WorldWideScience

Sample records for genetic diversity mining

  1. Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex genetic diversity: mining the fourth international spoligotyping database (SpolDB4 for classification, population genetics and epidemiology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajduda Anna

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Direct Repeat locus of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC is a member of the CRISPR (Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats sequences family. Spoligotyping is the widely used PCR-based reverse-hybridization blotting technique that assays the genetic diversity of this locus and is useful both for clinical laboratory, molecular epidemiology, evolutionary and population genetics. It is easy, robust, cheap, and produces highly diverse portable numerical results, as the result of the combination of (1 Unique Events Polymorphism (UEP (2 Insertion-Sequence-mediated genetic recombination. Genetic convergence, although rare, was also previously demonstrated. Three previous international spoligotype databases had partly revealed the global and local geographical structures of MTC bacilli populations, however, there was a need for the release of a new, more representative and extended, international spoligotyping database. Results The fourth international spoligotyping database, SpolDB4, describes 1939 shared-types (STs representative of a total of 39,295 strains from 122 countries, which are tentatively classified into 62 clades/lineages using a mixed expert-based and bioinformatical approach. The SpolDB4 update adds 26 new potentially phylogeographically-specific MTC genotype families. It provides a clearer picture of the current MTC genomes diversity as well as on the relationships between the genetic attributes investigated (spoligotypes and the infra-species classification and evolutionary history of the species. Indeed, an independent Naïve-Bayes mixture-model analysis has validated main of the previous supervised SpolDB3 classification results, confirming the usefulness of both supervised and unsupervised models as an approach to understand MTC population structure. Updated results on the epidemiological status of spoligotypes, as well as genetic prevalence maps on six main lineages are also shown. Our results suggests the existence of fine geographical genetic clines within MTC populations, that could mirror the passed and present Homo sapiens sapiens demographical and mycobacterial co-evolutionary history whose structure could be further reconstructed and modelled, thereby providing a large-scale conceptual framework of the global TB Epidemiologic Network. Conclusion Our results broaden the knowledge of the global phylogeography of the MTC complex. SpolDB4 should be a very useful tool to better define the identity of a given MTC clinical isolate, and to better analyze the links between its current spreading and previous evolutionary history. The building and mining of extended MTC polymorphic genetic databases is in progress.

  2. Recombination and Genetic Diversity

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    T. C., Coutinho; T.T.da, Silva; G.L., Toledo.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present a spatial stochastic model for genetic recombination, that answers if diversity is preserved in an infinite population of recombinat-ing individuals distributed spatially. We show that, for finite times, recombination may maintain all the various potential different types, b [...] ut when time grows infinitely, the diversity of individuals extinguishes off. So under the model premisses, recombination and spatial localization alone are not enough to explain diversity in a population. Further we discuss an application of the model to a controversy regarding the diversity of "Major Histocompatibility Complex" (MHC).

  3. Imposing genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The idea that a world in which everyone was born "perfect" would be a world in which something valuable was missing often comes up in debates about the ethics of technologies of prenatal testing and preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). This thought plays an important role in the "disability critique" of prenatal testing. However, the idea that human genetic variation is an important good with significant benefits for society at large is also embraced by a wide range of figures writing in the bioethics literature, including some who are notoriously hostile to the idea that we should not select against disability. By developing a number of thought experiments wherein we are to contemplate increasing genetic diversity from a lower baseline in order to secure this value, I argue that this powerful intuition is more problematic than is generally recognized, especially where the price of diversity is the well-being of particular individuals. PMID:26030484

  4. Genetic diversity of merozoite surface protein-1 gene of Plasmodium vivax isolates in mining villages of Venezuela (Bolivar State).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Marie Claude; Gauthier, Céline; Villegas, Leopoldo; Urdaneta, Ludmel

    2005-07-01

    The merozoite surface protein-1 gene of Plasmodium vivax is highly polymorphic and so, currently used in epidemiological studies of P. vivax malaria. We sequenced the variable block 5 of the gene from 39 Venezuelan isolates, 18 of which were co-infected with Plasmodium falciparum. We observed a limited variability with 34 isolates belonging to the type Salvador I, none Belem type and only five recombinants. Among the recombinants, only two types of sequences were observed with, respectively, 18 and 21 poly-Q residues. Nucleotide substitutions explained the major differences of the 11 patterns observed. We could evidence neither specific MSP-1 genotype associated with co-infected samples, nor peculiar MSP-1 genotype distribution inside the investigated areas. In comparison with other low endemic regions in the world, our sampling has a lower genetic diversity, which could be mainly explained by the lack of Belem type. In fact, the variable repeats of poly-Q residues involved in the polymorphism of Belem type and recombinant isolates are responsible for a great part of variability observed in MSP-1 block 5. PMID:15862584

  5. Genetic diversity in experimental metapopulations

    OpenAIRE

    Bakker, Johanna,

    2008-01-01

    The biological diversity. of our planet is rapidly declining. Because of habitat deterioration and fragmentation, many species have been reduced to small, more. or less isolated populations. with. an increased extinction risk. Such small populations suffering from temporary extinctions, but connected through (limited) migration constitute a metapopulation. The genetic diversity in a metapopulation is mostly decided by "genetic drift" removing genetic variation from small populations, and by "...

  6. Genetic Diversity and Human Equality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobzhansky, Theodosius

    The idea of equality often, if not frequently, bogs down in confusion and apparent contradictions; equality is confused with identity, and diversity with inequality. It would seem that the easiest way to discredit the idea of equality is to show that people are innately, genetically, and, therefore, irremediably diverse and unlike. The snare is,…

  7. Genetic Diversity of Toscana Virus

    OpenAIRE

    Collao, Ximena; Palacios, Gustavo; Sanbonmatsu-Gámez, Sara; Pérez-Ruiz, Mercedes; Negredo, Ana I.; Navarro-Marí, José-María; Grandadam, Marc; Aransay, Ana Maria; Lipkin, W. Ian; Tenorio, Antonio; Sánchez-Seco, María-Paz

    2009-01-01

    Distribution of Toscana virus (TOSV) is evolving with climate change, and pathogenicity may be higher in nonexposed populations outside areas of current prevalence (Mediterranean Basin). To characterize genetic diversity of TOSV, we determined the coding sequences of isolates from Spain and France. TOSV is more diverse than other well-studied phleboviruses (e.g.,Rift Valley fever virus).

  8. Genetic diversity in Entamoeba histolytica

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C Graham Clark; Mehreen Zaki; Ibne Karim Md Ali

    2002-11-01

    Genetic diversity within Entamoeba histolytica led to the re-description of the species 10 years ago. However, more recent investigation has revealed significant diversity within the re-defined species. Both protein-coding and non-coding sequences show variability, but the common feature in all cases is the presence of short tandem repeats of varying length and sequence. The ability to identify strains of E. histolytica may lead to insights into the population structure and epidemiology of the organism.

  9. Allele mining and enhanced genetic recombination for rice breeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Hei; Raghavan, Chitra; Zhou, Bo; Oliva, Ricardo; Choi, Il Ryong; Lacorte, Vanica; Jubay, Mona Liza; Cruz, Casiana Vera; Gregorio, Glenn; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Ulat, Victor Jun; Borja, Frances Nikki; Mauleon, Ramil; Alexandrov, Nickolai N; McNally, Kenneth L; Sackville Hamilton, Ruaraidh

    2015-12-01

    Traditional rice varieties harbour a large store of genetic diversity with potential to accelerate rice improvement. For a long time, this diversity maintained in the International Rice Genebank has not been fully used because of a lack of genome information. The publication of the first reference genome of Nipponbare by the International Rice Genome Sequencing Project (IRGSP) marked the beginning of a systematic exploration and use of rice diversity for genetic research and breeding. Since then, the Nipponbare genome has served as the reference for the assembly of many additional genomes. The recently completed 3000 Rice Genomes Project together with the public database (SNP-Seek) provides a new genomic and data resource that enables the identification of useful accessions for breeding. Using disease resistance traits as case studies, we demonstrated the power of allele mining in the 3,000 genomes for extracting accessions from the GeneBank for targeted phenotyping. Although potentially useful landraces can now be identified, their use in breeding is often hindered by unfavourable linkages. Efficient breeding designs are much needed to transfer the useful diversity to breeding. Multi-parent Advanced Generation InterCross (MAGIC) is a breeding design to produce highly recombined populations. The MAGIC approach can be used to generate pre-breeding populations with increased genotypic diversity and reduced linkage drag. Allele mining combined with a multi-parent breeding design can help convert useful diversity into breeding-ready genetic resources. PMID:26606925

  10. Do species conservation assessments capture genetic diversity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malin C. Rivers

    2014-12-01

    Our results support the view that current threat thresholds of the IUCN Red List criteria reflect genetic diversity, and hence evolutionary potential; although the genetic diversity distinction between threatened categories was less evident. Thus, by supplementing conventional conservation assessments with genetic data, new insights into the biological robustness of IUCN Red List assessments for targeted conservation initiatives can be achieved.

  11. The genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax populations.

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, L.; Escalante, AA; Imwong, M; Snounou, G.

    2003-01-01

    Little is known of the genetic diversity and population structure of Plasmodium vivax, a debilitating and highly prevalent malaria parasite of humans. This article reviews the known polymorphic genetic markers, summarizes current data on the population structure of this parasite and discusses future prospects for using knowledge of the genetic diversity to improve control measures.

  12. Genetic diversity in a crop metapopulation

    OpenAIRE

    Heerwaarden, J., van; van Eeuwijk, F. A.; Ross-Ibarra, J

    2010-01-01

    The need to protect crop genetic resources has sparked a growing interest in the genetic diversity maintained in traditional farming systems worldwide. Although traditional seed management has been proposed as an important determinant of genetic diversity and structure in crops, no models exist that can adequately describe the genetic effects of seed management. We present a metapopulation model that accounts for several features unique to managed crop populations. Using traditional maize agr...

  13. Genetic Diversity and Societally Important Disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Noah A; Kang, Jonathan T L

    2015-09-01

    The magnitude of genetic diversity within human populations varies in a way that reflects the sequence of migrations by which people spread throughout the world. Beyond its use in human evolutionary genetics, worldwide variation in genetic diversity sometimes can interact with social processes to produce differences among populations in their relationship to modern societal problems. We review the consequences of genetic diversity differences in the settings of familial identification in forensic genetic testing, match probabilities in bone marrow transplantation, and representation in genome-wide association studies of disease. In each of these three cases, the contribution of genetic diversity to social differences follows from population-genetic principles. For a fourth setting that is not similarly grounded, we reanalyze with expanded genetic data a report that genetic diversity differences influence global patterns of human economic development, finding no support for the claim. The four examples describe a limit to the importance of genetic diversity for explaining societal differences while illustrating a distinction that certain biologically based scenarios do require consideration of genetic diversity for solving problems to which populations have been differentially predisposed by the unique history of human migrations. PMID:26354973

  14. Personalized medicine and human genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi-Fan; Goldstein, David B; Angrist, Misha; Cavalleri, Gianpiero

    2014-09-01

    Human genetic diversity has long been studied both to understand how genetic variation influences risk of disease and infer aspects of human evolutionary history. In this article, we review historical and contemporary views of human genetic diversity, the rare and common mutations implicated in human disease susceptibility, and the relevance of genetic diversity to personalized medicine. First, we describe the development of thought about diversity through the 20th century and through more modern studies including genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and next-generation sequencing. We introduce several examples, such as sickle cell anemia and Tay-Sachs disease that are caused by rare mutations and are more frequent in certain geographical populations, and common treatment responses that are caused by common variants, such as hepatitis C infection. We conclude with comments about the continued relevance of human genetic diversity in medical genetics and personalized medicine more generally. PMID:25059740

  15. Mining Frequent Itemsets Using Genetic Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Soumadip Ghosh; Sushanta Biswas; Debasree Sarkar; Partha Pratim Sarkar

    2010-01-01

    In general frequent itemsets are generated from large data sets by applying association rule mining algorithms like Apriori, Partition, Pincer-Search, Incremental, Border algorithm etc., which take too much computer time to compute all the frequent itemsets. By using Genetic Algorithm (GA) we can improve the scenario. The major advantage of using GA in the discovery of frequent itemsets is that they perform global search and its time complexity is less compared to other algo...

  16. Genetic diversity and structure of livestock breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Wilkinson, Samantha

    2012-01-01

    This thesis addresses the genetic characterisation of livestock breeds, a key aspect of the long-term future breed preservation and, thus, of primary interest for animal breeders and management in the industry. First, the genetic diversity and structure of breeds were investigated. The application of individual-based population genetic approaches at characterising genetic structure was assessed using the British pig breeds. All approaches, except for Principle Component Anal...

  17. Synthesis and assessment of date palm genetic diversity studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    A thorough assessment of genetic diversity and population differentiation of Phoenix dactylifera are critical for its dynamic conservation and sustainable utilization of its genetic diversity. Estimates of genetic diversity based on phenotypic, biochemical and molecular markers; and fruit quality tr...

  18. The Genetic Algorithm for Truck Dispatching Problems in Surface Mine

    OpenAIRE

    Xin- Ming Lu; Jiu- Chuan Wei; Ming- Xiang He; Bao-Xiang Huang

    2010-01-01

    At first, this study described the characteristics of truck transport in surface mine, then construct the model of truck dispatching and expound working principle and application of genetic algorithm. Finally, the typical experiment, by using the MATLAB genetic algorithm toolbox for calculation, showed that using genetic algorithm to optimize mine vehicle dispatching is feasible and effective.

  19. The Genetic Algorithm for Truck Dispatching Problems in Surface Mine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin- Ming Lu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available At first, this study described the characteristics of truck transport in surface mine, then construct the model of truck dispatching and expound working principle and application of genetic algorithm. Finally, the typical experiment, by using the MATLAB genetic algorithm toolbox for calculation, showed that using genetic algorithm to optimize mine vehicle dispatching is feasible and effective.

  20. Genetic diversity in farm animals - a review

    OpenAIRE

    Groeneveld, L. F.; Lenstra, J A; Eding, H.; TORO, M.A.; Scherf, B.; PILLING, D; Negrini, R.; Finlay, E.K; Jianlin, H.; Groeneveld, E; S. Weigend; Globaldiv, Consortium

    2010-01-01

    Domestication of livestock species and a long history of migrations, selection and adaptation have created an enormous variety of breeds. Conservation of these genetic resources relies on demographic characterization, recording of production environments and effective data management. In addition, molecular genetic studies allow a comparison of genetic diversity within and across breeds and a reconstruction of the history of breeds and ancestral populations. This has been summarized for cattl...

  1. Microbial Diversity in Uranium Mine Waste Heaps

    OpenAIRE

    Schippers, A.; Hallmann, R; Wentzien, S.; Sand, W.

    1995-01-01

    Two different uranium mine waste heaps near Ronneburg, Thuringia, Germany, which contain the remains of the activity of the former uranium-mining Soviet-East German company Wismut AG, were analyzed for the occurrence of lithotrophic and chemoorganotropic leach bacteria. A total of 162 ore samples were taken up to a depth of 5 m. Cell counts of ferrous iron-, sulfur-, sulfur compound-, ammonia-, and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were determined quantitatively by the most-probable-number technique...

  2. European pig genetic diversity: a minireview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ollivier, L

    2009-07-01

    An evaluation of the European pig diversity has been carried on by several countries, with the support of the European Union over the period of 1994 to 2000. This article presents an overview of the results of this investigation, focussing on two genetic marker techniques, namely microsatellites (MS) and amplification of fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). Nearly 200 loci were characterised on about 50 individuals from each of 59 to 71 breeds, according to the marker considered. The analysis of diversity, based on genetic distances, led to similar conclusions for the two marker types (MS and AFLP), in spite of a markedly lower total diversity of AFLP compared to MS. The analysis of the MS loci showed that the allelic diversity pattern among breeds was quasi-independent from the diversity pattern based on allele frequencies. Genetic distances showed no particular clustering of local with international breeds, confirming the genetic uniqueness of the European local breeds compared to mainstream international breeds. The taxonomy of the local breeds revealed a cluster of the Iberian type breeds, in contrast with a wider dispersal of the breeds from other countries. Phylogeny often disagreed with documented breeds' history, showing the complex migration/admixture patterns which underlie the breeds' relationships. Methodologies developed in this investigation as well as the database and the DNA depository created should provide support for further innovative research in the field of domestic animal diversity management. PMID:22444811

  3. Diversity of potato genetic resources

    OpenAIRE

    Machida-Hirano, Ryoko

    2015-01-01

    A considerable number of highly diverse species exist in genus Solanum. Because they can adapt to a broad range of habitats, potato wild relatives are promising sources of desirable agricultural traits. Potato taxonomy is quite complex because of introgression, interspecific hybridization, auto- and allopolyploidy, sexual compatibility among many species, a mixture of sexual and asexual reproduction, possible recent species divergence, phenotypic plasticity, and the consequent high morphologi...

  4. Genetic diversity in Stylosanthes capitata ACCESS

    OpenAIRE

    Janaina Azevedo Martuscello; Thiago Gomes dos Santos Braz; Jéssica Mariane Silveira; Rosangela Maria Simeão; Lara Jank; Mariane Rodrigues Ferreira; Daniel Noronha Figueiredo da Cunha

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity and the relative importance of morphological traits for the study of genetic diversity among Stylosanthes capitata genotypes. Ten open-pollinated families (297-2, 49-5, 1064-4, 49-4, 1095-5, 141-6, 1064-6, 297-6, 625-3, and 111-3), previously selected by the Embrapa Gado de Corte improvement program, and the Campo Grande cultivar as control were evaluated. A completely randomized design consisting of four repetitions was used. ...

  5. Genetic diversity of eleven European pig breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Foulley Jean-Louis; Geldermann Hermann; Beeckmann Petra; Jørgensen Claus B; Nissen Peter H; Andersson Leif; Giuffra Elisabetta; Groenen Martien AM; Milan Denis; Legault Christian; Iannuccelli Nathalie; Laval Guillaume; Chevalet Claude; Ollivier Louis

    2000-01-01

    Abstract A set of eleven pig breeds originating from six European countries, and including a small sample of wild pigs, was chosen for this study of genetic diversity. Diversity was evaluated on the basis of 18 microsatellite markers typed over a total of 483 DNA samples collected. Average breed heterozygosity varied from 0.35 to 0.60. Genotypic frequencies generally agreed with Hardy-Weinberg expectations, apart from the German Landrace and Schwäbisch-Hällisches breeds, which showed signific...

  6. Genetic diversity of 11 European pig breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Lavall, G.; Iannuccelli, N.; Legault, C; Milan, D; Groenen, M.A.M.; Andersson, L; Fredholm, M.; Geldermann, H.; Foulley, J.L.; Chevalet, C.; Ollivier, L

    2000-01-01

    A set of eleven pig breeds originating from six European countries, and including a small sample of wild pigs, was chosen for this study of genetic diversity. Diversity was evaluated on the basis of 18 microsatellite markers typed over a total of 483 DNA samples collected. Average breed heterozygosity varied from 0.35 to 0.60. Genotypic frequencies generally agreed with Hardy-Weinberg expectations, apart from the German Landrace and Schwäbisch-Hällisches breeds, which showed significantly red...

  7. Genetic diversity of eleven European pig breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Laval, Guillaume; Iannuccelli, Nathalie; Legault, Christian; Milan, Denis; Groenen, Martien; Giuffra, Elisabetta; Andersson, Leif; Nissen, Peter; Jørgensen, Claus; Beeckmann, Petra; Geldermann, Hermann; Foulley, Jean-Louis; Chevalet, Claude; Ollivier, Louis

    2000-01-01

    A set of eleven pig breeds originating from six European countries, and including a small sample of wild pigs, was chosen for this study of genetic diversity. Diversity was evaluated on the basis of 18 microsatellite markers typed over a total of 483 DNA samples collected. Average breed heterozygosity varied from 0.35 to 0.60. Genotypic frequencies generally agreed with Hardy-Weinberg expectations, apart from the German Landrace and Schwäbisch-Hällisches breeds, which showed significantly red...

  8. Genetic erosion of diversity in cereals

    OpenAIRE

    Petrovi? Sofija; Dimitrijevi? Miodrag

    2012-01-01

    Cereals play an important role in human nutrition. Consequently, one of the main goals in breeding is to obtain varieties with high genetic potential for yield. Modern agricultural production includes the expansion of intensive varieties over large areas that lead to narrow selection criteria in breeding programs. The consequence is a drastic reduction in the number of species and genotypes (genetic erosion), or harming biological diversity of local populat...

  9. Genetic Diversity of Neisseria gonorrhoeae Housekeeping Genes

    OpenAIRE

    Viscidi, Raphael P.; Demma, James C.

    2003-01-01

    Molecular typing of Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains is an important tool for epidemiological studies of gonococcal infection and transmission. The recently developed multilocus sequence typing (MLST) method is based on the genetic variation among housekeeping genes. As a preliminary investigation for the development of such a method, we characterized the genetic diversity at 18 gonococcal housekeeping gene loci. Approximately 17,500 nucleotides, spanning 18 loci, were sequenced from 24 isolates...

  10. Crop genetic diversity benefits farmland biodiversity in cultivated fields

    OpenAIRE

    Chateil, Carole; Goldringer, Isabelle; Tarallo, Léa; Kerbiriou, Christian; Le Viol, Isabelle; Ponge, Jean-François; Salmon, Sandrine; Gachet, Sophie; Porcher, Emmanuelle

    2013-01-01

    This study tested whether increasing crop genetic diversity benefited farmland biodiversity in bread wheat (Triticum aestivum) fields, using an experimental approach in which arthropod and wild plant diversity were compared in a genetically homogeneous wheat variety vs. a variety mixture. The diversity of wild plant species was not affected by crop genetic diversity. However, we showed for the first time a positive impact of crop genetic diversity on below (collembola) and aboveground arthrop...

  11. Genetic diversity of eleven European pig breeds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foulley Jean-Louis

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A set of eleven pig breeds originating from six European countries, and including a small sample of wild pigs, was chosen for this study of genetic diversity. Diversity was evaluated on the basis of 18 microsatellite markers typed over a total of 483 DNA samples collected. Average breed heterozygosity varied from 0.35 to 0.60. Genotypic frequencies generally agreed with Hardy-Weinberg expectations, apart from the German Landrace and Schwäbisch-Hällisches breeds, which showed significantly reduced heterozygosity. Breed differentiation was significant as shown by the high among-breed fixation index (overall FST = 0.27, and confirmed by the clustering based on the genetic distances between individuals, which grouped essentially all individuals in 11 clusters corresponding to the 11 breeds. The genetic distances between breeds were first used to construct phylogenetic trees. The trees indicated that a genetic drift model might explain the divergence of the two German breeds, but no reliable phylogeny could be inferred among the remaining breeds. The same distances were also used to measure the global diversity of the set of breeds considered, and to evaluate the marginal loss of diversity attached to each breed. In that respect, the French Basque breed appeared to be the most "unique" in the set considered. This study, which remains to be extended to a larger set of European breeds, indicates that using genetic distances between breeds of farm animals in a classical taxonomic approach may not give clear resolution, but points to their usefulness in a prospective evaluation of diversity.

  12. Microbial diversity in uranium mine waste heaps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schippers, A; Hallmann, R; Wentzien, S; Sand, W

    1995-08-01

    Two different uranium mine waste heaps near Ronneburg, Thuringia, Germany, which contain the remains of the activity of the former uranium-mining Soviet-East German company Wismut AG, were analyzed for the occurrence of lithotrophic and chemoorganotropic leach bacteria. A total of 162 ore samples were taken up to a depth of 5 m. Cell counts of ferrous iron-, sulfur-, sulfur compound-, ammonia-, and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria were determined quantitatively by the most-probable-number technique. Sulfate-, nitrate-, ferric iron-, and manganese-reducing bacteria were also detected. In addition, the metabolic activity of sulfur- and iron-oxidizing bacteria was measured by microcalorimetry. Generally, all microorganisms mentioned above were detectable in the heaps. Aerobic and anaerobic microorganisms thrived up to a depth of 1.5 to 2 m. Up to 99% of Thiobacillus ferrooxidans cells, the dominant leaching bacteria, occurred to this depth. Their numbers correlated with the microbial activity measurements. Samples below 1.5 to 2 m exhibited reduced oxygen concentrations and reduced cell counts for all microorganisms. PMID:16535096

  13. Genetic diversity in two Italian almond collections

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Maria Pia, Rigoldi; Emma, Rapposelli; Donato, De Giorgio; Paolo, Resta; Andrea, Porceddu.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Sweet-seeded domesticated almonds were brought to the Mediterranean Basin from central Asia about 4000 years ago. In Italy, most of the almonds produced are cultivated in the southern part of the country. Local populations of the tree in Sardinia are largely seed-derived and mostly self-i [...] ncompatible, so have developed extensive genetic diversity. The need to protect biodiversity has prompted a revived interest in local genetic materials in almond. Two Italian collections have been established, one in Sardinia and the other in Apulia. These collections were the focus of the present evaluation of genetic diversity. Results Eleven SSRs (microsatellites) were used for fingerprinting. The Sardinian germplasm was highly polymorphic, revealing a mean of 14.5 alleles per locus and a mean heterozygosity of 0.71. Using a model-based clustering approach, two genetic clusters were distinguished: one included all the commercial varieties and most of the Sardinian accessions, and the other most of the Apulian accessions. A similar structure was produced using a distance-based cluster analysis. The Sardinian accessions could still be distinguished from the commercial germplasm with few exceptions. Conclusion The extensive genetic variability present in the Sardinian and Apulian almond germplasm indicates that these materials represent an important source of genes for the improvement of the crop.

  14. Fitness Uniform Selection to Preserve Genetic Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Hutter, Marcus

    2001-01-01

    In evolutionary algorithms, the fitness of a population increases with time by mutating and recombining individuals and by a biased selection of more fit individuals. The right selection pressure is critical in ensuring sufficient optimization progress on the one hand and in preserving genetic diversity to be able to escape from local optima on the other. We propose a new selection scheme, which is uniform in the fitness values. It generates selection pressure towards sparse...

  15. Limited Genetic Diversity of Brucella spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Gándara, Benjamín; Merino, Ahidé López; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza

    2001-01-01

    Multilocus enzyme electrophoresis (MLEE) of 99 Brucella isolates, including the type strains from all recognized species, revealed a very limited genetic diversity and supports the proposal of a monospecific genus. In MLEE-derived dendrograms, Brucella abortus and a marine Brucella sp. grouped into a single electrophoretic type related to Brucella neotomae and Brucella ovis. Brucella suis and Brucella canis formed another cluster linked to Brucella melitensis and related to Rhizobium tropici....

  16. Genetic Diversity among Lassa Virus Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Bowen, Michael D.; Rollin, Pierre E; Ksiazek, Thomas G; Hustad, Heather L.; Daniel G. Bausch; Demby, Austin H.; Bajani, Mary D.; Peters, Clarence J; Stuart T. Nichol

    2000-01-01

    The arenavirus Lassa virus causes Lassa fever, a viral hemorrhagic fever that is endemic in the countries of Nigeria, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Guinea and perhaps elsewhere in West Africa. To determine the degree of genetic diversity among Lassa virus strains, partial nucleoprotein (NP) gene sequences were obtained from 54 strains and analyzed. Phylogenetic analyses showed that Lassa viruses comprise four lineages, three of which are found in Nigeria and the fourth in Guinea, Liberia, and Si...

  17. Genetic Diversity of Tunisian Barley Accessions Based on Microsatellite Markers

    OpenAIRE

    F. Guasmi; L. Touil; K. Feres; W. Elfelah; T. Triki; Ferchichi, A.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic diversity can be measured by several criteria, including phenotype, pedigree, allelic diversity at marker loci and allelic diversity at loci controlling phenotypes of interest. Abundance, high level of polymorphism and ease of genotyping make simple sequence repeats (SSRs) an excellent molecular marker system for genetics diversity analyses. In this study, we used a three of mapped SSRs to examine the genetic diversity of Tunisian barley accessions and to establish phylogenetic ...

  18. Managing genetic diversity and society needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arthur da Silva Mariante

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Most livestock are not indigenous to Brazil. Several animal species were considered domesticated in the pre-colonial period, since the indigenous people manage them as would be typical of European livestock production. For over 500 years there have been periodic introductions resulting in the wide range of genetic diversity that for centuries supported domestic animal production in the country. Even though these naturalized breeds have acquired adaptive traits after centuries of natural selection, they have been gradually replaced by exotic breeds, to such an extent, that today they are in danger of extinction To avoid further loss of this important genetic material, in 1983 Embrapa Genetic Resources and Biotechnology decided to include conservation of animal genetic resources among its priorities. In this paper we describe the effort to genetically characterize these populations, as a tool to ensure their genetic variability. To effectively save the threatened local breeds of livestock it is important to find a niche market for each one, reinserting them in production systems. They have to be utilized in order to be conserved. And there is no doubt that due to their adaptive traits, the Brazilian local breeds of livestock can play an important role in animal production, to meet society needs.

  19. Great ape genetic diversity and population history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado-Martinez, Javier; Sudmant, Peter H; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Li, Heng; Kelley, Joanna L; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Veeramah, Krishna R; Woerner, August E; O'Connor, Timothy D; Santpere, Gabriel; Cagan, Alexander; Theunert, Christoph; Casals, Ferran; Laayouni, Hafid; Munch, Kasper; Hobolth, Asger; Halager, Anders E; Malig, Maika; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Hernando-Herraez, Irene; Prüfer, Kay; Pybus, Marc; Johnstone, Laurel; Lachmann, Michael; Alkan, Can; Twigg, Dorina; Petit, Natalia; Baker, Carl; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Fernandez-Callejo, Marcos; Dabad, Marc; Wilson, Michael L; Stevison, Laurie; Camprubí, Cristina; Carvalho, Tiago; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Vives, Laura; Mele, Marta; Abello, Teresa; Kondova, Ivanela; Bontrop, Ronald E; Pusey, Anne; Lankester, Felix; Kiyang, John A; Bergl, Richard A; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth; Myers, Simon; Ventura, Mario; Gagneux, Pascal; Comas, David; Siegismund, Hans; Blanc, Julie; Agueda-Calpena, Lidia; Gut, Marta; Fulton, Lucinda; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Mullikin, James C; Wilson, Richard K; Gut, Ivo G; Gonder, Mary Katherine; Ryder, Oliver A; Hahn, Beatrice H; Navarro, Arcadi; Akey, Joshua M; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Reich, David; Mailund, Thomas; Schierup, Mikkel H; Hvilsom, Christina; Andrés, Aida M; Wall, Jeffrey D; Bustamante, Carlos D; Hammer, Michael F; Eichler, Evan E; Marques-Bonet, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    /eastern populations. We find extensive inbreeding in almost all wild populations, with eastern gorillas being the most extreme. Inferred effective population sizes have varied radically over time in different lineages and this appears to have a profound effect on the genetic diversity at, or close to, genes in almost......Most great ape genetic variation remains uncharacterized; however, its study is critical for understanding population history, recombination, selection and susceptibility to disease. Here we sequence to high coverage a total of 79 wild- and captive-born individuals representing all six great ape...... species and seven subspecies and report 88.8?million single nucleotide polymorphisms. Our analysis provides support for genetically distinct populations within each species, signals of gene flow, and the split of common chimpanzees into two distinct groups: Nigeria-Cameroon/western and central...

  20. A Survey: Web Log Mining using Genetic Algorithm .

    OpenAIRE

    Ranu Singhal; NirupamaTiwari

    2013-01-01

    Web mining has become a vast area of Research in last few years. Web Mining Which deals with the extraction of interesting knowledge from logging information produced by web server. In this paper we present a survey generate clusters using a multi objective genetic algorithm. Genetic algorithm is also a very hot area of research. In this paper we will compare the error value between FCM(Fuzzy c-means) and FCM-MOGA(Fuzzy CMeans multi objective Genetic algorithm). Genetic algorithm follows some...

  1. Genetic diversity of American wild rice species

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Elizabeth Ann, Veasey; Eduardo de Andrade, Bressan; Maria Imaculada, Zucchi; Roland, Vencovsky; Daruska Cavalcante, Cardim; Rainério Meireles da, Silva.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies on genetic diversity and genetic structure of natural populations are important in order to define strategies for in situ and ex situ conservation actions and for plant pre-breeding programs. Aiming to assess the genetic diversity and genetic structure of three wild American Oryza species wi [...] th isozyme markers, 14 populations of the diploid O. glumaepatula (AglAgl), 11 populations of the tetraploid O. grandiglumis (CCDD) and five populations of the also tetraploid O. latifolia (CCDD) were studied. They were all originated from Rio Paraguay hydrographic basin and the Amazon. Four enzymes were used and they gave 40 polymorphic bands. The most polymorphic species was O. glumaepatula, followed by O. latifolia and O. grandiglumis. A cluster analysis with the Jaccard similarity coefficient separated the diploid from the two tetraploid species, and also the two tetraploid species. This separation was also evident on a scatter plot from a principal component analysis, suggesting that they should be treated as two separate species, although further studies are necessary to provide support for this affirmative. The AMOVA analyses showed a high intrapopulational variability for O. latifolia (67.6%) and O. grandiglumis (52.2%), when compared to their interpopulational variability (32.4% and 47.8%, respectively), which suggests the hypothesis of a higher degree of outcrossing events within these species. When studying the correlation between the Jaccard dissimilarity coefficient and geographic distances, a spatial genetic structure was observed for O. glumaepatula only. These results are important for defining strategies of both in situ and ex situ conservation.

  2. Great ape genetic diversity and population history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado-Martinez, Javier; Sudmant, Peter H

    2013-01-01

    Most great ape genetic variation remains uncharacterized; however, its study is critical for understanding population history, recombination, selection and susceptibility to disease. Here we sequence to high coverage a total of 79 wild- and captive-born individuals representing all six great ape species and seven subspecies and report 88.8?million single nucleotide polymorphisms. Our analysis provides support for genetically distinct populations within each species, signals of gene flow, and the split of common chimpanzees into two distinct groups: Nigeria-Cameroon/western and central/eastern populations. We find extensive inbreeding in almost all wild populations, with eastern gorillas being the most extreme. Inferred effective population sizes have varied radically over time in different lineages and this appears to have a profound effect on the genetic diversity at, or close to, genes in almost all species. We discover and assign 1,982 loss-of-function variants throughout the human and great ape lineages, determining that the rate of gene loss has not been different in the human branch compared to other internal branches in the great ape phylogeny. This comprehensive catalogue of great ape genome diversity provides a framework for understanding evolution and a resource for more effective management of wild and captive great ape populations.

  3. Genetic Diversity of Koala Retroviral Envelopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqin Xu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity, attributable to the low fidelity of reverse transcription, recombination and mutation, is an important feature of infectious retroviruses. Under selective pressure, such as that imposed by superinfection interference, gammaretroviruses commonly adapt their envelope proteins to use alternative receptors to overcome this entry block. The first characterized koala retroviruses KoRV subgroup A (KoRV-A were remarkable in their absence of envelope genetic variability. Once it was determined that KoRV-A was present in all koalas in US zoos, regardless of their disease status, we sought to isolate a KoRV variant whose presence correlated with neoplastic malignancies. More than a decade after the identification of KoRV-A, we isolated a second subgroup of KoRV, KoRV-B from koalas with lymphomas. The envelope proteins of KoRV-A and KoRV-B are sufficiently divergent to confer the ability to bind and employ distinct receptors for infection. We have now obtained a number of additional KoRV envelope variants. In the present studies we report these variants, and show that they differ from KoRV-A and KoRV-B envelopes in their host range and superinfection interference properties. Thus, there appears to be considerable variation among KoRVs envelope genes suggesting genetic diversity is a factor following the KoRV-A infection process.

  4. Genetic diversity in Stylosanthes capitata ACCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Azevedo Martuscello

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate the genetic diversity and the relative importance of morphological traits for the study of genetic diversity among Stylosanthes capitata genotypes. Ten open-pollinated families (297-2, 49-5, 1064-4, 49-4, 1095-5, 141-6, 1064-6, 297-6, 625-3, and 111-3, previously selected by the Embrapa Gado de Corte improvement program, and the Campo Grande cultivar as control were evaluated. A completely randomized design consisting of four repetitions was used. The following morphological traits were studied: type of growth, length, width and length-to-width ratio of the central and lateral leaflets, plant height, stem length, and number of secondary ramifications. Mahalanobis generalized distance was calculated using the phenotypic means for each trait and the matrix of residual variances and covariances. Once the dissimilarity matrix was obtained, the families and Campo Grande cultivar were grouped using Ward’s method. Canonical variables were also analyzed using the phenotypic mean of the traits studied and the matrix of residual variances and covariances. Cluster analysis by Ward’s method permitted to divide the 11 genotypes into five groups. Canonical analysis was efficient since it permitted to summarize the total variation observed in the nine morphological traits into only three canonical variables, which accounted for 81.65% of the total variation in the data. The importance of the traits for clustering was also analyzed. Central leaflet width, length-to-width ratio of the central and lateral leaflets, lateral leaflet width and secondary ramifications were the most important traits for the evaluation of genetic diversity among Stylosanthes capitata genotypes.

  5. Genetic diversity between human metapneumovirus subgroups

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete consensus nucleotide sequences were determined for human metapneumovirus (HMPV) isolates CAN97-83 and CAN98-75, representing the two proposed genotypes or genetic subgroups of HMPV. The overall level of genome nucleotide sequence identity and aggregate proteome amino acid sequence identity between the two HMPV subgroups were 80 and 90%, respectively, similar to the respective values of 81 and 88% between the two antigenic subgroups of human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV). The diversity between HMPV subgroups was greatest for the SH and G proteins (59 and 37% identity, respectively), which were even more divergent than their HRSV counterparts (72 and 55% cross-subgroup identity, respectively). It is reasonable to anticipate that the two genetic subgroups of HMPV represent antigenic subgroups approximately comparable to those of HRSV

  6. Beauveria bassiana: Quercetinase production and genetic diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Eula Maria de M. B. Costa; Fabiana Cristina Pimenta; Christian Luz; Valéria de Oliveira; Marília Oliveira; Elda Bueno; Silvana Petrofeza

    2011-01-01

    Beauveria bassiana genetic diversity and ability to synthesize quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase (quercetinase) were analyzed. B. bassiana isolates, obtained from Brazilian soil samples, produced quercetinase after induction using 0.5 g/L quercetin. B. bassiana ATCC 7159 (29.6 nmol/mL/min) and isolate IP 11 (27.5 nmol/ml/min) showed the best performances and IP 3a (9.5 nmol/mL/min) presented the lowest level of quercetinase activity in the culture supernatant. A high level of polymorphism was detecte...

  7. Determination of Mitochondrial Genetic Diversity in Mammals

    OpenAIRE

    Nabholz, Benoit; Mauffrey, Jean-François; Bazin, Eric; Galtier, Nicolas; Glemin, Sylvain

    2008-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is one of the most popular population genetic markers. Its relevance as an indicator of population size and history has recently been questioned by several large-scale studies in animals reporting evidence for recurrent adaptive evolution, at least in invertebrates. Here we focus on mammals, a more restricted taxonomic group for which the issue of mtDNA near neutrality is crucial. By analyzing the distribution of mtDNA diversity across species and relating it to allo...

