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Sample records for ground reaction force

  1. Ambulatory Measurement of Ground Reaction Forces

    Veltink, Peter H.; Liedtke, Christian; Droog, Ed

    2004-01-01

    The measurement of ground reaction forces is important in the biomechanical analysis of gait and other motor activities. It is the purpose of this study to show the feasibility of ambulatory measurement of ground reaction forces using two six degrees of freedom sensors mounted under the shoe. One se

  2. Ground Reaction Forces in Alternative Footwear during Slip Events

    Harish Chander; John C. Garner; Chip Wade

    2015-01-01

    Slips, trips and falls are major causitive factors for occupational and non-occupational falls. Alternative footwear such has crocs and flip flops have been used in and around work places and communities that can be slip prone environments. The purpose of the study is to analyze the effects of alternative footwear [crocs (CC), flip-flops (FF)] and industry standard slip resistant shoes (LT) on ground reaction forces (GRFs) during slip events. Eighteen healthy male participants following a rep...

  3. Crouched posture maximizes ground reaction forces generated by muscles.

    Hoang, Hoa X; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A

    2012-07-01

    Crouch gait decreases walking efficiency due to the increased knee and hip flexion during the stance phase of gait. Crouch gait is generally considered to be disadvantageous for children with cerebral palsy; however, a crouched posture may allow biomechanical advantages that lead some children to adopt a crouch gait. To investigate one possible advantage of crouch gait, a musculoskeletal model created in OpenSim was placed in 15 different postures from upright to severe crouch during initial, middle, and final stance of the gait cycle for a total of 45 different postures. A series of optimizations was performed for each posture to maximize transverse plane ground reaction forces in the eight compass directions by modifying muscle forces acting on the model. We compared the force profile areas across all postures. Larger force profile areas were allowed by postures from mild crouch (for initial stance) to crouch (for final stance). The overall ability to generate larger ground reaction force profiles represents a mechanical advantage of a crouched posture. This increase in muscle capacity while in a crouched posture may allow a patient to generate new movements to compensate for impairments associated with cerebral palsy, such as motor control deficits. PMID:22542242

  4. Ground Reaction Forces in Alternative Footwear during Slip Events

    Harish Chander

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Slips, trips and falls are major causitive factors for occupational and non-occupational falls. Alternative footwear such has crocs and flip flops have been used in and around work places and communities that can be slip prone environments. The purpose of the study is to analyze the effects of alternative footwear [crocs (CC, flip-flops (FF] and industry standard slip resistant shoes (LT on ground reaction forces (GRFs during slip events. Eighteen healthy male participants following a repeated measures design for each footwear condition, were tested for heel kinematics during normal dry surface gait (NG; unexpected slip (US, alert slip (AS and expected slip (ES. A 3x4 repeated measures ANOVA was used to analyze the dependent vertical GRFs parameters (Mean Z-GRF and Peak Z-GRF at p = 0.05. Significant interactions between footwear and gait trials were found for Mean Z-GRF and significant main effect in gait trials for Peak Z-GRF were evident. On average significantly lower GRFs were seen in slip trials compared to normal gait. FF exhibited significantly lower GRFs during slip trials while LT demonstrated lower GRFs in normal gait. The reduced ground reaction forces during all slip events compared to normal gait can be attributed to the incomplete weight transfer on the slipping foot during the unexpected and alert slips and to the anticipation of the slippery environment in expected slips. Flip flops which had greater incidence of slips also demonstrated reduced GRFs compared to CC and LT during slip events, further suggesting incomplete weight transfer, while during normal gait, LT demonstrated reduced GRFs compared to alternative footwear owing to its cushioning midsole properties. The LT with lowest incidence of slips demonstrates to be the choice of footwear for maneuvering slippery flooring conditions and for reducing impact reaction forces during non-slippery flooring conditions.Keywords: Slips, Falls, Alternative Footwear, Ground Reaction

  5. Systematic review of ground reaction force measurements in cats.

    Schnabl, E; Bockstahler, B

    2015-10-01

    Although orthopaedic abnormalities in cats are frequently observed radiographically, they remain clinically underdiagnosed, and kinetic motion analysis, a fundamental aspect of orthopaedic research in dogs and horses, is not commonly performed. More information obtained with non-invasive measurement techniques to assess normal and abnormal gait in cats would provide a greater insight into their locomotion and biomechanics and improve the objective measurement of disease alterations and treatment modalities. In this systematic review, 12 previously performed studies that investigated ground reaction force measurements in cats during locomotion were evaluated. The aims of these studies, the measurement methods and equipment used, and the outcomes of parameters used to assess both sound and diseased cats are summarised and discussed. All reviewed studies used pressure sensitive walkways to gain data and all provided an acclimatisation period as a prerequisite for measurements. In sound cats during walking, the forelimb peak vertical force was greater than in the hindlimb and the peak vertical force in the hindlimb was greater in cats than in dogs. This review confirms that ground reaction forces can be used to evaluate lameness and treatment effects in the cat. PMID:26118478

  6. Does an instrumented treadmill correctly measure the ground reaction forces?

    Patrick A. Willems

    2013-11-01

    Since the 1990s, treadmills have been equipped with multi-axis force transducers to measure the three components of the ground reaction forces during walking and running. These measurements are correctly performed if the whole treadmill (including the motor is mounted on the transducers. In this case, the acceleration of the treadmill centre of mass relative to the reference frame of the laboratory is nil. The external forces exerted on one side of the treadmill are thus equal in magnitude and opposite in direction to the external forces exerted on the other side. However, uncertainty exists about the accuracy of these measures: due to friction between the belt and the tread-surface, due to the motor pulling the belt, some believe that it is not possible to correctly measure the horizontal components of the forces exerted by the feet on the belt. Here, we propose a simple model of an instrumented treadmill and we demonstrate (1 that the forces exerted by the subject moving on the upper part of the treadmill are accurately transmitted to the transducers placed under it and (2 that all internal forces – including friction – between the parts of the treadmill are cancelling each other.

  7. Computation of ground reaction force using Zero Moment Point.

    Dijkstra, Erik J; Gutierrez-Farewik, Elena M

    2015-11-01

    Motion analysis is a common clinical assessment and research tool that uses a camera system or motion sensors and force plates to collect kinematic and kinetic information of a subject performing an activity of interest. The use of force plates can be challenging and sometimes even impossible. Over the past decade, several computational methods have been developed that aim to preclude the use of force plates. Useful in particular for predictive simulations, where a new motion or change in control strategy inherently means different external contact loads. These methods, however, often depend on prior knowledge of common observed ground reaction force (GRF) patterns, are computationally expensive, or difficult to implement. In this study, we evaluated the use of the Zero Moment Point as a computationally inexpensive tool to obtain the GRFs for normal human gait. The method was applied on ten healthy subjects walking in a motion analysis laboratory and predicted GRFs are evaluated against the simultaneously measured force plate data. Apart from the antero-posterior forces, GRFs are well-predicted and errors fall within the error ranges from other published methods. Joint extension moments were underestimated at the ankle and hip but overestimated at the knee, attributable to the observed discrepancy in the predicted application points of the GRFs. The computationally inexpensive method evaluated in this study can reasonably well predict the GRFs for normal human gait without using prior knowledge of common gait kinetics. PMID:26482731

  8. System of gait analysis based on ground reaction force assessment

    František Vaverka

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Biomechanical analysis of gait employs various methods used in kinematic and kinetic analysis, EMG, and others. One of the most frequently used methods is kinetic analysis based on the assessment of the ground reaction forces (GRF recorded on two force plates. Objective: The aim of the study was to present a method of gait analysis based on the assessment of the GRF recorded during the stance phase of two steps. Methods: The GRF recorded with a force plate on one leg during stance phase has three components acting in directions: Fx - mediolateral, Fy - anteroposterior, and Fz - vertical. A custom-written MATLAB script was used for gait analysis in this study. This software displays instantaneous force data for both legs as Fx(t, Fy(t and Fz(t curves, automatically determines the extremes of functions and sets the visual markers defining the individual points of interest. Positions of these markers can be easily adjusted by the rater, which may be necessary if the GRF has an atypical pattern. The analysis is fully automated and analyzing one trial takes only 1-2 minutes. Results: The method allows quantification of temporal variables of the extremes of the Fx(t, Fy(t, Fz(t functions, durations of the braking and propulsive phase, duration of the double support phase, the magnitudes of reaction forces in extremes of measured functions, impulses of force, and indices of symmetry. The analysis results in a standardized set of 78 variables (temporal, force, indices of symmetry which can serve as a basis for further research and diagnostics. Conclusions: The resulting set of variable offers a wide choice for selecting a specific group of variables with consideration to a particular research topic. The advantage of this method is the standardization of the GRF analysis, low time requirements allowing rapid analysis of a large number of trials in a short time, and comparability of the variables obtained during different research measurements.

  9. Comparison of vertical ground reaction forces during overground and treadmill running. A validation study

    Kluitenberg, Bas; Bredeweg, Steef W.; Zijlstra, Sjouke; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Buist, Ida

    2012-01-01

    Background: One major drawback in measuring ground-reaction forces during running is that it is time consuming to get representative ground-reaction force (GRF) values with a traditional force platform. An instrumented force measuring treadmill can overcome the shortcomings inherent to overground te

  10. Ground reaction forces during human locomotion on railroad ballast.

    Wade, Chip; Redfern, Mark S

    2007-11-01

    Locomotion over ballast surfaces provides a unique situation for investigating the biomechanics of gait. Although much research has focused on level and sloped walking on a smooth, firm surface in order to understand the common kinematic and kinetic variables associated with human locomotion, the literature currently provides few if any discussions regarding the dynamics of locomotion on surfaces that are either rocky or uneven. The purpose of this study was to investigate a method for using force plates to measure the ground reaction forces (GRFs) during gait on ballast. Ballast is a construction aggregate of unsymmetrical rock used in industry for the purpose of forming track bed on which railway ties are laid or in yards where railroad cars are stored. It is used to facilitate the drainage of water and to create even running surfaces. To construct the experimental ballast surfaces, 31.75 mm (1 1/4 in.) marble ballast at depths of approximately 63.5 mm (2.5 in.) or 101.6 mm (4 in.) were spread over a carpeted vinyl tile walkway specially designed for gait studies. GRF magnitudes and time histories from a force plate were collected under normal smooth surface and under both ballast surface conditions for five subjects. GRF magnitudes and time histories during smooth surface walking were similar to GRF magnitudes and time histories from the two ballast surface conditions. The data presented here demonstrate the feasibility of using a force plate system to expand the scope of biomechanical analyses of locomotion on ballast surfaces. PMID:18089931

  11. The Effect of Increasing Inertia upon Vertical Ground Reaction Forces during Locomotion

    DeWitt, John K.; Hagan, R. Donald; Cromwell, Ronita L.

    2007-01-01

    The addition of inertia to exercising astronauts could increase ground reaction forces and potentially provide a greater health benefit. However, conflicting results have been reported regarding the adaptations to additional mass (inertia) without additional net weight (gravitational force) during locomotion. We examined the effect of increasing inertia while maintaining net gravitational force on vertical ground reaction forces and kinematics during walking and running. Vertical ground reaction force was measured for ten healthy adults (5 male/5 female) during walking (1.34 m/s) and running (3.13 m/s) using a force-measuring treadmill. Subjects completed locomotion at normal weight and mass, and at 10, 20, 30, and 40% of added inertial force. The added gravitational force was relieved with overhead suspension, so that the net force between the subject and treadmill at rest remained equal to 100% body weight. Peak vertical impact forces and loading rates increased with increased inertia during walking, and decreased during running. As inertia increased, peak vertical propulsive forces decreased during walking and did not change during running. Stride time increased during walking and running, and contact time increased during running. Vertical ground reaction force production and adaptations in gait kinematics were different between walking and running. The increased inertial forces were utilized independently from gravitational forces by the motor control system when determining coordination strategies.

  12. Forelimb and hindlimb ground reaction forces of walking cats: Assessment and comparison with walking dogs

    Corbee, Ronald; Hazewinkel, Herman; Doornenbal, Arie; Maas, Huub

    2014-01-01

    The primary aim of this study was to assess the potential of force plate analysis for describing the stride cycle of the cat. The secondary aim was to define differences in feline and canine locomotion based on force plate characteristics. Ground reaction forces of 24 healthy cats were measured and

  13. Ground reaction force sensor fault detection and recovery method based on virtual force sensor for walking biped robots

    Hashlamon, Iyad; ERBATUR, Kemalettin

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for ground force sensor faults detection and faulty signal reconstruction using Virtual force Sensor (VFS) for slow walking bipeds. The design structure of the VFS consists of two steps, the total ground reaction force (GRF) and its location estimation for each leg based on the center of mass (CoM) position, the leg kinematics, and the IMU readings is carried on in the first step. In the second step, the optimal estimation of the distributed reaction forces ...

  14. Comparison of vertical ground reaction forces during overground and treadmill running. A validation study

    Kluitenberg Bas

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One major drawback in measuring ground-reaction forces during running is that it is time consuming to get representative ground-reaction force (GRF values with a traditional force platform. An instrumented force measuring treadmill can overcome the shortcomings inherent to overground testing. The purpose of the current study was to determine the validity of an instrumented force measuring treadmill for measuring vertical ground-reaction force parameters during running. Methods Vertical ground-reaction forces of experienced runners (12 male, 12 female were obtained during overground and treadmill running at slow, preferred and fast self-selected running speeds. For each runner, 7 mean vertical ground-reaction force parameters of the right leg were calculated based on five successful overground steps and 30 seconds of treadmill running data. Intraclass correlations (ICC(3,1 and ratio limits of agreement (RLOA were used for further analysis. Results Qualitatively, the overground and treadmill ground-reaction force curves for heelstrike runners and non-heelstrike runners were very similar. Quantitatively, the time-related parameters and active peak showed excellent agreement (ICCs between 0.76 and 0.95, RLOA between 5.7% and 15.5%. Impact peak showed modest agreement (ICCs between 0.71 and 0.76, RLOA between 19.9% and 28.8%. The maximal and average loading-rate showed modest to excellent ICCs (between 0.70 and 0.89, but RLOA were higher (between 34.3% and 45.4%. Conclusions The results of this study demonstrated that the treadmill is a moderate to highly valid tool for the assessment of vertical ground-reaction forces during running for runners who showed a consistent landing strategy during overground and treadmill running. The high stride-to-stride variance during both overground and treadmill running demonstrates the importance of measuring sufficient steps for representative ground-reaction force values. Therefore, an

  15. Validation of vertical ground reaction forces on individual limbs calculated from kinematics of horse locomotion

    Bobbert, M.F.; Alvarez, C.B.; Weeren, van, Harald; Roepstorff, L.; Weishaupt, M A

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether individual limb forces could be calculated accurately from kinematics of trotting and walking horses. We collected kinematic data and measured vertical ground reaction forces on the individual limbs of seven Warmblood dressage horses, trotting at 3.4 m s(-1) and walking at 1.6 m s(-1) on a treadmill. First, using a segmental model, we calculated from kinematics the total ground reaction force vector and its moment arm relative to each of the ...

  16. RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SPRINT VELOCITIES, HORIZONTAL GROUND REACTION FORCE, AND ISOKINETIC TRUNK STRENGTH VARIABLES

    Kale Mehmet

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among sprint velocities, horizontal ground reaction force, and isokinetic trunk strength variables. Voluntary 19 athletes were participated to the study [age (year= 20.9±2.3, training age (month= 91.3±48.2, body height (cm= 173.1±6.5, body weight (kg= 64.7±8.4] from different sports including in explosive strength. Sprints (10m, 20m, 30m, and 40m were tested on a non-motorized treadmill. Velocities (V10m, V20m, V30m, and V40m and horizontal ground reaction forces (HGRF-10m, HGRF-20m, HGRF-30m, and HGRF-40m of the sprints were calculated. Isokinetic trunk strength criteria (flexion-extension peak torques at 3 different angular velocities (30o.s-1, 90o.s-1, and 120o.s-1 were tested. Pearson Correlation Coefficient was used for statistical analysis. Probability level was p≤0.05. All sprint velocities was correlated with all horizontal ground reaction forces (except the correlation between V10m and HGRF-20m and all isokinetic trunk flexion-extension peak torques (except the correlation between V10m and isokinetic trunk flexion peak torque at 120o.s-1. Statistically highest significant correlations have been found between V40m and all horizontal ground reaction forces and also between V40m and isokinetic trunk flexion-extension peak torques (30o.s-1, 90o.s-1, and 120o.s-1. There were significant relationships of horizontal ground reaction forces with isokinetic trunk extension-flexion peak torques at 30o.s-1, 90o.s-1, and 120o.s-1. In conclusion, isokinetic trunk flexion and extension strength values are crucial for improving sprint acceleration and horizontal component of ground reaction force.

  17. BILATERAL GROUND REACTION FORCES AND JOINT MOMENTS FOR LATERAL SIDESTEPPING AND CROSSOVER STEPPING TASKS

    William I. Sellers

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Racquet sports have high levels of joint injuries suggesting the joint loads during play may be excessive. Sports such as badminton employ lateral sidestepping (SS and crossover stepping (XS movements which so far have not been described in terms of biomechanics. This study examined bilateral ground reaction forces and three dimensional joint kinetics for both these gaits in order to determine the demands of the movements on the leading and trailing limb and predict the contribution of these movements to the occurrence of overuse injury of the lower limbs. A force platform and motion-analysis system were used to record ground reaction forces and track marker trajectories of 9 experienced male badminton players performing lateral SS, XS and forward running tasks at a controlled speed of 3 m·s-1 using their normal technique. Ground reaction force and kinetic data for the hip, knee and ankle were analyzed, averaged across the group and the biomechanical variables compared. In all cases the ground reaction forces and joint moments were less than those experienced during moderate running suggesting that in normal play SS and XS gaits do not lead to high forces that could contribute to increased injury risk. Ground reaction forces during SS and XS do not appear to contribute to the development of overuse injury. The distinct roles of the leading and trailing limb, acting as a generator of vertical force and shock absorber respectively, during the SS and XS may however contribute to the development of muscular imbalances which may ultimately contribute to the development of overuse injury. However it is still possible that faulty use of these gaits might lead to high loads and this should be the subject of future work

  18. In-Shoe Plantar Pressures and Ground Reaction Forces during Overweight Adults' Overground Walking

    de Castro, Marcelo P.; Abreu, Sofia C.; Sousa, Helena; Machado, Leandro; Santos, Rubim; Vilas-Boas, João Paulo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Because walking is highly recommended for prevention and treatment of obesity and some of its biomechanical aspects are not clearly understood for overweight people, we compared the absolute and normalized ground reaction forces (GRF), plantar pressures, and temporal parameters of normal-weight and overweight participants during…

  19. Sagittal Plane Knee Biomechanics and Vertical Ground Reaction Forces Are Modified Following ACL Injury Prevention Programs

    Padua, Darin A.; DiStefano, Lindsay J.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) occur because of excessive loading on the knee. ACL injury prevention programs can influence sagittal plane ACL loading factors and vertical ground reaction force (VGRF). Objective: To determine the influence of ACL injury prevention programs on sagittal plane knee biomechanics (anterior tibial shear force, knee flexion angle/moments) and VGRF. Data Sources: The PubMed database was searched for studies published between January 1988 an...

  20. Analysis of kinematic data and determination of ground reaction force of foot in slow squat

    Zhang, Xu-Shu; Guo, Yuan; An, Mei-Wen; Chen, Wei-Yi

    2013-02-01

    In the present paper, the ground reaction force (GRF) acting on foot in slow squat was determined through a force measuring system, and at the same time, the kinematic data of human squat were obtained by analyzing the photographed image sequences. According to the height and body weight, six healthy volunteers were selected, three men in one group and the other three women in another group, and the fundamental parameters of subjects were recorded, including body weight, height and age, etc. Based on the anatomy characteristics, some markers were placed on the right side of joints. While the subject squatted at slow speed on the force platform, the ground reaction forces on the forefoot and heel for each foot were obtained through calibrated force platform. The analysis results show that the reaction force on heel is greater than that on forefoot, and double feet have nearly constant force. Moreover, from processing and analyzing the synchronously photographed image sequences in squat, the kinematic data of human squat were acquired, including mainly the curves of angle, angular velocity and angular acceleration varied with time for knee, hip and ankle joints in a sagittal plane. The obtained results can offer instructive reference for photographing and analyzing the movements of human bodies, diagnosing some diseases, and establishing in the future appropriate mathematical models for the human motion.

  1. A rolling constraint reproduces ground reaction forces and moments in dynamic simulations of walking, running, and crouch gait

    Hamner, Samuel R.; Seth, Ajay; Steele, Katherine M.; Delp, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in computational technology have dramatically increased the use of muscle-driven simulation to study accelerations produced by muscles during gait. Accelerations computed from muscle-driven simulations are sensitive to the model used to represent contact between the foot and ground. A foot-ground contact model must be able to calculate ground reaction forces and moments that are consistent with experimentally measured ground reaction forces and moments. We show here that a rol...

  2. Ground Reaction Forces and Loading Rates Associated with Parkour and Traditional Drop Landing Techniques

    Damien L. Puddle; Maulder, Peter S.

    2013-01-01

    Due to the relative infancy of Parkour there is currently a lack of empirical evidence on which to base specific technique instruction upon. The purpose of this study was to compare the ground reaction forces and loading rates involved in two Parkour landing techniques encouraged by local Parkour instructors and a traditional landing technique recommended in the literature. Ten male participants performed three different drop landing techniques (Parkour precision, Parkour roll, and traditiona...

  3. GROUND REACTION FORCE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN RUNNING SHOES, RACING FLATS, AND DISTANCE SPIKES IN RUNNERS

    Suzanna Logan; Ian Hunter; J. Ty Hopkins; J.T., J. Brent Feland; Parcell, Allen C.

    2010-01-01

    Various shoes are worn by distance runners throughout a training season. This study measured the differences in ground reaction forces between running shoes, racing flats, and distance spikes in order to provide information about the potential effects of footwear on injury risk in highly competitive runners. Ten male and ten female intercollegiate distance runners ran across a force plate at 6.7 m·s-1 (for males) and 5.7 m·s-1 (for females) in each of the three types of shoes. To control for ...

  4. Ground reaction forces and loading rates associated with parkour and traditional drop landing techniques.

    Puddle, Damien L; Maulder, Peter S

    2013-01-01

    Due to the relative infancy of Parkour there is currently a lack of empirical evidence on which to base specific technique instruction upon. The purpose of this study was to compare the ground reaction forces and loading rates involved in two Parkour landing techniques encouraged by local Parkour instructors and a traditional landing technique recommended in the literature. Ten male participants performed three different drop landing techniques (Parkour precision, Parkour roll, and traditional) onto a force plate. Compared to the traditional technique the Parkour precision technique demonstrated significantly less maximal vertical landing force (38%, p Parkour roll technique compared to the traditional technique. It is unclear whether or not the Parkour precision technique produced lower landing forces and loading rates than the Parkour roll technique as no significant differences were found. The landing techniques encouraged by local Parkour instructors such as the precision and roll appear to be more appropriate for Parkour practitioners to perform than a traditional landing technique due to the lower landing forces and loading rates experienced. Key pointsParkour precision and Parkour roll landings were found to be safer than a traditional landing technique, resulting in lower maximal vertical forces, slower times to maximal vertical force and ultimately lesser loading rates.Parkour roll may be more appropriate (safer) to utilize than the Parkour precision during Parkour landing scenarios.The Parkour landing techniques investigated n this study may be beneficial for landing by non-Parkour practitioners in everyday life. PMID:24149735

  5. Sagittal plane ground reaction forces, centre of pressure and centre of mass in trotting horses.

    Hobbs, Sarah J; Clayton, Hilary M

    2013-12-01

    The aims of this study were to measure ground reaction forces (GRFs) of concurrently loaded limbs and to evaluate spatial relationships between the centre of pressure (COP) and centre of mass (COM) in trotting horses. Kinematic (120Hz) and GRF data were collected at trot from three trials of eight horses using four force plates (960 Hz). Forelimb and hind limb GRFs were measured, COP was calculated from the resultant vertical GRF vector and COM was calculated by summation of weighted segmental COMs. Peak total vertical force (19.3 ± 1.3N/kg at 45.1 ± 2.3% diagonal stance) coincided with zero total longitudinal force (45.1 ± 2.4% stance). Initially, COP position corresponded with the fore or hind hoof of the diagonal that contacted the ground earlier. During diagonal overlap, COP position reflected forelimb contribution to total vertical GRF; it maintained a fairly constant position relative to the base of support through the middle part of stance, then moved cranially in the last third of stance towards the fore hoof, which was always the last hoof to leave the ground. The COM moved forward continuously; its longitudinal velocity decreased with the net braking force in early stance and increased with the net propulsive force in late stance. The COM was caudal to the COP in early stance, coincident at 35.8 ± 4.4% stance and was maximally ahead of the COP at 67.6 ± 4.8% stance. Changes in the spatial relationship between COP and COM affect the moment arms of the forelimb and hind limb vertical GRFs and their effect in generating a pitching torque around the COM. PMID:24138935

  6. RELATIONSHIPS AMONG SPRINT VELOCITIES, HORIZONTAL GROUND REACTION FORCE, AND ISOKINETIC TRUNK STRENGTH VARIABLES

    Kale Mehmet; Kirkaya I

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationships among sprint velocities, horizontal ground reaction force, and isokinetic trunk strength variables. Voluntary 19 athletes were participated to the study [age (year)= 20.9±2.3, training age (month)= 91.3±48.2, body height (cm)= 173.1±6.5, body weight (kg)= 64.7±8.4] from different sports including in explosive strength. Sprints (10m, 20m, 30m, and 40m) were tested on a non-motorized treadmill. Velocities (V10m, V20m, V30m, and V40m...

  7. Isokinetic analysis of ankle and ground reaction forces in runners and triathletes

    Natália Mariana Silva Luna

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze and compare the vertical component of ground reaction forces and isokinetic muscle parameters for plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the ankle between long-distance runners, triathletes, and nonathletes. METHODS: Seventy-five males with a mean age of 30.26 (±6.5 years were divided into three groups: a triathlete group (n=26, a long-distance runner group (n = 23, and a non-athlete control group. The kinetic parameters were measured during running using a force platform, and the isokinetic parameters were measured using an isokinetic dynamometer. RESULTS: The non-athlete control group and the triathlete group exhibited smaller vertical forces, a greater ground contact time, and a greater application of force during maximum vertical acceleration than the long-distance runner group. The total work (180º/s was greater in eccentric dorsiflexion and concentric plantar flexion for the non-athlete control group and the triathlete group than the long-distance runner group. The peak torque (60º/s was greater in eccentric plantar flexion and concentric dorsiflexion for the control group than the athlete groups. CONCLUSIONS: The athlete groups exhibited less muscle strength and resistance than the control group, and the triathletes exhibited less impact and better endurance performance than the runners.

