-acute myocardial infarction patients (mean 48.02 vs. 4.50, p = 0.005. All five acute myocardial infarction cases occurred in vascular surgery patients with high CRP levels. CONCLUSIONS: Patients undergoing high-risk noncardiac surgery, especially vascular surgery, and presenting elevated baseline high-sensitivity C-reactive protein levels are at increased risk for perioperative acute myocardial infarction.

  3. Valproate attenuates the risk of myocardial infarction in patients with epilepsy: a nationwide cohort study

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Andersson, Charlotte; Weeke, Peter; Schmiegelow, Michelle; Erdal, Jesper; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar; Hansen, Peter Riis; Abildstrøm, Steen Zabell

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Patients with epilepsy have increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI). Valproate can exert anti-atherosclerotic effects. We therefore examined the risk of MI in patients with epilepsy receiving valproate. METHODS: Two cohorts of patients with valproate-treated epilepsy and sex- and ag...

  4. Socioeconomic differences in risk of myocardial infarction 1971-1994 in Sweden

    Hallqvist, J; Lundberg, Mats; Diderichsen, Finn;

    1998-01-01

    The general trend in incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) in the Stockholm area changed from increasing to decreasing around 1980. The objective of this study is to examine time trends in incidence in major socioeconomic strata, relative risk between socioeconomic groups and population risk at...

  5. Discontinuation of beta-blockers and the risk of myocardial infarction in the elderly.

    Teichert, M.; Smet, P.A.G.M. de; Hofman, A.; Witteman, J.C.; Stricker, B.H.C.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It has been shown that the abrupt cessation of treatment with beta-adrenoceptor antagonists (beta-blockers) increases the risk of myocardial infarction in patients with hypertension. As beta-blockers differ in their pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, this risk of discontinua

  6. Elevated triglycerides and risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-positive persons

    Worm, Signe W; Kamara, David Alim; Reiss, Peter;

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the relationship between elevated triglyceride levels and the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in HIV-positive persons after adjustment for total cholesterol (TC), high-density lipoprotein–cholesterol (HDL-C) and nonlipid risk factors. Background: Although elevated trigly...

  7. Hypercoagulability Is a Stronger Risk Factor for Ischaemic Stroke than for Myocardial Infarction: A Systematic Review

    Maino, Alberto; Rosendaal, Frits R.; Algra, Ale; Peyvandi, Flora; Siegerink, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Hypercoagulability increases the risk of arterial thrombosis; however, this effect may differ between various manifestations of arterial disease. Methods In this study, we compared the effect of coagulation factors as measures of hypercoagulability on the risk of ischaemic stroke (IS) and myocardial infarction (MI) by performing a systematic review of the literature. The effect of a risk factor on IS (relative risk for IS, RRIS) was compared with the effect on MI (RRMI)...

  8. Modeling Linkage Disequilibrium Increases Accuracy of Polygenic Risk Scores

    Vilhjálmsson, Bjarni J.; Yang, Jian; Finucane, Hilary K.; Gusev, Alexander; Lindström, Sara; Ripke, Stephan; Genovese, Giulio; Loh, Po-Ru; Bhatia, Gaurav; Do, Ron; Hayeck, Tristan; Won, Hong-Hee; Ripke, Stephan; Neale, Benjamin M.; Corvin, Aiden; Walters, James T.R.; Farh, Kai-How; Holmans, Peter A.; Lee, Phil; Bulik-Sullivan, Brendan; Collier, David A.; Huang, Hailiang; Pers, Tune H.; Agartz, Ingrid; Agerbo, Esben; Albus, Margot; Alexander, Madeline; Amin, Farooq; Bacanu, Silviu A.; Begemann, Martin; Belliveau, Richard A.; Bene, Judit; Bergen, Sarah E.; Bevilacqua, Elizabeth; Bigdeli, Tim B.; Black, Donald W.; Bruggeman, Richard; Buccola, Nancy G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Byerley, William; Cahn, Wiepke; Cai, Guiqing; Campion, Dominique; Cantor, Rita M.; Carr, Vaughan J.; Carrera, Noa; Catts, Stanley V.; Chambert, Kimberly D.; Chan, Raymond C.K.; Chen, Ronald Y.L.; Chen, Eric Y.H.; Cheng, Wei; Cheung, Eric F.C.; Chong, Siow Ann; Cloninger, C. Robert; Cohen, David; Cohen, Nadine; Cormican, Paul; Craddock, Nick; Crowley, James J.; Curtis, David; Davidson, Michael; Davis, Kenneth L.; Degenhardt, Franziska; Del Favero, Jurgen; DeLisi, Lynn E.; Demontis, Ditte; Dikeos, Dimitris; Dinan, Timothy; Djurovic, Srdjan; Donohoe, Gary; Drapeau, Elodie; Duan, Jubao; Dudbridge, Frank; Durmishi, Naser; Eichhammer, Peter; Eriksson, Johan; Escott-Price, Valentina; Essioux, Laurent; Fanous, Ayman H.; Farrell, Martilias S.; Frank, Josef; Franke, Lude; Freedman, Robert; Freimer, Nelson B.; Friedl, Marion; Friedman, Joseph I.; Fromer, Menachem; Genovese, Giulio; Georgieva, Lyudmila; Gershon, Elliot S.; Giegling, Ina; Giusti-Rodrguez, Paola; Godard, Stephanie; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Golimbet, Vera; Gopal, Srihari; Gratten, Jacob; Grove, Jakob; de Haan, Lieuwe; Hammer, Christian; Hamshere, Marian L.; Hansen, Mark; Hansen, Thomas; Haroutunian, Vahram; Hartmann, Annette M.; Henskens, Frans A.; Herms, Stefan; Hirschhorn, Joel N.; Hoffmann, Per; Hofman, Andrea; Hollegaard, Mads V.; Hougaard, David M.; Ikeda, Masashi; Joa, Inge; Julia, Antonio; Kahn, Rene S.; Kalaydjieva, Luba; Karachanak-Yankova, Sena; Karjalainen, Juha; Kavanagh, David; Keller, Matthew C.; Kelly, Brian J.; Kennedy, James L.; Khrunin, Andrey; Kim, Yunjung; Klovins, Janis; Knowles, James A.; Konte, Bettina; Kucinskas, Vaidutis; Kucinskiene, Zita Ausrele; Kuzelova-Ptackova, Hana; Kahler, Anna K.; Laurent, Claudine; Keong, Jimmy Lee Chee; Lee, S. Hong; Legge, Sophie E.; Lerer, Bernard; Li, Miaoxin; Li, Tao; Liang, Kung-Yee; Lieberman, Jeffrey; Limborska, Svetlana; Loughland, Carmel M.; Lubinski, Jan; Lnnqvist, Jouko; Macek, Milan; Magnusson, Patrik K.E.; Maher, Brion S.; Maier, Wolfgang; Mallet, Jacques; Marsal, Sara; Mattheisen, Manuel; Mattingsdal, Morten; McCarley, Robert W.; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Meier, Sandra; Meijer, Carin J.; Melegh, Bela; Melle, Ingrid; Mesholam-Gately, Raquelle I.; Metspalu, Andres; Michie, Patricia T.; Milani, Lili; Milanova, Vihra; Mokrab, Younes; Morris, Derek W.; Mors, Ole; Mortensen, Preben B.; Murphy, Kieran C.; Murray, Robin M.; Myin-Germeys, Inez; Mller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nelis, Mari; Nenadic, Igor; Nertney, Deborah A.; Nestadt, Gerald; Nicodemus, Kristin K.; Nikitina-Zake, Liene; Nisenbaum, Laura; Nordin, Annelie; O’Callaghan, Eadbhard; O’Dushlaine, Colm; O’Neill, F. Anthony; Oh, Sang-Yun; Olincy, Ann; Olsen, Line; Van Os, Jim; Pantelis, Christos; Papadimitriou, George N.; Papiol, Sergi; Parkhomenko, Elena; Pato, Michele T.; Paunio, Tiina; Pejovic-Milovancevic, Milica; Perkins, Diana O.; Pietilinen, Olli; Pimm, Jonathan; Pocklington, Andrew J.; Powell, John; Price, Alkes; Pulver, Ann E.; Purcell, Shaun M.; Quested, Digby; Rasmussen, Henrik B.; Reichenberg, Abraham; Reimers, Mark A.; Richards, Alexander L.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Roussos, Panos; Ruderfer, Douglas M.; Salomaa, Veikko; Sanders, Alan R.; Schall, Ulrich; Schubert, Christian R.; Schulze, Thomas G.; Schwab, Sibylle G.; Scolnick, Edward M.; Scott, Rodney J.; Seidman, Larry J.; Shi, Jianxin; Sigurdsson, Engilbert; Silagadze, Teimuraz; Silverman, Jeremy M.; Sim, Kang; Slominsky, Petr; Smoller, Jordan W.; So, Hon-Cheong; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Stahl, Eli A.; Stefansson, Hreinn; Steinberg, Stacy; Stogmann, Elisabeth; Straub, Richard E.; Strengman, Eric; Strohmaier, Jana; Stroup, T. Scott; Subramaniam, Mythily; Suvisaari, Jaana; Svrakic, Dragan M.; Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Sderman, Erik; Thirumalai, Srinivas; Toncheva, Draga; Tooney, Paul A.; Tosato, Sarah; Veijola, Juha; Waddington, John; Walsh, Dermot; Wang, Dai; Wang, Qiang; Webb, Bradley T.; Weiser, Mark; Wildenauer, Dieter B.; Williams, Nigel M.; Williams, Stephanie; Witt, Stephanie H.; Wolen, Aaron R.; Wong, Emily H.M.; Wormley, Brandon K.; Wu, Jing Qin; Xi, Hualin Simon; Zai, Clement C.; Zheng, Xuebin; Zimprich, Fritz; Wray, Naomi R.; Stefansson, Kari; Visscher, Peter M.; Adolfsson, Rolf; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blackwood, Douglas H.R.; Bramon, Elvira; Buxbaum, Joseph D.; Børglum, Anders D.; Cichon, Sven; Darvasi, Ariel; Domenici, Enrico; Ehrenreich, Hannelore; Esko, Tonu; Gejman, Pablo V.; Gill, Michael; Gurling, Hugh; Hultman, Christina M.; Iwata, Nakao; Jablensky, Assen V.; Jonsson, Erik G.; Kendler, Kenneth S.; Kirov, George; Knight, Jo; Lencz, Todd; Levinson, Douglas F.; Li, Qingqin S.; Liu, Jianjun; Malhotra, Anil K.; McCarroll, Steven A.; McQuillin, Andrew; Moran, Jennifer L.; Mortensen, Preben B.; Mowry, Bryan J.; Nthen, Markus M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Owen, Michael J.; Palotie, Aarno; Pato, Carlos N.; Petryshen, Tracey L.; Posthuma, Danielle; Rietschel, Marcella; Riley, Brien P.; Rujescu, Dan; Sham, Pak C.; Sklar, Pamela; St. Clair, David; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Wendland, Jens R.; Werge, Thomas; Daly, Mark J.; Sullivan, Patrick F.; O’Donovan, Michael C.; Kraft, Peter; Hunter, David J.; Adank, Muriel; Ahsan, Habibul; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Baglietto, Laura; Berndt, Sonja; Blomquist, Carl; Canzian, Federico; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Chanock, Stephen J.; Crisponi, Laura; Czene, Kamila; Dahmen, Norbert; Silva, Isabel dos Santos; Easton, Douglas; Eliassen, A. Heather; Figueroa, Jonine; Fletcher, Olivia; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gaudet, Mia M.; Gibson, Lorna; Haiman, Christopher A.; Hall, Per; Hazra, Aditi; Hein, Rebecca; Henderson, Brian E.; Hofman, Albert; Hopper, John L.; Irwanto, Astrid; Johansson, Mattias; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kibriya, Muhammad G.; Lichtner, Peter; Lindström, Sara; Liu, Jianjun; Lund, Eiliv; Makalic, Enes; Meindl, Alfons; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Muranen, Taru A.; Nevanlinna, Heli; Peeters, Petra H.; Peto, Julian; Prentice, Ross L.; Rahman, Nazneen; Sánchez, María José; Schmidt, Daniel F.; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Southey, Melissa C.; Tamimi, Rulla; Travis, Ruth; Turnbull, Clare; Uitterlinden, Andre G.; van der Luijt, Rob B.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Wang, Zhaoming; Whittemore, Alice S.; Yang, Rose; Zheng, Wei; Kathiresan, Sekar; Pato, Michele; Pato, Carlos; Tamimi, Rulla; Stahl, Eli; Zaitlen, Noah; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Belbin, Gillian; Kenny, Eimear E.; Schierup, Mikkel H.; De Jager, Philip; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; McCarroll, Steve; Daly, Mark; Purcell, Shaun; Chasman, Daniel; Neale, Benjamin; Goddard, Michael; Visscher, Peter M.; Kraft, Peter; Patterson, Nick; Price, Alkes L.

    2015-01-01

    Polygenic risk scores have shown great promise in predicting complex disease risk and will become more accurate as training sample sizes increase. The standard approach for calculating risk scores involves linkage disequilibrium (LD)-based marker pruning and applying a p value threshold to association statistics, but this discards information and can reduce predictive accuracy. We introduce LDpred, a method that infers the posterior mean effect size of each marker by using a prior on effect sizes and LD information from an external reference panel. Theory and simulations show that LDpred outperforms the approach of pruning followed by thresholding, particularly at large sample sizes. Accordingly, predicted R2 increased from 20.1% to 25.3% in a large schizophrenia dataset and from 9.8% to 12.0% in a large multiple sclerosis dataset. A similar relative improvement in accuracy was observed for three additional large disease datasets and for non-European schizophrenia samples. The advantage of LDpred over existing methods will grow as sample sizes increase. PMID:26430803

  9. IS OPIUM ADDICTION A RISK FACTOR FOR ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION?

    "S. M. Sadr Bafghi; M Rafiei; L Bahadorzadeh; S. M. Namayeh; Soltani, M. H.; M. Motafaker A. Andishmand

    2005-01-01

    There is a misconception among our people that opioids may prevent or have ameliorating effects in the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. In this study we evaluated 556 consecutive male patients hospitalized due to acute myocardial infarction (MI) in city of Yazd, from May 2000 to October 2001 and compared the characteristics of opium addicts to non opium users. Prevalence of opium addiction in MI patients was 19% in comparison with 2-2.8% in general population. There were not any differe...

  10. Depression in silent lacunar infarction: a cross-sectional study of its association with location of silent lacunar infarction and vascular risk factors

    Wu, Ri-Han; LI Qiang; Tan, Yan; Liu, Xue-Yuan; Huang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    Most previous studies reported a close link between fresh infarcts and post-stroke depression. However, studies on the relation of depression and silent lacunar infarction (SLI) are limited. This study aims to analyze the effects of SLI and the vascular risk factors on depression. A total of 243 patients with SLI were divided into depression and non-depression groups. The presence and location of SLI were evaluated with magnetic resonance imaging. Depression was assessed with the Patient Heal...

  11. Risk Factors for Silent Lacunar Infarction in Patients with Transient Ischemic Attack.

    Li, Ying; Liu, Nan; Huang, Yonghua; Wei, Wei; Chen, Fei; Zhang, Weiwei

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Lacunar infarctions represent 25% of ischemic strokes. Lacunar stroke and transient ischemic attack (TIA) share a number of symptoms. This study aimed to assess the potential risk factors for lacunar infarction in patients with TIA. MATERIAL AND METHODS This was a retrospective study performed at the Beijing Military General Hospital in patients with TIA admitted between March 2010 and December 2011. Patients were grouped according to lacunar vs. no lacunar infarction. All patients were diagnosed using diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Brain angiography (computed tomography and MRI) was used to measure intracranial stenosis. Carotid artery stenosis was measured by ultrasound. RESULTS Patients with TIA and lacunar infarction (n=298) were older than those without lacunar infarction (n=157) (69.4±10.0 vs. 58.9±9.0 years, Pdiabetes (32.6% vs. 21.0%, P=0.010), hyperlipidemia (53.4% vs. 29.3%, P<0.001), carotid stenosis (73.2% vs. 40.1%, P<0.001), and intracranial stenosis (55.6% vs. 31.9%, P<0.001), but a lower frequency of alcohol drinking (8.1% vs. 14.0%, P=0.045). Lacunar infarction mostly involved the anterior circulation (62.8%). Multivariate analysis showed that age (odds ratio (OR)=1.085, 95% confidence interval (95%CI): 1.054-1.117, P<0.001), hypertension (OR=1.738, 95%CI: 1.041-2.903, P=0.035), hyperlipidemia (OR=2.169, 95%CI: 1.307-3.601, P=0.003), and carotid stenosis (OR=1.878, 95%CI: 1.099-3.206, P=0.021) were independently associated with lacunar infarction. CONCLUSIONS Age, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and carotid stenosis were independently associated with silent lacunar infarction in patients with TIA. PMID:26864634

  12. Impact of Replacing the Pooled Cohort Equation With Other Cardiovascular Disease Risk Scores on Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease Risk Assessment (from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis [MESA]).

    Qureshi, Waqas T; Michos, Erin D; Flueckiger, Peter; Blaha, Michael; Sandfort, Veit; Herrington, David M; Burke, Gregory; Yeboah, Joseph

    2016-09-01

    The increase in statin eligibility by the new cholesterol guidelines is mostly driven by the Pooled Cohort Equation (PCE) criterion (≥7.5% 10-year PCE). The impact of replacing the PCE with either the modified Framingham Risk Score (FRS) or the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) on assessment of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk assessment and statin eligibility remains unknown. We assessed the comparative benefits of using the PCE, FRS, and SCORE for ASCVD risk assessment in the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Of 6,815 participants, 654 (mean age 61.4 ± 10.3; 47.1% men; 37.1% whites; 27.2% blacks; 22.3% Hispanics; 12.0% Chinese-Americans) were included in analysis. Area under the curve (AUC) and decision curve analysis were used to compare the 3 risk scores. Decision curve analysis is the plot of net benefit versus probability thresholds; net benefit = true positive rate - (false positive rate × weighting factor). Weighting factor = Threshold probability/1 - threshold probability. After a median of 8.6 years, 342 (6.0%) ASCVD events (myocardial infarction, coronary heart disease death, fatal or nonfatal stroke) occurred. All 4 risk scores had acceptable discriminative ability for incident ASCVD events; (AUC [95% CI] PCE: 0.737 [0.713 to 0.762]; FRS: 0.717 [0.691 to 0.743], SCORE (high risk) 0.722 [0.696 to 0.747], and SCORE (low risk): 0.721 [0.696 to 0.746]. At the ASCVD risk threshold recommended for statin eligibility for primary prevention (≥7.5%), the PCE provides the best net benefit. Replacing the PCE with the SCORE (high), SCORE (low) and FRS results in a 2.9%, 8.9%, and 17.1% further increase in statin eligibility. The PCE has the best discrimination and net benefit for primary ASCVD risk assessment in a US-based multiethnic cohort compared with the SCORE or the FRS. PMID:27445216

  13. EVALUATION OF CORONARY RISK FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Santosh; Rangaswamy

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION : Cardiovascular disease is the commonest cause of death globally. Acute myocardial infarction generally occurs when coronary blood flow decreases abruptly after thrombotic occlusion of a coronary artery causing focal or massive necrosis of cardiac muscle. The risk factor concept implies that a person with one risk factor is more likely to develop clinical atherosclerotic event and is more likely to do so earlier than a person with no risk factors. The presen...

  14. Arrhythmia risk stratification of patients after myocardial infarction using personalized heart models

    Arevalo, Hermenegild J.; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Guallar, Eliseo; Jebb, Alexander; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C.; Trayanova, Natalia A.

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from arrhythmias is a leading cause of mortality. For patients at high SCD risk, prophylactic insertion of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduces mortality. Current approaches to identify patients at risk for arrhythmia are, however, of low sensitivity and specificity, which results in a low rate of appropriate ICD therapy. Here, we develop a personalized approach to assess SCD risk in post-infarction patients based on cardiac imaging and computation...

  15. Sociodemographic differences in myocardial infarction risk perceptions among people with coronary heart disease

    Aalto, Anna-Mari; Weinman, John; French, David P;

    2007-01-01

    This study examines sociodemographic differences in myocardial infarction (MI) risk perceptions among people with coronary heart disease (CHD) (N = 3130). Two variables for comparative risk perceptions were computed: (1) own risk compared to that of an average person; and (2) own risk compared to...... that of an average person with CHD. Comparative optimism in MI risk perceptions was common, particularly among men and those with higher education. CHD severity and psychosocial resources mediated these sociodemographic differences. These results suggest challenges for secondary prevention in CHD......, particularly regarding psychosocial interventions for communicating risk information and supporting lifestyle adjustments....