  8. Genetic erosion of diversity in cereals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrovi? Sofija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cereals play an important role in human nutrition. Consequently, one of the main goals in breeding is to obtain varieties with high genetic potential for yield. Modern agricultural production includes the expansion of intensive varieties over large areas that lead to narrow selection criteria in breeding programs. The consequence is a drastic reduction in the number of species and genotypes (genetic erosion, or harming biological diversity of local populations, and spontaneous relatives (biodiversity in cereals. Based on detailed inventories of the territory of Montenegro and to some extent in Eastern Serbia, a endangerment of gene pool in cereals could be denoted. The reason for this is a transition to another type of agricultural production, changing land purposes, the presence of nursing homes, and use of intensive varieties. Old varieties and local populations represent the original genetic variability that could be used in breeding programs and organic production. It is therefore essential to take measures to preserve the genetic resources of cereals.

  9. Conservation of Genetic Diversity in Culture Plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MAXIM A.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The most important international document relating to the conservation of biodiversity is one adopted by theUN in Rio de Janeiro (1992 that "Convention on Biodiversity". Based on this agreement, the EU has taken a series ofmeasures to reduce genetic erosion in agriculture, which grew with the expansion of industrialized agriculture.Throughout its existence, mankind has used some 10,000 growing plant species. According to FAO statistics, today,90% of food production is ensured by some 120 growing plant species. In addition to drastic reduction in specificdiversity, the advent of industrialized agriculture has generated a process of strong genetic erosion. Old varieties andlocal varieties of crops have mostly been affected, in favour of "modern" varieties. Landraces are characterized by highheterogenity. They have the advantage of being much better adapted to biotic and abiotic stress conditions (diseases,pests, drought, low in nutrients, etc. and have excellent taste qualities, which can justify a higher price recovery thancommercial varieties. Thanks to these features, these crops need small inputs, which correspond to the concept ofsustainable development. Landraces are an invaluable genetic potential for obtaining new varieties of plants and are bestsuited for crop cultivation in ecological systems, becoming more common. Also, for long term food security in thecontext of global warming, rich genetic diversity will be require. “In situ” and “ex situ” conservation are the two majorstrategies used in the conservation of plant genetic resources. There is a fundamental difference between these twostrategies: “ex situ” conservation involves sampling, transfer and storage of a particular species population away fromthe original location, while “in situ” conservation (in their natural habitat implies that the varieties of interest,management and monitoring their place of origin takes place in the community to which they belong. These twostrategies should not be viewed as alternatives or in opposition, but a complementary approach is required. Obviously,only the on farm preservation, with traditional technologies, allows a sustainable management of the varieties, becausethese, in their natural habitat, can continue their evolutionary processes under the pressures of the environment, man,and technology. Romania, with an agricultural area of 14,722 millions Ha, still has a very rich diversity of conservationvarieties in plants growing, but they risk losing if appropriate action is taken.

  10. Microbial diversity and metabolic networks in acid mine drainage habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Méndez-García, Celia; Peláez, Ana I; Mesa, Victoria; Sánchez, Jesús; Golyshina, Olga V; Ferrer, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) emplacements are low-complexity natural systems. Low-pH conditions appear to be the main factor underlying the limited diversity of the microbial populations thriving in these environments, although temperature, ionic composition, total organic carbon, and dissolved oxygen are also considered to significantly influence their microbial life. This natural reduction in diversity driven by extreme conditions was reflected in several studies on the microbial populations inhabiting the various micro-environments present in such ecosystems. Early studies based on the physiology of the autochthonous microbiota and the growing success of omics-based methodologies have enabled a better understanding of microbial ecology and function in low-pH mine outflows; however, complementary omics-derived data should be included to completely describe their microbial ecology. Furthermore, recent updates on the distribution of eukaryotes and archaea recovered through sterile filtering (herein referred to as filterable fraction) in these environments demand their inclusion in the microbial characterization of AMD systems. In this review, we present a complete overview of the bacterial, archaeal (including filterable fraction), and eukaryotic diversity in these ecosystems, and include a thorough depiction of the metabolism and element cycling in AMD habitats. We also review different metabolic network structures at the organismal level, which is necessary to disentangle the role of each member of the AMD communities described thus far. PMID:26074887

  11. Benefits of host genetic diversity for resistance to infection depend on parasite diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Ganz, Holly H.; Ebert, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    Host populations with high genetic diversity are predicted to have lower levels of infection prevalence. This theory assumes that host genetic diversity results in variation in susceptibility and that parasites exhibit variation in infectivity. Empirical studies on the effects of host heterogeneity typically neglect the role of parasite diversity. We conducted three laboratory experiments designed to test if genetic variation in Daphnia magna populations and genetic variation in its parasites...

  12. Genetic diversity and species diversity of stream fishes covary across a land-use gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, M.J.; Bagley, M.J.; Walters, D.M.; Jackson, S.A.; Daniel, F.B.; Chaloud, D.J.; Cade, B.S.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversity and species diversity are expected to covary according to area and isolation, but may not always covary with environmental heterogeneity. In this study, we examined how patterns of genetic and species diversity in stream fishes correspond to local and regional environmental conditions. To do so, we compared population size, genetic diversity and divergence in central stonerollers (Campostoma anomalum) to measures of species diversity and turnover in stream fish assemblages among similarly sized watersheds across an agriculture-forest land-use gradient in the Little Miami River basin (Ohio, USA). Significant correlations were found in many, but not all, pair-wise comparisons. Allelic richness and species richness were strongly correlated, for example, but diversity measures based on allele frequencies and assemblage structure were not. In-stream conditions related to agricultural land use were identified as significant predictors of genetic diversity and species diversity. Comparisons to population size indicate, however, that genetic diversity and species diversity are not necessarily independent and that variation also corresponds to watershed location and glaciation history in the drainage basin. Our findings demonstrate that genetic diversity and species diversity can covary in stream fish assemblages, and illustrate the potential importance of scaling observations to capture responses to hierarchical environmental variation. More comparisons according to life history variation could further improve understanding of conditions that give rise to parallel variation in genetic diversity and species diversity, which in turn could improve diagnosis of anthropogenic influences on aquatic ecosystems. ?? 2011 Springer-Verlag.

  13. Genetic Diversity Increases Insect Herbivory on Oak Saplings

    OpenAIRE

    Castagneyrol, Bastien; Lagache, Lélia; Giffard, Brice; Kremer, Antoine; Jactel, Hervé

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence from community genetics studies suggests that ecosystem functions supported by plant species richness can also be provided by genetic diversity within plant species. This is not yet true for the diversity-resistance relationship as it is still unclear whether damage by insect herbivores responds to genetic diversity in host plant populations. We developed a manipulative field experiment based on a synthetic community approach, with 15 mixtures of one to four oak (Qu...

  14. Immigrants' Genes: Genetic Diversity and Economic Development in the US

    OpenAIRE

    Ager, Philipp; Brückner, Markus

    2013-01-01

    We examine the effect of genetic diversity on economic development in the United States. Our estimation strategy exploits that immigrants from different countries of origin differed in their genetic diversity and that these immigrants settled in different regions. Based on a sample of over 2250 counties, we find that increases in genetic diversity of US counties that arose due to immigration during the 19th century had a significant positive effect on US counties' economic development. We als...

  15. Genetic diversity within a dominant plant outweighs plant species diversity in structuring an arthropod community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Kerri M; Rudgers, Jennifer A

    2013-05-01

    Plant biodiversity is being lost at a rapid rate. This has spurred much interest in elucidating the consequences of this loss for higher trophic levels. Experimental tests have shown that both plant species diversity and genetic diversity within a plant species can influence arthropod community structure. However, the majority of these studies have been conducted in separate systems, so their relative importance is currently unresolved. Furthermore, potential interactions between the two levels of diversity, which likely occur in natural systems, have not been investigated. To clarify these issues, we conducted three experiments in a freshwater sand dune ecosystem. We (1) independently manipulated plant species diversity, (2) independently manipulated genetic diversity within the dominant plant species, Ammophila breviligulata, and (3) jointly manipulated genetic diversity within the dominant plant and species diversity. We found that genetic diversity within the dominant plant species, Ammophila breviligulata, more strongly influenced arthropod communities than plant species diversity, but this effect was dependent on the presence of other species. In species mixtures, A. breviligulata genetic diversity altered overall arthropod community composition, and arthropod richness and abundance peaked at the highest level of genetic diversity. Positive nonadditive effects of diversity were detected, suggesting that arthropods respond to emergent properties of diverse plant communities. However, in the independent manipulations where A. breviligulata was alone, effects of genetic diversity were weaker, with only arthropod richness responding. In contrast, plant species diversity only influenced arthropods when A. breviligulata was absent, and then only influenced herbivore abundance. In addition to showing that genetic diversity within a dominant plant species can have large effects on arthropod community composition, these results suggest that understanding how species diversity and genetic diversity interact to influence community structure may be critically important for predicting the consequences of biodiversity loss. PMID:23858643

  16. Pyrosequencing and genetic diversity of microeukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Christoffer Bugge

    2013-01-01

    Free-living, heterotrophic protozoa have an important ecological role in most terrestrial ecosystems by their grazing of bacteria as one of the first links in food chains and webs. Furthermore, some of them serve as reservoirs for disease-causing bacteria and /or as occasional opportunistic pathogens themselves. Protozoa is a morphological group which occurs in many different eukaryotic phyla, and many apparently morphologically similar types are very different from each others genetically. This complicates the development of good primers for analysis of their diversity with modern DNA based methods. Compared to other microorganisms such as fungi, algae and bacteria, much less is known about protozoa. It has been an essential element of this thesis to to advance our knowledge of protozoa by developing new primers for DNA-based studies of protozoa impact on ecosystems or as indicators of environmental conditions. The ribosomal 18S region is the only marker that is sufficiently well known in a broad range of eukaryotic microorganisms to be widely applicable in protozoa, and this defined the frame for the work. Pyrosequencing of environmental DNA from environmental DNA has revolutionised microbiology, as it enables the exploration and description of diversity (also the one that is not cultivable) on a hitherto unprecedented scale. In the bacterial microbiogy the technique is standardized and well established, and this was used in a study of bacterial diversity in sand filters at 11 Danish carefully selected waterworks (Article IV), where the bacterial metabolic diversity and its important for water purification was described. Building on this, the most important part of the thesis consists of two pyrosequencing analyses of protozoa with newly developed 18S primers. One specifically targets Cercozoa, a particularly abundant phylum of protozoa (Article III), on heath land that had been subjected to prolonged artificially induced drought in a Danish free-air climate-manipulation experiment (CLIMAITE). Article III showed that the testate cercozoan forms responded negatively to prolonged drought, and that on just on this one biotope, an unknown diversity of cercozoans is present, far exceeding the number of described cercozoan species. The other applied general eukaryotic 18S primers on the aforementioned 11 waterworks (Article V). Their eukaryotic community was dominated by protozoa, and when we compared it to the bacterial dataset from Article IV, we found that unlike the bacterial community composition, the eukaryotic community composition was not primarily driven by ecological conditions, but by geographical distances. Pyrosequencing analyses are highly dependent on existing DNA libraries that can be used to identify the thousands of DNA sequences, and Article II contributes to this by a morphological and phylogenetic characterization and naming of two new genera of flagellates found in Danish soil. The fact that it is possible to find two unknown and genetically divergent lineages in a few grams of soil from a well-studied country is an illustration of the limited knowledge of the microbial diversity. Finally, Article I separates a group of closely related fungi that could not be determined by morphology by using a phylogenetic analysis combining three marker genes. Using multiple markers makes it possible to evaluate the explanatory power of individual genes and their mutual consistency. The fact that ITS, the most widely used marker in fungi, did not show the best taxonomic resolution serves to put the heavy reliance upon a single marker (18S) in protozoology into perspective.

  17. Genetic diversity of the Arctic fox using SRAP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, M; Bai, X J

    2013-01-01

    Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) is a recently developed molecular marker technique that is stable, simple, reliable, and achieves moderate to high numbers of codominant markers. This study is the first to apply SRAP markers in a mammal, namely the Arctic fox. In order to investigate the genetic diversity of the Arctic fox and to provide a reference for use of its germplasm, we analyzed 7 populations of Arctic fox by SRAP. The genetic similarity coefficient, genetic distance, proportion of polymorphic loci, total genetic diversity (Ht), genetic diversity within populations (Hs), and genetic differentiation (Gst) were calculated using the Popgene software package. The results indicated abundant genetic diversity among the different populations of Arctic fox studied in China. The genetic similarity coefficient ranged from 0.1694 to 0.0417, genetic distance ranged from 0.8442 to 0.9592, and the proportion of polymorphic loci was smallest in the TS group. Genetic diversity ranged from 0.2535 to 0.3791, Ht was 0.3770, Hs was 0.3158, Gst was 0.1624, and gene flow (Nm) was estimated at 2.5790. Thus, a high level of genetic diversity and many genetic relationships were found in the populations of Arctic fox evaluated in this study. PMID:24338412

  18. Population genetic diversity and fitness in multiple environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McGreevy Thomas J

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background When a large number of alleles are lost from a population, increases in individual homozygosity may reduce individual fitness through inbreeding depression. Modest losses of allelic diversity may also negatively impact long-term population viability by reducing the capacity of populations to adapt to altered environments. However, it is not clear how much genetic diversity within populations may be lost before populations are put at significant risk. Development of tools to evaluate this relationship would be a valuable contribution to conservation biology. To address these issues, we have created an experimental system that uses laboratory populations of an estuarine crustacean, Americamysis bahia with experimentally manipulated levels of genetic diversity. We created replicate cultures with five distinct levels of genetic diversity and monitored them for 16 weeks in both permissive (ambient seawater and stressful conditions (diluted seawater. The relationship between molecular genetic diversity at presumptive neutral loci and population vulnerability was assessed by AFLP analysis. Results Populations with very low genetic diversity demonstrated reduced fitness relative to high diversity populations even under permissive conditions. Population performance decreased in the stressful environment for all levels of genetic diversity relative to performance in the permissive environment. Twenty percent of the lowest diversity populations went extinct before the end of the study in permissive conditions, whereas 73% of the low diversity lines went extinct in the stressful environment. All high genetic diversity populations persisted for the duration of the study, although population sizes and reproduction were reduced under stressful environmental conditions. Levels of fitness varied more among replicate low diversity populations than among replicate populations with high genetic diversity. There was a significant correlation between AFLP diversity and population fitness overall; however, AFLP markers performed poorly at detecting modest but consequential losses of genetic diversity. High diversity lines in the stressful environment showed some evidence of relative improvement as the experiment progressed while the low diversity lines did not. Conclusions The combined effects of reduced average fitness and increased variability contributed to increased extinction rates for very low diversity populations. More modest losses of genetic diversity resulted in measurable decreases in population fitness; AFLP markers did not always detect these losses. However when AFLP markers indicated lost genetic diversity, these losses were associated with reduced population fitness.

  19. The study on genetic algorithm on mining quantitative association rules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Li, Liang

    2005-12-01

    With the development of the internet and the application of databases, seas of storage of data have become available. How to use the data for humans is the task of data mining. But in the process of data mining, a problem often encountered is that mining association rules on the quantitative attributes in RDBMS (Relational Database Management System) or Web logs. A genetic algorithm is proposed in the present paper to solve the clustering problem which can be solved by FCM (Fuzzy Clustering Method), so as to avoid the local optimization that often occurs in FCM. The quantitative attributes can be converted into categorical attributes, and then the categorical attributes are mapped into Boolean attributes, so that many association algorithms can be used to mine significant association rules.

  20. A REVIEW ON GENETIC DIVERSITY OF WILD PLANTS BY USING DIFFERENT GENETIC MARKERS

    OpenAIRE

    Muhammad Younas Khan Barozai, Sazia Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Biodiversity is the variation of life at all levels of biological organization. One of the important components of biological diversity is the genetic diversity. Genetic diversity refers to the variation of genes or entire genome within and between populations of organisms. Keeping in view the significance of genetic diversity in wild plants, some research articles based on important wild plant genera and species of angiosperms including few rare, threatened, endemic, medicinal and e...

  1. Genetic landscapes GIS Toolbox: tools to map patterns of genetic divergence and diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandergast, Amy G.; Perry, William M.; Lugo, Roberto V.; Hathaway, Stacie A.

    2011-01-01

    The Landscape Genetics GIS Toolbox contains tools that run in the Geographic Information System software, ArcGIS, to map genetic landscapes and to summarize multiple genetic landscapes as average and variance surfaces. These tools can be used to visualize the distribution of genetic diversity across geographic space and to study associations between patterns of genetic diversity and geographic features or other geo-referenced environmental data sets. Together, these tools create genetic landscape surfaces directly from tables containing genetic distance or diversity data and sample location coordinates, greatly reducing the complexity of building and analyzing these raster surfaces in a Geographic Information System.

  2. Surviving with low genetic diversity: the case of albatrosses

    OpenAIRE

    Milot, Emmanuel; Weimerskirch, Henri; Duchesne, Pierre; Bernatchez, Louis

    2007-01-01

    Low genetic diversity is predicted to negatively impact species viability and has been a central concern for conservation. In contrast, the possibility that some species may thrive in spite of a relatively poor diversity has received little attention. The wandering and Amsterdam albatrosses (Diomedea exulans and Diomedea amsterdamensis) are long-lived seabirds standing at an extreme along the gradient of life strategies, having traits that may favour inbreeding and low genetic diversity. Dive...

  3. The characterization of goat genetic diversity: Towards a genomic approach

    OpenAIRE

    Ajmone Marsan, Paolo; Colli, Licia; Han, Jian Lin; Achilli, A.; Lancioni, H.; Joost, Stéphane; Crepaldi, Paola; Pilla, Fabio; Stella, Alessandra; Taberlet, Pierre; Boettcher, Paul; Negrini, Riccardo; Lenstra, J A

    2014-01-01

    The investigation of genetic diversity at molecular level has been proposed as a valuable complement and sometimes proxy to phenotypic diversity of local breeds and is presently considered as one of the FAO priorities for breed characterization. By recommending a set of selected molecular markers for each of the main livestock species, FAO has promoted the meta-analysis of local datasets, to achieve a global view of molecular genetic diversity. Analysis within the EU Globaldiv project of two ...

  4. Genetic diversity in aspen and its relation to arthropod abundance.

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Chunxia; Vornam, Barbara; Volmer, Katharina; Prinz, Kathleen; Kleemann, Frauke; Köhler, Lars; Polle, Andrea; Finkeldey, Reiner

    2014-01-01

    The ecological consequences of biodiversity have become a prominent public issue. Little is known on the effect of genetic diversity on ecosystem services. Here, a diversity experiment was established with European and North American aspen (Populus tremula, P. tremuloides) planted in plots representing either a single deme only or combinations of two, four and eight demes. The goals of this study were to explore the complex inter- and intraspecific genetic diversity of aspen and to then relat...

  5. GENETIC RESOURCES AND DIVERSITY IN PAKISTANI CATTLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. SAJJAD KHAN, ZIA-UR REHMAN1 , MUQARRAB A. KHAN2 AND SOHAIL AHMAD3

    Full Text Available Cattle in Pakistan have traditionally been raised for producing bullocks except breeds such as Sahiwal and Red Sindhi which are established milch breeds. General production system is low-input extensive system with crossbreds mainly raised under intensive high input system in the cattle/buffalo colonies to sustain the demand of milk especially during summer, the slump period in buffalo milk. Although, draft breeds are losing utility yet, it will take many generations before they are replaced due to mechanization. Efforts, however, are needed for their in situ conservation and directional selection towards beef. Institutional records indicate weak genetic control for most of the economic traits but accurate recording of performance and pedigrees can improve these estimates. Breeding policy guidelines need adoption in letter and sprit to conserve various breeds. Institutions established for breed improvement need to be restructured for achieving the goals. Adequate diversity in performance and adaptability can be exploited for actual improvement accruing to conservation and development of indigenous cattle resources.

  6. Beauveria bassiana: quercetinase production and genetic diversity

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Eula Maria de M. B, Costa; Fabiana Cristina, Pimenta; Christian, Luz; Valéria de, Oliveira; Marília, Oliveira; Elda, Bueno; Silvana, Petrofeza.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Beauveria bassiana genetic diversity and ability to synthesize quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase (quercetinase) were analyzed. B. bassiana isolates, obtained from Brazilian soil samples, produced quercetinase after induction using 0.5 g/L quercetin. B. bassiana ATCC 7159 (29.6 nmol/mL/min) and isolate IP 11 [...] (27.5 nmol/ml/min) showed the best performances and IP 3a (9.5 nmol/mL/min) presented the lowest level of quercetinase activity in the culture supernatant. A high level of polymorphism was detected by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis. The use of internal-transcribed-spacer ribosomal region restriction fragment length polymorphism (ITS-RFLP) did not reveal characteristic markers to differentiate isolates. However, the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region sequence analysis provided more information on polymorphism among the isolates, allowing them to be clustered by relative similarity into three large groups. Correlation was tested according to the Person's correlation. Data of our studies showed, that lower associations among groups, level of quercetinase production, or geographical origin could be observed. This study presents the production of a novel biocatalyst by B. bassiana and suggests the possible industrial application of this fungal species in large-scale biotechnological manufacture of quercetinase.

  7. Genetic diversity studies of Papaya meleira virus

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Cleidiane B., Daltro; Emanuel Felipe Medeiros, Abreu; Francisco Jose Lima, Aragão; Eduardo C., Andrade.

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Papaya (Carica papaya) is a fruit crop of great economic and social importance for Brazil and other papaya-producing countries. Brazil is the second largest producer in the world. The papaya sticky disease, caused by Papaya meleira virus (PMeV), has caused great losses in the major Brazilian papaya- [...] producing states. In order to estimate the genetic diversity of PMeV, latex samples were collected from papaya plants in the states of Bahia, Espírito Santo, Pernambuco, Ceará and Rio Grande do Norte, and total RNA was extracted. Specific primer for the replicase region allowed the amplification, by RT-PCR, of a fragment of approximately 560 bp from 31 isolates. The sequence analysis indicated a level of conservation greater than 88% among isolates. Furthermore, comparative analyzes indicated that PMeV has similarity with mycoviruses of the family Totiviridae. This phylogenetic relationship was reinforced by the presence of conserved motifs within in the RdRp regions from mycoviruses.

  8. Beauveria bassiana: quercetinase production and genetic diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eula Maria de M. B Costa

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Beauveria bassiana genetic diversity and ability to synthesize quercetin 2,3-dioxygenase (quercetinase were analyzed. B. bassiana isolates, obtained from Brazilian soil samples, produced quercetinase after induction using 0.5 g/L quercetin. B. bassiana ATCC 7159 (29.6 nmol/mL/min and isolate IP 11 (27.5 nmol/ml/min showed the best performances and IP 3a (9.5 nmol/mL/min presented the lowest level of quercetinase activity in the culture supernatant. A high level of polymorphism was detected by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis. The use of internal-transcribed-spacer ribosomal region restriction fragment length polymorphism (ITS-RFLP did not reveal characteristic markers to differentiate isolates. However, the ITS1-5.8S-ITS2 region sequence analysis provided more information on polymorphism among the isolates, allowing them to be clustered by relative similarity into three large groups. Correlation was tested according to the Person's correlation. Data of our studies showed, that lower associations among groups, level of quercetinase production, or geographical origin could be observed. This study presents the production of a novel biocatalyst by B. bassiana and suggests the possible industrial application of this fungal species in large-scale biotechnological manufacture of quercetinase.

  9. Flooding stress: acclimations and genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey-Serres, J; Voesenek, L A C J

    2008-01-01

    Flooding is an environmental stress for many natural and man-made ecosystems worldwide. Genetic diversity in the plant response to flooding includes alterations in architecture, metabolism, and elongation growth associated with a low O(2) escape strategy and an antithetical quiescence scheme that allows endurance of prolonged submergence. Flooding is frequently accompanied with a reduction of cellular O(2) content that is particularly severe when photosynthesis is limited or absent. This necessitates the production of ATP and regeneration of NAD(+) through anaerobic respiration. The examination of gene regulation and function in model systems provides insight into low-O(2)-sensing mechanisms and metabolic adjustments associated with controlled use of carbohydrate and ATP. At the developmental level, plants can escape the low-O(2) stress caused by flooding through multifaceted alterations in cellular and organ structure that promote access to and diffusion of O(2). These processes are driven by phytohormones, including ethylene, gibberellin, and abscisic acid. This exploration of natural variation in strategies that improve O(2) and carbohydrate status during flooding provides valuable resources for the improvement of crop endurance of an environmental adversity that is enhanced by global warming. PMID:18444902

  10. Multiple paternity does not depend on male genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thonhauser, Kerstin E; Raveh, Shirley; Penn, Dustin J

    2014-07-01

    Polyandry is common in many species and it has been suggested that females engage in multiple mating to increase the genetic diversity of their offspring (genetic diversity hypothesis). Multiple paternity occurs in 30% of litters in wild populations of house mice, Mus musculus musculus, and multiple-sired litters are genetically more diverse than single-sired ones. Here, we aimed to test whether female house mice produce multiple-sired litters when they have the opportunity to produce genetically diverse litters. We assessed the rates of multiple paternity when females could choose to mate with two males that were genetically dissimilar to each other (i.e. nonsiblings and MHC dissimilar) compared with when females could choose to mate with two males that were genetically similar to each other (i.e. siblings and shared MHC alleles). Multiple mating may depend upon a female's own condition, and, therefore, we also tested whether inbred (from full-sibling matings) females were more likely to produce multiple-sired progeny than outbred controls. Overall we found that 29% of litters had multiple sires, but we found no evidence that females were more likely to produce multiple-sired litters when they had the opportunity to mate with genetically dissimilar males compared with controls, regardless of whether females were inbred or outbred. Thus, our findings do not support the idea that female mice increase multiple paternity when they have the opportunity to increase the genetic diversity of their offspring, as expected from the genetic diversity hypothesis. PMID:25018559

  11. Intelligence Service Of Web Mining With Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolli Prabhakara Rao

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The Main objective of this paper is to eliminate user uninterested rules and find the optimal patterns or association rules. Association rules are important basis of describing Web user’s behavior characteristic. Traditional algorithms of Web association rule mining, based on statistics, usually pays attention to the analysis on existing data, they can’t offer effective means and optimizing measure and cannot find out the latent and possible rules. In this paper we are proposing an efficient web association rule mining approach with Apriori algorithm and genetic algorithm features like cross over and mutation for generation of the optimal patterns.

  12. Predicting mining activity with parallel genetic algorithms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talaie, S.; Leigh, R.; Louis, S.J.; Raines, G.L.

    2005-01-01

    We explore several different techniques in our quest to improve the overall model performance of a genetic algorithm calibrated probabilistic cellular automata. We use the Kappa statistic to measure correlation between ground truth data and data predicted by the model. Within the genetic algorithm, we introduce a new evaluation function sensitive to spatial correctness and we explore the idea of evolving different rule parameters for different subregions of the land. We reduce the time required to run a simulation from 6 hours to 10 minutes by parallelizing the code and employing a 10-node cluster. Our empirical results suggest that using the spatially sensitive evaluation function does indeed improve the performance of the model and our preliminary results also show that evolving different rule parameters for different regions tends to improve overall model performance. Copyright 2005 ACM.

  13. Genetic diversity of canine olfactory receptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitte Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Evolution has resulted in large repertoires of olfactory receptor (OR genes, forming the largest gene families in mammalian genomes. Knowledge of the genetic diversity of olfactory receptors is essential if we are to understand the differences in olfactory sensory capability between individuals. Canine breeds constitute an attractive model system for such investigations. Results We sequenced 109 OR genes considered representative of the whole OR canine repertoire, which consists of more than 800 genes, in a cohort of 48 dogs of six different breeds. SNP frequency showed the overall level of polymorphism to be high. However, the distribution of SNP was highly heterogeneous among OR genes. More than 50% of OR genes were found to harbour a large number of SNP, whereas the rest were devoid of SNP or only slightly polymorphic. Heterogeneity was also observed across breeds, with 25% of the SNP breed-specific. Linkage disequilibrium within OR genes and OR clusters suggested a gene conversion process, consistent with a mean level of polymorphism higher than that observed for introns and intergenic sequences. A large proportion (47% of SNP induced amino-acid changes and the Ka/Ks ratio calculated for all alleles with a complete ORF indicated a low selective constraint with respect to the high level of redundancy of the olfactory combinatory code and an ongoing pseudogenisation process, which affects dog breeds differently. Conclusion Our demonstration of a high overall level of polymorphism, likely to modify the ligand-binding capacity of receptors distributed differently within the six breeds tested, is the first step towards understanding why Labrador Retrievers and German Shepherd Dogs have a much greater potential for use as sniffer dogs than Pekingese dogs or Greyhounds. Furthermore, the heterogeneity in OR polymorphism observed raises questions as to why, in a context in which most OR genes are highly polymorphic, a subset of these genes is not? This phenomenon may be related to the nature of their ligands and their importance in everyday life.

  14. High Performance Data mining by Genetic Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadmehr Rahbari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Data mining in computer science is the process of discovering interesting and useful patterns and relationships in large volumes of data. Most methods for mining problems is based on artificial intelligence algorithms. Neural network optimization based on three basic parameters topology, weights and the learning rate is a powerful method. We introduce optimal method for solving this problem. In this paper genetic algorithm with mutation and crossover operators change the network structure and optimized that. Dataset used for our work is stroke disease with twenty features that optimized number of that achieved by new hybrid algorithm. Result of this work is very well incomparison with other similar method. Low present of error show that our method is our new approach to efficient, high-performance data mining problems is introduced.

  15. Human mining activity across the ages determines the genetic structure of modern brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Josephine R; King, R Andrew; Stevens, Jamie R

    2015-07-01

    Humans have exploited the earth's metal resources for thousands of years leaving behind a legacy of toxic metal contamination and poor water quality. The southwest of England provides a well-defined example, with a rich history of metal mining dating to the Bronze Age. Mine water washout continues to negatively impact water quality across the region where brown trout (Salmo trutta L.) populations exist in both metal-impacted and relatively clean rivers. We used microsatellites to assess the genetic impact of mining practices on trout populations in this region. Our analyses demonstrated that metal-impacted trout populations have low genetic diversity and have experienced severe population declines. Metal-river trout populations are genetically distinct from clean-river populations, and also from one another, despite being geographically proximate. Using approximate Bayesian computation (ABC), we dated the origins of these genetic patterns to periods of intensive mining activity. The historical split of contemporary metal-impacted populations from clean-river fish dated to the Medieval period. Moreover, we observed two distinct genetic populations of trout within a single catchment and dated their divergence to the Industrial Revolution. Our investigation thus provides an evaluation of contemporary population genetics in showing how human-altered landscapes can change the genetic makeup of a species. PMID:26136823

  16. Genetic diversity patterns in five protist species occurring in lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logares, Ramiro; Boltovskoy, Andrés; Bensch, Staffan; Laybourn-Parry, Johanna; Rengefors, Karin

    2009-05-01

    Little is known about the extent of the genetic diversity and its structuring patterns in protist species living in lakes. Here, we have investigated the genetic diversity patterns within five dinoflagellate species (Peridinium aciculiferum, Peridinium cinctum, Peridiniopsis borgei, Polarella glacialis, Scrippsiella aff. hangoei) that are present in lakes and sometimes, in marine habitats located in polar and temperate regions. A total of 68 clonal strains were investigated using Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP), a sensitive genetic fingerprinting technique. All used strains within each species had identical ITS nuclear ribosomal DNA sequences, a characteristic that indicates that they likely belong to the same species. We found a wide variability in the genetic diversity among species (between 20% and 90% of polymorphic loci; Nei's gene diversity between 0.08 and 0.37). In some cases, our analyses suggested the presence of different genetically homogeneous subgroups (genetic populations) within the same water body. Thus, it appears that different genetic populations can coexist within the same lake despite the likely occurrence of recombination that tends to homogenize the gene pool. Overall, our results indicated that a large number of dinoflagellate genotypes are present in lake populations, instead of a few dominating ones. In addition, our study shows that protists with identical ITS sequences can harbor considerable amounts of genetic diversity. PMID:19162540

  17. Does genetic diversity hinder parasite evolution in social insect colonies?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, William Owen Hamar; Boomsma, Jacobus Jan

    2006-01-01

    Polyandry is often difficult to explain because benefits of the behaviour have proved elusive. In social insects, polyandry increases the genetic diversity of workers within a colony and this has been suggested to improve the resistance of the colony to disease. Here we examine the possible impact of host genetic diversity on parasite evolution by carrying out serial passages of a virulent fungal pathogen through leaf-cutting ant workers of known genotypes. Parasite virulence increased over the ...

  18. Genetic diversity of Ascaris in southwestern Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Nejsum, Peter; Llewellyn-Hughes, Julia; Griffin, Claire; Atuhaire, Aaron; Arinaitwe, Moses; Adriko, Moses; Ruggiana, Andrew; Turyakira, Grace; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Stothard, J. Russell

    2012-01-01

    Despite the common occurrence of ascariasis in southwestern Uganda, helminth control in the region has been limited. To gain further insights into the genetic diversity of Ascaris in this area, a parasitological survey in mothers (n=41) and children (n=74) living in two villages, Habutobere and Musezero, was carried out. Adult Ascaris worms were collected from infected individuals by chemo-expulsion using pyrantel pamoate treatment. Genetic diversity within these worms was assessed by inspection...

  19. Genetic diversity and reproductive success in mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx)

    OpenAIRE

    Charpentier, M.; Setchell, J.M.; Prugnolle, F.; Knapp, L.A.; Wickings, E. J.; Peignot, P.; Hossaert-McKey, M.

    2005-01-01

    Recent studies of wild animal populations have shown that estimators of neutral genetic diversity, such as mean heterozygosity, are often correlated with various fitness traits, such as survival, disease susceptibility, or reproductive success. We used two estimators of genetic diversity to explore the relationship between heterozygosity and reproductive success in male and female mandrills (Mandrillus sphinx) living in a semifree ranging setting in Gabon. Because social rank is known to infl...

  20. A call for tiger management using "reserves" of genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Rachael A; Ramakrishnan, Uma; Hadly, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Tigers (Panthera tigris), like many large carnivores, are threatened by anthropogenic impacts, primarily habitat loss and poaching. Current conservation plans for tigers focus on population expansion, with the goal of doubling census size in the next 10 years. Previous studies have shown that because the demographic decline was recent, tiger populations still retain a large amount of genetic diversity. Although maintaining this diversity is extremely important to avoid deleterious effects of inbreeding, management plans have yet to consider predictive genetic models. We used coalescent simulations based on previously sequenced mitochondrial fragments (n = 125) from 5 of 6 extant subspecies to predict the population growth needed to maintain current genetic diversity over the next 150 years. We found that the level of gene flow between populations has a large effect on the local population growth necessary to maintain genetic diversity, without which tigers may face decreases in fitness. In the absence of gene flow, we demonstrate that maintaining genetic diversity is impossible based on known demographic parameters for the species. Thus, managing for the genetic diversity of the species should be prioritized over the riskier preservation of distinct subspecies. These predictive simulations provide unique management insights, hitherto not possible using existing analytical methods. PMID:24336928

  1. Assessing and broadening genetic diversity of a rapeseed germplasm collection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jinfeng; Li, Feng; Xu, Kun; Gao, Guizhen; Chen, Biyun; Yan, Guixin; Wang, Nian; Qiao, Jiangwei; Li, Jun; Li, Hao; Zhang, Tianyao; Song, Weiling; Wu, Xiaoming

    2014-12-01

    Assessing the level of genetic diversity within a germplasm collection contributes to evaluating the potential for its utilization as a gene pool to improve the performance of cultivars. In this study, 45 high-quality simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were screened and used to estimate the genetic base of a world-wide collection of 248 rapeseed (Brassica napus) inbred lines. For the whole collection, the genetic diversity of A genome was higher than that of C genome. The genetic diversity of C genome for the semi-winter type was the lowest among the different germplasm types. Because B. oleracea is usually used to broaden the genetic diversity of C genome in rapeseed, we evaluated the potential of 25 wild B. oleracea lines. More allelic variations and a higher genetic diversity were observed in B. oleracea than in rapeseed. One B. oleracea line and one oilseed B. rapa line were used to generate a resynthesized Brassica napus line, which was then crossed with six semi-winter rapeseed cultivars to produce 7 F1 hybrids. Not only the allele introgression but also mutations were observed in the hybrids, resulting in significant improvement of the genetic base. PMID:25914586

  2. Nested core collections maximizing genetic diversity in Arabidopsis thaliana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McKhann, Heather I; Camilleri, Christine; Bérard, Aurélie; Bataillon, Thomas; David, Jacques L; Reboud, Xavier; Le Corre, Valérie; Caloustian, Christophe; Gut, Ivo G; Brunel, Dominique

    2004-01-01

    The successful exploitation of natural genetic diversity requires a basic knowledge of the extent of the variation present in a species. To study natural variation in Arabidopsis thaliana, we defined nested core collections maximizing the diversity present among a worldwide set of 265 accessions. The core collections were generated based on DNA sequence data from a limited number of fragments evenly distributed in the genome and were shown to successfully capture the molecular diversity in other...

  3. Genetic Diversity among Ancient Nordic Populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Melchior, Linea; Lynnerup, Niels; Siegismund, Hans R; Kivisild, Toomas; Dissing, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    success rate varied substantially between sites; the highest rates were obtained with untouched, freshly excavated material, whereas heavy handling, archeological preservation and storage for many years influenced the ability to obtain authentic endogenic DNA. While the nucleotide diversity at two...

  4. Genetic diversity of Sardinian goat population based on microsatellites

    OpenAIRE

    Sechi, Tiziana; Usai, Mario Graziano; Casu, Sara; Carta, Antonello

    2005-01-01

    During the last century, the selection for production traits of the main livestock species has led to a reduction in number of local populations with consequent loss of genetic variability. In Sardinia, the genetic improvement strategy has been based on selection for the local pure breed in sheep, whereas in the other species (cattle, swine and goat), an often unplanned crossbreeding with improved breeds has been applied. In this context, several studies on genetic diversity of th...

  5. Genetic Diversity in the Interference Selection Limit

    OpenAIRE

    Good, Benjamin H.; Walczak, Aleksandra M; Neher, Richard A.; Desai, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Pervasive natural selection can strongly influence observed patterns of genetic variation, but these effects remain poorly understood when multiple selected variants segregate in nearby regions of the genome. Classical population genetics fails to account for interference between linked mutations, which grows increasingly severe as the density of selected polymorphisms increases. Here, we describe a simple limit that emerges when interference is common, in which the fitness effects of individ...

  6. Great ape genetic diversity and population history

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prado-Martinez, Javier; Sudmant, Peter H; Kidd, Jeffrey M; Li, Heng; Kelley, Joanna L; Lorente-Galdos, Belen; Veeramah, Krishna R; Woerner, August E; O'Connor, Timothy D; Santpere, Gabriel; Cagan, Alexander; Theunert, Christoph; Casals, Ferran; Laayouni, Hafid; Munch, Kasper; Hobolth, Asger; Halager, Anders E; Malig, Maika; Hernandez-Rodriguez, Jessica; Hernando-Herraez, Irene; Prüfer, Kay; Pybus, Marc; Johnstone, Laurel; Lachmann, Michael; Alkan, Can; Twigg, Dorina; Petit, Natalia; Baker, Carl; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Fernandez-Callejo, Marcos; Dabad, Marc; Wilson, Michael L; Stevison, Laurie; Camprubí, Cristina; Carvalho, Tiago; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora; Vives, Laura; Mele, Marta; Abello, Teresa; Kondova, Ivanela; Bontrop, Ronald E; Pusey, Anne; Lankester, Felix; Kiyang, John A; Bergl, Richard A; Lonsdorf, Elizabeth; Myers, Simon; Ventura, Mario; Gagneux, Pascal; Comas, David; Siegismund, Hans; Blanc, Julie; Agueda-Calpena, Lidia; Gut, Marta; Fulton, Lucinda; Tishkoff, Sarah A; Mullikin, James C; Wilson, Richard K; Gut, Ivo G; Gonder, Mary Katherine; Ryder, Oliver A; Hahn, Beatrice H; Navarro, Arcadi; Akey, Joshua M; Bertranpetit, Jaume; Reich, David; Mailund, Thomas; Schierup, Mikkel H; Hvilsom, Christina; Andrés, Aida M; Wall, Jeffrey D; Bustamante, Carlos D; Hammer, Michael F; Eichler, Evan E; Marques-Bonet, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Most great ape genetic variation remains uncharacterized; however, its study is critical for understanding population history, recombination, selection and susceptibility to disease. Here we sequence to high coverage a total of 79 wild- and captive-born individuals representing all six great ape species and seven subspecies and report 88.8?million single nucleotide polymorphisms. Our analysis provides support for genetically distinct populations within each species, signals of gene flow, and the...