  8. GROUND REACTION FORCE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN RUNNING SHOES, RACING FLATS, AND DISTANCE SPIKES IN RUNNERS

    Suzanna Logan

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Various shoes are worn by distance runners throughout a training season. This study measured the differences in ground reaction forces between running shoes, racing flats, and distance spikes in order to provide information about the potential effects of footwear on injury risk in highly competitive runners. Ten male and ten female intercollegiate distance runners ran across a force plate at 6.7 m·s-1 (for males and 5.7 m·s-1 (for females in each of the three types of shoes. To control for differences in foot strike, only subjects who exhibited a heel strike were included in the data analysis. Two repeated-measures ANOVAs with Tukey's post-hoc tests (p < 0.05 were used to detect differences in shoe types among males and females. For the males, loading rate, peak vertical impact force and peak braking forces were significantly greater in flats and spikes compared to running shoes. Vertical stiffness in spikes was also significantly greater than in running shoes. Females had significantly shorter stance times and greater maximum propulsion forces in racing flats compared to running shoes. Changing footwear between the shoes used in this study alters the loads placed on the body. Care should be taken as athletes enter different phases of training where different footwear is required. Injury risk may be increased since the body may not be accustomed to the differences in force, stance time, and vertical stiffness

  9. GROUND REACTION FORCES AND LOADING RATES ASSOCIATED WITH PARKOUR AND TRADITIONAL DROP LANDING TECHNIQUES

    Damien L. Puddle

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Due to the relative infancy of Parkour there is currently a lack of empirical evidence on which to base specific technique instruction upon. The purpose of this study was to compare the ground reaction forces and loading rates involved in two Parkour landing techniques encouraged by local Parkour instructors and a traditional landing technique recommended in the literature. Ten male participants performed three different drop landing techniques (Parkour precision, Parkour roll, and traditional onto a force plate. Compared to the traditional technique the Parkour precision technique demonstrated significantly less maximal vertical landing force (38%, p < 0.01, ES = 1.76 and landing loading rate (54%, p < 0.01, ES = 1.22. Similarly, less maximal vertical landing force (43%, p < 0.01, ES = 2.04 and landing loading rate (63%, p < 0.01, ES = 1.54 were observed in the Parkour roll technique compared to the traditional technique. It is unclear whether or not the Parkour precision technique produced lower landing forces and loading rates than the Parkour roll technique as no significant differences were found. The landing techniques encouraged by local Parkour instructors such as the precision and roll appear to be more appropriate for Parkour practitioners to perform than a traditional landing technique due to the lower landing forces and loading rates experienced

  10. An algorithm to decompose ground reaction forces and moments from a single force platform in walking gait.

    Villeger, David; Costes, Antony; Watier, Bruno; Moretto, Pierre

    2014-11-01

    In walking experimental conditions, subjects are sometimes unable to perform two steps on two different forceplates. This leads the authors to develop methods for discerning right and left ground reaction data while they are summed during the double support in walking. The aim of this study is to propose an adaptive transition function that considers the walking speed and ground reaction forces (GRF). A transition function is used to estimate left and right side GRF signals in double support. It includes a shape coefficient adjusted using single support GRF parameters. This shape coefficient is optimized by a non-linear least-square curve-fitting procedure to match the estimated signals with real GRF. A multiple regression is then performed to identify GRF parameters of major importance selected to compute the right and left GRF of the double support. Relative RMSE (RMSER), maximum GRF differences normalized to body mass and differences of center of pressure (CoP) are computed between real and decomposed signals. During double support, RMSER are 6%, 18%, 3.8%, 4.3%, 3%, and 12.3% for anterior force, lateral force, vertical force, frontal moment, sagittal moment and transverse moment, respectively. Maximum GRF differences normalized to body mass are lower than 1N/kg and mean CoP difference is 0.0135 m, when comparing real to decomposed signals during double support. This work shows the accuracy of an adaptive transition function to decompose GRF and moment of right and left sides. This method is especially useful to accurately discern right and left GRF data in single force platform configurations. PMID:25239287

  11. The Effect of Exertion and Sex on Vertical Ground Reaction Force Variables and Landing Mechanics.

    Bell, David R; Pennuto, Anthony P; Trigsted, Stephanie M

    2016-06-01

    Bell, DR, Pennuto, AP, and Trigsted, SM. The effect of exertion and sex on vertical ground reaction force variables and landing mechanics. J Strength Cond Res 30(6): 1661-1669, 2016-The purpose of this investigation was to determine how exertion and sex affected a variety of vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) parameters during a jump-landing task, including peak VGRF, peak VGRF asymmetry, loading rate, and loading rate asymmetry. Additionally, we wanted to determine whether landing mechanics changed after exertion as measured by the Landing Error Scoring System (LESS). Forty recreationally active participants (20 men and 20 women) completed jump landings from a 30-cm-high box onto force plates before and after repeated bouts of an exercise circuit until a specific rating of perceived exertion was achieved. Three-way (sex × time × limb) analyses of variance were used to analyze variables pre-exertion to postexertion. No significant 3-way interactions were observed for peak VGRF (p = 0.31) or loading rate (p = 0.14). Time by sex interactions were observed for peak VGRF (p = 0.02) and loading rate (p = 0.008). Post hoc analysis revealed that men increased landing force and loading rate after exertion while women did not. Landing mechanics, as assessed by total LESS score, were worse after exertion (p < 0.001) with increased frequency of errors for knee flexion <30° at initial contact, lateral trunk flexion, and not flexing the hip during landing. Women may be more resistant to exertion compared with men and use different joint controls' strategies to cope with VGRF after exertion. However, VGRF asymmetry is not affected by sex and exertion. Limiting peak VGRF and addressing landing postures, especially after exertion, should be components of injury prevention strategies. PMID:26562710

  12. Assessment of changes in gait parameters and vertical ground reaction forces after total hip arthroplasty

    Bhargava P

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The principal objectives of arthroplasty are relief of pain and enhancement of range of motion. Currently, postoperative pain and functional capacity are assessed largely on the basis of subjective evaluation scores. Because of the lack of control inherent in this method it is often difficult to interpret data presented by different observers in the critical evaluation of surgical method, new components and modes of rehabilitation. Gait analysis is a rapid, simple and reliable method to assess functional outcome. This study was undertaken in an effort to evaluate the gait characteristics of patients who underwent arthroplasty, using an Ultraflex gait analyzer. Materials and Methods: The study was based on the assessment of gait and weight-bearing pattern of both hips in patients who underwent total hip replacement and its comparison with an age and sex-matched control group. Twenty subjects of total arthroplasty group having unilateral involvement, operated by posterior approach at our institution with a minimum six-month postoperative period were selected. Control group was age and sex-matched, randomly selected from the general population. Gait analysis was done using Ultraflex gait analyzer. Gait parameters and vertical ground reaction forces assessment was done by measuring the gait cycle properties, step time parameters and VGRF variables. Data of affected limb was compared with unaffected limb as well as control group to assess the weight-bearing pattern. Statistical analysis was done by′t′ test. Results: Frequency is reduced and gait cycle duration increased in total arthroplasty group as compared with control. Step time parameters including Step time, Stance time and Single support time are significantly reduced ( P value < .05 while Double support time and Single swing time are significantly increased ( P value < .05 in the THR group. Forces over each sensor are increased more on the unaffected limb of the THR group as compared to

  13. Gender Differences among Sagittal Plane Knee Kinematic and Ground Reaction Force Characteristics during a Rapid Sprint and Cut Maneuver

    James, C. Roger; Sizer, Phillip S.; Starch, David W.; Lockhart, Thurmon E.; Slauterbeck, James

    2004-01-01

    Women are more prone to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury during cutting sports than men. The purpose of this study was to examine knee kinematic and ground reaction forces (GRF) differences between genders during cutting. Male and female athletes performed cutting trials while force platform and video data were recorded (180 Hz).…

  14. Machine learning techniques for gait biometric recognition using the ground reaction force

    Mason, James Eric; Woungang, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    This book focuses on how machine learning techniques can be used to analyze and make use of one particular category of behavioral biometrics known as the gait biometric. A comprehensive Ground Reaction Force (GRF)-based Gait Biometrics Recognition framework is proposed and validated by experiments. In addition, an in-depth analysis of existing recognition techniques that are best suited for performing footstep GRF-based person recognition is also proposed, as well as a comparison of feature extractors, normalizers, and classifiers configurations that were never directly compared with one another in any previous GRF recognition research. Finally, a detailed theoretical overview of many existing machine learning techniques is presented, leading to a proposal of two novel data processing techniques developed specifically for the purpose of gait biometric recognition using GRF. This book · introduces novel machine-learning-based temporal normalization techniques · bridges research gaps concerning the effect of ...

  15. A ground reaction force analysis for designing a sustainable energy-harvesting stairway

    Puspitarini, Debrina; Suzianti, Amalia; Rasyid, Harun Al; Priscandy, Nabila

    2016-06-01

    There are many issues of how energy is currently generated and consumed. These include the cost of harvesting energy, the ever-growing demand for it, and the ever-decreasing reserve of current most applicable energy resources. Numerous ways to exploit new sustainable potential energy sources have been pursued, one of which is to create an energy-harvester; a device that captures free potential energy, scattered around in its environment, and transform it into another form of energy. Using NPD approach, Puspitarini, Suzianti, and Al Rasyid (2016) has developed a conceptual design of an energy-harvesting device, which includes a selection of product specification options and a gear set layout design. In this study, a mockup was built for the experiment based on those product specification options. The experiment was conducted using AMTI Force Platform, and its results were processed using Factorial Design. This effort is to test which product specification option contributes the most to Ground Reaction Force (GRF) generation. The greater the generated GRF, the greater amount of electricity produced. A theoretical calculation of electromotive force was also conducted based on the experiment result and the gear set layout design. The result of this study was later discussed and used as a basis to develop further the stairway design.

  16. Ground reaction forces on stairs: effects of stair inclination and age.

    Stacoff, Alex; Diezi, Christian; Luder, Gerhard; Stüssi, Edgar; Kramers-de Quervain, Inès A

    2005-01-01

    The goals of the study were to compare data of vertical ground reaction force (GRF) parameters during level walking, stair ascent and descent on three different stair inclinations and three different age groups. Twenty healthy subjects of three age groups (young 33.7 years; middle 63.6 years; old 76.5 years) were tested during the seven test conditions with 8-10 repetitions. Vertical forces were measured during two consecutive steps with force plates embedded in the walkway and the staircase. The results showed that during level walking the vertical GRF curves were very regular and repetitive, the trail-to-trial variability and left-right asymmetry of defined test parameters being around 2-5% and 3-5%. During stair ascent the vertical GRF force pattern was found to change slightly compared to level gait, but considerably compared to stair descent. On the steep stair the average vertical load increased up to 1.6 BW, and variability (5-10%) and asymmetry (5-15%) were increased significantly. The steep stair descent condition was found to be the most demanding test showing the largest variability and asymmetry and thus, the least stable gait pattern. Age was found to be a factor which should be considered, because the young age group walked faster and produced larger vertical GRF maxima during level walking and on stair ascent than the middle and old age group. Differences between the middle and old age group were found to be small. The present investigation is the first to provide normative data of GRF parameters on gait variability and symmetry of two consecutive steps during level gait and stair ambulation. It is the intention that the results of this study may be used as a basis for comparison with patient data. PMID:15536031

  17. A rolling constraint reproduces ground reaction forces and moments in dynamic simulations of walking, running, and crouch gait.

    Hamner, Samuel R; Seth, Ajay; Steele, Katherine M; Delp, Scott L

    2013-06-21

    Recent advances in computational technology have dramatically increased the use of muscle-driven simulation to study accelerations produced by muscles during gait. Accelerations computed from muscle-driven simulations are sensitive to the model used to represent contact between the foot and ground. A foot-ground contact model must be able to calculate ground reaction forces and moments that are consistent with experimentally measured ground reaction forces and moments. We show here that a rolling constraint can model foot-ground contact and reproduce measured ground reaction forces and moments in an induced acceleration analysis of muscle-driven simulations of walking, running, and crouch gait. We also illustrate that a point constraint and a weld constraint used to model foot-ground contact in previous studies produce inaccurate reaction moments and lead to contradictory interpretations of muscle function. To enable others to use and test these different constraint types (i.e., rolling, point, and weld constraints) we have included them as part of an induced acceleration analysis in OpenSim, a freely-available biomechanics simulation package. PMID:23702045

  18. The effects of baseball bat mass properties on swing mechanics, ground reaction forces, and swing timing.

    Laughlin, Walter A; Fleisig, Glenn S; Aune, Kyle T; Diffendaffer, Alek Z

    2016-03-01

    Swing trajectory and ground reaction forces (GRF) of 30 collegiate baseball batters hitting a pitched ball were compared between a standard bat, a bat with extra weight about its barrel, and a bat with extra weight in its handle. It was hypothesised that when compared to a standard bat, only a handle-weighted bat would produce equivalent bat kinematics. It was also hypothesised that hitters would not produce equivalent GRFs for each weighted bat, but would maintain equivalent timing when compared to a standard bat. Data were collected utilising a 500 Hz motion capture system and 1,000 Hz force plate system. Data between bats were considered equivalent when the 95% confidence interval of the difference was contained entirely within ±5% of the standard bat mean value. The handle-weighted bat had equivalent kinematics, whereas the barrel-weighted bat did not. Both weighted bats had equivalent peak GRF variables. Neither weighted bat maintained equivalence in the timing of bat kinematics and some peak GRFs. The ability to maintain swing kinematics with a handle-weighted bat may have implications for swing training and warm-up. However, altered timings of kinematics and kinetics require further research to understand the implications on returning to a conventionally weighted bat. PMID:26836969

  19. Residual analysis of ground reaction forces simulation during gait using neural networks with different configurations.

    Leporace, Gustavo; Batista, Luiz Alberto; Metsavaht, Leonardo; Nadal, Jurandir

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to analyze and compare the residuals obtained from ground reaction force (GRF) models developed using two different neural network configurations (one network with three outputs; and three networks with one output each), based on accelerometer data. Seventeen healthy subjects walked along a walkway, with a force plate embedded, with a three dimensional accelerometer attached to the shank. Multilayer perceptron networks (MLP) models were developed with the 3D accelerometer data as inputs to predict the GRF. The residuals of these models were evaluated graphically and numerically to verify the fitting. A visual analysis of the simulated signals suggests the model was able to adequately predict the GRF. The errors and correlations found in the MLP models for the 3D GRF is at least similar to other studies, although some of them showed higher errors. There was not difference between the two MLP configurations. However, despite the high correlation coefficient and closeness to a normal probability distribution, the residual analysis still presented a higher kurtosis and skewness, suggesting that the inclusion of other variables and the increase of the validation sample size could increase the fitting of the simulation. PMID:26736876

  20. Normalization of ground reaction forces, joint moments, and free moments in human locomotion.

    Wannop, John W; Worobets, Jay T; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2012-12-01

    Authors who report ground reaction force (GRF), free moment (FM), and resultant joint moments usually normalize these variables by division normalization. Normalization parameters include body weight (BW), body weight x height (BWH), and body weight x leg length (BWL). The purpose of this study was to explore the appropriateness of division normalization, power curve normalization, and offset normalization on peak GRF, FM, and resultant joint moments. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected on 98 subjects who walked at 1.2 and 1.8 m/s and ran at 3.4 and 4.0 m/s. Linear curves were best fit to the data, and regression analyses performed to test the significance of the correlations. It was found that the relationship between peak force and BW, as well as joint moments and BW, BWH, and BWL, were not always linear. After division normalization, significant correlations were still found. Power curve and offset normalization, however, were effective at normalizing all variables; therefore, when attempting to normalize GRF and joint moments, perhaps nonlinear or offset methods should be implemented. PMID:23348130

  1. Metabolic Rate and Ground Reaction Force During Motorized and Non-Motorized Treadmill Exercise

    Everett, Meghan E.; Loehr, James A.; DeWitt, John K.; Laughlin, Mitzi; Lee, Stuart M. C.

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To measure vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) and oxygen consumption (VO2) at several velocities during exercise using a ground-based version of the ISS treadmill in the M and NM modes. METHODS: Subjects (n = 20) walked or ran at 0.89, 1.34, 1.79, 2.24, 2.68, and 3.12 m/s while VO2 and vGRF data were collected. VO2 was measured using open-circuit spirometry (TrueOne 2400, Parvo-Medics). Data were averaged over the last 2 min of each 5-min stage. vGRF was measured in separate 15-s bouts at 125 Hz using custom-fitted pressure-sensing insoles (F-Scan Sport Sensors, Tekscan, Inc). A repeated-measures ANOVA was used to test for differences in VO2 and vGRF between M and NM and across speeds. Significance was set at P speeds above 1.79 m/s in the NM mode; however, vGRF data were obtained for all subjects at each speed in both modes. VO2 was approx.40% higher during NM than M exercise across treadmill speeds. vGRF increased with treadmill speed but was not different between modes. CONCLUSION: Higher VO2 with no change in vGRF suggests that the additional metabolic cost associated with NM treadmill exercise is accounted for in the horizontal forces required to move the treadmill belt. Although this may limit the exercise duration at faster speeds, high-intensity NM exercise activates the hamstrings and plantarflexors, which are not specifically targeted or well protected by other in-flight countermeasures.

  2. Bilateral and unilateral vertical ground reaction forces and leg asymmetries in soccer players.

    Yanci, J; Camara, J

    2016-06-01

    The purposes of this study were to assess unilateral and bilateral vertical jump performance characteristics, and to compare the vertical ground reaction force characteristics of the impulse and landing phase of a vertical jump between the dominant and non-dominant leg in soccer players. The sample consisted of 20 male soccer players (22.80 ± 2.71 years, 1.88 ± 0.06 m, 76.47 ± 8.80 kg) who competed in the third division of the Spanish football league. Vertical jump performance was determined by testing the impulse and landing phase of a bilateral vertical jump, dominant leg vertical jump and non-dominant leg vertical jump. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between dominant and non-dominant legs were found in counter movement jump (CMJ) flight time (LA = -2.38%, d = 0.33), CMJ flight height (LA = -4.55%, d = 0.33) and CMJ speed take-off (LA = -2.91%, d = 0.42). No significant differences were found between the dominant and non-dominant leg in the F1 and F2 magnitudes during the landing phase, the time from the first contact of the foot with the ground to the production of F1, the time from the second contact of the foot with the ground to the production of F2, and the time to stabilization of the landing phase. Although differences were found between the dominant and non-dominant leg in the impulse phase of the jump, no significant differences were found between dominant and non-dominant legs in the landing phase of vertical jump variables. PMID:27274112

  3. A wearable force plate system for the continuous measurement of triaxial ground reaction force in biomechanical applications

    The ambulatory measurement of ground reaction force (GRF) and human motion under free-living conditions is convenient, inexpensive and never restricted to gait analysis in a laboratory environment and is therefore much desired by researchers and clinical doctors in biomedical applications. A wearable force plate system was developed by integrating small triaxial force sensors and three-dimensional (3D) inertial sensors for estimating dynamic triaxial GRF in biomechanical applications. The system, in comparison to existent systems, is characterized by being lightweight, thin and easy-to-wear. A six-axial force sensor (Nitta Co., Japan) was used as a verification measurement device to validate the static accuracy of the developed force plate. To evaluate the precision during dynamic gait measurements, we compared the measurements of the triaxial GRF and the center of pressure (CoP) by using the developed system with the reference measurements made using a stationary force plate and an optical motion analysis system. The root mean square (RMS) differences of the two transverse components (x- and y-axes) and the vertical component (z-axis) of the GRF were 4.3 ± 0.9 N, 6.0 ± 1.3 N and 12.1 ± 1.1 N, respectively, corresponding to 5.1 ± 1.1% and 6.5 ± 1% of the maximum of each transverse component and 1.3 ± 0.2% of the maximum vertical component of GRF. The RMS distance between the two systems' CoP traces was 3.2 ± 0.8 mm, corresponding to 1.2 ± 0.3% of the length of the shoe. Moreover, based on the results of the assessment of the influence of the system on natural gait, we found that gait was almost never affected. Therefore, the wearable system as an alternative device can be a potential solution for measuring CoP and triaxial GRF in non-laboratory environments

  4. Subject recognition based on ground reaction force measurements of gait signals.

    Moustakidis, Serafeim P; Theocharis, John B; Giakas, Giannis

    2008-12-01

    An effective subject recognition approach is designed in this paper, using ground reaction force (GRF) measurements of human gait. The method is a three-stage procedure: 1) The original GRF data are translated through wavelet packet (WP) transform in the time-frequency domain. Using a fuzzy-set-based criterion, we determine an optimal WP decomposition, involving feature subspaces with distinguishing gait characteristics. 2) A feature extraction scheme is employed next for wavelet feature ranking, according to discrimination power. 3) The classification task is accomplished by means of a kernel-based support vector machine. The design parameters of the classifier are tuned through a genetic algorithm to improve recognition rates. The method is evaluated on a database comprising GRF records obtained from 40 subjects. To account for the natural variability of human gait, the experimental setup is designed, allowing different walking speeds and loading conditions. Simulation results demonstrate that high recognition rates can be achieved with moderate number of features and for different training/testing settings. Finally, the performance of our approach is favorably compared with the one obtained using other traditional classification algorithms. PMID:19022720

  5. Estimation of ground reaction force and zero moment point on a powered ankle-foot prosthesis.

    Martinez-Villalpando, Ernesto C; Herr, Hugh; Farrell, Matthew

    2007-01-01

    The ground reaction force (GRF) and the zero moment point (ZMP) are important parameters for the advancement of biomimetic control of robotic lower-limb prosthetic devices. In this document a method to estimate GRF and ZMP on a motorized ankle-foot prosthesis (MIT Powered Ankle-Foot Prosthesis) is presented. The method proposed is based on the analysis of data collected from a sensory system embedded in the prosthetic device using a custom designed wearable computing unit. In order to evaluate the performance of the estimation methods described, standing and walking clinical studies were conducted on a transtibial amputee. The results were statistically compared to standard analysis methodologies employed in a gait laboratory. The average RMS error and correlation factor were calculated for all experimental sessions. By using a static analysis procedure, the estimation of the vertical component of GRF had an averaged correlation coefficient higher than 0.94. The estimated ZMP location had a distance error of less than 1 cm, equal to 4% of the anterior-posterior foot length or 12% of the medio-lateral foot width. PMID:18003052

  6. Ground reaction force and 3D biomechanical characteristics of walking in short-leg walkers.

    Zhang, Songning; Clowers, Kurt G; Powell, Douglas

    2006-12-01

    Short-leg walking boots offer several advantages over traditional casts. However, their effects on ground reaction forces (GRF) and three-dimensional (3D) biomechanics are not fully understood. The purpose of the study was to examine 3D lower extremity kinematics and joint dynamics during walking in two different short-leg walking boots. Eleven (five females and six males) healthy subjects performed five level walking trials in each of three conditions: two testing boot conditions, Gait Walker (DeRoyal Industries, Inc.) and Equalizer (Royce Medical Co.), and one pair of laboratory shoes (Noveto, Adidas). A force platform and a 6-camera Vicon motion analysis system were used to collect GRFs and 3D kinematic data during the testing session. A one-way repeated measures analysis of variance (ANOVA) was used to evaluate selected kinematic, GRF, and joint kinetic variables (p<0.05). The results revealed that both short-leg walking boots were effective in minimizing ankle eversion and hip adduction. Neither walker increased the bimodal vertical GRF peaks typically observed in normal walking. However, they did impose a small initial peak (<1BW) earlier in the stance phase. The Gait Walker also exhibited a slightly increased vertical GRF during midstance. These characteristics may be related to the sole materials/design, the restriction of ankle movements, and/or the elevated heel heights of the tested walkers. Both walkers appeared to increase the demand on the knee extensors while they decreased the demand of the knee and hip abductors based on the joint kinetic results. PMID:16414263

  7. The Effects of Opposition and Gender on Knee Kinematics and Ground Reaction Force during Landing from Volleyball Block Jumps

    Hughes, Gerwyn; Watkins, James; Owen, Nick

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of opposition and gender on knee kinematics and ground reaction force during landing from a volleyball block jump. Six female and six male university volleyball players performed two landing tasks: (a) an unopposed and (b) an opposed volleyball block jump and landing. A 12-camera motion analysis…

  8. A COMPARISON OF GOLF SHOE DESIGNS HIGHLIGHTS GREATER GROUND REACTION FORCES WITH SHORTER IRONS

    Paul Worsfold

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available In an effort to reduce golf turf damage the traditional metal spike golf shoe has been redesigned, but shoe-ground biomechanical evaluations have utilised artificial grass surfaces. Twenty-four golfers wore three different golf shoe traction designs (traditional metal spikes, alternative spikes, and a flat-soled shoe with no additional traction when performing shots with a driver, 3 iron and 7 iron. Ground action forces were measured beneath the feet by two natural grass covered force platforms. The maximum vertical force recorded at the back foot with the 3 iron and 7 iron was 0.82 BW (body weight and at the front foot 1.1 BW approximately in both the metal spike and alternative spike golf shoe designs. When using the driver these maximal vertical values were 0.49 BW at the back foot and 0.84 BW at the front foot. Furthermore, as performance of the backswing and then downswing necessitates a change in movement direction the range of force generated during the complete swing was calculated. In the metal spike shoe the vertical force generated at the back foot with both irons was 0.67 BW and at the front foot 0.96 BW with the 3 iron and 0.92 BW with the 7 iron. The back foot vertical force generated with the driver was 0.33 BW and at the front foot 0.83 BW wearing the metal spike shoe. Results indicated the greater force generation with the irons. When using the driver the more horizontal swing plane associated with the longer club reduced vertical forces at the back and front foot. However, the mediolateral force generated across each foot in the metal and alternative spike shoes when using the driver was greater than when the irons were used. The coefficient of friction was 0. 62 at the back and front foot whichever shoe was worn or club used

  9. Vertical Ground Reaction Forces are Associated with Pain and Self-Reported Functional Status in Recreational Athletes with Patellofemoral Pain.

    de Oliveira Silva, Danilo; Briani, Ronaldo; Pazzinatto, Marcella; Ferrari, Deisi; Aragão, Fernando; de Azevedo, Fábio

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with patellofemoral pain (PFP) use different motor strategies during unipodal support in stair climbing activities, which may be assessed by vertical ground reaction force parameters. Thus, the aims of this study were to investigate possible differences in first peak, valley, second peak, and loading rate between recreational female athletes with PFP and pain-free athletes during stair climbing in order to determine the association and prediction capability between these parameters, pain level, and functional status in females with PFP. Thirty-one recreational female athletes with PFP and 31 pain-free recreational female athletes were evaluated with three-dimensional kinetics while performing stair climbing to obtain vertical ground reaction force parameters. A visual analog scale was used to evaluate the usual knee pain. The anterior knee pain scale was used to evaluate knee functional score. First peak and loading rate were associated with pain (r = .46, P = .008; r = .56, P = .001, respectively) and functional limitation (r = .31, P = .049; r = -.36, P = .032, respectively). Forced entry regression revealed the first peak was a significant predictor of pain (36.5%) and functional limitation (28.7%). Our findings suggest that rehabilitation strategies aimed at correcting altered vertical ground reaction force may improve usual knee pain level and self-reported knee function in females with PFP. PMID:26286949

  10. Effects of Prophylactic Ankle Supports on Vertical Ground Reaction Force During Landing: A Meta-Analysis

    Wenxin Niu, Tienan Feng, Lejun Wang, Chenghua Jiang, Ming Zhang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available There has been much debate on how prophylactic ankle supports (PASs may influence the vertical ground reaction force (vGRF during landing. Therefore, the primary aims of this meta-analysis were to systematically review and synthesize the effect of PASs on vGRF, and to understand how PASs affect vGRF peaks (F1, F2 and the time from initial contact to peak loading (T1, T2 during landing. Several key databases, including Scopus, Cochrane, Embase, PubMed, ProQuest, Medline, Ovid, Web of Science, and the Physical Activity Index, were used for identifying relevant studies published in English since inception to April 1, 2015. The computerized literature search and cross-referencing the citation list of the articles yielded 3,993 articles. Criteria for inclusion required that 1 the study was conducted on healthy adults; 2 the subject number and trial number were known; 3 the subjects performed landing with and without PAS; 4 the landing movement was in the sagittal plane; 5 the comparable vGRF parameters were reported; and 6 the F1 and F2 must be normalized to the subject’s body weight. After the removal of duplicates and irrelevant articles, 6, 6, 15 and 11 studies were respectively pooled for outcomes of F1, T1, F2 and T2. This study found a significantly increased F2 (.03 BW, 95% CI: .001, .05 and decreased T1 (-1.24 ms, 95% CI: -1.77, -.71 and T2 (-3.74 ms, 95% CI: -4.83, -2.65 with the use of a PAS. F1 was not significantly influenced by the PAS. Heterogeneity was present in some results, but there was no evidence of publication bias for any outcome. These changes represented deterioration in the buffering characteristics of the joint. An ideal PAS design should limit the excessive joint motion of ankle inversion, while allowing a normal range of motion, especially in the sagittal plane.

  11. Effects of Prophylactic Ankle Supports on Vertical Ground Reaction Force During Landing: A Meta-Analysis.

    Niu, Wenxin; Feng, Tienan; Wang, Lejun; Jiang, Chenghua; Zhang, Ming

    2016-03-01

    There has been much debate on how prophylactic ankle supports (PASs) may influence the vertical ground reaction force (vGRF) during landing. Therefore, the primary aims of this meta-analysis were to systematically review and synthesize the effect of PASs on vGRF, and to understand how PASs affect vGRF peaks (F1, F2) and the time from initial contact to peak loading (T1, T2) during landing. Several key databases, including Scopus, Cochrane, Embase, PubMed, ProQuest, Medline, Ovid, Web of Science, and the Physical Activity Index, were used for identifying relevant studies published in English since inception to April 1, 2015. The computerized literature search and cross-referencing the citation list of the articles yielded 3,993 articles. Criteria for inclusion required that 1) the study was conducted on healthy adults; 2) the subject number and trial number were known; 3) the subjects performed landing with and without PAS; 4) the landing movement was in the sagittal plane; 5) the comparable vGRF parameters were reported; and 6) the F1 and F2 must be normalized to the subject's body weight. After the removal of duplicates and irrelevant articles, 6, 6, 15 and 11 studies were respectively pooled for outcomes of F1, T1, F2 and T2. This study found a significantly increased F2 (.03 BW, 95% CI: .001, .05) and decreased T1 (-1.24 ms, 95% CI: -1.77, -.71) and T2 (-3.74 ms, 95% CI: -4.83, -2.65) with the use of a PAS. F1 was not significantly influenced by the PAS. Heterogeneity was present in some results, but there was no evidence of publication bias for any outcome. These changes represented deterioration in the buffering characteristics of the joint. An ideal PAS design should limit the excessive joint motion of ankle inversion, while allowing a normal range of motion, especially in the sagittal plane. Key pointsPAS can effectively protect the ligamentous structure from spraining by providing mechanical support and cutaneous proprioceptive benefits.Using of PAS can

  12. Multi-body simulation of a canine hind limb: model development, experimental validation and calculation of ground reaction forces

    Wefstaedt Patrick

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among other causes the long-term result of hip prostheses in dogs is determined by aseptic loosening. A prevention of prosthesis complications can be achieved by an optimization of the tribological system which finally results in improved implant duration. In this context a computerized model for the calculation of hip joint loadings during different motions would be of benefit. In a first step in the development of such an inverse dynamic multi-body simulation (MBS- model we here present the setup of a canine hind limb model applicable for the calculation of ground reaction forces. Methods The anatomical geometries of the MBS-model have been established using computer tomography- (CT- and magnetic resonance imaging- (MRI- data. The CT-data were collected from the pelvis, femora, tibiae and pads of a mixed-breed adult dog. Geometric information about 22 muscles of the pelvic extremity of 4 mixed-breed adult dogs was determined using MRI. Kinematic and kinetic data obtained by motion analysis of a clinically healthy dog during a gait cycle (1 m/s on an instrumented treadmill were used to drive the model in the multi-body simulation. Results and Discussion As a result the vertical ground reaction forces (z-direction calculated by the MBS-system show a maximum deviation of 1.75%BW for the left and 4.65%BW for the right hind limb from the treadmill measurements. The calculated peak ground reaction forces in z- and y-direction were found to be comparable to the treadmill measurements, whereas the curve characteristics of the forces in y-direction were not in complete alignment. Conclusion In conclusion, it could be demonstrated that the developed MBS-model is suitable for simulating ground reaction forces of dogs during walking. In forthcoming investigations the model will be developed further for the calculation of forces and moments acting on the hip joint during different movements, which can be of help in context with the in

  13. Gender difference in older adult's utilization of gravitational and ground reaction force in regulation of angular momentum during stair descent.

    Singhal, Kunal; Kim, Jemin; Casebolt, Jeffrey; Lee, Sangwoo; Han, Ki-Hoon; Kwon, Young-Hoo

    2015-06-01

    Angular momentum of the body is a highly controlled quantity signifying stability, therefore, it is essential to understand its regulation during stair descent. The purpose of this study was to investigate how older adults use gravity and ground reaction force to regulate the angular momentum of the body during stair descent. A total of 28 participants (12 male and 16 female; 68.5 years and 69.0 years of mean age respectively) performed stair descent from a level walk in a step-over-step manner at a self-selected speed over a custom made three-step staircase with embedded force plates. Kinematic and force data were used to calculate angular momentum, gravitational moment, and ground reaction force moment about the stance foot center of pressure. Women show a significantly greater change in normalized angular momentum (0.92Nms/Kgm; p=.004) as compared to men (0.45Nms/Kgm). Women produce higher normalized GRF (p=.031) during the double support phase. The angular momentum changes show largest backward regulation for Step 0 and forward regulation for Step 2. This greater difference in overall change in the angular momentum in women may explain their increased risk of fall over the stairs. PMID:25846952

  14. Comparison of ankle kinematics and ground reaction forces between prospectively injured and uninjured collegiate cross country runners.