  16. Impact of the Residual SYNTAX Score on Outcomes of Revascularization in Patients with ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction and Multivessel Disease

    Mohamed Loutfi; Sherif Ayad; Mohamed Sobhy

    2016-01-01

    Primary percutaneous coronary intervention (P-PCI) has become the preferred reperfusion strategy in ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) when performed by an experienced team in a timely manner. However, no consensus exists regarding the management of multivessel coronary disease detected at the time of P-PCI. AIM The aim of this study was to evaluate the use of the residual SYNTAX score (rSS) following a complete vs. culprit-only revascularization strategy in patients with STEMI and mu...

  17. Risk scores for diabetes and impaired glycaemia in the Middle East and North Africa

    Handlos, Line Neerup; Witte, Daniel Rinse; Almdal, Thomas Peter;

    2013-01-01

    AIMS: To develop risk scores for diabetes and diabetes or impaired glycaemia for individuals living in the Middle East and North Africa region. In addition, to derive national risk scores for Algeria, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates and to compare the performance of the regional risk...... between 50% and 57%. The regional and the national risk scores performed equally well in the three national samples. CONCLUSIONS: Two regional risk scores for diabetes and diabetes or impaired glycaemia applicable to the Middle East and North Africa region were identified. The regional risk scores...

  18. Use of nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors and risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-infected patients

    Lundgren, Jens

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Two nucleos(t)ide reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs)--abacavir and didanosine--may each be associated with excess risk of myocardial infarction. The reproducibility of this finding in an independent dataset was explored and plausible biological mechanisms were sought. METHODS...

  19. Risk factors for adverse outcome in preterm infants with periventricular hemorrhagic infarction

    Roze, Elise; Kerstjens, Jorien M.; Maathuis, Carel G. B.; ter Horst, Hendrik J.; Bos, Arend F.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. Our objective was to identify risk factors that were associated with mortality and adverse neurologic outcome at 18 months of age in preterm infants with periventricular hemorrhagic infarction. METHODS. This was a retrospective cohort study of all preterm infants who were <37 weeks' gesta

  20. Glycosylated hemoglobin and the risk of periprocedural myocardial infarction in non-diabetic patients

    Verdoia, M.; Schaffer, A.; Barbieri, L.; Giovine, G. Di; Marino, P.; Suryapranata, H.; Luca, G. De

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Alterations of glucose homeostasis have been reported to occur even in non-diabetic patients, thus increasing the risk of cardiovascular events and worsening the outcome after an acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Still debated is the role of impaired glucose control in patients undergoi

  1. [Coronary risk factors in 287 cases of myocardial infarct treated in a coronary unit].

    Borello, G; Dessy, P; Russo, P; Accatino, G; Bellone, A; Brocchi, A; Rappelli, A; Viara, A

    1975-04-01

    The main coronary risk factors were estimated in a series of 287 myocardial infarct patients admitted to a coronary unit. Particular attention is drawn to smoking, arterial hypertesion, diabetes and hypercholesterolaemia in this respect. 24 cases in patients under 40 yr where cigarette smoking was by far the most important factor are examined more closely. PMID:1134666

  2. The Incidence and the Risk Factors of Silent Embolic Cerebral Infarction After Coronary Angiography and Percutaneous Coronary Interventions.

    Deveci, Onur Sinan; Celik, Aziz Inan; Ikikardes, Firat; Ozmen, Caglar; Caglıyan, Caglar Emre; Deniz, Ali; Bicakci, Kenan; Bicakci, Sebnem; Evlice, Ahmet; Demir, Turgay; Kanadasi, Mehmet; Demir, Mesut; Demirtas, Mustafa

    2016-05-01

    Silent embolic cerebral infarction (SECI) is a major complication of coronary angiography (CAG) and percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) who underwent CAG with or without PCI were recruited. Cerebral diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed for SECI within 24 hours. Clinical and angiographic characteristics were compared between patients with and without SECI. Silent embolic cerebral infarction occurred in 12 (12%) of the 101 patients. Age, total cholesterol, SYNTAX score (SS), and coronary artery bypass history were greater in the SECI(+) group (65 ± 10 vs 58 ± 11 years,P= .037; 223 ± 85 vs 173 ± 80 mg/dL,P= .048; 30.1 ± 2 vs 15 ± 3,P< .001; 4 [33.3%] vs 3 [3.3%],P= .005). The SECI was more common in the PCI group (8/24 vs 4/77,P= .01). On subanalysis, the SS was significantly higher in the SECI(+) patients in both the CAG and the PCI groups (29.3 ± 1.9 vs 15 ± 3,P< .01; 30.5 ± 1.9 vs 15.1 ± 3.2,P< .001, respectively). The risk of SECI after CAG and PCI increases with the complexity of CAD (represented by the SS). The SS is a predictor of the risk of SECI, a complication that should be considered more often after CAG. PMID:26253467

  3. Risk Stratification and Effects of Pharmacotherapy in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction (AMI) based on data from Pilot AMI Registry

    Peleška, Jan; Grünfeldová, H.; Monhart, Z.; Faltus, Václav; Tomečková, Marie; Ryšavá, D.; Velimský, T.; Ballek, L.; Hubač, J.; Charalampidi, K.; Jánský, P.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 30 (2007), s. 367-367. ISSN 1420-4096. [Central European Meeting on Hypertension and Cardiovascular Disease Prevention . 11.10.2007-13.10.2007, Kraków] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : pilot registry of acute myocardial infarction * risk stratification in acute myocardial infarction * effects of pharmacotherapy in acute myocardial infarction Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Disease s incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  4. SCORING ASSESSMENT AND FORECASTING MODELS BANKRUPTCY RISK OF COMPANIES

    SUSU Stefanita

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bankruptcy risk made the subject of many research studies that aim at identifying the time of the bankruptcy, the factors that compete to achieve this state, the indicators that best express this orientation (the bankruptcy. The threats to enterprises require the managers knowledge of continually economic and financial situations, and vulnerable areas with development potential. Managers need to identify and properly manage the threats that would prevent achieving the targets. In terms of methods known in the literature of assessment and evaluation of bankruptcy risk they are static, functional, strategic, and scoring nonfinancial models. This article addresses Altman and Conan-Holder-known internationally as the model developed at national level by two teachers from prestigious universities in our country-the Robu-Mironiuc model. Those models are applied to data released by the profit and loss account and balance sheet Turism Covasna company over which bankruptcy risk analysis is performed. The results of the analysis are interpreted while trying to formulate solutions to the economic and financial viability of the entity.

  5. Arrhythmia risk stratification of patients after myocardial infarction using personalized heart models.

    Arevalo, Hermenegild J; Vadakkumpadan, Fijoy; Guallar, Eliseo; Jebb, Alexander; Malamas, Peter; Wu, Katherine C; Trayanova, Natalia A

    2016-01-01

    Sudden cardiac death (SCD) from arrhythmias is a leading cause of mortality. For patients at high SCD risk, prophylactic insertion of implantable cardioverter defibrillators (ICDs) reduces mortality. Current approaches to identify patients at risk for arrhythmia are, however, of low sensitivity and specificity, which results in a low rate of appropriate ICD therapy. Here, we develop a personalized approach to assess SCD risk in post-infarction patients based on cardiac imaging and computational modelling. We construct personalized three-dimensional computer models of post-infarction hearts from patients' clinical magnetic resonance imaging data and assess the propensity of each model to develop arrhythmia. In a proof-of-concept retrospective study, the virtual heart test significantly outperformed several existing clinical metrics in predicting future arrhythmic events. The robust and non-invasive personalized virtual heart risk assessment may have the potential to prevent SCD and avoid unnecessary ICD implantations. PMID:27164184

  6. Metabolic syndrome and Framingham risk score in obese young adults

    Felix F. Widjaja

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increase number of the metabolic syndrome (MetS among young adults was mostly caused by obesity. MetS increases the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD which can be estimated by Framingham risk score (FRS. The study was aimed to know the prevalence of MetS and FRS in obese young adults and to associate them with the components of MetS. Methods: A total of 70 male and female students aged 18 to 25 years with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2 in Faculty of Medicine Universitas Indonesia were selected consecutively. The blood samples used to test fasting blood glucose, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein, and triglyceride were examined in Department of Clinical Pathology, Cipto Mangunkusumo Hospital after fasting for 14 to 16 hours. International Diabetes Federation (IDF definition was used to diagnose MetS. Univariate and bivariate analysis were done. Results: The prevalence of MetS based on IDF definition was 18.6% among obese young adults. The most associated MetS components was hypertriglyceridemia (OR 12.13; 95% CI 2.92-50.46; p = 0.001, followed with high blood pressure (OR 9.33; 95% CI 2.26-38.56; p = 0.001, low-HDL (OR 8.33; 95% CI 2.17-32.05; p = 0.003, and impaired fasting glucose (p = 0.03. Four subjects had FRS ≥ 1% and 66 subjects had risk < 1%. Increased FRS was not associated with MetS (p = 0.154. There was no component of MetS associated with increased FRS. Conclusion: Prevalence of MetS in obese young adults was similar with obese children and adolescents. Although no association of MetS and FRS was found, they are significant predictors for CHD which should not be used separately. (Med J Indones. 2013;22:100-6Keywords: Abdominal obesity, Framingham risk score, metabolic syndrome, young adults

  7. MTHFR homozygous mutation and additional risk factors for cerebral infarction in a large Italian family.

    Del Balzo, Francesca; Spalice, Alberto; Perla, Massimo; Properzi, Enrico; Iannetti, Paola

    2009-01-01

    Several cases with cerebral infarctions associated with the C677T mutation in the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have been reported. Given the large number of asymptomatic individuals with the MTHFR mutation, additional risk factors for cerebral infarction should be considered. This study describes a large family with the MTHFR mutation and a combination of heterozygous factor V Leiden mutations and different additional exogenous and endogenous thrombogenic risk factors. Psychomotor retardation and a left fronto-insular infarct associated with the MTHFR mutation together with diminished factor VII and low level of protein C was documented in the first patient. In the second patient, generalized epilepsy and a malacic area in the right nucleus lenticularis was associated with the MTHFR mutation and a low level of protein C. In the third patient, right hemiparesis and a left fronto-temporal porencephalic cyst were documented, together with the MTHFR mutation and hyperhomocysteinemia. An extensive search of additional circumstantial and genetic thrombogenic risk factors should be useful for prophylaxis and prognosis of infants with cerebral infarctions associated with the MTHFR mutation and of their related family members. PMID:19068258

  8. Fatty Acid Desaturase Gene Variants, Cardiovascular Risk Factors, and Myocardial Infarction in the Costa Rica Study

    Aslibekyan, S.; Jensen, M K; Campos, H.; Linkletter, C. D.; Loucks, E. B.; Ordovas, J. M.; Deka, R.; Rimm, E. B.; Baylin, A

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variation in fatty acid desaturases (FADS) has previously been linked to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) in adipose tissue and cardiovascular risk. The goal of our study was to test associations between six common FADS polymorphisms (rs174556, rs3834458, rs174570, rs2524299, rs174589, rs174627), intermediate cardiovascular risk factors, and non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI) in a matched population based case–control study of Costa Rican adults (n = 1756). Generalized...

  9. SCORE underestimates cardiovascular risk (CVR of HIV+ patients

    R Ramírez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The new European Guidelines of Dislipidemia Management of the European Societies of Cardiology and Arteriosclerosis consider HIV+ as patients at high risk of developing cardiovascular events and deaths. The objective of the study was to evaluate cardiovascular events and deaths in a series of HIV+ patients. Observational, cross-sectional study, including a cohort of HIV+ and HIV− patients from 2008. CVR was calculated using the SCORE-CVR chart. Variation on lipid profile and incidence of cardiovascular events, cardiovascular death or death related to any cause were recorded. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 for MAC. 154 HIV+ and 155 HIV− patients were included. Mean age: 44.8±9.5 vs 55.2±14.3 y and 69.5% vs 49% males respectively (p<0.01. Mean time since HIV+ diagnosis was 11±6.2 y. Mean BMI and systolic blood pressure were lower in HIV+ (25.1±6.7 kg/m2 vs 28.7±5.1 kg/m2, (p<0.01 and 119.6±19.4 vs 124.7±14.7 mmHg, (p=0.044; respectively. A lower proportion of hypertense, diabetic and obese patients was observed in HIV+ (25.5% vs 6.5%; 20.6% vs 3.9% and 36.8% vs 12.3% but a larger proportion of smokers (68.8% vs 29.7% was observed (p<0.01 in all cases. Mean cholesterol and LDLc were lower in HIV+ (191.2±41.4 vs 218.5±44.6 mg/dl and 109.5±33.9 vs 134.6±37.7 mg/dl; p<0.01; respectively but with a lower mean HDLc and higher TG (50.3±19 mg/dl vs 55.2±14.9 mg/dl; p=0.013 and 156.7±85.7 vs 135.8±66.2 mg/dl; p=0.017; respectively. There was no significant difference in mean CVR-SCORE (3.5±3.6% vs 4.4±3.8%; p=0.091. With this SCORE, 5.2±5.3 and 6.7±5.8 cardiovascular events or deaths should be expected in HIV+ and HIV− respectively at 10 y. Four years later cholesterol, LDLc, HDLc, TG in HIV+ and HIV− patients did not vary compared with those obtained 4 y before. 5 events and 1 death were seen at 4 y follow-up in HIV+, and in HIV− patients. The incidence of events in HIV+ patients is similar to the expected according

  10. Risk stratification in non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes: Risk scores, biomarkers and clinical judgment

    David Corcoran

    2015-09-01

    Clinical guidelines recommend an early invasive strategy in higher risk NSTE-ACS. The Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE risk score is a validated risk stratification tool which has incremental prognostic value for risk stratification compared with clinical assessment or troponin testing alone. In emergency medicine, there has been a limited adoption of the GRACE score in some countries (e.g. United Kingdom, in part related to a delay in obtaining timely blood biochemistry results. Age makes an exponential contribution to the GRACE score, and on an individual patient basis, the risk of younger patients with a flow-limiting culprit coronary artery lesion may be underestimated. The future incorporation of novel cardiac biomarkers into this diagnostic pathway may allow for earlier treatment stratification. The cost-effectiveness of the new diagnostic pathways based on high-sensitivity troponin and copeptin must also be established. Finally, diagnostic tests and risk scores may optimize patient care but they cannot replace patient-focused good clinical judgment.

  11. A four-year cardiovascular risk score for type 2 diabetic inpatients

    Dolores Ramírez-Prado

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As cardiovascular risk tables currently in use were constructed using data from the general population, the cardiovascular risk of patients admitted via the hospital emergency department may be underestimated. Accordingly, we constructed a predictive model for the appearance of cardiovascular diseases in patients with type 2 diabetes admitted via the emergency department. We undertook a four-year follow-up of a cohort of 112 adult patients with type 2 diabetes admitted via the emergency department for any cause except patients admitted with acute myocardial infarction, stroke, cancer, or a palliative status. The sample was selected randomly between 2010 and 2012. The primary outcome was time to cardiovascular disease. Other variables (at baseline were gender, age, heart failure, renal failure, depression, asthma/chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypertension, dyslipidaemia, insulin, smoking, admission for cardiovascular causes, pills per day, walking habit, fasting blood glucose and creatinine. A cardiovascular risk table was constructed based on the score to estimate the likelihood of cardiovascular disease. Risk groups were established and the c-statistic was calculated. Over a mean follow-up of 2.31 years, 39 patients had cardiovascular disease (34.8%, 95% CI [26.0–43.6%]. Predictive factors were gender, age, hypertension, renal failure, insulin, admission due to cardiovascular reasons and walking habit. The c-statistic was 0.734 (standard error: 0.049. After validation, this study will provide a tool for the primary health care services to enable the short-term prediction of cardiovascular disease after hospital discharge in patients with type 2 diabetes admitted via the emergency department.

  12. Effect of antecedent hypertension and follow-up blood pressure on outcomes after high-risk myocardial infarction

    Thune, J.J.; Signorovitch, J.; Velazquez, E.J.;

    2007-01-01

    The influence of blood pressure on outcomes after high-risk myocardial infarction is not well characterized. We studied the relationship between blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular events in 14 703 patients with heart failure, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, or both after acute...... higher risk of stroke (adjusted HR: 1.64; 95% CI: 1.17 to 2.29) and combined cardiovascular events (adjusted HR: 1.14; 95% CI: 1.00 to 1.31). Six months after a high-risk myocardial infarction, elevated systolic blood pressure, a potentially modifiable risk factor, is associated with an increased risk of...... myocardial infarction in the Valsartan in Myocardial Infarction Trial. We assessed the relationship between antecedent hypertension and outcomes and the association between elevated (systolic: >140 mm Hg) or low blood pressure (systolic: <100 mm Hg) in 2 of 3 follow-up visits during the first 6 months and...

  13. Mortality Risk Prediction by Application of PRISM Scoring System in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Mahdi Mohammadi; Afshin Fayyazi; Mohsen Raeisi; Noor Mohammad Noori; Ali Khajeh; Ghasem Miri-Aliabad

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The Pediatric Risk of Mortality (PRISM) score is one of the scores used by many pediatricians for prediction of the mortality risk in the pediatric intensive care unit (PICU). Herein, evaluate the efficacy of PRISM score in prediction of mortality rate in PICU.Methods: In this cohort study, 221 children admitted during an 18-month period to PICU, were enrolled. PRISM score and mortality risk were calculated. Follow up was noted as death or discharge. Results were analyzed by Kaplan...

  14. Risk of hypertension in Yozgat Province, Central Anatolia: application of Framingham Hypertension Prediction Risk Score.

    Kilic, M; Ede, H; Kilic, A I

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to estimate the risk of hypertension in 1106 Caucasian individuals aged 20-69 years in Yozgat Province, using the Framingham Hypertension Risk Prediction Score (FHRPS). According to FHRPS, average risk of developing hypertension over 4 years was 6.2%. The participants were classified into low- (10%) risk groups. The percentage of participants that fell into these groups was 59.4%, 19.8% and 20.8% respectively. The proportion of participants in the high-risk group was similar to the 4-year incidence of hypertension (21.3%) in the Turkish population. Regression analysis showed that high salt consumption and low educational level significantly increased the risk of hypertension. Economic level, fat consumption, life satisfaction, physical activity, and fruit and vegetable consumption were not correlated with risk of hypertension. This study shows that FHRPS can also be used for predicting risk of hypertension in Central Anatolia. PMID:27432406

  15. Intake of whole grains is associated with lower risk of myocardial infarction

    Helnæs, Anne; Kyrø, Cecilie; Andersen, Ingelise; Lacoppidan, Sandra; Overvad, Kim; Christensen, Jane; Tjønneland, Anne; Olsen, Anja

    2016-01-01

    with higher intakes in both men and women. Rye bread (in men and women) and oatmeal (in men) were associated with significantly lower risk of myocardial infarction, whereas no significant association was shown for whole-grain bread, crispbread, and wheat. CONCLUSION: In this study, we provide support......BACKGROUND: High intake of whole grains has been associated with lower risk of coronary heart disease; however, the research that has been used to evaluate different effects of different whole-grain cereals (e.g., wheat, rye, and oats) has been sparse. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the association...... whole-grain products was available from a self-administered food-frequency questionnaire, and intakes of total whole grain and whole-grain species (wheat, rye, and oats) were estimated. The association between intake of whole grains and risk of myocardial infarction was examined with the use of a Cox...

  16. The high-density lipoprotein-adjusted SCORE model worsens SCORE-based risk classification in a contemporary population of 30 824 Europeans

    Mortensen, Martin B; Afzal, Shoaib; Nordestgaard, Børge G;

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Recent European guidelines recommend to include high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in risk assessment for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), using a SCORE-based risk model (SCORE-HDL). We compared the predictive performance of SCORE-HDL with SCORE in an independent...... with SCORE, but deteriorated risk classification based on NRI. Future guidelines should consider lower decision thresholds and prioritize CVD morbidity and people above age 65....

  17. A novel risk score to predict cardiovascular disease risk in national populations (Globorisk)

    Hajifathalian, Kaveh; Ueda, Peter; Lu, Yuan;

    2015-01-01

    , diabetes, and total cholesterol, and allowed the effects of sex and age on cardiovascular disease to vary between cohorts or countries. We developed risk equations for fatal cardiovascular disease and for fatal plus non-fatal cardiovascular disease. We validated the risk equations internally and also using...... regions (China, Czech Republic, Denmark, England, Iran, Japan, Malawi, Mexico, South Korea, Spain, and USA). FINDINGS: The risk score discriminated well in internal and external validations, with C statistics generally 70% or more. At any age and risk factor level, the estimated 10 year fatal....... Conversely, the proportion of people at high risk of fatal cardiovascular disease was largest in China and Mexico. In China, 33% of men and 28% of women had a 10-year risk of fatal cardiovascular disease of 10% or more, whereas in Mexico, the prevalence of this high risk was 16% for men and 11% for women...