  7. Genetic diversity in Populus nigra plantations from west of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrooz Alimohamadi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to adopt strategies for forest conservation and development, it is necessary to estimate the amount and distribution of genetic diversity in existing populations of poplar in Iran. In this study, the genetic diversity between eight stands of Populus nigra established in Kermanshah province was evaluated on the basis of molecular and morphological markers. To amplify microsatellite loci (WPMS09, WPMS16 and WPMS18, DNA extraction from young and fresh leaveswas done. Various conditions of the PCR assay were examined and to evaluate the morphological variation of the morphological characters leaves (consist of 19 traits were measured. In addition, height growth was measured, to evaluate the growth function of the stands in homogeneous conditions. Genetic diversity in term of polymorphic loci was 0%, because three investigated microsatellite loci were monomorphic. The total number of alleles for 3 microsatellite loci was 6 (na = 2, ne = 2, heo = 1, hee = 0.51. Genetic identity based on Nei was 100%, so genetic distance was 0%. The whole sampled trees represented the same thus the genotype. No significant differences between the mean values of all morphological characters and height growth were revealed. Observed genetic similarity gave indication that same ramets had been selected to plant in poplar plantation established in Kermanshah province. These results suggest the need for an initial evaluation of the genetic diversity in selected ramets for planting in plantation to avoid repetition.  

  8. Genetic diversity in Populus nigra plantations from west of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afrooz Alimohamadi

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available In order to adopt strategies for forest conservation and development,it is necessary to estimate the amount and distribution of genetic diversity in existing populations of poplar in Iran. In this study, the genetic diversity between eight stands of Populus nigra established in Kermanshah province was evaluated on the basis of molecular and morphological markers. To amplify microsatellite loci (WPMS09, WPMS16 and WPMS18, DNA extraction from young and fresh leaveswas done. Various conditions of the PCR assay were examined and to evaluate the morphological variation of the morphological characters leaves (consist of 19 traits were measured. In addition, height growth was measured, to evaluate the growth function of the stands in homogeneous conditions. Genetic diversity in termof polymorphic loci was 0%, because three investigated microsatellite loci were monomorphic. The total number of alleles for 3 microsatellite loci was 6 (na = 2, ne = 2, heo = 1, hee = 0.51. Genetic identity based on Nei was 100%, so genetic distance was 0%. The whole sampled trees represented the same thus the genotype. No significant differences between the mean values of all morphological characters and height growth were revealed. Observed genetic similarity gave indication that same ramets had been selected to plant in poplar plantation established in Kermanshah province.These results suggest the need for an initial evaluation of the genetic diversity in selected ramets for planting in plantation to avoid repetition.

  9. Assessment of genetic diversity of sweet potato in Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Bonilla, Lorraine; Cuevas, Hugo E; Montero-Rojas, Milly; Bird-Pico, Fernando; Luciano-Rosario, Dianiris; Siritunga, Dimuth

    2014-01-01

    Sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas L.) is the seventh most important food crop due to its distinct advantages, such as adaptability to different environmental conditions and high nutritional value. Assessing the genetic diversity of this important crop is necessary due to the constant increase of demand for food and the need for conservation of agricultural and genetic resources. In Puerto Rico (PR), the genetic diversity of sweet potato has been poorly understood, although it has been part of the diet since Pre-Columbus time. Thus, 137 landraces from different localities around PR were collected and subjected to a genetic diversity analysis using 23 SSR-markers. In addition, 8 accessions from a collection grown in Gurabo, PR at the Agricultural Experimental Station (GAES), 10 US commercial cultivars and 12 Puerto Rican accessions from the USDA repository collection were included in this assessment. The results of the analysis of the 23 loci showed 255 alleles in the 167 samples. Observed heterozygosity was high across populations (0.71) while measurements of total heterozygosity revealed a large genetic diversity throughout the population and within populations. UPGMA clustering method revealed two main clusters. Cluster 1 contained 12 PR accessions from the USDA repository collection, while cluster 2 consisted of PR landraces, US commercial cultivars and the PR accessions from GAES. Population structure analysis grouped PR landraces in five groups including four US commercial cultivars. Our study shows the presence of a high level of genetic diversity of sweet potato across PR which can be related to the genetic makeup of sweet potato, human intervention and out-crossing nature of the plant. The history of domestication and dispersal of sweet potato in the Caribbean and the high levels of genetic diversity found through this study makes sweet potato an invaluable resource that needs to be protected and further studied. PMID:25551388

  10. Low genetic diversity in a marine nature reserve: re-evaluating diversity criteria in reserve design

    OpenAIRE

    Bell, J. J.; Okamura, B.

    2005-01-01

    Little consideration has been given to the genetic composition of populations associated with marine reserves, as reserve designation is generally to protect specific species, communities or habitats. Nevertheless, it is important to conserve genetic diversity since it provides the raw material for the maintenance of species diversity over longer, evolutionary time-scales and may also confer the basis for adaptation to environmental change. Many current marine reserves are small in size and i...

  11. Radiation induced mutants in elite genetic background for the augmentation of genetic diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice (Oryza sativa L.), an important food crop for India, shows large genetic diversity. However, despite the large genetic resource, high genetic similarity is reported in cultivated varieties indicating genetic erosion. Radiation induced mutations provide genetic variability in elite background. In the present study, twenty gamma ray induced mutants of rice variety WL112 (carrying sd-1 semi-dwarfing gene) were analysed for genetic diversity using microsatellite markers. The high range of genetic diversity among mutants indicated that the mutants possess potential for enhancing variability in rice. Cluster analysis showed presence of five clusters having small sub-clusters. Earliness, semi-dwarf stature or resistance to blast disease observed among the mutants showed that these will be useful in breeding programmes. (author)

  12. Thai pigs and cattle production, genetic diversity of livestock and strategies for preserving animal genetic resources

    OpenAIRE

    Kesinee Gatphayak

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the current situation of livestock production in Thailand, genetic diversity and evaluation, as well as management strategies for animal genetic resources focusing on pigs and cattle. Sustainable conservation of indigenous livestock as a genetic resource and vital components within the agricultural biodiversity domain is a great challenge as well as an asset for the future development of livestock production in Thailand.

  13. The structural diversity of artificial genetic polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anosova, Irina; Kowal, Ewa A.; Dunn, Matthew R.; Chaput, John C.; Van Horn, Wade D.; Egli, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic genetics is a subdiscipline of synthetic biology that aims to develop artificial genetic polymers (also referred to as xeno-nucleic acids or XNAs) that can replicate in vitro and eventually in model cellular organisms. This field of science combines organic chemistry with polymerase engineering to create alternative forms of DNA that can store genetic information and evolve in response to external stimuli. Practitioners of synthetic genetics postulate that XNA could be used to safeguard synthetic biology organisms by storing genetic information in orthogonal chromosomes. XNA polymers are also under active investigation as a source of nuclease resistant affinity reagents (aptamers) and catalysts (xenozymes) with practical applications in disease diagnosis and treatment. In this review, we provide a structural perspective on known antiparallel duplex structures in which at least one strand of the Watson–Crick duplex is composed entirely of XNA. Currently, only a handful of XNA structures have been archived in the Protein Data Bank as compared to the more than 100 000 structures that are now available. Given the growing interest in xenobiology projects, we chose to compare the structural features of XNA polymers and discuss their potential to access new regions of nucleic acid fold space. PMID:26673703

  14. Genetic diversity and interrelationship among mulberry genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Rita; Roychowdhuri, Sukhen; Sau, Haradhan; Das, Bimal Kumar; Ghosh, Pannalal; Saratchandra, Beera

    2007-08-01

    Fourteen morphometric traits were used to examine the genetic divergence of 25 mulberry (Morus spp.) genotypes from varied agroclimatic conditions of India. Wide variation was observed for all the traits. The genotypes irrespective of their place of collection were grouped into 10 different clusters. Seven accessions, that is, Baragura-2, Gorabandha-2, Kalimpong, Herbertpur, Kollegal, Resham majri-7, and UP-14 each a cluster of unique entries will be of useful for genetic resources. Nevertheless, the correlation and path analysis suggest the direct selection of lamina length, fresh leaf weight, leaf area, and single leaf weight will be rewarding for mulberry leaf yield improvement. PMID:17707213

  15. Pyrosequencing and genetic diversity of microeukaryotes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harder, Christoffer Bugge

    carefully selected waterworks (Article IV), where the bacterial metabolic diversity and its important for water purification was described. Building on this, the most important part of the thesis consists of two pyrosequencing analyses of protozoa with newly developed 18S primers. One specifically targets...

  16. Genetic Diversity of Turf-Type Tall Fescue Using Diversity Arrays Technology.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Baird, J. H.; Kopecký, David; Lukaszewski, A.J.; Green, R. J.; Bartoš, Jan; Doležel, Jaroslav

    2012-01-01

    Ro?. 52, ?. 1 (2012), s. 408-412. ISSN 0011-183X Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Festuca arundinacea * Diversity Arrays Technology (DArT) * Low genetic polymorphism Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.513, year: 2012

  17. Analysis on genetic diversity and genetic relationship of medicinal species in Dipsacus from China by SRAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Da-xia; Zhang, Xue; Wang, Yu; Li, Long-yun; Zhang, Ze

    2015-07-01

    The author detected the genetic diversity and genetic relationship within and among eight medicinal species of Dipsacus by the approach of sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP). The associated genetic parameters were calculated by POPGENE 1.31. The Genetic distance was calculated by TREECONW and the systematic diagrams of genetic relationship were clustered by UPG-MA. The results showed that, using 26 primers, a total of 558 bands were produced, of which 539 were polymorphic loci. There was a high level of genetic diversity among species (PPB = 96.59%, Na = 1.9659, Na = 1.3375, H = 0.2143, I = 0.3423). However, genetic diversity was lower within species, the average of genetic parameters was PPB = 6.97%, Na = 1.0697, Na = 1.0311, H = 0.0187, I = 0.0291. The Nei's genetic differentiation coefficient was 0.9126, indicated that most of the genetic variation existed among species. By clustering analysis, different individuals gathered in the same group and the classified result of SRAP marker between traditional modal characters was almost same. The results confirmed that SRAP marker can be used as one of the effective methods to reveal the genetic diversity and relationship among medicinal species of Dipsacus. PMID:26697678

  18. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Homar R., Gill-Langarica; José S., Muruaga-Martínez; M.L. Patricia, Vargas-Vázquez; Rigoberto, Rosales-Serna; Netzahualcoyotl, Mayek-Pérez.

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico) Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collecti [...] on (200 accessions) was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each), as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP) +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR) loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA) and molecular variance (AMOVA) analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic) while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus). AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  19. Genetic diversity assessed by microsatellite markers in sweet corn cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Daniela Lopes

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Information on genetic diversity is essential to the characterization and utilization of germplasm. The genetic diversity of twenty-two sweet corn cultivars (seventeen open-pollinated varieties, OPV, and five hybrids, H was investigated by applying simple sequence repeat markers. A total of 257 primers were tested, of which 160 were found to be usable in terms of high reproducibility for all the samples tested; 45 were polymorphic loci, of which 30 were used to assess the genetic diversity of sweet corn cultivars. We detected a total of 86 alleles using 30 microsatellite primers. The mean polymorphism was 82 %. The highest heterozygosity values (Ho = 0.20 were found in the PR030-Doce Flor da Serra and BR427 III OPVs, whereas the lowest values (0.14 were recorded in the MG161-Branco Doce and Doce Cubano OPVs. The polymorphism information content ranged from 0.19 (Umc2319 to 0.71 (Umc2205. The analysis of molecular variance revealed that most of the genetic variability was concentrated within the cultivars of sweet corn (75 %, with less variability between them (25 %. The consensus tree derived from the neighbor-joining (NJ algorithm using 1,000 bootstrapping replicates revealed seven genetically different groups. Nei’s diversity values varied between 0.103 (Doce do Hawai × CNPH-1 cultivars and 0.645 (Amarelo Doce × Lili cultivars, indicating a narrow genetic basis. The Lili hybrid was the most distant cultivar, as revealed by Principal Coordinates Analysis and the NJ tree. This study on genetic diversity will be useful for planning future studies on sweet corn genetic resources and can complement the breeding programs for this crop.

  20. Genetic diversity analysis of common beans based on molecular markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Homar R. Gill-Langarica

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A core collection of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., representing genetic diversity in the entire Mexican holding, is kept at the INIFAP (Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Forestales, Agricolas y Pecuarias, Mexico Germplasm Bank. After evaluation, the genetic structure of this collection (200 accessions was compared with that of landraces from the states of Oaxaca, Chiapas and Veracruz (10 genotypes from each, as well as a further 10 cultivars, by means of four amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLP +3/+3 primer combinations and seven simple sequence repeats (SSR loci, in order to define genetic diversity, variability and mutual relationships. Data underwent cluster (UPGMA and molecular variance (AMOVA analyses. AFLP analysis produced 530 bands (88.5% polymorphic while SSR primers amplified 174 alleles, all polymorphic (8.2 alleles per locus. AFLP indicated that the highest genetic diversity was to be found in ten commercial-seed classes from two major groups of accessions from Central Mexico and Chiapas, which seems to be an important center of diversity in the south. A third group included genotypes from Nueva Granada, Mesoamerica, Jalisco and Durango races. Here, SSR analysis indicated a reduced number of shared haplotypes among accessions, whereas the highest genetic components of AMOVA variation were found within accessions. Genetic diversity observed in the common-bean core collection represents an important sample of the total Phaseolus genetic variability at the main Germplasm Bank of INIFAP. Molecular marker strategies could contribute to a better understanding of the genetic structure of the core collection as well as to its improvement and validation.

  1. Genetic diversity of domestic pigs in Tierralta (Colombia using microsatellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Pardo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: according to several authors, domestic pigs come from different wild boar populations with varied geographic distribution and are grouped in the genus Sus. Pig domestication occurred gradually. The first animals were small and gathered in small numbers. Several civilizations domesticated this animal as an important source of protein. Tierralta, in Córdoba province, has a large population of domestic pigs, which are a mixture of creole and other breeds. The genetic characterization of populations is used to check the status of genetic diversity, a conclusive element in determining breeding strategies and genetic conservation programs. PCR is the most commonly used technique for studying highly polymorphic markers, such as microsatellites or SSRs. The use of microsatellites is a powerful tool in genetic studies. They have been used for characterization studies of genetic diversity, genetic relationships between populations, paternity testing, inbreeding and genetic bottlenecks. Objective: the purpose of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of domestic pigs in Tierralta (Córdoba, Colombia using 20 microsatellites. Methods: fifty four samples were studied. Twenty microsatellites recommended by the FAO/ISAG for swine biodiversity studies were used. Results: all the microsatellites were polymorphic, and were detected between 3 (SW911 and 14 (TNFB alleles (the average number was 6.9 alleles and a total of 138 alleles were detected. Average expected heterozygosity was 0.5259 and the observed heterozygosity was 0.5120. PIC values ranged from 0.3212 to 0.7980 for loci SW2410 and IFNG, respectively. Conclusions: the results suggest that the analyzed population represents a group with high genetic diversity.

  2. Eestimation of genetic diversity in walnut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juglans regia L. belonging to the family Juglandaceae inhabits the northern parts of Pakistan. Biochemical analysis of the plant is not well documented in the country. Present research was the first documented attempt to study total seed storage proteins in 20 genotypes of Juglans regia collected from Swat, Dir and Chitral areas. A protocol was optimized for extraction and separation of seed storage protein from unprocessed seeds. Comparatively simple banding pattern (as compared to legumes and cereals) was observed in Juglans regia L. A total of 114 protein loci were detected in 20 genotypes giving an average of approximately 7 alleles per genotype. Genetic distances estimated during present study range from 0 to 60. Medium values of Genetic Distances (GDmax= 60%) was estimated among three comparisons. Twenty genotypes were grouped in three clusters based on dendrogram analysis. Genotypes collected from Chitral valley were predominantly grouped in one cluster. (author)

  3. Genetic gain and gene diversity of seed orchard crops

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Kyu-Suk [Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Umeaa (Sweden). Dept. of Forest Genetics and Plant Physiology

    2001-07-01

    Seed orchards are the major tool for deploying the improvement generated by breeding programs and assuring the consistent supply of genetically improved seed. Attainment of genetic gain and monitoring of gene diversity through selection and breeding were studied considering the factors: selection intensity; genetic value; coancestry; fertility variation; and pollen contamination. The optimum goal of a seed orchard is achieved when the orchard population is under an idealized situation, i.e., panmixis, equal gamete contributions from all parental genotypes, non-relatedness and no pollen contamination. In practice, however, due to relatedness among parents, variation in clonal fertility and ramet number, and gene migration from outside, the realized genetic gain and gene diversity deviate from the expectation. In the present study, the genetic value of seed orchard crops (genetic gain, G) could be increased by selective harvest, genetic thinning and/or both. Status number (N{sub S}) was used to monitor the loss of gene diversity in the process of forest tree domestication, and calculated to be reasonably high in most seed orchards. Fertility of parents was estimated based on the assessment of flowering or seed production, which was shown to be under strong genetic control. Variation in fertility among orchard parents was a general feature and reduced the predicted gene diversity of the orchard crop. Fertility variation among parents could be described by the sibling coefficient ({psi}). {psi} was estimated to be 2 (CV = 100% for fertility). In calculating {psi}, it was possible to consider, besides fertility variation, the phenotypic correlation between maternal and parental fertilities, and pollen contamination. Status number was increased by controlling parental fertility, e.g., equal seed harvest, mixing seed in equal proportions and balancing parental contribution. By equalizing female fertility among over-represented parents, it was possible to effect a favourable tradeoff between gene diversity and seed production. If the status number of orchard crop is not large enough, loss of gene diversity, random drift in gene frequency and potential inbreeding problems could occur in subsequent generations. Genetic loss or erosion did not seem to be alarming during the domestication of forest trees, because a large number of parents are commonly used in first-generation seed orchards. An understanding of reproductive processes and monitoring of the impacts of the management practices are essential to maximize genetic gain and to maintain sustainable gene diversity in seed orchard programs.

  4. Conservation of Genetic Diversity in Culture Plants

    OpenAIRE

    A. MAXIM

    2010-01-01

    The most important international document relating to the conservation of biodiversity is one adopted by theUN in Rio de Janeiro (1992) that "Convention on Biodiversity". Based on this agreement, the EU has taken a series ofmeasures to reduce genetic erosion in agriculture, which grew with the expansion of industrialized agriculture.Throughout its existence, mankind has used some 10,000 growing plant species. According to FAO statistics, today,90% of food production is ensured by some 120 gro...

  5. Diversity-Oriented Synthesis as a Tool for Chemical Genetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Lenci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Chemical genetics is an approach for identifying small molecules with the ability to induce a biological phenotype or to interact with a particular gene product, and it is an emerging tool for lead generation in drug discovery. Accordingly, there is a need for efficient and versatile synthetic processes capable of generating complex and diverse molecular libraries, and Diversity-Oriented Synthesis (DOS of small molecules is the concept of choice to give access to new chemotypes with high chemical diversity. In this review, the combination of chemical genetics and diversity-oriented synthesis to identify new chemotypes as hit compounds in chemical biology and drug discovery is reported, giving an overview of basic concepts and selected case studies.

  6. Genetic diversity and relationships of Vietnamese and European pig breeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indigenous resources of the Asian pig population are less defined and only rarely compared with European breeds. In this study, five indigenous pig breeds from Viet Nam (Mong Cai, Muong Khuong, Co, Meo, Tap Na), two exotic breeds kept in Viet Nam (Large White, Landrace), three European commercial breeds (Pietrain, Landrace, Large White), and European Wild Boar were chosen for evaluation and comparison of genetic diversity. Samples and data from 317 animals were collected and ten polymorphic microsatellite loci were selected according to the recommendations of the FAO Domestic Animal Diversity Information System (DAD-IS; http://www.fao.org/dad-is/). Effective number of alleles, Polymorphism Information Content (PIC), within-breed diversity, estimated heterozygosities and tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium were determined. Breed differentiation was evaluated using the fixation indices of Wright (1951). Genetic distances between breeds were estimated according to Nei (1972) and used for the construction of UPGMA dendrograms which were evaluated by bootstrapping. Heterozygosity was higher in indigenous Vietnamese breeds than in the other breeds. The Vietnamese indigenous breeds also showed higher genetic diversity than the European breeds and all genetic distances had a strong bootstrap support. The European commercial breeds, in contrast, were closely related and bootstrapping values for genetic distances among them were below 60%. European Wild Boar displayed closer relation with commercial breeds of European origin than with the native breeds from Viet Nam. This study is one of the first to contribute to a genetic characterization of autochthonous Vietnamese pig breeds and it clearly demonstrates that these breeds harbour a rich reservoir of genetic diversity. (author)

  7. Genetic diversity among ancient Nordic populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Linea; Lynnerup, Niels; Siegismund, Hans R; Kivisild, Toomas; Dissing, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    Using established criteria for work with fossil DNA we have analysed mitochondrial DNA from 92 individuals from 18 locations in Denmark ranging in time from the Mesolithic to the Medieval Age. Unequivocal assignment of mtDNA haplotypes was possible for 56 of the ancient individuals; however, the success rate varied substantially between sites; the highest rates were obtained with untouched, freshly excavated material, whereas heavy handling, archeological preservation and storage for many years influenced the ability to obtain authentic endogenic DNA. While the nucleotide diversity at two locations was similar to that among extant Danes, the diversity at four sites was considerably higher. This supports previous observations for ancient Britons. The overall occurrence of haplogroups did not deviate from extant Scandinavians, however, haplogroup I was significantly more frequent among the ancient Danes (average 13%) than among extant Danes and Scandinavians (approximately 2.5%) as well as among other ancient population samples reported. Haplogroup I could therefore have been an ancient Southern Scandinavian type "diluted" by later immigration events. Interestingly, the two Neolithic samples (4,200 YBP, Bell Beaker culture) that were typed were haplogroup U4 and U5a, respectively, and the single Bronze Age sample (3,300-3,500 YBP) was haplogroup U4. These two haplogroups have been associated with the Mesolithic populations of Central and Northern Europe. Therefore, at least for Southern Scandinavia, our findings do not support a possible replacement of a haplogroup U dominated hunter-gatherer population by a more haplogroup diverse Neolithic Culture. PMID:20689597

  8. Genetic diversity measures of the Croatian Spotted goat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavi? Vesna

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, microsatellite data of 20 loci were generated and utilized to evaluate genetic variability of the Croatian Spotted goat. Genetic variability was high, with means for expected gene diversity of 0.771, observed heterozygosity of 0.759, and 8.1 for the total number of alleles per locus. There are no indications for deviations from random breeding within the population. Level of inbreeding was only 2% and non-significant. The population was found to deviate significantly under infinitive allele model (IAM and two phase model (TPM, while stepwise mutation model (SMM and qualitative mode-shift test of allele frequencies indicate the absence of genetic bottleneck in the recent past in the population of the Croatian Spotted goat. High level of genetic diversity, as it is presented in this study, may be seen as an initial guide for conservation decisions in the future.

  9. Genetic diversity studies of Kherigarh cattle based on microsatellite markers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. K. Pandey; Rekha Sharma; Yatender Singh; B. B. Prakash; S. P. S. Ahlawat

    2006-08-01

    We report a genetic diversity study of Kherigarh cattle, a utility draught-purpose breed of India, currently declining at a startling rate, by use of microsatellite markers recommended by the Food and Agriculture Organization. Microsatellite genotypes were derived, and allelic and genotypic frequencies, heterozygosities and gene diversity were estimated. A total of 131 alleles were distinguished by the 21 microsatellite markers used. All the microsatellites were highly polymorphic, with mean (± s.e.) allelic number of 6.24 ± 1.7, ranging 4–10 per locus. The observed heterozygosity in the population ranged between 0.261 and 0.809, with mean (± s.e.) of 0.574 ± 0.131, indicating considerable genetic variation in this population. Genetic bottleneck hypotheses were also explored. Our data suggest that the Kherigarh breed has not experienced a genetic bottleneck in the recent past.

  10. Genetic diversity of Actinobacillus lignieresii isolates from different hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokotovic, Branko; Angen, Øystein

    2011-01-01

    Genetic diversity detected by analysis of amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) of 54 Actinobacilus lignieresii isolates from different hosts and geographic localities is described. On the basis of variances in AFLP profiles, the strains were grouped in two major clusters; one comprising strains isolated from horses and infected wounds of humans bitten by horses and another consisting of strains isolated from bovine and ovine hosts. The present data indicate a comparatively higher degree of genetic diversity among strains isolated from equine hosts and confirm the existence of a separate genomospecies for A. lignieresi-like isolates from horses. Among the isolates from bovine and ovine hosts some clonal lines appear to be genetically stable over time and could be detected at very distant geographic localities. Although all ovine strains investigated grouped in a single cluster, the existence of distinct genetic lineages that have evolved specificity for ovine hosts is not obvious and needs to be confirmed in other studies.

  11. The genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax: a review

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Wanessa Christina de, Souza-Neiras; Luciane Moreno Storti de, Melo; Ricardo Luiz Dantas, Machado.

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax has been investigated in several malaria-endemic areas, including the Brazilian Amazon region, where this is currently the most prevalent species causing malaria in humans. This review summarizes current views on the use of molecular markers to examine P. vi [...] vax populations, with a focus on studies performed in Brazilian research laboratories. We emphasize the importance of phylogenetic studies on this parasite and discuss the perspectives created by our increasing understanding of genetic diversity and population structure of this parasite for the development of new control strategies, including vaccines, and more effective drugs for the treatment of P. vivax malaria.

  12. The genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanessa Christina de Souza-Neiras

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax has been investigated in several malaria-endemic areas, including the Brazilian Amazon region, where this is currently the most prevalent species causing malaria in humans. This review summarizes current views on the use of molecular markers to examine P. vivax populations, with a focus on studies performed in Brazilian research laboratories. We emphasize the importance of phylogenetic studies on this parasite and discuss the perspectives created by our increasing understanding of genetic diversity and population structure of this parasite for the development of new control strategies, including vaccines, and more effective drugs for the treatment of P. vivax malaria.

  13. The population genetics of mimetic diversity in Heliconius butterflies

    OpenAIRE

    Kronforst, Marcus R.; Gilbert, Lawrence E.

    2007-01-01

    Theory predicts strong stabilizing selection on warning patterns within species and convergent evolution among species in Müllerian mimicry systems yet Heliconius butterflies exhibit extreme wing pattern diversity. One potential explanation for the evolution of this diversity is that genetic drift occasionally allows novel warning patterns to reach the frequency threshold at which they gain protection. This idea is controversial, however, because Heliconius butterflies are unlikely to experie...

  14. Diversity-Oriented Synthesis as a Tool for Chemical Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Lenci; Antonio Guarna; Andrea Trabocchi

    2014-01-01

    Chemical genetics is an approach for identifying small molecules with the ability to induce a biological phenotype or to interact with a particular gene product, and it is an emerging tool for lead generation in drug discovery. Accordingly, there is a need for efficient and versatile synthetic processes capable of generating complex and diverse molecular libraries, and Diversity-Oriented Synthesis (DOS) of small molecules is the concept of choice to give access to new chemotypes with high che...

  15. Roads, interrupted dispersal, and genetic diversity in timber rattlesnakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Rulon W; Brown, William S; Stechert, Randy; Zamudio, Kelly R

    2010-08-01

    Anthropogenic habitat modification often creates barriers to animal movement, transforming formerly contiguous habitat into a patchwork of habitat islands with low connectivity. Roadways are a feature of most landscapes that can act as barriers or filters to migration among local populations. Even small and recently constructed roads can have a significant impact on population genetic structure of some species, but not others. We developed a research approach that combines fine-scale molecular genetics with behavioral and ecological data to understand the impacts of roads on population structure and connectivity. We used microsatellite markers to characterize genetic variation within and among populations of timber rattlesnakes (Crotalus horridus) occupying communal hibernacula (dens) in regions bisected by roadways. We examined the impact of roads on seasonal migration, genetic diversity, and gene flow among populations. Snakes in hibernacula isolated by roads had significantly lower genetic diversity and higher genetic differentiation than snakes in hibernacula in contiguous habitat. Genetic-assignment analyses revealed that interruption to seasonal migration was the mechanism underlying these patterns. Our results underscore the sizeable impact of roads on this species, despite their relatively recent construction at our study sites (7 to 10 generations of rattlesnakes), the utility of population genetics for studies of road ecology, and the need for mitigating effects of roads. PMID:20151984

  16. Genetic characteristics of diversity of apple resistance to apple scab

    OpenAIRE

    Sikorskaitė-Gudžiūnienė, Sidona

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the research. To identify genes involved in V. inaequalis induced resistance response in Malus sp. and to develop apple hybrids with pyramidic resistance. Specific aims: 1. To characterize the genetic diversity and resistance to apple scab in the collection of apple genetic resources; 2. To develop apple hybrids of pyramidic resistance for apple breeding; 3. To characterize apple nuclear proteome and to perform a comparative genomic analysis of V. inaequalis induced Malus response;...

  17. Molecular and genetic diversity in the metastatic process of melanoma

    OpenAIRE

    Harbst, Katja; Lauss, Martin; Cirenajwis, Helena; Winter, Christof; Howlin, Jillian; Törngren, Therese; Kvist, Anders; Nodin, Björn; Olsson, Eleonor; Häkkinen, Jari; Jirström, Karin; Staaf, Johan; Lundgren, Lotta; Olsson, Håkan; Ingvar, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Diversity between metastatic melanoma tumours in individual patients is known; however, the molecular and genetic differences remain unclear. To examine the molecular and genetic differences between metastatic tumours, we performed gene-expression profiling of 63 melanoma tumours obtained from 28 patients (two or three tumours/patient), followed by analysis of their mutational landscape, using targeted deep sequencing of 1697 cancer genes and DNA copy number analysis. Gene-expression signatur...

  18. Genetic diversity in wild populations of Paulownia fortune.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H Y; Ru, G X; Zhang, J; Lu, Y Y

    2014-11-01

    The genetic diversities of 16 Paulownia fortunei populations involving 143 individuals collected from 6 provinces in China were analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP). A total of 9 primer pairs with 1169 polymorphic loci were screened out, and each pair possessed 132 bands on average. The percentage of polymorphic bands (98.57%), the effective number of alleles (1.2138-1.2726), Nei's genetic diversity (0.1566-0.1887), and Shannon's information index (0.2692-0.3117) indicated a plentiful genetic diversity and different among Paulownia fortunei populations. The genetic differentiation coefficient between populations was 0.2386, while the gene flow was 1.0954, and the low gene exchange promoted genetic differentiation. Analysis of variance indicated that genetic variation mainly occurred within populations (81.62% of total variation) rather than among populations (18.38%). The 16 populations were divided by unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic means (UPGMA) into 4 groups with obvious regionalism, in which the populations with close geographical locations (latitude) were clustered together. PMID:25739286

  19. Archaeal Diversity in Waters from Deep South African Gold Mines

    OpenAIRE

    Takai, Ken; Moser, Duane P.; DeFlaun, Mary; Onstott, Tullis C.; Fredrickson, James K.

    2001-01-01

    A culture-independent molecular analysis of archaeal communities in waters collected from deep South African gold mines was performed by performing a PCR-mediated terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis of rRNA genes (rDNA) in conjunction with a sequencing analysis of archaeal rDNA clone libraries. The water samples used represented various environments, including deep fissure water, mine service water, and water from an overlying dolomite aquifer. T-RFLP analysis ...

  20. Mitochondrial DNA perspective of Serbian genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidovic, Slobodan; Malyarchuk, Boris; Aleksic, Jelena M; Derenko, Miroslava; Topalovic, Vladanka; Litvinov, Andrey; Stevanovic, Milena; Kovacevic-Grujicic, Natasa

    2015-03-01

    Although south-Slavic populations have been studied to date from various aspects, the population of Serbia, occupying the central part of the Balkan Peninsula, is still genetically understudied at least at the level of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) variation. We analyzed polymorphisms of the first and the second mtDNA hypervariable segments (HVS-I and HVS-II) and informative coding-region markers in 139 Serbians to shed more light on their mtDNA variability, and used available data on other Slavic and neighboring non-Slavic populations to assess their interrelations in a broader European context. The contemporary Serbian mtDNA profile is consistent with the general European maternal landscape having a substantial proportion of shared haplotypes with eastern, central, and southern European populations. Serbian population was characterized as an important link between easternmost and westernmost south-Slavic populations due to the observed lack of genetic differentiation with all other south-Slavic populations and its geographical positioning within the Balkan Peninsula. An increased heterogeneity of south Slavs, most likely mirroring turbulent demographic events within the Balkan Peninsula over time (i.e., frequent admixture and differential introgression of various gene pools), and a marked geographical stratification of Slavs to south-, east-, and west-Slavic groups, were also found. A phylogeographic analyses of 20 completely sequenced Serbian mitochondrial genomes revealed not only the presence of mtDNA lineages predominantly found within the Slavic gene pool (U4a2a*, U4a2a1, U4a2c, U4a2g, HV10), supporting a common Slavic origin, but also lineages that may have originated within the southern Europe (H5*, H5e1, H5a1v) and the Balkan Peninsula in particular (H6a2b and L2a1k). PMID:25418795

  1. Genetic diversity and conservation in a small endangered horse population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janova, Eva; Futas, Jan; Klumplerova, Marie; Putnova, Lenka; Vrtkova, Irena; Vyskocil, Mirko; Frolkova, Petra; Horin, Petr

    2013-08-01

    The Old Kladruber horses arose in the 17th century as a breed used for ceremonial purposes. Currently, grey and black coat colour varieties exist as two sub-populations with different recent breeding history. As the population underwent historical bottlenecks and intensive inbreeding, loss of genetic variation is considered as the major threat. Therefore, genetic diversity in neutral and non-neutral molecular markers was examined in the current nucleus population. Fifty microsatellites, 13 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in immunity-related genes, three mutations in coat colour genes and one major histocompatibility (MHC-DRA) gene were studied for assessing genetic diversity after 15 years of conservation. The results were compared to values obtained in a similar study 13 years ago. The extent of genetic diversity of the current population was comparable to other breeds, despite its small size and isolation. The comparison between 1997 and 2010 did not show differences in the extent of genetic diversity and no loss of allele richness and/or heterozygosity was observed. Genetic differences identified between the black and grey sub-populations observed 13 years ago persisted. Deviations from the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium found in 19 microsatellite loci and in five SNP loci are probably due to selective breeding. No differences between neutral and immunity-related markers were found. No changes in the frequencies of markers associated with two diseases, melanoma and insect bite hypersensitivity, were observed, due probably to the short interval of time between comparisons. It, thus, seems that, despite its small size, previous bottlenecks and inbreeding, the molecular variation of Old Kladruber horses is comparable to other horse breeds and that the current breeding policy does not compromise genetic variation of this endangered population. PMID:23649723

  2. Landscape genetics, adaptive diversity and population structure in Phaseolus vulgaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Monica; Rau, Domenico; Bitocchi, Elena; Bellucci, Elisa; Biagetti, Eleonora; Carboni, Andrea; Gepts, Paul; Nanni, Laura; Papa, Roberto; Attene, Giovanna

    2016-03-01

    Here we studied the organization of genetic variation of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in its centres of domestication. We used 131 single nucleotide polymorphisms to investigate 417 wild common bean accessions and a representative sample of 160 domesticated genotypes, including Mesoamerican and Andean genotypes, for a total of 577 accessions. By analysing the genetic spatial patterns of the wild common bean, we documented the existence of several genetic groups and the occurrence of variable degrees of diversity in Mesoamerica and the Andes. Moreover, using a landscape genetics approach, we demonstrated that both demographic processes and selection for adaptation were responsible for the observed genetic structure. We showed that the study of correlations between markers and ecological variables at a continental scale can help in identifying local adaptation genes. We also located putative areas of common bean domestication in Mesoamerica, in the Oaxaca Valley, and the Andes, in southern Bolivia-northern Argentina. These observations are of paramount importance for the conservation and exploitation of the genetic diversity preserved within this species and other plant genetic resources. PMID:26526745

  3. Genetic diversity of Kenyan native oyster mushroom (Pleurotus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otieno, Ojwang D; Onyango, Calvin; Onguso, Justus Mungare; Matasyoh, Lexa G; Wanjala, Bramwel W; Wamalwa, Mark; Harvey, Jagger J W

    2015-01-01

    Members of the genus Pleurotus, also commonly known as oyster mushroom, are well known for their socioeconomic and biotechnological potentials. Despite being one of the most important edible fungi, the scarce information about the genetic diversity of the species in natural populations has limited their sustainable utilization. A total of 71 isolates of Pleurotus species were collected from three natural populations: 25 isolates were obtained from Kakamega forest, 34 isolates from Arabuko Sokoke forest and 12 isolates from Mount Kenya forest. Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) was applied to thirteen isolates of locally grown Pleurotus species obtained from laboratory samples using five primer pair combinations. AFLP markers and internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequences of the ribosomal DNA were used to estimate the genetic diversity and evaluate phylogenetic relationships, respectively, among and within populations. The five primer pair combinations generated 293 polymorphic loci across the 84 isolates. The mean genetic diversity among the populations was 0.25 with the population from Arabuko Sokoke having higher (0.27) diversity estimates compared to Mount Kenya population (0.24). Diversity between the isolates from the natural population (0.25) and commercial cultivars (0.24) did not differ significantly. However, diversity was greater within (89%; P > 0.001) populations than among populations. Homology search analysis against the GenBank database using 16 rDNA ITS sequences randomly selected from the two clades of AFLP dendrogram revealed three mushroom species: P. djamor, P. floridanus and P. sapidus; the three mushrooms form part of the diversity of Pleurotus species in Kenya. The broad diversity within the Kenyan Pleurotus species suggests the possibility of obtaining native strains suitable for commercial cultivation. PMID:25344263

  4. Molecular Diversity and Genetic Structure of Durum Wheat Landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GULNAR SHIKHSEYIDOVA

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available To determine the genetic diversity of durum wheat, 41 accessions from Morocco, Ethiopia, Turkey, Lebanon, Kazakhstan, China, and Mongolia were analyzed through Inter-Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR molecular markers. Out of the used twenty primers, 15 primers that included a considerable polymorphism were selected for the analyses. Among the genotypes under study, 163 fragments (73.7% were polymorph. Several indexes were used to determine the most appropriate primers. While UBC812, UBC864, UBC840, and UBC808 primers were among those markers which produced the highest number of bands and polymorphic bands, they also dedicated the highest rate of polymorphic index content (PIC. These primers also possessed the highest amounts of effective multiplex ratio (EMR and marker index (MI. Therefore, these primers can be recommended for genetic evaluation of the durum wheat. The results of cluster analysis and principle component analysis indicated that the observed genetic diversity in wheat materials under study is geographically structured. The results also indicated that the genetic diversity index based on ISSR markers was higher for Turkey, Lebanon, Morocco, and Ethiopia accessions than for other countries. The high level of polymorphism in this collections durum wheat would agree with the suggestion that Fertile Crescent and parts of Africa are first possible diversity center of this crop.