    Kuhman, Daniel J; Paquette, Max R; Peel, Shelby A; Melcher, Daniel A

    2016-06-01

    Biomechanical comparative studies on running-related injuries have included either currently or retrospectively injured runners. The purpose of this study was to prospectively compare ankle joint and ground reaction force variables between collegiate runners who developed injuries during the cross country season and those who did not. Running gait analyses using a motion capture system and force platform were conducted on 19 collegiate runners prior to the start of their cross country season. Ten runners sustained running-related injuries and 9 remained healthy during the course of the season. Strike index, peak loading rate of the vertical ground reaction force, dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM), eversion ROM, peak eversion angle, peak eversion velocity, and eversion duration from the start of the season were compared between injury groups. Ankle eversion ROM and peak eversion velocity were greater in uninjured runners while peak eversion angle was greater in injured runners. Greater ankle eversion ROM and eversion velocity with lower peak eversion angle may be beneficial in reducing injury risk in collegiate runners. The current data may only be applicable to collegiate cross country runners with similar training and racing schedules and threshold magnitudes of ankle kinematic variables to predict injury risk are still unknown. PMID:26827155

  15. MEMS two-axis force plate array used to measure the ground reaction forces during the running motion of an ant

    A terrestrial insect can perform agile running maneuvers. However, the balance of ground reaction forces (GRFs) between each leg in an insect have remained poorly characterized. In this report, we present a micro force plate array for the simultaneous measurement of the anterior and vertical components of GRFs of multiple legs during the running motion of an ant. The proposed force plate, which consists of a 2000 µm × 980 µm × 20 µm plate base as the contact surface of an ant's leg, and the supported beams with piezoresistors on the sidewall and surface are sufficiently compact to be adjacently arrayed along the anterior direction. Eight plates arrayed in parallel were fabricated on the same silicon-on-insulator substrate to narrow the gap between each plate to 20 µm. We compartmented the plate surface into 32 blocks and evaluated the sensitivities to two-axis forces in each block so that the exerted forces could be detected wherever a leg came into contact. The force resolutions in both directions were under 1 µN within ±20 µN. Using the fabricated force plate array, we achieved a simultaneous measurement of the GRFs of three legs on one side while an ant was running. (paper)

  16. Changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after hip strength training for single-sided ankle dorsiflexion restriction

    Kondo, Hitoshi; Someya, Fujiko

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Lateral ankle sprains are common injuries suffered while playing sports, and abnormal forward- and inward-directed ground reaction force occurs during a jumping task. However, the influence of hip muscle strength training on jumping performance after ankle injuries has not been fully examined. This study thus examined changes in ground reaction force during a rebound-jump task after training to strengthen hip muscles. [Subjects and Methods] Ten of 30 female high school basketball players were assigned as subjects who showed a difference of 7 or more degrees in dorsiflexion ranges between the bilateral ankles. The subjects underwent 12 weeks of training to strengthen hip abductors and external rotators. Comparisons between before and after training were made regarding ground reaction force components, hip and knee joint angles, percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in leg muscles, and muscle strength of hip muscles during the rebound-jump task. [Results] After training, the subjects showed increased strength of external rotator muscles, increased percentage of maximum voluntary contraction in the gluteus medius muscle, decreased inward ground reaction force, and increased flexion angles of the hip and knee joints. [Conclusion] This study suggests that training to strengthen hip muscles may ameliorate the inward ground reaction force in athletes with ankle dorsiflexion restriction. PMID:27065513

  17. Gait Phases Recognition from Accelerations and Ground Reaction Forces: Application of Neural Networks

    S. Rafajlović

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to test the applicability of accelerometer as the sensor for assessment of the walking. We present here the comparison of gait phases detected from the data recorded by force sensing resistors mounted in the shoe insoles, non-processed acceleration and processed acceleration perpendicular to the direction of the foot. The gait phases in all three cases were detected by means of a neural network. The output from the neural network was the gait phase, while the inputs were data from the sensors. The results show that the errors were in the ranges: 30 ms (2.7% – force sensors; 150 ms (13.6% – nonprocessed acceleration, and 120 ms (11% – processed acceleration data. This result suggests that it is possible to use the accelerometer as the gait phase detector, however, with the knowledge that the gait phases are time shifted for about 100 ms with respect the neural network predicted times.

  18. Effects of slip-induced changes in ankle movement on muscle activity and ground reaction forces during running acceleration

    Ketabi, Shahin; Kersting, Uwe G.

    Ground contact in running is always linked to a minimum amount of slipping, e.g., during the early contact phase when horizontal forces are high compared to vertical forces. Studies have shown altered muscular activation when expecting slips [2-4]. It is not known what the mechanical effect of such...

  19. Do runners who suffer injuries have higher vertical ground reaction forces than those who remain injury-free? A systematic review and meta-analysis

    van der Worp, Henk; Vrielink, Jelte W.; Bredeweg, Steef W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) parameters have been implicated as a cause of several running-related injuries. However, no systematic review has examined this relationship. Aim We systematically reviewed evidence for a relation between VGRF parameters and specific running-related i

  20. Do runners who suffer injuries have higher vertical ground reaction forces than those who remain injury-free? : A systematic review and meta-analysis

    van der Worp, Henk; Vrielink, Jelte W.; Bredeweg, Steef W.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vertical ground reaction force (VGRF) parameters have been implicated as a cause of several running-related injuries. However, no systematic review has examined this relationship. AIM: We systematically reviewed evidence for a relation between VGRF parameters and specific running-related

  1. NUMBER OF SUCCESSIVE CYCLES NECESSARY TO ACHIEVE STABILITY OF SELECTED GROUND REACTION FORCE VARIABLES DURING CONTINUOUS JUMPING

    Jasmes M.W. Brownjohn

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Because of inherent variability in all human cyclical movements, such as walking, running and jumping, data collected across a single cycle might be atypical and potentially unable to represent an individual's generalized performance. The study described here was designed to determine the number of successive cycles due to continuous, repetitive countermovement jumping which a test subject should perform in a single experimental session to achieve stability of the mean of the corresponding continuously measured ground reaction force (GRF variables. Seven vertical GRF variables (period of jumping cycle, duration of contact phase, peak force amplitude and its timing, average rate of force development, average rate of force relaxation and impulse were extracted on the cycle-by-cycle basis from vertical jumping force time histories generated by twelve participants who were jumping in response to regular electronic metronome beats in the range 2-2.8 Hz. Stability of the selected GRF variables across successive jumping cycles was examined for three jumping rates (2, 2.4 and 2.8 Hz using two statistical methods: intra-class correlation (ICC analysis and segmental averaging technique (SAT. Results of the ICC analysis indicated that an average of four successive cycles (mean 4.5 ± 2.7 for 2 Hz; 3.9 ± 2.6 for 2.4 Hz; 3.3 ± 2.7 for 2.8 Hz were necessary to achieve maximum ICC values. Except for jumping period, maximum ICC values took values from 0.592 to 0.991 and all were significantly (p < 0.05 different from zero. Results of the SAT revealed that an average of ten successive cycles (mean 10.5 ± 3.5 for 2 Hz; 9.2 ± 3.8 for 2.4 Hz; 9.0 ± 3.9 for 2.8 Hz were necessary to achieve stability of the selected parameters using criteria previously reported in the literature. Using 10 reference trials, the SAT required standard deviation criterion values of 0.49, 0.41 and 0.55 for 2 Hz, 2.4 Hz and 2.8 Hz jumping rates, respectively, in order to approximate

  2. Increasing plantarflexion angle during landing reduces vertical ground reaction forces, loading rates and the hip's contribution to support moment within participants.

    Rowley, K Michael; Richards, James G

    2015-01-01

    The ankle joint's role in shock absorption during landing has been researched in many studies, which have found that landing with higher amounts of plantarflexion (PF) results in lower peak vertical ground reaction forces and loading rates. However, there has not yet been a study that compares drop landings within participants along a quantitative continuum of PF angles. Using a custom-written real-time feedback program, participants adjusted their ankles to an instructed PF angle and dropped onto two force platforms. For increasing PF, peak ground reaction force and peak loading rate during weight acceptance decreased significantly. The hip's contribution to peak support moment decreased as PF at initial contact increased up to 30°. The ankle and knee contributions increased over this same continuum of PF angles. There appears to be no optimal PF angle based on peak ground reaction force and loading rate measurements, but there may be an optimum where joint contributions to peak support moment converge and the hip moment's contribution is minimised. PMID:25775364

  3. A comparison of lower limb EMG and ground reaction forces between barefoot and shod gait in participants with diabetic neuropathic and healthy controls

    Akashi Paula MH

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is known that when barefoot, gait biomechanics of diabetic neuropathic patients differ from non-diabetic individuals. However, it is still unknown whether these biomechanical changes are also present during shod gait which is clinically advised for these patients. This study investigated the effect of the participants own shoes on gait biomechanics in diabetic neuropathic individuals compared to barefoot gait patterns and healthy controls. Methods Ground reaction forces and lower limb EMG activities were analyzed in 21 non-diabetic adults (50.9 ± 7.3 yr, 24.3 ± 2.6 kg/m2 and 24 diabetic neuropathic participants (55.2 ± 7.9 yr, 27.0 ± 4.4 kg/m2. EMG patterns of vastus lateralis, lateral gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior, along with the vertical and antero-posterior ground reaction forces were studied during shod and barefoot gait. Results Regardless of the disease, walking with shoes promoted an increase in the first peak vertical force and the peak horizontal propulsive force. Diabetic individuals had a delay in the lateral gastrocnemius EMG activity with no delay in the vastus lateralis. They also demonstrated a higher peak horizontal braking force walking with shoes compared to barefoot. Diabetic participants also had a smaller second peak vertical force in shod gait and a delay in the vastus lateralis EMG activity in barefoot gait compared to controls. Conclusions The change in plantar sensory information that occurs when wearing shoes revealed a different motor strategy in diabetic individuals. Walking with shoes did not attenuate vertical forces in either group. Though changes in motor strategy were apparent, the biomechanical did not support the argument that the use of shoes contributes to altered motor responses during gait.

  4. Zapateado technique as an injury risk in Mexican folkloric and Spanish dance: an analysis of execution, ground reaction force, and muscle strength.

    Echegoyen, Soledad; Aoyama, Takeshi; Rodríguez, Cristina

    2013-06-01

    Zapateado is a repetitive percussive footwork in dance. This percussive movement, and the differences in technique, may be risk factors for injury. A survey on zapateado dance students found a rate of 1.5 injuries/1,000 exposures. Knee injuries are more frequent than in Spanish dancers than folkloric dancers. The aim of this research was to study the relationship between technique and ground reaction force between zapateado on Spanish and Mexican folkloric dancers. Ten female dance students (age 22.4 ± 4 yrs), six Spanish dancers and four Mexican folkloric dancers, were considered. Each student performed zapateado with a flat foot, wearing high-heeled shoes during 5 seconds on a force platform. Videotapes were taken on a lateral plane, and knee and hip angles in each movement phase were measured with Dartfish software. Additionally, knee and ankle flexor and extensor strength was measured with a dynamometer. Ground reaction forces were lower for Spanish dancers than Mexican folkloric dancers. Spanish dancers had less knee flexion when the foot contacted to the ground than did Mexican folkloric dancers. On Spanish dancers, the working leg had more motion in relation to hip and knee angles than was seen in folkloric dancers. The ankle extensors were stronger on folkloric dancers, and there were no differences for the other muscle groups. Knee flexion at foot contact and muscle strength imbalance could be risk factors for injuries. It is suggested that the technique in Spanish dance in Mexico be reviewed, although more studies are required to define more risk factors. PMID:23752281

  5. Estimating 3D L5/S1 moments and ground reaction forces during trunk bending using a full-body ambulatory inertial motion capture system.

    Faber, G S; Chang, C C; Kingma, I; Dennerlein, J T; van Dieën, J H

    2016-04-11

    Inertial motion capture (IMC) systems have become increasingly popular for ambulatory movement analysis. However, few studies have attempted to use these measurement techniques to estimate kinetic variables, such as joint moments and ground reaction forces (GRFs). Therefore, we investigated the performance of a full-body ambulatory IMC system in estimating 3D L5/S1 moments and GRFs during symmetric, asymmetric and fast trunk bending, performed by nine male participants. Using an ambulatory IMC system (Xsens/MVN), L5/S1 moments were estimated based on the upper-body segment kinematics using a top-down inverse dynamics analysis, and GRFs were estimated based on full-body segment accelerations. As a reference, a laboratory measurement system was utilized: GRFs were measured with Kistler force plates (FPs), and L5/S1 moments were calculated using a bottom-up inverse dynamics model based on FP data and lower-body kinematics measured with an optical motion capture system (OMC). Correspondence between the OMC+FP and IMC systems was quantified by calculating root-mean-square errors (RMSerrors) of moment/force time series and the interclass correlation (ICC) of the absolute peak moments/forces. Averaged over subjects, L5/S1 moment RMSerrors remained below 10Nm (about 5% of the peak extension moment) and 3D GRF RMSerrors remained below 20N (about 2% of the peak vertical force). ICCs were high for the peak L5/S1 extension moment (0.971) and vertical GRF (0.998). Due to lower amplitudes, smaller ICCs were found for the peak asymmetric L5/S1 moments (0.690-0.781) and horizontal GRFs (0.559-0.948). In conclusion, close correspondence was found between the ambulatory IMC-based and laboratory-based estimates of back load. PMID:26795123

  6. Comparisons of knee and ankle joint angles and ground reaction force according to functional differences during single-leg drop landing

    Kim, Kewwan; Jeon, Kyoungkyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine potential predictors of functional instability of the knee and ankle joints during single-leg drop landing based on the prior history of injury. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 24 collegiate soccer players without pain or dysfunction. To compare the differences between the stable and unstable sides during single-leg drop landing, 8 motion analysis cameras and a force plate were used. The Cortex 4 software was used for a biomechanical analysis of 3 events. An independent t-test was used for statistical comparison between both sides; pknee joint movements showed gradual flexion in the sagittal plane. The unstable-side ankle joint showed plantar flexion of approximately 2° relative to the stable side. In the coronal plane, the unstable-side knee joint differed from the stable side in its tendency for valgus movement. The unstable-side ankle joint showed contrasting movement compared with the stable side, and the difference was significant. Regarding the vertical ground reaction force, the stable side showed maximum knee flexion that was approximately 0.1 BW lower than that of the unstable side. [Conclusion] Increasing the flexion angle of the knee joint can help prevent injury during landing.

  7. Predição da força de reação do solo durante a corrida na água Prediction of ground reaction force during water immersion running

    Alessandro Haupenthal

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Este estudo visou desenvolver um modelo para a predição da força de reação do solo na corrida subaquática. Participaram 20 sujeitos (9 homens e 11 mulheres, que realizaram corrida subaquática em dois níveis de imersão e três velocidades. Para cada sujeito foram coletadas seis passagens válidas em cada condição, com a utilização de uma plataforma subaquática de força. O modelo para predição da força foi construído por regressão linear múltipla. Foram consideradas variáveis dependentes a componente vertical e a componente ântero-posterior da força de reação do solo. As variáveis imersão, sexo, velocidade, massa corporal, densidade corporal e percentual de gordura foram consideradas independentes. Permaneceu no modelo final de regressão para a componente vertical a velocidade (pThis study aimed at developing a model to predict ground reaction force during deep-water running. A total of 20 subjects ((9 men, 11 women ran in water at two immersion levels and three different speeds. Each subject performed six valid trials in each condition, data being captured by an underwater force plate. The force prediction model was build by multiple linear regression. Dependent variables were the vertical and anteroposterior components of the ground reaction force; independent variables were runners' immersion, sex, speed, body mass, body density, and percentage of fat. At the final regression model for the vertical component, only speed remained (p<0.001, while for the anteroposterior component, speed, immersion, and body mass were maintained (all at p<0.001. The obtained model for the anteroposterior component of ground reaction force may be found satisfactory, as adjusted determination coefficient was 0.79. However, the prediction model for the vertical component cannot be recommended for prediction during deep-water running, since that coefficient was 0.18. It must be noted that the proposed prediction model applies to subjects

  8. Unmanned ground vehicles for integrated force protection

    Carroll, Daniel M.; Mikell, Kenneth; Denewiler, Thomas

    2004-09-01

    The combination of Command and Control (C2) systems with Unmanned Ground Vehicles (UGVs) provides Integrated Force Protection from the Robotic Operation Command Center. Autonomous UGVs are directed as Force Projection units. UGV payloads and fixed sensors provide situational awareness while unattended munitions provide a less-than-lethal response capability. Remote resources serve as automated interfaces to legacy physical devices such as manned response vehicles, barrier gates, fence openings, garage doors, and remote power on/off capability for unmanned systems. The Robotic Operations Command Center executes the Multiple Resource Host Architecture (MRHA) to simultaneously control heterogeneous unmanned systems. The MRHA graphically displays video, map, and status for each resource using wireless digital communications for integrated data, video, and audio. Events are prioritized and the user is prompted with audio alerts and text instructions for alarms and warnings. A control hierarchy of missions and duty rosters support autonomous operations. This paper provides an overview of the key technology enablers for Integrated Force Protection with details on a force-on-force scenario to test and demonstrate concept of operations using Unmanned Ground Vehicles. Special attention is given to development and applications for the Remote Detection Challenge and Response (REDCAR) initiative for Integrated Base Defense.

  9. Computerized identification and classification of stance phases as made by front og hind feet of walking cows based on 3-dimensional ground reaction forces

    Skjøth, F; Thorup, Vivi Mørkøre; do Nascimento, Omar Feix; Ingvartsen, Klaus Lønne; Rasmussen, Morten Dam; Voigt, Michael

    2013-01-01

    force information. Features were derived from measurements made using two parallel 3-dimensional force plates. The approach presented is based on clustering of Centre of Pressure (COP) trace points over space and time, combined with logical sequencing of stance phases based on the dynamics of...

  10. Effects of ground and joint reaction force exercise on lumbar spine and femoral neck bone mineral density in postmenopausal women: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    Kelley George A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Low bone mineral density (BMD and subsequent fractures are a major public health problem in postmenopausal women. The purpose of this study was to use the aggregate data meta-analytic approach to examine the effects of ground (for example, walking and/or joint reaction (for example, strength training exercise on femoral neck (FN and lumbar spine (LS BMD in postmenopausal women. Methods The a priori inclusion criteria were: (1 randomized controlled trials, (2 exercise intervention ≥ 24 weeks, (3 comparative control group, (4 postmenopausal women, (5 participants not regularly active, i.e., less than 150 minutes of moderate intensity (3.0 to 5.9 metabolic equivalents weight bearing endurance activity per week, less than 75 minutes of vigorous intensity (> 6.0 metabolic equivalents weight bearing endurance activity per week, resistance training g was calculated for each FN and LS BMD result and pooled using random-effects models. Z-score alpha values, 95%confidence intervals (CI and number-needed-to-treat (NNT were calculated for pooled results. Heterogeneity was examined using Q and I2. Mixed-effects ANOVA and simple meta-regression were used to examine changes in FN and LS BMD according to selected categorical and continuous variables. Statistical significance was set at an alpha value ≤0.05 and a trend at >0.05 to ≤ 0.10. Results Small, statistically significant exercise minus control group improvements were found for both FN (28 g’s, 1632 participants, g = 0.288, 95% CI = 0.102, 0.474, p = 0.002, Q = 90.5, p I2 = 70.1%, NNT = 6 and LS (28 g’s, 1504 participants, g = 0.179, 95% CI = −0.003, 0.361, p = 0.05, Q = 77.7, p I2 = 65.3%, NNT = 6 BMD. Clinically, it was estimated that the overall changes in FN and LS would reduce the 20-year relative risk of osteoporotic fracture at any site by approximately 11% and 10%, respectively. None of the mixed

  11. About Radiation Reaction with Force Approach

    Velazquez, Gustavo Lopez

    2015-01-01

    The difficulty of usual approach to radiation reaction is pointed out , and a possible approach based on the force acting to the charged particle which produces the acceleration itself, is presented. This approach brings about an expression such that acceleration is zero whenever the external force is zero.

  12. Effects of shoeing on limb movement and ground reaction forces in Icelandic horses at walk, tölt and trot.

    Waldern, Nina M; Wiestner, Thomas; Ramseier, Lea C; Amport, Claude; Weishaupt, Michael A

    2013-12-01

    Tölt is a symmetric four-beat gait with a speed range extending into that of trot and canter. Specific shoeing methods, such as unnaturally high and long hooves, are used to enforce individual gait predisposition. The aim of this study was to assess the consequences of this shoeing style on loading and movement of the limbs at walk, tölt and trot, and at different velocities. Simultaneous kinetic and kinematic gait analysis was carried out at walk (1.4m/s) and at two tölting and trotting speeds (3.3m/s and 3.9 m/s) on an instrumented treadmill. Thirteen sound Icelandic horses were first measured with high, long front hooves (SH) and, 1 week later, after trimming the hooves according to standard shoeing principles (SN). Comparing SH with SN, front hooves had 21 ± 5 mm longer dorsal hoof walls, and the shoeing material per hoof was 273 ± 50 g heavier. In all three gaits, gait quality, as it is currently judged, was improved with SH due to a lower stride rate, a longer stride length and a higher, but not wider, forelimb protraction arc, which were also positively associated with speed. Forelimb-hind limb balance remained unchanged, but limb impulses were higher. Apart from an increase of ≤ 2.2% in the forelimbs at the faster speed of both tölt and trot, SH had little influence on vertical peak forces. PMID:24360730

  13. A vacuum--generated inertia reaction force

    A clear and succinct covariant approach shows that, in principle, there must be a contribution to the inertia reaction force on an accelerated object by the surrounding vacuum electromagnetic field in which the object is embedded. No details of the vacuum to object electromagnetic interaction need to be specified other than the fact that the object is made of electromagnetically interacting particles. Some interesting consequences of this feature are discussed. This analysis strongly supports the concept that inertia is indeed an opposition of the vacuum fields to any attempt to change the uniform state of motion of material bodies. This also definitely shows that inertia should be viewed as extrinsic to mass and that causing agents and/or mechanisms responsible for the inertia reaction force are neither intrinsic to the notion of mass nor to the entities responsible for the existence of mass in elementary particles (as, e.g., the Higgs field). In other words the mechanism that produces the inertia-reaction-force requires an explicit explanation. This explicit explanation is that inertia is an opposition of the vacuum fields to the accelerated motion of any material entities, i.e., of entities that possess mass. It is briefly commented why the existence of a Higgs field responsible for the generation of mass in elementary particles does not contradict the view presented here. It is also briefly discussed why a strict version of Mach's Principle does really contradict this view, though a broad sense version of Mach's Principle may be in agreement

  14. Grounding-Induced Sectional Forces and Residual Strength of Grounded Ship Hulls

    Paik, Jeom Kee; Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the sectional forces induced by ship grounding and also to assess the residual strength of groundedship hulls. An analytical approach is used to estimate the grounding-induced sectional forces of ships. The extent and location of structural damage due to...... grounding is defined based on the ABS Safe Hull guide. The residual strength of damaged hulls is calculated by using a simple analytical formula. The method is applied to residual strength assessment of a damaged double hull tanker of 38,400 dwt due to grounding....

  15. Ground reaction curve based upon block theory

    Discontinuities in a rock mass can intersect an excavation surface to form discrete blocks (keyblocks) which can be unstable. Once a potentially unstable block is identified, the forces affecting it can be calculated to assess its stability. The normal and shear stresses on each block face before displacement are calculated using elastic theory and are modified in a nonlinear way by discontinuity deformations as the keyblock displaces. The stresses are summed into resultant forces to evaluate block stability. Since the resultant forces change with displacement, successive increments of block movement are examined to see whether the block ultimately becomes stable or fails. Two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) analytic models for the stability of simple pyramidal keyblocks were evaluated. Calculated stability is greater for 3D analyses than for 2D analyses. Calculated keyblock stability increases with larger in situ stress magnitudes, larger lateral stress ratios, and larger shear strengths. Discontinuity stiffness controls blocks displacement more strongly than it does stability itself. Large keyblocks are less stable than small ones, and stability increases as blocks become more slender

  16. Regulation of reaction forces during the golf swing.

    McNitt-Gray, J L; Munaretto, J; Zaferiou, A; Requejo, P S; Flashner, H

    2013-06-01

    During the golf swing, the reaction forces applied at the feet control translation and rotation of the body-club system. In this study, we hypothesized that skilled players using a 6-iron would regulate shot distance by scaling the magnitude of the resultant horizontal reaction force applied to the each foot with minimal modifications in force direction. Skilled players (n = 12) hit golf balls using a 6-iron. Shot distance was varied by hitting the ball as they would normally and when reducing shot distance using the same club. During each swing, reaction forces were measured using dual force plates (1200 Hz) and three-dimensional kinematics were simultaneously captured (110 Hz). The results indicate that, on average, the peak resultant horizontal reaction forces of the target leg were significantly less than normal (5%, p < 0.05) when reducing shot distance. No significant differences in the orientation of the peak resultant horizontal reaction forces were observed. Resultant horizontal reaction force-angle relationships within leg and temporal relationships between target and rear legs during the swing were consistent within player across shot conditions. Regulation of force magnitude with minimal modification in force direction is expected to provide advantages from muscle activation, coordination, and performance points of view. PMID:23898685

  17. Unattended ground sensors for Expeditionary Force 21 intelligence collections

    Harrington, Ryan F.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited As our adversaries continue to evolve in complexity, the U.S. Marines adapt in kind with its design and intent through its Expeditionary Force 21 (EF 21) Capstone. EF 21 stresses the need for increased persistent intelligence collections capabilities and the optimization of existing assets. Current requirements for Unattended Ground Sensors (UGS) limit usage in non-permissive environments beyond the Area of Operations, contrary to the ...

  18. The enemy below: preparing ground forces for subterranean warfare

    Bowes, Joshua S.; Newdigate, Mark T.; Rosario, Pedro J.; Tindoll, Davis D.

    2013-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This capstone project analyses subterranean threats in the contemporary operational environment. It identifies the doctrinal gap in the U.S. military regarding operations within tunnels, urban and natural cavities, and other underground facilities, and outlines the changes necessary to prepare ground forces to operate in these complex environments. This paper reviews historical cases spanning back over half a millennium, proposes a ne...

  19. CHEMICAL REACTIONS SIMULATED BY GROUND-WATER-QUALITY MODELS.

    Grove, David B.; Stollenwerk, Kenneth G.

    1987-01-01

    Recent literature concerning the modeling of chemical reactions during transport in ground water is examined with emphasis on sorption reactions. The theory of transport and reactions in porous media has been well documented. Numerous equations have been developed from this theory, to provide both continuous and sequential or multistep models, with the water phase considered for both mobile and immobile phases. Chemical reactions can be either equilibrium or non-equilibrium, and can be quantified in linear or non-linear mathematical forms. Non-equilibrium reactions can be separated into kinetic and diffusional rate-limiting mechanisms. Solutions to the equations are available by either analytical expressions or numerical techniques. Saturated and unsaturated batch, column, and field studies are discussed with one-dimensional, laboratory-column experiments predominating. A summary table is presented that references the various kinds of models studied and their applications in predicting chemical concentrations in ground waters.

  20. On the Compensation of Dynamic Reaction Forces in Stationary Machinery

    Radermacher, Tobias; Lübbert, Jan; Weber, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a method for active electrohydraulic force compensation in industrial scale high power applications. A valve controlled cylinder moves a mass using the force of inertia to compensate for the reaction forces of an industrial process. Two strategies for force compensation are developed and investigated in a 160 ton clamping unit of an injection moulding machine to significantly reduce the excitation. Results of the different strategies are shown and evaluated. Advantages and ...

  1. Analytical r-mode solution with gravitational radiation reaction force

    Dias, O J C; S\\'a, Paulo M.

    2005-01-01

    We present and discuss the analytical r-mode solution to the linearized hydrodynamic equations of a slowly rotating, Newtonian, barotropic, non-magnetized, perfect-fluid star in which the gravitational radiation reaction force is present.