  18. Frequency of risk factors of cerebral infarction in stroke patients. a study of 100 cases in naseer teaching hospital, peshawar

    To study the risk factors of cerebral infarction in stroke patients. It is a descriptive hospital based study conducted at the Department of Medicine, Naseer Teaching Hospital, Peshawar from January 2005 to December 2005. One hundred patients of stroke with cerebral infarction confirmed on C.T. scan brain and more than twenty years of age were included. Risk factors for cerebral infarction were defined in terms of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, ischemic heart disease, smoking, dyslipidaemia, TIAs (transient ischemic attacks), carotid artery stenosis and family history of stroke. Data of 100 cases with cerebral infarction was recorded. Most of the patients had more than one risk factors for cerebral infarction. hypertension was commonest risk factor (55%), smoking (30%), ischemic heart disease (34%), diabetes mellitus) (26%), hyperlipedaemia (30%), atrial fibrillation (25%), carotid artery stenosis (27%), obesity (15%) and family history of stroke (12%). 39% of patients had physical inactivity. Males were slightly predominant than females (51% vs 49%) and mean age was 50 years. females were rather older with mean age of 53 years. Cerebral infarction accounts for 80% to 85% of cases of stroke, which is a common neurological disorder. It increases a burden of disability and misery for patients and their families. Most of the risk factors of cerebral infarction are modifiable, its prevention should be the main cause of concern for the community. (author)

  19. Multi-locus genetic risk score predicts risk for Crohn’s disease in Slovenian population

    Zupančič, Katarina; Skok, Kristijan; Repnik, Katja; Weersma, Rinse K; Potočnik, Uroš; Skok, Pavel

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To develop a risk model for Crohn’s disease (CD) based on homogeneous population. METHODS: In our study were included 160 CD patients and 209 healthy individuals from Slovenia. The association study was performed for 112 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). We generated genetic risk scores (GRS) based on the number of risk alleles using weighted additive model. Discriminatory accuracy was measured by area under ROC curve (AUC). For risk evaluation, we divided individuals according to positive and negative likelihood ratios (LR) of a test, with LR > 5 for high risk group and LR 5.54) showed significantly increased odds of developing CD (OR = 26.65, 95%CI: 11.25-63.15) compared to the individuals with the lowest risk (GRS < 4.57) which is a considerably greater risk captured than in one SNP with the highest effect size (OR = 3.24). When more than 33 SNPs were included in GRS, discriminatory ability was not improved significantly; AUC of all 74 SNPs was 0.76. CONCLUSION: The authors proved the possibility of building accurate genetic risk score based on 33 risk variants on Slovenian CD patients which may serve as a screening tool in the targeted population. PMID:27076762

  20. Comparison of the TIMI and the GRACE risk scores with the extent of coronary artery disease in patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome

    Objective: To compare the accuracy of the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events risk score and the Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction risk score in predicting the extent of coronary artery disease in patients with non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. Methods: The cross-sectional study comprising 406 consecutive patients was conducted at the National Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Karachi, from August 2010 to March 2011. For all patients, the GRACE and TIMI RS's relevant scores on the two indices were calculated on admission using specified variables. The patients underwent coronary angiography to determine the extent of the disease. A significant level was defined as >70% stenosis in any major epicardial artery or >50% stenosis in the left main coronary artery. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Both the indices showed good predictive value in identifying the extent of the disease. A Thrombolysis In Myocardial Infarction score >4 and Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events score >133 was significantly associated with 3vessel disease and left main disease, while for the former score <4 and latter score <133 was associated with normal or non-obstructive coronary disease (p<0.01). On comparison of the two risk scores, the discriminatory accuracy of the latter was significantly superior to the former in predicting 2vessel, 3vessel and left main diseases (p<0.05). Conclusion: Although both the indices were helpful in predicting the extent of the disease, the Global Registry showed better performance and was more strongly associated with multi-vessel and left main coronary artery disease. (author)

  1. EVALUATION OF CORONARY RISK FACTORS IN PATIENTS WITH ACUTE MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Santosh

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION : Cardiovascular disease is the commonest cause of death globally. Acute myocardial infarction generally occurs when coronary blood flow decreases abruptly after thrombotic occlusion of a coronary artery causing focal or massive necrosis of cardiac muscle. The risk factor concept implies that a person with one risk factor is more likely to develop clinical atherosclerotic event and is more likely to do so earlier than a person with no risk factors. The presence of multiple risk factors further accelerates th e atherosclerosis. Hence it is important to identify the major risk factors of coronary atherosclerosis in an individual with acute myocardial infarction so that further preventive measures can be taken in the form of lifestyle modification and pharmacothe rapy. MATERIALS AND METHODOLOGY: T his is a hospital based study. This study comprises of 100 cases of acute myocardial infarction admitted in ICCU under the department of medicine and 100 normal healthy controls in the age group of 29 - 85 years. Patients wi th the evidence of acute MI were diagnosed according to WHO criteria. Blood samples collected in vacutainers were analyzed for different biochemical parameters in the clinical biochemistry laboratory. RESULTS: Common risk factors have been evaluated in our study and we found that maximum MI patients were recorded in the age group of 51 - 60 years, with respect to other risk factors history like sex, majority of patients were males (82%, Sedentary life style (44%, Mixed dietary habits (84%, Family history o f IHD (6%, Dyslipidemia and Smoking (46%, Hypertension (31%, Diabetes (37%, Obesity (18%. In our study we found that 81% of the patients of acute MI had multiple risk factors. CONCLUSION: Thus from the study we can conclude that risk factors play a ma jor role in the genesis of coronary heart disease. Modification of these factors by pharmacotherapy, diet, physical exercises and behavioral therapy can improve the

  2. Management of High Blood Pressure in Those without Overt Cardiovascular Disease Utilising Absolute Risk Scores

    Mark R. Nelson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing blood pressure has a continuum of adverse risk for cardiovascular events. Traditionally this single measure was used to determine who to treat and how vigorously. However, estimating absolute risk rather than measurement of a single risk factor such as blood pressure is a superior method to identify who is most at risk of having an adverse cardiovascular event such as stroke or myocardial infarction, and therefore who would most likely benefit from therapeutic intervention. Cardiovascular disease (CVD risk calculators must be used to estimate absolute risk in those without overt CVD as physician estimation is unreliable. Incorporation into usual practice and limitations of the strategy are discussed.

  3. The SYNTAX score predicts early mortality risk in the elderly with acute coronary syndrome having primary PCI.

    Scherff F.; Vassalli G.; Sürder D.; Mantovani A; Corbacelli C.; Pasotti E.; Klersy C.; Auricchio A.; Moccetti T.; Pedrazzini G.B.

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The SYNTAX score (SXscore), an angiographic score reflecting coronary lesion complexity, predicts clinical outcomes in patients with left main or multivessel disease, and in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary PCI. The clinical SXscore (CSS) integrates the SXscore and clinical variables (age, ejection fraction, serum creatinine) into a single score. We analyzed these scores in elderly patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) undergoing pr...

  4. Extreme lipoprotein(a) levels and risk of myocardial infarction in the general population

    Kamstrup, Pia R; Benn, Marianne; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2008-01-01

    Elevated lipoprotein(a) levels are associated with myocardial infarction (MI) in some but not all studies. Limitations of previous studies include lack of risk estimates for extreme lipoprotein(a) levels, measurements in long-term frozen samples, no correction for regression dilution bias, and lack...... of absolute risk estimates in the general population. We tested the hypothesis that extreme lipoprotein(a) levels predict MI in the general population, measuring levels shortly after sampling, correcting for regression dilution bias, and calculating hazard ratios and absolute risk estimates....

  5. Depressive Symptoms and Risk of New Cardiovascular Events or Death in Patients with Myocardial Infarction

    Larsen, Karen Kjær; Christensen, Bo; Søndergaard, Jens; Vestergaard, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    Depressive symptoms is associated with adverse cardiovascular outcomes in patients with myocardial infarction (MI), but the underlying mechanisms are unclear and it remains unknown whether subgroups of patients are at a particularly high relative risk of adverse outcomes. We examined the risk of...... new cardiovascular events and/or death in patients with depressive symptoms following first-time MI taking into account other secondary preventive factors. We further explored whether we could identify subgroups of patients with a particularly high relative risk of adverse outcomes....

  6. Impact of type of procedure and surgeon on EuroSCORE operative risk validation

    Fernando A. Atik; da Cunha, Claudio Ribeiro

    2014-01-01

    Objective EuroSCORE has been used in cardiac surgery operative risk assessment, despite important variables were not included. The objective of this study was to validate EuroSCORE on mortality prediction in a Brazilian cardiovascular surgery center, defining the influence of type of procedure and surgical team. Methods Between January 2006 and June 2011, 2320 consecutive adult patients were studied. According to additive EuroSCORE, patients were divided into low risk (score12). The relation ...

  7. Risk of myocardial infarction in parents of HIV-infected Individuals: a population-based Cohort Study

    2010-01-01

    HIV disease and HAART or whether life-style related or genetic factors also increase the risk in this population. To establish whether the increased risk of myocardial infarction in HIV patients partly reflects an increased risk of MI in their families, we estimated the relative risk of MI in parents...

  8. Effects of health belief model-based video training about risk factors on knowledge and attitude of myocardial infarction patients after discharge

    Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Borhani, Fariba; Asadi, Neda

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Ischemic heart diseases are the most common cardiovascular diseases. This study aimed to assess the effects of video training about risk factors based on health belief model on knowledge and attitude of myocardial infarction patients after discharge. METHODS: This was a quasi-experimental study conducted in 2010. Eighty patients were randomly assigned to either intervention or control group. Data was collected by a researcher-made questionnaire. RESULTS: Study results showed that the mean score of knowledge about disease, diet, physical activity and perceived benefit, severity, and susceptibility after video training was increased significantly. CONCLUSIONS: Using videos for educating myocardial infarction patients is a useful method for preventing recurrence of the disease. PMID:22091231

  9. Risk Factors and Markers for Acute Myocardial Infarction With Angiographically Normal Coronary Arteries.

    Daniel, Maria; Ekenbäck, Christina; Agewall, Stefan; Brolin, Elin B; Caidahl, Kenneth; Cederlund, Kerstin; Collste, Olov; Eurenius, Lars; Frick, Mats; Younis-Hassan, Shams; Henareh, Loghman; Jernberg, Tomas; Malmqvist, Karin; Spaak, Jonas; Sörensson, Peder; Hofman-Bang, Claes; Tornvall, Per

    2015-09-15

    Myocardial Infarction with normal coronary arteries (MINCA) is common with a prevalence of 1% to 12% of all myocardial infarctions. The pathogenic mechanisms of MINCA are still unknown, but endothelial dysfunction has been suggested as a possible cause. To investigate risk factors and markers for MINCA, we conducted a case-control study. Considering the reported low prevalence of classical risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD) in some but not all studies, our hypothesis was that endothelial function and intima-media thickness (IMT) were better, respectively lower, than CHD controls. One hundred patients with MINCA fulfilling diagnostic criteria according to the European Society of Cardiology/American Collage of Cardiology/American Heart Association universal definition of myocardial infarction with myocarditis excluded by cardiac magnetic resonance imaging were investigated. Risk factors, endothelial function (EndoPAT), and IMT were compared to gender- and age-matched patients with myocardial infarction and CHD, respectively healthy controls. Smoking, hypertension, impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes mellitus, inflammatory disease, and psychiatric disorders were more common in patients with MINCA than in healthy controls. In contrast to patients with CHD, the lipid profile was antiatherogenic with low low-density lipoprotein and high high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. There were no major differences between the groups regarding endothelial function and IMT that were in the normal range. In conclusion, the present study showed that MINCA was associated with many established cardiovascular risk factors without major differences in atherosclerosis markers. MINCA patients recalled a high prevalence of emotional stress before admission that together with previous psychiatric vulnerability and female gender speaks strongly in favor of Takotsubo syndrome being an important cause of MINCA. PMID:26251000

  10. Risk factors for post-acute myocardial infarction depression in elderly

    Cristina Moşuţan; Raluca E. Diaconu; Maria L. Rădulescu; Adela M. Şerban; Caius R. Duncea

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine risk factors for development of post-acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) depression in elderly. Material and Methods: We included 104 elderly patients diagnosed with STEMI. Clinical, lab and imagistic data was recorded in the first week after STEMI. Six months after STEMI patients were evaluated for the presence of depression. Results: Bivariate analysis showed statistically significant association between post-STEMI depression and sex, arterial hypertensi...

  11. Attributable risks for acute myocardial infarction in four countries of Latin America

    M. Ciruzzi; Schargrodsky, H; P. Pramparo; E. Rivas Estany; L. Rodriguez Naude; R. De la Noval Garcia; S. Gaxiola Cazarez; MEANEY, E.; Nass, A.; B. Finizola; Castillo, L.

    2003-01-01

    This multicenter case control study investigated, in four countries of America, the proportions of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) attributable to cholesterol, smoking, hypertension, body mass index, diabetes and family history of coronary heart disease (attributable risks, AR). AR were estimated using information from 1060 cases of AMI and 1071 controls from Argentina, 323 cases of AMI and 314 controls from Cuba, 200 cases of AMI and 200 controls from Mexico and 266 cases of AMI and 264 co...

  12. Dietary antioxidants and risk of myocardial infarction in the elderly: the Rotterdam Study

    Klipstein-Grobusch, Kerstin; Geleijnse, Marianne; Breeijen, J.H.; Boeing, H.; Grobbee, Diederick; Witteman, Jacqueline; Hofman, Albert

    1999-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND: Epidemiologic studies have shown dietary antioxidants to be inversely correlated with ischemic heart disease. OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether dietary beta-carotene, vitamin C, and vitamin E were related to the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) in an elderly population. DESIGN: The study sample consisted of 4802 participants of the Rotterdam Study aged 55-95 y who were free of MI at baseline and for whom dietary data assessed by a semiquantitative food frequency que...

  13. Correlating plasma endothelin-1 and beta-endorphin levels to nine risk factors of acute cerebral infarction

    Daoyou Zhou; Jun Liu; Yingrong Lao; Yigang Xing; Yan Huang

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND:Several studies have confirmed that endothelin and endorphin are involved in the occurrence of cerebral vasospasm. However, the correlation of these factors to acute cerebral infarction-related risk factors needs to be confirmed.OBJECTIVE:To detect endothelin-1(ET-1)and beta-endorphin(β-EP)levels in plasma of patients with acute cerebral infarction,and to analyze the correlations of these factors to smoking,alcohol abuse, hypertension,diabetes mellitus,diseased region,diseased degree,gender,and other factors related to acute cerebral infarction. DESIGN:A case-control observation. SETTING:First Department of Neurology,Guangdong Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine; Department of Neurology,Second Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University.PARTICIPANTS:Sixty-nine inpatients with acute cerebral infarction were admitted to the Department of Neurology,Second Affiliated Hospital of Sun Yat-sen University(March 2003-January 2004)and First Department of Neurology,Guangdong Hospital of Traditional Chinese Medicine(March - July 2004)and recruited for this study.All 69 inpatients corresponded to the diagnosis criteria of acute cerebral infarction,formulated in the National Working Conference of Cerebrovascular Disease in 1998,and were confirmed as acute cerebral infarction by CT/MRI.The patient group consisted of 35 males [(64±12)years old] and 34 females[(67±13 )years old].Among them,9 patients were smokers,7 were alcohol users,48 had a history of hypertension,and 16 had a history of diabetes mellitus.CT/MRI examinations revealed that 35 patients presented with left focus sites,11 with right ones and 23 with bilateral ones.Following attack,24 patients had Barthel Index Scale grading<40 points,21 patients 40-60 points,and 24 patients>60 points.An additional 59 healthy individuals,who received health examinations simultaneously,were included as controls.Among the control subjects,there were 37 males [(62±10)years old] and 22 females [(65±11) years old

  14. Mercury, fish oils and the risk of myocardial infarction

    Guallar, E.; Sanz-Gallardo, M.I.; Veer, van 't P.; Bode, P.; Aro, A.; Gomez-Aracena, J.; Kark, J.D.; Riemersma, R.A.; Martin-Moreno, J.M.; Kok, F.J.

    2002-01-01

    Background: It has been suggested that mercury, a highly reactive heavy metal with no known physiologic activity, increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. Because fish intake is a major source of exposure to mercury, the mercury content of fish may counteract the beneficial effects of its n-3 f

  15. Evaluation of risk for type 2 diabetes mellitus in medical students using Indian diabetes risk score

    Pranita Ashok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to World Health Organisation, type 2 diabetes mellitus [type 2 D. M] has recently escalated in all age groups and is now being identified in younger age groups. This underscores the need for mass awareness and screening programs to detect diabetes at an early stage. For this purpose we have used a simplified Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS for prediction of diabetes in undergraduate medical students. Objectives: To screen and to identify 1st MBBS students at risk for developing type 2 D. M using IDRS. Materials and Methods : 261 undergraduates (1st MBBS students were scored using IDRS which includes age, family history of diabetes, exercise status, and waist circumference. After scoring them, we assessed random capillary blood glucose (RCBG in students with high IDRS score. Students with RCBG ≥ 113 mg/dl are followed for definitive tests for diagnosis of prediabetes and diabetes. Results and Conclusion: We have assessed 261 students till now. It was observed that 5%, 55%, and 38% students in High, Moderate, and Low risk group, respectively, for developing type 2 D. M. The mean abdominal obesity in high risk students was 101.95 ± 5.76 as compared to 79.17 ± 11.08 in moderate and low risk students (P 113 mg/dl in which one student found to have prediabetic. Conclusion: This underscores the need for further investigations to detect diabetes at an early stage and to overcome the disease burden of diabetes in future. Prevention of obesity and promotion of physical activity have to be the future plan of action which can be suggested in the form of regular exercise and diet planning for the students as part of an integrated approach.

  16. Whether chronic bronchitis is an independent risk factor for cerebral infarction in the elderly 1:1 case paired study

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The inflammatory reaction already becomes an important risk factor of causing acute cerebral infarction; however, the correlation between chronic bronchitis and senile cerebral infarction is still unclear.OBJECTIVE: To study whether the chronic bronchitis is the risk factor for senile cerebral infarction.DESIGN: 1:1 pair, case contrast, and risk factor study.SETTINGS: Department of Respiratory Medicine, Third Hospital of Tangshan; Department of Neurology,Affiliated Hospital of North China Coal Medical College.PARTICIPANTS: A total of 147 patients with acute cerebral infarction who were regarded as case group were selected from Department of Neurology, the Third Hospital of Tangshan from January 2004 to December 2006. All patients met the diagnostic criteria of the Fourth National Cerebrovascular Diseases Meeting. There were 87 males and 60 females, and their ages ranged from 65 to 83 years. Based on 1∶1 pair study, another 147 subjects without cerebrovascular disease were regarded as control group. Except the diseases about infection, there were 73 males and 74 females, and their ages ranged from 62 to 81 years. All subjects provided the confirm consent and agreed with the coordinate experiment.METHODS: ① Questionnaire of risk factor of cerebral infarction was designed to measure the following items: chronic bronchitis, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipemia, coronary heart disease, primary cerebral infarction/transient ischemic attack and history of smoking. ② Cerebral infarction was regarded as the dependent variance, while chronic bronchitis, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperiipemia, primary cerebral infarction/transient ischemic attack, coronary heart disease and smoking were regarded as the independent variance for multiple regression analysis.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Risk factors of senile cerebral infarction.RESULTS: All 147 patients with acute cerebral infarction and 147 subjects without cerebrovascular diseases were involved in

  17. Anticoagulation after anterior myocardial infarction and the risk of stroke.

    Jacob A Udell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Survivors of anterior MI are at increased risk for stroke with predilection to form ventricular thrombus. Commonly patients are discharged on dual antiplatelet therapy. Given the frequency of early coronary reperfusion and risk of bleeding, it remains uncertain whether anticoagulation offers additional utility. We examined the effectiveness of anticoagulation therapy for the prevention of stroke after anterior MI. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We performed a population-based cohort analysis of 10,383 patients who survived hospitalization for an acute MI in Ontario, Canada from April 1, 1999 to March 31, 2001. The primary outcome was four-year ischemic stroke rates compared between anterior and non-anterior MI patients. Risk factors for stroke were assessed by multivariate Cox proportional-hazards analysis. Warfarin use was determined at discharge and followed for 90 days among a subset of patients aged 66 and older (n = 1483. Among the 10,383 patients studied, 2,942 patients survived hospitalization for an anterior MI and 20% were discharged on anticoagulation therapy. Within 4 years, 169 patients (5.7% were admitted with an ischemic stroke, half of which occurred within 1-year post-MI. There was no significant difference in stroke rate between anterior and non-anterior MI patients. The use of warfarin up to 90 days was not associated with stroke protection after anterior MI (hazard ratio [HR], 0.68; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.37-1.26. The use of angiotensin-converting-enzyme inhibitors (HR, 0.65; 95% CI, 0.44-0.95 and beta-blockers (HR, 0.60; 95% CI, 0.41-0.87 were associated with a significant decrease in stroke risk. There was no significant difference in bleeding-related hospitalizations in patients who used warfarin for up to 90 days post-MI. CONCLUSION: Many practitioners still consider a large anterior-wall MI as high risk for potential LV thrombus formation and stroke. Among a cohort of elderly patients who survived an anterior

  18. Risk of Acute Myocardial Infarction or Stroke in Patients with Mycosis Fungoides and Parapsoriasis

    Lindahl, Lise Maria; Heide-Jørgensen, Uffe; Pedersen, Lars;

    2015-01-01

    Mycosis fungoides (MF) and parapsoriasis display increased inflammation, which may be associated with increased risk of arterial cardiovascular events. The aim of this Danish nationwide population-based cohort study was to assess the relative risk (RR) of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) or stro...... 1.7 (95% CI 1.1-2.7) within the first 5 years of follow-up, whereas the RR of AMI during the first 5 years of follow-up was 2.0 (95% CI 1.2-3.4). In conclusion, patients with MF and parapsoriasis have an increased RR of AMI or stroke within the first 5 years of follow-up....