  5. Genetic diversity and population structure of begomoviruses infecting sweet potato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Begomoviruses infecting sweet potatoes (Ipomoea batatas) exhibit high genetic diversity, and approximately eight species including Sweet potato leaf curl virus (SPLCV) have been described from different regions around the world. In this study, the complete genomic sequences of 17 geographically dist...

  6. Genetic diversity of Ascaris in southwestern Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Nejsum, Peter; Llewellyn-Hughes, Julia; Griffin, Claire; Atuhaire, Aaron; Arinaitwe, Moses; Adriko, Moses; Ruggiana, Andrew; Turyakira, Grace; Kabatereine, Narcis B.; Stothard, J. Russell

    2012-01-01

    Despite the common occurrence of ascariasis in southwestern Uganda, helminth control in the region has been limited. To gain further insights into the genetic diversity of Ascaris in this area, a parasitological survey in mothers (n=41) and children (n=74) living in two villages, Habutobere and M...

  7. Bovine Genetic Diversity Revealed By mtDNA Sequence Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitochondrial DNA single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) data were used to determine genetic distance, nucleotide diversity, construction of haplotypes, estimation of information contents, and phylogenic relationships in bovine HapMap breeds. The Bovine International HapMap panel consists of 720 anima...

  8. Genetic diversity of Actinobacillus lignieresii isolates from different hosts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kokotovic, Branko; Angen, Øystein; Bisgaard, Magne

    2011-01-01

    strains isolated from horses and infected wounds of humans bitten by horses and another consisting of strains isolated from bovine and ovine hosts. The present data indicate a comparatively higher degree of genetic diversity among strains isolated from equine hosts and confirm the existence of a separate...

  9. Genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. in captive reptiles.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Xiao, L.; Ryan, U. M.; Graczyk, T. K.; Limor, J.; Li, L.; Kombert, M.; Junge, R.; Sulaiman, I. M.; Zhou, L.; Arrowood, M. J.; Koudela, B?etislav; Modrý, David; Lal, A. A.

    2004-01-01

    Ro?. 70, ?. 2 (2004), s. 891-899. ISSN 0099-2240 R&D Projects: GA ?R GA524/00/P015 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6022909 Keywords : Cryptosporidium * reptiles * genetic diversity Subject RIV: EG - Zoology Impact factor: 3.810, year: 2004

  10. Strength in Diversity: Hidden Genetic Depths of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Samantha L

    2016-02-01

    Next-generation whole genome sequencing data is currently being utilised to explore Mycobacterium tuberculosis genetic diversity. Studies have focused in particular on the evolution of drug resistance, and have revealed a surprising degree of dynamic population heterogeneity, with implications for transmission studies, treatment regimens and new drug target development. PMID:26755442

  11. Genetic Diversity of Tunisian Barley Accessions Based on Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Guasmi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity can be measured by several criteria, including phenotype, pedigree, allelic diversity at marker loci and allelic diversity at loci controlling phenotypes of interest. Abundance, high level of polymorphism and ease of genotyping make simple sequence repeats (SSRs an excellent molecular marker system for genetics diversity analyses. In this study, we used a three of mapped SSRs to examine the genetic diversity of Tunisian barley accessions and to establish phylogenetic relationships among them. These primers produce a total of 9 bands witch 7 loci polymorphic, the percentage of polymorphism ranged from 14.28 to 42.85%. The clustering grouped the studied accessions into 3 clusters with no correlation to geographical origins. The CFA permit to group the various populations by projected them in a plan formed by two axes (F1, F2, present 3 groups which are similar with those obtained by hierarchical classification. Present results demonstrate that this SSR marker was highly informative and was useful in generating a meaningful classification of barley germplasm.

  12. Genetic Diversity Of Plukenetia Volubilis L. Assessed By ISSR Markers*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ocelák M.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The diversity and genetic relationships in 173 sacha inchi samples were analyzed using ISSR markers. Thirty ISSR primers were used, only 8 showed variability in tested samples. ISSR fragments ranged from 200 to 2500 bp. The mean number of bands per primer was 12 and the average number of polymorphic bands per primer was 11. The lowest percentages of polymorphic bands (27%, gene diversity (0.103, and Shannon’s information index (0.15 were exhibited by the Santa Lucia population, which was also geographically most distant. This fact may be attributed to a very small size of this group. In contrast, the Dos de Mayo population exhibited the highest percentage of polymorphic bands (78%, and the Santa Cruz population the highest Nei’s gene diversity index (0.238 and Shannon’s information index (0.357. The obtained level of genetic variability was 36% among tested populations and 64% within populations. Although the diversity indices were low, a cluster analysis revealed 8 clusters containing mainly samples belonging to individual populations. Principal coordinate analysis clearly distinguished Chumbaquihui, Pucallpa, Dos de Mayo, and Aguas de Oro populations, the others were intermixed. The obtained results indicated the level of genetic diversity present in this location of Peru, although it is influenced by anthropological aspects and independent on the geographical distances.

  13. Molecular genetic diversity of Satureja bachtiarica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saidi, Mehdi; Movahedi, Khavar; Mehrabi, Ali Ashraf; Kahrizi, Danial

    2013-11-01

    Fifty-seven genotypes from eight population of Satureja bachtiarica was evaluated using fifteen ISSR and eleven RAPD markers. DNA profiling using RAPD primers amplified 84 loci, among which 81 were polymorphic with an average of 7.36 polymorphic fragments per locus. Also, using RAPD markers maximum and minimum polymorphic bands observed for Semyrom (77.38 %) and Farsan (40.48 %) populations, respectively. Semyrom population recorded the highest unbiased expected heterozygosity (0.259) and Shannon's Indices (0.38). While, the lowest values of unbiased expected heterozygosity (0.172) and Shannon's Index (0.245) were recorded for Eghlid and Farsan populations, respectively. On the other hand, ISSR primers produced 136 bands, from which 134 were polymorphic with an average of 9.06 polymorphic fragments per primer (98.52 %). The ISSR markers evaluation revealed that maximum and minimum polymorphic bands observed for Semyrom (66.18 %) and Farsan (31.62 %), respectively. Shahrekorud population recorded the highest unbiased expected heterozygosity (0.211) and Shannon's Indices (0.301). While, the lowest value of unbiased expected heterozygosity (0.175) observed for Farsan and Yazd populations and the lowest Shannon's Index (0.191) recorded by Farsan population. The overall results of the study revealed that both ISSR and RAPD markers were effective for evaluation of genetic variation of S. bachtiarica. PMID:24096911

  14. Soil properties drive a negative correlation between species diversity and genetic diversity in a tropical seasonal rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wumei; Liu, Lu; He, Tianhua; Cao, Min; Sha, Liqing; Hu, Yuehua; Li, Qiaoming; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    A negative species-genetic diversity correlation (SGDC) could be predicted by the niche variation hypothesis, whereby an increase in species diversity within community reduces the genetic diversity of the co-occurring species because of the reduction in average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of the species within community. We tested these predictions within a 20 ha tropical forest dynamics plot (FDP) in the Xishuangbanna tropical seasonal rainforest. We established 15 plots within the FDP and investigated the soil properties, tree diversity, and genetic diversity of a common tree species Beilschmiedia roxburghiana within each plot. We observed a significant negative correlation between tree diversity and the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within the communities. Using structural equation modeling, we further determined that the inter-plot environmental characteristics (soil pH and phosphorus availability) directly affected tree diversity and that the tree diversity within the community determined the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana. Increased soil pH and phosphorus availability might promote the coexistence of more tree species within community and reduce genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana for the reduced average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within community. PMID:26860815

  15. Soil properties drive a negative correlation between species diversity and genetic diversity in a tropical seasonal rainforest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wumei; Liu, Lu; He, Tianhua; Cao, Min; Sha, Liqing; Hu, Yuehua; Li, Qiaoming; Li, Jie

    2016-01-01

    A negative species-genetic diversity correlation (SGDC) could be predicted by the niche variation hypothesis, whereby an increase in species diversity within community reduces the genetic diversity of the co-occurring species because of the reduction in average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of the species within community. We tested these predictions within a 20 ha tropical forest dynamics plot (FDP) in the Xishuangbanna tropical seasonal rainforest. We established 15 plots within the FDP and investigated the soil properties, tree diversity, and genetic diversity of a common tree species Beilschmiedia roxburghiana within each plot. We observed a significant negative correlation between tree diversity and the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within the communities. Using structural equation modeling, we further determined that the inter-plot environmental characteristics (soil pH and phosphorus availability) directly affected tree diversity and that the tree diversity within the community determined the genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana. Increased soil pH and phosphorus availability might promote the coexistence of more tree species within community and reduce genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana for the reduced average niche breadth; alternatively, competition could reduce effective population size and therefore genetic diversity of B. roxburghiana within community. PMID:26860815

  16. Population genetic structure and genetic diversity of soybean aphids from USA, Korea and Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Following its recent invasion of North America, the soybean aphid (Aphis glycines Matsumura) has become the number one insect pest of soybean (Glycine max L. Merr.) in the north central states of USA. Very little is known about the population genetic structure and genetic diversity of the soybean ap...

  17. Molecular genetic diversity and genetic structure of Vietnamese indigenous pig populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, L. D.; Do, Duy Ngoc; Nam, L. Q.; Van Ba, N.; Minh, L. T. A.; Hoan, T. X.; Cuong, V. C.; Kadarmideen, Haja

    2014-01-01

    The study characterized genetic diversity and genetic structure of five indigenous pig populations (Ha Lang, Muong Te, Mong Cai, Lung and Lung Pu), two wild pig populations (Vietnamese and Thai wild pigs) and an exotic pig breed (Yorkshire) using FAO/ISAG recommended 16 microsatellite markers in...

  18. Determination of genetic diversity among some almond accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinar Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available More recently the use of different molecular markers in fruit species to determine particularly genetic diversity, genetic relationships and cultivar identification has been gained more importance. In the study, 13 randomly amplified polimorfic DNA (RAPD and 4 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR markers were used to evaluate genetic relationships among 95 almong accessions (26 foreign cultivars and 69 national cultivars and selections. The all plant material found in Almond Germplasm Repository in Gaziantep, Turkey. Both RAPD and ISSR markers distinguished the almond cultivars and selections in various levels. 17 RAPD and ISSR markers yielded a total of 73 scorable bands, which 51 are polymorphic. The two marker system exhibited variation with regard to average band sizes and polymorphism ratio. The average polymorphism was higher in ISSR (88% compared to RAPD (74%. RAPD and ISSR marker systems were found to be useful for determining genetic diversity among almong genotypes and cultivars. Combining of two dendrograms obtained through these markers show different clustering of 96 almond specimens without geographical isolation. These results supported that almonds in Turkey indicated considerable genetic diversity.

  19. GENETIC RESOURCES AND DIVERSITY IN DAIRY BUFFALOES OF PAKISTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. SAJJAD KHAN, NAZIR AHMAD1 AND MUQARRAB ALI KHAN2

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Buffalo is the main dairy animal in Pakistan. There are five known buffalo breeds in the country namely: Nili, Ravi, Nili-Ravi, Kundhi and Azi Kheli (or Azakhale. Population trend is available for Nili-Ravi and Kundhi breeds and is positive. Azi-Kheli breed was included in 2006 livestock census for the first time. General production system is low-input extensive system but high input intensive system prevails around most cities in the form of buffalo colonies for supplying fresh milk. Buffaloes are seasonal breeders. Vast diversity exits both at phenotypic and genetic level. Economic traits have a wide variation and genetic control is moderate for production traits but very low for reproduction traits. Inbreeding is inimical to genetic diversity and has been reported to deteriorate productivity. Efforts to improve productivity of the species are needed alongwith sustainable utilization of existing resources.

  20. Genetic Diversity of Arginine Catabolic Mobile Element in Staphylococcus epidermidis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miragaia, Maria; de Lencastre, Herminia; Perdreau-Remington, Francoise; Chambers, Henry F.; Higashi, Julie; Sullam, Paul M.; Lin, Jessica; Wong, Kester I.; King, Katherine A.; Otto, Michael; Sensabaugh, George F.; Diep, Binh An

    2009-01-01

    Background The methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clone USA300 contains a novel mobile genetic element, arginine catabolic mobile element (ACME), that contributes to its enhanced capacity to grow and survive within the host. Although ACME appears to have been transferred into USA300 from S. epidermidis, the genetic diversity of ACME in the latter species remains poorly characterized. Methodology/Principal Findings To assess the prevalence and genetic diversity of ACME, 127 geographically diverse S. epidermidis isolates representing 86 different multilocus sequence types (STs) were characterized. ACME was found in 51% (65/127) of S. epidermidis isolates. The vast majority (57/65) of ACME-containing isolates belonged to the predominant S. epidermidis clonal complex CC2. ACME was often found in association with different allotypes of staphylococcal chromosome cassette mec (SCCmec) which also encodes the recombinase function that facilities mobilization ACME from the S. epidermidis chromosome. Restriction fragment length polymorphism, PCR scanning and DNA sequencing allowed for identification of 39 distinct ACME genetic variants that differ from one another in gene content, thereby revealing a hitherto uncharacterized genetic diversity within ACME. All but one ACME variants were represented by a single S. epidermidis isolate; the singular variant, termed ACME-I.02, was found in 27 isolates, all of which belonged to the CC2 lineage. An evolutionary model constructed based on the eBURST algorithm revealed that ACME-I.02 was acquired at least on 15 different occasions by strains belonging to the CC2 lineage. Conclusions/Significance ACME-I.02 in diverse S. epidermidis isolates were nearly identical in sequence to the prototypical ACME found in USA300 MRSA clone, providing further evidence for the interspecies transfer of ACME from S. epidermidis into USA300. PMID:19893740

  1. Thai pigs and cattle production, genetic diversity of livestock and strategies for preserving animal genetic resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kesinee Gatphayak

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reviews the current situation of livestock production in Thailand, genetic diversity and evaluation, as well as management strategies for animal genetic resources focusing on pigs and cattle. Sustainable conservation of indigenous livestock as a genetic resource and vital components within the agricultural biodiversity domain is a great challenge as well as an asset for the future development of livestock production in Thailand.

  2. Genetic diversity and molecular genealogy of local silkworm varieties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhouhe Du

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to explore the genetic diversity and systematic differentiation pattern among silkworm varieties, aiming to guide hybridization breeding, we sequenced a total of 72 Bmamy2 gene fragments from local silkworm varieties. The analysis of nucleotide sequence diversity and systematic differentiation indicated that there was rich genovariation in the sequencing region of Bmamy2 gene, and the base mutation rate is 5.6–8.2%, the haplotype diversity is 0.8294, and the nucleotide diversity is 0.0236±0.00122, suggesting Bmamy2 being a better marking gene with rich nucleotide sequence diversity, based on which the genetic diversity among different local silkworm varieties can be identified. The same heredity population structure is proclaimed by several analysis methods that every clade consisting of varieties from different geosystems and ecological types, while the varieties from the same geosystem and ecotype belong to different clades in the phylogeny. There is no population structure pattern that different varieties claded together according to geosystem or ecotype. It can be speculated that the silkworm origins from mixture of kinds of several voltinism mulberry silkworm, Bombyx mandarina, while the domestication events took place in several regions, from which the domesticated mulberry silkworms are all devoting to the domesticated silkworm population of today.

  3. Genetic Diversity Revealed by Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers in a Worldwide Germplasm Collection of Durum Wheat

    OpenAIRE

    Ming-Cheng Luo; Junhua Peng; Eviatar Nevo; Dongfa Sun; Yunliang Peng; Jirui Wang; You, Frank M.; Liang Chen; Daokun Sun; Jing Ren

    2013-01-01

    Evaluation of genetic diversity and genetic structure in crops has important implications for plant breeding programs and the conservation of genetic resources. Newly developed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers are effective in detecting genetic diversity. In the present study, a worldwide durum wheat collection consisting of 150 accessions was used. Genetic diversity and genetic structure were investigated using 946 polymorphic SNP markers covering the whole genome of tetraploid w...

  4. Bacterial Diversity in a Mine Water Treatment Plant▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Heinzel, Elke; Hedrich, Sabrina; Janneck, Eberhard; Glombitza, Franz; Seifert, Jana; Schlömann, Michael

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the microbial community in a pilot plant for treatment of acid mine water by biological ferrous iron oxidation using clone library analysis and calculated statistical parameters for further characterization. The microbial community in the plant was conspicuously dominated by a group of Betaproteobacteria affiliated with “Ferribacter polymyxa”.

  5. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Theileria annulata in Oman

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamidhi, Salama; H. Tageldin, Mohammed.; Weir, William; Al-Fahdi, Amira; Johnson, Eugene H.; Bobade, Patrick; Alqamashoui, Badar; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Thompson, Joanne; Kinnaird, Jane; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Babiker, Hamza

    2015-01-01

    Background Theileriosis, caused by a number of species within the genus Theileria, is a common disease of livestock in Oman. It is a major constraint to the development of the livestock industry due to a high rate of morbidity and mortality in both cattle and sheep. Since little is currently known about the genetic diversity of the parasites causing theileriosis in Oman, the present study was designed to address this issue with specific regard to T. annulata in cattle. Methods Blood samples were collected from cattle from four geographically distinct regions in Oman for genetic analysis of the Theileria annulata population. Ten genetic markers (micro- and mini-satellites) representing all four chromosomes of T. annulata were applied to these samples using a combination of PCR amplification and fragment analysis. The resultant genetic data was analysed to provide a first insight into the structure of the T. annulata population in Oman. Results We applied ten micro- and mini-satellite markers to a total of 310 samples obtained from different regions (174 [56%] from Dhofar, 68 [22%] from Dhira, 44 [14.5%] from Batinah and 24 [8%] from Sharqia). A high degree of allelic diversity was observed among the four parasite populations. Expected heterozygosity for each site ranged from 0.816 to 0.854. A high multiplicity of infection was observed in individual hosts, with an average of 3.3 to 3.4 alleles per locus, in samples derived from Batinah, Dhofar and Sharqia regions. In samples from Dhira region, an average of 2.9 alleles per locus was observed. Mild but statistically significant linkage disequilibrium between pairs of markers was observed in populations from three of the four regions. In contrast, when the analysis was performed at farm level, no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed. Finally, no significant genetic differentiation was seen between the four populations, with most pair-wise FST values being less than 0.03. Slightly higher FST values (GST’ = 0.075, ? = 0.07) were detected when the data for T. annulata parasites in Oman was compared with that previously generated for Turkey and Tunisia. Conclusion Genetic analyses of T. annulata samples representing four geographical regions in Oman revealed a high level of genetic diversity in the parasite population. There was little evidence of genetic differentiation between parasites from different regions, and a high level of genetic diversity was maintained within each sub-population. These findings are consistent with a high parasite transmission rate and frequent movement of animals between different regions in Oman. PMID:26469349

  6. Population genetic diversity and hybrid detection in captive zebras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Hideyuki; Langenhorst, Tanya; Ogden, Rob; Inoue-Murayama, Miho

    2015-01-01

    Zebras are members of the horse family. There are three species of zebras: the plains zebra Equus quagga, the Grevy's zebra E. grevyi and the mountain zebra E. zebra. The Grevy's zebra and the mountain zebra are endangered, and hybridization between the Grevy's zebra and the plains zebra has been documented, leading to a requirement for conservation genetic management within and between the species. We characterized 28 microsatellite markers in Grevy's zebra and assessed cross-amplification in plains zebra and two of its subspecies, as well as mountain zebra. A range of standard indices were employed to examine population genetic diversity and hybrid populations between Grevy's and plains zebra were simulated to investigate subspecies and hybrid detection. Microsatellite marker polymorphism was conserved across species with sufficient variation to enable individual identification in all populations. Comparative diversity estimates indicated greater genetic variation in plains zebra and its subspecies than Grevy's zebra, despite potential ascertainment bias. Species and subspecies differentiation were clearly demonstrated and F1 and F2 hybrids were correctly identified. These findings provide insights into captive population genetic diversity in zebras and support the use of these markers for identifying hybrids, including the known hybrid issue in the endangered Grevy's zebra. PMID:26294133

  7. Genetic Diversity in Brassica Species Using SDS-PAGE Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Md. Mukhlesur

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Eighty five different cultivars of Brassica rapa, B.juncea, B.napus, B. carinata, B. oleracea and hexaploid Brassica, collected from Bangladesh, Japan, China and Denmark, were analyzed for seed and leaf protein variations by SDS-PAGE to identify the polymorphic genetic markers for evaluation of genetic resources. Ten polymorphic markers were identified from seed protein and no identifiable polymorphic band was found from leaf protein. However, polymorphic markers clearly distinguished these Brassica species. Brassica rapa var. `yellow sarson` of Bangladesh origin showed uniquely identifiable four polymorphic bands for seed protein in contrast to the other B.rapa of brown-seeded type. The Bangladeshi and Japanese cultivars of B. rapa differed among protein quantity. Analytical results of SDS-PAGE for seed protein showed that hexaploid Brassica has the highest indices, such as % of polymorphic band, the degree of phenotypic diversity (Ho, diversity value for genetic marker (HEP and the sum of the effective number of alleles (SENA. The genetic diversity values of hexaploid Brassica were followed by amphidiploid (B. napus, B. juncea, B. carinata and diploid (B. oleracea, B. rapa species, respectively.

  8. Genetic diversity of Ascaris in southwestern Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Betson, Martha; Nejsum, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Despite the common occurrence of ascariasis in southwestern Uganda, helminth control in the region has been limited. To gain further insights into the genetic diversity of Ascaris in this area, a parasitological survey in mothers (n=41) and children (n=74) living in two villages, Habutobere and Musezero, was carried out. Adult Ascaris worms were collected from infected individuals by chemo-expulsion using pyrantel pamoate treatment. Genetic diversity within these worms was assessed by inspection of DNA sequence variation in a mitochondrial marker and length polymorphism at microsatellite loci. Overall prevalence of ascariasis was 42.5% in mothers and 30.4% in their children and a total of 98 worms was examined from 18 hosts. Sequence analysis of a portion of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 gene revealed 19 different haplotypes, 13 of which had not been previously encountered. Microsatellite analysis using eight loci provided evidence for high gene flow between worm populations from the two villages but comparing these worms with others obtained in a prior study on Unguja, Zanzibar, confirmed little genetic exchange and mixing of worm populations between the two areas. By adding to our understanding of the genetic diversity of Ascaris in Africa, this study provides useful information for monitoring changes in parasite population structure in the face of ongoing and future control.

  9. Genetic diversity affects colony survivorship in commercial honey bee colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpy, David R.; vanEngelsdorp, Dennis; Pettis, Jeffrey S.

    2013-08-01

    Honey bee ( Apis mellifera) queens mate with unusually high numbers of males (average of approximately 12 drones), although there is much variation among queens. One main consequence of such extreme polyandry is an increased diversity of worker genotypes within a colony, which has been shown empirically to confer significant adaptive advantages that result in higher colony productivity and survival. Moreover, honey bees are the primary insect pollinators used in modern commercial production agriculture, and their populations have been in decline worldwide. Here, we compare the mating frequencies of queens, and therefore, intracolony genetic diversity, in three commercial beekeeping operations to determine how they correlate with various measures of colony health and productivity, particularly the likelihood of queen supersedure and colony survival in functional, intensively managed beehives. We found the average effective paternity frequency ( m e ) of this population of honey bee queens to be 13.6 ± 6.76, which was not significantly different between colonies that superseded their queen and those that did not. However, colonies that were less genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e ? 7.0) were 2.86 times more likely to die by the end of the study when compared to colonies that were more genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e > 7.0). The stark contrast in colony survival based on increased genetic diversity suggests that there are important tangible benefits of increased queen mating number in managed honey bees, although the exact mechanism(s) that govern these benefits have not been fully elucidated.

  10. Genetic diversity affects colony survivorship in commercial honey bee colonies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarpy, David R; Vanengelsdorp, Dennis; Pettis, Jeffrey S

    2013-08-01

    Honey bee (Apis mellifera) queens mate with unusually high numbers of males (average of approximately 12 drones), although there is much variation among queens. One main consequence of such extreme polyandry is an increased diversity of worker genotypes within a colony, which has been shown empirically to confer significant adaptive advantages that result in higher colony productivity and survival. Moreover, honey bees are the primary insect pollinators used in modern commercial production agriculture, and their populations have been in decline worldwide. Here, we compare the mating frequencies of queens, and therefore, intracolony genetic diversity, in three commercial beekeeping operations to determine how they correlate with various measures of colony health and productivity, particularly the likelihood of queen supersedure and colony survival in functional, intensively managed beehives. We found the average effective paternity frequency (m e ) of this population of honey bee queens to be 13.6?±?6.76, which was not significantly different between colonies that superseded their queen and those that did not. However, colonies that were less genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e ???7.0) were 2.86 times more likely to die by the end of the study when compared to colonies that were more genetically diverse (headed by queens with m e ?>?7.0). The stark contrast in colony survival based on increased genetic diversity suggests that there are important tangible benefits of increased queen mating number in managed honey bees, although the exact mechanism(s) that govern these benefits have not been fully elucidated. PMID:23728203

  11. Evaluation of genetic diversity in different Pakistani wheat land races

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheat is one of the main sources of nutrition worldwide. Genetic improvement of the seed makes wheat a source of high quality flour for human consumption and for other industrial uses. With the help of molecular markers, the available germplasm of wheat can be assessed for future breeding programs. Therefore, the aim of the present work was to analyze the genetic diversity among 15 Pakistani wheat land races based on Random Amplified Polymorphism DNA (RAPD) markers. A total of 284 DNA fragments were amplified, ranging in size from 200bp to 1100bp by using six primers. The number of DNA fragments for each primer varied from 2 (OPC-6) to 9 (OPC-8) with an average of 6 fragments per primer. Out of 284 amplified products, 120 were monomorphic and 137 were polymorphic showing an average of 7.8% polymorphism per primer. One specific marker was detected both for OPC-1 and OPC-8, two for OPC-5, while no RAPD specific marker was detected for the remaining primers. The genetic similarity index values ranged from 0.36 to 0.93, with an average of 0.64. Maximum genetic similarity (91%) was observed between Sur bej and Khushkawa. On the contrary, minimum genetic similarity (32%) was observed in Khushkaba-1 and Khushkawa. The dendrogram resulting from the NTSYS cluster analysis showed that the studied genotypes are divided into two main clusters from the same node. The first cluster contained 13 land races, while the second cluster contained only 2 land races. The dendrogram clustered the genotypes into 5 groups and showed efficiency in identifying genetic variability. These results indicated the usefulness of RAPD technique in estimating the genetic diversity among wheat genetic resources. (author)

  12. A genetic algorithm approach to recognition and data mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Punch, W.F.; Goodman, E.D.; Min, Pei [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    We review here our use of genetic algorithm (GA) and genetic programming (GP) techniques to perform {open_quotes}data mining,{close_quotes} the discovery of particular/important data within large datasets, by finding optimal data classifications using known examples. Our first experiments concentrated on the use of a K-nearest neighbor algorithm in combination with a GA. The GA selected weights for each feature so as to optimize knn classification based on a linear combination of features. This combined GA-knn approach was successfully applied to both generated and real-world data. We later extended this work by substituting a GP for the GA. The GP-knn could not only optimize data classification via linear combinations of features but also determine functional relationships among the features. This allowed for improved performance and new information on important relationships among features. We review the effectiveness of the overall approach on examples from biology and compare the effectiveness of the GA and GP.

  13. The genetic diversity of Sardinian myrtle (Myrtus communis L.) populations

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Sara, Melito; Innocenza, Chessa; Patrizia, Erre; János, Podani; Maurizio, Mulas.

    2013-11-15

    Full Text Available Background: The myrtle (Myrtus communis) is a common shrub widespread in the Mediterranean Basin. Its fruit and leaves exhibit antioxidant, antibacterial and antifungal properties, and are used for their content of essential oils and for their medicinal properties, but most commonly as an ingredient [...] in locally made liquor. The uncontrolled exploitation of natural stands has reduced both the species' geographical coverage and the size of individual populations. The selection of genotypes for controlled cultivation requires a characterization of the genetic diversity present both within and between populations. Results: Genotypic variation was evaluated using ISSR profiling and genetic diversity characterized using standard population genetics approaches. Two major clusters were identified: one capturing all the candidate cultivars selected from various Sardinian localities, and the other wild individuals collected from Asinara, Corsica and Surigheddu. A moderate level of gene flow between the Sardinian and Corsican populations was identified. Discriminant analysis of principal components revealed a level of separation among the wild populations, confirming the population structure identified by the clustering methods. Conclusions: The wild accessions were well differentiated from the candidate cultivars. The level of genetic variability was high. The genetic data were compatible with the notion that myrtle has a mixed pollination system, including both out-pollination by insects and self-pollination. The candidate cultivars are suggested to represent an appropriate basis for directed breeding.

  14. A Novel Method for Privacy Preserving in Association Rule Mining Based on Genetic Algorithms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Naderi Dehkordi

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Extracting of knowledge form large amount of data is an important issue in data mining systems. One of most important activities in data mining is association rule mining and the new head for data mining research area is privacy of mining. Today association rule mining has been a hot research topic in Data Mining and security area. A lot of research has done in this area but most of them focused on perturbation of original database heuristically. Therefore the final accuracy of released database falls down intensely. In addition to accuracy of database the main aspect of security in this area is privacy of database that is not warranted in most heuristic approaches, perfectly. In this paper we introduce new multi-objective method for hiding sensitive association rules based on the concept of genetic algorithms. The main purpose of this method is fully supporting security of database and keeping the utility and certainty of mined rules at highest level.

  15. Genetic diversity and genetic structure of the rare and endangered species, Primula ranunculoides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyun Wang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The rare and endangered species Primula ranunculoides is endemic to China and is of reasonably high potential horticultural value. The genetic diversity and structure of the species was examined by surveying variation at nine microsatellite loci across 222 individuals sampled from seven natural populations. The results indicated that there was relatively low genetic diversity present within populations (He = 0.330, Ho = 0.286 and high genetic differentiation among populations. Levels of population genetic diversity and effective population size were both correlated with plant density, rather than population census size or population area. Gene flow between populations was low (Nm = 0.730 and an AMOVA analysis showed that 48.08% of the total genetic diversity was attributable to among populations and the rest (51.92% to variation within populations. Bayesian assignment and principal coordinate analyses supported clustering of the seven populations into four groups, which were correlated with topographical features. This suggested that Lianghu Plain (Dongtinghu Plain and Jianghan Plain and the farming area of Xiushui and Wuning counties were major barriers to gene flow, causing high divergence between different mountain populations. Based on the genetic structure of P. ranunculoides, four management units for conservation purposes are proposed, i.e. the Jiulingshan, Mufushan, Qizimeishan and Yinlu units.

  16. Genetic diversity of Cuban pineapple germplasm assessed by AFLP Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ermis Yanes Paz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The Cuban pineapple germplasm collection represents the genetic diversity of pineapple cultivated in that country and includes other important genotypes obtained from the germplasm collections in Brazil and Martinique. The collection has previously been characterized with morphological descriptors but a molecular characterization has been lacking. With this aim, 56 six genotypes of A. comosus and one of Bromelia pinguin were analyzed with a total of 191 AFLP markers. A dendrogram that represents the genetic relationships between these samples based on the AFLP results showed a low level of diversity in the Cuban pineapple collection. All Ananas comosus accessions, being the majority obtained from farmers in different regions in Cuba, are grouped at distances lower than 0.20. Molecular characterization was in line with morphological characterization. These results are useful for breeding and conservation purposes.

  17. A genomic scale map of genetic diversity in Trypanosoma cruzi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ackermann Alejandro A

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas Disease, affects more than 16 million people in Latin America. The clinical outcome of the disease results from a complex interplay between environmental factors and the genetic background of both the human host and the parasite. However, knowledge of the genetic diversity of the parasite, is currently limited to a number of highly studied loci. The availability of a number of genomes from different evolutionary lineages of T. cruzi provides an unprecedented opportunity to look at the genetic diversity of the parasite at a genomic scale. Results Using a bioinformatic strategy, we have clustered T. cruzi sequence data available in the public domain and obtained multiple sequence alignments in which one or two alleles from the reference CL-Brener were included. These data covers 4 major evolutionary lineages (DTUs: TcI, TcII, TcIII, and the hybrid TcVI. Using these set of alignments we have identified 288,957 high quality single nucleotide polymorphisms and 1,480 indels. In a reduced re-sequencing study we were able to validate ~ 97% of high-quality SNPs identified in 47 loci. Analysis of how these changes affect encoded protein products showed a 0.77 ratio of synonymous to non-synonymous changes in the T. cruzi genome. We observed 113 changes that introduce or remove a stop codon, some causing significant functional changes, and a number of tri-allelic and tetra-allelic SNPs that could be exploited in strain typing assays. Based on an analysis of the observed nucleotide diversity we show that the T. cruzi genome contains a core set of genes that are under apparent purifying selection. Interestingly, orthologs of known druggable targets show statistically significant lower nucleotide diversity values. Conclusions This study provides the first look at the genetic diversity of T. cruzi at a genomic scale. The analysis covers an estimated ~ 60% of the genetic diversity present in the population, providing an essential resource for future studies on the development of new drugs and diagnostics, for Chagas Disease. These data is available through the TcSNP database (http://snps.tcruzi.org.

  18. Description and analysis of genetic diversity among squash accessions

    OpenAIRE

    Athanasios L. Tsivelikas; Olga Koutita; Anastasia Anastasiadou; Skaracis, George N.; Ekaterini Traka-Mavrona; Metaxia Koutsika-Sotiriou

    2009-01-01

    In this work, the part of the squash core collection, maintained in the Greek Gene Bank, was assessed using the morphological and molecular data. Sixteen incompletely classified accessions of the squash were characterized along with an evaluation of their resistance against two isolates of Fusarium oxysporum. A molecular analysis using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers was also performed, revealing high level of polymorphism. To study the genetic diversity among the squash acces...

  19. Genetic diversity of siderophore-producing bacteria of tobacco rhizosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Tian, Fang; Ding, Yanqin; Zhu, Hui; Yao, Liangtong; Du, Binghai

    2009-01-01

    The genetic diversity of siderophore-producing bacteria of tobacco rhizosphere was studied by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), 16S rRNA sequence homology and phylogenetics analysis methods. Studies demonstrated that 85% of the total 354 isolates produced siderophores in iron limited liquid medium. A total of 28 ARDRA patterns were identified among the 299 siderophore-producing bacterial isolates. The 28 ARDRA patterns represented bacteria of 14 different genera belonging ...

  20. Assessment of Genetic Diversity in Iranian Fennels Using ISSR Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Kaivan Bahmani; Ali Izadi-Darbandi; Ali Ashraf Jafari; Seyed Ahmad Sadat Noori; Mostafa Farajpour

    2012-01-01

    Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare Mill.) is an important medicinal plant with used for various purposes in different industries. In this study 25 different ecotypes of fennel from all over Iran were collected and their genetic diversity studied by seven ISSR primers. Seven ISSR primers generated 52 amplified fragments, of which 49 were polymorphic. The highest similarity coefficient among the ecotypes was between Chahestan and Haji abad whereas the minimum similarity coefficient observed between Foz...

  1. Relationship and genetic diversity of mistletoe (Viscum album L.) subspecies

    OpenAIRE

    Leon Mejnartowicz

    2006-01-01

    With the help of 21 putative isoenzyme loci, the genetic diversity and variations of Viscum album ssp. album L. from 42 species, subspecies, varieties and hybrids of broadleaf trees, Viscum album ssp. austriacum (Wiesb.) Vollmann, from 4 populations of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) and Viscum album ssp. abietis (Wiesb.) Abromeit, from 8 populations of European silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) were analyzed. On the dendrogram, the three investigated subspecies form three clusters, each clearly...

  2. DETECTION OF GENETIC DIVERSITY OF TRITICALE BY MICROSATELLITE MARKERS

    OpenAIRE

    Andrej Trebichalský; Želmíra Balážová; Zdenka Gálová; Milan Chňapek; Marián Tomka

    2013-01-01

    The aim of our work was to detect genetic variability in the set of 59 winter and spring triticale (x Triticosecale Witt.) varieties using 5 wheat SSR markers. Totally, 35 alleles with an average number of 7 alleles per locus were detected. The highest number of alleles showed out Xbarc 004 (9). Based on the number and frequencies of alleles, the diversity index (DI), the probability of identity (PI) and the polymorphic information content (PIC) of SSR markers were calculated. The polymorphic...

  3. Pathogenesis and genetic diversity of rodent Torque teno virus

    OpenAIRE

    Nishiyama, Shoko

    2013-01-01

    Torque teno virus (TTV) is a single stranded circular DNA virus and, despite its widespread nature in the human population, its pathogenesis is still unknown. Factors complicating TTV research include its huge genetic diversity, difficulties identifying an uninfected control population, the lack of a small animal model and lack of a good cell culture system for viral propagation. Recently we have identified a TTV homologue (RoTTV) in wild rodents. RoTTV was frequently observed in wood mice an...

  4. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Azerbaijan

    OpenAIRE

    Majori Giancarlo; Aliyev Namig; Gasimov Elkhan; Mammadov Suleyman; Noyer Jean; Cligny Alexandra; Menegon Michela; Leclerc Marie; Severini Carlo

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Plasmodium vivax, although causing a less serious disease than Plasmodium falciparum, is the most widespread of the four human malarial species. Further to the recent recrudescence of P. vivax cases in the Newly Independent States (NIS) of central Asia, a survey on the genetic diversity and dissemination in Azerbaijan was undertaken. Azerbaijan is at the crossroads of Asia and, as such, could see a rise in the number of cases, although an effective malaria control programm...

  5. Genetic diversity in Spanish donkey breeds using microsatellite DNA markers

    OpenAIRE

    Aranguren-Méndez, José; Jordana, Jordi; Gomez, Mariano

    2001-01-01

    Genetic diversity at 13 equine microsatellite loci was compared in five endangered Spanish donkey breeds: Andaluza, Catalana, Mallorquina, Encartaciones and Zamorano-Leonesa. All of the equine microsatellites used in this study were amplified and were polymorphic in the domestic donkey breeds with the exception of HMS1, which was monomorphic, and ASB2, which failed to amplify. Allele number, frequency distributions and mean heterozygosities were very similar among the Spanish donkey breeds. T...

  6. Genetic diversity in Hucul and Polish primitive horse breeds

    OpenAIRE

    M. Mackowski; Mucha, S.; CHOLEWINSKI, G.; Cieslak, J.

    2015-01-01

    Pedigree and molecular data were used to evaluate genetic diversity in the Polish populations of the Polish primitive horse (also known as Polish Konik) and Hucul breeds over the time period of 30 years (1980–2011). Based on genotypes in 12 microsatellite loci (for 3865 Polish primitive horses and 1627 Huculs), as well as on pedigree data derived from over 7000 individuals (both breeds), several indices describing structure of the analysed populations were estimated. For both ...