  2. Relação entre a mobilidade do tornozelo e pé e a magnitude da força vertical de reação do solo Relationship between ankle and foot mobility and the magnitude of the vertical ground reaction force

    DL Vianna

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Verificar a relação entre a mobilidade do tornozelo e do pé, e o pico da força vertical de reação do solo, considerada como porcentagem do peso corporal, gerada durante a fase de apoio da marcha. MÉTODOS: foram estudados pés normais do lado direito e esquerdo de 15 homens com 22,1±2,7 anos (19-28 e 15 mulheres 24,20±5,24 anos (19-34. Os parâmetros de exclusão foram: deformidades nos pés, doenças ou traumas, que pudessem acometer o sistema musculoesquelético e a marcha. A mobilidade do tornozelo e dos pés foi obtida através da goniometria da flexão plantar, dorsiflexão, extensão do hálux e extensão dos dedos, o pico da força vertical de reação do solo FRS, foi obtido pela baropodometria computadorizada do sistema FSCAN R. A correlação entre ambas foi feita pelo teste estatístico de Spearman. RESULTADOS: os indivíduos do grupo masculino apresentaram menores valores de mobilidade, e maiores valores do pico da força vertical de reação do solo, quando comparados com o grupo feminino. Não houve diferença entre os pés direito e esquerdo. No sexo feminino foi encontrada correlação negativa estatisticamente significante entre os valores da flexão plantar e a força vertical, e entre os valores da extensão dos dedos e a foça vertical. No sexo masculino, houve correlação negativa estatisticamente significante entre os valores da dorsiflexão e a força vertical. Entre os demais valores não foi encontrada correlação significante. CONCLUSÃO: Há relação entre a mobilidade e a força vertical gerada durante a marcha.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between ankle and foot mobility and the peak of the vertical ground reaction force, as a percentage of body weight, generated during the gait stance phase. METHOD: Fifteen men with mean age of 22.1 ± 2.7 years (range: 19-28 and fifteen women with mean age of 24.20 ± 5.24 years (range: 19-34 with normal feet were studied. The exclusion criteria

  3. Computational Catalysis Using the Artificial Force Induced Reaction Method.

    Sameera, W M C; Maeda, Satoshi; Morokuma, Keiji

    2016-04-19

    The artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method in the global reaction route mapping (GRRM) strategy is an automatic approach to explore all important reaction paths of complex reactions. Most traditional methods in computational catalysis require guess reaction paths. On the other hand, the AFIR approach locates local minima (LMs) and transition states (TSs) of reaction paths without a guess, and therefore finds unanticipated as well as anticipated reaction paths. The AFIR method has been applied for multicomponent organic reactions, such as the aldol reaction, Passerini reaction, Biginelli reaction, and phase-transfer catalysis. In the presence of several reactants, many equilibrium structures are possible, leading to a number of reaction pathways. The AFIR method in the GRRM strategy determines all of the important equilibrium structures and subsequent reaction paths systematically. As the AFIR search is fully automatic, exhaustive trial-and-error and guess-and-check processes by the user can be eliminated. At the same time, the AFIR search is systematic, and therefore a more accurate and comprehensive description of the reaction mechanism can be determined. The AFIR method has been used for the study of full catalytic cycles and reaction steps in transition metal catalysis, such as cobalt-catalyzed hydroformylation and iron-catalyzed carbon-carbon bond formation reactions in aqueous media. Some AFIR applications have targeted the selectivity-determining step of transition-metal-catalyzed asymmetric reactions, including stereoselective water-tolerant lanthanide Lewis acid-catalyzed Mukaiyama aldol reactions. In terms of establishing the selectivity of a reaction, systematic sampling of the transition states is critical. In this direction, AFIR is very useful for performing a systematic and automatic determination of TSs. In the presence of a comprehensive description of the transition states, the selectivity of the reaction can be calculated more accurately

  4. Radiation reaction force and unification of electromagnetic and gravitational fields

    A unified theory of electromagnetic and gravitational fields should modify classical electrodynamics such that the radiation reaction force is accounted for. The analysis leads to a five-dimensional unified theory of five variables. The theory is supported by showing that, for the case of a charged particle moving in a constant magnetic field, the radiation reaction force is indeed included. Moreover, this example shows explicitly that physical changes are associated with the fifth variable. Thus, the notion of a physical five-dimensional space should be seriously taken into consideration

  5. A thermodynamic force generated by chemical gradient and adsorption reaction

    Sugawara, Takeshi

    2009-01-01

    Biological units such as macromolecules, organelles, and cells are directed to a proper location under gradients of relevant chemicals. By considering a macroscopic element that has binding sites for a chemical adsorption reaction to occur on its surface, we show the existence of a thermodynamic force that is generated by the gradient and exerted on the element. By assuming local equilibrium and adopting the grand potential from thermodynamics, we derive a formula for such a thermodynamic force, which depends on the chemical potential gradient and Langmuir isotherm. The conditions under which the formula can be applied are demonstrated to hold in intracellular reactions. The role of the force in the partitioning of bacterial chromosome/plasmid during cell division is discussed.

  6. Government Applications Task Force ground truth study of WAG 4

    Evers, T.K.; Smyre, J.L.; King, A.L.

    1997-06-01

    This report documents the Government Applications Task Force (GATF) Buried Waste Project. The project was initiated as a field investigation and verification of the 1994 Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program`s (SERDP) Buried Waste Identification Project results. The GATF project team included staff from three US Department of Energy (DOE) Laboratories [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC)] and from the National Exploitation Laboratory. Similar studies were conducted at each of the three DOE laboratories to demonstrate the effective use of remote sensing technologies. The three locations were selected to assess differences in buried waste signatures under various environmental conditions (i.e., climate, terrain, precipitation, geology, etc.). After a brief background discussion of the SERDP Project, this report documents the field investigation (ground truth) results from the 1994--1995 GATF Buried Waste Study at ORNL`s Waste Area Grouping (WAG) 4. Figures for this report are located in Appendix A.

  7. The reaction force: Three key points along an intrinsic reaction coordinate

    Peter Politzer; Alejandro Toro-Labbé; Soledad Gutiérrez-Oliva; Bárbara herrera; Pablo Jaque; Monica C Concha; Jane S Murray

    2005-09-01

    The concept of the reaction force is presented and discussed in detail. For typical processes with energy barriers, it has a universal form which defines three key points along an intrinsic reaction coordinate: the force minimum, zero and maximum. We suggest that the resulting four zones be interpreted as involving preparation of reactants in the first, transition to products in the second and third, and relaxation in the fourth. This general picture is supported by the distinctive patterns of the variations in relevant electronic properties. Two important points that are brought out by the reaction force are that (a) the traditional activation energy comprises two separate contributions, and (b) the transition state corresponds to a balance between the driving and the retarding forces.

  8. A influência do uso acumulado de calçados de corrida sobre a força de reação do solo e as respostas de pressão plantar The influence of running shoes cumulative usage on the ground reaction forces and plantar pressure responses

    Roberto Bianco

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Acredita-se que a eficiência do calçado seja afetada pelo uso prolongado, mas as alterações biomecânicas ainda não estão bem compreendidas. O objetivo deste estudo é analisar a influência do uso de calçados de corrida na força de reação do solo e os parâmetros de pressão plantar. Três corredores do sexo masculino receberam quatro calçados de corrida para usarem em suas sessões de treinamento. O Sistema Gaitway e o Sistema de F-scan foram usados para registrar a força de reação do solo e parâmetros pressão plantar em diferentes regiões do pé. As coletas ocorreram em quatro momentos: novo e 100, 200 e 300 km de uso. O primeiro pico diminuiu da condição novo para os 300 km de uso (p The prolonged use of a running shoe is thought to affect the efficiency of its impact attenuation properties. However, its effect over biomechanical variables has yet not been well understood. The aim of this study was to examine the influence of running shoe usage on ground reaction force and plantar pressure parameters. Three male runners received four running shoes each to use at their training sessions. The Gaitway System was used to register the vertical component of the ground reaction force, whereas the contact area and peak plantar pressure at different regions of the foot were assessed via the the F-scan System. Data collection occurred at baseline (when the shoes were new - New and after 100, 200 and 300km of use. The first peak decreased significantly from New to 300km (p < 0.01 and the loading rate showed a significant decrease at 200km in relation to the New condition (p < 0.01. Total area increased significantly from New to 100km (p < 0.01 of use and maintained a similar value when compared with the other conditions. There was a continuous and significant decrease (p < 0.01 on forefoot peak pressure as the mileage increased from New to 300km. The hallux peak pressure values were significantly smaller (p < 0.01 at 300km when

  9. Crouched Posture Maximizes Ground Reaction Forces Generated by Muscles

    Hoang, Hoa X.; Reinbolt, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Crouch gait decreases walking efficiency due to the increased knee and hip flexion during the stance phase of gait. Crouch gait is generally considered to be disadvantageous for children with cerebral palsy; however, a crouched posture may allow biomechanical advantages that lead some children to adopt a crouch gait. To investigate one possible advantage of crouch gait, a musculoskeletal model created in OpenSim was placed in 15 different postures from upright to severe crouch during initial,...

  10. Reduction in ground reaction force variables with instructed barefoot running

    Cynthia D. Samaan; Michael J. Rainbow; Davis, Irene S.

    2014-01-01

    Backgound: Barefoot (BF) running has recently increased in popularity with claims that it is more natural and may result in fewer injuries due to a reduction in impact loading. However, novice BF runners do not necessarily immediately switch to a forefoot strike pattern. This may increase mechanical parameters such as loading rate, which has been associated with certain running-related injuries, specifically, tibial stress fractures, patellofemoral pain, and plantar fasciitis. The purpose of ...

  11. Reduction in ground reaction force variables with instructed barefoot running

    Cynthia D. Samaan

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: As impact loading has been associated with certain running-related injuries, instruction and feedback on the proper forefoot strike pattern may help reduce the injury risk associated with transitioning to BF running.

  12. Experimental verification of a computational technique for determining ground reactions in human bipedal stance.

    Audu, Musa L; Kirsch, Robert F; Triolo, Ronald J

    2007-01-01

    We have developed a three-dimensional (3D) biomechanical model of human standing that enables us to study the mechanisms of posture and balance simultaneously in various directions in space. Since the two feet are on the ground, the system defines a kinematically closed-chain which has redundancy problems that cannot be resolved using the laws of mechanics alone. We have developed a computational (optimization) technique that avoids the problems with the closed-chain formulation thus giving users of such models the ability to make predictions of joint moments, and potentially, muscle activations using more sophisticated musculoskeletal models. This paper describes the experimental verification of the computational technique that is used to estimate the ground reaction vector acting on an unconstrained foot while the other foot is attached to the ground, thus allowing human bipedal standing to be analyzed as an open-chain system. The computational approach was verified in terms of its ability to predict lower extremity joint moments derived from inverse dynamic simulations performed on data acquired from four able-bodied volunteers standing in various postures on force platforms. Sensitivity analyses performed with model simulations indicated which ground reaction force (GRF) and center of pressure (COP) components were most critical for providing better estimates of the joint moments. Overall, the joint moments predicted by the optimization approach are strongly correlated with the joint moments computed using the experimentally measured GRF and COP (0.78 unity slope (experimental=computational results) for postures of the four subjects examined. These results indicate that this model-based technique can be relied upon to predict reasonable and consistent estimates of the joint moments using the predicted GRF and COP for most standing postures. PMID:16797023

  13. Forced vibration tests of a model foundation on rock ground

    The response of very stiff structures, such as nuclear reactor buildings, to earthquake ground motion is significantly affected by radiation damping due to the soil-structure interaction. The radiation damping can be computed by vibration admittance theory or dynamical ground compliance theory. In order to apply the values derived from these theories to the practical problems, comparative studies between theoretical results and experimental results concerning the soil-structure interaction, especially if the ground is rock, are urgently needed. However, experimental results for rock are less easily obtained than theoretical ones. The purpose of this paper is to describe the harmonic excitation tests of a model foundation on rock and to describe the results of comparative studies. (orig./HP)

  14. The solar forcing on the ground 7 Be concentration variability

    7 Be, natural radionuclide, is produced by the interaction of cosmic radiation with oxygen and nitrogen molecules. 7 Be production in atmosphere depends on the intensity of cosmic radiation which is influenced by the Earth's magnetosphere. The magnetosphere shape depends on solar activity. This paper presents the influence of sunspots number (11 years period) on the ground 7 Be concentration variability. (authors)

  15. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    1991-10-01

    This report presents information concerning field procedures employed during the monitoring, well construction, well purging, sampling, and well logging at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Activities were conducted in an effort to evaluate ground water contamination.

  16. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    1992-03-01

    This report presents information related to the sampling of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of an investigation into possible ground water contamination. Information concerns well drilling/construction; x-ray diffraction and sampling; soil boring logs; and chain-of-custody records.

  17. Tethered satellite system control using electromagnetic forces and reaction wheels

    Alandi Hallaj, Mohammad Amin; Assadian, Nima

    2015-12-01

    In this paper a novel non-rotating space tethered configuration is introduced which its relative positions controlled using electromagnetic forces. The attitude dynamics is controlled by three reaction wheels in the body axes. The nonlinear coupled orbital dynamics of a dumbbell tethered satellite formation flight are derived through a constrained Lagrangian approach. These equations are presented in the leader satellite orbital frame. The tether is assumed to be mass-less and straight, and the J2 perturbation is included to the analysis. The forces and the moments of the electromagnetic coils are modeled based on the far-filed model of the magnetic dipoles. A guidance scheme for generating the desired positions as a function of time in Cartesian form is presented. The satellite tethered formation with variable length is controlled utilizing a linear controller. This approach is applied to a specified scenario and it is shown that the nonlinear guidance method and the linear controller can control the nonlinear system of the tethered formation and the results are compared with optimal control approach.

  18. Fore-aft ground force adaptations to induced forelimb lameness in walking and trotting dogs.

    Abdelhadi, Jalal; Wefstaedt, Patrick; Nolte, Ingo; Schilling, Nadja

    2012-01-01

    Animals alter their locomotor mechanics to adapt to a loss of limb function. To better understand their compensatory mechanisms, this study evaluated the changes in the fore-aft ground forces to forelimb lameness and tested the hypothesis that dogs unload the affected limb by producing a nose-up pitching moment via the exertion of a net-propulsive force when the lame limb is on the ground. Seven healthy Beagles walked and trotted at steady speed on an instrumented treadmill while horizontal force data were collected before and after a moderate lameness was induced. Peak, mean and summed braking and propulsive forces as well as the duration each force was exerted and the time to reach maximum force were evaluated for both the sound and the lame condition. Compared with the sound condition, a net-propulsive force was produced by the lame diagonal limbs due to a reduced braking force in the affected forelimb and an increased propulsive force in the contralateral hindlimb when the dogs walked and trotted. To regain pitch stability and ensure steady speed for a given locomotor cycle, the dogs produced a net-braking force when the sound diagonal limbs were on the ground by exerting greater braking forces in both limbs during walking and additionally reducing the propulsive force in the hindlimb during trotting. Consistent with the proposed mechanism, dogs maximize their double support phases when walking. Likely associated with the fore-aft force adaptations to lameness are changes in muscle recruitment that potentially result in short- and long-term effects on the limb and trunk muscles. PMID:23300614

  19. Fore-Aft Ground Force Adaptations to Induced Forelimb Lameness in Walking and Trotting Dogs

    Abdelhadi, Jalal; Wefstaedt, Patrick; Nolte, Ingo; Schilling, Nadja

    2012-01-01

    Animals alter their locomotor mechanics to adapt to a loss of limb function. To better understand their compensatory mechanisms, this study evaluated the changes in the fore-aft ground forces to forelimb lameness and tested the hypothesis that dogs unload the affected limb by producing a nose-up pitching moment via the exertion of a net-propulsive force when the lame limb is on the ground. Seven healthy Beagles walked and trotted at steady speed on an instrumented treadmill while horizontal f...

  20. Resolution of Forces and Strain Measurements from an Acoustic Ground Test

    Smith, Andrew M.; LaVerde, Bruce T.; Hunt, Ronald; Waldon, James M.

    2013-01-01

    The Conservatism in Typical Vibration Tests was Demonstrated: Vibration test at component level produced conservative force reactions by approximately a factor of 4 (approx.12 dB) as compared to the integrated acoustic test in 2 out of 3 axes. Reaction Forces Estimated at the Base of Equipment Using a Finite Element Based Method were Validated: FEM based estimate of interface forces may be adequate to guide development of vibration test criteria with less conservatism. Element Forces Estimated in Secondary Structure Struts were Validated: Finite element approach provided best estimate of axial strut forces in frequency range below 200 Hz where a rigid lumped mass assumption for the entire electronics box was valid. Models with enough fidelity to represent diminishing apparent mass of equipment are better suited for estimating force reactions across the frequency range. Forward Work: Demonstrate the reduction in conservatism provided by; Current force limited approach and an FEM guided approach. Validate proposed CMS approach to estimate coupled response from uncoupled system characteristics for vibroacoustics.

  1. Decrease of reaction force of metal gaskets just after initial tightening

    The decrease of reaction force of some metal gaskets inserted into the test flange at room temperature, 120 C(real cask temperature) and 200 C(accelerated condition) are measured. The reaction forces of metal gaskets in the room temperature have been almost not changed. The reaction force of 120 C and 200 C metal gaskets has decreased according to the temperature increase. After the temperature became stable, the decrease of the reaction force gradually proceeded, this decrease have been as same as previous studies. The bolts of transport and storage casks are usually tightened just after the loading of spent fuels, and then the temperature of metal gaskets at that time is almost the room temperature. The reaction forces of the metal gasket tightened at this condition would be decreased after the temperature increase due to the decay heat of spent fuels. It is confirmed that the loosening of the bolts might be happened if the tightening torque of bolts is not appropriate. It is easy to evaluate that the reaction forces of the metal gasket in storage condition according to Larson-Miller parameter or relaxation of the gasket material, but the decrease of the reaction forces of the metal gasket just after the loading is not able to evaluate by these method. It is necessary to evaluate the reaction forces according to plastic deformation property of the metal gaskets so as to fasten the gaskets safety

  2. Influence of joint models on lower-limb musculo-tendon forces and threedimensional joint reaction forces during gait

    Dumas, Raphaël; Moissenet, Florent; GASPARUTTO, Xavier; CHEZE, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Several three-dimensional (3D) lower-limb musculo-skeletal models have been developed for gait analysis and different hip, knee and ankle joint models have been considered in the literature. Conversely to the influence of the musculotendon geometry, the influence of the joint models - i.e. number of degrees of freedom and passive joint moments - on the estimated musculo-tendon forces and 3D joint reaction forces has not been extensively examined. In this paper musculo-tendon forces and 3D joi...

  3. Foot Reaction Forces during Long Duration Space Flight

    Gopalakrishnan, R.; Rice, A. J.; Genc, K. O.; Maender, C. C.; Kuklis, M. M.; Humphreys, B.; Cavanagh, P. R.

    2008-01-01

    Musculoskeletal changes, particularly in the lower extremities, are an established consequence of long-duration space flight despite exercise countermeasures. It is widely believed that disuse and reduction in load bearing are key to these physiological changes, but no quantitative data characterizing the on-orbit movement environments currently exist. Here we present data from the Foot Experiment (E318) regarding astronaut activity on the ground and on-orbit during typical days from 4 International Space Station (ISS) crew members who flew during increments 6, 8, 11, and 12.

  4. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    1992-03-01

    An environmental investigation of ground water conditions has been undertaken at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), Ohio to obtain data to assist in the evaluation of a potential removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, migration of the contaminated ground water across Base boundaries. Field investigations were limited to the central section of the southwestern boundary of Area C and the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B. Further, the study was limited to a maximum depth of 150 feet below grade. Three primary activities of the field investigation were: (1) installation of 22 monitoring wells, (2) collection and analysis of ground water from 71 locations, (3) measurement of ground water elevations at 69 locations. Volatile organic compounds including trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, and/or vinyl chloride were detected in concentrations exceeding Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) at three locations within the Area C investigation area. Ground water at the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B occurs in two primary units, separated by a thicker-than-expected clay layers. One well within Area B was determined to exceed the MCL for trichloroethylene.

  5. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990 Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential CERCLA removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground-water contamination in the Mad River Valley Aquifer within and across WPAFB boundaries. The action will be based on a Focused Feasibility Study with an Action Memorandum serving as a decision document that is subject to approval by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The first phase (Phase 1) of this effort involves an investigation of ground-water contamination migrating across the southwest boundary of Area C and across Springfield Pike adjacent to Area B. Task 4 of Phase 1 is a field investigation to collect sufficient additional information to evaluate removal alternatives. The field investigation will provide information in the following specific areas of study: water-level data which will be used to permit calibration of the ground-water flow model to a unique time in history; and ground-water quality data which will be used to characterize the current chemical conditions of ground water.

  6. Thinking anew causality problems for the radiation reaction force

    Souza, Reinaldo de Melo e

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we analyze a Lagrangian formalism recently proposed to approach the issue of the Abraham-Lorentz force. Instead of involving only position and velocity, as usual in Classical Mechanics, this Lagrangian involves the acceleration of the charge. We find the conserved momentum of the charge in the absence of any field and show that it contains an acceleration term. This enables us to re-visit the well-known pre-acceleration problem and show that, contrary to what has been widely believed, it is not related to any violation of causality.

  7. VTOL in ground effect flows for closely spaced jets. [to predict pressure and upwash forces on aircraft structures

    Migdal, D.; Hill, W. G., Jr.; Jenkins, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Results of a series of in ground effect twin jet tests are presented along with flow models for closely spaced jets to help predict pressure and upwash forces on simulated aircraft surfaces. The isolated twin jet tests revealed unstable fountains over a range of spacings and jet heights, regions of below ambient pressure on the ground, and negative pressure differential in the upwash flow field. A separate computer code was developed for vertically oriented, incompressible jets. This model more accurately reflects fountain behavior without fully formed wall jets, and adequately predicts ground isobars, upwash dynamic pressure decay, and fountain lift force variation with height above ground.

  8. Behavior of temporal parameters of the ground reactive forces for the walking of postmenopausal women.

    DE Sousa, Adriana Leite; Calçadas Dias Gabriel, Ronaldo Eugênio; Faria, Aurélio Marques; Aragão, Florbela R; Rodrigues Moreira, Maria Helena

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the influence of body composition and menopause characteristics on certain temporal parameters of the behavior of vertical and anteroposterior components of ground reactive forces, as well as the vertical and anteroposterior rates on the walking of postmenopausal women. The sample consisted of 67 postmenopausal women, average age 59 years. Body composition was assessed by octapolar bioimpedance and ground reactive force by the Kistler force platform. Vertical loading rate correlated positively with age (r = 0.02) and negatively with weight (r = -0.33). The relationship between the rates of vertical loading and unloading associated positively with menopause time (r = 0.27) but negatively with weight (r = -0.27). Vertical unloading rate showed a negative association with abdominal visceral adiposity (r = -0.27). The relationship between the times of the intermediate and final phases of the support correlated significantly with abdominal visceral adiposity (r = 0.25) and fat mass (r = 0.24). The study suggests that fat mass and abdominal visceral adiposity affect the support time, and increased abdominal visceral adiposity implies a slower pre-suspension phase during the walking of postmenopausal women. Hormone replacement therapy was shown to be an enhancer of steeper vertical loading and anteroposterior unloading and longer time in the double support phase, indicating a greater stability of postmenopausal women when walking. PMID:26686563

  9. Role of the radiation-reaction force in the optical response of two-dimensional crystals

    Merano, Michele

    2016-01-01

    A classical theory of a radiating two-dimensional crystal is proposed and an expression for the radiative-reaction force is derived. It is shown how this force, acting on the dipoles forming the material, induces a flow of energy away from the dipole vibrations into radiative electromagnetic energy. As conservation of energy requires, the time-average work per unit time and unit area done by the radiation-reaction force is negative and equal in absolute value to the time-average intensity radiated by the crystal.

  10. Radiation Reaction as a Non-conservative Force

    Aashish, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    We study a system of a finite-size charged particle and electromagnetic field by exploiting the Hamilton's principle for classical non-conservative systems introduced recently by Galley[1] and obtain the equation of motion of the charged particle which turns out to be the same as obtained by Jackson[2]. We show that radiation reaction stems from the non-conservative potential of the effective Lagrangian. We derive the Abraham-Lorentz equation using the effective non-conservative Lagrangian for a point charge. We establish a correspondence between a charge interacting with its own electromagnetic field and that of a particle interacting with infinite bath oscillators which in turn affords a way to justify the non-conservative nature of the former system.

  11. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio

    This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size

  12. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    1992-04-01

    This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

  13. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    1991-10-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  14. Ground-based measurements of aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing in North China

    Hongbin Chen; Xiangao Xia; Pucai Wang; Wenxing Zhang

    2007-01-01

    In order to gain an insight into the aerosol properties and their climatic effect over the continental source regions of China, it is of significance to carry out long-term ground-based measurements of aerosol optical properties and radiative forcing. A couple of temporary and permanent Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) sites and three comprehensive radiative sites were established in China as a result of international cooperation in recent years. Heavy aerosol loading and significant temporal and spatial variation over North China are revealed by the AERONET data.Aerosol-induced reductions in surface radiation budget are examined on the basis of collocated observations by sun photometers and pyranometers.

  15. Forcing factors of cloud-to-ground lightning over Iberia: regional-scale assessments

    J. A. Santos

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Cloud-to-ground lightning in a sector covering the Iberian Peninsula, the Balearic Islands and nearby seas (36–44° N, 10° W–5° E is analysed in the period from 2003 to 2009 (7 yr. Two Iberian lightning detection networks, composed of 18 sensors over Portugal and Spain, are combined for the first time in the present study. The selected characteristics are cloud-to-ground flashes (CGFs, first stroke peak current, polarity and multiplicity (number of strokes in a given flash. This study examines the temporal (on hourly, monthly and seasonal timescales and spatial variability of CGFs. The influence of five forcing factors on lightning (elevation, lifted index, convective available potential energy and daily minimum and maximum near-surface air temperatures over the Iberian sector is also assessed. For regional-scale assessments, six subsectors with different climatic conditions were analysed separately. Despite important regional differences, the strongest lightning activity occurs from late spring to early autumn, and mostly in the afternoon. Furthermore, CGFs are mainly located over high-elevation areas in late spring to summer, while they tend to occur over the sea in autumn. The results suggest that (1 orographically forced thunderstorms over mountainous areas, mostly from May to September, (2 tropospheric buoyancy forcing over western-central and northern regions in summer and over the Mediterranean regions in autumn, and (3 near-surface thermal contrasts from October to February largely control the location of lightning in Iberia. There is no evidence of different forcings by polarity. A clear correspondence between summertime precipitation patterns and CGFs is also found.

  16. Influence of Muscle-Tendon Wrapping on Calculations of Joint Reaction Forces in the Equine Distal Forelimb

    Pandy, Marcus G.; Colin Burvill; Davies, Helen M. S.; Merritt, Jonathan S.

    2008-01-01

    The equine distal forelimb is a common location of injuries related to mechanical overload. In this study, a two-dimensional model of the musculoskeletal system of the region was developed and applied to kinematic and kinetic data from walking and trotting horses. The forces in major tendons and joint reaction forces were calculated. The components of the joint reaction forces caused by wrapping of tendons around sesamoid bones were found to be of similar magnitude to the reaction forces betw...

  17. Cloud-to-ground lightning in Portugal: patterns and dynamical forcing

    J. A. Santos

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of the cloud-to-ground discharges (CGD over Portugal is carried out using data collected by a network of sensors maintained by the Portuguese Meteorological Institute for 2003–2009 (7 yr. Only cloud-to-ground flashes are considered and negative polarity CGD are largely dominant. The total number of discharges reveals a considerable interannual variability and a large irregularity in their distribution throughout the year. However, it is shown that a large number of discharges occur in the May–September period (71%, with a bimodal distribution that peaks in May and September, with most of the lightning activity recorded in the afternoon (from 16:00 to 18:00 UTC. In spring and autumn the lightning activity tends to be scattered throughout the country, whereas in summer it tends to be more concentrated over northeastern Portugal. Winter generally presents low lightning activity. Furthermore, two significant couplings between the monthly number of days with discharges and the large-scale atmospheric circulation are isolated: a regional forcing, predominantly in summer, and a remote forcing. In fact, the identification of daily lightning regimes revealed three important atmospheric conditions for triggering lightning activity: regional cut-off lows, cold troughs induced by remote low pressure systems and summertime regional low pressures at low-tropospheric levels combined with a mid-tropospheric cold trough.

  18. Cloud-to-ground lightning in Portugal: patterns and dynamical forcing

    Santos, J. A.; Reis, M. A.; Sousa, J.; Leite, S. M.; Correia, S.; Janeira, M.; Fragoso, M.

    2012-03-01

    An analysis of the cloud-to-ground discharges (CGD) over Portugal is carried out using data collected by a network of sensors maintained by the Portuguese Meteorological Institute for 2003-2009 (7 yr). Only cloud-to-ground flashes are considered and negative polarity CGD are largely dominant. The total number of discharges reveals a considerable interannual variability and a large irregularity in their distribution throughout the year. However, it is shown that a large number of discharges occur in the May-September period (71%), with a bimodal distribution that peaks in May and September, with most of the lightning activity recorded in the afternoon (from 16:00 to 18:00 UTC). In spring and autumn the lightning activity tends to be scattered throughout the country, whereas in summer it tends to be more concentrated over northeastern Portugal. Winter generally presents low lightning activity. Furthermore, two significant couplings between the monthly number of days with discharges and the large-scale atmospheric circulation are isolated: a regional forcing, predominantly in summer, and a remote forcing. In fact, the identification of daily lightning regimes revealed three important atmospheric conditions for triggering lightning activity: regional cut-off lows, cold troughs induced by remote low pressure systems and summertime regional low pressures at low-tropospheric levels combined with a mid-tropospheric cold trough.

  19. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    Thompson, Bill

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

  20. Quasi in situ scanning force microscope with an automatic operated reaction chamber.

    Hund, Markus; Olszowka, Violetta; Fischer, Franz; Krejtschi, Heinz

    2011-11-01

    We describe the design and performance of a quasi in situ scanning force microscope with an automatic operated reaction chamber. The design provides a repetitive hermetically sealed sample environment for successive processing. The reaction chamber is based on a combination of a flexure-guided cover, a piezo-positioning system and a force applicator system. An axial force seals the cover against the reactor enabling flow-through applications at low pressure, ambient pressure, or elevated pressure. The position stability of the sample relative to the probe is characterized and a full automated operation of the instrument is explored by the alignment of an ABC terblock copolymer thin film undergoing solvent vapor annealing in the presence of a high electric field. Due to the high electric field strength and the sharp scanning force microscope tip it is impossible to perform in situ scanning in the presence of the electric field. PMID:22128986

  1. Measurement of muscle actions and foot reaction forces from crew members during entire working days on the International Space Station (ISS)

    We present pilot work in preparation for ISS Experiment 318, which will investigate changes in lower limb daily mechanical loading and muscular activity profiles that have been implicated in bone mineral loss and muscle atrophy during spaceflight. Prototype equipment for the musculo-skeletal rack of the Human Research Facility (HRF) was used in conjunction with the Ambulatory Data Acquisition System to record and store data. Right foot ground reaction force profiles, right leg EMG activity profiles from the tibialis anterior and vastus medialis, and joint angular excursion profiles from the right knee and ankle were collected during five minutes each of forward and backward running in 1g as well as over a twelve hour period of activities during daily living. Ground reaction force profiles were analyzed to provide an estimate of 1g daily mechanical load stimulus, while EMG and joint angle profiles characterized the role of individual muscles in generating and absorbing energy

  2. BALANCE : a computer program for calculating mass transfer for geochemical reactions in ground water

    Parkhurst, David L.; Plummer, L. Niel; Thorstenson, Donald C.