  19. A Novel Fatty Acid Profile Index—the Lipophilic Index—and Risk of Myocardial Infarction

    Toledo, Estefania; Campos, Hannia; Ding, Eric L.; Wu, Hongyu; Hu, Frank B.; Sun, Qi; Baylin, Ana

    2013-01-01

    The lipophilic index (LI), a mean measure of fatty acid melting points, has been proposed to capture overall fatty acid profile and may play an important role in the etiology of coronary heart disease. We aimed to determine the association between LI in diet and in adipose tissue and metabolic risk factors for myocardial infarction (MI) and risk of MI. We used a population-based, matched case-control study of nonfatal first acute MI conducted in Costa Rica between 1994 and 2004, with 1,627 ca...

  20. A study of risk factors in young patients of myocardial infarction

    Mohd Vaseem Akram

    2015-10-01

    Results: In our study, we have examined patients of myocardial infarction who are aged between 18-45 yrs. and other eligibility criteria for the assessment of modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors in Ghaziabad area. The ratio of male to female sex ratio in our study is 5.25:1 and 64% of the patients in present study had anterior wall MI while 24% had inferior wall MI and 12% had antero-septal wall MI. Conclusions: Mean age of study group is 36.24 +/-4.32 years. The maximum number of patients was in 35-40 years of age. Youngest patient was 25 years old male. The incidence of acute myocardial infarction is increasing in younger age group. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(10.000: 2677-2681

  1. Poor predictive ability of the risk chart SCORE in a Danish population

    Saidj, Madina; Jørgensen, Torben; Prescott, Eva;

    2013-01-01

    In Denmark, the European risk chart Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) from the European Society of Cardiology is recommended for use in cardiovascular prevention. Nevertheless, its predictive ability in a Danish population has never been investigated. The purpose of this study was...... therefore to assess the predictive ability of the SCORE risk chart with regard to fatal cardiovascular risk according to the socio-demographic factors of age, sex, income and education in a Danish population....

  2. MODALITY OF DETERMINING THE TOTAL SCORE OF RISKS IN INTERNAL AUDIT

    FRANCA DUMITRU

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Risk analysis materializes in: applying to the weightings of risk factors the level of risk assessment, on risk factors, based on the assessments made by auditors regarding: the functionality of internal control, the influence of quantitative and qualitative elements; determination of the total risk score, which represents a sum of weights between the appreciation level of each risk and the weightings of risk factors.

  3. Comparison of visual scoring and quantitative planimetry methods for estimation of global infarct size on delayed enhanced cardiac MRI and validation with myocardial enzymes

    Mewton, Nathan, E-mail: nmewton@gmail.com [Hopital Cardiovasculaire Louis Pradel, 28, Avenue Doyen Lepine, 69677 Bron cedex, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); CREATIS-LRMN (Centre de Recherche et d' Applications en Traitement de l' Image et du Signal), Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5220, U 630 INSERM (France); Revel, Didier [Hopital Cardiovasculaire Louis Pradel, 28, Avenue Doyen Lepine, 69677 Bron cedex, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); CREATIS-LRMN (Centre de Recherche et d' Applications en Traitement de l' Image et du Signal), Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5220, U 630 INSERM (France); Bonnefoy, Eric [Hopital Cardiovasculaire Louis Pradel, 28, Avenue Doyen Lepine, 69677 Bron cedex, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); Ovize, Michel [Hopital Cardiovasculaire Louis Pradel, 28, Avenue Doyen Lepine, 69677 Bron cedex, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); INSERM Unite 886 (France); Croisille, Pierre [Hopital Cardiovasculaire Louis Pradel, 28, Avenue Doyen Lepine, 69677 Bron cedex, Hospices Civils de Lyon (France); CREATIS-LRMN (Centre de Recherche et d' Applications en Traitement de l' Image et du Signal), Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, UMR CNRS 5220, U 630 INSERM (France)

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Although delayed enhanced CMR has become a reference method for infarct size quantification, there is no ideal method to quantify total infarct size in a routine clinical practice. In a prospective study we compared the performance and post-processing time of a global visual scoring method to standard quantitative planimetry and we compared both methods to the peak values of myocardial biomarkers. Materials and methods: This study had local ethics committee approval; all patients gave written informed consent. One hundred and three patients admitted with reperfused AMI to our intensive care unit had a complete CMR study with gadolinium-contrast injection 4 {+-} 2 days after admission. A global visual score was defined on a 17-segment model and compared with the quantitative planimetric evaluation of hyperenhancement. The peak values of serum Troponin I (TnI) and creatine kinase (CK) release were measured in each patient. Results: The mean percentage of total left ventricular myocardium with hyperenhancement determined by the quantitative planimetry method was (20.1 {+-} 14.6) with a range of 1-68%. There was an excellent correlation between quantitative planimetry and visual global scoring for the hyperenhancement extent's measurement (r = 0.94; y = 1.093x + 0.87; SEE = 1.2; P < 0.001) The Bland-Altman plot showed a good concordance between the two approaches (mean of the differences = 1.9% with a standard deviation of 4.7). Mean post-processing time for quantitative planimetry was significantly longer than visual scoring post-processing time (23.7 {+-} 5.7 min vs 5.0 {+-} 1.1 min respectively, P < 0.001). Correlation between peak CK and quantitative planimetry was r = 0.82 (P < 0.001) and r = 0.83 (P < 0.001) with visual global scoring. Correlation between peak Troponin I and quantitative planimetry was r = 0.86 (P < 0.001) and r = 0.85 (P < 0.001) with visual global scoring. Conclusion: A visual approach based on a 17-segment model allows a rapid

  4. Comparison of visual scoring and quantitative planimetry methods for estimation of global infarct size on delayed enhanced cardiac MRI and validation with myocardial enzymes

    Purpose: Although delayed enhanced CMR has become a reference method for infarct size quantification, there is no ideal method to quantify total infarct size in a routine clinical practice. In a prospective study we compared the performance and post-processing time of a global visual scoring method to standard quantitative planimetry and we compared both methods to the peak values of myocardial biomarkers. Materials and methods: This study had local ethics committee approval; all patients gave written informed consent. One hundred and three patients admitted with reperfused AMI to our intensive care unit had a complete CMR study with gadolinium-contrast injection 4 ± 2 days after admission. A global visual score was defined on a 17-segment model and compared with the quantitative planimetric evaluation of hyperenhancement. The peak values of serum Troponin I (TnI) and creatine kinase (CK) release were measured in each patient. Results: The mean percentage of total left ventricular myocardium with hyperenhancement determined by the quantitative planimetry method was (20.1 ± 14.6) with a range of 1-68%. There was an excellent correlation between quantitative planimetry and visual global scoring for the hyperenhancement extent's measurement (r = 0.94; y = 1.093x + 0.87; SEE = 1.2; P < 0.001) The Bland-Altman plot showed a good concordance between the two approaches (mean of the differences = 1.9% with a standard deviation of 4.7). Mean post-processing time for quantitative planimetry was significantly longer than visual scoring post-processing time (23.7 ± 5.7 min vs 5.0 ± 1.1 min respectively, P < 0.001). Correlation between peak CK and quantitative planimetry was r = 0.82 (P < 0.001) and r = 0.83 (P < 0.001) with visual global scoring. Correlation between peak Troponin I and quantitative planimetry was r = 0.86 (P < 0.001) and r = 0.85 (P < 0.001) with visual global scoring. Conclusion: A visual approach based on a 17-segment model allows a rapid and accurate

  5. Vertebral Fracture Risk (VFR) Score for Fracture Prediction in Postmenopausal Women

    Lillholm, M.; Ghosh, A.; Pettersen, P. C.; Bruijne, M. de; Dam, E. B.; Karsdal, M. A.; Christiansen, C.; Genant, H.K.; Nielsen, Mads

    Early prognosis of osteoporosis risk is not only important to individual patients but is also a key factor when screening for osteoporosis drug trial populations. We present an osteoporosis fracture risk score based on vertebral heights. The score separated individuals who sustained fractures (by...

  6. Risk Stratification and Effects of the First 24-Hour Pharmacotherapy in Predominantly Hypertensive Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction

    Peleška, Jan; Grünfeldová, H.; Monhart, Z.; Faltus, Václav; Tomečková, Marie; Ryšavá, D.; Velimský, T.; Ballek, L.; Hubač, J.; Charalampidi, K.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 27, Suppl. 4 (2009), S421-S422. ISSN 0263-6352. [European Meeting on Hypertension /19./. 12.06.2009-16.06.2009, Milan] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06014 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : pilot registry of acute myocardial infarction * hypertension and other cardiovascular risk factors * first 24-hour pharmacotherapy of myocardial infarction Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery

  7. Early identification of patients at low risk of death after myocardial infarction and potentially suitable for early hospital discharge.

    Parsons, R. W.; Jamrozik, K D; Hobbs, M S; Thompson, P L; Thompson, D. L.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To find (a) whether data available shortly after admission for acute myocardial infarction can provide a reliable prognostic indicator of survival at 28 days, and (b) whether such an indicator might be used to identify patients at low risk of death and suitable for early discharge. DESIGN--Retrospective analysis of data collected on patients admitted to a coronary care unit for acute myocardial infarction. A validation sample was selected at random from these patients. SETTING--Co...

  8. Analysis on risk factors of short-term poor outcome among different subtypes of acute cerebral infarction

    Objective: to investigate the risk factors of short-term poor outcome among patients suffering from acute cerebral infarction who had different subtypes of cerebral infarction. Methods: A total of 3231 acute cerebral infarction patients were included in the present study. Data on demographic characteristics, life style, risk factors, history of cardiovascular disease, admission blood pressure, and clinical outcome at discharge were collected for all participants. Poor outcome was defined as NIHSS ≥10 at discharge or death occurring during hospitalization. The association between poor outcome of cerebral infarction and risk factors was analyzed by using multiple logistic models. Results: Incidence rate of poor outcome is the highest in the patients with cerebral embolism, next in patients with cerebral thrombosis and the lowest in patients with lacunar infarction. Cerebral thrombosis was positively associated with smoking (OR: 1.228; 95% CI: 1.013∼1.637), dyslipidemia (OR: 1.264; 95% CI: 1.081∼1.478), and a history of diabetes mellitus (OR: 1.371; 95% CI: 1.075∼1.747); cerebral embolism was positively associated with a history of atrial fibrillation (OR: 3.131; 95% CI: 1.206∼8.128) and a history of rheumatic heart disease (OR: 5.601; 95% CI: 1.561∼20.091); lacunar infarction is positively associated with alcohol consumption, (OR: 1.428; 95% CI: 1.063∼1.919). Conclusion: The incidence rate of poor outcome is the highest in the patients with cerebral embolism among three subtypes of cerebral infarction, there are different risk factors of poor outcome for three subtypes of cerebral infarction. (authors)

  9. Risk factors and therapeutic coverage at 6 years in patients with previous myocardial infarction: the CASTUO study

    Félix-Redondo, Francisco Javier; Lozano Mera, Luis; Consuegra-Sánchez, Luciano; Giménez Sáez, Fernando; Garcipérez de Vargas, Francisco Javier; Castellano Vázquez, José María; Fernández-Bergés, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To determine the degree of risk factor control, the clinical symptoms and the therapeutic management of patients with a history of previous myocardial infarction. Methods Cross-sectional study at 6 years of a first episode of acute myocardial infarction between 2000 and 2009, admitted at a hospital in the region of Extremadura (Spain). Of 2177 patients with this diagnosis, 1365 remained alive and therefore were included in the study. Results We conducted a person-to-person survey i...

  10. Hormone Replacement Therapy and Risk of New-Onset Atrial Fibrillation after Myocardial Infarction - A Nationwide Cohort Study

    Bretler, Ditte-Marie; Hansen, Peter Riis; Lindhardsen, Jesper; Ahlehoff, Ole; Andersson, Charlotte; Jensen, Thomas Bo; Raunsø, Jakob; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Gislason, Gunnar Hilmar

    2012-01-01

    Objectives Our aim was to assess the association between use of hormone replacement therapy (HRT) and risk of new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF) after myocardial infarction. Design, Setting and Participants We used Danish nationwide registers of hospitalizations and prescriptions to identify all women admitted with myocardial infarction in the period 1997 to 2009 and with no known diagnosis of AF. Their use of overall HRT and HRT categories was assessed. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards...

  11. Prostate cancer staging with extracapsular extension risk scoring using multiparametric MRI

    Boesen, Lars; Chabanova, Elizaveta; Løgager, Vibeke;

    2015-01-01

    of ECE changed to 61 %-74 % and 77 %-88 % for the readers, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Multiparametric MRI with ECE risk-scoring is an accurate diagnostic technique in determining prostate cancer clinical tumour stage and ECE at final pathology. KEY POINTS: • Multiparametric MRI is an accurate...... diagnostic technique for preoperative prostate cancer staging • ECE risk scoring predicts extracapsular tumour extension at final pathology • ECE risk scoring shows an AUC of 0.86 on the ROC-curve • ECE risk scoring shows a moderate inter-reader agreement (K = 0.45) • Multiparametric MRI provides essential......OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the diagnostic performance of preoperative multiparametric MRI with extracapsular extension (ECE) risk-scoring in the assessment of prostate cancer tumour stage (T-stage) and prediction of ECE at final pathology. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty-seven patients with clinically...

  12. Risk factors for acute myocardial infarction in Central India: A case-control study

    Sanjay P Zodpey

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Atherosclerosis is a multi-factorial disease involving the interplay of genetic and environmental factors. Studies highlighting the public health importance of risk factors like chronic infections causing acute myocardial infarction (AMI in the Indian context are scarce. This study was undertaken to study the association of socio-demographic and life-style factors with acute myocardial infarction in central India. Materials and Methods: The cases and controls were group-matched for age, gender, and socio-economic status. A blinded research associate administered the study questionnaire. We performed an unconditional multiple logistic regression analysis. Results: The case-control study included 265 cases of AMI and 265 controls. The results of final model of logistic regression analysis for risk factors of AMI included 11 risk factors at α = 0.05. They were waist hip ratio, body mass index, stress at home in last 1 year, hypertension, family history of CHD, past history of gingival sepsis, tobacco smoking, raised total serum cholesterol, Chlamydia pneumoniae, Helicobacter pylori and raised C-reactive protein. Conclusion: The findings confirm the role of conventional risk factors for cardiac disease and highlight need for research into the association between chronic infections with AMI.

  13. A risk prediction score for invasive mold disease in patients with hematological malignancies.

    Marta Stanzani

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A risk score for invasive mold disease (IMD in patients with hematological malignancies could facilitate patient screening and improve the targeted use of antifungal prophylaxis. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 1,709 hospital admissions of 840 patients with hematological malignancies (2005-2008 to collect data on 17 epidemiological and treatment-related risk factors for IMD. Multivariate regression was used to develop a weighted risk score based on independent risk factors associated with proven or probable IMD, which was prospectively validated during 1,746 hospital admissions of 855 patients from 2009-2012. RESULTS: Of the 17 candidate variables analyzed, 11 correlated with IMD by univariate analysis, but only 4 risk factors (neutropenia, lymphocytopenia or lymphocyte dysfunction in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, malignancy status, and prior IMD were retained in the final multivariate model, resulting in a weighted risk score 0-13. A risk score of 5% of IMD, with a negative predictive value (NPV of 0.99, (95% CI 0.98-0.99. During 2009-2012, patients with a calculated risk score at admission of 6 (0.9% vs. 10.6%, P <0.001. CONCLUSION: An objective, weighted risk score for IMD can accurately discriminate patients with hematological malignancies at low risk for developing mold disease, and could possibly facilitate "screening-out" of low risk patients less likely to benefit from intensive diagnostic monitoring or mold-directed antifungal prophylaxis.

  14. Plasma Homocysteine Levels Predict the Risk of Acute Cerebral Infarction in Patients with Carotid Artery Lesions.

    Wu, Wei; Guan, Yi; Xu, Kan; Fu, Xi-Jia; Lei, Xiao-Feng; Lei, Li-Jian; Zhang, Zhi-Qing; Cheng, Yan; Li, Yun-Qian

    2016-05-01

    This study examined the association between elevated plasma homocysteine (Hcy) levels and the risk of acute cerebral infarction in patients with carotid artery lesions. A total of 78 patients were divided into two groups, the high Hcy group (n = 38; Hcy levels >15 umol/L) and the low Hcy group (n = 40; Hcy levels ≤15 umol/L). High-resolution B-mode ultrasounds were performed to assess intima media thickness (IMT), infarcts, plaques, and stenosis in the extracranial carotid artery of these patients. All patients underwent 3 T MR scanners to evaluate cerebral artery stenosis in the intracranial cerebral artery. The plasma Hcy levels did not show any statistically significant differences when comparisons were based on gender, age, blood pressure, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and systolic and diastolic pressures. Importantly, the incidence of carotid plaque and severe stenosis of intracranial and extracranial artery were significantly higher in the high Hcy group compared to the low Hcy group. Pearson's test indicated that plasma Hcy levels positively correlated with IMT, total number of plaques and unstable plaques. Overall, the elevated plasma Hcy levels correlated with increased frequency of carotid plaque formation, extra- and intracranial arterial stenosis, and the degree of stenosis. In conclusion, we find a significant correlation between elevated plasma Hcy levels and the increased incidence of acute cerebral infarction in patients with carotid artery lesions. PMID:26063590

  15. Do factors in the psychosocial work environment mediate the effect of socioeconomic position on the risk of myocardial infarction? Study from the Copenhagen Centre for Prospective Population Studies

    Andersen, I; Burr, H; Kristensen, T S;

    2004-01-01

    To investigate whether the effect of socioeconomic position on risk of myocardial infarction (MI) is mediated by differential exposure or differential susceptibility to psychosocial work environment....

  16. Abacavir and risk of myocardial infarction in HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy: a population-based nationwide cohort study

    Obel, Niels; Farkas, D K; Kronborg, G;

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to examine whether exposure to abacavir increases the risk for myocardial infarction (MI). DESIGN, SETTING AND SUBJECTS: This was a prospective nationwide cohort study which included all Danish HIV-infected patients on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART......) from 1995 to 2005 (N = 2952). Data on hospitalization for MI and comorbidity were obtained from Danish medical databases. Hospitalization rates for MI after HAART initiation were calculated for patients who used abacavir and those who did not. We used Cox's regression to compute incidence rate ratios...... (IRR) as a measure of relative risk for MI, while controlling for potential confounders (as separate variables and via propensity score) including comorbidity. MAIN OUTCOME: Relative risk of hospitalization with MI in abacavir users compared with abacavir nonusers. RESULTS: Hospitalization rates for MI...

  17. Ten-year absolute risk of osteoporotic fractures according to BMD T score at menopause

    Abrahamsen, Bo; Vestergaard, Peter; Rud, Bo;

    2006-01-01

    by Kanis et al. Inclusion of HRT users in the cohorts used may have led to higher BMD values and lower absolute fracture risk in the Kanis model. These longitudinal data can be used directly in estimating absolute fracture risk in untreated north European women from BMD at menopause........ INTRODUCTION: International recommendations highlight the importance of absolute fracture risk in establishing intervention thresholds. The available estimates of long-term risk have been derived by combining relative risks from meta-analyses with U.S. normative BMD data and Swedish fracture incidence records...... neck T score and by 1.30 (95% CI, 1.06; 1.58) for each unit decrease in lumbar spine T score at baseline. Absolute fracture risk was higher than expected from the Kanis algorithm at all T score levels. The difference was greatest for participants in the higher range of T scores. At T = -1, the observed...

  18. The comparison of cardiovascular risk scores using two methods of substituting missing risk factor data in patient medical records

    Andrew Dalton

    2011-07-01

    Conclusions A simple method of substituting missing risk factor data can produce reliable estimates of CVD risk scores. Targeted screening for high CVD risk, using pre-existing electronic medical record data, does not require multiple imputation methods in risk estimation.