  7. Genetic diversity in Spanish donkey breeds using microsatellite DNA markers

    OpenAIRE

    Jordana Jordi; Aranguren-Méndez José; Gomez Mariano

    2001-01-01

    Abstract Genetic diversity at 13 equine microsatellite loci was compared in five endangered Spanish donkey breeds: Andaluza, Catalana, Mallorquina, Encartaciones and Zamorano-Leonesa. All of the equine microsatellites used in this study were amplified and were polymorphic in the domestic donkey breeds with the exception of HMS1, which was monomorphic, and ASB2, which failed to amplify. Allele number, frequency distributions and mean heterozygosities were very similar among the Spanish donkey ...

  8. Genetic Diversity of the Cameroon Indigenous Chicken Ecotypes

    OpenAIRE

    T.C. Keambou; B.A. Hako; Ommeh, S; C. Bembide; E.P. Ngono; Y. Manjeli; F. Wamonje; Nzuki; B. Wanjala; Wamalwa, M.; Cho, C Y; R.A. Skilton; Djikeng, A

    2014-01-01

    Cameroon has a wide range of agro-ecological zones, having indigenous chicken populations which are thought to be adapted and diversified. Genetic diversity of the Cameroon chicken populations from agro-ecological zones I, II, III and IV was assessed using 25 microsatellite markers. A total of 314 chickens were genotyped, revealing 226 distinct alleles and 24 private alleles (10.62%). The mean polymorphic information content was 0.57. The average observed, ...

  9. Genetic diversity in the Dutch harness horse population using pedigree

    OpenAIRE

    Schurink, A.; Arts, D.J.G.; Ducro, B J

    2012-01-01

    The Royal Dutch Warmblood Studbook consists of several types with different population sizes. The harness horse population, one of the types, is for several reasons suspected of substantial inbreeding. Since 2005 the studbook started applying measures to reduce inbreeding in the harness horse population. The aim of our study was to investigate the genetic diversity in the Dutch harness horse population. Furthermore, we determined whether attempts to reduce inbreeding in the Dutch harness hors...

  10. Genetic Diversity within Cryptosporidium parvum and Related Cryptosporidium Species

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Lihua; Morgan, Una M.; Limor, Josef; Escalante, Ananias; Arrowood, Michael; Shulaw, William; Thompson, R. C. A.; Fayer, Ronald; Altaf A Lal

    1999-01-01

    To assess the genetic diversity in Cryptosporidium parvum, we have sequenced the small subunit (SSU) rRNA gene of seven Cryptosporidium spp., various isolates of C. parvum from eight hosts, and a Cryptosporidium isolate from a desert monitor. Phylogenetic analysis of the SSU rRNA sequences confirmed the multispecies nature of the genus Cryptosporidium, with at least four distinct species (C. parvum, C. baileyi, C. muris, and C. serpentis). Other species previously defined by biologic characte...

  11. Genetic Diversity of Cryptosporidium spp. in Captive Reptiles

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Lihua; Ryan, Una M.; Thaddeus K. Graczyk; Limor, Josef; Li, Lixia; Kombert, Mark; Junge, Randy; Sulaiman, Irshad M.; Ling ZHOU; Arrowood, Michael J; Koudela, B?etislav; Modrý, David; Altaf A Lal

    2004-01-01

    The genetic diversity of Cryptosporidium in reptiles was analyzed by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism and sequence analysis of the small subunit rRNA gene. A total of 123 samples were analyzed, of which 48 snake samples, 24 lizard samples, and 3 tortoise samples were positive for Cryptosporidium. Nine different types of Cryptosporidium were found, including Cryptosporidium serpentis, Cryptosporidium desert monitor genotype, Cryptosporidium muris, Cryptosporidium parvum bovine and ...

  12. The genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Wanessa Christina de Souza-Neiras; Luciane Moreno Storti de Melo; Ricardo Luiz Dantas Machado

    2007-01-01

    The genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax has been investigated in several malaria-endemic areas, including the Brazilian Amazon region, where this is currently the most prevalent species causing malaria in humans. This review summarizes current views on the use of molecular markers to examine P. vivax populations, with a focus on studies performed in Brazilian research laboratories. We emphasize the importance of phylogenetic studies on this parasite and discuss the perspectives created by o...

  13. Genetic diversity and population structure of three Indian horse breeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, Mamta; Gupta, Ashok Kumar; Dhillon, Santosh

    2011-06-01

    The genetic relationships of three Indian horse breeds-Marwari, Spiti, and Kathiawari were studied by genotyping 96 individuals with 20 polymorphic microsatellite markers. A total of 157 alleles were detected across 20 polymorphic loci. The Marwari population showed the highest allelic diversity (A = 5.7 and Ar = 5.14), followed by Spiti (A = 4.9 and Ar = 4.74) and Kathiawari (A = 4.1 and Ar = 3.82). The gene diversity was highest in the Spiti population (He = 0.67), followed by Marwari (He = 0.66) and Kathiawari (He = 0.59). Within population inbreeding estimates (f) in Marwari, Spiti and Kathiawari breeds were 0.18, 0.08, and 0.07, respectively, suggesting high level of inbreeding in these breeds. Analysis of bottleneck revealed evidence of recent bottleneck in Spiti and Kathiawari populations. Pair-wise Fst analysis, AMOVA and assignment tests demonstrated high genetic differentiation and low gene flow between populations. The information about genetic diversity and population structure will be useful for the future development of effective breeding management in order to preserve these Indian horse breeds. PMID:21104137

  14. DETECTION OF GENETIC DIVERSITY OF TRITICALE BY MICROSATELLITE MARKERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Trebichalský

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of our work was to detect genetic variability in the set of 59 winter and spring triticale (x Triticosecale Witt. varieties using 5 wheat SSR markers. Totally, 35 alleles with an average number of 7 alleles per locus were detected. The highest number of alleles showed out Xbarc 004 (9. Based on the number and frequencies of alleles, the diversity index (DI, the probability of identity (PI and the polymorphic information content (PIC of SSR markers were calculated. The polymorphic information content (PIC ranged from 0.264 to 0.920 with an average of 0.654, which is generally considered sufficient for this purpose. For the assessment of genetic diversity the dendrogram, based on the hierarchical cluster analysis using UPGMA algorithm was prepared. Fifty nine triticale cultivars were grouped into three major clusters. The cultivar Terelland 22 (USA separated as unique one, second subcluster contained 3 cultivars and third one 55 cultivars. It was not possible to differentiate 15 genotypes between each other. For better differentiation it is necessary to use more polymorphic microsatellite markers. Results showed the utility of microsatellite markers for estimation of genetic diversity of triticale genotypes leading to genotype identification.

  15. Probing genetic diversity to characterize red rot resistance in sugarcane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genetic diversity was assessed in a set of twelve sugarcane genotypes using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD). A total of thirty-two oligo-primers were employed, sixteen of them revealed amplification at 149 loci, out of which 136 were polymorphic. The genotype SPSG-26 showed the highest number of polymorphic loci, followed by CSSG-668 and HSF-242. Pairwise genetic similarity ranged from 67.2% to 83.3%. The UPGMA cluster analysis resolved most of the accessions in two groups. The clustering pattern did not place all resistant varieties in one or related group which depict diverse resistance source in the present set of sugarcane varieties. Ten primers revealed genotype specific bands among which four primers (K07, H02, K10 and F01) produced multiple genotype specific bands that aid genotype identification especially those with red rot resistance. The present study not only provided information on the genetic diversity among the genotypes but also revealed the potential of RAPD-PCR markers for genotype identification and therefore could be utilized in marker assisted selection for red rot resistance in sugarcane. (author)

  16. Feature Selection in Data-Mining for Genetics Using Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Rajavarman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We discovered genetic features and environmental factors which were involved in multifactorial diseases. To exploit the massive data obtained from the experiments conducted at the General Hospital, Chennai, data mining tools were required and we proposed a 2-Phase approach using a specific genetic algorithm. This heuristic approach had been chosen as the number of features to consider was large (upto 3654 for biological data under our study. Collected data indicated for pairs of affected individuals of a same family their similarity at given points (locus of their chromosomes. This was represented in a matrix where each locus was represented by a column and each pairs of individuals considered by a row. The objective was first to isolate the most relevant associations of features and then to class individuals that had the considered disease according to these associations. For the first phase, the feature selection problem, we used a genetic algorithm (GA. To deal with this very specific problem, some advanced mechanisms had been introduced in the genetic algorithm such as sharing, random immigrant, dedicated genetic operators and a particular distance operator had been defined. Then, the second phase, a clustering based on the features selected during the previous phase, will use the clustering algorithm k-means.

  17. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Siberian apricot (Prunus sibirica L.) in China

    OpenAIRE

    Ming Li; Zhong Zhao; Xingjun Miao; Jingjing Zhou

    2013-01-01

    The genetic diversity and population genetic structure of 252 accessions from 21 Prunus sibirica L. populations were investigated using 10 ISSR, SSR, and SRAP markers. The results suggest that the entire population has a relatively high level of genetic diversity, with populations HR and MY showing very high diversity. A low level of inter-population genetic differentiation and a high level of intra-population genetic differentiation was found, which is supported by a moderate level of gene f...

  18. Evaluation of bamboo genetic diversity using morphological and SRAP analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S; Liu, T; Tang, Q; Fu, L; Tang, Sh

    2014-03-01

    Bamboo is an important member of the giant grass subfamily Bambusoideae of Poaceae. In this study, 13 bamboo accessions belonging to 5 different genera were subjected to morphological evaluation and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) analysis. Unweighted pair-group method of arithmetic averages (UPGMA) cluster analysis was used to construct a dendrogram and to estimate the genetic distances among accessions. On the basis of morphological characteristics, the 13 accessions were distinctly classified into 2 major clusters; 3 varieties, PPYX, PGNK, and PLYY were grouped as cluster A, and 10 accessions were categorized under cluster B. Similarity coefficients ranging from 0.23 to 0.96 indicated abundant genetic variation among bamboo varieties. Approximately 38 SRAP primer combinations generated 186 bands, with 150 bands (80.65%) showing polymorphisms among the 13 accessions. Based on SRAP analysis, 13 bamboo accessions were grouped into 3 major clusters. Five species comprised Cluster I (PASL, PLYY, PTSC, SCNK, and BMAK), which belongs to genus Phyllostachys. Cluster II consisted of 5 varieties, PASL, PLYY, PTSC, SCNK, and BMAK; Cluster III included 3 varieties, PGNK, PLSY, and BMRS. Comparison of the results generated by morphological and SRAP analyses showed that the classification based on SRAP markers was more concordant to the taxonomic results of Gamble than that performed using morphological characters, thus suggesting that SRAP analysis is more efficient in evaluating genetic diversity in bamboos compared to morphological analysis. The SRAP technique serves as an alternative method in assessing genetic diversity within bamboo collections. PMID:25508082

  19. Genetic and Functional Diversity of Propagating Cells in Glioblastoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara G.M. Piccirillo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is a lethal malignancy whose clinical intransigence has been linked to extensive intraclonal genetic and phenotypic diversity and the common emergence of therapeutic resistance. This interpretation embodies the implicit assumption that cancer stem cells or tumor-propagating cells are themselves genetically and functionally diverse. To test this, we screened primary GBM tumors by SNP array to identify copy number alterations (a minimum of three that could be visualized in single cells by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization. Interrogation of neurosphere-derived cells (from four patients and cells derived from secondary transplants of these same cells in NOD-SCID mice allowed us to infer the clonal and phylogenetic architectures. Whole-exome sequencing and single-cell genetic analysis in one case revealed a more complex clonal structure. This proof-of-principle experiment revealed that subclones in each GBM had variable regenerative or stem cell activity, and highlighted genetic alterations associated with more competitive propagating activity in vivo.

  20. Genetic and functional diversity of propagating cells in glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piccirillo, Sara G M; Colman, Sue; Potter, Nicola E; van Delft, Frederik W; Lillis, Suzanne; Carnicer, Maria-Jose; Kearney, Lyndal; Watts, Colin; Greaves, Mel

    2015-01-13

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a lethal malignancy whose clinical intransigence has been linked to extensive intraclonal genetic and phenotypic diversity and the common emergence of therapeutic resistance. This interpretation embodies the implicit assumption that cancer stem cells or tumor-propagating cells are themselves genetically and functionally diverse. To test this, we screened primary GBM tumors by SNP array to identify copy number alterations (a minimum of three) that could be visualized in single cells by multicolor fluorescence in situ hybridization. Interrogation of neurosphere-derived cells (from four patients) and cells derived from secondary transplants of these same cells in NOD-SCID mice allowed us to infer the clonal and phylogenetic architectures. Whole-exome sequencing and single-cell genetic analysis in one case revealed a more complex clonal structure. This proof-of-principle experiment revealed that subclones in each GBM had variable regenerative or stem cell activity, and highlighted genetic alterations associated with more competitive propagating activity in vivo. PMID:25533637

  1. Genetic Diversity in Natural Populations of New World Leishmania

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Elisa, Cupolillo; Hooman, Momen; Gabriel, Grimaldi Jr.

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Our results have shown the wide diversity of parasites within New World Leishmania. Biochemical and molecular characterization of species within the genus has revealed that much of the population heterogeneity has a genetic basis. The source of genetic diversity among Leishmania appears to arise fro [...] m predominantly asexual, clonal reproduction, although occasional bouts of sexual reproduction can not be ruled out. Genetic variation is extensive with some clones widely distributed and others seemingly unique and localized to a particular endemic focus. Epidemiological studies of leishmaniasis has been directed to the ecology and dynamics of transmission of Leishmania species/variants, particularly in localized areas. Future research using molecular techniques should aim to identify and follow Leishmania types in nature and correlate genetic typing with important clinical characteristics such as virulence, pathogenicity, drug resistance and antigenic variation. The epidemiological significance of such variation not only has important implications for the control of the leishmaniases, but would also help to elucidate the evolutionary biology of the causative agents.

  2. Genetic Diversity in Natural Populations of New World Leishmania

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Cupolillo

    1998-09-01

    Full Text Available Our results have shown the wide diversity of parasites within New World Leishmania. Biochemical and molecular characterization of species within the genus has revealed that much of the population heterogeneity has a genetic basis. The source of genetic diversity among Leishmania appears to arise from predominantly asexual, clonal reproduction, although occasional bouts of sexual reproduction can not be ruled out. Genetic variation is extensive with some clones widely distributed and others seemingly unique and localized to a particular endemic focus. Epidemiological studies of leishmaniasis has been directed to the ecology and dynamics of transmission of Leishmania species/variants, particularly in localized areas. Future research using molecular techniques should aim to identify and follow Leishmania types in nature and correlate genetic typing with important clinical characteristics such as virulence, pathogenicity, drug resistance and antigenic variation. The epidemiological significance of such variation not only has important implications for the control of the leishmaniases, but would also help to elucidate the evolutionary biology of the causative agents.

  3. Promoting utilization of Saccharum spp. genetic resources through genetic diversity analysis and core collection construction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Spurthi N; Song, Jian; Villa, Andrea; Pathak, Bhuvan; Ayala-Silva, Tomas; Yang, Xiping; Todd, James; Glynn, Neil C; Kuhn, David N; Glaz, Barry; Gilbert, Robert A; Comstock, Jack C; Wang, Jianping

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) and other members of Saccharum spp. are attractive biofuel feedstocks. One of the two World Collections of Sugarcane and Related Grasses (WCSRG) is in Miami, FL. This WCSRG has 1002 accessions, presumably with valuable alleles for biomass, other important agronomic traits, and stress resistance. However, the WCSRG has not been fully exploited by breeders due to its lack of characterization and unmanageable population. In order to optimize the use of this genetic resource, we aim to 1) genotypically evaluate all the 1002 accessions to understand its genetic diversity and population structure and 2) form a core collection, which captures most of the genetic diversity in the WCSRG. We screened 36 microsatellite markers on 1002 genotypes and recorded 209 alleles. Genetic diversity of the WCSRG ranged from 0 to 0.5 with an average of 0.304. The population structure analysis and principal coordinate analysis revealed three clusters with all S. spontaneum in one cluster, S. officinarum and S. hybrids in the second cluster and mostly non-Saccharum spp. in the third cluster. A core collection of 300 accessions was identified which captured the maximum genetic diversity of the entire WCSRG which can be further exploited for sugarcane and energy cane breeding. Sugarcane and energy cane breeders can effectively utilize this core collection for cultivar improvement. Further, the core collection can provide resources for forming an association panel to evaluate the traits of agronomic and commercial importance. PMID:25333358

  4. Genetic differentiation and diversity of Callosobruchus chinensis collections from China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, C X; Li, W C; Zhu, Z D; Li, D D; Sun, S L; Wang, X M

    2016-02-01

    Callosobruchus chinensis (Linnaeus) is one of the most destructive pests of leguminous seeds. Genetic differentiation and diversity analysis of 345 C. chinensis individuals from 23 geographic populations using 20 polymorphic simple sequence repeats revealed a total of 149 alleles with an average of 7.45 alleles per locus. The average Shannon's information index was 1.015. The gene flow and genetic differentiation rate values at the 20 loci ranged from 0.201 to 1.841 and 11.0-47.2%, with averages of 0.849 and 24.4%, respectively. In the 23 geographic populations, the effective number of alleles and observed heterozygosity ranged from 1.441 to 2.218 and 0.191-0.410, respectively. Shannon's information index ranged from 0.357 to 0.949, with the highest value in Hohhot and the lowest in Rudong. In all comparisons, the fixation index (F ST ) values ranged from 0.049 to 0.441 with a total F ST value of 0.254 among the 23 C. chinensis populations, indicating a moderate level of genetic differentiation and gene flow among these populations. Analysis of molecular variance revealed that the genetic variation within populations accounted for 76.7% of the total genetic variation. The genetic similarity values between populations varied from 0.617 to 0.969, whereas genetic distances varied from 0.032 to 0.483. Using unweighted pair-group method using arithmetical averages cluster analysis, the 23 geographic collections were classified into four distinct genetic groups but most of them were clustered into a single group. The pattern of the three concentrated groups from polymerase chain reactions analysis showed a somewhat different result with cluster. PMID:26548842

  5. A MULTI-LOCUS, MULTI-TAXA PHYLOGEOGRAPHICAL ANALYSIS OF GENETIC DIVERSITY

    Science.gov (United States)

    In addition to measuring spatial patterns of genetic diversity, population genetic measures of biological resources should include temporal data that indicate whether the observed patterns are the result of historical or contemporary processes. In general, genetic measures focus...

  6. Genetic diversity and networks of exchange: a combined approach to assess intra-breed diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dumasy Jean-François

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cryopreservation of three endangered Belgian sheep breeds required to characterize their intra-breed genetic diversity. It is assumed that the genetic structure of a livestock breed depends mostly on gene flow due to exchanges between herds. To quantify this relation, molecular data and analyses of the exchanges were combined for three endangered Belgian breeds. Methods For each breed, between 91 and 225 sheep were genotyped with 19 microsatellites. Genetic differentiations between breeds and among herds within a breed were evaluated and the genetic structure of the breeds was described using Bayesian clustering (Structure. Exchanges of animals between 20, 46 and 95 herds according to breed were identified via semi-directed interviews and were analyzed using the concepts of the network theory to calculate average degrees and shortest path lengths between herds. Correlation between the Reynolds’ genetic distances and the shortest path lengths between each pair of herds was assessed by a Mantel test approach. Results Genetic differentiation between breeds was high (0.16. Overall Fst values among herds were high in each breed (0.17, 0.11 and 0.10. Use of the Bayesian approach made it possible to identify genetic groups of herds within a breed. Significant correlations between the shortest path lengths and the Reynolds’ genetic distances were found in each breed (0.87, 0.33 and 0.41, which demonstrate the influence of exchanges between herds on the genetic diversity. Correlation differences between breeds could be explained by differences in the average degree of the animal exchange networks, which is a measure of the number of exchanges per herd. The two breeds with the highest average degree showed the lowest correlation. Information from the exchange networks was used to assign individuals to the genetic groups when molecular information was incomplete or missing to identify donors for a cryobank. Conclusions A fine-scale picture of the population genetic structure at the herd level was obtained for the three breeds. Network analysis made it possible to highlight the influence of exchanges on genetic structure and to complete or replace molecular information in establishing a conservation program.

  7. Characterisation of the genetic diversity of Brucella by multilocus sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MacMillan Alastair P

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Brucella species include economically important zoonotic pathogens that can infect a wide range of animals. There are currently six classically recognised species of Brucella although, as yet unnamed, isolates from various marine mammal species have been reported. In order to investigate genetic relationships within the group and identify potential diagnostic markers we have sequenced multiple genetic loci from a large sample of Brucella isolates representing the known diversity of the genus. Results Nine discrete genomic loci corresponding to 4,396 bp of sequence were examined from 160 Brucella isolates. By assigning each distinct allele at a locus an arbitrary numerical designation the population was found to represent 27 distinct sequence types (STs. Diversity at each locus ranged from 1.03–2.45% while overall genetic diversity equated to 1.5%. Most loci examined represent housekeeping gene loci and, in all but one case, the ratio of non-synonymous to synonymous change was substantially Brucella species, B. abortus, B. melitensis, B. ovis and B. neotomae correspond to well-separated clusters. With the exception of biovar 5, B. suis isolates cluster together, although they form a more diverse group than other classical species with a number of distinct STs corresponding to the remaining four biovars. B. canis isolates are located on the same branch very closely related to, but distinguishable from, B. suis biovar 3 and 4 isolates. Marine mammal isolates represent a distinct, though rather weakly supported, cluster within which individual STs display one of three clear host preferences. Conclusion The sequence database provides a powerful dataset for addressing ongoing controversies in Brucella taxonomy and a tool for unambiguously placing atypical, phenotypically discordant or newly emerging Brucella isolates. Furthermore, by using the phylogenetic backbone described here, robust and rationally selected markers for use in diagnostic assay development can be identified.

  8. Genetic diversity and bottleneck studies in the Marwari horse breed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, A K; Chauhan, M; Tandon, S N

    2005-12-01

    Genetic diversity within the Marwari breed of horses was evaluated using 26 different microsatellite pairs with 48 DNA samples from unrelated horses. This molecular characterisation was undertaken to evaluate the problem of genetic bottlenecks also, if any, in this breed. The estimated mean (-/+ s.e.) allelic diversity was 5.9 (-/+ 2.24), with a total of 133 alleles. A high level of genetic variability within this breed was observed in terms of high values of mean (-/+ s.e.) effective number of alleles (3.3 -/+ 1.27), observed heterozygosity (0.5306 -/+ 0.22), expected Levene's heterozygosity (0.6612 -/+ 0.15), expected Nei's heterozygosity (0.6535 -/+ 0.14), and polymorphism information content (0.6120 -/+ 0.03). Low values of Wright's fixation index, F(IS) (0.2433 -/+ 0.05) indicated low levels of inbreeding. This basic study indicated the existence of substantial genetic diversity in the Marwari horse population. No significant genotypic linkage disequilibrium was detected across the population, suggesting no evidence of linkage between loci. A normal 'L' shaped distribution of mode-shift test, non-significant heterozygote excess on the basis of different models, as revealed from Sign, Standardized differences and Wilcoxon sign rank tests as well as non-significant M ratio value suggested that there was no recent bottleneck in the existing Marwari breed population, which is important information for equine breeders. This study also revealed that the Marwari breed can be differentiated from some other exotic breeds of horses on the basis of three microsatellite primers. PMID:16385161

  9. Hidden genetic diversity in the green alga Spirogyra (Zygnematophyceae, Streptophyta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Charlotte

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The unbranched filamentous green alga Spirogyra (Streptophyta, Zygnemataceae is easily recognizable based on its vegetative morphology, which shows one to several spiral chloroplasts. This simple structure falsely points to a low genetic diversity: Spirogyra is commonly excluded from phylogenetic analyses because the genus is known as a long-branch taxon caused by a high evolutionary rate. Results We focused on this genetic diversity and sequenced 130 Spirogyra small subunit nuclear ribosomal DNA (SSU rDNA strands of different origin. The resulting SSU rDNA sequences were used for phylogenetic analyses using complex evolutionary models (posterior probability, maximum likelihood, neighbor joining, and maximum parsimony methods. The sequences were between 1672 and 1779 nucleotides long. Sequence comparisons revealed 53 individual clones, but our results still support monophyly of the genus. Our data set did not contain a single slow-evolving taxon that would have been placed on a shorter branch compared to the remaining sequences. Out of 130 accessions analyzed, 72 showed a secondary loss of the 1506 group I intron, which formed a long-branched group within the genus. The phylogenetic relationship to the genus Spirotaenia was not resolved satisfactorily. The genetic distance within the genus Spirogyra exceeded the distances measured within any other genus of the remaining Zygnemataceae included in this study. Conclusion Overall, we define eight distinct clades of Spirogyra, one of them including the genus Sirogonium. A large number of non-homoplasious synapomorphies (NHS; 114 NHS in total was found for Spirogyra (41 NHS and for each clade (totaling 73 NHS. This emphasizes the high genetic diversity of this genus and the distance to the remaining Zygnematophyceae.

  10. Genetic diversity and bottleneck studies in the Marwari horse breed

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A. K. Gupta; M. Chauhan; S. N. Tandon; Sonia

    2005-12-01

    Genetic diversity within the Marwari breed of horses was evaluated using 26 different microsatellite pairs with 48 DNA samples from unrelated horses. This molecular characterisation was undertaken to evaluate the problem of genetic bottlenecks also, if any, in this breed. The estimated mean (± s.e.) allelic diversity was 5.9 (± 2.24), with a total of 133 alleles. A high level of genetic variability within this breed was observed in terms of high values of mean (± s.e.) effective number of alleles (3.3 ± 1.27), observed heterozygosity (0.5306 ± 0.22), expected Levene’s heterozygosity (0.6612 ± 0.15), expected Nei’s heterozygosity (0.6535 ± 0.14), and polymorphism information content (0.6120 ± 0.03). Low values of Wright’s fixation index, $F_{\\text{IS}}$ (0.2433 ± 0.05) indicated low levels of inbreeding. This basic study indicated the existence of substantial genetic diversity in the Marwari horse population. No significant genotypic linkage disequilibrium was detected across the population, suggesting no evidence of linkage between loci. A normal ‘L’ shaped distribution of mode–shift test, non-significant heterozygote excess on the basis of different models, as revealed from Sign, Standardized differences and Wilcoxon sign rank tests as well as non-significant ratio value suggested that there was no recent bottleneck in the existing Marwari breed population, which is important information for equine breeders. This study also revealed that the Marwari breed can be differentiated from some other exotic breeds of horses on the basis of three microsatellite primers.

  11. On the origin of sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.) genetic diversity in New Guinea, a secondary centre of diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Roullier, C; Kambouo, R; Paofa, J; McKey, D.; Lebot, V.

    2013-01-01

    New Guinea is considered the most important secondary centre of diversity for sweet potato (Ipomoea batatas). We analysed nuclear and chloroplast genetic diversity of 417 New Guinea sweet potato landraces, representing agro-morphological diversity collected throughout the island, and compared this diversity with that in tropical America. The molecular data reveal moderate diversity across all accessions analysed, lower than that found in tropical America. Nuclear data confirm p...

  12. Genetic diversity of breeding popcorn lines determined by SSR markers

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ana Paula, Ribeiro Trindade; Ronald José, Barth Pinto; Antonio Teixeira do, Amaral Júnior; Claudete Aparecida, Mangolin; Maria de Fátima Pires da, Silva Machado; Carlos Alberto, Scapim.

    2010-01-15

    Full Text Available Information about genetic dissimilarity is very important to corroborate genealogical relationships and to predict the most heterozygotic hybrid combinations. Eight popcorn S6 lines of diverse germplasm types were evaluated using simple sequence repeats (SSR) markers. Of a total of 51 evaluated poly [...] morphic primers, 15 were used for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification. The genetic distance was estimated by Rogers’ modified distance. The different popcorn breeding programs in Brazil are possibly using highly similar base-populations. The genetic similarity of lines P1-3 and P8-1 was lowest, while P3-3 and P8-2 were genetically more similar. The cophenetic correlation showed that the Unweighted Pair-Group Method Using Arithmetic Averages (UPGMA) was reliable to discriminate the genotypes in five groups. The clusters were consistent with the estimates of genetic identity. There was a moderate coincidence degree between the groups and genealogy of lines. Higher levels of heterozygosity are expected from crosses between the group containing lines P3-3 and P7-3 with that of P1-3 and P7-4. Crosses between lines P1-3 and P8-1 are also promising.

  13. Genetic basis of transcriptome diversity in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wen; Carbone, Mary Anna; Magwire, Michael M; Peiffer, Jason A; Lyman, Richard F; Stone, Eric A; Anholt, Robert R H; Mackay, Trudy F C

    2015-11-01

    Understanding how DNA sequence variation is translated into variation for complex phenotypes has remained elusive but is essential for predicting adaptive evolution, for selecting agriculturally important animals and crops, and for personalized medicine. Gene expression may provide a link between variation in DNA sequence and organismal phenotypes, and its abundance can be measured efficiently and accurately. Here we quantified genome-wide variation in gene expression in the sequenced inbred lines of the Drosophila melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP), increasing the annotated Drosophila transcriptome by 11%, including thousands of novel transcribed regions (NTRs). We found that 42% of the Drosophila transcriptome is genetically variable in males and females, including the NTRs, and is organized into modules of genetically correlated transcripts. We found that NTRs often were negatively correlated with the expression of protein-coding genes, which we exploited to annotate NTRs functionally. We identified regulatory variants for the mean and variance of gene expression, which have largely independent genetic control. Expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) for the mean, but not for the variance, of gene expression were concentrated near genes. Notably, the variance eQTLs often interacted epistatically with local variants in these genes to regulate gene expression. This comprehensive characterization of population-scale diversity of transcriptomes and its genetic basis in the DGRP is critically important for a systems understanding of quantitative trait variation. PMID:26483487

  14. Ethnohistory, intertribal relationships, and genetic diversity among Amazonian Indians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, G F

    1991-12-01

    The influence of recent ethnohistorical factors on the microevolution of South American Indians has not been adequately evaluated by population geneticists. This makes difficult a reasonable interpretation of the present genetic structure of these groups. In this article the genetic diversity of 18 tribes of the Amazon and neighboring areas belonging to 3 linguistic groups (Tupi, Carib, and Gê) is analyzed in light of documentary sources about historical events, such as demographic changes, geographic movements, intertribal relationships, and marriage practices, that have taken place since the end of the eighteenth century. The high depopulation rate suffered by the Tupi groups (61.4% on average) is a probable factor conditioning the large intergroup genetic distances in this linguistic stock, for depopulation is a phenomenon associated with random genetic drift caused by a bottleneck effect. On the other hand, the relatively high similarity of the Gê and the Carib shows an association with two main factors: (1) reduced spatial dispersion of the Gê in the recent past, providing adequate conditions for within-stock gene flow, and (2) strong tradition of intergroup contacts among the Carib, frequently followed by genetic admixture and even fusion of groups, as verified for the Wayana and the Aparaí. The patterns of biologic variation of some Tupi tribes (Waiãpi, Emerillon, Parakanã, and Assurini) are better explained by historical and regional contingencies than by linguistic classification. PMID:1959909

  15. Evaluation of genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium in Korean-bred rice varieties using SSR markers

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Xiao-Qiang, Wang; Soon-Wook, Kwon; Yong-Jin, Park.

    2013-09-15

    Full Text Available Background: In order to evaluate the variation among different rice types, the genetic diversity in a rice collection composed by 59 breeding lines, 23 landraces, 18 weedy rice lines, and 35 introduced lines that collected from countries worldwide was analyzed using 134 simple sequence repeat marker [...] s. Results: In total, 1264 alleles were identified (average, 9.43 per locus). Rare alleles made up a large portion (58.4%) of the detected alleles, and 29 unique alleles associated with rice accessions were also discovered. A model-based structural analysis revealed the presence of three subpopulations. The genetic relationships revealed by the neighbour-joining tree method were fairly consistent with the structure-based membership assignments for most of the accessions. A total of 105 accessions (79.5%) showed a clear relationship to each cluster, while the remaining 27 accessions (20.5%) were categorized as admixtures. Linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns and distributions are of fundamental importance for genome-wide association mapping. The mean r² value for all intrachromosomal loci pairs was 0.1286. The LD between linked markers decreased with the genetic distance between pairs of linked loci. Conclusions: These results will provide an effective aid for future allele mining, association genetics, mapping and cloning gene(s), germplasm conservation, and improvement programs.

  16. Exploiting a wheat EST database to assess genetic diversity

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Ozge, Karakas; Filiz, Gurel; Ahu Altinkut, Uncuoglu.

    Full Text Available Expressed sequence tag (EST) markers have been used to assess variety and genetic diversity in wheat (Triticum aestivum). In this study, 1549 ESTs from wheat infested with yellow rust were used to examine the genetic diversity of six susceptible and resistant wheat cultivars. The aim of using these [...] cultivars was to improve the competitiveness of public wheat breeding programs through the intensive use of modern, particularly marker-assisted, selection technologies. The F2 individuals derived from cultivar crosses were screened for resistance to yellow rust at the seedling stage in greenhouses and adult stage in the field to identify DNA markers genetically linked to resistance. Five hundred and sixty ESTs were assembled into 136 contigs and 989 singletons. BlastX search results showed that 39 (29%) contigs and 96 (10%) singletons were homologous to wheat genes. The database-matched contigs and singletons were assigned to eight functional groups related to protein synthesis, photosynthesis, metabolism and energy, stress proteins, transporter proteins, protein breakdown and recycling, cell growth and division and reactive oxygen scavengers. PCR analyses with primers based on the contigs and singletons showed that the most polymorphic functional categories were photosynthesis (contigs) and metabolism and energy (singletons). EST analysis revealed considerable genetic variability among the Turkish wheat cultivars resistant and susceptible to yellow rust disease and allowed calculation of the mean genetic distance between cultivars, with the greatest similarity (0.725) being between Harmankaya99 and Sönmez2001, and the lowest (0.622) between Aytin98 and Izgi01.

  17. Exploiting a wheat EST database to assess genetic diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ozge Karakas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Expressed sequence tag (EST markers have been used to assess variety and genetic diversity in wheat (Triticum aestivum. In this study, 1549 ESTs from wheat infested with yellow rust were used to examine the genetic diversity of six susceptible and resistant wheat cultivars. The aim of using these cultivars was to improve the competitiveness of public wheat breeding programs through the intensive use of modern, particularly marker-assisted, selection technologies. The F2 individuals derived from cultivar crosses were screened for resistance to yellow rust at the seedling stage in greenhouses and adult stage in the field to identify DNA markers genetically linked to resistance. Five hundred and sixty ESTs were assembled into 136 contigs and 989 singletons. BlastX search results showed that 39 (29% contigs and 96 (10% singletons were homologous to wheat genes. The database-matched contigs and singletons were assigned to eight functional groups related to protein synthesis, photosynthesis, metabolism and energy, stress proteins, transporter proteins, protein breakdown and recycling, cell growth and division and reactive oxygen scavengers. PCR analyses with primers based on the contigs and singletons showed that the most polymorphic functional categories were photosynthesis (contigs and metabolism and energy (singletons. EST analysis revealed considerable genetic variability among the Turkish wheat cultivars resistant and susceptible to yellow rust disease and allowed calculation of the mean genetic distance between cultivars, with the greatest similarity (0.725 being between Harmankaya99 and Sönmez2001, and the lowest (0.622 between Aytin98 and Izgi01.

  18. Genetic diversity in cattle of eight regions in Costa Rica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Miguel Cordero-Solórzano

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to explore the extent of inter-regional genetic diversity present in the cattle of Costa Rica. 1498 DNA samples were collected (year 2013 from eight different regions within the country. Allelic frequencies and major population genetic parameters were determined for eighteen microsatellite markers. An analysis of molecular variance was also carried out and genetic distances were calculated between cattle from different regions. At the national level, a high allelic diversity was found, with an average of 14.6±1.01 observed alleles and 5.6+0.37 effective alleles per marker. Observed (Ho and expected (He heterozygosities were 0.76±0.01 and 0.81±01, respectively. Polymorphic Information Content (PIC and Coefficient of Inbreeding (FIS were 0.79±0.06 and 0.06±0.004, respectively. At the regional level, Ho ranged between 0.73±0.02 in the South Central region to 0.78±0.01 in the North Huetar region. The dendrogram showed three clearly distinct groups, Metropolitan Central and West Central regions in one group, Caribbean Huetar, South Central, Central Pacific and Chorotega regions in a second group; and North Huetar and Brunca regions in a third intermediate group. Estimates of genetic differentiation (RST were significant between regions from different groups and non-significant for regions within the same group. Genetic differences between regions are related to differential proliferation of breed groups based on their adaptability to the agro-ecological conditions and production systems prevailing in each region.

  19. Indigenous cattle in Sri Lanka: production systems and genetic diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Production status, farming systems and genetic diversity of indigenous cattle in Sri Lanka were evaluated using six geographically distinct populations. The indigenous cattle population of the country is considered as a nondescript mixture of genotypes, and represents more than half of the total cattle population of 1.2 million heads. Five distinct indigenous populations were investigated for morphological analysis, and four were included in evaluating genetic differences. Farming systems were analysed using a pre-tested structured questionnaire. The genetic variation was assessed within and between populations using 15 autosomal and two Y-specific microsatellite markers, and compared with two indigenous populations from the African region. Farming system analysis revealed that indigenous cattle rearing was based on traditional mixed-crop integration practices and operates under limited or no input basis. The contribution of indigenous cattle to total tangible income ranged from zero to 90% reflecting the high variation in the purpose of keeping. Morphometric measurements explained specific phenotypic characteristics arising from geographical isolation and selective breeding. Though varying according to the region, the compact body, narrow face, small horns and humps with shades of brown and black coat colour described the indigenous cattle phenotype in general. Genetic analysis indicated that indigenous cattle in Sri Lanka have high diversity with average number of alleles per locus ranging from 7.9 to 8.5. Average heterozygosity of different regions varied within a narrow range (0.72 ± 0.04 to 0.76 ± 0.03). Genetic distances between regions were low (0.085 and 0.066) suggesting a similar mixture of genotypes across regions. Y-specific analysis indicated a possible introgression of Taurine cattle in one of the cattle populations. (author)

  20. Diversity and Distribution of Arsenic-Related Genes Along a Pollution Gradient in a River Affected by Acid Mine Drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desoeuvre, Angélique; Casiot, Corinne; Héry, Marina

    2016-04-01

    Some microorganisms have the capacity to interact with arsenic through resistance or metabolic processes. Their activities contribute to the fate of arsenic in contaminated ecosystems. To investigate the genetic potential involved in these interactions in a zone of confluence between a pristine river and an arsenic-rich acid mine drainage, we explored the diversity of marker genes for arsenic resistance (arsB, acr3.1, acr3.2), methylation (arsM), and respiration (arrA) in waters characterized by contrasted concentrations of metallic elements (including arsenic) and pH. While arsB-carrying bacteria were representative of pristine waters, Acr3 proteins may confer to generalist bacteria the capacity to cope with an increase of contamination. arsM showed an unexpected wide distribution, suggesting biomethylation may impact arsenic fate in contaminated aquatic ecosystems. arrA gene survey suggested that only specialist microorganisms (adapted to moderately or extremely contaminated environments) have the capacity to respire arsenate. Their distribution, modulated by water chemistry, attested the specialist nature of the arsenate respirers. This is the first report of the impact of an acid mine drainage on the diversity and distribution of arsenic (As)-related genes in river waters. The fate of arsenic in this ecosystem is probably under the influence of the abundance and activity of specific microbial populations involved in different As biotransformations. PMID:26603631

  1. Genetic diversity Genetic diversity pattern in finger millet [Eleusine coracana (L. Gaertn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. Shinde, S. V. Desai, and R. M. Pawar

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The genetic distance for 41 genotypes of finger millet collected from different geographical areas was estimated using D2 statistics. These genotypes were grouped into seven clusters. Cluster II, I, V, VI, and III comprised 17, 10, 7, 3 and 2 genotypes, respectively. The clusters IV and VII were mono-genotypic indicating wide divergence from other clusters. Most of the strains were from same origin and found to be one or more components of seven clusters indicating the presence of wide genetic variability among the material belonging to same geographical origin. The highest inter-cluster distance was observed between clusters II and VII followed by IV and VII suggesting the use of genotypes from these clusters to serve as potential parents for hybridization. The characters iron content (70.12% contributed maximum towards divergence followed by plant height (11.72% , days to physiological maturity (7.07% and days to 50% flowering (5.49%.