    1982-01-01

    BALANCE is a Fortran computer designed to define and quantify chemical reactions between ground water and minerals. Using (1) the chemical compositions of two waters along a flow path and (2) a set of mineral phases hypothesized to be the reactive constituents in the system, the program calculates the mass transfer (amounts of the phases entering or leaving the aqueous phase) necessary to account for the observed changes in composition between the two waters. Additional constraints can be included in the problem formulation to account for mixing of two end-member waters, redox reactions, and, in a simplified form, isotopic composition. The computer code and a description of the input necessary to run the program are presented. Three examples typical of ground-water systems are described. (USGS)

  3. Violation of action--reaction and self-forces induced by nonequilibrium fluctuations

    Buenzli, P. R.; Soto, R.

    2008-01-01

    We show that the extension of Casimir-like forces to fluctuating fluids driven out of equilibrium can exhibit two interrelated phenomena forbidden at equilibrium: self-forces can be induced on single asymmetric objects and the action--reaction principle between two objects can be violated. These effects originate in asymmetric restrictions imposed by the objects' boundaries on the fluid's fluctuations. They are not ruled out by the second law of thermodynamics since the fluid is in a nonequil...

  4. A test on reactive force fields for the study of silica dimerization reactions

    We studied silica dimerization reactions in the gas and aqueous phase by density functional theory (DFT) and reactive force fields based on two parameterizations of ReaxFF. For each method (both ReaxFF force fields and DFT), we performed constrained geometry optimizations, which were subsequently evaluated in single point energy calculations using the other two methods. Standard fitting procedures typically compare the force field energies and geometries with those from quantum mechanical data after a geometry optimization. The initial configurations for the force field optimization are usually the minimum energy structures of the ab initio database. Hence, the ab initio method dictates which structures are being examined and force field parameters are being adjusted in order to minimize the differences with the ab initio data. As a result, this approach will not exclude the possibility that the force field predicts stable geometries or low transition states which are realistically very high in energy and, therefore, never considered by the ab initio method. Our analysis reveals the existence of such unphysical geometries even at unreactive conditions where the distance between the reactants is large. To test the effect of these discrepancies, we launched molecular dynamics simulations using DFT and ReaxFF and observed spurious reactions for both ReaxFF force fields. Our results suggest that the standard procedures for parameter fitting need to be improved by a mutual comparative method

  5. A test on reactive force fields for the study of silica dimerization reactions

    Moqadam, Mahmoud; Riccardi, Enrico; Trinh, Thuat T.; Åstrand, Per-Olof; Erp, Titus S. van, E-mail: titus.van.erp@ntnu.no [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), Høgskoleringen 5, Realfagbygget D3-117, 7491 Trondheim (Norway)

    2015-11-14

    We studied silica dimerization reactions in the gas and aqueous phase by density functional theory (DFT) and reactive force fields based on two parameterizations of ReaxFF. For each method (both ReaxFF force fields and DFT), we performed constrained geometry optimizations, which were subsequently evaluated in single point energy calculations using the other two methods. Standard fitting procedures typically compare the force field energies and geometries with those from quantum mechanical data after a geometry optimization. The initial configurations for the force field optimization are usually the minimum energy structures of the ab initio database. Hence, the ab initio method dictates which structures are being examined and force field parameters are being adjusted in order to minimize the differences with the ab initio data. As a result, this approach will not exclude the possibility that the force field predicts stable geometries or low transition states which are realistically very high in energy and, therefore, never considered by the ab initio method. Our analysis reveals the existence of such unphysical geometries even at unreactive conditions where the distance between the reactants is large. To test the effect of these discrepancies, we launched molecular dynamics simulations using DFT and ReaxFF and observed spurious reactions for both ReaxFF force fields. Our results suggest that the standard procedures for parameter fitting need to be improved by a mutual comparative method.

  6. Knee joint reaction force during tibial diaphyseal lengthening: a study on a rabbit model.

    Yang, Lang; Cai, Gang; Coulton, Les; Saleh, Michael

    2004-07-01

    The in vivo passive knee joint reaction force was measured in a rabbit model of tibial diaphyseal lengthening. This was based on the assumption that limb lengthening creates soft tissue tension that compresses the joint surface and generates the joint contact force. A measurement method was developed that involved the distraction of the joint and the determination of the distraction force that just separates the joint surfaces. Sixteen immature (mean+/-SD age=9+/-0.6 weeks) New Zealand White rabbits underwent 30% (left) tibial diaphyseal lengthening at a rate of two 0.4mm incremental lengthenings per day. The knee joint reaction force was measured at the end of lengthening (8 rabbits, mean+/-SD age=14+/-0.6 weeks) and five weeks after lengthening (8 rabbits, mean+/-SD age=19+/-0.7 weeks). An instrumented bilateral distractor and an extensometer were fixed cross the knee joint. The joint distraction force and distraction displacement were measured when the joint was distracted in steps and after the section of the Achilles tendon. The joint reaction force on the lengthened side was significantly higher than the control side at both time points (mean+/-SD 44.4+/-7.8 N v. 27.2+/-4.0 N at the end of lengthening, 44.3+/-S6.5 N v. 31.3+/-3.0 N at 5 weeks after lengthening). The contribution of the gastrocnemius to the joint reaction force on the lengthened side was also significantly higher than the control side at both time points (mean+/-SD 9.0+/-1.3N v. 2.8+/-0.8 N at the end of lengthening, 5.3+/-1.4N v. 2.7+/-0.5N at 5 weeks after lengthening). There were significant knee and ankle joint contractures at the end of lengthening, as evidenced by decreased range of motion (mean+/-SD 27+/-8 degrees and 36+/-13 degrees, respectively), which remained 5 weeks after lengthening (mean+/-SD 26+/-6 degrees and 35+/-8 degrees, respectively). The gastrocnemius contributed about 20% of the joint reaction force, indicating that changes in the other intra- and extra

  7. Aerodynamic forces and flow structures of the leading edge vortex on a flapping wing considering ground effect

    The aim of this work is to provide an insight into the aerodynamic performance of the beetle during takeoff, which has been estimated in previous investigations. We employed a scaled-up electromechanical model flapping wing to measure the aerodynamic forces and the three-dimensional flow structures on the flapping wing. The ground effect on the unsteady forces and flow structures were also characterized. The dynamically scaled wing model could replicate the general stroke pattern of the beetle's hind wing kinematics during takeoff flight. Two wing kinematic models have been studied to examine the influences of wing kinematics on unsteady aerodynamic forces. In the first model, the angle of attack is asymmetric and varies during the translational motion, which is the flapping motion of the beetle's hind wing. In the second model, the angle of attack is constant during the translational motion. The instantaneous aerodynamic forces were measured for four strokes during the beetle's takeoff by the force sensor attached at the wing base. Flow visualization provided a general picture of the evolution of the three-dimensional leading edge vortex (LEV) on the beetle hind wing model. The LEV is stable during each stroke, and increases radically from the root to the tip, forming a leading-edge spiral vortex. The force measurement results show that the vertical force generated by the hind wing is large enough to lift the beetle. For the beetle hind wing kinematics, the total vertical force production increases 18.4% and 8.6% for the first and second strokes, respectively, due to the ground effect. However, for the model with a constant angle of attack during translation, the vertical force is reduced during the first stroke. During the third and fourth strokes, the ground effect is negligible for both wing kinematic patterns. This finding suggests that the beetle's flapping mechanism induces a ground effect that can efficiently lift its body from the ground during takeoff

  8. Aerodynamic forces and flow structures of the leading edge vortex on a flapping wing considering ground effect.

    Van Truong, Tien; Byun, Doyoung; Kim, Min Jun; Yoon, Kwang Joon; Park, Hoon Cheol

    2013-09-01

    The aim of this work is to provide an insight into the aerodynamic performance of the beetle during takeoff, which has been estimated in previous investigations. We employed a scaled-up electromechanical model flapping wing to measure the aerodynamic forces and the three-dimensional flow structures on the flapping wing. The ground effect on the unsteady forces and flow structures were also characterized. The dynamically scaled wing model could replicate the general stroke pattern of the beetle's hind wing kinematics during takeoff flight. Two wing kinematic models have been studied to examine the influences of wing kinematics on unsteady aerodynamic forces. In the first model, the angle of attack is asymmetric and varies during the translational motion, which is the flapping motion of the beetle's hind wing. In the second model, the angle of attack is constant during the translational motion. The instantaneous aerodynamic forces were measured for four strokes during the beetle's takeoff by the force sensor attached at the wing base. Flow visualization provided a general picture of the evolution of the three-dimensional leading edge vortex (LEV) on the beetle hind wing model. The LEV is stable during each stroke, and increases radically from the root to the tip, forming a leading-edge spiral vortex. The force measurement results show that the vertical force generated by the hind wing is large enough to lift the beetle. For the beetle hind wing kinematics, the total vertical force production increases 18.4% and 8.6% for the first and second strokes, respectively, due to the ground effect. However, for the model with a constant angle of attack during translation, the vertical force is reduced during the first stroke. During the third and fourth strokes, the ground effect is negligible for both wing kinematic patterns. This finding suggests that the beetle's flapping mechanism induces a ground effect that can efficiently lift its body from the ground during takeoff

  9. Optimal control of the initiation of a pericyclic reaction in the electronic ground state

    Timm Bredtmann; Jörn Manz

    2012-01-01

    Pericyclic reactions in the electronic ground state may be initiated by down-chirped pump-dump sub-pulses of an optimal laser pulse, in the ultraviolet (UV) frequency and sub-10 femtosecond (fs) time domain. This is demonstrated by means of a quantum dynamics model simulation of the Cope rearrangement of Semibullvalene. The laser pulse is designed by means of optimal control theory, with detailed analysis of the mechanism. The theoretical results support the recent experimental initiation of a pericyclic reaction. The present approach provides an important step towards monitoring asynchronous electronic fluxes during synchronous nuclear pericyclic reaction dynamics, with femto-to-attosecond time resolution, as motivated by the recent prediction of our group.

  10. The effects of hibernation and forced disuse (neurectomy) on bone properties in arctic ground squirrels.

    Bogren, Lori K; Johnston, Erin L; Barati, Zeinab; Martin, Paula A; Wojda, Samantha J; Van Tets, Ian G; LeBlanc, Adrian D; Donahue, Seth W; Drew, Kelly L

    2016-05-01

    Bone loss is a well-known medical consequence of disuse such as in long-term space flight. Immobilization in many animals mimics the effects of space flight on bone mineral density. Decreases in metabolism are also thought to contribute to a loss of skeletal mass. Hibernating mammals provide a natural model of disuse and metabolic suppression. Hibernating ground squirrels have been shown to maintain bone strength despite long periods of disuse and decreased metabolism during torpor. This study examined if the lack of bone loss during torpor was a result of the decrease in metabolic rate during torpor or an evolutionary change in these animals affording protection against disuse. We delineated changes in bone density during natural disuse (torpor) and forced disuse (sciatic neurectomy) in the hind limbs of the arctic ground squirrel (AGS) over an entire year. We hypothesized that the animals would be resistant to bone loss due to immobilization and disuse during the winter hibernation season when metabolism is depressed but not the summer active season. This hypothesis was not supported. The animals maintained bone density (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry) and most bone structural and mechanical properties in both seasons. This was observed in both natural and forced disuse, regardless of the known metabolic rate increase during the summer. However, trabecular bone volume fraction (microcomputed tomography) in the distal femur was lower in neurectomized AGS at the study endpoint. These results demonstrate a need to better understand the relationship between skeletal load (use) and bone density that may lead to therapeutics or strategies to maintain bone density in disuse conditions. PMID:27225624

  11. (Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio)

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

  12. The mechanism of chemisorption of hydrogen atom on graphene: Insights from the reaction force and reaction electronic flux

    At the PBE-D3/cc-pVDZ level of theory, the hydrogen chemisorption on graphene was analyzed using the reaction force and reaction electronic flux (REF) theories in combination with electron population analysis. It was found that chemisorption energy barrier is mainly dominated by structural work (∼73%) associated to the substrate reconstruction whereas the electronic work is the greatest contribution of the reverse energy barrier (∼67%) in the desorption process. Moreover, REF shows that hydrogen chemisorption is driven by charge transfer processes through four electronic events taking place as H approaches the adsorbent surface: (a) intramolecular charge transfer in the adsorbent surface; (b) surface reconstruction; (c) substrate magnetization and adsorbent carbon atom develops a sp3 hybridization to form the σC-H bond; and (d) spontaneous intermolecular charge transfer to reach the final chemisorbed state

  13. Influence of Muscle-Tendon Wrapping on Calculations of Joint Reaction Forces in the Equine Distal Forelimb

    Marcus G. Pandy

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The equine distal forelimb is a common location of injuries related to mechanical overload. In this study, a two-dimensional model of the musculoskeletal system of the region was developed and applied to kinematic and kinetic data from walking and trotting horses. The forces in major tendons and joint reaction forces were calculated. The components of the joint reaction forces caused by wrapping of tendons around sesamoid bones were found to be of similar magnitude to the reaction forces between the long bones at each joint. This finding highlighted the importance of taking into account muscle-tendon wrapping when evaluating joint loading in the equine distal forelimb.

  14. Interconnection between critical flow rate and reaction force at discharge of boiling liquid coolant

    An analytical relationship enabling to determine reaction force at discharge of boiling liquid coolant by known critical flow rate and deceleration parameters is derived on the basis of the system of integral conservation equations. The formula is applicable both to critical and subcritical conditions of the discharge of dropping liquids, gases and two-phase mixtures through cylindrical flanges of different inlet geometry. Comparison with experimental data (deceleration pressure of 0.1-15 MPa, channel diameter of 0.82-97.1 mm, initial underheating of 0-100K, initial mass steam content of 0-1, reaction force of 2.5-5x104 N) shows good agreement. A conclusion is made that the derived dependences correctly account for the effect of scale factor and can be used for calculating emergency and transient conditions in nuclear power plants

  15. Atomic force microscope based Kelvin probe measurements : application to an electrochemical reaction

    Böhmisch, Mathias; Burmeister, Frank; Rettenberger, Armin; Zimmermann, Jörg; Boneberg, Johannes; Leiderer, Paul

    1997-01-01

    An atomic force microscope (AFM) was utilized as a Kelvin probe to determine work functions of several metals and semiconductors quantitarively. Most of the experimental data show excellent agreement with published values measured by photoemission. Variations in work functions as low as 5 mV could be detected with a typical lateral resolution of 20 nm. This method allowed us to analyze and explain the energetics of an electrochemical reaction on the surface of WSe2, which could be in situ ind...

  16. Experimental study of pipe reaction force and jet impingement load at the pipe break

    In the design of a light-water reactor nuclear power plant, the extreme loads which are caused as the result of hypothetical pipe break accident have recently become the most severe factors for the structure and equipment design of the plant. In this paper, we describe the results of experiments about reaction forces and jet impingement loads in the pipe break accident conditions. Experiments were carried out for the kinds of jets, that is steam jet and subcooled water jet. (orig.)

  17. Reaction Force Control of a Linear Electrical Generator for Direct Drive Wave Energy Conversion

    Shek, J.K.H.; Macpherson, D.E.; Mueller, M.A.; Xiang, J.

    2007-01-01

    Direct drive wave energy converters have been proposed in view of the disadvantage of mechanical complexity and low conversion efficiencies in conventional wave energy converters. By directly coupling a linear generator to a reciprocating wave energy device, it is suggested that direct drive power take-off could be a viable alternative to hydraulic- and pneumatic-based systems. To further realise the benefits of a direct drive system, a control scheme based on reaction force control to maximi...

  18. Trends in Ground-State Entropies for Transition Metal Based Hydrogen Atom Transfer Reactions

    Mader, Elizabeth A.; Manner, Virginia W.; Markle, Todd F.; Wu, Adam; Franz, James A.; Mayer, James M.

    2009-03-10

    Reported herein are thermochemical studies of hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions involving transition metal H-atom donors MIILH and oxyl radicals. [FeII(H2bip)3]2+, [FeII(H2bim)3]2+, [CoII(H2bim)3]2+ and RuII(acac)2(py-imH) [H2bip = 2,2’-bi-1,4,5,6-tetrahydro¬pyrimidine, H2bim = 2,2’-bi-imidazoline, acac = 2,4-pentandionato, py-imH = 2-(2’-pyridyl)¬imidazole)] each react with TEMPO (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinoxyl) or tBu3PhO• (2,4,6-tri-tert-butylphenoxyl) to give the deprotonated, oxidized metal complex MIIIL, and TEMPOH or tBu3PhOH. Solution equilibrium measurements for the reactions of Co and Fe complexes with TEMPO show a large, negative ground-state entropy for hydrogen atom transfer: ΔSºHAT = -30 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for the two iron complexes and -41 ± 2 cal mol-1 K-1 for [CoII(H2bim)3]2+. The ΔSºHAT for TEMPO + RuII(acac)2(py-imH) is much closer to zero, 4.9 ± 1.1 cal mol-1 K-1. Calorimetric measurements quantitatively confirm the enthalpy of reaction for [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ + TEMPO, thus also confirming ΔSºHAT. Calorimetry on TEMPOH + tBu3PhO• gives ΔHºHAT = 11.2 ± 0.5 kcal mol-1 which matches the enthalpy predicted from the difference in literature solution BDEs. An evaluation of the literature BDEs of both TEMPOH and tBu3PhOH is briefly presented and new estimates are included on the relative enthalpy of solvation for tBu3PhO• vs. tBu3PhOH. The primary contributor to the large magnitude of the ground-state entropy |ΔSºHAT| for the metal complexes is vibrational entropy, ΔSºvib. The common assumption that ΔSºHAT ≈ 0 for HAT reactions, developed for organic and small gas phase molecules, does not hold for transition metal based HAT reactions. The trend in magnitude of |ΔSºHAT| for reactions with TEMPO, RuII(acac)2(py-imH) << [FeII(H2bip)3]2+ = [FeII(H2bim)3]2+ < [CoII(H2bim)3]2+, is surprisingly well predicted by the trends for electron transfer half-reaction entropies, ΔSºET, in aprotic solvents. ΔSºET and

  19. The gravitational radiation reaction force of a continuous medium. I. Perturbation of a quasi-newtonian motion

    We determine, within the general theory of relativity, the equations of motion in the slow approximation of a continuous medium in which the forces from material stresses do not play a leading part with respect to the gravitational forces. The gravitational radiation reaction force appears as a disturbing force in the post-post-newtonian equations of motion. Then, we deduce the formula for the variation of the energy of the system due to the gravitational radiation

  20. Biomechanics of gecko locomotion: the patterns of reaction forces on inverted, vertical and horizontal substrates

    The excellent locomotion ability of geckos on various rough and/or inclined substrates has attracted scientists’ attention for centuries. However, the moving ability of gecko-mimicking robots on various inclined surfaces still lags far behind that of geckos, mainly because our understanding of how geckos govern their locomotion is still very poor. To reveal the fundamental mechanism of gecko locomotion and also to facilitate the design of gecko-mimicking robots, we have measured the reaction forces (RFs) acting on each individual foot of moving geckos on inverted, vertical and horizontal substrates (i.e. ceiling, wall and floor), have associated the RFs with locomotion behaviors by using high-speed camera, and have presented the relationships of the force components with patterns of reaction forces (PRFs). Geckos generate different PRF on ceiling, wall and floor, that is, the PRF is determined by the angles between the direction of gravity and the substrate on which geckos move. On the ceiling, geckos produce reversed shear forces acting on the front and hind feet, which pull away from the body in both lateral and fore-aft directions. They use a very large supporting angle from 21° to 24° to reduce the forces acting on their legs and feet. On the floor, geckos lift their bodies using a supporting angle from 76° to 78°, which not only decreases the RFs but also improves their locomotion ability. On the wall, geckos generate a reliable self-locking attachment by using a supporting angle of 14.8°, which is only about half of the critical angle of detachment. (paper)

  1. Role of radiation reaction forces in the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles

    In this paper we study the influence of radiation reaction (RR) forces on the dynamics of centrifugally accelerated particles. It is assumed that the particles move along magnetic field lines anchored in the rotating central object. The common 'bead-on-the-wire' approximation is used. The solutions are found and analyzed for cases when the form of the prescribed trajectory (rigidly rotating field line) is approximated by: (a) straight line, and (b) Archimedes spiral. Dynamics of neutral and charged particles are compared with the emphasis on the role of RR forces in the latter case. It is shown that for charged particles there exist locations of stable equilibrium. It is demonstrated that for particular initial conditions RR forces cause centripetal motion of the particles: their 'falling' on the central rotating object. It is found that in the case of Archimedes spiral both neutral and charged particles can reach infinity where their motion has asymptotically force-free character. The possible importance of these processes for the acceleration of relativistic, charged particles by rotating magnetospheres in the context of the generation of nonthermal, high-energy emission of AGN and pulsars is discussed

  2. Force.

    Gamble, Reed

    1989-01-01

    Discusses pupil misconceptions concerning forces. Summarizes some of Assessment of Performance Unit's findings on meaning of (1) force, (2) force and motion in one dimension and two dimensions, and (3) Newton's second law. (YP)

  3. Force Limiting Vibration Tests Evaluated from both Ground Acoustic Tests and FEM Simulations of a Flight Like Vehicle System Assembly

    Smith, Andrew; LaVerde, Bruce; Waldon, James; Hunt, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has conducted a series of ground acoustic tests with the dual goals of informing analytical judgment, and validating analytical methods when estimating vibroacoustic responses of launch vehicle subsystems. The process of repeatedly correlating finite element-simulated responses with test-measured responses has assisted in the development of best practices for modeling and post-processing. In recent work, force transducers were integrated to measure interface forces at the base of avionics box equipment. Other force data was indirectly measured using strain gauges. The combination of these direct and indirect force measurements has been used to support and illustrate the advantages of implementing the Force Limiting approach for equipment qualification tests. The comparison of force response from integrated system level tests to measurements at the same locations during component level vibration tests provides an excellent illustration. A second comparison of the measured response cases from the system level acoustic tests to finite element simulations has also produced some principles for assessing the suitability of Finite Element Models (FEMs) for making vibroacoustics estimates. The results indicate that when FEM models are employed to guide force limiting choices, they should include sufficient detail to represent the apparent mass of the system in the frequency range of interest.

  4. Intervertebral reaction force prediction using an enhanced assembly of OpenSim models.

    Senteler, Marco; Weisse, Bernhard; Rothenfluh, Dominique A; Snedeker, Jess G

    2016-01-01

    OpenSim offers a valuable approach to investigating otherwise difficult to assess yet important biomechanical parameters such as joint reaction forces. Although the range of available models in the public repository is continually increasing, there currently exists no OpenSim model for the computation of intervertebral joint reactions during flexion and lifting tasks. The current work combines and improves elements of existing models to develop an enhanced model of the upper body and lumbar spine. Models of the upper body with extremities, neck and head were combined with an improved version of a lumbar spine from the model repository. Translational motion was enabled for each lumbar vertebrae with six controllable degrees of freedom. Motion segment stiffness was implemented at lumbar levels and mass properties were assigned throughout the model. Moreover, body coordinate frames of the spine were modified to allow straightforward variation of sagittal alignment and to simplify interpretation of results. Evaluation of model predictions for level L1-L2, L3-L4 and L4-L5 in various postures of forward flexion and moderate lifting (8 kg) revealed an agreement within 10% to experimental studies and model-based computational analyses. However, in an extended posture or during lifting of heavier loads (20 kg), computed joint reactions differed substantially from reported in vivo measures using instrumented implants. We conclude that agreement between the model and available experimental data was good in view of limitations of both the model and the validation datasets. The presented model is useful in that it permits computation of realistic lumbar spine joint reaction forces during flexion and moderate lifting tasks. The model and corresponding documentation are now available in the online OpenSim repository. PMID:26031341

  5. The Effect of Mechanical Vibration Stimulation of Perception Subthreshold on the Muscle Force and Muscle Reaction Time of Lower Leg

    Kim, Huigyun; Kwak, Kiyoung; Kim, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of mechanical vibration stimulation on the muscle force and muscle reaction time of lower leg according to perception threshold and vibration frequency. A vibration stimulation with perception threshold intensity was applied on the Achilles tendon and tibialis anterior tendon. EMG measurement and analysis system were used to analyze the change of muscle force and muscle reaction time according to perception threshold and vibration frequ...

  6. Optimizing the third-and-a-half post-Newtonian gravitational radiation-reaction force for numerical simulations

    The gravitational radiation-reaction force acting on perfect fluids at 3.5 post-Newtonian order is cast into a form which is directly applicable to numerical simulations. Extensive use is made of metric-coefficient changes induced by functional coordinate transformations, of the continuity equation, as well as of the equations of motion. We also present an expression appropriate for numerical simulations of the radiation field causing the worked out reaction force

  7. Referral of tactile stimuli to action points in virtual reality with reaction force.

    Moizumi, Shunjiro; Yamamoto, Shinya; Kitazawa, Shigeru

    2007-09-01

    When we touch something with a tool, we feel the touch at the tip of the tool rather than at the hand. Yamamoto and Kitazawa [Yamamoto, S., Kitazawa, S., 2001b. Sensation at the tips of invisible tools. Nat. Neurosci. 4, 979-980] previously showed that the judgment of the temporal order of two successive stimuli, delivered to the tips of sticks held in each hand, was dramatically altered by crossing the sticks without changing the positions of the hands. This provided evidence for the referral of tactile signals to the tip of a tool in hand. In this study, we examined importance of force feedback from the tool in the referral by manipulating the direction of force feedback in a virtual reality. The virtual tool consisted of a spherical action point that was moved with a stylus in hand. Subjects held two styli, one in each hand, put each action point on each of two buttons in the virtual reality, and were required to judge the order of successive taps, delivered to the two styli. We manipulated the direction of reaction force from each button so that it was congruent or incongruent to the visual configuration of the button. When the arms were uncrossed, judgment primarily depended on whether the action points were crossed or not in the visual space. But when the arms were crossed, judgment critically depended on the direction of force feedback. The results show that tactile signals can be referred to the action point in the virtual reality and that the force feedback becomes a critical factor when the arms are crossed. PMID:17617482

  8. Impact of walking speed and slope of the ground on axial force of poles in Nordic walking

    Martin Pšurný

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Nordic walking (NW, due to its attractiveness and convenience of equipment, is becoming more popular and utilised in the areas of sports, recreation and physiotherapy. Some of its impacts on load to the body have not yet been sufficiently explored. OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to determine the impact of walking speed and slope of the ground on the magnitude of axial forces, transferred to the poles by upper extremities during NW. METHODS: The study was participated in by 17 healthy subjects, aged 25.9 ± 3.6 years, who went through 12 independent measurements on a treadmill in various speeds (6.0; 6.6; 7.2 and 7.8 km • h–1 and slopes (0; 5 and 7.5%. These measurements provided us with values of basic spatiotemporal variables, characterizing NW performance and force variables, acting on the poles. RESULTS: Increased walking speed led to increase in cycle frequency (p < .001 and increase in peak poling force and average poling force (p < .001. Poling time reduced with increasing speed (p < .001. Increase in slope of ground had no significant impact on the magnitude of time and dynamic variables. CONCLUSIONS: Increased walking speed during NW increases the force, generated by the upper extremities on the poles. During NW it is possible to prefer walking speed rather than to change the slope of the ground for those patients, who are indicated to strengthen upper extremities.

  9. Ground Reaction Force Differences in the Countermovement Jump in Girls with Different Levels of Performance

    Floría, Pablo; Harrison, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to ascertain the biomechanical differences between better and poorer performers of the vertical jump in a homogeneous group of children. Method: Twenty-four girls were divided into low-scoring (LOW; M [subscript age] = 6.3 ± 0.8 years) and high-scoring (HIGH; M [subscript age] = 6.6 ± 0.8 years) groups based on…

  10. Ground Reaction Forces and Plantar Pressure Distribution Generated by Two Tai Chi Movements

    Wong, Shiu Hong Trevor

    2013-01-01

    Tai Chi Chuan, Tai Chi (TC) in short, is a popular form of Chinese martial arts which have been practised by millions of people and provides various health benefits, such as improving balance control, strengthening leg muscles, reducing fear of falling, enhancing flexibility and many more. The American Geriatrics Society and the British Geriatrics Society have recommended TC as a suitable exercise for preventing falls of older people. However, it is not clear which TC components are the most ...

  11. The ground state of medium-heavy nuclei with non central forces

    A. FabrociniINFN and Phys.Dept., Univ.of Pisa, Pisa, Italy

    1997-01-01

    We study microscopically the ground state properties of 16O and 40Ca nuclei within correlated basis function theory. A truncated version of the realistic Urbana v14 (U14) potential, without momentum dependent terms, is adopted with state dependent correlations having spin, isospin and tensor components. Fermi hypernetted chain integral equations and single operator chain approximation are used to evaluate one- and two-body densities and ground state energy. The results are i...

  12. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 5, Field Investigation report

    1992-03-01

    An environmental investigation of ground water conditions has been undertaken at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), Ohio to obtain data to assist in the evaluation of a potential removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, migration of the contaminated ground water across Base boundaries. Field investigations were limited to the central section of the southwestern boundary of Area C and the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B. Further, the study was limited to a maximum depth of 150 feet below grade. Three primary activities of the field investigation were: (1) installation of 22 monitoring wells, (2) collection and analysis of ground water from 71 locations, (3) measurement of ground water elevations at 69 locations. Volatile organic compounds including trichloroethylene, perchloroethylene, and/or vinyl chloride were detected in concentrations exceeding Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCL) at three locations within the Area C investigation area. Ground water at the Springfield Pike boundary of Area B occurs in two primary units, separated by a thicker-than-expected clay layers. One well within Area B was determined to exceed the MCL for trichloroethylene.

  13. A theoretical investigation of ground effects on USB configurations

    Lan, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    A formulation predicts the variation of circulation forces and jet reaction forces in ground proximity as a function of ground height. The predicted results agree well with available experimental data. It is shown that the wing-alone theory is not capable of predicting the ground effect for USB configurations.