  19. Significant association of cagA positive Helicobacter pylori strains with risk of premature myocardial infarction

    Gunn, M.; Stephens, J.; Thompson, J.; Rathbone, B; Samani, N

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate whether genetic diversity of Helicobacter pylori influences its association with coronary heart disease, and specifically whether the risk is confined to infection with the more virulent strains bearing the cytotoxin associated gene-A (cagA) antigen.
DESIGN AND SETTING—Case-control study in hospital admitting unselected patients with myocardial infarction.
METHODS AND SUBJECTS—Serological status for cagA and H pylori were determined in 342 cases of acute myocardial in...

  20. Prospective study of serum uric acid and risk of brain infarction

    孟令民

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prospectively investigate the association between serum uric acid concentration and the risk of brain infarction in Chinese adults.Methods In this prospective cohort study,a total of 95 738 participants(aged 18-98 years old)were included and were categorized into sex-specific quintiles according to serum uric acid concentration which were collected during 2006—2007 by health examinations.The study was followed up for an average of 4 years.We used Cox regression models to

  1. METHYLENETETRAHYDROFOLATE REDUCTASE C677T GENE POLYMORPHISM AND HOMOCYSTEINE LEVELS ARE RISK FACTORS FOR MYOCARDIAL INFARCTION

    Parthasaradhi Reddy Tanguturi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Increased plasma total homocysteine (tHcy levels shown to be a risk factor for coronary artery disease (CAD. The common methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase C677T (MTHFR C677T polymorphism has been reported to be a strong predictor of mild hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHcy. We assessed whether this mutation was associated with increased risk of myocardial infarction (MI and plasma levels of tHcy.The study group consisted of 210 angiographically proven MI patients, and 202 age and sexmatched healthy individuals as controls. MTHFR (C677T gene polymorphism was detected based on the polymerase chain reaction and restriction digestion with HinfI. Total homocysteine plasma concentration was measured using immunoassay. T allele frequency was not found to be significantly higher in patients than in the control group: T vs. Cwas χ2=0.19, OR 1.0, CI 95% 0.8–1.4, p=0.6; and TT vs. CCwas χ2=0.24, OR 1.2, CI 95% 0.6–2.3, p=0.6.We found significantly elevated levels of mean homocysteine in the patient group when compared to the control group (p =0.00. Our findings showed that MTHFR C677T polymorphism is not a risk factor for myocardial infarction in South Indian population and higher levels of homocysteine in patients indicated that the severity of the disease is independentof homocystein levels.

  2. Assessing the risk: Scoring systems for outcome prediction in emergency laparotomies.

    Nag, Deb Sanjay

    2015-12-01

    Emergency laparotomy is the commonest emergency surgical procedure in most hospitals and includes over 400 diverse surgical procedures. Despite the evolution of medicine and surgical practices, the mortality in patients needing emergency laparotomy remains abnormally high. Although surgical risk assessment first started with the ASA Physical Status score in 1941, efforts to find an ideal scoring system that accurately estimates the risk of mortality, continues till today. While many scoring systems have been developed, no single scoring system has been validated across multiple centers and geographical locations. While some scoring systems can predict the risk merely based upon preoperative findings and parameters, some rely on intra-operative assessment and histopathology reports to accurately stratify the risk of mortality. Although most scoring systems can potentially be used to compare risk-adjusted mortality across hospitals and amongst surgeons, only those which are based on preoperative findings can be used for risk prognostication and identify high-risk patients before surgery for an aggressive treatment. The recognition of the fact, that in the absence of outcome data in these patients, it would be impossible to evaluate the impact of quality improvement initiatives on risk-adjusted mortality, hospital groups and surgical societies have got together and started to pool data and analyze it. Appropriate scoring systems for emergency laparotomies would help in risk prognostication, risk-adjusted audit and assess the impact of quality improvement initiative in patient care across hospitals. Large multi-centric studies across varied geographic locations and surgical practices need to assess and validate the ideal and most apt scoring system for emergency laparotomies. While APACHE-II and P-POSSUM continue to be the most commonly used scoring system in emergency laparotomies,studies need to compare them in their ability to predict mortality and explore if either

  3. DESIGN AND STUDY OF ONLINE FUZZY RISK SCORE ANALYZER FOR DIABETES MELLITUS

    SunithaKarnam Anantha

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to determine the risks of various subjects to type 2 Diabetes and its dependence on the different subject records. A Fuzzy based system was designed to find the risk scores for diabetes based on risk score derived from Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study (CURES. The risk score that has been adapted into the system is referred to as Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS. The variables employed in it are age, gender, waist, exercise and history of diabetes. A database of subject records was collected from hundred random individuals from southern regions of India. A comparative study was performed on these records between the normal and fuzzified risk score based on IDRS. The program has been designed using Lab VIEW with Fuzzy System Designer being used for fuzzy rule execution. The details are transmitted online through web page to the physicians who can provide assistance in prevention of diabetes. The obtained risk scores of the subjects are used to improve the lifestyle and delay the onset of diabetes to the maximum possible. This system can be implemented in rural regions where experienced medical assistance may not be available. This system would form an ideal part of the current developments in medicine where physical physician presence is not required due to the buttress provided by advancements in computer technology. The aim of this study is to determine the risks of various subjects to type 2 Diabetes and its dependence on the different subject records. A Fuzzy based system was designed to find the risk scores for diabetes based on risk score derived from Chennai Urban Rural Epidemiology Study (CURES. The risk score that has been adapted into the system is referred to as Indian Diabetes Risk Score (IDRS. The variables employed in it are age, gender, waist, exercise and history of diabetes. A database of subject records was collected from hundred random individuals from southern regions of India. A comparative study

  4. Dietary intake and adipose tissue content of α-linolenic acid and risk of myocardial infarction

    Bork, Christian S; Jakobsen, Marianne U; Lundbye-Christensen, Søren;

    2016-01-01

    content of ALA, and risk of incident myocardial infarction (MI). DESIGN: A total of 57,053 participants, aged 50-64 y, were enrolled in the prospective Danish cohort study Diet, Cancer and Health between 1993 and 1997. Dietary intake of ALA was assessed with the use of a validated semiquantitative food...... factors did not influence the observed associations numerically. CONCLUSION: This study suggests that ALA has no appreciable association with risk of incident MI in either men or women.......BACKGROUND: Intake of the plant-derived ω-3 (n-3) fatty acid α-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3; n-3) may reduce coronary heart disease (CHD) risk, but the results of previous studies have been inconsistent. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the association between dietary intake of ALA, adipose tissue...

  5. Time-perspective in cardiovascular risk of NSAID use after first-time myocardial infarction

    Olsen, Anne-Marie Schjerning; Gislason, Gunnar H; Fosbøl, Emil L

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Despite the fact that NSAIDs are not recommended among patients with established cardiovascular disease, many patients receive NSAID treatment for a short period of time. However, up until recently, data on the relationship between treatment duration and associated cardiovascular...... risk were sparse and have not been summarized. RECENT FINDINGS: A series of recent studies of patients with prior myocardial infarction (MI) demonstrated that short-term treatment with most NSAIDs is associated with an increased cardiovascular risk relative to no NSAID treatment. These studies...... furthermore demonstrated that NSAID use among patients with first-time MI was associated with persistently increased risk of all-cause mortality and of a composite of coronary death or nonfatal recurrent MI for at least 5 years thereafter. SUMMARY: The present review indicates that there is no apparent well...

  6. Comparison of carotid artery intima - media thickness and risk factors of atherosclerosis in lacunar versus non-lacunar cerebral infarcts

    Seyed Ali Mousavi

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available

    BACKGROUND: Increases in the thickness of the intima-media of the carotid artery have been associated with an increased risk of myocardial infarction and stroke in subjects without a history of cardiovascular disease. Lacunar infarcts, one of the most common subtypes of ischemic stroke, show unique pathological and clinicoradiological characteristics. The present study examined the relationship between the vascular risk factors, including carotid artery intimamedia thickness (IMT, and lacunar versus non-lacunar infarcts.
    METHODS: We collected data from patients admitted to hospital with acute ischemic stroke. 195 Patients and 96 control subjects underwent B-mode ultrasonographic measurements of IMT of the common carotid artery. We examined the association of lacunar and non-lacunar infarcts with age, sex, and potential vascular risk factors.
    RESULTS: Of 195 adult patients with acute ischemic stroke, 87 were considered lacunar and 108 were considered nonlacunar strokes. Between these two groups of patients, we did not find a significantly different percentage of diabetes,
    smoking, hypertension, dyslipidemia, myocardial infarction, or previous history of ischemic stroke, alcohol, obesity,
    atherogen diet, exercise, and IMT. However, patients with lacunar infarct, diabetes mellitus (P = 0.02, and hypertension
    (P = 0.02 had a significantly higher percentage of history of prior CVA (P = 0.03 and a significantly higher percentage
    of non-lacunar infarct.
    CONCLUSIONS: The present results indicated that diabetes mellitus and hypertension are more common in patients with lacunar infarcts, and history of CVA is more common in patients with non–lacunar infarcts. We further concluded that IMT cannot differentiate subtypes of ischemic stroke. Because risk factors and clinical presentation of ischemic stroke differ among races, more national studies

  7. A genetic risk score combining ten psoriasis risk loci improves disease prediction.

    Haoyan Chen

    Full Text Available Psoriasis is a chronic, immune-mediated skin disease affecting 2-3% of Caucasians. Recent genetic association studies have identified multiple psoriasis risk loci; however, most of these loci contribute only modestly to disease risk. In this study, we investigated whether a genetic risk score (GRS combining multiple loci could improve psoriasis prediction. Two approaches were used: a simple risk alleles count (cGRS and a weighted (wGRS approach. Ten psoriasis risk SNPs were genotyped in 2815 case-control samples and 858 family samples. We found that the total number of risk alleles in the cases was significantly higher than in controls, mean 13.16 (SD 1.7 versus 12.09 (SD 1.8, p = 4.577×10(-40. The wGRS captured considerably more risk than any SNP considered alone, with a psoriasis OR for high-low wGRS quartiles of 10.55 (95% CI 7.63-14.57, p = 2.010×10(-65. To compare the discriminatory ability of the GRS models, receiver operating characteristic curves were used to calculate the area under the curve (AUC. The AUC for wGRS was significantly greater than for cGRS (72.0% versus 66.5%, p = 2.13×10(-8. Additionally, the AUC for HLA-C alone (rs10484554 was equivalent to the AUC for all nine other risk loci combined (66.2% versus 63.8%, p = 0.18, highlighting the dominance of HLA-C as a risk locus. Logistic regression revealed that the wGRS was significantly associated with two subphenotypes of psoriasis, age of onset (p = 4.91×10(-6 and family history (p = 0.020. Using a liability threshold model, we estimated that the 10 risk loci account for only 11.6% of the genetic variance in psoriasis. In summary, we found that a GRS combining 10 psoriasis risk loci captured significantly more risk than any individual SNP and was associated with early onset of disease and a positive family history. Notably, only a small fraction of psoriasis heritability is captured by the common risk variants identified to date.

  8. Usefulness of desirable lifestyle factors to attenuate the risk of heart failure among offspring whose parents had myocardial infarction before age 55 years.

    Khawaja, Owais; Kotler, Gregory; Gaziano, John Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2012-08-01

    Heart failure (HF) is one of the leading causes of hospitalization and death in the United States and throughout Europe. Although a higher risk for HF with antecedent myocardial infarction (MI) has been reported in offspring whose parents had MIs before age 55 years, it is unclear whether adherence to healthful behaviors can mitigate that risk. The aim of the present study was therefore to prospectively examine if adherence to healthy weight, regular exercise, moderate alcohol consumption, and abstinence from smoking can attenuate such increased HF risk. Information on parental history of MI and lifestyle factors was collected using questionnaires. Subjects adhering to ≥3 healthy lifestyle factors were classified as having good versus poor lifestyle scores. Incident HF was assessed via yearly follow-up questionnaires and validated in a subsample. During an average follow up of 21.7 ± 6.5 years, 1,323 new HF cases (6.6%), of which 190 (14.4%) were preceded by MI, occurred. Compared to subjects with good lifestyle scores and no parental histories of premature MI, multivariate adjusted hazard ratios for incident HF with antecedent MI were 3.21 (95% confidence interval 1.74 to 5.91) for subjects with good lifestyle score and parental histories of premature MI, 1.52 (95% confidence interval 1.12 to 2.07) for those with poor lifestyle score and no parental histories of premature MI, and 4.60 (95% confidence interval 2.55 to 8.30) for those with poor lifestyle scores and parental histories of premature MI. In conclusion, our data suggest that even in subjects at higher risk for HF because of genetic predisposition, adherence to healthful lifestyle factors may attenuate such an elevated HF risk. PMID:22516528

  9. Association of a Dietary Score with Incident Type 2 Diabetes: The Dietary-Based Diabetes-Risk Score (DDS)

    Dominguez, Ligia J.; Bes-Rastrollo, Maira; Basterra-Gortari, Francisco Javier; Gea, Alfredo; Barbagallo, Mario; Martínez-González, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Strong evidence supports that dietary modifications may decrease incident type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Numerous diabetes risk models/scores have been developed, but most do not rely specifically on dietary variables or do not fully capture the overall dietary pattern. We prospectively assessed the association of a dietary-based diabetes-risk score (DDS), which integrates optimal food patterns, with the risk of developing T2DM in the SUN (“Seguimiento Universidad de Navarra”) longitudinal study. Methods We assessed 17,292 participants initially free of diabetes, followed-up for a mean of 9.2 years. A validated 136-item FFQ was administered at baseline. Taking into account previous literature, the DDS positively weighted vegetables, fruit, whole cereals, nuts, coffee, low-fat dairy, fiber, PUFA, and alcohol in moderate amounts; while it negatively weighted red meat, processed meats and sugar-sweetened beverages. Energy-adjusted quintiles of each item (with exception of moderate alcohol consumption that received either 0 or 5 points) were used to build the DDS (maximum: 60 points). Incident T2DM was confirmed through additional detailed questionnaires and review of medical records of participants. We used Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for socio-demographic and anthropometric parameters, health-related habits, and clinical variables to estimate hazard ratios (HR) of T2DM. Results We observed 143 T2DM confirmed cases during follow-up. Better baseline conformity with the DDS was associated with lower incidence of T2DM (multivariable-adjusted HR for intermediate (25–39 points) vs. low (11–24) category 0.43 [95% confidence interval (CI) 0.21, 0.89]; and for high (40–60) vs. low category 0.32 [95% CI: 0.14, 0.69]; p for linear trend: 0.019). Conclusions The DDS, a simple score exclusively based on dietary components, showed a strong inverse association with incident T2DM. This score may be applicable in clinical practice to improve

  10. Predicting Parkinson disease in the community using a nonmotor risk score.

    Darweesh, Sirwan K L; Koudstaal, Peter J; Stricker, Bruno H; Hofman, Albert; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Ikram, M Arfan

    2016-07-01

    At present, there are no validated methods to identify persons who are at increased risk for Parkinson Disease (PD) from the general population. We investigated the clinical usefulness of a recently proposed non-motor risk score for PD (the PREDICT-PD risk score) in the population-based Rotterdam Study. At baseline (1990), we constructed a weighted risk score based on 10 early nonmotor features and risk factors in 6492 persons free of parkinsonism and dementia. We followed these persons for up to 20 years (median 16.1 years) for the onset of PD until 2011. We studied the association between the PREDICT-PD risk score and incident PD using competing risk regression models with adjustment for age and sex. In addition, we assessed whether the PREDICT-PD risk score improved discrimination (C-statistics) and risk classification (net reclassification improvement) of incident PD beyond age and sex. During follow-up, 110 persons were diagnosed with incident PD. The PREDICT-PD risk score was associated with incident PD (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.30; 95 % confidence interval [1.06; 1.59]) and yielded a small, non-significant improvement in overall discrimination (ΔC-statistic = 0.018[-0.005; 0.041]) and risk classification (net reclassification improvement = 0.172[-0.017; 0.360]) of incident PD. In conclusion, the PREDICT-PD risk score only slightly improves long-term prediction of PD in the community. PMID:26898908

  11. Dietary Intake Is Related to Multifactor Cardiovascular Risk Score in Obese Boys

    Tracy L. Schumacher

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD originates in childhood and early identification of risk factors provides an early intervention opportunity. The aim was to identify children at higher risk using a CVD risk score, developed from factors known to cluster in childhood. Risk was scored as very high (≥97.5th centile, high (≥95th, moderate (≥90th or threshold (<90th using normal pediatric reference ranges for 10 common biomedical risk factors. These were summed in a multifactor CVD risk score and applied to a sample of 285 observations from 136 overweight Australian children (41% male, aged 7–12 years. Strength of associations between CVD risk score and individual biomedical and dietary variables were assessed using univariate logistic regression. High waist circumference (Odds Ratio: 5.48 [95% CI: 2.60–11.55], body mass index (OR: 3.22 [1.98–5.26], serum insulin (OR: 3.37 [2.56–4.42] and triglycerides (OR: 3.02 [2.22–4.12] were all significantly related to CVD risk score. High intakes of total fat (OR: 4.44 [1.19–16.60], sugar (OR: 2.82 [1.54–5.15] and carbohydrate (OR 1.75 [1.11–2.77] were significantly related to CVD risk score in boys only. This multifactor CVD risk score could be a useful tool for researchers to identify elevated risk in children. Further research is warranted to examine sex-specific dietary factors related to CVD risk in children.

  12. Midregional Proadrenomedullin Improves Risk Stratification beyond Surgical Risk Scores in Patients Undergoing Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement.

    Adam Csordas

    Full Text Available Conventional surgical risk scores lack accuracy in risk stratification of patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR. Elevated levels of midregional proadrenomedullin (MR-proADM levels are associated with adverse outcome not only in patients with manifest chronic disease states, but also in the general population.We investigated the predictive value of MR-proADM for mortality in an unselected contemporary TAVR population.We prospectively included 153 patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis who underwent TAVR from September 2013 to August 2014. This population was compared to an external validation cohort of 205 patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing TAVR. The primary endpoint was all cause mortality.During a median follow-up of 258 days, 17 out of 153 patients who underwent TAVR died (11%. Patients with MR-proADM levels above the 75th percentile (≥ 1.3 nmol/l had higher mortality (31% vs. 4%, HR 8.9, 95% CI 3.0-26.0, P 6.8 only showed a trend towards higher mortality (18% vs. 9%, HR 2.1, 95% CI 0.8-5.6, P = 0.13. The Harrell's C-statistic was 0.58 (95% CI 0.45-0.82 for the EuroSCORE II, and consideration of baseline MR-proADM levels significantly improved discrimination (AUC = 0.84, 95% CI 0.71-0.92, P = 0.01. In bivariate analysis adjusted for EuroSCORE II, MR-proADM levels ≥1.3 nmol/l persisted as an independent predictor of mortality (HR 9.9, 95% CI (3.1-31.3, P <0.01 and improved the model's net reclassification index (0.89, 95% CI (0.28-1.59. These results were confirmed in the independent validation cohort.Our study identified MR-proADM as a novel predictor of mortality in patients undergoing TAVR. In the future, MR-proADM should be added to the commonly used EuroSCORE II for better risk stratification of patients suffering from severe aortic stenosis.

  13. Validación del score de riesgo TIMI para pacientes con síndrome coronario agudo sin elevación del ST TIMI risk score validation for patients with acute coronary syndrome without ST elevation

    Rodrigo H. Bagur

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Los síndromes coronarios agudos sin elevación del segmento ST (SCA-SST son causa frecuente de hospitalización, siendo responsables del 10 al 15% de infartos de miocardio (IM o muertes al año. El objetivo fue evaluar eventos cardiovasculares a 6 meses de seguimiento y validar el score de riesgo TIMI (Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction en nuestra población. Se analizaron retrospectivamente pacientes con diagnóstico de SCA-SST. Se realizó seguimiento telefónico a los 6 meses del ingreso. Los puntos finales evaluados fueron la combinación de muerte, internación por síndrome coronario agudo y necesidad de revascularización. Se incluyeron 204 pacientes. El 70.2% eran hombres, edad promedio de 64.5 ± 11.8 años. Luego de la evaluación inicial, se hizo diagnóstico de angina inestable en el 34.6%, IM en 38.9% y el 26.4% fueron catalogados como "dolor no coronario". Al aplicar el score de TIMI, 52 (25.5% pacientes tenían riesgo bajo, 106 (52% riesgo intermedio, y 46 (22.5% riesgo alto. La mortalidad global fue 12.6%. Se encontró un incremento progresivo y significativo en la tasa de eventos combinados a medida que aumentaba el score de TIMI (p Non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (NSTE-ACS are frequent cause of hospitalization, being responsible for 10-15% of infarcts or deaths per year. The study was designed to analyze 6 months follow-up of cardiovascular events as well as to validate the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI risk score for patients hospitalized for NSTE-ACS. We retrospectively analyzed patients admitted with NSTE-ACS. Telephone follow-up were performed at 6 month. Combination of death, re-admission for acute coronary syndrome and revascularization were considered as end point. Two hundred and four patients were included for the analysis. There were 70.2% males, with a mean age of 64.5 ± 11.8 years. After the initial evaluation, we diagnosed unstable angina in 34.6% of cases, MI in 38.9% of cases, and 26

  14. Assessment of cardiovascular risk in rheumatoid arthritis: impact of the new EULAR recommendations on the score cardiovascular risk index.