  2. Molecular assessment of genetic diversity in mung bean germplasm

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    G. Roopa Lavanya; Jyoti Srivastava; Shirish A. Ranade

    2008-04-01

    RAPD profiles were used to identify the extent of diversity among 54 accessions of mung bean that included both improved and local land races. Out of the 40 primers screened, seven primers generated 174 amplification products with an average of 24.85 bands per primer. The RAPD profiles were analysed for Jaccard’s similarity coefficients that was found to be in the range from 0 to 0.48, indicating the presence of wide range of genetic diversity at molecular level. Cluster analysis was carried out based on distances (1-similarity coefficient) using neighbour-joining method in Free Tree package. The dendrogram resolved all the accessions into two major clusters, I (with 11 accessions) and II (with 43 accessions). However, the cluster was further divided into four subclusters (II A with six, II B with nine, II C with 15 and II D with 13 accessions). The distribution of the accessions in different clusters and subclusters appeares to be related to their performance in field conditions for 10 morphological traits that were scored. This study indicated that the RAPD profiles provide an easy and simple technique for preliminary genetic diversity assessment of mung bean accessions that may reflect morphological trait differences among them.

  3. Genetic diversity of Colombian sheep by microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Ocampo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In Colombia the sheep production systems are managed under extensive conditions and mainly correspond to peasant production systems so their genetic management has led to increased homozygosity and hence productivity loss. The aim of this study was to determine the genetic diversity in 549 individuals corresponding to 13 sheep breeds in Colombia, using a panel of 11 microsatellite molecular markers. One hundred and fifty seven alleles were found (average of 14.27 alleles/locus, with a range of observed and expected heterozygosity from 0.44 to 0.84 and 0.67 to 0.86, respectively. Thirty-three of 143 Hardy Weinberg tests performed showed significant deviations (p < 0.05 due to a general lack of heterozygous individuals. The Fis ranged from 0.01 in Corriedale to 0.15 for the Persian Black Head breed, suggesting that there are presenting low to moderate levels of inbreeding. Overall, Colombian sheep showed high levels of genetic diversity which is very important for future selection and animal breeding programs.

  4. Estimation of Genetic Diversity in Genetic Stocks of Hexaploid Wheat Using Seed Storage Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanweer Kumar

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Bread wheat (Triticum aestivum L. is an allohexaploid specie, consist of three genomes AABBDD having 2n = 6x = 42 chromosomes. The wheat is a staple food of human beings due to its bread making quality which is composed of seed storage proteins of wheat especially High Molecular Weight Glutenins (HMW-GS. During present research, HMW-GS were analyzed in genetic stocks of common wheat consist of Nullisomic- tetrasomic, ditelosomic and deletion lines of group 3 homoeologous chromosomes by Sodium Dodecyle Sulpahate Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE. Protocol for protein extraction and separation was optimized. The protein profiles were used to estimate genetic distances and Phylogenetic relationships among the genetic stocks were evaluated. Genetic stocks showed different banding patterns and each protein band was considered as a locus/allele. Alleles were scored as present (1 and absent (0 to generate bivariate 1-0 data matrix. A total of 45 alleles were amplified. Genetic distance among the genetic stocks ranged from 0-72%. A dendrogram was constructed using computer program Pop Gene version 3.2. Genetic stocks of wheat were clustered in 3group A, B and C comprising 4, 4 and 1 genotypes, respectively. Maximum differences were observed among Dit-3BS and NT-3B3D and hence it is recommended that these 2 genetic stocks should be crossed to obtain maximum genetic diversity in the segregating population of wheat.

  5. Mining diverse small RNA species in the deep transcriptome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vickers, Kasey C; Roteta, Leslie A; Hucheson-Dilks, Holli; Han, Leng; Guo, Yan

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptomes of many species are proving to be exquisitely diverse, and many investigators are now using high-throughput sequencing to quantify non-protein-coding RNAs, namely small RNAs (sRNA). Unfortunately, most studies are focused solely on microRNA changes, and many investigators are not analyzing the full compendium of sRNA species present in their large datasets. We provide here a rationale to include all types of sRNAs in sRNA sequencing analyses, which will aid in the discovery of their biological functions and physiological relevance. PMID:25435401

  6. Web Log Mining Based-on Improved Double-Points Crossover Genetic Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Xie

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Web log files have become important data source for discoveries of user behaviors. Analyzing web log files is one of the significant research fields of web mining. This paper proposes an improved double-points crossover genetic algorithm for mining user access patterns from web log files. Our work contains three different components. First, we design a coding rule according to pre-processed web log data. Second, a fitness function is presented by analyzing user sessions. Finally, a new genetic algorithm based on double-points crossover genetic algorithm is designed. In comparison with simple genetic algorithm, double-points crossover genetic algorithm demonstrates better convergence than the other, and it is more suitable for web log mining. We conducted an experiment to verify the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm. The results show that the proposed algorithm helps the website to easily gain access patterns.

  7. Improved Genetic Algorithm Based on Simulated Annealing and Quantum Computing Strategy for Mining Association Rules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongsheng Liu

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Association rules mining is an important content in data mining. It can discover the relations of different attributes by analyzing and disposing data which is in database. This paper proposes a novel data mining algorithm to enhance the capability of exploring valuable information from databases with continuous values. The algorithm combines with quantum-inspired genetic algorithm and simulated annealing to find interesting association rules. The final best sets of membership functions in all the populations are then gathered together to be used for mining association rules. The experiment result demonstrates that the proposed approach could generate more association rules than other algorithms.

  8. Genetic diversity and relationships of Vietnamese and European pig breeds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: East Asia contains more than 50% of the world's pig population and Europe about 30% (according to FAO inventory. Both indigenous resources were domesticated from different sub-species and are assumed to be the basis of the world-wide genetic diversity in pig. Indigenous resources of Asia, however, are less defined and only rarely compared with European breeds. Taking advantage of DNA diagnostics, animals within as well as between breeds from Vietnam and Europe were analysed for numerous well defined markers in order to gain more knowledge about pig genetic biodiversity. The main objective was to investigate indigenous Vietnamese pig breeds from different local geographic regions. A set of pig breeds was chosen for this study of genetic diversity: five indigenous breeds from Vietnam (Mong Cai, Muong Khuong, Co, Meo, Tap Na), two exotic breeds kept in Vietnam (Large White, Landrace), three European commercial breeds (Pietrain, Landrace, Large White), and European Wild Boar. Samples and data from 317 animals (17 to 32 unrelated animals per breed) were collected. A panel of 27 polymorphic microsatellite loci was chosen according to FAO recommendations for diversity analyses and genetic distance studies. The loci were distributed evenly over the porcine genome with additional loci linked to immunological relevant genes (MHC, IFNG). Moreover, a few Type I loci (RYR1, FSH) were genotyped. DNA was isolated and PCR fragment lengths analysis were carried out on an ALF DNA sequencer (Pharmacia, Freiburg, Germany). Some of the RFLPs were analysed by agarose gel electrophoresis. Selected microsatellite alleles of equal lengths were sequenced for animals of different breeds. Within-breed diversity estimated heterozygosities and tests for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium by taking into account sample sizes, tests per locus and breed as well as breed-locus combinations. Calculations were performed using the BIOSYS-1 software package. Breed differentiation was evaluated by the fixation indices of Wright. Genetic distances between breeds were estimated on the basis of allelic frequencies of the loci in each breed using different measures, e.g the standard Nei's distances. Distances between breeds were further analysed according to the neighbour-joining algorithm of Nei and the bootstrapping procedure of Felsenstein. In average of the marker loci, heterozygous genotypes occurred more frequently than expected, but this was, not statistically significant. Heterozygosity was higher in indigenous Vietnamese breeds than in the other breeds. Breed differentiation was shown which allowed grouping of all individuals in clusters corresponding to the breeds. Herein the Vietnamese indigenous breeds form a distinct cluster with considerable genetic distance to the European breeds. Vietnamese exotic breeds were similar to the breeds in Europe. European Wild Boar displayed closer relation with commercial breeds of European origin than with the indigenous Vietnamese breeds. The microsatellite loci which are closely linked to functional genes of immune response showed differences between breeds. This finding may indicate adaptation to local geographic conditions. Type I loci revealed considerable differences between Vietnamese and European breeds which are partly due to breeding influences. The comparative DNA sequencing showed differences between microsatellite alleles of equal lengths. About 30% of these alleles displayed length independent variants in at least one nucleotide position. Between the genetic diverse breeds, like those from Vietnam and Europe, DNA sequences between alleles differed more often. Their relevance is discussed in view of the use of microsatellite polymorphisms. (author)

  9. Genetic Diversity Analysis of CIMMYT Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) Lines by SRAP Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Filiz, Ertugrul

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversity is one of the key factors for the improvement of many crop plants including wheat. Many wheat scientistshave studied genetic diversity in wheat germplasm using different molecular markers which have provided a powerfulapproach to analyze genetic relationships among wheat germplasms. In this study, genetic diversity of CIMMYT(International maize and wheat improvement center) bread wheat lines collected from Russia was evaluated using 30sequence-related amplified polymorphism ...

  10. Microsatellite analysis of the genetic diversity in the Black Slavonian pig

    OpenAIRE

    Bradi? Martina; Uremovi? Marija; Uremovi? Z.; Mio? B.; Konja?i? M.; Lukovi? Z.; Safner T.

    2007-01-01

    This research is focused on the genetic diversity and population structure of the Black Slavonian pig, with the aim of assessing the situation regarding the endangerment of genetic diversity, and defining the further role of this breed in the preseration of its genetic diversity. Genetic population parameters were assessed in 42 animals at 8 microsatellite loci. On three of the observed loci there was a deviation from the Hardy-Weinberg (HW) equilibrium with P<0.01, one locus showe...

  11. Demographic histories and genetic diversities of Fennoscandian marine and landlocked ringed seal subspecies

    OpenAIRE

    Nyman, Tommi; Valtonen, Mia; Aspi, Jouni; Ruokonen, Minna; Kunnasranta, Mervi; Palo, Jukka U

    2014-01-01

    Island populations are on average smaller, genetically less diverse, and at a higher risk to go extinct than mainland populations. Low genetic diversity may elevate extinction probability, but the genetic component of the risk can be affected by the mode of diversity loss, which, in turn, is connected to the demographic history of the population. Here, we examined the history of genetic erosion in three Fennoscandian ringed seal subspecies, of which one inhabits the Baltic Sea ‘mainland’ and ...

  12. New insights into the genetic and metabolic diversity of thiocyanate-degrading microbial consortia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Mathew P; Moreau, John W

    2016-02-01

    Thiocyanate is a common contaminant of the gold mining and coal coking industries for which biological degradation generally represents the most viable approach to remediation. Recent studies of thiocyanate-degrading bioreactor systems have revealed new information on the structure and metabolic activity of thiocyanate-degrading microbial consortia. Previous knowledge was limited primarily to pure-culture or co-culture studies in which the effects of linked carbon, sulfur and nitrogen cycling could not be fully understood. High throughput sequencing, DNA fingerprinting and targeted gene amplification have now elucidated the genetic and metabolic diversity of these complex microbial consortia. Specifically, this has highlighted the roles of key consortium members involved in sulfur oxidation and nitrification. New insights into the biogeochemical cycling of sulfur and nitrogen in bioreactor systems allow tailoring of the microbial metabolism towards meeting effluent composition requirements. Here we review these rapidly advancing studies and synthesize a conceptual model to inform new biotechnologies for thiocyanate remediation. PMID:26596573

  13. Data Mining Using Neural–Genetic Approach: A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Parvez Rahi; Bhumika Gupta

    2014-01-01

    In the advance age of technology, there is an increasing availability of digital documents in various languages in various fields. Data mining is gaining popularity in field of knowledge discovery. Data mining is the knowledge discovery process by which we can analyze the large amounts of data from various data repositories and summarizing it into information useful to us. Due to its importance of extracting information/ knowledge from the large data repositories, data mining ...

  14. Genetics, Genomics and Evolution of Ergot Alkaloid Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn A. Young

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The ergot alkaloid biosynthesis system has become an excellent model to study evolutionary diversification of specialized (secondary metabolites. This is a very diverse class of alkaloids with various neurotropic activities, produced by fungi in several orders of the phylum Ascomycota, including plant pathogens and protective plant symbionts in the family Clavicipitaceae. Results of comparative genomics and phylogenomic analyses reveal multiple examples of three evolutionary processes that have generated ergot-alkaloid diversity: gene gains, gene losses, and gene sequence changes that have led to altered substrates or product specificities of the enzymes that they encode (neofunctionalization. The chromosome ends appear to be particularly effective engines for gene gains, losses and rearrangements, but not necessarily for neofunctionalization. Changes in gene expression could lead to accumulation of various pathway intermediates and affect levels of different ergot alkaloids. Genetic alterations associated with interspecific hybrids of Epichloë species suggest that such variation is also selectively favored. The huge structural diversity of ergot alkaloids probably represents adaptations to a wide variety of ecological situations by affecting the biological spectra and mechanisms of defense against herbivores, as evidenced by the diverse pharmacological effects of ergot alkaloids used in medicine.

  15. Genetic Diversity Analysis among Greengram genotypes using RAPD Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.Pandiyan., N.Senthil, P.Sivakumar, AR.Muthiah and N.Ramamoorthi

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Green gram is also one of the important pulse crops. Conventional breeding methods are very much difficult to utilize in thedevelopment of new genotypes. Hence incorporation of the molecular approaches along with the conventional techniques ismost powerful method. Evaluation of the available wild accessions are more useful for selecting desirable gene sources.Genetic diversity analysis place an important role in this purpose. For this molecular analysis of selected 18 accessions ingreengram (representing all nine clusters was carried out through RAPD markers. Out of ten primers used nine werepolymorphic in which the primer OPS-11 exhibited 100 per cent polymorphism. The value of similarity indices 0.72 to 0.91indicates high genetic similarity among the selected accessions at molecular level.

  16. Diversity of bacterial communities in acid mine drainage from the Shen-bu copper mine, Gansu province, China

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Yu, Yang; Wuyang, Shi; Minxi, Wan; Yanfei, Zhang; Lihong, Zou; Jufang, Huang; Guanzhou, Qiu; Xueduan, Liu.

    2008-01-15

    Full Text Available This study presents bacterial population analyses of microbial communities inhabiting three sites of acid mine drainage (AMD) in the Shen-bu copper mine, Gansu Province, China. These sites were located next to acid-leached chalcopyrite slagheaps that had been abandoned since 1995. The pH values of t [...] hese samples with high concentrations of metals ranged from 2.0 to 3.5. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA) was used to characterize the bacterial population by amplifying the 16S rRNA gene of microorganisms. A total of 39 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained from the three samples and sequenced from 384 clones. Sequence data and phylogenetic analyses showed that two dominant clones (JYC-1B, JYC-1D) in sample JYC-1 represented 69.5% of the total clones affiliated with Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans (?-Proteobacteria), and the most dominant clones of JYC-2 and JYC-3 were affiliated with Caulobacter crescentus (?-Protebacteria). At the level of bacterial divisions, differences in the relative incidence of particular phylogenetic groups among the three samples and discrepancies in physicochemical characteristics suggested that the physico-chemical characteristics had an influence on phylogenetic diversity. Furthermore, the relationships between the discrepancies of physicochemical characteristics and the diversity of the bacteria communities in the three samples suggested that the biogeochemical properties, pH and concentration of soluble metal, could be key factors in controlling the structure of the bacterial population

  17. Simple sequence repeat-based analysis of the genetic diversity and population genetic structure of populations of Siniperca chuatsi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, C F; Ye, X; Tian, Y Y; Dong, J J

    2015-01-01

    In order to provide genetic information for the selective breeding of Siniperca chuatsi, 14 microsatellite DNA loci were used to evaluate the genetic diversity and structure of four farmed populations and one wild population in China. The four cultivated populations were Foshan (FS), Jiangmen (JM), Nanjing (NJ), and Hongze Lake (HZL), and the wild population was collected from the Hubei HuangGang section of the Yangtze River (HG). All five populations exhibited high genetic diversity (HE values of between 0.608 and 0.633); the highest was found in the wild population (HE = 0.633). Genetic differentiation within the populations was relatively low (FST < 0.15); 5.44% of the genetic variation was between the populations and 94.56% was within the populations. The greatest genetic distance was between JM and HG (0.1894), which had the lowest genetic identity (0.8725). NJ and HG had the shortest genetic distance (0.0365) and the highest genetic identity (0.9641). A phylogenetic analysis revealed that FS, JM, and HZL were clustered into one group, while NJ and HG were in another group, suggesting that the wild and NJ populations were closely related. Our results demonstrate that although the farmed populations have maintained a relatively high genetic diversity, they exhibit lower genetic diversity and higher genetic differentiation than the wild population. These results provide evidence that wild resources should be used for breeding, in order to maintain genetic diversity and ensure sustainable S. chuatsi farming. PMID:26345868

  18. Microsatellite markers for determining genetic identities and genetic diversity among jute cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesmin Akter

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA fingerprint was generated using jute specific SSR markers on 10 jute cultivars from two Corchorus species (C. olitorius and C. capsularis and the genetic relatedness among the cultivars was estimated. A total of 106 alleles were identified using 23 primer pairs among the 10 cultivars with an average of 4.61 ± 1.92 alleles per locus, and a mean genetic diversity of 0.68±0.16. Four C. olitorius cultivars could be easily distinguished with 6 markers using 5 primer pairs and six C. capsularis cultivars with 7 markers using 6 primer pairs. The UPGMA analysis enabled the grouping of the cultivars into two major clusters, which matched with the known information on jute. This experiment provides proof that in spite of low levels of genetic polymorphisms among jute cultivars, SSR markers can reliably distinguish among them. This finding reinforces the utility of SSR primers for providing unique genetic identities or fingerprints of various jute cultivars.

  19. STUDIES ON GENETIC DIVERSITY FOR GRAIN YIELD AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS IN MAIZE (Zea mays L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.Lingaiah

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The D2 statistics is useful tool to assess genetic diversity among genotypes. It also provides qualitative measures of association between geographical and genetic diversity based on generalized distances. In the present study data on forty nine genotypes were subjected to D2 analysis, which revealed the presence of substantial amount of genetic variability among them. The pattern of distribution of genotypes into various clusters was random, suggesting that geographical and genetic diversity were not related. The experimental material was partitioned into eight clusters. Flag leaf area per plant contributed maximum towards genetic diversity followed by days to 50 per cent tasseling.

  20. Whole mitochondrial genome genetic diversity in an Estonian population sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoljarova, Monika; King, Jonathan L; Takahashi, Maiko; Aaspõllu, Anu; Budowle, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA is a useful marker for population studies, human identification, and forensic analysis. Commonly used hypervariable regions I and II (HVI/HVII) were reported to contain as little as 25 % of mitochondrial DNA variants and therefore the majority of power of discrimination of mitochondrial DNA resides in the coding region. Massively parallel sequencing technology enables entire mitochondrial genome sequencing. In this study, buccal swabs were collected from 114 unrelated Estonians and whole mitochondrial genome sequences were generated using the Illumina MiSeq system. The results are concordant with previous mtDNA control region reports of high haplogroup HV and U frequencies (47.4 and 23.7 % in this study, respectively) in the Estonian population. One sample with the Northern Asian haplogroup D was detected. The genetic diversity of the Estonian population sample was estimated to be 99.67 and 95.85 %, for mtGenome and HVI/HVII data, respectively. The random match probability for mtGenome data was 1.20 versus 4.99 % for HVI/HVII. The nucleotide mean pairwise difference was 27?±?11 for mtGenome and 7?±?3 for HVI/HVII data. These data describe the genetic diversity of the Estonian population sample and emphasize the power of discrimination of the entire mitochondrial genome over the hypervariable regions. PMID:26289416

  1. Genetic diversity in a world germplasm collection of tall fescue

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Romina, Cuyeu; Beatriz, Rosso; Elba, Pagano; Gabriela, Soto; Romina, Fox; Nicolás Daniel, Ayub.

    Full Text Available Festuca arundinacea Schreb., commonly known as tall fescue, is a major forage crop in temperate regions. Recently, a molecular analysis of different accessions of a world germplasm collection of tall fescue has demonstrated that it contains different species from the genus Festuca and allowed their [...] rapid classification into the three major morphotypes (Continental, Mediterranean and Rhizomatous). In this study, we explored the genetic diversity of 161 accessions of Festuca species from 29 countries, including 28 accessions of INTA (Argentina), by analyzing 15 polymorphic SSR markers by capillary electrophoresis. These molecular markers allowed us to detect a total of 214 alleles. The number of alleles per locus varied between 5 and 24, and the values of polymorphic information content ranged from 0.627 to 0.840. In addition, the accessions analyzed by flow cytometry showed different ploidy levels (diploid, tetraploid, hexaploid and octaploid), placing in evidence that the world germplasm collection consisted of multiple species, as previously suggested. Interestingly, almost all accessions of INTA germplasm collection were true hexaploid tall fescue, belonging to two eco-geographic races (Continental and Mediterranean). Finally, the data presented revealed an ample genetic diversity of tall fescue showing the importance of preserving the INTA collection for future breeding programs.

  2. Genetic diversity in Spanish donkey breeds using microsatellite DNA markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordana Jordi

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Genetic diversity at 13 equine microsatellite loci was compared in five endangered Spanish donkey breeds: Andaluza, Catalana, Mallorquina, Encartaciones and Zamorano-Leonesa. All of the equine microsatellites used in this study were amplified and were polymorphic in the domestic donkey breeds with the exception of HMS1, which was monomorphic, and ASB2, which failed to amplify. Allele number, frequency distributions and mean heterozygosities were very similar among the Spanish donkey breeds. The unbiased expected heterozygosity (HE over all the populations varied between 0.637 and 0.684 in this study. The low GST value showed that only 3.6% of the diversity was between breeds (P A distance matrix showed little differentiation between Spanish breeds, but great differentiation between them and the Moroccan ass and also with the horse, used as an outgroup. These results confirm the potential use of equine microsatellite loci as a tool for genetic studies in domestic donkey populations, which could also be useful for conservation plans.

  3. Relationship and genetic diversity of mistletoe (Viscum album L. subspecies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leon Mejnartowicz

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available With the help of 21 putative isoenzyme loci, the genetic diversity and variations of Viscum album ssp. album L. from 42 species, subspecies, varieties and hybrids of broadleaf trees, Viscum album ssp. austriacum (Wiesb. Vollmann, from 4 populations of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. and Viscum album ssp. abietis (Wiesb. Abromeit, from 8 populations of European silver fir (Abies alba Mill. were analyzed. On the dendrogram, the three investigated subspecies form three clusters, each clearly separated from the other, so we suggest a revision of the systematic nomenclature proposed to take into consideration a return to an earlier system of dividing the European mistletoe into three species: Viscum album L., Viscum abietis Beck, and Viscum laxum Boiss. et Reut. From among the 21 tested loci only one locus, SOD-A, was monomorphic. The average number of actual alleles (Na and effective alleles (Ne was 2.23 and 1.61 respectively. The observed heterozygosity (Ho varied from 0.199 in V. album ssp. abietis to 0.345 in the V.a. ssp. album populations. Average FST = 0.277 indicates that about 28% of genetic differentiation is due to an interpopulation diversity of Viscum album populations. There is a small gene flux between Viscum album populations with only one immigrant successfully entering a population per two generations (Nm = 0,653.

  4. Genetic diversity among and within cultured cyanobionts of diverse species of Azolla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sood, A; Prasanna, R; Prasanna, B M; Singh, P K

    2008-01-01

    The cyanobionts isolated from 10 Azolla accessions belonging to 6 species (Azolla mexicana, A. microphylla, A. rubra, A. caroliniana, A. filiculoides, A. pinnata) were cultured under laboratory conditions and analyzed on the basis of whole cell protein profiles and molecular marker dataset generated using repeat sequence primers (STRR(mod) and HipTG). The biochemical and molecular marker profiles of the cyanobionts were compared with those of the free-living cyanobacteria and symbiotic Nostoc strains from Anthoceros sp., Cycas sp. and Gunnera monoika. Cluster analysis revealed the genetic diversity among the selected strains, and identified 3 distinct clusters. Group 1 included cyanobionts from all the 10 accessions of Azolla, group 2 comprised all the symbiotic Nostoc strains, while group 3 included the free-living cyanobacteria belonging to the genera Nostoc and Anabaena. The interrelationships among the Azolla cyanobionts were further revealed by principal component analysis. Cyanobionts from A. caroliniana-A. microphylla grouped together while cyanobionts associated with A. mexicana-A. filiculoides along with A. pinnata formed another group. A. rubra cyanobionts had intermediate relationship with both the subgroups. This is the first study analyzing the diversity existing among the cultured cyanobionts of diverse Azolla species through the use of biochemical and molecular profiles and also the genetic distinctness of these free-living cyanobionts as compared to cyanobacterial strains of the genera Anabaena and Nostoc. PMID:18481216

  5. Genetic diversity and relationships among indigenous Mozambican cattle breeds

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    I., Bessa; I., Pinheiro; M., Matola; K., Dzama; A., Rocha; P., Alexandrino.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Three indigenous Mozambican cattle breeds, namely the Angone, Landim and Bovino de Tete were characterized using six proteins, 13 autosomal microsatellite loci and one Y-specific microsatellite locus (INRA124). The Mashona breed from Zimbabwe was also studied to elucidate the origin of the Bovino de [...] Tete cattle. Expected mean heterozygosity ranged from 0.46 - 0.50 in the proteins and from 0.66 - 0.69 in the microsatellites. Population genetic variability was relatively high when compared to other African breeds. Only 4.5% of the total genetic variation could be attributed to the differences among the breeds. D A genetic distances and principal component analysis suggest that Mozambican breeds occupy an intermediate position between Indian Zebu and African taurine cattle. The genetic contribution from Indian Zebu, estimated by mR and average percentage of Zebu diagnostic alleles, was highest in the Angone breed and lowest in the Landim breed. The indicine Y-specific allele was fixed in the Angone breed (classified as Zebu), was found in 62% of the Bovino de Tete breed and was absent in the Landim breed (classified as Sanga). The hybrid nature of these breeds was also revealed by using an admixture model to infer population structure. Cluster analysis correctly assigned individuals to their rightful populations with probabilities ranging from 0.96 to 0.98, using prior population information. The results support the hypothesis of the Bovino de Tete cattle being a result of crossbreeding between Sanga and Zebu breeds. This study presents the first extensive information on the genetic diversity and relationships among Mozambican cattle breeds and with other breeds from different continents.

  6. Genetic diversity among five T4-like bacteriophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertrand Claire

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteriophages are an important repository of genetic diversity. As one of the major constituents of terrestrial biomass, they exert profound effects on the earth's ecology and microbial evolution by mediating horizontal gene transfer between bacteria and controlling their growth. Only limited genomic sequence data are currently available for phages but even this reveals an overwhelming diversity in their gene sequences and genomes. The contribution of the T4-like phages to this overall phage diversity is difficult to assess, since only a few examples of complete genome sequence exist for these phages. Our analysis of five T4-like genomes represents half of the known T4-like genomes in GenBank. Results Here, we have examined in detail the genetic diversity of the genomes of five relatives of bacteriophage T4: the Escherichia coli phages RB43, RB49 and RB69, the Aeromonas salmonicida phage 44RR2.8t (or 44RR and the Aeromonas hydrophila phage Aeh1. Our data define a core set of conserved genes common to these genomes as well as hundreds of additional open reading frames (ORFs that are nonconserved. Although some of these ORFs resemble known genes from bacterial hosts or other phages, most show no significant similarity to any known sequence in the databases. The five genomes analyzed here all have similarities in gene regulation to T4. Sequence motifs resembling T4 early and late consensus promoters were observed in all five genomes. In contrast, only two of these genomes, RB69 and 44RR, showed similarities to T4 middle-mode promoter sequences and to the T4 motA gene product required for their recognition. In addition, we observed that each phage differed in the number and assortment of putative genes encoding host-like metabolic enzymes, tRNA species, and homing endonucleases. Conclusion Our observations suggest that evolution of the T4-like phages has drawn on a highly diverged pool of genes in the microbial world. The T4-like phages harbour a wealth of genetic material that has not been identified previously. The mechanisms by which these genes may have arisen may differ from those previously proposed for the evolution of other bacteriophage genomes.

  7. Managing Genetic Variation to Conserve Genetic Diversity in Goats and Sheep

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. N. B. Shrestha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Domestic goat and sheep populations maintained for many generations with small numbers of male and female parents, or declining in total numbers, not only endure accumulated genetic drift but also a steady rise in inbreeding, which can be directly attributed to dispersive forces of evolutionary significance that influence gene frequency. Increasing effective population size shows theoretical promise in lessening the impact on erosion of biodiversity from genetic drift. For example, doubling the effective numbers of parents which increases effective population size reduces rate of inbreeding by nearly one-half in many of the scenarios in the present study. Similarly, equalizing the number of male and female parents can decrease the variance among progeny of each parent, which in turn increases effective population size. The recurring erosion of domestic goat and sheep diversity has contributed to decreased fecundity, reduced fitness and poor adaptability, all known to influence efficiency of production. The potential loss in performance of livestock and poultry following many generations of accumulated genetic drift, which often goes unnoticed, can be predicted for specific populations from precise estimates of their mean value, additive genetic variance and heritability along with their effective number of male and female parents. For example, when the effective population size decreases from 200 to 40, the potential reduction in mean performance for economically important traits of goat and sheep populations following 20 generations of accumulated genetic drift will nearly double. In contrast, increasing effective population size from 200 to 600 will have the potential reduction in mean performance. The accumulation of favourable mutations could imply an effective population size of 100 or more, which is equal to a rise in rate of inbreeding of 0.5% or less, may be acceptable in sustaining genetic response to artificial selection in commercial breeding populations. The application of quantitative genetic principles related to inbreeding and genetic drift make it possible to safeguard against erosion of genetic diversity in endangered breeds, populations and landraces while lessening the impact from potential loss in their performance. Conservation of domestic animal diversity can be achieved by managing the erosion of genetic variation based on breeding strategies which promote the mating of sires to all dams, in either ‘random bred’ or ‘balanced pedigreed’ breeding structure for populations of endangered domestic goats and sheep. Obviously, the in-situ and ex-situ conservation of live animals, along with cryogenic preservation of their gametes, stem cells, somatic cells, blood and gonads will be complementary to conservation breeding.

  8. GENETIC DIVERSITY, PARENTAGE VERIFICATION AND GENETIC BOTTLENECKS EVALUATION IN IRANIAN TURKMEN HORSE BREED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi-Mianji, G; Nejati-Javaremi, A; Farhadi, A

    2015-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to genetically evaluate Turkmen horses for genetic diversity and to evaluate whether they have experienced any recent genetic bottlenecks. A total of 565 individuals from Turkmen horses were characterized for within breed diversity using 12 microsatellite markers. The estimated mean allelic diversity was (9.42 ± 1.78) per locus, with a total of 131 alleles in genotyped samples. A high level of genetic variability within this breed was observed in terms of high values of effective number of alleles (4.70 ± 1.36), observed heterozygosity (0.757 ± 0.19), expected Nei's heterozygosity (0.765 ± 0.13), and polymorphism information content (0.776 ± 0.17). The estimated cumulative probability of exclusion of wrongly named parents (PE) was high, with an average value of 99.96% that indicates the effectiveness of applied markers in resolving of parentage typing in Turkmen horse population. The paternity testing results did not show any misidentification and all selected animals were qualified based on genotypic information using a likelihood-based method. Low values of Wright's fixation index, F(IS) (0.012) indicated low levels of inbreeding. A significant heterozygote excess on the basis of different models, as revealed from Sign and Wilcoxon sign rank test suggested that Turkmen horse population is not in mutation-drift equilibrium. But, the Mode-shift indicator test showed a normal 'L' shaped distribution for allelic class and proportion of alleles, thus indicating the absence of bottleneck events in the recent past history of this breed. Further research work should be carrying out to clarify the cause of discrepancy observed forbottleneck results in this breed. In conclusion, despite unplanned breeding in Turkmen horse population, this breed still has sufficient genetic variability and could provide a valuable source of genetic material that may use for meeting the demands of future breeding programs. PMID:26606803

  9. Genomic and Genetic Diversity within the Pseudomonas fluorescens Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrido-Sanz, Daniel; Meier-Kolthoff, Jan P.; Göker, Markus; Martín, Marta; Rivilla, Rafael; Redondo-Nieto, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    The Pseudomonas fluorescens complex includes Pseudomonas strains that have been taxonomically assigned to more than fifty different species, many of which have been described as plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria (PGPR) with potential applications in biocontrol and biofertilization. So far the phylogeny of this complex has been analyzed according to phenotypic traits, 16S rDNA, MLSA and inferred by whole-genome analysis. However, since most of the type strains have not been fully sequenced and new species are frequently described, correlation between taxonomy and phylogenomic analysis is missing. In recent years, the genomes of a large number of strains have been sequenced, showing important genomic heterogeneity and providing information suitable for genomic studies that are important to understand the genomic and genetic diversity shown by strains of this complex. Based on MLSA and several whole-genome sequence-based analyses of 93 sequenced strains, we have divided the P. fluorescens complex into eight phylogenomic groups that agree with previous works based on type strains. Digital DDH (dDDH) identified 69 species and 75 subspecies within the 93 genomes. The eight groups corresponded to clustering with a threshold of 31.8% dDDH, in full agreement with our MLSA. The Average Nucleotide Identity (ANI) approach showed inconsistencies regarding the assignment to species and to the eight groups. The small core genome of 1,334 CDSs and the large pan-genome of 30,848 CDSs, show the large diversity and genetic heterogeneity of the P. fluorescens complex. However, a low number of strains were enough to explain most of the CDSs diversity at core and strain-specific genomic fractions. Finally, the identification and analysis of group-specific genome and the screening for distinctive characters revealed a phylogenomic distribution of traits among the groups that provided insights into biocontrol and bioremediation applications as well as their role as PGPR. PMID:26915094

  10. Genetic diversity and variability in two Italian autochthonous donkey genetic types assessed by microsatellite markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donato Matassino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since 13rd century, Italian domestic autochthonous donkey population has been characterised by Mediterranean grey mousy cruciate ancestral phenotype, currently typical of Amiata donkey (AD genetic type. This phenotype persisted up to the 16th century when a marked introduction of Hispanic and French big sized and dark bay or darkish coloured sires occurred. In the context of a safeguard programme of Latial Equide resources, the aim of this research was to evaluate the genetic diversity and similarity between the AD breed and an autochthonous donkey population native from Lazio, the Viterbese donkey (VD, using molecular markers. A total of 135 animals (50 AD and 85 VD were genetically characterised by using 16 short tandem repeat markers. A high genetic differentiation between populations (FST=0.158; P<0.01 and a low betweenbreeds genetic similarity (0.233±0.085 were observed. Correspondence analysis, the result of STRUCTURE software analysis and analysis of molecular variance would seem to indicate genetically different entities as well. It would be desirable to increase the number of comparison with other breeds to better understand the origin of VD. Moreover, results obtained in this study suggest that the loss of genetic variation observed in VD could mainly derive from unnoticed sub-population structuring (Wahlund effect, rather than to other factors such as inbreeding, null alleles or selection influence.

  11. Microsatellite markers for determining genetic identities and genetic diversity among jute cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    Jesmin Akter; Md. Shahidul Islam; Abu Ashfaqur Sajib; Nadim Ashraf; Samiul Haque; Haseena Khan

    2008-01-01

    DNA fingerprint was generated using jute specific SSR markers on 10 jute cultivars from two Corchorus species (C. olitorius and C. capsularis) and the genetic relatedness among the cultivars was estimated. A total of 106 alleles were identified using 23 primer pairs among the 10 cultivars with an average of 4.61 ± 1.92 alleles per locus, and a mean genetic diversity of 0.68±0.16. Four C. olitorius cultivars could be easily distinguished with 6 markers using 5 primer pairs and six C. capsulari...

  12. Molecular genetic diversity and genetic structure of Vietnamese indigenous pig populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, L. D.; Do, Duy Ngoc; Nam, L. Q.; Van Ba, N.; Minh, L. T. A.; Hoan, T. X.; Cuong, V. C.; Kadarmideen, Haja

    2014-01-01

    The study characterized genetic diversity and genetic structure of five indigenous pig populations (Ha Lang, Muong Te, Mong Cai, Lung and Lung Pu), two wild pig populations (Vietnamese and Thai wild pigs) and an exotic pig breed (Yorkshire) using FAO/ISAG recommended 16 microsatellite markers in 236 samples. All estimated loci were very polymorphic indicated by high values of polymorphism information content (from 0.76 in S0225 to 0.92 in Sw2410). Indigenous populations had very high level of ge...

  13. Correlating Microbial Diversity Patterns with Geochemistry in an Extreme and Heterogeneous Environment of Mine Tailings

    OpenAIRE

    Jun LIU; Hua, Zheng-Shuang; Chen, Lin-Xing; Kuang, Jia-liang; Li, Sheng-jin; Shu, Wen-sheng; Huang, Li-nan

    2014-01-01

    Recent molecular surveys have advanced our understanding of the forces shaping the large-scale ecological distribution of microbes in Earth's extreme habitats, such as hot springs and acid mine drainage. However, few investigations have attempted dense spatial analyses of specific sites to resolve the local diversity of these extraordinary organisms and how communities are shaped by the harsh environmental conditions found there. We have applied a 16S rRNA gene-targeted 454 pyrosequencing app...