  14. Reaction forces due to the decompression of pressurized vessels filled with two-phase fluids

    A unique fluid behavioral model which is applicable to many homogeneous multiphase fluids is used as a generic model to examine the reaction forces developed by the decompression of pressurized vessels filled with single component two-phase fluids. The decompression is the result of the sudden creation of an outflow area such as by the accidental puncture of the vessel shell or the rupture of a pipe connection at the vessel. The study includes the treatment of two basic initial conditions: the case of a vessel completely filled with a saturated liquid, and the case of a vessel partially filled with a saturated liquid and covered with its saturated vapor, that is, the two region stratified condition. The principal variables include an expansion parameter which characterizes the fluid behavior in the two-phase domain, the vapor volume fraction, and the location of the outflow area for the stratified case

  15. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 9, Removal action system design

    1992-04-01

    This Removal Action System Design has been prepared as a Phase I Volume for the implementation of the Phase II removal action at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) near Dayton, Ohio. The objective of the removal action is to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground water contaminated with chlorinated volatile organic compounds (VOCS) across the southwest boundary of Area C. The Phase 1, Volume 9 Removal Action System Design compiles the design documents prepared for the Phase II Removal Action. These documents, which are presented in Appendices to Volume 9, include: Process Design, which presents the 30 percent design for the ground water treatment system (GWTS); Design Packages 1 and 2 for Earthwork and Road Construction, and the Discharge Pipeline, respectively; no drawings are included in the appendix; Design Package 3 for installation of the Ground Water Extraction Well(s); Design Package 4 for installation of the Monitoring Well Instrumentation; and Design Package 5 for installation of the Ground Water Treatment System; this Design Package is incorporated by reference because of its size.

  16. Simulation of (p,d) reaction on RIBLL2 for study of tensor force

    郭晨雷; 张高龙; 屈卫卫; Satoru Terashim; Isao Tanihat; 乐小云

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the effect of tensor force, we plan to perform a (p,d) reaction with a 400–1600 MeV proton beam on the RIBLL2 at Lanzhou. Based on the experimental conditions of RIBLL2, a Monte Carlo method is used to simulate (p,d) reaction process. The distributions of primary beam and scattered deuterons are given on the target and at the F1, F2, F3, and F4 positions. Considering the yield of the deuteron, to separate the produced deuteron from the background particles, the target thickness is optimized. To obtain a clear particle identification spectrum by time of fl ight (TOF) and energy loss (∆E ), the distance between the two detectors, as well as the energy and timing resolution of detectors are simulated. As a result, the distance between F2 and F4 is fit for that of TOF. After taking into account the particle distribution at F4, both sizes of Multi-Wire Drift Chamber, namely MWDC2 and MWDC3, are selected to be 50 mm × 50 mm.

  17. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 5, Appendix A, Part 1, Field Investigation report

    1992-03-01

    This report presents information related to the sampling of ground water at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. It is part of an investigation into possible ground water contamination. Information concerns well drilling/construction; x-ray diffraction and sampling; soil boring logs; and chain-of-custody records.

  18. Grounding the Lexical Semantics of Verbs in Visual Perception using Force Dynamics and Event Logic

    Siskind, J M

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an implemented system for recognizing the occurrence of events described by simple spatial-motion verbs in short image sequences. The semantics of these verbs is specified with event-logic expressions that describe changes in the state of force-dynamic relations between the participants of the event. An efficient finite representation is introduced for the infinite sets of intervals that occur when describing liquid and semi-liquid events. Additionally, an efficient procedure using this representation is presented for inferring occurrences of compound events, described with event-logic expressions, from occurrences of primitive events. Using force dynamics and event logic to specify the lexical semantics of events allows the system to be more robust than prior systems based on motion profile.

  19. Grounding the Lexical Semantics of Verbs in Visual Perception using Force Dynamics and Event Logic

    Siskind, J. M.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents an implemented system for recognizing the occurrence of events described by simple spatial-motion verbs in short image sequences. The semantics of these verbs is specified with event-logic expressions that describe changes in the state of force-dynamic relations between the participants of the event. An efficient finite representation is introduced for the infinite sets of intervals that occur when describing liquid and semi-liquid events. Additionally, an efficient proced...

  20. Mechanics of Ship Grounding

    Pedersen, Preben Terndrup

    1996-01-01

    In these notes first a simplified mathematical model is presented for analysis of ship hull loading due to grounding on relatively hard and plane sand, clay or rock sea bottoms. In a second section a more rational calculation model is described for the sea bed soil reaction forces on the sea bott...

  1. Force and Torque Analytical Models of a Reaction Sphere Actuator Based on Spherical Harmonic Rotation and Decomposition

    Rossini, L.; Chetelat, O.; Onillon, E.; Perriard, Y.

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an analytical model for the force and torque developed by a reaction sphere actuator for satellite attitude control. The reaction sphere is an innovative momentum exchange device consisting of a magnetic bearings spherical rotor that can be electronically accelerated in any direction making all the three axes of stabilized spacecrafts controllable by a unique device. The spherical actuator is composed of an 8-pole permanent magnet spherical rotor and of a 20-coil stator. F...

  2. Coupling Satellite and Ground-Based Instruments to Map Climate Forcing by Anthropogenic Aerosols

    Charlson, Robert J.; Anderson, Theodore L.; Hostetler, Chris (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Climate forcing by anthropogenic aerosols is a significant but highly uncertain factor in global climate change. Only satellites can offer the global coverage essential to reducing this uncertainty; however, satellite measurements must be coupled with correlative, in situ measurements both to constrain the aerosol optical properties required in satellite retrieval algorithms and to provide chemical identification of aerosol sources. This grant funded the first two years of a three-year project which seeks to develop methodologies for combining spaceborne lidar with in-situ aerosol data sets to improve estimates of direct aerosol climate forcing. Progress under this two-year grant consisted in the development and deployment of a new in-situ capability for measuring aerosol 180' backscatter and the extinction-to-backscatter ratio. This new measurement capacity allows definitive lidar/in-situ comparisons and improves our ability to interpret lidar data in terms of climatically relevant quantities such as the extinction coefficient and optical depth. Measurements were made along the coast of Washington State, in Central Illinois, over the Indian Ocean, and in the Central Pacific. Thus, this research, combined with previous measurements by others, is rapidly building toward a global data set of extinction-to-backscatter ratio for key aerosol types. Such information will be critical to interpreting lidar data from the upcoming PICASSO-CENA, or P-C, satellite mission. Another aspect of this project is to investigate innovative ways to couple the lidar-satellite signal with targeted in-situ measurements toward a direct determination of aerosol forcing. This aspect is progressing in collaboration with NASA Langley's P-C lidar simulator and radiative transfer modeling by the University of Lille, France.

  3. The Effect of Mechanical Vibration Stimulation of Perception Subthreshold on the Muscle Force and Muscle Reaction Time of Lower Leg

    Kim, Huigyun; Kwak, Kiyoung; Kim, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effect of mechanical vibration stimulation on the muscle force and muscle reaction time of lower leg according to perception threshold and vibration frequency. A vibration stimulation with perception threshold intensity was applied on the Achilles tendon and tibialis anterior tendon. EMG measurement and analysis system were used to analyze the change of muscle force and muscle reaction time according to perception threshold and vibration frequency. A root-mean-square (RMS) value was extracted using analysis software and Maximum Voluntary Contraction (MVC) and Premotor Time (PMT) were analyzed. The measurement results showed that perception threshold was different from application sites of vibration frequency. Also, the muscle force and muscle reaction time showed difference according to the presence of vibration, frequency, and intensity. This result means that the vibration stimulation causes the change on the muscle force and muscle reaction time and affects the muscles of lower leg by the characteristics of vibration stimulation. PMID:27382244

  4. Reaction Force/Torque Sensing in a Master-Slave Robot System without Mechanical Sensors

    Kyoko Shibata

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In human-robot cooperative control systems, force feedback is often necessary in order to achieve high precision and high stability. Usually, traditional robot assistant systems implement force feedback using force/torque sensors. However, it is difficult to directly mount a mechanical force sensor on some working terminals, such as in applications of minimally invasive robotic surgery, micromanipulation, or in working environments exposed to radiation or high temperature. We propose a novel force sensing mechanism for implementing force feedback in a master-slave robot system with no mechanical sensors. The system consists of two identical electro-motors with the master motor powering the slave motor to interact with the environment. A bimanual coordinated training platform using the new force sensing mechanism was developed and the system was verified in experiments. Results confirm that the proposed mechanism is capable of achieving bilateral force sensing and mirror-image movements of two terminals in two reverse control directions.

  5. Use of aquifer testing to complete ground water remedial design, shallow aquifer Nellis Air Force Base, Las Vegas, Nevada

    As part of a US Army Corps of Engineers-directed remedial action, a ground water treatment system is being installed at Site 27, Nellis Air Force Base, Las Vegas, Nevada. Twenty-three extraction wells were installed in the center and on the leading edge of a jet fuel plume of free and dissolved product in the uppermost (nonpotable) aquifer. The purpose of the extraction well system is to contain and remediate the plume, and to recover free product, which is over 10 feet thick in one well. Aquifer testing, including step and constant discharge tests, was conducted during well installation in order to (1) assist in location of subsequent wells, (2) obtain dynamic product thickness data for selection of wells in which skimmer pumps will be installed, (3) determine initial pumping rates, (4) determine aquifer parameters for modeling and optimization, and (5) provide baseline data on well performance to evaluate possible future biofouling

  6. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 1, Site assessment report

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an effort for the evaluation of potential removal of ground water contamination at the Base. This report presents a current assessment of the nature and extent of the contamination believed to be migrating across the southwestern boundary of Area C and the northern boundary of Area B based upon analysis of existing environmental data obtained from several sources. The existing data base indicates widespread, low-level contamination moving across Base boundaries at levels that pose no immediate threat to the Mad River Valley well fields. An investigation by the City of Dayton in May and June 1990, however, implies that a more identifiable plume of PCE and TCE may be crossing the southwestern boundary of Area C immediately downgradient of Landfill 5. More data is needed to delineate ground water contamination and to design and implement a suitable control system. This report concludes that although an extensive study of the boundaries in question would be the preferred approach, a limited, focused investigation and subsequent feasibility study can be accomplished with a reasonable certainty of achieving the desired outcome of this project.

  7. The law of action and reaction for the effective force in a non-equilibrium colloidal system

    We study a non-equilibrium Langevin many-body system containing two 'test' particles and many 'background' particles. The test particles are spatially confined by a harmonic potential, and the background particles are driven by an external driving force. Using numerical simulations of the model, we formulate an effective description of the two test particles in a non-equilibrium steady state. In particular, we investigate several different definitions of the effective force acting between the test particles. We find that the law of action and reaction does not hold for the total mechanical force exerted by the background particles, but that it does hold for the thermodynamic force defined operationally on the basis of an idea used to extend the first law of thermodynamics to non-equilibrium steady states

  8. Toward Determining ATPase Mechanism in ABC Transporters: Development of the Reaction Path-Force Matching QM/MM Method.

    Zhou, Y; Ojeda-May, P; Nagaraju, M; Pu, J

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous ATP-dependent membrane proteins involved in translocations of a wide variety of substrates across cellular membranes. To understand the chemomechanical coupling mechanism as well as functional asymmetry in these systems, a quantitative description of how ABC transporters hydrolyze ATP is needed. Complementary to experimental approaches, computer simulations based on combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potentials have provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism in ABC transporters. Quantitatively reliable determination of the free energy requirement for enzymatic ATP hydrolysis, however, requires substantial statistical sampling on QM/MM potential. A case study shows that brute force sampling of ab initio QM/MM (AI/MM) potential energy surfaces is computationally impractical for enzyme simulations of ABC transporters. On the other hand, existing semiempirical QM/MM (SE/MM) methods, although affordable for free energy sampling, are unreliable for studying ATP hydrolysis. To close this gap, a multiscale QM/MM approach named reaction path-force matching (RP-FM) has been developed. In RP-FM, specific reaction parameters for a selected SE method are optimized against AI reference data along reaction paths by employing the force matching technique. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for a proton transfer reaction in the gas phase and in solution. The RP-FM method may offer a general tool for simulating complex enzyme systems such as ABC transporters. PMID:27498639

  9. Toward Determining ATPase Mechanism in ABC Transporters: Development of the Reaction Path–Force Matching QM/MM Method

    Zhou, Y.; Ojeda-May, P.; Nagaraju, M.; Pu, J.

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are ubiquitous ATP-dependent membrane proteins involved in translocations of a wide variety of substrates across cellular membranes. To understand the chemomechanical coupling mechanism as well as functional asymmetry in these systems, a quantitative description of how ABC transporters hydrolyze ATP is needed. Complementary to experimental approaches, computer simulations based on combined quantum mechanical and molecular mechanical (QM/MM) potentials have provided new insights into the catalytic mechanism in ABC transporters. Quantitatively reliable determination of the free energy requirement for enzymatic ATP hydrolysis, however, requires substantial statistical sampling on QM/MM potential. A case study shows that brute force sampling of ab initio QM/MM (AI/MM) potential energy surfaces is computationally impractical for enzyme simulations of ABC transporters. On the other hand, existing semiempirical QM/MM (SE/MM) methods, although affordable for free energy sampling, are unreliable for studying ATP hydrolysis. To close this gap, a multiscale QM/MM approach named reaction path–force matching (RP–FM) has been developed. In RP–FM, specific reaction parameters for a selected SE method are optimized against AI reference data along reaction paths by employing the force matching technique. The feasibility of the method is demonstrated for a proton transfer reaction in the gas phase and in solution. The RP–FM method may offer a general tool for simulating complex enzyme systems such as ABC transporters. PMID:27498639

  10. 3D FEM Numerical Simulation of Seismic Pile-supported Bridge Structure Reaction in Liquefying Ground

    Ling XianZhang, Tang Liang and Xu Pengju

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the establishment of liquefied ground pile-soil-bridge seismic interaction analysis of three-dimensional finite element analysis method for the simulation of liquefied ground shaking table test of pile-soil seismic interaction analysis, undertake OpenSees finite element based numerical simulation platform, for the shaking table test based on two-phase saturated porous media, Comparative numerical and experimental results, detailed test pile dynamic response of bridge structure and dynamic properties, especially liquefaction pore pressure, liquefaction of pile foundation and the dynamic response of the free field. Finite element method can reasonably predict the site of pore pressure, dynamic response; despite the conventional beam element simulation of pile, pile dynamic response can still accurately simulated.

  11. Guiding-centre transformation of the radiation-reaction force in a non-uniform magnetic field

    Hirvijoki, E.; Decker, J.; Brizard, A. J.; Embréus, O.

    2015-10-01

    > In this paper, we present the guiding-centre transformation of the radiation-reaction force of a classical point charge travelling in a non-uniform magnetic field. The transformation is valid as long as the gyroradius of the charged particles is much smaller than the magnetic field non-uniformity length scale, so that the guiding-centre Lie-transform method is applicable. Elimination of the gyromotion time scale from the radiation-reaction force is obtained with the Poisson-bracket formalism originally introduced by Brizard (Phys. Plasmas, vol. 11, 2004, 4429-4438), where it was used to eliminate the fast gyromotion from the Fokker-Planck collision operator. The formalism presented here is applicable to the motion of charged particles in planetary magnetic fields as well as in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas, where the corresponding so-called synchrotron radiation can be detected. Applications of the guiding-centre radiation-reaction force include tracing of charged particle orbits in complex magnetic fields as well as the kinetic description of plasma when the loss of energy and momentum due to radiation plays an important role, e.g. for runaway-electron dynamics in tokamaks.

  12. Russian Military and Security Forces: A Postulated Reaction to a Nuclear Detonation

    Ball, D

    2005-04-29

    In this paper, we will examine how Russia's military and security forces might react to the detonation of a 10-kiloton nuclear weapon placed next to the walls surrounding the Kremlin. At the time of this 'big bang,' Putin is situated outside Moscow and survives the explosion. No one claims responsibility for the detonation. No other information is known. Numerous variables will determine how events ultimately unfold and how the military and security forces will respond. Prior to examining these variables in greater detail, it is imperative to elucidate first what we mean by Russia's military and security forces.

  13. Calculation of reaction forces in the boiler supports using the method of equivalent stiffness of membrane wall.

    Sertić, Josip; Kozak, Dražan; Samardžić, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    The values of reaction forces in the boiler supports are the basis for the dimensioning of bearing steel structure of steam boiler. In this paper, the application of the method of equivalent stiffness of membrane wall is proposed for the calculation of reaction forces. The method of equalizing displacement, as the method of homogenization of membrane wall stiffness, was applied. On the example of "Milano" boiler, using the finite element method, the calculation of reactions in the supports for the real geometry discretized by the shell finite element was made. The second calculation was performed with the assumption of ideal stiffness of membrane walls and the third using the method of equivalent stiffness of membrane wall. In the third case, the membrane walls are approximated by the equivalent orthotropic plate. The approximation of membrane wall stiffness is achieved using the elasticity matrix of equivalent orthotropic plate at the level of finite element. The obtained results were compared, and the advantages of using the method of equivalent stiffness of membrane wall for the calculation of reactions in the boiler supports were emphasized. PMID:24959612

  14. The law of action and reaction for the effective force in a nonequilibrium colloidal system

    Hayashi, Kumiko; Sasa, Shin-ichi

    2005-01-01

    We study a nonequilibrium Langevin many-body system containing two 'test' particles and many 'background' particles. The test particles are spatially confined by a harmonic potential, and the background particles are driven by an external driving force. Employing numerical simulations of the model, we formulate an effective description of the two test particles in a nonequilibrium steady state. In particular, we investigate several different definitions of the effective force acting between t...

  15. Reassessment of psychological distress and post-traumatic stress disorder in United States Air Force Distributed Common Ground System operators.

    Prince, Lillian; Chappelle, Wayne L; McDonald, Kent D; Goodman, Tanya; Cowper, Sara; Thompson, William

    2015-03-01

    The goal of this study was to assess for the main sources of occupational stress, as well as self-reported symptoms of distress and post-traumatic stress disorder among U.S. Air Force (USAF) Distributed Common Ground System (DCGS) intelligence exploitation and support personnel. DCGS intelligence operators (n=1091) and nonintelligence personnel (n = 447) assigned to a USAF Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance Wing responded to the web-based survey. The overall survey response rate was 31%. Study results revealed the most problematic stressors among DCGS intelligence personnel included high workload, low manning, as well as organizational leadership and shift work issues. Results also revealed 14.35% of DCGS intelligence operators' self-reported high levels of psychological distress (twice the rate of DCGS nonintelligence support personnel). Furthermore, 2.0% to 2.5% self-reported high levels of post-traumatic stress disorder symptoms, with no significant difference between groups. The implications of these findings are discussed along with recommendations for USAF medical and mental health providers, as well as operational leadership. PMID:25747649

  16. Measurement of the rates of reaction of the ground and metastable excited states of 02+, N0+ and 0+ with atmospheric gases at thermal energy

    Thermal-energy reaction rate coefficients and product ion distributions have been measured for reactions of both the ground state and metastable electronic states of 02+, N0+ and 0+ with several neutral species, using a selected-ion flow tube. In general the excited-ion reaction rates are fast, frequently approaching the Langevin limit. Collisional quenching occurs for the reactions of N0+sup(star) with N2,02 and H2 and the quenching rates have been determined. The ion source also provided a substantial yield of doubly charged 02 permitting some measurements of reaction rates of 022+. (author)

  17. Cluster emission in superdeformed Sr isotopes in the ground state and formed in heavy-ion reaction

    K P Santhosh; Antony Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Cluster decay of superdeformed 76,78,80Sr isotopes in their ground state are studied taking the Coulomb and proximity potential as the interacting barrier for the post-scission region. The predicted 1/2 values are found to be in close agreement with those values reported by the preformed cluster model (PCM). Our calculation shows that these nuclei are stable against both light and heavy cluster emissions. We studied the decay of these nuclei produced as an excited compound system in heavy-ion reaction. It is found that inclusion of excitation energy increases the decay rate (decreases 1/2 value) considerably and these nuclei become unstable against decay. These findings support earlier observation of Gupta et al based on PCM.

  18. Construction of cryptographic information protection in automated control systems for rapid reaction military forces

    Sergey Petrovich Evseev

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available New approaches to realizations of military operations are analyzed. The main factors that directly affect the construction and operation of information security subsystems in prospective automated command and control military systems are described. Possible ways of the construction of cryptographic subsystems of information protection in automated operation management systems for united military force groups are investigated.

  19. Students' Understanding on Newton's Third Law in Identifying the Reaction Force in Gravity Interactions

    Zhou, Shaona; Zhang, Chunbin; Xiao, Hua

    2015-01-01

    In the past three decades, previous researches showed that students had various misconceptions of Newton's Third Law. The present study focused on students' difficulties in identifying the third-law force pair in gravity interaction situations. An instrument involving contexts with gravity and non-gravity associated interactions was designed and…

  20. Repulsion forces of superplasticizers on ground granulated blast furnace slag in alkaline media, from AFM measurements to rheological properties

    Palacios, M.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The electrostatic and steric repulsion induced by different superplasticizers on ground granulated blast furnace slag in alkaline media have been studied. The superplasticizers were sulfonated naphthalene, sulfonated melamine, vinyl copolymer, and polycarboxylate- based admixtures. With these superplasticizers the slag suspensions had negative zeta potentials, ranging from -3 to -10 mV. For the first time the adsorbed layer thicknesses for superplasticizers on slag using colloidal probe atomic force microscopy has been measured. To model the interparticle force interactions an effective Hamaker constant was computed from dielectric properties measured on a dense slag sample produced by spark plasma sintering. The obtained results conclude that the dispersion mechanism for all the superplasticizers studied in the present work is mainly dominated by the steric repulsion. Results were then used in a yield stress model, YODEL, to predict the yield stress with and without the superplasticizers. Predictions of the yield stress agreed well with experimental results.

    En este trabajo se ha estudiado la repulsión electrostática y estérica inducida por diferentes aditivos superplastificantes en sistemas de escoria de horno alto en medios alcalinos. Se han estudiado aditivos superplastificantes basados en naftaleno, melamina, copolímeros vinílicos y basados en policarboxilato. Estos aditivos inducen en la escoria un potencial zeta negativo, entre -3 y -10 mV. Por primera vez, se ha determinado el grosor de la capa de aditivo adsorbido sobre la escoria mediante microscopía de fuerzas atómicas (AFM. Para modelizar las fuerzas de interacción entre partículas, se ha determinado la constante efectiva de Hamaker de la escoria a partir de las propiedades dieléctricas de una muestra de escoria obtenida mediante sinterización spark plasma sintering. Los resultados obtenidos concluyen que el mecanismo de dispersión de los superplastificantes

  1. Kinetic study of radiation-reaction-limited particle acceleration during the relaxation of unstable force-free equilibria

    Yuan, Yajie; Zrake, Jonathan; East, William E; Blandford, Roger D

    2016-01-01

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over very short time scales. These are likely due to rapid dissipation of electromagnetic energy in a highly magnetized, relativistic plasma. In order to understand the generic features of such processes, we have investigated simple models based on relaxation of unstable force-free magnetostatic equilibria. In this work, we make the connection between the corresponding plasma dynamics and the expected radiation signal, using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently include synchrotron radiation reaction. We focus on the lowest order unstable force-free equilibrium in a 2D periodic box. We find that rapid variability, with modest apparent radiation efficiency as perceived by a fixed observer, can be produced during the evolution of the instability. The "flares" are accompanied by an increased pol...

  2. Experimental Studies of the Coulomb Force Effects in Deuteron-Proton Break-up Reaction at Medium Energy Regime

    Ciepał, I.; Parol, W.; Kalantar-Nayestanaki, N.; Khatri, G.; Kistryn, St.; Kłos, B.; Kozela, A.; Kulessa, P.; Messchendorp, J.; Skwira-Chalot, I.; Stephan, E.; Włoch, B.

    2016-03-01

    A set of differential cross-section data of the 1H(d, pp)n breakup reaction at 130 and 160 MeV deuteron beam energies has been measured in the forward polar angles domain. The data were collected with the use of the Germanium Wall (FZ Jülich) and BINA (KVI Groningen) detectors. This part of the phase-space is special with respect to the dominant Coulomb force influence on the system dynamics. The data are compared with the theoretical calculations based on the Argonne V18 potential supplemented with the long-range electromagnetic component. The predictions also include the Urbana IX three nucleon force model. The strongest Coulomb effects are found in regions where the relative energy of the two protons is the smallest.

  3. Kinetic Study of Radiation-reaction-limited Particle Acceleration During the Relaxation of Unstable Force-free Equilibria

    Yuan, Yajie; Nalewajko, Krzysztof; Zrake, Jonathan; East, William E.; Blandford, Roger D.

    2016-09-01

    Many powerful and variable gamma-ray sources, including pulsar wind nebulae, active galactic nuclei and gamma-ray bursts, seem capable of accelerating particles to gamma-ray emitting energies efficiently over very short timescales. These are likely due to the rapid dissipation of electromagnetic energy in a highly magnetized, relativistic plasma. In order to understand the generic features of such processes, we have investigated simple models based on the relaxation of unstable force-free magnetostatic equilibria. In this work, we make the connection between the corresponding plasma dynamics and the expected radiation signal, using 2D particle-in-cell simulations that self-consistently include synchrotron radiation reactions. We focus on the lowest order unstable force-free equilibrium in a 2D periodic box. We find that rapid variability, with modest apparent radiation efficiency as perceived by a fixed observer, can be produced during the evolution of the instability. The “flares” are accompanied by an increased polarization degree in the high energy band, with rapid variation in the polarization angle. Furthermore, the separation between the acceleration sites and the synchrotron radiation sites for the highest energy particles facilitates acceleration beyond the synchrotron radiation reaction limit. We also discuss the dynamical consequences of the radiation reaction, and some astrophysical applications of this model. Our current simulations with numerically tractable parameters are not yet able to reproduce the most dramatic gamma-ray flares, e.g., from the Crab Nebula. Higher magnetization studies are promising and will be carried out in the future.

  4. 基于足地接触力跟踪的单足机器人弹跳运动控制%Hopping Control of Single leg Robot on Compliant Ground Based on Ground Force Control

    尹鹏; 李满天; 王俊; 查富生; 孙立宁

    2015-01-01

    The performance of legged hopping robot is subjected to the influence of the ground stiffness feature during the contact phase.To avoid the influence and insulate the ground stiffness disturbance we first established the simplified single leg hopping model with elastic featured ground,then an analysis about the relation of ground stiffness with moving trajectory and contact force profile is made.Based on this a control strategy to utilized to compensate the ground contact force to be the same as that of an undisturbed system via active extension or retraction of the leg during contact.The validity is demonstrated by simulation result.%为了使足式弹跳机器人在运动中避免由于地面接触刚度的变化对弹跳运动产生的影响,首先建立了单足弹跳机器人在弹性地面条件下的运动简化模型,进而分析了地面弹簧刚度变化对机体重心运动轨迹以及着地相中足地接触力的影响。采用足地接触力补偿控制的手段,通过主动控制单腿的伸缩,使模型中弹簧系统的足力输出与期望保持一致,消除了地面刚度变化对机体运动的干扰。利用仿真实验表明了控制方法的可行性。

  5. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 2, Work plan: Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990 Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB) initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential CERCLA removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the migration of ground-water contamination in the Mad River Valley Aquifer within and across WPAFB boundaries. The action will be based on a Focused Feasibility Study with an Action Memorandum serving as a decision document that is subject to approval by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency. The first phase (Phase 1) of this effort involves an investigation of ground-water contamination migrating across the southwest boundary of Area C and across Springfield Pike adjacent to Area B. Task 4 of Phase 1 is a field investigation to collect sufficient additional information to evaluate removal alternatives. The field investigation will provide information in the following specific areas of study: water-level data which will be used to permit calibration of the ground-water flow model to a unique time in history; and ground-water quality data which will be used to characterize the current chemical conditions of ground water.

  6. Wave packet and statistical quantum calculations for the He + NeH{sup +} → HeH{sup +} + Ne reaction on the ground electronic state

    Koner, Debasish; Panda, Aditya N., E-mail: adi07@iitg.ernet.in [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati 781039 (India); Barrios, Lizandra; González-Lezana, Tomás, E-mail: t.gonzalez.lezana@csic.es [Instituto de Física Fundamental, C.S.I.C., Serrano 123, Madrid 28006 (Spain)

    2014-09-21

    A real wave packet based time-dependent method and a statistical quantum method have been used to study the He + NeH{sup +} (v, j) reaction with the reactant in various ro-vibrational states, on a recently calculated ab initio ground state potential energy surface. Both the wave packet and statistical quantum calculations were carried out within the centrifugal sudden approximation as well as using the exact Hamiltonian. Quantum reaction probabilities exhibit dense oscillatory pattern for smaller total angular momentum values, which is a signature of resonances in a complex forming mechanism for the title reaction. Significant differences, found between exact and approximate quantum reaction cross sections, highlight the importance of inclusion of Coriolis coupling in the calculations. Statistical results are in fairly good agreement with the exact quantum results, for ground ro-vibrational states of the reactant. Vibrational excitation greatly enhances the reaction cross sections, whereas rotational excitation has relatively small effect on the reaction. The nature of the reaction cross section curves is dependent on the initial vibrational state of the reactant and is typical of a late barrier type potential energy profile.