    Gómez-Vaquero, Carmen; Robustillo, Montserrat; Narváez, Javier; Rodríguez-Moreno, Jesús; González-Juanatey, Carlos; Llorca, Javier; Nolla, Joan Miquel; González-Gay, Miguel Angel

    2012-01-01

    To assess the impact of the application of the European League against Rheumatism (EULAR) task force recommendations in the cardiovascular (CV) risk of a series of Spanish patients diagnosed with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Two hundred consecutive RA patients seen at the rheumatology outpatient clinics of Bellvitge Hospital, Barcelona, were studied. Information on clinical features of the disease, classic CV risk factors, and history of CV events was assessed. Both the systematic coronary risk evaluation (SCORE) CV risk index and the modified SCORE (mSCORE) according to the last EULAR recommendations were calculated. Based on the classic CV risk factors, the mean ± standard deviation SCORE was 2.1 ± 2.3% (median, 2; interquartile range [IQR], 1-3). Twenty-three (11%) patients were above the threshold of high CV risk for the Spanish population (≥5%). Following the EULAR recommendations, a change in the score was required in 119 (59%) patients. Therefore, the mean mSCORE was 2.7 ± 2.9% (median, 2; IQR, 1-3) and, due to this, 28 (14%) patients were above the threshold of high CV risk. Nine (5%) had at least one ischemic CV event. Patients with CV events were older and had more CV risk factors and higher SCORE and mSCORE than those without CV events. Although a large proportion of patients from this series fulfilled the criteria for the application of the EULAR recommendations, the final impact on the calculated CV risk was low and clinically significant in only a few patients. However, an association between the mSCORE and the presence of ischemic CV events was observed. PMID:21567119

  15. Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Using Framingham Risk Score in Korean Cancer Survivors

    So, Ji-Hyun; Shin, Jin-Young; Park, Wan

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in cancer survivors. The aim of this study was to investigate the modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors and 10-year probability of the disease based on the Framingham risk score in cancer survivors, compared with the general population. Methods A total of 1,225 cancer survivors and 5,196 non-cancer controls who participated in the 2007–2013 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were enrolled. We assessed modifiable cardiovascular disease risk factors including smoking, body mass index, physical inactivity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and elevated blood glucose level. The 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease was determined by applying the Framingham cardiovascular disease risk equation among cancer survivors and non-cancer controls, ranging from 30 to 74 years old who had no overt cardiovascular diseases. Results The proportion of subjects who had higher fasting glucose levels, hemoglobin A1c levels, systolic blood pressure, and low density lipoprotein cholesterol levels, and those who had lower high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels was significantly higher in the cancer survivors than in the non-cancer controls. The average 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease among the cancer survivors was higher than that in the non-cancer controls in both men and women. The average 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease in relation to the cancer type was significantly higher in patients with hepatic, colon, lung, breast, and gastric cancer. Conclusion Cancer survivors have a higher cardiovascular disease risk and 10-year probability of cardiovascular disease than non-cancer controls. Control of cardiovascular disease risk factors and implementation of a well-defined cardiovascular disease prevention program are needed for treating cancer survivors. PMID:27468342

  16. Low Adiponectin Levels and Increased Risk of Type 2 Diabetes in Patients With Myocardial Infarction

    Lindberg, Søren; Jensen, Jan S; Pedersen, Sune H;

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI) have increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Adiponectin is an insulin-sensitizing hormone produced in adipose tissue, directly suppressing hepatic gluconeogenesis, stimulating fatty acid oxidation and glucose uptake in...... skeletal muscle and insulin secretion. In healthy humans, low plasma adiponectin levels associate with increased risk of T2DM; however, the relationship between adiponectin and T2DM in patients with MI has never been investigated. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We prospectively included 666 patients with ST......-segment elevation MI, without diabetes, treated with percutaneous coronary intervention, from September 2006 to December 2008 at a tertiary cardiac center. Blood samples were drawn before intervention, and total plasma adiponectin was measured in all samples. During follow-up (median 5.7 years [interquartile range...

  17. A Simple Risk Score for Identifying Individuals with Impaired Fasting Glucose in the Southern Chinese Population

    Hui Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to develop and validate a simple risk score for detecting individuals with impaired fasting glucose (IFG among the Southern Chinese population. A sample of participants aged ≥20 years and without known diabetes from the 2006–2007 Guangzhou diabetes cross-sectional survey was used to develop separate risk scores for men and women. The participants completed a self-administered structured questionnaire and underwent simple clinical measurements. The risk scores were developed by multiple logistic regression analysis. External validation was performed based on three other studies: the 2007 Zhuhai rural population-based study, the 2008–2010 Guangzhou diabetes cross-sectional study and the 2007 Tibet population-based study. Performance of the scores was measured with the Hosmer-Lemeshow goodness-of-fit test and ROC c-statistic. Age, waist circumference, body mass index and family history of diabetes were included in the risk score for both men and women, with the additional factor of hypertension for men. The ROC c-statistic was 0.70 for both men and women in the derivation samples. Risk scores of ≥28 for men and ≥18 for women showed respective sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 56.6%, 71.7%, 13.0% and 96.0% for men and 68.7%, 60.2%, 11% and 96.0% for women in the derivation population. The scores performed comparably with the Zhuhai rural sample and the 2008–2010 Guangzhou urban samples but poorly in the Tibet sample. The performance of pre-existing USA, Shanghai, and Chengdu risk scores was poorer in our population than in their original study populations. The results suggest that the developed simple IFG risk scores can be generalized in Guangzhou city and nearby rural regions and may help primary health care workers to identify individuals with IFG in their practice.

  18. A Study of Risk Factors and T- Score Variability in Romanian Women with Postmenopausal Osteoporosis.

    Rodica TöRöK-Oance

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyse the prevalence of postmenopausal osteoporosis risk factors and to analyse the T-score variability in spine and hip according to the associated risk factors.This is a retrospective study (2003-2007 including 177 female patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis. The patients were separated in seven groups according to the number of risk factors per case. The T-score was compared between this groups using unpaired t-Student test.The most frequent risk factor was early menopause (44.63%, followed by low consumption of dairy products (37.29%, coffee consumption (25.99%, sedentary lifestyle (20.9%, smoking (19.21%, delayed menarche (15.25%, low body mass index (10.71%, nulliparity (7.91%, alcohol consumption (0.56%. The maximum number of risk factors per case was six. The T-score decreased with increasing number of risk factors. T-score differences are statistically significant when comparing cases with 6 risk factors to cases with 5 risk factors (P=0.0315 in spine; P=0.0088 in hip, 4 risk factors (P=0.0076 in spine; P=0.043 in hip, 3 risk factors (P<0.0001 in spine; P=0.0205 in hip, 2 risk factors (P=0.0012 in spine; P<0.0001 in hip, a single risk factor (P<0.001 in spine and hip and no risk factor (P=0.0075 in spine; P=0.0006 in hip.Association of several risk factors leads to decrease of T-score so being able to avoid any such factors may contribute to a better bone mineral density. This could be achieved by the education of female population regarding postmenopausal osteoporosis risk factors, followed by adopting an appropriate lifestyle and diet.

  19. High risk for obstructive sleep apnea in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    Carla Renata Silva Andrechuk

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to stratify the risk for obstructive sleep apnea in patients with acute myocardial infarction, treated at a public, tertiary, teaching hospital of the state of São Paulo, Brazil, and to identify related sociodemographic and clinical factors.Method: cross-sectional analytical study with 113 patients (mean age 59.57 years, 70.8% male. A specific questionnaire was used for the sociodemographic and clinical characterization and the Berlin Questionnaire for the stratification of the risk of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.Results: the prevalence of high risk was 60.2% and the outcome of clinical worsening during hospitalization was more frequent among these patients. The factors related to high risk were body mass index over 30 kg/m2, arterial hypertension and waist circumference indicative of cardiovascular risk, while older age (60 years and over constituted a protective factor.Conclusion: considering the high prevalence of obstructive sleep apnea and its relation to clinical worsening, it is suggested that nurses should monitor, in their clinical practice, people at high risk for this syndrome, guiding control measures of modifiable factors and aiming to prevent the associated complications, including worsening of cardiovascular diseases.

  20. Hypercoagulability Is a Stronger Risk Factor for Ischaemic Stroke than for Myocardial Infarction: A Systematic Review.

    Alberto Maino

    Full Text Available Hypercoagulability increases the risk of arterial thrombosis; however, this effect may differ between various manifestations of arterial disease.In this study, we compared the effect of coagulation factors as measures of hypercoagulability on the risk of ischaemic stroke (IS and myocardial infarction (MI by performing a systematic review of the literature. The effect of a risk factor on IS (relative risk for IS, RRIS was compared with the effect on MI (RRMI by calculating their ratio (RRR = RRIS/RRMI. A relevant differential effect was considered when RRR was >1+ its own standard error (SE or 1+1SE was found in 49/343 (14% markers. Of these, 18/49 (37% had an RRR greater than 1+2SE. On the opposite side, a larger effect on MI risk (RRR<1-1SE was found in only 17/343 (5% markers.These results suggest that hypercoagulability has a more pronounced effect on the risk of IS than that of MI.

  1. Plasma fatty acids, oxylipins, and risk of myocardial infarction: the Singapore Chinese Health Study.

    Sun, Ye; Koh, Hiromi W L; Choi, Hyungwon; Koh, Woon-Puay; Yuan, Jian-Min; Newman, John W; Su, Jin; Fang, Jinling; Ong, Choon Nam; van Dam, Rob M

    2016-07-01

    We aimed to examine the prospective association between plasma FAs, oxylipins, and risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a Singapore Chinese population. A nested case-control study with 744 incident AMI cases and 744 matched controls aged 47-83 years was conducted within the Singapore Chinese Health Study. Nineteen plasma FAs and 12 oxylipins were quantified using MS. These were grouped into 12 FA clusters and 5 oxylipin clusters using hierarchical clustering, and their associations with AMI risk were assessed. Long-chain n-3 FAs [odds ratio (OR) = 0.67 per SD increase, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.53-0.84, P stearic acid (OR = 0.65, 95% CI: 0.44-0.97, P = 0.03) were inversely associated with AMI risk, whereas arachidonic acid (AA) was positively associated with AMI risk (OR = 1.25, 95% CI: 1.03-1.52, P = 0.02) in the multivariable model with adjustment for other FAs. Further adjustment for oxylipins did not substantially change these associations. An inverse association was observed between AA-derived oxylipin, thromboxane (TX)B2, and AMI risk (OR = 0.81, 95% CI: 0.71-0.93, P = 0.003). Circulating long-chain n-3 FAs and stearic acid were associated with a lower and AA was associated with a higher AMI risk in this Chinese population. The association between the oxylipin TXB2 and AMI requires further research. PMID:27371261

  2. Correlation between retinopathy of prematurity and clinical risk index for babies score

    Mousa Ahmadpour-kacho; Yadollah Zahed Pasha; Seyed Ahmad Rasoulinejad; Mahmoud Hajiahmadi; Parisa Pourdad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Several risk factors like prematurity, hyperoxia, hyperglycemia, duration of mechanical ventilation and supplemental oxygen use have been attributed to the occurrence of retinopathy of prematurity (ROP) in low birth weight infants. Clinical Risk Index for Babies (CRIB) score have been used to assess the severity of the newborn's disease and neonatal mortality. The relation between the CRIB score and the incidence of retinopathy of prematurity is less assessed. This study was carri...

  3. Risk-assessment score for screening diabetes mellitus among Omani adults

    D’Souza, Melba S; Amirtharaj, Anandhi; Venkatesaperumal, Ramesh; Isac, Chandrani; Maroof, Samira

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a self-administered risk-assessment scoring system for identifying Omani adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Methods: An exploratory cross-sectional design was used. Simple random sampling was used to select 93 adults in Muscat. Ethical approval was obtained from the College of Nursing Research and Ethics Committee. The Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) was used to collect the data in 2009. Informed consent was obtained from the...

  4. A risk score development for diabetic retinopathy screening in Isfahan-Iran

    Hosseini, Sayed Mohsen; Maracy, Mohammad Reza; Amini, Masoud; Baradaran, Hamid Reza

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to develop a simple risk score as screening tool for retinopathy in type II diabetic patients. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out recruiting 3734 patients with type II diabetes in an outpatient clinic in Isfahan Endocrinology and Metabolism Research Center (IEMRC), Iran. The logistic regression was used as a model to predict diabetic retinopathy. The cut-off value for the risk score was determined using the Receiver Operating Characteris...

  5. Using family atopy scores to identify the risk of atopic dermatitis in infants

    Melisa Anggraeni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Atopic dermatitis is the first manifestation of allergic disease in early life. Early interventions may prevent the development of allergy disease. Allergy trace cards have been used to identify the level of allergic risk, based on family atopy scores. Because environmental factors may also influence the development of atopic dermatitis, the usefulness of the allergy trace card needs to be reevaluated. Objective To compare the incidence of atopic dermatitis in infants aged 0-4 months with total family atopy scores of > 0 to those with scores of 0. Methods We conducted this cohort study from June 1, 2012 to December 31, 2012 at Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar. Family atopy score was tabulated from all pregnant woman in the Obstetric Outpatient Clinic and the Maternity Room. Subjects were divided into two groups based on their total family atopy score: those with scores > 0 and those with scores of 0. The appearance of atopic dermatitis symptoms in the infants were evaluated until they reached 4 months of age. The incidence of atopic dermatitis in two groups was compared using Chi-square test. Results The incidence of atopic dermatitis in this study was 10.9%. The group with total family atopy scores of 0 had a significantly higher incidence of atopic dermatitis than the group with scores > 0 (adjusted RR 22.5; 95%CI 8.8 to 57.0; P = 0.001. Conclusion The incidence of atopic dermatitis is higher in infants with total family atopy score > 0 and this group has a 22.5 times higher risk of atopic dermatitis compared to infants with total family atopy score of 0. Allergy trace cards are relevant in differentiating the risk of atopy with regards to development of atopic dermatitis. We suggest that family atopy scores be evaluated during antenatal care in order to limit the development of atopic dermatitis in infants. [Paediatr Indones. 2014;54:330-7.].

  6. Assessing Framingham cardiovascular risk scores in subjects with diabetes and their correlation with diabetic retinopathy

    Deepali R Damkondwar

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the Framingham cardiovascular risk assessment scores in subjects with diabetes and their association with diabetic retinopathy in subjects with diabetes. Materials and Methods: In this population-based prospective study, subjects with diabetes were recruited (n=1248; age ≥40 years. The Framingham cardiovascular risk scores were calculated for 1248 subjects with type 2 diabetes. The scores were classified as high risk (>10%, and low risk (<10%. Results: Out of the 1248 subjects, 830 (66.5% patients had a low risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD in 10 years and 418 (33.5% had a high risk of developing CVD in 10 years. The risk of developing CVD was more in males than females (56.8% vs. 7% The prevalence of both diabetic retinopathy and sight-threatening retinopathy was more in the high-risk group (21% and 4.5%, respectively. The risk factors for developing diabetic retinopathy were similar in both the groups (low vs. high - duration of diabetes (OR 1.14 vs. 1.08, higher HbA1c (OR 1.24 vs. 1.22, presence of macro- and microalbuminuria (OR 10.17 vs. 6.12 for macro-albuminuria and use of insulin (OR 2.06 vs. 4.38. The additional risk factors in the high-risk group were presence of anemia (OR 2.65 and higher serum high density lipoprotein (HDL cholesterol (OR 1.05. Conclusion: Framingham risk scoring, a global risk assessment tool to predict the 10-year risk of developing CVD, can also predict the occurrence and type of diabetic retinopathy. Those patients with high CVD scores should be followed up more frequently and treated adequately. This also warrants good interaction between the treating physician/cardiologist and the ophthalmologist.

  7. CAIDE Dementia Risk Score and biomarkers of neurodegeneration in memory clinic patients without dementia.

    Enache, Daniela; Solomon, Alina; Cavallin, Lena; Kåreholt, Ingemar; Kramberger, Milica Gregoric; Aarsland, Dag; Kivipelto, Miia; Eriksdotter, Maria; Winblad, Bengt; Jelic, Vesna

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to explore cross-sectional associations between Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia Study (CAIDE) Dementia Risk Score and dementia-related cerebrospinal fluid and neuroimaging biomarkers in 724 patients without dementia from the Memory Clinic at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, Sweden. We additionally evaluated the score's capacity to predict dementia. Two risk score versions were calculated: one including age, gender, obesity, hyperlipidemia, and hypertension; and one additionally including apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 carrier status. Cerebrospinal fluid was analyzed for amyloid β (Aβ), total tau, and phosphorylated tau. Visual assessments of medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA), global cortical atrophy-frontal subscale, and Fazekas scale for white matter changes (WMC) were performed. Higher CAIDE Dementia Risk Score (version without APOE) was significantly associated with higher total tau, more severe MTA, WMC, and global cortical atrophy-frontal subscale. Higher CAIDE Dementia Risk Score (version with APOE) was associated with reduced Aβ, more severe MTA, and WMC. CAIDE Dementia Risk Score version with APOE seemed to predict dementia better in this memory clinic population with short follow-up than the version without APOE. PMID:27143429

  8. Periodontitis as risk factor for acute myocardial infarction: A case control study

    Sujal M Parkar

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: The results of the present study show evidence that those patients who have experienced myocardial infarction exhibit poor periodontal conditions in comparison to healthy subjects and suggest an association between chronic oral infections and myocardial infarction.

  9. Performance of Surgical Risk Scores to Predict Mortality after Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation

    Leonardo Sinnott Silva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Predicting mortality in patients undergoing transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI remains a challenge. Objectives: To evaluate the performance of 5 risk scores for cardiac surgery in predicting the 30-day mortality among patients of the Brazilian Registry of TAVI. Methods: The Brazilian Multicenter Registry prospectively enrolled 418 patients undergoing TAVI in 18 centers between 2008 and 2013. The 30-day mortality risk was calculated using the following surgical scores: the logistic EuroSCORE I (ESI, EuroSCORE II (ESII, Society of Thoracic Surgeons (STS score, Ambler score (AS and Guaragna score (GS. The performance of the risk scores was evaluated in terms of their calibration (Hosmer–Lemeshow test and discrimination [area under the receiver–operating characteristic curve (AUC]. Results: The mean age was 81.5 ± 7.7 years. The CoreValve (Medtronic was used in 86.1% of the cohort, and the transfemoral approach was used in 96.2%. The observed 30-day mortality was 9.1%. The 30-day mortality predicted by the scores was as follows: ESI, 20.2 ± 13.8%; ESII, 6.5 ± 13.8%; STS score, 14.7 ± 4.4%; AS, 7.0 ± 3.8%; GS, 17.3 ± 10.8%. Using AUC, none of the tested scores could accurately predict the 30-day mortality. AUC for the scores was as follows: 0.58 [95% confidence interval (CI: 0.49 to 0.68, p = 0.09] for ESI; 0.54 (95% CI: 0.44 to 0.64, p = 0.42 for ESII; 0.57 (95% CI: 0.47 to 0.67, p = 0.16 for AS; 0.48 (95% IC: 0.38 to 0.57, p = 0.68 for STS score; and 0.52 (95% CI: 0.42 to 0.62, p = 0.64 for GS. The Hosmer–Lemeshow test indicated acceptable calibration for all scores (p > 0.05. Conclusions: In this real world Brazilian registry, the surgical risk scores were inaccurate in predicting mortality after TAVI. Risk models specifically developed for TAVI are required.

  10. Risk of myocardial infarction and stroke in bipolar disorder: a systematic review and exploratory meta-analysis

    Prieto, M.L.; Cuéllar-Barboza, A.B.; Bobo, W.V.; Roger, V.L.; Bellivier, F.; Leboyer, M.; West, C.P.; Frye, M.A.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To review the evidence on and estimate the risk of myocardial infarction and stroke in bipolar disorder. Method A systematic search using MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Web of Science, Scopus, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, and bibliographies (1946 – May, 2013) was conducted. Case-control and cohort studies of bipolar disorder patients age 15 or older with myocardial infarction or stroke as outcomes were included. Two independent reviewers extracted data and assessed quality. Estimates of effect were summarized using random-effects meta-analysis. Results Five cohort studies including 13 115 911 participants (27 092 bipolar) were included. Due to the use of registers, different statistical methods, and inconsistent adjustment for confounders, there was significant methodological heterogeneity among studies. The exploratory meta-analysis yielded no evidence for a significant increase in the risk of myocardial infarction: [relative risk (RR): 1.09, 95% CI 0.96–1.24, P = 0.20; I2 = 6%]. While there was evidence of significant study heterogeneity, the risk of stroke in bipolar disorder was significantly increased (RR 1.74, 95% CI 1.29–2.35; P = 0.0003; I2 = 83%). Conclusion There may be a differential risk of myocardial infarction and stroke in patients with bipolar disorder. Confidence in these pooled estimates was limited by the small number of studies, significant heterogeneity and dissimilar methodological features. PMID:24850482

  11. HIV infection does not contribute to increased cardiovascular risk as assessed by Framingham risk score

    I Ramsay

    2012-11-01

    significant predictors. The overall mean cfPWV for the HIV cohort (n=47 was 9.09±2.13 m/s compared to 11.95±2.37 m/s in the control group (n=46(p<0.01. HIV infection does not contribute to increased cardiovascular risk as assessed by Framingham risk score or carotid-femoral pulse wave velocity. This may be due to good control of traditional cardiovascular risk factors and a healthy lifestyle in this cohort.