  14. Indigenous cattle in Sri Lanka: Production systems and genetic diversity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The production status, farming systems and genetic diversity of indigenous cattle in Sri Lanka were evaluated using six geographically distinct populations in Sri Lanka, which is a small island located below the southern tip of Indian subcontinent. The indigenous cattle population of the country is considered as a non-descript type mixture of genotypes, and represent more than the half of total cattle population of 1.2 million heads. Six distinct indigenous populations (NE, NC, So, No, TK and Th) were investigated for morphological and genetic differences. The respective farming systems were also evaluated to complete the requirement in developing conservation and utilization strategies. The sampling was carried out based on the non-existence of artificial insemination facilities to assure the target populations are indigenous. The six populations were assumed genetically isolated from each other in the absence of nomadic pattern of rearing and regular cattle migration. The farming systems were analyzed using a pre-tested structured questionnaire by single visits to each location. Single visits were practiced, as there is no variation in farming system according to the period of the year. Morphometric measurements were taken during the visit and the genetic variation was assessed within and between five populations using 15 autosomal and two Y-specific microsatellite markers. The farming system analysis revealed that indigenous cattle are reared as a traditional practice in all the regions of the country under limited or no input situations. Since the low productivity masks its real contribution to the rural livelihood, the level of utilization was confounded within the attributes of respective farming systems. The contribution of indigenous cattle to total tangible income ranged from 0% to 90% in different regions reflecting the high variation in the purpose of keeping indigenous cattle. Integration with crop, especially with paddy was the common feature in systems across the regions. Morphometric measurements identified the specific phenotypic characteristics resulted by geographical isolation and selective breeding. Though vary according to the regional preferences, the compact body, narrow face, small horns and humps with shades of brown and black coat colour described the indigenous cattle phenotype in general. The diversity analysis based on microsatellite genotyping indicated that indigenous cattle in Sri Lanka has a high genetic diversity with average number of alleles per locus ranging from 7.9 to 8.5. Average heterozygosity of different regions varied within a narrow range (0.72 ± 0.04 to 0.76 ± 0.03). The genetic distances (DA) between regions were low (ranged between 0.085 and 0.066) suggesting a similar mixture of genotypes across regions despite the geographical isolation. However, two genetic clusters were visible though no relationship of those clusters with the geographical distribution of different regions could be observed. Introgression of taurine cattle was evidenced in one of the cattle populations (NC) as suggested by the Y-specific microsatellite analysis (author)

  15. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Azerbaijan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majori Giancarlo

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium vivax, although causing a less serious disease than Plasmodium falciparum, is the most widespread of the four human malarial species. Further to the recent recrudescence of P. vivax cases in the Newly Independent States (NIS of central Asia, a survey on the genetic diversity and dissemination in Azerbaijan was undertaken. Azerbaijan is at the crossroads of Asia and, as such, could see a rise in the number of cases, although an effective malaria control programme has been established in the country. Methods Thirty-six P. vivax isolates from Central Azerbaijan were characterized by analysing the genetic polymorphism of the circumsporozoite protein (CSP and the merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1 genes, using PCR amplifications and amplicons sequencing. Results Analysis of CSP sequences showed that all the processed isolates belong to the VK 210 type, with variations in the alternation of alanine residue (A or aspartic acid residue (D in the repeat motif GDRA(A/DGQPA along the sequence. As far as MSP-1 genotyping is concerned, it was found that the majority of isolates analysed belong to Belem and Sal I types. Five recombinant isolates were also identified. Combined analysis with the two genetic markers allowed the identification of 19 plasmodial sub-types. Conclusion The results obtained in the present study indicate that there are several P. vivax clones circulating in Azerbaijan and, consequently, a careful malaria surveillance could be of paramount importance to identify, at early stage, the occurrence of possible P. vivax malaria outbreaks.

  16. Genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax isolates from Azerbaijan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclerc, Marie Claude; Menegon, Michela; Cligny, Alexandra; Noyer, Jean Louis; Mammadov, Suleyman; Aliyev, Namig; Gasimov, Elkhan; Majori, Giancarlo; Severini, Carlo

    2004-01-01

    Background Plasmodium vivax, although causing a less serious disease than Plasmodium falciparum, is the most widespread of the four human malarial species. Further to the recent recrudescence of P. vivax cases in the Newly Independent States (NIS) of central Asia, a survey on the genetic diversity and dissemination in Azerbaijan was undertaken. Azerbaijan is at the crossroads of Asia and, as such, could see a rise in the number of cases, although an effective malaria control programme has been established in the country. Methods Thirty-six P. vivax isolates from Central Azerbaijan were characterized by analysing the genetic polymorphism of the circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and the merozoite surface protein 1 (MSP-1) genes, using PCR amplifications and amplicons sequencing. Results Analysis of CSP sequences showed that all the processed isolates belong to the VK 210 type, with variations in the alternation of alanine residue (A) or aspartic acid residue (D) in the repeat motif GDRA(A/D)GQPA along the sequence. As far as MSP-1 genotyping is concerned, it was found that the majority of isolates analysed belong to Belem and Sal I types. Five recombinant isolates were also identified. Combined analysis with the two genetic markers allowed the identification of 19 plasmodial sub-types. Conclusion The results obtained in the present study indicate that there are several P. vivax clones circulating in Azerbaijan and, consequently, a careful malaria surveillance could be of paramount importance to identify, at early stage, the occurrence of possible P. vivax malaria outbreaks. PMID:15535878

  17. Molecular and genetic diversity in the metastatic process of melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbst, Katja; Lauss, Martin; Cirenajwis, Helena; Winter, Christof; Howlin, Jillian; Törngren, Therese; Kvist, Anders; Nodin, Björn; Olsson, Eleonor; Häkkinen, Jari; Jirström, Karin; Staaf, Johan; Lundgren, Lotta; Olsson, Håkan; Ingvar, Christian; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia K; Saal, Lao H; Jönsson, Göran

    2014-05-01

    Diversity between metastatic melanoma tumours in individual patients is known; however, the molecular and genetic differences remain unclear. To examine the molecular and genetic differences between metastatic tumours, we performed gene-expression profiling of 63 melanoma tumours obtained from 28 patients (two or three tumours/patient), followed by analysis of their mutational landscape, using targeted deep sequencing of 1697 cancer genes and DNA copy number analysis. Gene-expression signatures revealed discordant phenotypes between tumour lesions within a patient in 50% of the cases. In 18 of 22 patients (where matched normal tissue was available), we found that the multiple lesions within a patient were genetically divergent, with one or more melanoma tumours harbouring 'private' somatic mutations. In one case, the distant subcutaneous metastasis of one patient occurring 3 months after an earlier regional lymph node metastasis had acquired 37 new coding sequence mutations, including mutations in PTEN and CDH1. However, BRAF and NRAS mutations, when present in the first metastasis, were always preserved in subsequent metastases. The patterns of nucleotide substitutions found in this study indicate an influence of UV radiation but possibly also DNA alkylating agents. Our results clearly demonstrate that metastatic melanoma is a molecularly highly heterogeneous disease that continues to progress throughout its clinical course. The private aberrations observed on a background of shared aberrations within a patient provide evidence of continued evolution of individual tumours following divergence from a common parental clone, and might have implications for personalized medicine strategies in melanoma treatment. PMID:24399611

  18. Genetic diversity and genetic relationships in Hyacinthaceae in India using RAPD and SRAP markers

    OpenAIRE

    Jehan, Tabassum; Vashishtha, Amit; Yadav, S. R.; Lakhanpaul, Suman

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity and relationship among three genera namely Drimia, Dipcadi and Ledebouria of Hyacinthaceae in India was studied using RAPD and SRAP markers. Twenty one RAPD primers and nine SRAP were used for analyzing 41 accessions. RAPD gave an average 12.6 markers per primer, while SRAP generated 10.1 markers per primer pair. The family emerged very diverged with high polymorphism. The study resolved the three genera into monophyletic groups corresponding to three subfamilies; Urginoidea...

  19. Genetic Diversity and Spatial Genetic Structure of the Grassland Perennial Saxifraga granulata along Two River Systems

    OpenAIRE

    van der Meer, Sascha; Jacquemyn, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Due to changes in land use, the natural habitats of an increasing number of plant species have become more and more fragmented. In landscapes that consist of patches of suitable habitat, the frequency and extent of long-distance seed dispersal can be expected to be an important factor determining local genetic diversity and regional population structure of the remaining populations. In plant species that are restricted to riparian habitats, rivers can be expected to have a strong impact on th...

  20. [Genetic diversity of microsatellite loci in captive Amur tigers].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu-Gaung; Li, Di-Qiang; Xiao, Qi-Ming; Rao, Li-Qun; Zhang, Xue-Wen

    2004-09-01

    The tiger is one of the most threatened wildlife species since the abundance and distribution of tiger have decreased dramatically in the last century. The wild Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) only distributed in northeast China, the far east area of Russia and the north Korea and its size of wild population is about 450 in the world and 20 in China. Several hundred captive populations of Amur tigers are the main source to protect gene library of tiger and the source of recovering the wild populations. The Breeding Center for Felidae at Hengdaohezi and Haoerbin Tiger Park in Heilongjiang Province is the biggest captive breeding base in China. How to make clear the genetic pedigree and establish reasonable breeding system is the urgent issues. So we use the microsatellite DNA markers and non-invasive technology to research on the genetic diversity of captive Amur tiger in this study. Ten microsatellite loci (Fca005, Fca075, Fca094, Fca152, Fca161, Fca294, Pti002, Pti003, Pti007 and Pti010), highly variable nuclear markers, were studied their genetic diversity in 113 captive Amur tigers. The PCR amplified products of microsatellite loci were detected by non-denatured polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Allele numbers, allelic frequency, gene heterozygosity(H(e)), polymorphism information content(PIC) and effective number of allele(N(e)) were calculated. 41 alleles were found and their size were ranged from 110bp to 250bp in ten microsatellite loci, Fca152 had 6 alleles, Fca075, Fca094 and Fca294 had 5 alleles, Fca005 and Pti002 had 4 alleles and the others had 3 alleles in all tiger samples, respectively. The allelic frequencies were from 0.009 to 0.767; The He ranged from 0.385 to 0.707, and Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value; the PIC were from 0.353 to 0.658, Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value; and N(e) were from 1.626 to 3.409, Fca294 and Pti010 locus had the highest and lowest value, which showed the ten microsatellie loci had high or medium polymorphism in these Amur tigers and had high genetic diversity. At the same time, we only found even bases variability which showed the even bases repeat sequence (CA/GT) maybe the basic unit for length variability of microsatellite in all loci. In this study, the samples were made up of 75 hair specimens, 23 blood specimens and 15 tissue specimens, we obtained the genome DNA from hairs using the non-invasive DNA technology and demonstrated that DNA derived from hair samples is as good as that obtained from blood samples for the analysis of microsatellite polymorphism. These results imply that microsatellite DNA markers and non-invasive DNA technology can help study the genetic diversity of Amur tiger. This method could be used in the captive management of other endangered species. PMID:15640074

  1. Molecular genetic diversity in populations of the stingless bee Plebeia remota: A case study

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Flávio de Oliveira, Francisco; Leandro Rodrigues, Santiago; Maria Cristina, Arias.

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity is a major component of the biological diversity of an ecosystem. The survival of a population may be seriously threatened if its genetic diversity values are low. In this work, we measured the genetic diversity of the stingless bee Plebeia remota based on molecular data obtained b [...] y analyzing 15 microsatellite loci and sequencing two mitochondrial genes. Population structure and genetic diversity differed depending on the molecular marker analyzed: microsatellites showed low population structure and moderate to high genetic diversity, while mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) showed high population structure and low diversity in three populations. Queen philopatry and male dispersal behavior are discussed as the main reasons for these findings.

  2. Genetic diversity and population structure in Brazilian Mangalarga Marchador horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAssis, J B; DeLaat, D M; Peixoto, M G C D; Bergmann, J A G; Fonseca, C G; Carvalho, M R S

    2009-01-01

    One hundred and fifteen unrelated Mangalarga Marchador horses were sampled from three geographically distinct regions of Minas Gerais State, Brazil (South, Southeast, and Northeast) and tested for 10 microsatellite loci. Genetic diversity and population structure parameters were estimated with ARLEQUIN 3.0, CERVUS 2.0, POPGENE 1.31, GENEPOP on the web, STRUCTURE 2.0, and SPAGEDI 1.2 software packages. Under Hardy-Weinberg assumptions, seven markers were at equilibrium (LEX014, LEX017, LEX019, SGCV23, TKY321, VHL20, and VIASH39), while two (ASB3 and LEX031) presented significant homozygote excess. Seventy-four alleles were identified in these nine markers, with a mean of 8.22 alleles. Mean heterozygosity was 0.637 and polymorphism information content was 0.662. Markers ASB3, LEX019, SGCV23, TKY321, and VHL20 were highly informative (PIC >0.7) and may be useful for eventual expansion of parentage test panels. The F(ST) value (0.0562) indicated relatively little geographical structure. However, based on a Bayesian-based cluster analysis under a three-cluster model, 94% of the 115 individuals were correctly assigned to the subpopulations from where they were sampled. Mean pairwise f was relatively high (0.11), and in spite of the efforts towards non-consanguineous sampling, 1% of the pairs of individuals shared over 50% of the alleles. These results strongly suggest that the population is genetically structured. Under a conservation genetics approach, two strategies are recommended: avoidance of crosses between highly endogamic individuals and stimulation of crosses between individuals from those regions for which low genetic flow was identified. PMID:20082264

  3. Genetic Diversity of Sitobion avenae (Homoptera: Aphididae) Populations from Different Geographic Regions in China

    OpenAIRE

    Xin, Juan-Juan; Shang, Qing-Li; Desneux, Nicolas; Gao, Xi-Wu

    2014-01-01

    Sitobion avenae is a major agricultural pest of wheat in China. Using microsatellite markers, we studied the potential gene flow, genetic diversity, genetic differentiation, and genetic structure of seven S. avenae populations from different regions of China (Beijing, Hebei, Henan, Hubei, Jiangsu, Shandong, and Shanxi provinces). The populations from Henan, Shandong, and Jiangsu showed high levels of genic and genotypic diversity. By contrast, the genic diversity in the Beijing and Hebei popu...

  4. Peak and Persistent Excess of Genetic Diversity Following an Abrupt Migration Increase

    OpenAIRE

    Alcala, Nicolas; Streit, Daniela; Goudet, Jérôme; Vuilleumier, Séverine

    2013-01-01

    Genetic diversity is essential for population survival and adaptation to changing environments. Demographic processes (e.g., bottleneck and expansion) and spatial structure (e.g., migration, number, and size of populations) are known to shape the patterns of the genetic diversity of populations. However, the impact of temporal changes in migration on genetic diversity has seldom been considered, although such events might be the norm. Indeed, during the millions of years of a species’ lifetim...

  5. Loss of genetic diversity in Maculinea populations over 10 years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nash, David Richard; Lomborg, Andreas Eg

    2008-01-01

    I will present the results of research on the population genetics of Maculinea alcon and M. arion in Southern scandinavia, which shows a strong decrease in genetic diversity in most populations, even if those populations are apparently otherwise healthy.

  6. EFFECTS OF CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS ON GENETIC DIVERSITY IN NATURAL POPULATIONS: IMPLICATIONS FOR BIOMONITORING AND ECOTOXICOLOGY

    Science.gov (United States)

    The conservation of genetic diversity has emerged as one of the central issues in conservation biology. Although researchers in the areas of evolutionary biology, population management, and conservation biology routinely investigate genetic variability in natural populations, onl...

  7. Mining Classification Rules by Using Genetic Algorithms with Non-random Initial Population and Uniform Operator

    OpenAIRE

    GÜNDO?AN, Korkut Koray; Alata?, Bilal; Karci, Ali

    2004-01-01

    Classification is a supervised learning method that induces a classification model from a database and is one of the most commonly applied data mining task. The frequently employed techniques are decision tree or neural network-based classification algorithms. This work presents an efficient genetic algorithm (GA) for classification rule mining technique that discovers comprehensible IF-THEN rules using a generalized uniform population method and a uniform operator inspired from the ...

  8. A Genetic Programming Framework for Two Data Mining Tasks: Classification and Generalized Rule Induction

    OpenAIRE

    Freitas, Alex A

    1997-01-01

    This paper proposes a genetic programming (GP) framework for two major data mining tasks, namely classification and generalized rule induction. The framework emphasizes the integration between a GP algorithm and relational database systems. In particular, the fitness of individuals is computed by submitting SQL queries to a (parallel) database server. Some advantages of this integration from a data mining viewpoint are scalability, data-privacy control and automatic parallelization.

  9. Genetic diversity and germplasm conservation of three minor Andean tuber crop species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malice M.

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In traditional Andean agrosystems, three minor tuber crop species are of regional or local importance: oca (Oxalis tuberosa Molina, ulluco (Ullucus tuberosus Caldas and mashua (Tropaeolum tuberosum Ruiz and Pav.. Genetic diversity within these species is very large and could result from the high ecological and cultural variability that characterizes the Andean area. Nowadays, many anthropic or ecological factors cause the loss of diversity and contribute to genetic erosion. The development of conservation strategies for genetic resources of Andean tubers, in situ as well as ex situ, includes a better knowledge of diversity in addition to the study of Andean farming strategies linked to this genetic diversity.

  10. Italian Common Bean Landraces: History, Genetic Diversity and Seed Quality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela R. Piergiovanni

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The long tradition of common bean cultivation in Italy has allowed the evolution of many landraces adapted to restricted areas. Nowadays, in response to market demands, old landraces are gradually being replaced by improved cultivars. However, landraces still survive in marginal areas of several Italian regions. Most of them appear severely endangered with risk of extinction due to the advanced age of the farmers and the socio-cultural context where they are cultivated. The present contribution is an overview of the state of the art about the knowledge of Italian common bean germplasm, describing the most important and recent progresses made in its characterization, including genetic diversity and nutritional aspects.

  11. Genetic diversity assessment of summer squash landraces using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mady, Emad A; Helaly, Alaa Al-Din; Abu El-Hamd, Abdel Naem; Abdou, Arafa; Shanan, Shamel A; Craker, Lyle E

    2013-07-01

    Plant identification, classification, and genotyping within a germplasm collection are essential elements for establishing a breeding program that enhances the probability of plants with desirable characteristics in the market place. In this study, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) was used as a molecular tool to assess the diversity and relationship among 20 summer squash (Curcubita pepo L.) landraces traditionally used to treat hypertension and prostate hyperplasia. A total of 10 RAPD primers produced 65 reproducible bands of which 46 (70.77 %) were polymorphic, indicating a large number of genotypes within the summer squash lines. Cluster analysis divided the summer squash germplasm into two groups, one including one landrace and a second containing 19 landraces that could be divided into five sub-groups. Results of this study indicate the potential of RAPD markers for the identification and assessment of genetic variations among squash landraces and provide a number of choices for developing a successful breeding program to improve summer squash. PMID:23666102

  12. Genetic diversity of Gallibacterium anatis isolates from different chicken flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, A.M.; Torpdahl, Mia

    2003-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) were used to characterize the genotypic diversity of a total of 114 Gallibacterium anatis isolates originating from a reference collection representing 15 biovars from four countries and isolates obtained from tracheal and cloacal swab samples of chickens from an organic, egg-producing flock and a layer parent flock. A subset of strains was also characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and biotyping. The organic flock isolates were characterized by more than 94% genetic similarity, indicating that only a single clone was apparent in the flock. The layer parent flock isolates were grouped into two subclusters, each with similarity above 90%. One subcluster contained only tracheal isolates, while the other primarily included cloacal isolates. In conclusion, we show that AFLP analysis enables fingerprinting of G. anatis, which seems to have a clonal. population structure within natural populations. There was further evidence of clonal lineages, which may have adapted to different sites within the same animal.

  13. Genetic diversity of flavonoid content in leaf of hawthorn resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawthorn (Cratageus spp.) are important medicinal plants. Flavonoids are the main active ingredient in hawthorn. With the help of hawthorn leaf flavonoids efficient detection system, vitexin, rhamnosylvitexin, hyperin, rutin and quercetin of 122 hawthorn resources was precisely measured.The flavonoid contents of 10 hawthorn species were explicited. The comparation of flavonoids revealed the abundant genetic diversity of hawthorn flavones. Large variable coefficient has been observed among 5 flavonoid monomer traits. The coefficients of variation were 44.17%, 132.2%, 157.08%, 113.91% and 31.05 for Vitexin, Rhamnosylvitexin, Hyperoside, Rutin and Quercetin respectively. The sum of these 5 flavonoid monomer contents represented the total flavonoids in hawthorn. The total coefficients of variation was 44.01%. Some high-content-flavone and valuable leaf resources were found. This research could provide accurate date for further production, breeding and the effective use of medicinal resources. (author)

  14. Consequences of geographical habitats on population structure and genetic diversity in Campanula spp.

    OpenAIRE

    Paul Arens; Valentina Scariot; Matteo Caser

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of populations by means of DNA techniques provides a tool for precise identification and a quantitative estimate of genetic diversity, crucial in evaluation of genetic fragmentation within and among populations. NBS profiling are PCR-based approaches that sample genetic variation in resistance genes (R-gene), and R gene analogs (RGA). To date, myb patterns have not been used for evaluating genetic diversity in other species. NBS primers are homologous to the conserved sequenc...

  15. Consequences of geographical habitats on population structure and genetic diversity in Campanula spp

    OpenAIRE

    CASER, Matteo; SCARIOT, VALENTINA

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of populations by means of DNA techniques provides a tool for precise identification and a quantitative estimate of genetic diversity, crucial in evaluation of genetic fragmentation within and among populations. NBS profiling are PCR-based approaches that sample genetic variation in resistance genes (R-gene), and R gene analogs (RGA). To date, myb patterns have not been used for evaluating genetic diversity in other species. NBS primers are homologous to the conserved sequ...

  16. The genetic diversity of the Vigna angularis complex in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zong, Xu Xiao; Kaga, Akito; Tomooka, Norihiko; Wang, Xin Wang; Han, Ouk Kyu; Vaughan, Duncan

    2003-08-01

    A selected set of accessions of components of the azuki bean (Vigna angularis) complex comprising 123 cultivated accessions and 23 wild or weedy accessions from Bhutan, China (including Taiwan), India, Japan, Korea, and Nepal was analyzed using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) methodology. Using 12 AFLP primer pairs, 580 unambiguous bands were generated, 313 (53.9%) of which were polymorphic among azuki bean accessions. All 580 bands were used to assess phenotypic (band) and genetic (nucleotide) diversity among the 146 azuki bean accessions. The results indicate five major groups of azuki bean germplasm primarily associated with geographic origin of accessions and their status: wild, weedy, or cultivated. These five groups are (i) Himalayan wild, (ii) Nepal-Bhutan cultivated, (iii) Chinese wild, (iv) Taiwan wild - Bhutan cultivated, and (v) northeast Asian accessions. Within the northeast Asian accessions, three subgroups are present. These consist of (v1) Japanese complex - Korean cultivated, (v2) Japanese cultivated, and (v3) Chinese cultivated accessions. The results suggest domestication of azuki bean occurred at least twice, once in the Himalayan region of southern Asia and once in northeast Asia. The remarkable diversity of azuki bean germplasm in the Himalayan region compared with other regions suggests this is a rich source of germplasm for plant breeding. The results suggest there are important gaps in the germplasm collections of azuki bean and its close relatives from various parts of Asia and that specific collecting missions for Vigna germplasm related to azuki bean in the highlands of subtropical Asia are needed. PMID:12897872

  17. Multi-objective Genetic Algorithm for Association Rule Mining Using a Homogeneous Dedicated Cluster of Workstations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Dehuri

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a fast and scalable multi-objective association rule mining technique using genetic algorithm from large database. The objective functions such as confidence factor, comprehensibility and interestingness can be thought of as different objectives of our association rule-mining problem and is treated as the basic input to the genetic algorithm. The outcomes of our algorithm are the set of non-dominated solutions. However, in data mining the quantity of data is growing rapidly both in size and dimensions. Furthermore, the multi-objective genetic algorithm (MOGA tends to be slow in comparison with most classical rule mining methods. Hence, to overcome these difficulties we propose a fast and scalability technique using the inherent parallel processing nature of genetic algorithm and a homogeneous dedicated network of workstations (NOWs. Our algorithm exploit both data and control parallelism by distributing the data being mined and the population of individuals across all available processors. The experimental result shows that the algorithm has been found suitable for large database with an encouraging speed up.

  18. Genetic diversity of human blastocystis isolates in khorramabad, central iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebrahim Badparva

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available There are some genetic differences in Blastocystis that show the existence of species or genotypes. One of these genes that help in identifying Blastocystis is SSUrRNA. The aim of this study was assessment of genetic diversity of Blastocystis by PCR with seven pairs of STS primers.This study was done on 511 stool samples collected from patients referred to the health care centers of Khorramabad, Central Iran, in 2012. Genomic DNA was extracted and in order to determine the Blastocystis subtype in contaminated samples, seven pairs of primers STS (subtype specific sequence-tagged site were used.Out of 511 samples, 33 (6.5% samples were infected with Blastocystis. Subtype (ST of 30 samples was identified and three subtypes 2, 3 and 4 were determined. Mix infection was reported 10% which 3.33% of the infection was for the mixture of ST 3 and ST5 and 6.67% was for the mixture of ST 2 and ST 3.The predominant subtype was ST3 that is the main human subtype. The dominance of ST2 and 5 are important in this study. This superiority has been reported in some of the studies in ST 2 which is different from the studies in other countries, because they have announced priorities of the ST1 and ST6 after ST3.

  19. Genetic diversity of Leishmania infantum field populations from Brazil

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Marcela, Segatto; Lucas Secchim, Ribeiro; Dorcas Lamounier, Costa; Carlos Henrique Nery, Costa; Márcia Rosa de, Oliveira; Sílvio Fernando Guimarães, Carvalho; Andréa Mara, Macedo; Helder Magno Silva, Valadares; Reynaldo, Dietze; Cristiana Ferreira Alves de, Brito; Elenice Moreira, Lemos.

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Leishmania infantum (syn. Leishmania chagasi) is the etiological agent of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in Brazil. The epidemiology of VL is poorly understood. Therefore, a more detailed molecular characterization at an intraspecific level is certainly needed. Herein, three independent molecular metho [...] ds, multilocus microsatellite typing (MLMT), random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and simple sequence repeats-polymerase chain reaction (SSR-PCR), were used to evaluate the genetic diversity of 53 L. infantum isolates from five different endemic areas in Brazil. Population structures were inferred by distance-based and Bayesian-based approaches. Eighteen very similar genotypes were detected by MLMT, most of them differed in only one locus and no correlation was found between MLMT profiles, geographical origin or the estimated population structure. However, complex profiles composed of 182 bands obtained by both RAPD and SSR-PCR assays gave different results. Unweighted pair group method with arithmetic mean trees built from these data revealed a high degree of homogeneity within isolates of L. infantum. Interestingly, despite this genetic homogeneity, most of the isolates clustered according to their geographical origin.

  20. Does population size affect genetic diversity? A test with sympatric lizard species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hague, M T J; Routman, E J

    2016-01-01

    Genetic diversity is a fundamental requirement for evolution and adaptation. Nonetheless, the forces that maintain patterns of genetic variation in wild populations are not completely understood. Neutral theory posits that genetic diversity will increase with a larger effective population size and the decreasing effects of drift. However, the lack of compelling evidence for a relationship between genetic diversity and population size in comparative studies has generated some skepticism over the degree that neutral sequence evolution drives overall patterns of diversity. The goal of this study was to measure genetic diversity among sympatric populations of related lizard species that differ in population size and other ecological factors. By sampling related species from a single geographic location, we aimed to reduce nuisance variance in genetic diversity owing to species differences, for example, in mutation rates or historical biogeography. We compared populations of zebra-tailed lizards and western banded geckos, which are abundant and short-lived, to chuckwallas and desert iguanas, which are less common and long-lived. We assessed population genetic diversity at three protein-coding loci for each species. Our results were consistent with the predictions of neutral theory, as the abundant species almost always had higher levels of haplotype diversity than the less common species. Higher population genetic diversity in the abundant species is likely due to a combination of demographic factors, including larger local population sizes (and presumably effective population sizes), faster generation times and high rates of gene flow with other populations. PMID:26306730

  1. A nonlinear relationship between genetic diversity and productivity in a polyphagous seed beetle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burls, K J; Shapiro, J; Forister, M L; Hoelzer, G A

    2014-05-01

    There has been a renewed interest in the effects of genetic diversity on population-level and community-level processes. Many of these studies have found non-additive, positive effects of diversity, but these studies have rarely examined ecological mechanisms by which diverse populations increase productivity. We used the seed beetle Callosobruchus maculatus (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to study genetic diversity in insect host preference and fecundity and its effects on total productivity and resource use. We created genetically distinct lineages that varied in host preference and fecundity and then assembled groups consisting of one, three, five, or all ten lineages. We found that lineages with intermediate diversity had the highest productivity, though resource use did not change in diverse groups. In addition, lineages showed substantial plasticity in host preference when preference was assayed either individually or in groups, and productivity was much lower in groups than predicted by individual assays. These results highlight the interplay of genetic diversity, resource variation, and phenotypic plasticity in determining the ecological consequences of genetic diversity. In addition, when plasticity modifies a population's response to population density, this may create a complex interaction between genetic diversity and density, influencing selective pressures on the population and potentially maintaining genetic diversity across generations. PMID:24535057

  2. Estimating genetic diversity across the neutral genome with the use of dense marker maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijma Piter

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the advent of high throughput DNA typing, dense marker maps have become available to investigate genetic diversity on specific regions of the genome. The aim of this paper was to compare two marker based estimates of the genetic diversity in specific genomic regions lying in between markers: IBD-based genetic diversity and heterozygosity. Methods A computer simulated population was set up with individuals containing a single 1-Morgan chromosome and 1665 SNP markers and from this one, an additional population was produced with a lower marker density i.e. 166 SNP markers. For each marker interval based on adjacent markers, the genetic diversity was estimated either by IBD probabilities or heterozygosity. Estimates were compared to each other and to the true genetic diversity. The latter was calculated for a marker in the middle of each marker interval that was not used to estimate genetic diversity. Results The simulated population had an average minor allele frequency of 0.28 and an LD (r2 of 0.26, comparable to those of real livestock populations. Genetic diversities estimated by IBD probabilities and by heterozygosity were positively correlated, and correlations with the true genetic diversity were quite similar for the simulated population with a high marker density, both for specific regions (r = 0.19-0.20 and large regions (r = 0.61-0.64 over the genome. For the population with a lower marker density, the correlation with the true genetic diversity turned out to be higher for the IBD-based genetic diversity. Conclusions Genetic diversities of ungenotyped regions of the genome (i.e. between markers estimated by IBD-based methods and heterozygosity give similar results for the simulated population with a high marker density. However, for a population with a lower marker density, the IBD-based method gives a better prediction, since variation and recombination between markers are missed with heterozygosity.

  3. Genetic Diversity Revealed by Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Markers in a Worldwide Germplasm Collection of Durum Wheat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Cheng Luo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of genetic diversity and genetic structure in crops has important implications for plant breeding programs and the conservation of genetic resources. Newly developed single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers are effective in detecting genetic diversity. In the present study, a worldwide durum wheat collection consisting of 150 accessions was used. Genetic diversity and genetic structure were investigated using 946 polymorphic SNP markers covering the whole genome of tetraploid wheat. Genetic structure was greatly impacted by multiple factors, such as environmental conditions, breeding methods reflected by release periods of varieties, and gene flows via human activities. A loss of genetic diversity was observed from landraces and old cultivars to the modern cultivars released during periods of the Early Green Revolution, but an increase in cultivars released during the Post Green Revolution. Furthermore, a comparative analysis of genetic diversity among the 10 mega ecogeographical regions indicated that South America, North America, and Europe possessed the richest genetic variability, while the Middle East showed moderate levels of genetic diversity.

  4. Soil functional diversity analysis of a bauxite-mined restoration chronosequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Dawn E; White, John R; Wafula, Denis; Athar, Rana; Dickerson, Tamar; Williams, Henry N; Chauhan, Ashvini

    2010-05-01

    Soil microorganisms are sensitive to environmental perturbations such that changes in microbial community structure and function can provide early signs of anthropogenic disturbances and even predict restoration success. We evaluated the bacterial functional diversity of un-mined and three chronosequence sites at various stages of rehabilitation (0, 10, and 20 years old) located in the Mocho Mountains of Jamaica. Samples were collected during the dry and wet seasons and analyzed for metal concentrations, microbial biomass carbon, bacterial numbers, and functional responses of soil microbiota using community-level physiological profile (CLPP) assays. Regardless of the season, un-mined soils consisted of higher microbial biomass and numbers than any of the rehabilitated sites. Additionally, the number and rate of substrates utilized and substrate evenness (the distribution of color development between the substrates) were significantly greater in the un-mined soils with carbohydrates being preferentially utilized than amino acids, polymers, carboxylic acids, and esters. To some extent, functional responses varied with the seasons but the least physiological activity was shown by the site rehabilitated in 1987 indicating long-term perturbation to this ecosystem. Small subunit ribosomal DNA (SSUrDNA)-denaturing gradient-gel electrophoresis analyses on the microbiota collected from the most preferred CLPP substrates followed by taxonomic analyses showed Proteobacteria, specifically the gamma-proteobacteria, as the most functionally active phyla, indicating a propensity of this phyla to out-compete other groups under the prevailing conditions. Additionally, multivariate statistical analyses, Shannon's diversity, and evenness indices, principal component analysis, biplot and un-weighted-pair-group method with arithmetic averages dendrograms further confirmed that un-mined sites were distinctly different from the rehabilitated soils. PMID:20016980

  5. Genetic Algorithm Calibration of Probabilistic Cellular Automata for Modeling Mining Permit Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louis, S.J.; Raines, G.L.

    2003-01-01

    We use a genetic algorithm to calibrate a spatially and temporally resolved cellular automata to model mining activity on public land in Idaho and western Montana. The genetic algorithm searches through a space of transition rule parameters of a two dimensional cellular automata model to find rule parameters that fit observed mining activity data. Previous work by one of the authors in calibrating the cellular automaton took weeks - the genetic algorithm takes a day and produces rules leading to about the same (or better) fit to observed data. These preliminary results indicate that genetic algorithms are a viable tool in calibrating cellular automata for this application. Experience gained during the calibration of this cellular automata suggests that mineral resource information is a critical factor in the quality of the results. With automated calibration, further refinements of how the mineral-resource information is provided to the cellular automaton will probably improve our model.

  6. Assessment of genetic diversity and relationships among caladium cultivars and species using molecular markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caladium (Caladium hortulanum Birdsey) is an important aroid widely used in the ornamental plant industry. Concerns have been raised about possible loss of genetic diversity due to a drastic decline in the number of cultivars in the last century. This study assessed genetic diversity and relationshi...

  7. Noninvasive genetics provides insights into the population size and genetic diversity of an Amur tiger population in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dan; Hu, Yibo; Ma, Tianxiao; Nie, Yonggang; Xie, Yan; Wei, Fuwen

    2016-01-01

    Understanding population size and genetic diversity is critical for effective conservation of endangered species. The Amur tiger (Panthera tigris altaica) is the largest felid and a flagship species for wildlife conservation. Due to habitat loss and human activities, available habitat and population size are continuously shrinking. However, little is known about the true population size and genetic diversity of wild tiger populations in China. In this study, we collected 55 fecal samples and 1 hair sample to investigate the population size and genetic diversity of wild Amur tigers in Hunchun National Nature Reserve, Jilin Province, China. From the samples, we determined that 23 fecal samples and 1 hair sample were from 7 Amur tigers: 2 males, 4 females and 1 individual of unknown sex. Interestingly, 2 fecal samples that were presumed to be from tigers were from Amur leopards, highlighting the significant advantages of noninvasive genetics over traditional methods in studying rare and elusive animals. Analyses from this sample suggested that the genetic diversity of wild Amur tigers is much lower than that of Bengal tigers, consistent with previous findings. Furthermore, the genetic diversity of this Hunchun population in China was lower than that of the adjoining subpopulation in southwest Primorye Russia, likely due to sampling bias. Considering the small population size and relatively low genetic diversity, it is urgent to protect this endangered local subpopulation in China. PMID:26663614

  8. Astrophysical data mining with GPU. A case study: genetic classification of globular clusters

    OpenAIRE

    Cavuoti, Stefano; Garofalo, Mauro; Brescia, Massimo; Paolillo, Maurizio; Pescape', Antonio; Longo, Giuseppe; Ventre, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-purpose genetic algorithm, designed and implemented with GPGPU / CUDA parallel computing technology. The model was derived from our CPU serial implementation, named GAME (Genetic Algorithm Model Experiment). It was successfully tested and validated on the detection of candidate Globular Clusters in deep, wide-field, single band HST images. The GPU version of GAME will be made available to the community by integrating it into the web application DAMEWARE (DAta Mining Web App...

  9. Mining the human genome after Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Barbara J.

    2013-01-01

    The Supreme Court's recent decision in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics portrays the human genome as a product of nature. This frames medical genetics as an extractive industry that mines a natural resource to produce valuable goods and services. Natural resource law offers insights into problems medical geneticists can expect after this decision and suggests possible solutions. Increased competition among clinical laboratories offers various benefits but threatens to in...

  10. Genetic diversity of Brazilian Pantaneiro horse and relationships among horse breeds

    OpenAIRE

    Sereno, Fabiana Tavares Pires de Souza; Sereno, José Robson Bezerra; Vega-Pla, J.L.; Kelly, L; Delgado-Bermejo, J.V.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate the genetic diversity of Brazilian Pantaneiro horse by microsatellite markers, investigate the effect of genetic bottlenecks and estimate genetic differentiation among four horse breeds. Genetic variation was estimated through allele frequencies and mean breed heterozygosity. Nei´s genetic distances among the breeds Pantaneiro, Thoroughbred, Arabian, Spanish Pure Breed (Andalusian), and Uruguay Creole were calculated, and it was used to c...

  11. Genetic diversity of siderophore-producing bacteria of tobacco rhizosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fang; Ding, Yanqin; Zhu, Hui; Yao, Liangtong; Du, Binghai

    2009-04-01

    The genetic diversity of siderophore-producing bacteria of tobacco rhizosphere was studied by amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), 16S rRNA sequence homology and phylogenetics analysis methods. Studies demonstrated that 85% of the total 354 isolates produced siderophores in iron limited liquid medium. A total of 28 ARDRA patterns were identified among the 299 siderophore-producing bacterial isolates. The 28 ARDRA patterns represented bacteria of 14 different genera belonging to six bacterial divisions, namely ?-, ?-, ?-Proteobacteria, Sphingobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria. Especially, ?-Proteobacteria consisting of Pseudomonas, Enterobacter, Serratia, Pantoea, Erwinia and Stenotrophomonas genus encountered 18 different ARDRA groups. Results also showed a greater siderophore-producing bacterial diversity than previous researches. For example, Sphingobacterium (isolates G-2-21-1 and G-2-27-2), Pseudomonas poae (isolate G-2-1-1), Enterobacter endosymbiont (isolates G-2-10-2 and N-5-10), Delftia acidovorans (isolate G-1-15), and Achromobacter xylosoxidans (isolates N-46-11HH and N-5-20) were reported to be able to produce siderophores under low-iron conditions for the first time. Gram-negative isolates were more frequently encountered, with more than 95% total frequency. For Gram-positive bacteria, the Bacillus and Rhodococcus were the only two genera, with 1.7% total frequency. Furthermore, the Pseudomonas and Enterobacter were dominant in this environment, with 44.5% and 24.7% total frequency, respectively. It was also found that 75 percent of the isolates that had the high percentages of siderophore units (% between 40 and 60) belonged to Pseudomonas. Pseudomonas sp. G-229-21 screened out in this study may have potential to apply to low-iron soil to prevent plant soil-borne fungal pathogen diseases. PMID:24031358

  12. Genetic Diversity Among Botulinum Neurotoxin Producing Clostridial Strains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, K K; Smith, T J; Helma, C H; Ticknor, L O; Foley, B T; Svennson, R T; Brown, J L; Johnson, E A; Smith, L A; Okinaka, R T; Jackson, P J; Marks, J D

    2006-07-06

    Clostridium botulinum is a taxonomic designation for many diverse anaerobic spore forming rod-shaped bacteria which have the common property of producing botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs). The BoNTs are exoneurotoxins that can cause severe paralysis and even death in humans and various other animal species. A collection of 174 C. botulinum strains were examined by amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) analysis and by sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene and BoNT genes to examine genetic diversity within this species. This collection contained representatives of each of the seven different serotypes of botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT A-G). Analysis of the16S rRNA sequences confirmed earlier reports of at least four distinct genomic backgrounds (Groups I-IV) each of which has independently acquired one or more BoNT serotypes through horizontal gene transfer. AFLP analysis provided higher resolution, and can be used to further subdivide the four groups into sub-groups. Sequencing of the BoNT genes from serotypes A, B and E in multiple strains confirmed significant sequence variation within each serotype. Four distinct lineages within each of the BoNT A and B serotypes, and five distinct lineages of serotype E strains were identified. The nucleotide sequences of the seven serotypes of BoNT were compared and show varying degrees of interrelatedness and recombination as has been previously noted for the NTNH gene which is linked to BoNT. These analyses contribute to the understanding of the evolution and phylogeny within this species and assist in the development of improved diagnostics and therapeutics for treatment of botulism.