  7. Multi-Level Wild Land Fire Fighting Management Support System for an Optimized Guidance of Ground and Air Forces

    Almer, Alexander; Schnabel, Thomas; Perko, Roland; Raggam, Johann; Köfler, Armin; Feischl, Richard

    2016-04-01

    Climate change will lead to a dramatic increase in damage from forest fires in Europe by the end of this century. In the Mediterranean region, the average annual area affected by forest fires has quadrupled since the 1960s (WWF, 2012). The number of forest fires is also on the increase in Central and Northern Europe. The Austrian forest fire database shows a total of 584 fires for the period 2012 to 2014, while even large areas of Sweden were hit by forest fires in August 2014, which were brought under control only after two weeks of intense fire-fighting efforts supported by European civil protection modules. Based on these facts, the improvements in forest fire control are a major international issue in the quest to protect human lives and resources as well as to reduce the negative environmental impact of these fires to a minimum. Within this paper the development of a multi-functional airborne management support system within the frame of the Austrian national safety and security research programme (KIRAS) is described. The main goal of the developments is to assist crisis management tasks of civil emergency teams and armed forces in disaster management by providing multi spectral, near real-time airborne image data products. As time, flexibility and reliability as well as objective information are crucial aspects in emergency management, the used components are tailored to meet these requirements. An airborne multi-functional management support system was developed as part of the national funded project AIRWATCH, which enables real-time monitoring of natural disasters based on optical and thermal images. Airborne image acquisition, a broadband line of sight downlink and near real-time processing solutions allow the generation of an up-to-date geo-referenced situation map. Furthermore, this paper presents ongoing developments for innovative extensions and research activities designed to optimize command operations in national and international fire

  8. Comparative Finite Element Analysis of the Effects of Tillage Tool Geometry on Soil Disturbance and Reaction Forces

    Mohamed Ahmed Elbashir

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study a comparative finite element analysis was conducted to investigate the effects of tillage tool geometry on soil disturbance and reaction forces. A nonlinear three dimensional finite element model, using ANSYS software, was developed to study the soil cutting process by trapezoidal (T1 and rectangular (T2 flat tools that inclined to the horizontal at three rake angles (R1 = 30°, R2 = 60° and R3 = 90°, therefore a total of six treatments were considered in this analysis. The soil media was assumed as elastic-perfectly plastic material with Drucker-Prager’s model. Results of this study revealed that the maximum vertical soil displaced by T1 is greater than that of T2; hence T1 disturbed the soil better than T2 . Results also showed that a significant reduction in draft force was noticed when cutting the soil with T1 in comparison to T2 . Designing the tool in the form of T1 significantly reduces the surface area of the tool; thus conserving the engineering material.

  9. Driving forces and the influence of the buffer composition on the complexation reaction between ibuprofen and HPCD.

    Perlovich, German L; Skar, Merete; Bauer-Brandl, Annette

    2003-10-01

    Cyclodextrins are often used in order to increase the aqueous solubility of drug substances by complexation. In order to investigate the complexation reaction of ibuprofen and hydroxypropyl-beta-cyclodextrin, titration calorimetry was used as a direct method. The thermodynamic parameters of the complexation process (stability constant, K(11); complexation enthalpy, deltaH(c) degrees ) were obtained in two different buffer systems (citric acid/sodium-phosphate and phosphoric acid) at various pH values. Based on these data the relative contributions of the enthalpic and entropic terms of the Gibbs energy to the complexation process have been analyzed. In both buffers the enthalpic and entropic terms are of different sign and this case corresponds to a 'nonclassical' model of hydrophobic interaction. In citric buffer, the main driving force of complexation is the entropy, which increases from 60 to 67% while the pH of the solution increases from 3.2 to 8.0. However, for the phosphoric buffer the entropic term decreases from 60 to 45%, while the pH-value of the solution increases from 5.0 to 8.2, and the driving force of the complexation process changes from entropy to enthalpy. The experimental data of the present study are compared to results of other authors and discrepancies discussed in detail. PMID:14550885

  10. Kinematics and Ground Reaction Force Determination: A Demonstration Quantifying Locomotor Abilities of Young Adult, Middle-aged, and Geriatric Rats

    Webb, Aubrey A.; Kerr, Brendan; Neville, Tanya; Ngan, Sybil; Assem, Hisham

    2011-01-01

    Behavior, in its broadest definition, can be defined as the motor manifestation of physiologic processes. As such, all behaviors manifest through the motor system. In the fields of neuroscience and orthopedics, locomotion is a commonly evaluated behavior for a variety of disease models. For example, locomotor recovery after traumatic injury to the nervous system is one of the most commonly evaluated behaviors 1-3. Though locomotion can be evaluated using a variety of endpoint measurements (e....

  11. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright- Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 4, Health and Safety Plan (HSP); Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation report: Draft

    1991-10-01

    This Health and Safety Plan (HSP) was developed for the Environmental Investigation of Ground-water Contamination Investigation at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base near Dayton, Ohio, based on the projected scope of work for the Phase 1, Task 4 Field Investigation. The HSP describes hazards that may be encountered during the investigation, assesses the hazards, and indicates what type of personal protective equipment is to be used for each task performed. The HSP also addresses the medical monitoring program, decontamination procedures, air monitoring, training, site control, accident prevention, and emergency response.

  12. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Appendix A, Draft standard operating procedures and elements: Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation, Draft

    1991-10-01

    This report presents information concerning field procedures employed during the monitoring, well construction, well purging, sampling, and well logging at the Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. Activities were conducted in an effort to evaluate ground water contamination.

  13. Repulsion forces of superplasticizers on ground granulated blast furnace slag in alkaline media, from AFM measurements to rheological properties

    Palacios, M.; Bowen, P.; Kappl, M.; Butt, H. J.; Stuer, M; Pecharromán, C.; Aschauer, U.; Puertas, F.

    2012-01-01

    The electrostatic and steric repulsion induced by different superplasticizers on ground granulated blast furnace slag in alkaline media have been studied. The superplasticizers were sulfonated naphthalene, sulfonated melamine, vinyl copolymer, and polycarboxylate- based admixtures. With these superplasticizers the slag suspensions had negative zeta potentials, ranging from -3 to -10 mV. For the first time the adsorbed layer thicknesses for superplasticizers on slag using colloidal probe atomi...

  14. Repulsion forces of superplasticizers on ground granulated blast furnace slag in alkaline media, from AFM measurements to rheological properties

    Palacios, M.; Kappl, M.; Stuer, M; Aschauer, U.; Bowen, P.; Butt, H. J.; Pecharromán, Carlos; Puertas, F.

    2012-01-01

    [EN]The electrostatic and steric repulsion induced by different superplasticizers on ground granulated blast furnace slag in alkaline media have been studied. The superplasticizers were sulfonated naphthalene, sulfonated melamine, vinyl copolymer, and polycarboxylate- based admixtures. With these superplasticizers the slag suspensions had negative zeta potentials, ranging from -3 to -10 mV. For the first time the adsorbed layer thicknesses for superplasticizers on slag...

  15. Nonlocal field correlations and dynamical Casimir-Polder forces between one excited- and two ground-state atoms

    The problem of nonlocality in the dynamical three-body Casimir-Polder interaction between an initially excited and two ground-state atoms is considered. It is shown that the nonlocal spatial correlations of the field emitted by the excited atom during the initial part of its spontaneous decay may become manifest in the three-body interaction. The observability of this new phenomenon is discussed

  16. [Environmental investigation of ground water contamination at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base, Ohio]. Volume 3, Sampling and analysis plan (SAP): Phase 1, Task 4, Field Investigation: Draft

    1991-10-01

    In April 1990, Wright-Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB), initiated an investigation to evaluate a potential Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) removal action to prevent, to the extent practicable, the offsite migration of contaminated ground water from WPAFB. WPAFB retained the services of the Environmental Management Operations (EMO) and its principle subcontractor, International Technology Corporation (IT) to complete Phase 1 of the environmental investigation of ground-water contamination at WPAFB. Phase 1 of the investigation involves the short-term evaluation and potential design for a program to remove ground-water contamination that appears to be migrating across the western boundary of Area C, and across the northern boundary of Area B along Springfield Pike. Primarily, Task 4 of Phase 1 focuses on collection of information at the Area C and Springfield Pike boundaries of WPAFB. This Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP) has been prepared to assist in completion of the Task 4 field investigation and is comprised of the Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) and the Field Sampling Plan (FSP).

  17. Influence of Coulomb and nuclear forces on the pattern of the double differential cross section d2sigma/d theta dE for deep inelastic reactions

    The tremendous change in the pattern of the Wilczynski curves for deep inelastic reactions with the product Z1Z2 is interpreted within a model including both dissipation and statistical fluctuations. The competition between Coulomb and nuclear forces seems to account for this effect

  18. An experimental study on advancement of damping performance of foundations in soft ground. Pt.1: Forced vibration tests of a foundation block constructed on improved soil medium

    Purpose of this study is to enhance attenuation performance of structures that will be constructed in the soft ground area. We conducted material tests to obtain basic properties of the soil cement column. The forced vibration tests then were carried out to acquire dynamic feature of the reinforced concrete block constructed on improved soil mediums. Additional forced vibration tests for various conditions of trenches dug along the block were conducted to obtain fundamental features of damping effect of the side surfaces of the test block. According to results of the material testing, densities of the soil cement columns were 1.45-1.52 g/cm3 and the unconfined compressive strengths were 2.4-4.2 times as large as the specified design strength (1 MPa). In comparison of resonance curves by experiments and simulation analysis, simulation analysis results estimated by the hybrid approach were in good agreement with experiment ones for both the X and Y-directions. From the results of the forced vibration test focusing on various condition of the trenches dug along the test block, it was indicated that response of tamping by the rammer decreased compared with that of treading. (authors)

  19. Effects of the tensor force on the ground and first $2^{+}$ states of the magic $^{54}$Ca nucleus

    Yüksel, E; Khan, E; Bozkurt, K

    2014-01-01

    The magic nature of the $^{54}$Ca nucleus is investigated in the light of the recent experimental results. We employ both HFB and HF+BCS methods using Skyrme-type SLy5, SLy5+T and T44 interactions. The evolution of the single-particle spectra is studied for the N=34 isotones: $^{60}$Fe, $^{58}$Cr, $^{56}$Ti and $^{54}$Ca. An increase is obtained in the neutron spin-orbit splittings of $p$ and $f$ states due to the effect of the tensor force which also makes $^{54}$Ca a magic nucleus candidate. QRPA calculations on top of HF+BCS are performed to investigate the first $J^{\\pi}$=$2^{+}$ states of the calcium isotopic chain. A good agreement for excitation energies is obtained when we include the tensor force in the mean-field part of the calculations. The first $2^{+}$ states indicate a subshell closure for both $^{52}$Ca and $^{54}$Ca nuclei. We confirm that the tensor part of the interaction is quite essential in explaining the neutron subshell closure in $^{52}$Ca and $^{54}$Ca nuclei.

  20. Modeling Study of the Impact of Heterogeneous Reactions on Dust Surfaces on Aerosol Optical Depth and Direct Radiative Forcing over East Asia in Springtime

    LI Jia-Wei; HAN Zhi-Wei

    2011-01-01

    The spatial distributions and interannual variations of aerosol concentrations, aerosol optical depth (AOD), aerosol direct radiative forcings, and their responses to heterogeneous reactions on dust surfaces over East Asia in March 2006-10 were investigated by utilizing a regional coupled climate-chemistry/aerosol model. Anthropogenic aerosol concentrations (inorganic + carbonaceous) were higher in March 2006 and 2008, whereas soil dust reached its highest levels in March 2006 and 2010, resulting in stronger aerosol radiative forcings in these periods. The domain and five-year (2006-10) monthly mean concentrations of anthropogenic and dust aerosols, AOD, and radiative forcings at the surface (SURF) and at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) in March were 2.4 μg m 3 13.1 lag m^-3, 0.18, -19.0 W m^-2, and -7.4 W m^-2, respectively. Heterogeneous reactions led to an increase of total inorganic aerosol concentration; however, the ambient inorganic aerosol concentration decreased, resulting in a smaller AOD and weaker aerosol radiative forcings. In March 2006 and 2010, the changes in ambient inorganic aerosols, AOD, and aerosol radiative forcings were more evident. In terms of the domain and five-year averages, the total inorganic aerosol concentrations increased by 13.7% (0.17 μg m^-3) due to heterogeneous reactions, but the ambient inorganic aerosol concentrations were reduced by 10.5% (0.13 lag m-3). As a result, the changes in AOD, SURF and TOA radiative forcings were estimated to be -3.9% (-0.007), -1.7% (0.34 W m^-2), and -4.3% (0.34 W m^-2), respectively, in March over East Asia.

  1. A new type of power energy for accelerating chemical reactions: the nature of a microwave-driving force for accelerating chemical reactions.

    Zhou, Jicheng; Xu, Wentao; You, Zhimin; Wang, Zhe; Luo, Yushang; Gao, Lingfei; Yin, Cheng; Peng, Renjie; Lan, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    The use of microwave (MW) irradiation to increase the rate of chemical reactions has attracted much attention recently in nearly all fields of chemistry due to substantial enhancements in reaction rates. However, the intrinsic nature of the effects of MW irradiation on chemical reactions remains unclear. Herein, the highly effective conversion of NO and decomposition of H2S via MW catalysis were investigated. The temperature was decreased by several hundred degrees centigrade. Moreover, the apparent activation energy (Ea') decreased substantially under MW irradiation. Importantly, for the first time, a model of the interactions between microwave electromagnetic waves and molecules is proposed to elucidate the intrinsic reason for the reduction in the Ea' under MW irradiation, and a formula for the quantitative estimation of the decrease in the Ea' was determined. MW irradiation energy was partially transformed to reduce the Ea', and MW irradiation is a new type of power energy for speeding up chemical reactions. The effect of MW irradiation on chemical reactions was determined. Our findings challenge both the classical view of MW irradiation as only a heating method and the controversial MW non-thermal effect and open a promising avenue for the development of novel MW catalytic reaction technology. PMID:27118640

  2. A new type of power energy for accelerating chemical reactions: the nature of a microwave-driving force for accelerating chemical reactions

    Zhou, Jicheng; Xu, Wentao; You, Zhimin; Wang, Zhe; Luo, Yushang; Gao, Lingfei; Yin, Cheng; Peng, Renjie; Lan, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    The use of microwave (MW) irradiation to increase the rate of chemical reactions has attracted much attention recently in nearly all fields of chemistry due to substantial enhancements in reaction rates. However, the intrinsic nature of the effects of MW irradiation on chemical reactions remains unclear. Herein, the highly effective conversion of NO and decomposition of H2S via MW catalysis were investigated. The temperature was decreased by several hundred degrees centigrade. Moreover, the apparent activation energy (Ea’) decreased substantially under MW irradiation. Importantly, for the first time, a model of the interactions between microwave electromagnetic waves and molecules is proposed to elucidate the intrinsic reason for the reduction in the Ea’ under MW irradiation, and a formula for the quantitative estimation of the decrease in the Ea’ was determined. MW irradiation energy was partially transformed to reduce the Ea’, and MW irradiation is a new type of power energy for speeding up chemical reactions. The effect of MW irradiation on chemical reactions was determined. Our findings challenge both the classical view of MW irradiation as only a heating method and the controversial MW non-thermal effect and open a promising avenue for the development of novel MW catalytic reaction technology. PMID:27118640

  3. Atomic force microscopy of photochemistry and the Baeyer-Villiger reaction of 4,4{sup '}-dimethylbenzophenone in the solid state

    Zeng, Q.D.; Wang, C.; Xu, S.D.; Bai, C.L. [Inst. of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Li, Y.; Yan, X.J. [Inst. of Chemical Metallurgy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2001-08-01

    Nanostructures are formed by photodimerization of crystalline 4,4{sup '}-dimethylbenzophenone (1) through intermolecular hydrogen abstraction and Baeyer-Villiger reaction of 1 with m-chloroperoxybenzoic acid (MCPBA) (5) in the solid state. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) reveals that the crystal face (001) of 1 during photodimerization exhibits volcanoes, whereas the same face (001) of 1 yields both craters and volcanoes all over the surface from the contact edge of the crystals during the Baeyer-Villiger reaction. All the experimental results are correlated with the bulk crystal structure. Molecular interpretation of the AFM features of 1 is given. (orig.)

  4. Measurement of the 2H(p, n) Breakup Reaction at 170 MeV and the Three-Nucleon Force Effects

    The effects of three nucleon force (3NF) have been actively studied via the nucleon–deuteron (Nd) scattering states. The differential cross sections and the vector analyzing powers Ay of the 2H(p, n) inclusive breakup reaction at 170 MeV were measured for the study of 3NF effects in the intermediate energy region. The polarized proton beam of 170 MeV was injected to the deuterated polyethylene (CD2) target and the energy of scattered neutrons were measured by using TOF method. The data were compared with the Faddeev calculations based on modern nucleon–nucleon (NN) forces with and without the 3NF. Concerning the differential cross sections, we can see large discrepancies between the data and the calculations in the region of scattered neutron energies are low, which is similar to the results of the 2H(p, p) inclusive breakup reaction at 250 MeV. (author)

  5. Reactivity from excited state (4)FeO(+) + CO sampled through reaction of ground state (4)FeCO(+) + N2O.

    Ard, Shaun G; Shuman, Nicholas S; Martinez, Oscar; Brown, Steven A; Sawyer, Jordan C; Viggiano, Albert A

    2016-06-21

    The kinetics of the FeCO(+) + N2O reaction have been studied at thermal energies (300-600 K) using a variable temperature selected ion flow tube apparatus. Rate constants and product branching fractions are reported. The reaction is modestly inefficient, proceeding with a rate constant of 6.2 × 10(-11) cm(3) s(-1) at 300 K, with a small negative temperature dependence, declining to 4.4 × 10(-11) cm(3) s(-1) at 600 K. Both Fe(+) and FeO(+) products are observed, with a constant branching ratio of approximately 40:60 at all temperatures. Calculation of the stationary points along the reaction coordinate shows that only the ground state quartet surface is initially sampled resulting in N2 elimination; a submerged barrier along this portion of the surface dictates the magnitude and temperature dependence of the total rate constant. The product branching fractions are determined by the behavior of the remaining (4)OFeCO(+) fragment, and this behavior is compared to that found in the reaction of FeO(+) + CO, which initially forms (6)OFeCO(+). Thermodynamic and kinetic arguments are used to show that the spin-forbidden surface crossing in this region is efficient, proceeding with an average rate constant of greater than 10(12) s(-1). PMID:27334158

  6. Reactivity from excited state 4FeO+ + CO sampled through reaction of ground state 4FeCO+ + N2O

    Ard, Shaun G.; Shuman, Nicholas S.; Martinez, Oscar; Brown, Steven A.; Sawyer, Jordan C.; Viggiano, Albert A.

    2016-06-01

    The kinetics of the FeCO+ + N2O reaction have been studied at thermal energies (300-600 K) using a variable temperature selected ion flow tube apparatus. Rate constants and product branching fractions are reported. The reaction is modestly inefficient, proceeding with a rate constant of 6.2 × 10-11 cm3 s-1 at 300 K, with a small negative temperature dependence, declining to 4.4 × 10-11 cm3 s-1 at 600 K. Both Fe+ and FeO+ products are observed, with a constant branching ratio of approximately 40:60 at all temperatures. Calculation of the stationary points along the reaction coordinate shows that only the ground state quartet surface is initially sampled resulting in N2 elimination; a submerged barrier along this portion of the surface dictates the magnitude and temperature dependence of the total rate constant. The product branching fractions are determined by the behavior of the remaining 4OFeCO+ fragment, and this behavior is compared to that found in the reaction of FeO+ + CO, which initially forms 6OFeCO+. Thermodynamic and kinetic arguments are used to show that the spin-forbidden surface crossing in this region is efficient, proceeding with an average rate constant of greater than 1012 s-1.

  7. Ground effects on USB configurations. [Upper Surface Blowing

    Lan, C. E.

    1979-01-01

    Recent investigations of ground effects on aerodynamic characteristics have been stimulated by the interest in powered-lift STOL airplanes. The ground effects on upper-surface-blowing (USB) configurations may involve change in both the circulation forces and the jet reaction forces. In this note, a theoretical method is proposed for predicting these effects. It is shown that the predicted results agree well with available experimental data. In particular, the wing-alone method is shown to be incapable of predicting the ground effects of USB configurations.

  8. Ground-state correlations in 12C and the mechanism of the (e,e'p) reaction

    In this thesis the results of an investigation into two aspects of the mechanism of the quasi-elastic (e,e'p) reaction: the interaction between the incident electron and the bound proton and the residual nucleus (final-state interaction (FSI)), are presented and used in the extraction of nuclear-structure information from (e,e'p) measurements on 12C. The experiments were carried out at NIKHEF-K with a high-resolution spectrometer. Two kinds of experiments have been performed on 12C. The first was aimed at obtaining accurate momentum distributions for various final states in 11B. Some special measurements were carried out in order to vary the parameters influencing the FSI. The role of coupled-channels effects in the 12C(e,e'p)11Be reaction is discussed. It is discussed whether some of the weak transitions observed in this reaction, can be associated with knockout from normally unoccupied shell-model orbitals. The second experiment on 12C was devoted to the e-p coupling. These measurements were supplemented with data taken on 6Li. The latter measurement allowed for measuring simultaneously knockout from the relatively dense 4He core and the relatively dilute deuteron. In this way the density dependence of the e-p coupling in the nucleus could be studied. The results of these experiments have been compared to various models that take into account the effect of the nuclear medium upon the e-p coupling. The possible role of charge-exchange and meson-exchange currents in the interpretation of these experiments is also considered. A brief survey of the formalism of the quasi-elastic (e,e'p) reaction is also presented. (author). 196 refs.; 53 figs.; 21 tabs

  9. Procedures for addressing uncertainty and variability in exposure to characterize potential health risk from trichloroethylene contaminated ground water at Beale Air Force Base in California; TOPICAL

    Conservative deterministic, screening-level calculations of exposure and risk commonly are used in quantitative assessments of potential human-health consequences from contaminants in environmental media. However, these calculations generally are based on multiple upper-bound point estimates of input parameters, particularly for exposure attributes, and can therefore produce results for decision makers that actually overstate the need for costly remediation. Alternatively, a more informative and quantitative characterization of health risk can be obtained by quantifying uncertainty and variability in exposure. This process is illustrated in this report for a hypothetical population at a specific site at Beale Air Force Base in California, where there is trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated ground water and a potential for future residential use. When uncertainty and variability in exposure were addressed jointly for this case, the 95th-percentile upper-bound value of individual excess lifetime cancer risk was a factor approaching 10 lower than the most conservative deterministic estimate. Additionally, the probability of more than zero additional cases of cancer can be estimated, and in this case it is less than 0.5 for a hypothetical future residential population of up to 26,900 individuals present for any 7.6-y interval of a 70-y time period. Clearly, the results from application of this probabilistic approach can provide reasonable and equitable risk-acceptability criteria for a contaminated site

  10. Procedures for addressing uncertainty and variability in exposure to characterize potential health risk from trichloroethylene contaminated ground water at Beale Air Force Base in California

    Daniels, J I; Bogen, K T; Hall, L C

    1999-10-05

    Conservative deterministic, screening-level calculations of exposure and risk commonly are used in quantitative assessments of potential human-health consequences from contaminants in environmental media. However, these calculations generally are based on multiple upper-bound point estimates of input parameters, particularly for exposure attributes, and can therefore produce results for decision makers that actually overstate the need for costly remediation. Alternatively, a more informative and quantitative characterization of health risk can be obtained by quantifying uncertainty and variability in exposure. This process is illustrated in this report for a hypothetical population at a specific site at Beale Air Force Base in California, where there is trichloroethylene (TCE) contaminated ground water and a potential for future residential use. When uncertainty and variability in exposure were addressed jointly for this case, the 95th-percentile upper-bound value of individual excess lifetime cancer risk was a factor approaching 10 lower than the most conservative deterministic estimate. Additionally, the probability of more than zero additional cases of cancer can be estimated, and in this case it is less than 0.5 for a hypothetical future residential population of up to 26,900 individuals present for any 7.6-y interval of a 70-y time period. Clearly, the results from application of this probabilistic approach can provide reasonable and equitable risk-acceptability criteria for a contaminated site.

  11. How low-energy weak reactions can constrain three-nucleon forces and the neutron-neutron scattering length

    Gardestig, A.; Phillips, D.R.

    2006-01-01

    We show that chiral symmetry and gauge invariance enforce relations between the short-distance physics that occurs in a number of electroweak and pionic reactions on light nuclei. Within chiral perturbation theory this is manifested via the appearance of the same axial isovector two-body contact term in pi- d -> n n gamma, p-wave pion production in NN collisions, tritium beta decay, pp fusion, nu d scattering, and the hep reaction. Using a Gamow-Teller matrix element obtained from calculation...

  12. Self-medication of anaphylactic reactions due to Hymenoptera stings-an EAACI Task Force Consensus Statement.

    Bilò, M B; Cichocka-Jarosz, E; Pumphrey, R; Oude-Elberink, J N; Lange, J; Jakob, T; Bonadonna, P; Fernandez, J; Kosnik, M; Helbling, A; Mosbech, H; Gawlik, R; Niedoszytko, M; Patella, V; Pravettoni, V; Rodrigues-Alves, R; Sturm, G J; Rueff, F

    2016-07-01

    An anaphylactic reaction due to a Hymenoptera sting is a clinical emergency, and patients, their caregivers as well as all healthcare professionals should be familiar with its recognition and acute management. This consensus report has been prepared by a European expert panel of the EAACI Interest Group of Insect Venom Hypersensitivity. It is targeted at allergists, clinical immunologists, internal medicine specialists, pediatricians, general practitioners, emergency department doctors, and any other healthcare professional involved. The aim was to report the scientific evidence on self-medication of anaphylactic reactions due to Hymenoptera stings, to inform healthcare staff about appropriate patient self-management of sting reactions, to propose indications for the prescription of an adrenaline auto-injector (AAI), and to discuss other forms of medication. First-line treatment for Hymenoptera sting anaphylaxis is intramuscular adrenaline. Prescription of AAIs is mandatory in the case of venom-allergic patients who suffer from mast cell diseases or with an elevated baseline serum tryptase level and in untreated patients with a history of a systemic reaction involving at least two different organ systems. AAI prescription should also be considered in other specific situations before, during, and after stopping venom immunotherapy. PMID:27060567

  13. Study of the Three-Nucleon Force Effects in the 2H(p, n) Breakup Reaction at 170 MeV

    For the study of three nucleon force (3NF) effects in the intermediate energy region, the differential cross sections and the vector analyzing power Ay were measured for the 2H(p, n) inclusive breakup reaction at 170 MeV. The polarized proton beam of 170 MeV was injected to the deuterated polyethylene (CD2) target and the energy of scattered neutrons were deduce by TOF method. The data was compared with the results of the Faddeev calculations with and without 3NFs. Concerning about the differential cross sections, we can see large discrepancies between the data and the calculations in the region where the energies of scattered neutrons are low, which are similar to the results of the 2H(p, p) inclusive breakup reaction at 250 MeV. (author)

  14. Odd oxygen formation in the laser irradiation of O2 at 248 nm - Evidence for reactions of O2 in the Herzberg states with ground state O2

    Shi, Jichun; Barker, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Two O3 formation processes (initiation and autocatalytic) are studied in pure O2 and in O2+N2 and O2+Ar mixtures at pressures between 200 and 1600 torr and at temperatures between 298 and 370 K. Evidence is presented that the initiation process produces O3 through chemical reactions between ground state O2 and excited O2 in the Herzberg states, which are produced by the photoabsorption of O2 at 248 nm. For the autocatalytic process, the results are consistent with the proposal that the O3 formation is accelerated by photodissociating vibrationally excited O2(nu), produced in the photolysis of O3 following its initial formation. It is argued that the O2 Herzberg states and O2(nu) may play important roles in the odd oxygen chemistry in the middle atmosphere. It is estimated that the O2(A3Sigma-u(+))+O2 reaction may yield up to about 6 percent of the total odd oxygen production rate near 50 km.

  15. How low-energy weak reactions can constrain three-nucleon forces and the neutron-neutron scattering length

    Gardestig, A

    2006-01-01

    We show that chiral symmetry and gauge invariance enforce relations between the short-distance physics that occurs in a number of electroweak and pionic reactions on light nuclei. Within chiral perturbation theory this is manifested via the appearance of the same axial isovector two-body contact term in pi- d -> n n gamma, p-wave pion production in NN collisions, tritium beta decay, pp fusion, nu d scattering, and the hep reaction. Using a Gamow-Teller matrix element obtained from calculations of pp fusion as input we compute the neutron spectrum obtained in pi- d -> n n gamma. With the short-distance physics in this process controlled from p p -> d e+ nu_e the theoretical uncertainty in the nn scattering length extracted from pi- d -> n n gamma is reduced by a factor larger than three, to <~0.05 fm.

  16. How low-energy weak reactions can constrain three-nucleon forces and the neutron-neutron scattering length.

    Gårdestig, A; Phillips, D R

    2006-06-16

    We show that chiral symmetry and gauge invariance enforce relations between the short-distance physics that occurs in a number of electroweak and pionic reactions on light nuclei. Within chiral perturbation theory, this is manifested via the appearance of the same axial isovector two-body contact term in pi(-)d --> nngamma, p-wave pion production in NN collisions, tritium beta decay, pp fusion, nud scattering, and the hep reaction. Using a Gamow-Teller matrix element obtained from calculations of pp fusion as input, we compute the neutron spectrum obtained in pi(-)d --> nngamma. With the short-distance physics in this process controlled from pp --> de(=)nu(e), the theoretical uncertainty in the nn scattering length extracted from pi(-)d --> nngamma is reduced by a factor larger than 3, to approximately < or = 0.05 fm. PMID:16803373

  17. Mass Transfer and Reaction Kinetics in the Carbonization of Magnesium Oxide from Light Calcined Magnesia with Mechanical Force Enhancement

    张焕军; 朱国才

    2004-01-01

    The carbonization of magnesium oxide particles by CO2 was investigated using a stirring mill reactor.The effects of the system temperature, stirring rotation speed, influx rate of CO2 and initial diameter of the magnesium oxide particles on the carbonization process were determined. The results show that the system temperature and the stirring rotation speed are the most significant influencing factors on the carbonization rate. The determination of critical decomposition temperature (CDT) gives the maximum carbonization rate with other conditions fixed. A theoretical model involving mass transfer and reaction kinetics was presented for the carbonization process.The apparent activation energy was calculated to be 32.8kJ·mo1-1. The carbonization process is co-controlled by diffusive mass transfer and chemical reaction. The model fits well with the experimental results.