  12. Comparison of mortality risk: a score for very low birthweight infants

    Maier, R.; Rey, M.; Metze, B; Obladen, M.; TARNOW-MORDI, W

    1997-01-01

    AIM—To develop and evaluate a score which quantifies mortality risk in very low birthweight (VLBW) infants (birthweight below 1500 g) at admission to the neonatal intensive care unit.
METHODS—Five hundred and seventy two VLBW infants admitted from 1978 to 1987 were randomly assigned to a cohort (n = 396) for score development and a cohort (n = 176) for score validation. Two hundred and ninety four VLBW infants admitted from 1988 to 1991 were used to compare risk adjusted mortality between the...

  13. Correlation between Progetto Cuore risk score and early cardiovascular damage in never treated subjects

    Bertolini Stefano

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Global cardiovascular risk is a new approach which allows the physicians to quantitate the prognosis of the patients. It is therefore possible that a score, based on the major cardiovascular risk factors, is correlated with some degree of cardiovascular anatomic damage. Since this hypothesis has been demonstrated with the Framingham risk score, we decided to verify it using another score (Progetto Cuore risk score, which is probably more precise in a european low-risk population, such as the italian one. Methods We studied 84 italian caucasian subjects (50 males and 34 females with elevated blood pressure and/or dyslipidemia plus other possible cardiovascular risk factors. The subjects have never been treated for these reasons. The following evaluations were performed: history, clinical and laboratory determinations, echocardiogram, carotid echodoppler. Results The recruited people were on the whole characterized by a low cardiovascular risk, as confirmed by the low scores of the Progetto Cuore. Simple linear regression analysis showed significant associations between some parameters of early cardiovascular damage (left ventricular mass, intima-media thickness, and an integrated measure of both the carotid wall thickness and the presence of a plaque, called Carotid score and some predictors. The highest significance was found between the cardiovascular structural results and the Progetto Cuore score. In a multivariate regression analysis our model, which included factors potentially linked to the cardiovascular anatomic changes, demonstrated that the Carotid score was significantly associated with age, sex and pulse pressure; intima-media thickness with the same factors and, in addition, with the body mass index; left ventricular mass with sex, pulse pressure and body mass index. Conclusion Our paper confirms previous studies about the association between a comprehensive risk score and signs of early cardiovascular damage. A

  14. How much does HDL cholesterol add to risk estimation? A report from the SCORE Investigators.

    Cooney, Marie Therese

    2009-06-01

    Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE), the risk estimation system recommended by the European guidelines on cardiovascular disease prevention, estimates 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease mortality based on age, sex, country of origin, systolic blood pressure, smoking status and either total cholesterol (TC) or TC\\/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio. As, counterintuitively, these two systems perform very similarly, we have investigated whether incorporating HDL-C and TC as separate variables improves risk estimation.

  15. Are the myocardial infarction risk factors the same in survived and dead patients

    Coronary heart disease is one of the most common diseases causing mortality and morbidity in industrialized and developing countries. The first presentation in 25% of cases is sudden cardiac death. The most common risk factors in dead people are hypercholesterolemia. This study was carried out to compare the prevalence of risk factors in patients hospitalized in CCU's and cardiology departments (case group) and people who died because of sudden death myocardial infarction before arriving at hospitals (control group). This study was a case-control one, carried out on 154 patients and 112 dead persons. The questionnaires were completed after referring to their first relatives and the documents, in control group and in case group, were completed from patients and their records in hospitals. Then history of risk factor were compared. The ratio of men/women in the first group (hospitalized patients) was 3 and the second group (dead patients) were 1.7 (P=0.000). The peak ages in men of both groups were 60 to 69 years old, 2-3 times more than women in both groups. The most prevalent risk factor in women of both groups was hypertension, the same as in men of the control group. But the most prevalent risk factor in men of the case group was smoking (P=0.000). So, primary prevention which has a great role in controlling coronary artery disease is suggested

  16. Antipsychotics and Mortality: Adjusting for Mortality Risk Scores to Address Confounding by Terminal Illness

    Park, Yoonyoung; Franklin, Jessica M.; Schneeweiss, Sebastian; Levin, Raisa; Crystal, Stephen; Gerhard, Tobias; Huybrechts, Krista F.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Earlier studies have documented a greater mortality risk associated with conventional compared with atypical antipsychotics. Concern remains that the association is not causal, but due to residual confounding by differences in underlying health. To address this concern, we evaluated whether adjustment for prognostic indices specifically developed fornursing home (NH) populations affected the magnitude of the previously observed associations. DESIGN Cohort study SETTING A merged dataset of Medicaid, Medicare, the Minimum Data Set (MDS), the Online Survey Certification and Reporting system (OSCAR), and the National Death Index in the US for 2001-2005 PARTICIPANTS Dual eligible subjects ≥ 65 years who initiated antipsychotic treatment in a NH (n=75,445). MEASUREMENTS Three mortality risk scores (MRIS, MMRI-R, and ADEPT) were derived for each patient using baseline MDS data, and their performance was assessed using c-statistics and goodness-of-fit tests. The impact of adjusting for these indices in addition to propensity scores (PS) on the antipsychotic-mortality association was evaluated using Cox models with and without adjustment for risk scores. RESULTS Each risk score showed moderate discrimination for 6-month mortality with c-statistics ranging from 0.61 to 0.63. There was no evidence of lack of fit. Imbalances in risk scores between conventional and atypical antipsychotic users in the full cohort, suggesting potential confounding, were greatly reduced within PS deciles. Accounting for each score in the Cox model did not change the relative risk estimates: 2.24 with PS only adjustment vs. 2.20, 2.20, 2.22 after further adjustment for the three risk scores. CONCLUSION Although causality cannot be proven based on non-randomized studies, this study adds to the body of evidence rejecting alternative explanations for the increased mortality risk associated with conventional antipsychotics. PMID:25752911

  17. Revising the link between proton-pump inhibitors and risk of acute myocardial infarction-a case-crossover analysis.

    Turkiewicz, Aleksandra; Perez Vicente, Raquel; Ohlsson, Henrik; Tydén, Patrik; Merlo, Juan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate if the prescription of proton-pump inhibitors (PPIs) was associated with a sudden risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) while controlling for time-invariant confounding by using a case-crossover design. An association might indicate that physicians take prodromal symptoms of myocardial ischaemia for dyspepsia.

  18. Toenail cerium levels and risk of a first acute myocardial infarction: The EURAMIC and heavy metals study

    Gomez-Aracena, J.; Riemersma, R.A.; Veer, van 't P.; Kok, F.J.

    2006-01-01

    The association between cerium status and risk of first acute myocardial infarction (AMI) was examined in a case-control study in 10 centres from Europe and Israel. Cerium in toenails was assessed by neutron activation analysis in 684 cases and 724 controls aged 70years or younger. Mean concentratio

  19. The Impact of Fasting on the Interpretation of Triglyceride Levels for Predicting Myocardial Infarction Risk in HIV-Positive Individuals

    Lundgren, Jens

    2011-01-01

    We assessed whether fasting modifies the prognostic value of these measurements for the risk of myocardial infarction (MI). Analyses used mixed effect models and Poisson regression. After confounders were controlled for, fasting triglyceride levels were, on average, 0.122 mmol/L lower than nonfas...

  20. Income as mediator of the effect of occupation on the risk of myocardial infarction: does the income measurement matter?

    Andersen, Ingelise; Gamborg, Michael; Osler, Merete;

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the effect of occupational grade on the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) is mediated by income with different aspects of income taken into account. METHODS: Data were used from three prospective population studies conducted in Copenhagen. A total of 16 665 employees...

  1. Clinical Characteristics and Risk Factors of Left Ventricular Thrombus after Acute Myocardial Infarction: A Matched Case-control Study

    Yue-Xin Jiang

    2015-01-01

    Conclusions: This study indicated that lower LVEF, extensive anterior myocardial infarction, severe RWMA, and left ventricular aneurysm were independent risk factors of LVT after AMI. It also suggested that further efforts are needed for the LVT diagnosis after AMI in clinical practice.

  2. Effects of epilepsy and selected antiepileptic drugs on risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and death in patients with or without previous stroke: a nationwide cohort study

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Abildstrøm, Steen Zabell; Erdal, Jesper;

    2011-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy have increased morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and death associated with epilepsy and examined if this risk was modified by treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs).......Patients with epilepsy have increased morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the risk of myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, and death associated with epilepsy and examined if this risk was modified by treatment with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs)....

  3. Cardiovascular disease risk score prediction models for women and its applicability to Asians

    Goh LGH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Louise GH Goh,1 Satvinder S Dhaliwal,1 Timothy A Welborn,2 Peter L Thompson,2–4 Bruce R Maycock,1 Deborah A Kerr,1 Andy H Lee,1 Dean Bertolatti,1 Karin M Clark,1 Rakhshanda Naheed,1 Ranil Coorey,1 Phillip R Della5 1School of Public Health, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 2Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Perth, WA, Australia; 3School of Population Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, WA, Australia; 4Harry Perkins Institute for Medical Research, Perth, WA, Australia; 5School of Nursing and Midwifery, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Purpose: Although elevated cardiovascular disease (CVD risk factors are associated with a higher risk of developing heart conditions across all ethnic groups, variations exist between groups in the distribution and association of risk factors, and also risk levels. This study assessed the 10-year predicted risk in a multiethnic cohort of women and compared the differences in risk between Asian and Caucasian women. Methods: Information on demographics, medical conditions and treatment, smoking behavior, dietary behavior, and exercise patterns were collected. Physical measurements were also taken. The 10-year risk was calculated using the Framingham model, SCORE (Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation risk chart for low risk and high risk regions, the general CVD, and simplified general CVD risk score models in 4,354 females aged 20–69 years with no heart disease, diabetes, or stroke at baseline from the third Australian Risk Factor Prevalence Study. Country of birth was used as a surrogate for ethnicity. Nonparametric statistics were used to compare risk levels between ethnic groups. Results: Asian women generally had lower risk of CVD when compared to Caucasian women. The 10-year predicted risk was, however, similar between Asian and Australian women, for some models. These findings were

  4. Aggregate National Early Warning Score (NEWS) values are more important than high scores for a single vital signs parameter for discriminating the risk of adverse outcomes

    Jarvis, Stuart; Kovacs, Caroline; Briggs, Jim; Meredith, Paul; Schmidt, Paul E.; Featherstone, Peter I.; Prytherch, David; Smith, Gary B.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The Royal College of Physicians (RCPL) National Early Warning Score (NEWS) escalates care to a doctor at NEWS values of ≥5 and when the score for any single vital sign is 3. Methods We calculated the 24-h risk of serious clinical outcomes for vital signs observation sets with NEWS values of 3, 4 and 5, separately determining risks when the score did/did not include a single score of 3. We compared workloads generated by the RCPL's escalation protocol and for aggregate NEWS value ...

  5. Levothyroxine substitution in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism and the risk of myocardial infarction and mortality

    Andersen, Mette Nygaard; Olsen, Anne-Marie Schjerning; Madsen, Jesper Clausager;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subclinical hypothyroidism is associated with a number of cardiovascular risk factors, yet only limited data exist on long-term outcome of levothyroxine treatment of this condition with respect to hard end-points. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to determine effects...... of levothyroxine treatment on myocardial infarction (MI), cardiovascular death and all-cause mortality, in patients with subclinical hypothyroidism. METHODS AND RESULTS: Primary care patients aged 18 years and older that underwent thyroid function tests between 2000 and 2009 were enrolled. Participants were...... identified by individual-level linkage of nationwide registers. Patients with subclinical hypothyroidism at baseline were included in the study. Exclusion criteria included a history of thyroid disease, related medication or medication affecting thyroid function. The total cohort comprised 628,953 patients...

  6. Does childhood misfortune raise the risk of acute myocardial infarction in adulthood?

    Morton, Patricia M; Mustillo, Sarah A; Ferraro, Kenneth F

    2014-03-01

    Whereas most research on acute myocardial infarction (AMI) has focused on more proximal influences, such as adult health behaviors, the present study examines the early origins of AMI. Longitudinal data were drawn from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (N = 3032), a nationally representative survey of men and women aged 25-74, which spans from 1995 to 2005. A series of event history analyses modeling age of first AMI investigated the direct effects of accumulated and separate domains of childhood misfortune as well as the mediating effects of adult health lifestyle and psychosocial factors. Findings reveal that accumulated childhood misfortune and child maltreatment increased AMI risk, net of several adult covariates, including family history of AMI. Smoking fully mediated the effects of both accumulated childhood misfortune and child maltreatment. These findings reveal the importance of the early origins of AMI and health behaviors as mediating factors. PMID:24581071

  7. Cardiovascular Outcomes in the Outpatient Kidney Transplant Clinic: The Framingham Risk Score Revisited

    Kiberd, Bryce; Panek, Romuald

    2008-01-01

    Background and objectives: Cardiovascular disease is an important cause of morbidity and death in kidney transplant recipients. This study examines the Framingham risk score's ability to predict cardiac and stroke events. Because cyclosporine and tacrolimus have different cardiovascular risk profiles, these agents were also examined.

  8. Patients with knee osteoarthritis undergoing total knee arthroplasty have a lower risk of subsequent severe cardiovascular events: propensity score and instrumental variable analysis.

    Wen-Yan Lin

    Full Text Available This population-based study investigated the subsequent cardiovascular risk of patients with knee osteoarthritis underwent total knee arthroplasty in Taiwan.This was a population-based follow-up study of 22931 patients diagnosed with knee osteoarthritis between 2008 and 2011. Each patient was followed for 3 years or until death. Treatment was dichotomized into conservative treatment and TKA. The association between TKA and cardiovascular disease (CVD events was analyzed using propensity score analysis and instrumental variable analysis and two-stage least-squares regression model.Patients with knee osteoarthritis who underwent TKA had a lower 3-year cumulative risk of stroke and acute myocardial infarction (AMI. After adjusting for measured risk and confounding factors, propensity score showed a 0.56 fold (adjusted OR = 0.56; 95% CI, 0.51-0.61; p<0.001 risk for CVD in those with TKA. Use of instrumental variable analysis for adjusting measured and unmeasured factors and two-stage least squares regression model revealed that the average treatment effect of TKA was statistically associated with a decreased 7% risk of CVD events (95% CI, 0.2%-13.6%.Our study revealed that patients with knee osteoarthritis who underwent TKA had a lower risk of suffering from a future severe cardiovascular event. This benefit may be attributed to an improvement in physical activity, reduction of psychosocial stress, and/or a decreased use of NSAIDs as a result of having undergone TKA.

  9. Low amniotic fluid index in high risk pregnancy and poor apgar score at birth

    To determine the accuracy of antepartum Amniotic Fluid Index (AFI) of 5 cm was labeled as predictor of good outcome at birth. The subjects in both the groups were demographically matched and fulfilled the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The Apgar score was calculated at 5 minutes of birth. The newborns, with Apgar score 6 were labeled as healthy. AFI was compared with Apgar score, using Chi-square and a p-value was calculated to determine the statistical significance. Sensitivity, specificity, efficiency and the predictive values of AFI at a cut off point of < 5 cm as a predictor of adverse outcome at birth (Apgar score of < 6 at 5 minutes of birth) in high-risk pregnancy were calculated. Only 8 neonates of 50 women with low AFI had low Apgar score. Similarly, 6 neonates of 50 women with normal AFI had poor Apgar score. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value and efficiency of AFI as test were 57.1%, 51.3%, 16%, 88% and 52% respectively. Low AFI is a poor predictor of adverse outcome for high-risk term patients. AFI is not a good screening test for high-risk pregnant women at term for birth of an infant with low Apgar score. (author)

  10. Genetic Variants Of Cytochrome b-245, Alpha Polypeptide Gene And Premature Acute Myocardial Infarction Risk In An Iranian Population

    Amin Fatemeh

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Oxidative stress induced by superoxide anion plays critical roles in the pathogenesis of coronary artery disease (CAD and hence acute myocardial infarction (AMI. The major source of superoxide production in vascular smooth muscle and endothelial cells is the NADPH oxidase complex. An essential component of this complex is p22phox, that is encoded by the cytochrome b-245, alpha polypeptide (CYBA gene. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of CYBA variants (rs1049255 and rs4673 and premature acute myocardial infarction risk in an Iranian population.

  11. Heart Transplant Survival Based on Recipient and Donor Risk Scoring: A UNOS Database Analysis.

    Trivedi, Jaimin R; Cheng, Allen; Ising, Mickey; Lenneman, Andrew; Birks, Emma; Slaughter, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the lung allocation score, currently, there is no quantitative scoring system available for patients on heart transplant waiting list. By using United Network for Organ Sharing (UNOS) data, we aim to generate a scoring system based on the recipient and donor risk factors to predict posttransplant survival. Available UNOS data were queried between 2005 and 2013 for heart transplant recipients aged ≥18 years to create separate cox-proportional hazard models for recipient and donor risk scoring. On the basis of risk scores, recipients were divided into five groups and donors into three groups. Kaplan-Meier curves were used for survival. Total 17,131 patients had heart transplant within specified time period. Major factors within high-risk groups were body mass index > 30 kg/m (46%), mean pulmonary artery pressure >30 mmHg (65%), creatinine > 1.5 mg% (63%), bilirubin > 1.5 mg% (54%), noncontinuous-flow left ventricular assist devices (45%) for recipients and gender mismatch (81%) and ischemia time >4 hours (88%) for donors. Survival in recipient groups 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 at 5 years was 81, 80, 77, 74, and 62%, respectively, and in donor groups 1, 2, and 3 at 5 years was 79, 77, and 70%, respectively (p transplanted with high-risk donor has acceptable survival at 5 years, but high-risk recipient combined with a high-risk donor has marginal results. Using an objective scoring system could help get the best results when utilizing high-risk donors. PMID:26771395

  12. Risk Factors of Reperfusion Failure following Primary Angioplasty for ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction (STEMI

    HamidReza Sanati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Although  percutaneous  coronary  intervention  (PCI  improves  outcomes  compared  to  thrombolysis,  a substantial number of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI patients do not achieve optimal myocardial reperfusion. This study was designed to evaluate factors related to suboptimal myocardial reperfusion after primary PCI in patients with STEMI.Methods: Totally, 155 patients (124 men; mean age = 56.6 ± 11.03 years, range = 31- 85 years with STEMI undergoing primary PCI were retrospectively studied. Additionally, the relationships between the occurrence of reperfusion failure and variables such as age, sex, cardiac risk factors, family history, Body Mass Index, time of symptom onset, ejection fraction, previous PCI, coronary artery bypass graft surgery or previous myocardial infarction, and angiographic data were analyzed. Results: Procedural success was 97.1% and complete ST resolution occurred in 43.2%. Age; cardiac risk factors; family history; body mass index; previous MI, coronary artery bypass graft surgery, or PCI; and use of thrombectomy device and GPIIb/IIIa inhibitor were not the determining factors (p value > 0.05. According to our multivariate analysis, time of symptom onset (OR [95% CI]: 045 [0.2 to 0.98]; p value = 0.044 and ejection fraction (OR [95% CI]:0.37 [0.26 to .091]; p value = 0.050 had reverse and male gender had direct significant associations with failed reperfusion (OR [95%CI]:0.34 [0.11 to 1.08]; p value = 0.068. More degrees of ST resolution occurred when the right coronary artery was the culpritvessel (p value = 0.001. The presence of more than three cardiac risk factors was associated with failed reperfusion (p value= 0.050.Conclusion: Considering the initial risk profile of patients with acute STEMI, including time of symptom onset and ejection fraction, as well as the accumulation of cardiac risk factors in a given patient, we could predict failed myocardial reperfusion to design a

  13. Atherosclerotic risk factors and their association with hospital mortality among patients with first myocardial infarction (from the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction).