  18. Measurement of the reaction 3He(γ,pp)n and its relation to three-body forces

    The three-body photodisintegration of 3He has been measured at photon energies ranging from 90 to 250 MeV, in kinematic regions where three-body forces effects are expected to be maximized, and two-body mechanisms suppressed. The differential cross sections as a function of neutron momentum demonstrate that calculations using only one-body and two-body photoabsorption mechanisms cannot describe the data and that a two-pion-exchange, three-body absorption mechanism is needed to adequately describe the data

  19. The brute-force polarization of 23Na and the 23Na(n,γ)24Na reaction

    A Na target has been polarized by brute force to 22% and the γ radiation produced by polarized thermal neutron capture has been investigated. The 2+ channel spin contribution has been determined model independently and unambiguously for 22 primary transitions. The average 2+ channel contribution is 5.8(5)%. Spins of final levels are in agreement with previous assignments. For three levels spin restrictions have been made. The energies of positive parity levels are in agreement with a shell model calculation in the complete sd shell. (Auth.)

  20. Two-phase flow characteristics of hot water discharged from a thin nozzle. 1st Report. Boiling two-phase flow rate in a nozzle and reaction force by two-phase jet

    An experimental and analytical study on the mass flux and reaction force of water single-phase and steam-water two-phase jets discharged from a thin nozzle was carried out. The mass flux of water jet is well predicted using the Bernoulli's equation with the contraction coefficient, but the recovery of contraction at the nozzle exit should be considered to evaluate the reaction force. The L/D of the nozzle affects the mass flux and reaction force of the two-phase jet, i.e., the mass flux decreases and the reaction force increases with the L/D. The behavior of high-temperature water jet is similar to that of the water jet if the L/D is smaller or nozzle inlet pressure is higher. The behaviors of the mass flux and the reaction force show hysteresis depending on the decrease or increase of nozzle inlet pressure. The mass flux and reaction force can be well predicted by the critical flow analysis based on a separated flow model with the non-equilibrium parameter. (author)

  1. Two-phase flow characteristics of hot water discharged from a thin nozzle. 1st Report. Boiling two-phase flow rate in a nozzle and reaction force by two-phase jet

    Hamada, Hirotsugu [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center; Takahashi, Minoru; Inoue, Akira; Aritomi, Masanori [Tokyo Inst. of Tech. (Japan)

    2003-01-01

    An experimental and analytical study on the mass flux and reaction force of water single-phase and steam-water two-phase jets discharged from a thin nozzle was carried out. The mass flux of water jet is well predicted using the Bernoulli's equation with the contraction coefficient, but the recovery of contraction at the nozzle exit should be considered to evaluate the reaction force. The L/D of the nozzle affects the mass flux and reaction force of the two-phase jet, i.e., the mass flux decreases and the reaction force increases with the L/D. The behavior of high-temperature water jet is similar to that of the water jet if the L/D is smaller or nozzle inlet pressure is higher. The behaviors of the mass flux and the reaction force show hysteresis depending on the decrease or increase of nozzle inlet pressure. The mass flux and reaction force can be well predicted by the critical flow analysis based on a separated flow model with the non-equilibrium parameter. (author)

  2. Study on HCl Driving Force for the Reaction of NaCl-Maleic Acid Mixing Single Droplet Using Micro-FTIR Spectroscopy

    He, Xiang; Zhang, Yunhong

    2016-04-01

    Chemical aging is the one of the most important physicochemical process in atmospheric aerosols. Mixing of sea salt and water-soluble organic components has profound effects on the volatile characteristic and evolving chemical composition of the anthropogenic origin aerosols, which are poorly understood. In this study, the chemical reaction behavior of the mixture of NaCl and maleic acid (H2MA) micron-level single droplet was investigated using a gas-flow system combined with microscopic Fourier transform infrared (micro-FTIR) spectrometer over the range of relative humidity (63˜95% RH) for the first time. The results showed that the mixture of NaCl and H2MA single droplet could react to form monosodium maleate salt (NaHMA) at the constant RH from the characterization of the FTIR. The reaction is a result of an acid displacement reaction R1, which is driven by high volatility of the HCl product. NaCl(aq)+H2MA(aq)=NaHMA(aq)+HCl(aq,g) (R1) According to the change tendency of the absorbance values of 1579 cm‑1 COO‑ stretching band of the NaHMA dependent upon reaction times at different RHs, the growth range of the trend which could lead to the faster reaction rate was obvious at lower RH. The water content of the droplet was also more likely to reduce rapidly with the loss of the RH from the absorbance changes of 3400 cm‑1H2O stretching band dependent upon reaction times. These may be due to irreversible evaporation of HCl gas which is the main driving force for this type of reaction and the NaHMA is a less hygroscopic component compared to H2MA. And the HCl gas is more likely to evaporate faster from the single droplet and promote the reaction rate and the consumption of water content at lower RH. These results could help in understanding the chemical conversion processes of water-soluble dicarboxylic acids to dicarboxylate salts, as well as the consumption of Cl in sea salt aerosols by organic acids in the atmosphere.

  3. Testing the cosmic censorship conjecture with point particles: The effect of radiation reaction and the self-force

    A classical thought-experiment to destroy black holes was envisaged by Wald in 1974: it consists of throwing particles with large angular momentum into an extremal black hole, checking whether their capture can overspin the black hole past the extremal limit and create a naked singularity. Wald showed that in the test-particle limit, particles that would be otherwise capable of producing naked singularities are simply scattered. Recently, Jacobson and Sotiriou showed that if one considers instead a black hole that is almost, but not exactly extremal, then in the absence of backreaction effects particle capture could indeed overspin the spacetime above the Kerr limit. Here we analyze backreaction effects and show that for some of the trajectories giving rise to naked singularities, radiative effects can be neglected. However, for these orbits the conservative self-force is important, and seems to have the right sign to prevent the formation of naked singularities.

  4. The chemical hardness of molecules and the band gap of solids within charge equilibration formalisms. Toward force field-based simulations of redox reactions

    Müser, M. H.

    2012-04-01

    This work finds that different charge equilibration methods lead to qualitatively different responses of molecules and solids to an excess charge. The investigated approaches are the regular charge equilibration (QE), the atom-atom-charge transfer (AACT), and the split-charge equilibration (SQE) method. In QE, the hardness of molecules and the band gap of solids approaches zero at large particle numbers, affirming the claim that QE induces metallic behavior. AACT suffers from producing negative values of the hardness; moreover valence and conduction bands of solids cross. In contrast to these methods, SQE can reproduce the generic behavior of dielectric molecules or solids. Moreover, first quantitative results for the NaCl molecule are promising. The results derived in this work may have beneficial implications for the modeling of redox reactions. They reveal that by introducing formal oxidation states into force field-based simulations it will become possible to simulate redox reactions including non-equilibrium contact electrification, voltage-driven charging of galvanic cells, and the formation of zwitterionic molecules.

  5. Development of a Subject-Specific Foot-Ground Contact Model for Walking.

    Jackson, Jennifer N; Hass, Chris J; Fregly, Benjamin J

    2016-09-01

    Computational walking simulations could facilitate the development of improved treatments for clinical conditions affecting walking ability. Since an effective treatment is likely to change a patient's foot-ground contact pattern and timing, such simulations should ideally utilize deformable foot-ground contact models tailored to the patient's foot anatomy and footwear. However, no study has reported a deformable modeling approach that can reproduce all six ground reaction quantities (expressed as three reaction force components, two center of pressure (CoP) coordinates, and a free reaction moment) for an individual subject during walking. This study proposes such an approach for use in predictive optimizations of walking. To minimize complexity, we modeled each foot as two rigid segments-a hindfoot (HF) segment and a forefoot (FF) segment-connected by a pin joint representing the toes flexion-extension axis. Ground reaction forces (GRFs) and moments acting on each segment were generated by a grid of linear springs with nonlinear damping and Coulomb friction spread across the bottom of each segment. The stiffness and damping of each spring and common friction parameter values for all springs were calibrated for both feet simultaneously via a novel three-stage optimization process that used motion capture and ground reaction data collected from a single walking trial. The sequential three-stage process involved matching (1) the vertical force component, (2) all three force components, and finally (3) all six ground reaction quantities. The calibrated model was tested using four additional walking trials excluded from calibration. With only small changes in input kinematics, the calibrated model reproduced all six ground reaction quantities closely (root mean square (RMS) errors less than 13 N for all three forces, 25 mm for anterior-posterior (AP) CoP, 8 mm for medial-lateral (ML) CoP, and 2 N·m for the free moment) for both feet in all walking trials. The

  6. Impulse-forces during walking are not increased in patients with knee osteoarthritis

    Henriksen, Marius; Simonsen, Erik B; Graven-Nielsen, Thomas;

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Impulsive forces in the knee joint have been suspected to be a co-factor in the development and progression of knee osteoarthritis. We thus evaluated the impulsive sagittal ground reaction forces (iGRF), shock waves and lower extremity joint kinematics at heel strike during walking in...... range. Our findings make us question the hypothesis that impulse-forces generated at heel strike during walking contribute to progression of OA....

  7. Analysis of Aerosol Radiative Forcing over Beijing under Different Air Quality Conditions Using Ground-Based Sun-Photometers between 2013 and 2015

    Wei Chen; Lei Yan; Nan Ding; Mengdie Xie; Ming Lu; Fan Zhang; Yongxu Duan; Shuo Zong

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol particles can strongly affect both air quality and the radiation budget of the atmosphere. Above Beijing, the capital city of China, large amounts of aerosols within the atmospheric column have caused the deterioration of local air quality and have influenced radiative forcings at both the top and the bottom of the atmosphere (BOA and TOA). Observations of aerosol radiative forcing and its efficiency have been made using two sun-photometers in urban Beijing between 2013 and 2015, and ...

  8. The CMS Experiment: on and under Ground Motions of Structures Due to the Magnetic Field Forces as Observed by the Link Alignment System

    This document describes results obtained from the Link Alignment System data recorded during the CMS Magnet Test (at SX5 on ground Hall) and the CRAFT08 and 09 periods data taking in the point P5 (UX5), 100 m underground. A brief description of the system is followed by the discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micrometres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotation of detector structures (from microradiants to milliradiants). Observed motions are studied as functions of the magnetic fi eld intensity. Comparisons between recorded data on and under ground are made. (Author) 23 refs.

  9. The CMS Experiment: on and under Ground Motions of Structures Due to the Magnetic Field Forces as Observed by the Link Alignment System

    Alberdi, J.; Arce, J.; Barcala, J. M.; Calvo, E.; Ferrando, A.; Josa, M. I.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J.; Oller, J. C.; Yuste, C.; Brochero, J.; Calderon, A.; Fernandez, M. G.; Gomez, G.; Gonzalez-Sanchez, F. J.; Martinez-Ribero, C.; Matorras, F.; Rodrigo, T.; Rui-Arbol, P.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron, M.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.; Fernandez, J.

    2010-05-01

    This document describes results obtained from the Link Alignment System data recorded during the CMS Magnet Test (at SX5 on ground Hall) and the CRAFT08 and 09 periods data taking in the point P5 (UX5), 100 m underground. A brief description of the system is followed by the discussion of the detected relative displacements (from micrometres to centimetres) between detector elements and rotation of detector structures (from microradiants to milliradiants). Observed motions are studied as functions of the magnetic fi eld intensity. Comparisons between recorded data on and under ground are made. (Author) 23 refs.

  10. Large atmospheric shortwave radiative forcing by Mediterranean aerosols derived from simultaneous ground-based and spaceborne observations and dependence on the aerosol type and single scattering albedo

    di Biagio, Claudia; di Sarra, Alcide; Meloni, Daniela

    2010-05-01

    Aerosol optical properties and shortwave irradiance measurements at the island of Lampedusa (central Mediterranean) during 2004-2007 are combined with Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System observations of the outgoing shortwave flux at the top of the atmosphere (TOA). The measurements are used to estimate the surface (FES), the top of the atmosphere (FETOA), and the atmospheric (FEATM) shortwave aerosol forcing efficiencies for solar zenith angle (θ) between 15° and 55° for desert dust (DD), urban/industrial-biomass burning aerosols (UI-BB), and mixed aerosols (MA). The forcing efficiency at the different atmospheric levels is derived by applying the direct method, that is, as the derivative of the shortwave net flux versus the aerosol optical depth at fixed θ. The diurnal average forcing efficiency at the surface/TOA at the equinox is (-68.9 ± 4.0)/(-45.5 ± 5.4) W m-2 for DD, (-59.0 ± 4.3)/(-19.2 ± 3.3) W m-2 for UI-BB, and (-94.9 ± 5.1)/(-36.2 ± 1.7) W m-2 for MA. The diurnal average atmospheric radiative forcing at the equinox is (+7.3 ± 2.5) W m-2 for DD, (+8.4 ± 1.9) W m-2 for UI-BB, and (+8.2 ± 1.9) W m-2 for MA, suggesting that the mean atmospheric forcing is almost independent of the aerosol type. The largest values of the atmospheric forcing may reach +35 W m-2 for DD, +23 W m-2 for UI-BB, and +34 W m-2 for MA. FETOA is calculated for MA and 25° ≤ θ ≤ 35° for three classes of single scattering albedo (0.7 ≤ ω < 0.8, 0.8 ≤ ω < 0.9, and 0.9 ≤ ω ≤ 1) at 415.6 and 868.7 nm: FETOA increases, in absolute value, for increasing ω. A 0.1 increment in ω determines an increase in FETOA by 10-20 W m-2.

  11. Dynamical response of the Galileo Galilei on the ground rotor to test the equivalence principle: Theory, simulation, and experiment. II. The rejection of common mode forces

    'Galileo Galilei on the ground' (GGG) is a fast rotating differential accelerometer designed to test the equivalence principle (EP). Its sensitivity to differential effects, such as the effect of an EP violation, depends crucially on the capability of the accelerometer to reject all effects acting in common mode. By applying the theoretical and simulation methods reported in Part I of this work, and tested therein against experimental data, we predict the occurrence of an enhanced common mode rejection of the GGG accelerometer. We demonstrate that the best rejection of common mode disturbances can be tuned in a controlled way by varying the spin frequency of the GGG rotor

  12. Study on the 8He ground state via 8He(p, d)7He and 8He(p, t)6He reaction at 82.3 MeV/nucleon

    The differential cross sections for reactions 8He(p, d)7Heg.s and 8He(p, t)6He2+ were measured by the coincidence of d + 6 He and t + 4He in a wide angular range from 15 to 130 degree in the center-of-mass system. The cross sections of the 8He(p, t)6Heg.s reaction were extremely lower than that of 8He(p, t)6He2+ reaction, and was not obtained from the present data. The experimental results were compared to the preliminary theoretical calculations in the frame of adiabatic distorted-wave approximation with the code Fresco. The results show that the configuration of (1p3/2)2(1p1/2)2 may have some probability in the ground state wave function of 8He. The cluster structure of 8He = 5H + 3H could not be neglected.

  13. Three-body forces

    Three-body forces are defined and their properties discussed. Evidence for such forces in the trinucleon bound states and scattering reactions is reviewed. The binding energy defects of the trinucleon bound states, the 3He charge density, the Phillips line for doublet n-d scattering lengths, and three-nucleon breakup reactions are discussed, together with the possible influence of three-body forces on these observables

  14. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed

  15. Quantum, Statistical, and Quasiclassical Trajectory Studies For the Ne + HeH(+) → NeH(+) + He Reaction on the Ground Electronic State.

    Koner, Debasish; Barrios, Lizandra; González-Lezana, Tomás; Panda, Aditya N

    2015-12-17

    Real wave packet, statistical quantum, and quasiclassical trajectory methods were employed to study the dynamics of Ne + HeH(+)(v0,j0) → He + NeH(+) reaction on an ab initio potential energy surface [J. Phys. Chem. A 2013, 117, 13070-13078]. Quantum and statistical quantum calculations were performed within the centrifugal sudden (CS) approximation as well as including the Coriolis coupling (CC). Dense oscillatory structures of the quantum reaction probabilities and fair agreement between quantum and statistical cross sections suggest a complex forming mechanism for the reaction. No significant differences between cross sections obtained within the CS and CC approaches are observed. Quasiclassical trajectory results give an excellent average description of the quantum CC results. At low collision energies, there is a substantial decrease in reactivity for the reaction upon rovibrational excitation. Initial state selected rate constants for the title reaction are calculated between 20 and 1000 K, and the calculated value at 300 K agrees quite well with the available experimental result. Reaction cross sections and rate constants are also compared with those calculated via the Langevin capture model for exothermic reactions. PMID:26172109

  16. Equilibrium constants in aqueous lanthanide and actinide chemistry from time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy: The role of ground and excited state reactions

    Equilibrium constants for aqueous reactions between lanthanide or actinide ions and (in-) organic ligands contain important information for various radiochemical problems, such as nuclear reprocessing or the migration of radioelements in the geosphere. We study the conditions required to determine equilibrium constants by time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy measurements. Based on a simulation study it is shown that the possibility to determine equilibrium constants depends upon the reaction rates in the photoexcited states of the lanthanide or actinide ions. (orig.)

  17. Ground-state and isomeric-state cross sections for the {sup 138}Ce(n,2n){sup 137}Ce reaction from its threshold to 20 MeV

    Luo, Junhua [Hexi Univ., Zhangye (China). Inst. of Theoretical Physics; Hexi Univ., Zhangye (China). School of Physics and Electromechanical Engineering; An, Li; Jiang, Li [Chinese Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang (China). Inst. of Nuclear Physics and Chemistry

    2015-07-01

    The cross sections of the {sup 138}Ce(n,2n){sup 137}Ce reactions and their isomeric cross section ratios σ{sub m}/σ{sub g} were measured at three neutron energies between 13.5 and 14.8 MeV using the activation technique. CeO{sub 2} samples and Nb monitor foils were activated together to determine the reaction cross section and the incident neutron flux. The monoenergetic neutron beams were formed via the {sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He reaction. The activities induced in the reaction products were measured using high-resolution γ-ray spectroscopy. The pure cross section of the ground-state was derived from the absolute cross section of the metastable state and the residual nuclear decay analysis. The cross sections were also estimated using the nuclear model code, TALYS-1.6 with different level density options at neutron energies varying from the reaction threshold to 20 MeV. Results are discussed and compared with the corresponding literature data.

  18. Communication: Direct comparison between theory and experiment for correlated angular and product-state distributions of the ground-state and stretching-excited O(3P) + CH4 reactions

    Motivated by a recent experiment [H. Pan and K. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 140, 191101 (2014)], we report a quasiclassical trajectory study of the O(3P) + CH4(vk = 0, 1) → OH + CH3 [k = 1 and 3] reactions on an ab initio potential energy surface. The computed angular distributions and cross sections correlated to the OH(v = 0, 1) + CH3(v = 0) coincident product states can be directly compared to experiment for O + CH4(v3 = 0, 1). Both theory and experiment show that the ground-state reaction is backward scattered, whereas the angular distributions shift toward sideways and forward directions upon antisymmetric stretching (v3) excitation of the reactant. Theory predicts similar behavior for the O + CH4(v1 = 1) reaction. The simulations show that stretching excitation enhances the reaction up to about 15 kcal/mol collision energy, whereas the O + CH4(vk = 1) reactions produce smaller cross sections for OH(v = 1) + CH3(v = 0) than those of O + CH4(v = 0) → OH(v = 0) + CH3(v = 0). The former finding agrees with experiment and the latter awaits for confirmation. The computed cold OH rotational distributions of O + CH4(v = 0) are in good agreement with experiment

  19. Investigating the relationship between pressure force and acoustic waveform in footstep sounds

    Grani, Francesco; Serafin, Stefania; Götzen, Amalia De;

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present an inquiry into of the relationships between audio waveforms and ground reaction force in recorded footstep sounds. In an anechoic room, we recorded several footstep sounds produced while walking on creaking wood and gravel. The recordings were performed by using a pair o...

  20. Ab initio study of {sup 2}H(d,{gamma}){sup 4}He, {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H, and {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 4}He reactions and the tensor force

    Arai, K.; Aoyama, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Descouvemont, P.; Baye, D. [Division of General Education, Nagaoka National College of Technology, 888 Nishikatakai, Nagaoka, Niigata, 940-8532 (Japan); Center for Academic Information Service, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181 (Japan); Department of Physics, Niigata University, Niigata 950-2181, Japan and RIKEN Nishina Center, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Physique Nucleaire Theorique et Physique Mathematique, C.P.229, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B 1050 Brussels (Belgium); Physique Quantique, CP165/82, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)

    2012-11-12

    The {sup 2}H(d,p){sup 3}H, {sup 2}H(d,n){sup 3}He, and {sup 2}H(d,{gamma}){sup 4}He reactions at low energies are studied with realistic nucleon-nucleon interactions in an ab initio approach. The obtained astrophysical S-factors are all in very good agreement with experiment. The most important channels for both transfer and radiative capture are all found to dominate thanks to the tensor force.

  1. Large-eddy simulation of pollutant dispersion from a ground-level area source over urban street canyons with irreversible chemical reactions

    Du, T. Z.; Liu, C.-H.; Zhao, Y. B.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the dispersion of chemically reactive pollutants is calculated by large-eddy simulation (LES) in a neutrally stratified urban canopy layer (UCL) over urban areas. As a pilot attempt, idealized street canyons of unity building-height-to-street-width (aspect) ratio are used. Nitric oxide (NO) is emitted from the ground surface of the first street canyon into the domain doped with ozone (O3). In the absence of ultraviolet radiation, this irreversible chemistry pr...

  2. ESR in zero field of the photoinduced triplet state in isolated reaction centers of rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26 detected by the singlet ground-state absorbance

    Den Blanken, H. J.; Van Der Zwet, G. P.; Hoff, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    We have measured zero-field resonance transitions of the triplet state of the primary donor monitoring the transmittance at 890 nm at 1.2 K in isolated reaction centers of Rhodopseudomonas sphaeroides R-26. The transitions correspond to a decrease in transmittance, confirming the energy transfer model for the transitions detected via the antenna fluorescence in whole cells.

  3. Applying the cost of generating force hypothesis to uphill running

    Wouter Hoogkamer; Paolo Taboga; Rodger Kram

    2014-01-01

    Historically, several different approaches have been applied to explain the metabolic cost of uphill human running. Most of these approaches result in unrealistically high values for the efficiency of performing vertical work during running uphill, or are only valid for running up steep inclines. The purpose of this study was to reexamine the metabolic cost of uphill running, based upon our understanding of level running energetics and ground reaction forces during uphill running. In contrast...

  4. Cross sections of ground and isomeric states for (n,p) reaction on Sm-154 between 13.57 and 14.83MeV neutrons.

    Reyhancan, Iskender Atilla

    2016-07-01

    In this study, the activation cross sections were measured for the (154)Sm(n,p)(154g)Pm, and (154)Sm(n,p)(154m)Pm reactions at several neutron energies between 13.57 and 14.83MeV, which were produced by the neutron generator (SAMES T-400) through the (3)H((2)H,n)(4)He reaction. The production of short-lived activity and the spectra accumulation were performed by the cyclic activation technique. Induced gamma-ray activities were measured using a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer equipped with a high-purity Germanium (HPGe) detector. In the cross section measurements, corrections were made regarding the effects of gamma-ray attenuation, dead-time, fluctuation of neutron flux, and low energy neutrons. The measured cross sections were compared with data reported in literature as well as model calculations using the code TALYS 1.6. PMID:27149398

  5. Testing nuclear forces by polarization transfer coefficients in d(\\vec p, \\vec p)d and d(\\vec p,\\vec d)p reactions at E^{lab}_p = 22.7 MeV

    Witala, H; Glöckle, W; Golak, J; Kamada, H; Kievsky, A; Nogga, A; Skibinski, R; Viviani, M

    2006-01-01

    The proton to proton polarization transfer coefficients K_x^{x'}, K_y^{y'}, K_z^{x'} and the proton to deuteron polarization transfer coefficients K_x^{x'}, K_y^{y'}, K_z^{x'}, K_x^{y'z'}, K_y^{z'z'}, K_z^{y'z'}, K_y^{x'z'} and K_y^{x'x'-y'y'} have been measured in d(\\vec p, \\vec p)d and d(\\vec p, \\vec d)p reactions at E^{lab}_p = 22.7 MeV, respectively. The data have been compared to predictions of modern nuclear forces obtained by solving the three-nucleon Faddeev equations in momentum space. Realistic (semi) phenomenological nucleon-nucleon potentials combined with model three-nucleon forces and modern chiral nuclear forces have been used. The AV18, CD Bonn, Nijm I and II nucleon-nucleon interactions have been applied alone or combined with the Tucson-Melbourne 99 three-nucleon force, adjusted separately for each potential to reproduce the triton binding energy. For the AV18 potential also the Urbana IX three-nucleon force have been used. In addition chiral NN potentials in the next-to-leading-order and ch...

  6. Ground subgroups

    Rozikov, U. A.

    2009-01-01

    In this article we give a concept of ground subgroup for finite and countable groups. By our definition such a subgroup of a group depends on a given subset of the group and on a given partition of the subset. For finite and free groups we describe some sets of ground subgroups. We apply the ground subgroups to describe ground states of a model of statistical mechanics.

  7. Variability of a "force signature" during windmill softball pitching and relationship between discrete force variables and pitch velocity.

    Nimphius, Sophia; McGuigan, Michael R; Suchomel, Timothy J; Newton, Robert U

    2016-06-01

    This study assessed reliability of discrete ground reaction force (GRF) variables over multiple pitching trials, investigated the relationships between discrete GRF variables and pitch velocity (PV) and assessed the variability of the "force signature" or continuous force-time curve during the pitching motion of windmill softball pitchers. Intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for all discrete variables was high (0.86-0.99) while the coefficient of variance (CV) was low (1.4-5.2%). Two discrete variables were significantly correlated to PV; second vertical peak force (r(5)=0.81, p=0.03) and time between peak forces (r(5)=-0.79; p=0.03). High ICCs and low CVs support the reliability of discrete GRF and PV variables over multiple trials and significant correlations indicate there is a relationship between the ability to produce force and the timing of this force production with PV. The mean of all pitchers' curve-average standard deviation of their continuous force-time curves demonstrated low variability (CV=4.4%) indicating a repeatable and identifiable "force signature" pattern during this motion. As such, the continuous force-time curve in addition to discrete GRF variables should be examined in future research as a potential method to monitor or explain changes in pitching performance. PMID:26999033

  8. Comparison of natural and artificial forcing to study the dynamic behaviour of bell towers in low wind context by means of ground-based radar interferometry: the case of the Leaning Tower in Pisa

    The study of Cultural Heritage assets needs the application of non-destructive and non-invasive monitoring techniques. In particular, monuments and historical buildings which are open to the visitors and/or subject to important stress must be studied for their dynamic response. In the last 10 years the new ground-based radar interferometry technology has been developed allowing to monitor displacements from a point of sight far from the studied targets. It virtually provides a continuous mapping of displacements of the observed structures up to 10 µm with a range resolution of 0.75 m. In this paper, the application of ground-based interferometry on one very important historical building, the Leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, is reported. The analysis of these kind of structures is important to catch their dynamic response to natural actions in general, and also to assess the effects due to pedestrian and users, and consequently to define functional capabilities and levels of acceptable dynamic stress. The studied structure was subject to artificial loading by synchronous movement of about 20 people. Artificial forcing led the structure to a resonance condition with the same frequency of the one due to the natural noise excitation, which was separately measured, and with an oscillation amplitude more than thirty times greater than the natural one (in conditions of weak wind). During the passive stages of the survey the recorded structural vibrations were very closed to the instrumental sensitivity, making difficult to distinguish vibration amplitudes amplifications of various segments at various heights. Through the spectral analysis of the acquired data it was possible to estimate the vibration frequencies of the first modal shapes of the structure along two orthogonal directions. The power spectra of the passive survey data have the same maximum frequency of the active but contain more noise at low frequency. (paper)

  9. Knee and ankle joint forces during steps and jumps down from two different heights.

    Nisell, R; Mizrah, J

    1988-05-01

    Two healthy subjects were filmed on TV-video when performing 14 different steps and jumps from two different heights (0·20 m and 0·43 m) onto two Kistler force platforms that recorded the reaction forces. The ankle and knee load moments and joint forces were calculated using a sagittal plane semi-dynamic biomechanical model. Steps with the ball of the foot from the lower height induced a vertical ground reaction force (Fz) close to 1 body weight (bw) and around 2 bw from the greater height. From the greater height the knee moments for the majority of the step-downs studied were about 100 Nm, which gave knee joint compressive forces of 4-7 bw. The ankle was exposed to loads of similar magnitude but not so much influenced by step height. The reasons why patients with knee pain prefer performing backward step-downs are discussed. PMID:23915840

  10. Design and Operation of a Borehole Straddle Packer for Ground-Water Sampling and Hydraulic Testing of Discrete Intervals at U.S. Air Force Plant 6, Marietta, Georgia

    Holloway, Owen G.; Waddell, Jonathan P.

    2008-01-01

    A borehole straddle packer was developed and tested by the U.S. Geological Survey to characterize the vertical distribution of contaminants, head, and hydraulic properties in open-borehole wells as part of an ongoing investigation of ground-water contamination at U.S. Air Force Plant 6 (AFP6) in Marietta, Georgia. To better understand contaminant fate and transport in a crystalline bedrock setting and to support remedial activities at AFP6, numerous wells have been constructed that include long open-hole intervals in the crystalline bedrock. These wells can include several discontinuities that produce water, which may contain contaminants. Because of the complexity of ground-water flow and contaminant movement in the crystalline bedrock, it is important to characterize the hydraulic and water-quality characteristics of discrete intervals in these wells. The straddle packer facilitates ground-water sampling and hydraulic testing of discrete intervals, and delivery of fluids including tracer suites and remedial agents into these discontinuities. The straddle packer consists of two inflatable packers, a dual-pump system, a pressure-sensing system, and an aqueous injection system. Tests were conducted to assess the accuracy of the pressure-sensing systems, and water samples were collected for analysis of volatile organic compound (VOCs) concentrations. Pressure-transducer readings matched computed water-column height, with a coefficient of determination of greater than 0.99. The straddle packer incorporates both an air-driven piston pump and a variable-frequency, electronic, submersible pump. Only slight differences were observed between VOC concentrations in samples collected using the two different types of sampling pumps during two sampling events in July and August 2005. A test conducted to assess the effect of stagnation on VOC concentrations in water trapped in the system's pump-tubing reel showed that concentrations were not affected. A comparison was conducted