    Canto, John G; Kiefe, Catarina I; Rogers, William J; Peterson, Eric D; Frederick, Paul D; French, William J; Gibson, C Michael; Pollack, Charles V; Ornato, Joseph P; Zalenski, Robert J; Penney, Jan; Tiefenbrunn, Alan J; Greenland, Philip

    2012-11-01

    Few studies have examined associations between atherosclerotic risk factors and short-term mortality after first myocardial infarction (MI). Histories of 5 traditional atherosclerotic risk factors at presentation (diabetes, hypertension, smoking, dyslipidemia, and family history of premature heart disease) and hospital mortality were examined among 542,008 patients with first MIs in the National Registry of Myocardial Infarction (1994 to 2006). On initial MI presentation, history of hypertension (52.3%) was most common, followed by smoking (31.3%). The least common risk factor was diabetes (22.4%). Crude mortality was highest in patients with MI with diabetes (11.9%) and hypertension (9.8%) and lowest in those with smoking histories (5.4%) and dyslipidemia (4.6%). The inclusion of 5 atherosclerotic risk factors in a stepwise multivariate model contributed little toward predicting hospital mortality over age alone (C-statistic = 0.73 and 0.71, respectively). After extensive multivariate adjustments for clinical and sociodemographic factors, patients with MI with diabetes had higher odds of dying (odds ratio [OR] 1.23, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.20 to 1.26) than those without diabetes and similarly for hypertension (OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.06 to 1.11). Conversely, family history (OR 0.71, 95% CI 0.69 to 0.73), dyslipidemia (OR 0.62, 95% CI 0.60 to 0.64), and smoking (OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.83 to 0.88) were associated with decreased mortality (C-statistic = 0.82 for the full model). In conclusion, in the setting of acute MI, histories of diabetes and hypertension are associated with higher hospital mortality, but the inclusion of atherosclerotic risk factors in models of hospital mortality does not improve predictive ability beyond other major clinical and sociodemographic characteristics. PMID:22840346

  14. Relative Risk of Acute Myocardial Infarction in People with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorder: A Population-Based Cohort Study

    Shu-I Wu; Su-Chiu Chen; Shen-Ing Liu; Fang-Ju Sun; Jimmy J M Juang; Hsin-Chien Lee; Kai-Liang Kao; Dewey, Michael E; Martin Prince; Robert Stewart

    2015-01-01

    Objective Despite high mortality associated with serious mental illness, risk of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) remains unclear, especially for patients with bipolar disorder. The main objective was to investigate the relative risk of AMI associated with schizophrenia and bipolar disorders in a national sample. Method Using nationwide administrative data, an 11-year historic cohort study was assembled, comprised of cases aged 18 and above who had received a diagnosis of schizophrenia or bi...

  15. Risk Pricing in Emerging Economies: Credit Scoring and Private Banking in Iran

    Yiannis Anagnostopoulos; Milad Abedi

    2016-01-01

    Iran’s banking industry as a developing country is comparatively very new to risk management practices. An inevitable predictive implication of this rapid growth is the growing concerns with regard to credit risk management which is the motivation of conducting this research. The paper focuses on the credit scoring aspect of credit risk management using both logit and probit regression approaches. Real data on corporate customers are available for conducting this research which is also a cont...

  16. Serum Gamma-Glutamyltransferase Concentration Correlates with Framingham Risk Score in Koreans

    Kim, Kyu-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Min; Lee, Duck-Joo; Joo, Nam-Seok

    2011-01-01

    Gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) is a novel coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factor, but its use as an independent factor for CAD risk prediction remains unclear in Asian population. This study examined the association between serum GGT concentration and Framingham risk score (FRS) in the Korean population. This cross-sectional study was performed on 30,710 Koreans. Besides FRS, body mass index, fasting blood glucose, liver enzymes, lipid profile, uric acid and high sensitive C-reactive prot...

  17. Validation of the pooled cohort risk score in an Asian population – a retrospective cohort study

    Chia, Yook Chin; Lim, Hooi Min; Ching, Siew Mooi

    2014-01-01

    Background The Pooled Cohort Risk Equation was introduced by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and American Heart Association (AHA) 2013 in their Blood Cholesterol Guideline to estimate the 10-year atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) risk. However, absence of Asian ethnicity in the contemporary cohorts and limited studies to examine the use of the risk score limit the applicability of the equation in an Asian population. This study examines the validity of the pooled cohort ...

  18. The CAIDE Dementia Risk Score App: The development of an evidence-based mobile application to predict the risk of dementia

    Sindi, Shireen; Calov, Elisabeth; Fokkens, Jasmine; Ngandu, Tiia; Soininen, Hilkka; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Kivipelto, Miia

    2015-01-01

    Background The CAIDE (Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging, and Incidence of Dementia) Dementia Risk Score is a validated tool to predict late-life dementia risk (20 years later), based on midlife vascular risk factors. The goal was to render this prediction tool widely accessible. Methods The CAIDE Risk Score (mobile application) App was developed based on the CAIDE Dementia Risk Score, involving information on age, educational level, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, obesity, and physical i...

  19. Unsupervised deep learning applied to breast density segmentation and mammographic risk scoring

    Kallenberg, Michiel Gijsbertus J; Petersen, Peter Kersten; Nielsen, Mads;

    2016-01-01

    Mammographic risk scoring has commonly been automated by extracting a set of handcrafted features from mammograms, and relating the responses directly or indirectly to breast cancer risk. We present a method that learns a feature hierarchy from unlabeled data. When the learned features are used as...... the input to a simple classifier, two different tasks can be addressed: i) breast density segmentation, and ii) scoring of mammographic texture. The proposed model learns features at multiple scales. To control the models capacity a novel sparsity regularizer is introduced that incorporates both...... lifetime and population sparsity. We evaluated our method on three different clinical datasets. Our state-of-the-art results show that the learned breast density scores have a very strong positive relationship with manual ones, and that the learned texture scores are predictive of breast cancer. The model...

  20. Association between selected dietary scores and the risk of urothelial cell carcinoma: A prospective cohort study.

    Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Hodge, Allison M; Brinkman, Maree T; Bassett, Julie K; Shivappa, Nitin; Hebert, James R; Hopper, John L; English, Dallas R; Milne, Roger L; Giles, Graham G

    2016-09-15

    Studies investigating the association of food and nutrient consumption with the risk of urothelial cell carcinoma (UCC) have produced mixed results. We used three common dietary scores, the Mediterranean Diet Score (MDS), the Alternate Healthy Eating Index 2010 (AHEI-2010) and the Dietary Inflammatory Index (DII) to assess the evidence of an association between diet and the risk of UCC. Over a median follow-up time of 21.3 years, 379 incident UCC cases were diagnosed. Dietary scores were calculated using data from a 121-item food frequency questionnaire administered at baseline. We used Cox models to compute hazard ratios (HR) for the association between dietary scores (per one standard deviation) and UCC risk. In order to reflect overall adherence to a healthy diet, a metascore was constructed by summing the quintiles of each of the three scores. None of the dietary scores was associated with the risk of UCC overall. A healthier diet was found to be inversely associated with the risk of invasive (MDS: HR = 0.86, 95% CI: 0.74-1.00, metascore: HR = 0.84, 95% CI: 0.71-0.98), but not superficial disease (heterogeneity between subtypes p = 0.04 and p = 0.03, respectively). Results were consistent but weaker for the DII and the AHEI-2010. We found some evidence of effect modification by smoking, in particular for the metascore (Current: HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.58-1.01, Former: HR = 0.77, 95% CI: 0.64-0.92, Never: HR = 1.01, 95% CI: 0.81-1.26, p for heterogeneity = 0.05). A healthy diet may be protective against the risk of invasive, but not superficial, UCC. Promoting healthy dietary habits may help lower the risk of invasive UCC, especially for current and former smokers. PMID:27149545

  1. Multiple rare alleles at LDLR and APOA5 confer risk for early-onset myocardial infarction

    Do, Ron; Stitziel, Nathan O; Won, Hong-Hee; Jørgensen, Anders Berg; Tybjærg-Hansen, Anne

    2015-01-01

    early age (≤50 years in males and ≤60 years in females) along with MI-free controls. We identified two genes where rare coding-sequence mutations were more frequent in cases versus controls at exome-wide significance. At low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR), carriers of rare, damaging mutations (3......Myocardial infarction (MI), a leading cause of death around the world, displays a complex pattern of inheritance1,2. When MI occurs early in life, the role of inheritance is substantially greater1. Previously, rare mutations in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) genes have been shown to contribute to MI...... risk in individual families3–8 whereas common variants at more than 45 loci have been associated with MI risk in the population9–15. Here, we evaluate the contribution of rare mutations to MI risk in the population. We sequenced the protein-coding regions of 9,793 genomes from patients with MI at an...

  2. Serial assessment of the area at risk in myocardial infarction with Gd-DTPA-enhanced MR imaging in humans

    Experimental studies have shown that the region of increased myocardial signal intensity with Gd-DTPA correlates with the area at risk but overestimates the infarct size. The authors have assessed the evolution of the area at risk in acute myocardial infarction in seven patients, using Gd-DTPA enhanced MR imaging at 1 and 2 weeks after the acute event. Multisection MR imaging of the total left ventricle was performed at 0.5 T after injection of 0.2 mmol/kg of Gd-DTPA. The area with a signal intensity greater than that of normal myocardium (± 2SDs) was designated as the area at risk in each section. The summation of these areas was measured by two observers at 1 and 2 weeks after infarction; intra- and interobserver variability was 3%. The area at risk ranged from 3% to 18%; at 2 weeks the size of the area at risk showed only slight changes (P = not significant). The authors discuss how Gd- DTPA enhances the area at risk and may be useful in assessing the evolution of the size of this area

  3. Dickkopf-1 as a novel predictor is associated with risk stratification by GRACE risk scores for predictive value in patients with acute coronary syndrome: a retrospective research.

    Lin Wang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Dickkopf-1 (DKK-1, a major regulator of the Wnt pathway, plays an important role in cardiovascular disease. However, no study has evaluated the association of DKK-1 and acute coronary syndrome (ACS. We investigated this association and whether the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE hospital-discharge risk score predicting major adverse cardiac events (MACE can be improved by adding the DKK-1 value. METHODS: We enrolled 291 patients (46 with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction [STEMI] and 245 with non-ST elevated ACS [NSTE-ACS] who were divided into groups by tertiles of baseline plasma DKK-1 level measured by ELISA. The GRACE risk score was calculated and predictive value alone and together with DKK-1 and/or high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP level were assessed, respectively. RESULTS: Compared with patients with NSTE-ACS, those with STEMI had higher plasma DKK-1 level at baseline (P = 0.006. Plasma DKK-1 level was correlated with hs-CRP level (r = 0.295, P<0.001 and was greater with high than intermediate or low GRACE scores (P = 0.002 and P<0.001, respectively. We found 44 (15.1% MACEs during a median 2-year follow-up. DKK-1 levels were higher for patients with than without events (P<0.001. The rate of MACE increased with increasing DKK-1 level (P<0.001. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for GRACE score with MACE was 0.524 and improved to 0.791 with the addition of hs-CRP level, 0.775 with the addition of DKK-1 level and 0.847 with both values added. CONCLUSIONS: DKK-1 is an independent predictor of long-term MACE of patients with ACS. The long-term predictive ability of post-discharge GRACE score may be enhanced by adding DKK-1 level.

  4. Preoperative risk score predicting 90-day mortality after liver resection in a population-based study.

    Chang, Chun-Ming; Yin, Wen-Yao; Su, Yu-Chieh; Wei, Chang-Kao; Lee, Cheng-Hung; Juang, Shiun-Yang; Chen, Yi-Ting; Chen, Jin-Cherng; Lee, Ching-Chih

    2014-09-01

    The impact of important preexisting comorbidities, such as liver and renal disease, on the outcome of liver resection remains unclear. Identification of patients at risk of mortality will aid in improving preoperative preparations. The purpose of this study is to develop and validate a population-based score based on available preoperative and predictable parameters predicting 90-day mortality after liver resection using data from a hepatitis endemic country.We identified 13,159 patients who underwent liver resection between 2002 and 2006 in the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. In a randomly selected half of the total patients, multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to develop a prediction score for estimating the risk of 90-day mortality by patient demographics, preoperative liver disease and comorbidities, indication for surgery, and procedure type. The score was validated with the remaining half of the patients.Overall 90-day mortality was 3.9%. Predictive characteristics included in the model were age, preexisting cirrhosis-related complications, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, cerebrovascular disease, renal disease, malignancy, and procedure type. Four risk groups were stratified by mortality scores of 1.1%, 2.2%, 7.7%, and 15%. Preexisting renal disease and cirrhosis-related complications were the strongest predictors. The score discriminated well in both the derivation and validation sets with c-statistics of 0.75 and 0.75, respectively.This population-based score could identify patients at risk of 90-day mortality before liver resection. Preexisting renal disease and cirrhosis-related complications had the strongest influence on mortality. This score enables preoperative risk stratification, decision-making, quality assessment, and counseling for individual patients. PMID:25211044

  5. The value of the CHA2DS2-VASc score for refining stroke risk stratification in patients with atrial fibrillation with a CHADS2 score 0-1

    Olesen, Jonas Bjerring; Torp-Pedersen, Christian; Hansen, Morten Lock;

    2012-01-01

    associated with increasing CHA2DS2-VASc score was estimated in Cox regression models adjusted for year of inclusion and antiplatelet therapy. The value of adding the extra CHA2DS2-VASc risk factors to the CHADS2 score was evaluated by c-statistics, Net Reclassification Improvement (NRI) and Integrated....... Of the cohort with a CHADS2 score of 0-1, the stroke/thromboembolism rate per 100 person-years increased with increasing CHA2DS2-VASc score (95% confidence interval): 0.84 (0.65-1.08), 1.79 (1.53-2.09), 3.67 (3.34-4.03), 5.75 (5.33-6.21), and 8.18 (6.68-10.02) at one year follow-up with CHA2DS2-VASc scores of 0......DS2-VASc score significantly improved the predictive value of the CHADS2 score alone and a CHA2DS2-VASc score=0 could clearly identify 'truly low risk' subjects. Use of the CHA2DS2-VASc score would significantly improve classification of AF patients at low and intermediate risk of stroke, compared...

  6. High Agatston Calcium Score of Intracranial Carotid Artery: A Significant Risk Factor for Cognitive Impairment.

    Kao, Hung-Wen; Liou, Michelle; Chung, Hsiao-Wen; Liu, Hua-Shan; Tsai, Ping-Huei; Chiang, Shih-Wei; Chou, Ming-Chung; Peng, Giia-Sheun; Huang, Guo-Shu; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chen, Cheng-Yu

    2015-09-01

    The effect of intracranial internal carotid artery (ICA) calcification on cognitive impairment is uncertain. Our objective was to investigate whether intracranial ICA calcification is a significant cognitive predictor for cognitive impairment. Global cognition and degrees of intracranial ICA calcification of 579 subjects were assessed with Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) and Agatston calcium scoring method, respectively. Other risk factors for cognitive impairment, including age, education level, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, smoking, hyperlipidemia, and body mass index, were documented and analyzed for their associations with cognitive function. In univariate analyses, older age, lower education level, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and higher intracranial ICA Agatston scores were significantly associated with cognitive impairment. In ordinal logistic regression, only age and total intracranial ICA Agatston score were significant risk factors for cognitive impairment. After adjustment for the other documented risk factors, subjects were 7% (95% CI: 5-10; P calcification on cognitive impairment. PMID:26426620

  7. A Risk Score to Predict Hypertension in Primary Care Settings in Rural India.

    Sathish, Thirunavukkarasu; Kannan, Srinivasan; Sarma, P Sankara; Razum, Oliver; Thrift, Amanda Gay; Thankappan, Kavumpurathu Raman

    2016-01-01

    We used the data of 297 participants (15-64 years old) from a cohort study (2003-2010) who were free from hypertension at baseline, to develop a risk score to predict hypertension by primary health care workers in rural India. Age ≥35 years, current smoking, prehypertension, and central obesity were significantly associated with incident hypertension. The optimal cutoff value of ≥3 had a sensitivity of 78.6%, specificity of 65.2%, positive predictive value of 41.1%, and negative predictive value of 90.8%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the risk score was 0.802 (95% confidence interval = 0.748-0.856). This simple and easy to administer risk score could be used to predict hypertension in primary care settings in rural India. PMID:26354334

  8. Predicting progression of IgA nephropathy: new clinical progression risk score.

    Jingyuan Xie

    Full Text Available IgA nephropathy (IgAN is a common cause of end-stage renal disease (ESRD in Asia. In this study, based on a large cohort of Chinese patients with IgAN, we aim to identify independent predictive factors associated with disease progression to ESRD. We collected retrospective clinical data and renal outcomes on 619 biopsy-diagnosed IgAN patients with a mean follow-up time of 41.3 months. In total, 67 individuals reached the study endpoint defined by occurrence of ESRD necessitating renal replacement therapy. In the fully adjusted Cox proportional hazards model, there were four baseline variables with a significant independent effect on the risk of ESRD. These included: eGFR [HR = 0.96(0.95-0.97], serum albumin [HR = 0.47(0.32-0.68], hemoglobin [HR = 0.79(0.72-0.88], and SBP [HR = 1.02(1.00-1.03]. Based on these observations, we developed a 4-variable equation of a clinical risk score for disease progression. Our risk score explained nearly 22% of the total variance in the primary outcome. Survival ROC curves revealed that the risk score provided improved prediction of ESRD at 24th, 60th and 120th month of follow-up compared to the three previously proposed risk scores. In summary, our data indicate that IgAN patients with higher systolic blood pressure, lower eGFR, hemoglobin, and albumin levels at baseline are at a greatest risk of progression to ESRD. The new progression risk score calculated based on these four baseline variables offers a simple clinical tool for risk stratification.

  9. Assessment of the EuroSCORE risk scoring system for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft surgery in a group of Iranian patients

    Hamidreza Jamaati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: Previous studies around the world indicated validity and accuracy of European System for Cardiac Operative Risk Evaluation (EuroSCORE risk scoring system we evaluated the EuroSCORE risk scoring system for patients undergoing coronary artery bypass graft (CABG surgery in a group of Iranian patients. Materials and Methods: In this cohort 2220 patients more than 18 years, who were performed CABG surgery in Massih Daneshvari Hospital, from January 2004 to March 2010 were recruited. Predicted mortality risk scores were calculated using logistic EuroSCORE and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE II and compared with observed mortality. Calibration was measured by the Hosmer-Lemeshow (HL test and discrimination by using the receiver operating characteristic (ROC curve area. Results: Of the 2220 patients, in hospital deaths occurred in 270 patients (mortality rate of 12.2%. The accuracy of mortality prediction in the logistic EuroSCORE and APACHE II model was 89.1%; in the local EuroSCORE (logistic was 91.89%; and in the local EuroSCORE support vector machines (SVM was 98.6%. The area under curve for ROC curve, was 0.724 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.57-0.88 for logistic EuroSCORE; 0.836 (95% CI: 0.731-0.942 for local EuroSCORE (logistic; 0.978 (95% CI: 0.937-1 for Local EuroSCORE (SVM; and 0.832 (95% CI: 0.723-0.941 for APACHE II model. The HL test showed good calibration for the local EuroSCORE (SVM, APACHE II model and local EuroSCORE (logistic (P = 0.823, P = 0.748 and P = 0.06 respectively; but there was a significant difference between expected and observed mortality according to EuroSCORE model (P = 0.033. Conclusion: We detected logistic EuroSCORE risk model is not applicable on Iranian patients undergoing CABG surgery.

  10. Evaluation of a risk factor scoring model in screening for undiagnosed diabetes in China population

    Jian-jun DONG; Neng-jun LOU; Jia-jun ZHAO; Zhong-wen ZHANG; Lu-lu QIU; Ying ZHOU; Lin LIAO

    2011-01-01

    Objective:To develop a risk scoring model for screening for undiagnosed type 2 diabetes in Chinese population.Methods:A total of 5348 subjects from two districts of Jinan City,Shandong Province,China were enrolled.Group A (2985) included individuals from east of the city and Group B (2363) from west of the city.Screening questionnaires and a standard oral glucose tolerance test (OGTr) were completed by all subjects.Based on the stepwise logistic regression analysis of Group A,variables were selected to establish the risk scoring model.The validity and effectiveness of this model were evaluated in Group B.Results:Based on stepwise logistic regression analysis performed with data of Group A,variables including age,body mass index (BMI),waist-to-hip ratio (WHR),systolic pressure,diastolic pressure,heart rate,family history of diabetes,and history of high glucose were accepted into the risk scoring model.The risk for having diabetes increased along with aggregate scores.When Youden index was closest to 1,the optimal cutoff value was set up at 51.At this point,the diabetes risk scoring model could identify diabetes patients with a sensitivity of 83.3% and a specificity of 66.5%,making the positive predictive value 12.83%and negative predictive value 98.53%.We compared our model with the Finnish and Danish model and concluded that our model has superior validity in Chinese population.Conclusions:Our diabetes risk scoring model has satisfactory sensitivity and specificity for identifying undiagnosed diabetes in our population,which might be a simple and practical tool suitable for massive diabetes screening.