  13. Genetic diversity of the allodeterminant alr2 in Hydractinia symbiolongicarpus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosengarten, Rafael D; Moreno, Maria A; Lakkis, Fadi G; Buss, Leo W; Dellaporta, Stephen L

    2011-02-01

    Hydractinia symbiolongicarpus, a colonial cnidarian (class Hydrozoa) epibiont on hermit crab shells, is well established as a model for genetic studies of allorecognition. Recently, two linked loci, allorecognition (alr) 1 and alr2, were identified by positional cloning and shown to be major determinants of histocompatibility. Both genes encode putative transmembrane proteins with hypervariable extracellular domains similar to immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. We sought to characterize the naturally occurring variation at the alr2 locus and to understand the origins of this molecular diversity. We examined full-length cDNA coding sequences derived from a sample of 21 field-collected colonies, including 18 chosen haphazardly and two laboratory reference strains. Of the 35 alleles recovered from the 18 unbiased samples, 34 encoded unique gene products. We identified two distinct structural classes of alleles that varied over a large central region of the gene but both possessed highly polymorphic extracellular domains I, similar to an Ig-like V-set domain. The discovery of structurally chimeric alleles provided evidence that interallelic recombination may contribute to alr2 variation. Comparisons of the genomic region encompassing alr2 from two field-derived haplotypes and one laboratory reference sequence revealed a history of structural variation at the haplotype level as well. Maintenance of large numbers of equally rare alleles in a natural population is a hallmark of negative frequency-dependent selection and is expected to produce high levels of heterozygosity. The observed alr2 allelic diversity is comparable with that found in immune recognition molecules such as human leukocyte antigens, B cell Igs, or natural killer cell Ig-like receptors. PMID:20966116

  14. Genetic diversity based on morphological data in Panicum maximum hybrids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janaina Azevedo Martuscello

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this experiment was to evaluate the genetic divergence between hybrids obtained from 10 sexual genitors of the Panicum maximum breeding program at Embrapa Beef Cattle. For this, the following morphological descriptors were used: plant height, growth habit, leaf aspect, leaf waxiness, hair density on the sheath (DePB and blade (DePL, degree of hardiness of the hairs on the leaf sheath (DuPB and blade (DuPL and length of hairs on the sheath and blade. The characteristics growth habit and waxiness were not included in the analysis for being invariant. The phenotypic correlations were low and, therefore, not used to eliminate variables. By the principal component analysis, an 84.3% accumulation of the variation was observed until the fourth component. The last four principal components presented an estimate lower than 0.7 and allowed the identification of the variables DePB, DuPB and DuPL as the least important for diversity studies. The morphological characters used were not efficient to distinguish the progenies, but allowed the formation of morphological groups that converged with the graphic analysis of the principal components. An apparent error rate of 17.04% was observed in the classification of the individuals in the groups and 55.5% in the classification of the individuals in the progenies. The individuals in the P. maximum half-sib progenies are genetically divergent, but may not be grouped with only the descriptors used in this experiment. The pubescence characteristics were the least important in the discrimination of the genotypes.

  15. Gut microbiology - broad genetic diversity, yet specific metabolic niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John Wallace, R

    2008-05-01

    Analysis of 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA)-encoding gene sequences from gut microbial ecosystems reveals bewildering genetic diversity. Some metabolic functions, such as glucose utilisation, are fairly widespread throughout the genetic spectrum. Others, however, are not. Despite so many phylotypes being present, single species or perhaps only two or three species often carry out key functions. Among ruminal bacteria, only three species can break down highly structured cellulose, despite the prevalence and importance of cellulose in ruminant diets, and one of those species, Fibrobacter succinogenes, is distantly related to the most abundant ruminal species. Fatty acid biohydrogenation in the rumen, particularly the final step of biohydrogenation of C18 fatty acids, stearate formation, is achieved only by a small sub-group of bacteria related to Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens. Individuals who lack Oxalobacter formigenes fail to metabolise oxalate and suffer kidney stones composed of calcium oxalate. Perhaps the most celebrated example of the difference a single species can make is the 'mimosine story' in ruminants. Mimosine is a toxic amino acid found in the leguminous plant, Leucaena leucocephala. Mimosine can cause thyroid problems by being converted to the goitrogen, 3-hydroxy-4(1H)-pyridone, in the rumen. Observations that mimosine-containing plants were toxic to ruminants in some countries but not others led to the discovery of Synergistes jonesii, which metabolises 3-hydroxy-4(1H)-pyridone and protects animals from toxicity. Thus, despite the complexities indicated by molecular microbial ecology and genomics, it should never be forgotten that gut communities contain important metabolic niches inhabited by species with highly specific metabolic capability. PMID:22443591

  16. Genetic diversity of Phytophthora infestans in the Northern Andean region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grünwald Niklaus J

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phytophthora infestans (Mont. de Bary, the causal agent of potato late blight, is responsible for tremendous crop losses worldwide. Countries in the northern part of the Andes dedicate a large proportion of the highlands to the production of potato, and more recently, solanaceous fruits such as cape gooseberry (Physalis peruviana and tree tomato (Solanum betaceum, all of which are hosts of this oomycete. In the Andean region, P. infestans populations have been well characterized in Ecuador and Peru, but are poorly understood in Colombia and Venezuela. To understand the P. infestans population structure in the Northern part of the Andes, four nuclear regions (ITS, Ras, ?-tubulin and Avr3a and one mitochondrial (Cox1 region were analyzed in isolates of P. infestans sampled from different hosts in Colombia and Venezuela. Results Low genetic diversity was found within this sample of P. infestans isolates from crops within several regions of Colombia and Venezuela, revealing the presence of clonal populations of the pathogen in this region. We detected low frequency heterozygotes, and their distribution patterns might be a consequence of a high migration rate among populations with poor effective gene flow. Consistent genetic differentiation exists among isolates from different regions. Conclusions The results here suggest that in the Northern Andean region P. infestans is a clonal population with some within-clone variation. P. infestans populations in Venezuela reflect historic isolation that is being reinforced by a recent self-sufficiency of potato seeds. In summary, the P. infestans population is mainly shaped by migration and probably by the appearance of variants of key effectors such as Avr3a.

  17. A preliminary examination of genetic diversity in the Indian false vampire bat Megaderma lyra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuvel Rajan, K.

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Habitat loss and fragmentation have serious consequences for species extinction as well as genetic diversity within a species. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD analysis was employed to assess the genetic diversity within and between four natural populations of M. lyra. Our results suggest that the genetic diversity varied from 0.21 to 0.26 with a mean of 0.11 to 0.13 (± SD. The mean Gst value of 0.15 was obtained from all four populations and estimated average Nm (1.41 showing gene flow between the populations. AMOVA analysis showed 88.96% within and 11.04% among the studied populations. Cluster analyses of RAPD phenotypes showed that specimens were not grouped by geographical origin. The genetic diversity found in the M. lyra population may be explained by its breeding behaviors. Though preliminary, the results indicate that all four populations should be considered to maintain the genetic diversity.

  18. A Novel Association Rules Method Based on Genetic Algorithm and Fuzzy Set Strategy for Web Mining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunlai Chai

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of fuzzy techniques has been considered to be one of the key components of data mining systems because of the affinity with human knowledge representation. A hybridization of fuzzy sets with genetic algorithms is described for Web mining in this paper. It is based on a hybrid technique that combines the strengths of rough set theory and genetic algorithm. The algorithm through the introduction of selection operators, crossover operators and mutation operators, improves the global convergence speed, and can effectively avoid prematurity. The role of fuzzy sets in handling the different types of uncertainties/impreciseness is highlighted. Experimental results indicate that this adaptive method significantly improves the performance in Web mining.

  19. Efficient Spatial Data mining using Integrated Genetic Algorithm and ACO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Sankar

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Spatial data plays a key role in numerous applications such as network traffic, distributed security applications such as banking, retailing, etc., The spatial data is essential mine, useful for decision making and the knowledge discovery of interesting facts from large amounts of data. Many private institutions, organizations collect the number of congestion on the network while packets of data are sent, the flow of data and the mobility of the same. In addition other databases provide the additional information about the client who has sent the data, the server who has to receive the data, total number of clients on the network, etc. These data contain a mine of useful information for the network traffic risk analysis. Initially study was conducted to identify and predict the number of nodes in the system; the nodes can either be a client or a server. It used a decision tree that studies from the traffic risk in a network. However, this method is only based on tabular data and does not exploit geo routing location. Using the data, combined to trend data relating to the network, the traffic flow, demand, load, etc., this work aims at deducing relevant risk models to help in network traffic safety task. The existing work provided a pragmatic approach to multi-layer geo-data mining. The process behind was to prepare input data by joining each layer table using a given spatial criterion, then applying a standard method to build a decision tree. The existing work did not consider multi-relational data mining domain. The quality of a decision tree depends, on the quality of the initial data which are incomplete, incorrect or non relevant data inevitably leads to erroneous results. The proposed model develops an ant colony algorithm integrated with GA for the discovery of spatial trend patterns found in a network traffic risk analysis database. The proposed ant colony based spatial data mining algorithm applies the emergent intelligent behavior of ant colonies. The experimental results on a network traffic (trend layer spatial database show that our method has higher efficiency in performance of the discovery process compared to other existing approaches using non-intelligent decision tree heuristics.

  20. Genetic diversity in Algerian maize (Zea mays L) landraces using SSR markers

    OpenAIRE

    Aci, Miyassa M.; Revilla Temiño, Pedro; Morsli, Abdelkader; Djemel, Abderrahmane; Belalia, Nawal; Kadri, Yasser; Khelifi-Saloui, Majda; Ordás López, Bernardo; Khelifi, Lakhdar

    2013-01-01

    In the Sahara, maize (Zea mays L) has been adapted to extreme environmental conditions during the last five centuries; therefore, this germplasm has a potential value as source of tolerance to stress. No previous report of the genetic diversity of Saharan maize has been published so far. The objective of this study was to determine the genetic diversity of a collection of Saharan maize. Fifteen accessions representing the geographic diversity of Algeria were characterized with 18 SSR. Most lo...

  1. Genetic recolonization of mangrove: Genetic diversity still increasing in the Mekong delta 30 years after Agent Orange

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaud-Haond, S.; Duarte, C. M.; S Teixeira; Massa, S. I.; Terrados, J.; Tri, N.H.; Hong, P. N.; Serrão, Ester

    2009-01-01

    The widespread use of Agent Orange (a mixture of phenoxyl herbicides) over Southern Vietnam by US Forces led to the decimation of mangrove forests in the Mekong Delta. Mangrove trees Avicennia alba were sampled across the Mekong Delta; their age was assessed using models based on internode growth and samples were genotyped for 6 microsatellite loci. The evolution of genetic diversity over time elapsed since local extinction was reconstructed and compared with the genetic diversity of an unaff...

  2. Genetic diversity within honeybee colonies increases signal production by waggle-dancing foragers

    OpenAIRE

    Mattila, Heather R; Burke, Kelly M; Seeley, Thomas D

    2008-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated considerable benefits of intracolonial genetic diversity for the productivity of honeybee colonies: single-patriline colonies have depressed foraging rates, smaller food stores and slower weight gain relative to multiple-patriline colonies. We explored whether differences in the use of foraging-related communication behaviour (waggle dances and shaking signals) underlie differences in foraging effort of genetically diverse and genetically uniform colonies. We crea...

  3. High Genetic Diversity in Geographically Remote Populations of Endemic and Widespread Coral Reef Angelfishes (genus: Centropyge)

    OpenAIRE

    Munday, Philip L; Jones, Geoffrey P; Hobbs, Jean-Paul A; Lynne van Herwerden; Jerry, Dean R.

    2013-01-01

    In the terrestrial environment, endemic species and isolated populations of widespread species have the highest rates of extinction partly due to their low genetic diversity. To determine if this pattern holds in the marine environment, we examined genetic diversity in endemic coral reef angelfishes and isolated populations of widespread species. Specifically, this study tested the prediction that angelfish (genus: Centropyge) populations at Christmas and Cocos Islands have low genetic divers...

  4. Genetic diversity within and between European pig breeds using microsatellite markers

    OpenAIRE

    SanCristobal, M.; Chevalet, C.; Haley, C. S.; Joosten, R.; Rattink, A P; Harlizius, B.; Groenen, M.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    An important prerequisite for a conservation programme is a comprehensive description of genetic diversity. The aim of this study was to use anonymous genetic markers to assess the between- and the within-population components of genetic diversity for European pig breeds at the scale of the whole continent using microsatellites. Fifty-eight European pig breeds and lines were analysed including local breeds, national varieties of international breeds and commercial lines. A sample of the Chine...

  5. EvoSNP-DB: A database of genetic diversity in East Asian populations

    OpenAIRE

    Young Uk Kim; Young Jin Kim; Jong-Young Lee; Kiejung Park

    2013-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have become popular as an approach for the identification of large numbers of phenotype-associated variants. However, differences in genetic architecture and environmental factors mean that the effect of variants can vary across populations. Understanding population genetic diversity is valuable for the investigation of possible population specific and independent effects of variants. EvoSNP-DB aims to provide information regarding genetic diversity amon...

  6. Genetic Divergence, Implication of Diversity, and Conservation of Silkworm, Bombyx mori

    OpenAIRE

    Bharat Bhusan Bindroo; Shunmugam Manthira Moorthy

    2014-01-01

    Genetic diversity is critical to success in any crop breeding and it provides information about the quantum of genetic divergence and serves a platform for specific breeding objectives. It is one of the three forms of biodiversity recognized by the World Conservation Union (IUCN) as deserving conservation. Silkworm Bombyx mori, an economically important insect, reported to be domesticated over 5000 years ago by human to meet his requirements. Genetic diversity is a particular concern because ...

  7. Characterization of Genetic Diversity in the Nematode Pristionchus pacificus from Population-Scale Resequencing Data

    OpenAIRE

    Rödelsperger, Christian; Neher, Richard A.; Weller, Andreas M.; Eberhardt, Gabi; Witte, Hanh; Mayer, Werner E; Dieterich, Christoph; Sommer, Ralf J

    2014-01-01

    The hermaphroditic nematode Pristionchus pacificus is an established model system for comparative studies with Caenorhabditis elegans in developmental biology, ecology, and population genetics. In this study, we present whole-genome sequencing data of 104 P. pacificus strains and the draft assembly of the obligate outcrossing sister species P. exspectatus. We characterize genetic diversity within P. pacificus and investigate the population genetic processes shaping this diversity. P. pacificu...

  8. Genetic diversity characterization of cassava cultivars (Manihot esculenta Crantz).: I) RAPD markers

    OpenAIRE

    Colombo Carlos; Second Gérard; Valle Tereza Losada; Charrier André

    1998-01-01

    RAPD markers were used to investigate the genetic diversity of 31 Brazilian cassava clones. The results were compared with the genetic diversity revealed by botanical descriptors. Both sets of variates revealed identical relationships among the cultivars. Multivariate analysis of genetic similarities placed genotypes destinated for consumption "in nature" in one group, and cultivars useful for flour production in another. Brazil’s abundance of landraces presents a broad dispersion and is cons...

  9. Genetic Diversity of Some Capparis L. Species Growing in Syria

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Bassam, Al- Safadi; Hussam, Faouri; Rana, Elias.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This work investigated the genetic diversity and relationships among Capparis species growing in Syria using IRAP and ISSR techniques. Forty-seven samples of three Capparis species genotypes were collected from 21 different locations in Syria. The genotypes were morphologically identified based on t [...] he descriptions available in the literature. When IRAP technique was used, an average of 71.5% of the amplified fragments were polymorphic compared to 82.04% in ISSR. Morphological characterization along with the cluster and PCoA analyses of the data divided the studied genotypes into three groups. The groups included genotypes identified as Capparis spinosa L, C. sicula Duh., and C. aegyptia Lam. Based on the morphological description, molecular studies and statistical analyses of this study, C. aegyptia could be suggested as a separate species and not a varietal rank of C. spinosa (C. spinosa var. aegyptia (Lam.). Two samples (Alep1 and Idl) were not placed in any of the three distinctive groups, despite their closeness morphologically to C. spinosa. In PCoA analysis, sample Alep1 came between C. sicula and C. spinosa and Idl was placed between C. sicula and C. aegyptia. Although hybridization between Capparis species could occur, it was not clear from the present study if these two genotypes were hybrids.

  10. Genetic diversity of some chili (Capsicum annuum L. genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.J. Hasan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A study on genetic diversity was conducted with 54 Chili (Capsicum annuum L. genotypes through Mohalanobis’s D2 and principal component analysis for twelve quantitative characters viz. plant height, number of secondary branch/plant, canopy breadth , days to first flowering, days to 50% flowering, fruits/plant, 5 fruits weight, fruit length, fruit diameter, seeds/fruit, 1000 seed weight and yield/plant were taken into consideration. Cluster analysis was used for grouping of 54 chili genotypes and the genotypes were fallen into seven clusters. Cluster II had maximum (13 and cluster III had the minimum number (1 of genotypes. The highest inter-cluster distance was observed between cluster I and III and the lowest between cluster II and VII. The characters yield/plant, canopy breadth, secondary branches/plant, plant height and seeds/fruit contributed most for divergence in the studied genotypes. Considering group distance, mean performance and variability the inter genotypic crosses between cluster I and cluster III, cluster III and cluster VI, cluster II and cluster III and cluster III and cluster VII may be suggested to use for future hybridization program.

  11. Assessment of genetic diversity in germplasm of linseed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abstract:- A set of 55 linseed accessions including a check variety (Chandni) were evaluated under rainfed conditions during three crop seasons i.e. 2008-09, 2009-10 and 2010-11. Data were recorded for days to flower initiation, flower completion, maturity, reproductive period, plant height, branches per plant, bolls per plant, plot biomass, harvest index and seed yield. Wide ranges between the mean values with high CV values were exhibited by plant height, bolls per plant, biomass and seed yield accompanied with maximum values of variances and standard deviation, revealed the existence of greater genetic diversity in the accessions for these traits. Dendrogram based on Euclidean distance coefficient using 10 quantitative traits, grouped all the linseed accessions into 13 clusters. Cluster II was the biggest and had 33 accessions followed by Cluster I having 11 accessions. For the development of high yielding varieties, best performing accessions of Clusters I and II could be used in hybridization programme by crossing with accessions of Clusters VII, VIII, IX and X followed by selection in segregating populations. (author)

  12. Assessing the contribution of breeds to genetic diversity in conservation schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Groenen Martien AM

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The quantitative assessment of genetic diversity within and between populations is important for decision making in genetic conservation plans. In this paper we define the genetic diversity of a set of populations, S, as the maximum genetic variance that can be obtained in a random mating population that is bred from the set of populations S. First we calculated the relative contribution of populations to a core set of populations in which the overlap of genetic diversity was minimised. This implies that the mean kinship in the core set should be minimal. The above definition of diversity differs from Weitzman diversity in that it attempts to conserve the founder population (and thus minimises the loss of alleles, whereas Weitzman diversity favours the conservation of many inbred lines. The former is preferred in species where inbred lines suffer from inbreeding depression. The application of the method is illustrated by an example involving 45 Dutch poultry breeds. The calculations used were easy to implement and not computer intensive. The method gave a ranking of breeds according to their contributions to genetic diversity. Losses in genetic diversity ranged from 2.1% to 4.5% for different subsets relative to the entire set of breeds, while the loss of founder genome equivalents ranged from 22.9% to 39.3%.

  13. Genetic Diversity, Morphological Uniformity and Polyketide Production in Dinoflagellates (Amphidinium, Dinoflagellata)

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Shauna A.; Garby, Tamsyn; Hoppenrath, Mona; Brett A. Neilan

    2012-01-01

    Dinoflagellates are an intriguing group of eukaryotes, showing many unusual morphological and genetic features. Some groups of dinoflagellates are morphologically highly uniform, despite indications of genetic diversity. The species Amphidinium carterae is abundant and cosmopolitan in marine environments, grows easily in culture, and has therefore been used as a ‘model’ dinoflagellate in research into dinoflagellate genetics, polyketide production and photosynthesis. We have investigated the ...

  14. Genetic diversity is related to climatic variation and vulnerability in threatened bull trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovach, Ryan; Muhlfeld, Clint C.; Wade, Alisa A.; Hand, Brian K.; Whited, Diane C.; DeHaan, Patrick W.; Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.; Luikart, Gordon

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how climatic variation influences ecological and evolutionary processes is crucial for informed conservation decision-making. Nevertheless, few studies have measured how climatic variation influences genetic diversity within populations or how genetic diversity is distributed across space relative to future climatic stress. Here, we tested whether patterns of genetic diversity (allelic richness) were related to climatic variation and habitat features in 130 bull trout (Salvelinus confluentus) populations from 24 watersheds (i.e., ~4–7th order river subbasins) across the Columbia River Basin, USA. We then determined whether bull trout genetic diversity was related to climate vulnerability at the watershed scale, which we quantified on the basis of exposure to future climatic conditions (projected scenarios for the 2040s) and existing habitat complexity. We found a strong gradient in genetic diversity in bull trout populations across the Columbia River Basin, where populations located in the most upstream headwater areas had the greatest genetic diversity. After accounting for spatial patterns with linear mixed models, allelic richness in bull trout populations was positively related to habitat patch size and complexity, and negatively related to maximum summer temperature and the frequency of winter flooding. These relationships strongly suggest that climatic variation influences evolutionary processes in this threatened species and that genetic diversity will likely decrease due to future climate change. Vulnerability at a watershed scale was negatively correlated with average genetic diversity (r = ?0.77;P bull trout and other imperiled species. Genetic diversity is already depressed where climatic vulnerability is highest; it will likely erode further in the very places where diversity may be most needed for future persistence.

  15. Global to local genetic diversity indicators of evolutionary potential in tree species within and outside forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Lars; Aravanopoulos, Filippos

    2014-01-01

    There is a general trend of biodiversity loss at global, regional, national and local levels. To monitor this trend, international policy processes have created a wealth of indicators over the last two decades. However, genetic diversity indicators are regrettably absent from comprehensive bio-monitoring schemes. Here, we provide a review and an assessment of the different attempts made to provide such indicators for tree genetic diversity from the global level down to the level of the management unit. So far, no generally accepted indicators have been provided as international standards, nor tested for their possible use in practice. We suggest that indicators for monitoring genetic diversity and dynamics should be based on ecological and demographic surrogates of adaptive diversity as well as genetic markers capable of identifying genetic erosion and gene flow. A comparison of past and present genecological distributions (patterns of genetic variation of key adaptive traits in the ecological space) of selected species is a realistic way of assessing the trend of intra-specific variation, and thus provides a state indicator of tree genetic diversity also able to reflect possible pressures threatening genetic diversity. Revealing benefits of genetic diversity related to ecosystem services is complex, but current trends in plantation performance offer the possibility of an indicator of benefit. Response indicators are generally much easier to define, because recognition and even quantification of, e.g., research, education, breeding, conservation, and regulation actions and programs are relatively straightforward. Only state indicators can reveal genetic patterns and processes, which are fundamental for maintaining genetic diversity. Indirect indicators of pressure, benefit, or response should therefore not be used independently of state indicators. A coherent set of indicators covering diversity-productivity-knowledge-management based on the genecological approach is proposed for application on appropriate groups of tree species in the wild and in cultivation worldwide. These indicators realistically reflect the state, trends and potentials of the world's tree genetic resources to support sustainable growth. The state of the genetic diversity will be based on trends in population distributions and diversity patterns for selected species. The productivity of the genetic resource of trees in current use will reflect the possible potential of mobilizing the resource further. Trends in knowledge will underpin the potential capacity for development of the resource and current management of the genetic resource itself will reveal how well we are actually doing and where improvements are required.

  16. High level of genetic diversity among spelt germplasm revealed by microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertin, P; Grégoire, D; Massart, S; de Froidmont, D

    2004-12-01

    The genetic diversity of spelt (Triticum aestivum (L.) Thell. subsp. spelta (L.) Thell.) cultivated presently is very narrow. Although the germplasm collections of spelt are extensive, the related genetic knowledge is often lacking and makes their use for genetic improvement difficult. The genetic diversity and structure of the spelt gene pool held in gene banks was determined using 19 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers applied to 170 spelt accessions collected from 27 countries and 4 continents. The genetic distances (1 - proportion of shared alleles) were calculated and an unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averaging (UPGMA)-based dendrogram was generated. The genetic diversity was high: 259 alleles were found and the mean interaccession genetic distance was 0.782 +/- 0.141. The dendrogram demonstrated the much higher genetic diversity of spelt held in germplasm collections than in the currently used genotypes. Accessions with the same geographical origin often tended to cluster together. Those from the Middle East were isolated first. All but one of the Spanish accessions were found in a unique subcluster. Most accessions from eastern Europe clustered together, while those from northwestern Europe were divided into two subclusters. The accessions from Africa and North America were not separated from the European ones. This analysis demonstrates the extent of genetic diversity of spelts held in germplasm collections and should help to widen the genetic basis of cultivated spelt in future breeding programs. PMID:15644962

  17. Astrophysical data mining with GPU. A case study: genetic classification of globular clusters

    CERN Document Server

    Cavuoti, Stefano; Brescia, Massimo; Paolillo, Maurizio; Pescape', Antonio; Longo, Giuseppe; Ventre, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    We present a multi-purpose genetic algorithm, designed and implemented with GPGPU / CUDA parallel computing technology. The model was derived from our CPU serial implementation, named GAME (Genetic Algorithm Model Experiment). It was successfully tested and validated on the detection of candidate Globular Clusters in deep, wide-field, single band HST images. The GPU version of GAME will be made available to the community by integrating it into the web application DAMEWARE (DAta Mining Web Application REsource (http://dame.dsf.unina.it/beta_info.html), a public data mining service specialized on massive astrophysical data. Since genetic algorithms are inherently parallel, the GPGPU computing paradigm leads to a speedup of a factor of 200x in the training phase with respect to the CPU based version.

  18. Astrophysical data mining with GPU. A case study: Genetic classification of globular clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavuoti, S.; Garofalo, M.; Brescia, M.; Paolillo, M.; Pescape', A.; Longo, G.; Ventre, G.

    2014-01-01

    We present a multi-purpose genetic algorithm, designed and implemented with GPGPU/CUDA parallel computing technology. The model was derived from our CPU serial implementation, named GAME (Genetic Algorithm Model Experiment). It was successfully tested and validated on the detection of candidate Globular Clusters in deep, wide-field, single band HST images. The GPU version of GAME will be made available to the community by integrating it into the web application DAMEWARE (DAta Mining Web Application REsource, http://dame.dsf.unina.it/beta_info.html), a public data mining service specialized on massive astrophysical data. Since genetic algorithms are inherently parallel, the GPGPU computing paradigm leads to a speedup of a factor of 200× in the training phase with respect to the CPU based version.

  19. Mining and modeling human genetics for autism therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Daniel G; Ehlers, Michael D

    2012-10-01

    A growing understanding of the genetic origins of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) and the impact of ASD risk genes on synaptic function presents new opportunities for drug discovery. Large-scale human genetics studies have begun to reveal molecular pathways and potential therapeutic drug targets. Subsequent validation and characterization of ASD risk genes in mouse models holds promise for defining relevant cellular mechanisms and brain circuits associated with the core behavioral symptoms of autism. Here we review recent advances in the molecular therapeutics in ASDs and discuss opportunities and obstacles for converting emerging biology into new medicines. We present emerging concepts on the impact of risk genes during development and adulthood that define points of intervention. We further highlight ongoing clinical trials in patients with syndromic forms of autism. These clinical studies will be an important test of the utility of human genetics as a starting point for drug discovery in ASDs. PMID:22483267

  20. Comparative analysis of genetic diversity among Chinese watermelon germplasmsusing SSR and SRAP markers, and implications for future genetic improvement

    OpenAIRE

    WANG, PANGQIAO; LI, QIONG; Hu, Jianbin; Su, Yan

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] in China, the world's largest producer of watermelon fruits, has not been examined. Two molecular markers, sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR), were used to investigate the genetic variation and genetic relationship among 54 Chinese watermelon accessions, as well as 7 accessions from Africa, the United States, and Japan. SRAP assay generated 312 bands, of which...

  1. Genetic diversity and structure found in samples of Eritrean bread wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desta, Zeratsion Abera; Orabi, Jihad; Jahoor, Ahmed; Backes, Gunter

    2014-01-01

    Genetic diversity and structure plays a key role in the selection of parents for crosses in plant breeding programmes. The aim of the present study was to analyse the genetic diversity and structure of Eritrean bread wheat accessions. We analysed 284 wheat accessions from Eritrea using 30 simple...... sequence repeat markers. A total of 539 alleles were detected. The allele number per locus ranged from 2 to 21, with a mean allele number of 9.2. The average genetic diversity index was 0.66, with values ranging from 0.01 to 0.89. Comparing the three genomes of wheat, the B genome had the highest genetic...... diversity (0.66) and the D genome the lowest diversity (0.61). A STRUCTURE analysis based on the Bayesian model-based cluster analysis followed by a graphical representation of the distances by non-parametric multidimensional scaling revealed a distinct partition of the Eritrean wheat accessions into two...

  2. Genetic diversity in cultivated carioca common beans based on molecular marker analysis

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso, Perseguini; Alisson Fernando, Chioratto; Maria Imaculada, Zucchi; Carlos Augusto, Colombo; Sérgio Augusto Moraes, Carbonell; Jorge Mauricio Costa, Mondego; Rodrigo, Gazaffi; Antonio Augusto Franco, Garcia; Tatiana de, Campos; Anete Pereira de, Souza; Luciana Benchimol, Rubiano.

    Full Text Available A wide array of molecular markers has been used to investigate the genetic diversity among common bean species. However, the best combination of markers for studying such diversity among common bean cultivars has yet to be determined. Few reports have examined the genetic diversity of the carioca be [...] an, commercially one of the most important common beans in Brazil. In this study, we examined the usefulness of two molecular marker systems (simple sequence repeats - SSRs and amplified fragment length polymorphisms - AFLPs) for assessing the genetic diversity of carioca beans. The amount of information provided by Roger's modified genetic distance was used to analyze SSR data and Jaccards similarity coefficient was used for AFLP data. Seventy SSRs were polymorphic and 20 AFLP primer combinations produced 635 polymorphic bands. Molecular analysis showed that carioca genotypes were quite diverse. AFLPs revealed greater genetic differentiation and variation within the carioca genotypes (Gst = 98% and Fst = 0.83, respectively) than SSRs and provided better resolution for clustering the carioca genotypes. SSRs and AFLPs were both suitable for assessing the genetic diversity of Brazilian carioca genotypes since the number of markers used in each system provided a low coefficient of variation. However, fingerprint profiles were generated faster with AFLPs, making them a better choice for assessing genetic diversity in the carioca germplasm.

  3. Genetic diversity in cultivated carioca common beans based on molecular marker analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Morini Küpper Cardoso Perseguini

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide array of molecular markers has been used to investigate the genetic diversity among common bean species. However, the best combination of markers for studying such diversity among common bean cultivars has yet to be determined. Few reports have examined the genetic diversity of the carioca bean, commercially one of the most important common beans in Brazil. In this study, we examined the usefulness of two molecular marker systems (simple sequence repeats - SSRs and amplified fragment length polymorphisms - AFLPs for assessing the genetic diversity of carioca beans. The amount of information provided by Roger's modified genetic distance was used to analyze SSR data and Jaccards similarity coefficient was used for AFLP data. Seventy SSRs were polymorphic and 20 AFLP primer combinations produced 635 polymorphic bands. Molecular analysis showed that carioca genotypes were quite diverse. AFLPs revealed greater genetic differentiation and variation within the carioca genotypes (Gst = 98% and Fst = 0.83, respectively than SSRs and provided better resolution for clustering the carioca genotypes. SSRs and AFLPs were both suitable for assessing the genetic diversity of Brazilian carioca genotypes since the number of markers used in each system provided a low coefficient of variation. However, fingerprint profiles were generated faster with AFLPs, making them a better choice for assessing genetic diversity in the carioca germplasm.

  4. Assessment of genetic diversity and population structure of Vietnamese indigenous cattle populations by microsatellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Lan Doan; Do, Duy Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Trong; Nam, Le Quang; Ba, Nguyen Van; Thuy, Tran Thi Thu; Hoan, Tran Xuan; Cuong, Vu Chi; Kadarmideen, Haja

    2013-01-01

    17 (ETH185). The level of gene diversity was high indicated by a mean expected heterozygosity (He) across populations and loci of 0.73. Level of inbreeding (mean FIS=0.05) and genetic differentiation (mean FST=0.04) was moderate. The phylogenetic tree based on Reynolds genetic distance reflected......Cattle play a very important role in agriculture and food security in Vietnam. A high level of cattle diversity exists and serves different needs of Vietnamese cattle keepers but has not yet been molecularly characterized. This study evaluates the genetic diversity and structure of Vietnamese...... of genetic diversity and distinct genetic structures. Based on these results, we recommend that for conservation homogenous populations (Nghe An, Thanh Hoa and Phu Yen) can be grouped to reduce costs and U Dau Riu, Lang Son and Ha Giang populations should be conserved separately to avoid loss of...

  5. HIV Populations Are Large and Accumulate High Genetic Diversity in a Nonlinear Fashion

    OpenAIRE

    Maldarelli, Frank; Kearney, Mary; PALMER, Sarah; Stephens, Robert; Mican, JoAnn; Polis, Michael A; Davey, Richard T.; Kovacs, Joseph; Shao, Wei; Rock-Kress, Diane; Metcalf, Julia A; REHM, Catherine; Greer, Sarah E; Lucey, Daniel L.; Danley, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    HIV infection is characterized by rapid and error-prone viral replication resulting in genetically diverse virus populations. The rate of accumulation of diversity and the mechanisms involved are under intense study to provide useful information to understand immune evasion and the development of drug resistance. To characterize the development of viral diversity after infection, we carried out an in-depth analysis of single genome sequences of HIV pro-pol to assess diversity and divergence a...

  6. Complex spatial dynamics maintain northern leopard frog (Lithobates pipiens) genetic diversity in a temporally varying landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mushet, David M.; Euliss, Ned H.; Chen, Yongjiu; Stockwell, Craig A.

    2013-01-01

    In contrast to most local amphibian populations, northeastern populations of the Northern Leopard Frog (Lithobates pipiens) have displayed uncharacteristically high levels of genetic diversity that have been attributed to large, stable populations. However, this widely distributed species also occurs in areas known for great climatic fluctuations that should be reflected in corresponding fluctuations in population sizes and reduced genetic diversity. To test our hypothesis that Northern Leopard Frog genetic diversity would be reduced in areas subjected to significant climate variability, we examined the genetic diversity of L. pipiens collected from 12 sites within the Prairie Pothole Region of North Dakota. Despite the region's fluctuating climate that includes periods of recurring drought and deluge, we found unexpectedly high levels of genetic diversity approaching that of northeastern populations. Further, genetic structure at a landscape scale was strikingly homogeneous; genetic differentiation estimates (Dest) averaged 0.10 (SD = 0.036) across the six microsatellite loci we studied, and two Bayesian assignment tests (STRUCTURE and BAPS) failed to reveal the development of significant population structure across the 68 km breadth of our study area. These results suggest that L. pipiens in the Prairie Pothole Region consists of a large, panmictic population capable of maintaining high genetic diversity in the face of marked climate variability.

  7. Mining of lethal recessive genetic variation in Danish cattle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Das, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    fertility. The primary objective of this PhD projekt was to identify recessive lethal gentic variants in the main Danish dairy cattle breed. Holstein-Friesian utilzing next generation sequencing (NGS) data. This study shows a potential for the use of the NGS-based reverse genetic approach in identifying...... lethal or semi-lethal recessive gentic variation...

  8. Modelling the loss of genetic diversity in vole populations in a spatially and temporally varying environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Topping, Christopher John; Østergaard, Siri; Pertoldi, Cino; Bach, Lars Arve

    2003-01-01

    Altering environmental conditions affects the genetic composition of populations via demographic and selective responses by creating of variety of population substructuring types. Classical genetic approaches can predict the genetic composition of populations under long-term or structurally stable conditions, but exclude factors such as animal behaviour, environmental structure, and breeding biology, all of which influence genetic diversity. Most populations are unique in some of these character...

  9. Cryptic genetic diversity in the genus Mesopodopsis (Crustacea, Mysidacea)

    OpenAIRE

    Broekaert, K.

    2007-01-01

    Genetic biodiversity is dynamic, species and their environment undergo continuously evolutionary changes. The start of these evolutionary changes always takes place at the population level. Genetic (allele) variation is caused by mutation, intraspecific and interspecific recombination. The survival of these new alleles is determined by selection, genetic drift and gene flow. Since molecular techniques have become more accessible in diversity research, it became clear that genetic biodiversity...

  10. Genetic diversity and differentiation of Mongolian indigenous cattle populations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Livestock production plays an important role in Mongolian economy. Over the last decade it has contributed to around 80-90% of the gross domestic agricultural products and to 30% of the revenues generated from exportations. Cattle is one of the five traditional and most important livestock species of Mongolia together with horse, sheep, goat and camel. Out of a total of 1.57 millions Mongolian cattle, 1.55 millions supposedly belong to three indigenous Bos taurus cattle breeds, namely Mongol, Selenge and Khalkhun Golun, all herded under extensive pastoral systems. Indigenous Mongolian cattle are generally small but look sturdy and strong. They have a well-off coat of hair, solid forward looking shoulders and short stubby snouts, and they are used for meat, milk and transport. Beef production contributes to 30% of the total meat supply in Mongolia. The Mongol breed is by the far the commonest with 1.53 million animals and it is found almost throughout the country. The Selenge breed, found in Selenge province and numbering 9000 heads, was developed in middle of the 20th century by crossing the Kazakh Whiteheaded with the local Mongol cattle. The Khalkhun Golun breed was developed from local Mongol cattle and it is distributed in Eastern and Suhbaatar provinces with about 10,000 heads. Until now, to the best of our knowledge, only a single population of Mongolian cattle has been studied with microsatellite DNA markers and no information is available on the genetic relationship between the Mongolian indigenous cattle breeds. In this study, we collected samples from two populations of the Mongol cattle (sampled at Ikhtamir soum in North Hangay province and Tsogt soum in Govi Altay province) and one population of the Khalkhun Golun cattle (sampled at Tumentsogt soum in Suhbaatar province). Samples were characterised with nine microsatellite markers MGTG4B, ILSTS005, ILSTS006, ILSTS008, ILSTS023, ILSTS028, ILSTS036, ILSTS050 and ILSTS103. To assess the genetic diversity and relationship of Mongolian cattle populations with breeds from neighboring countries and exotic breeds, data from the ILRI cattle genotyping database were included. More particularly, we used previously obtained data from Asian taurine (Hanwoo, Yanbian and Japanese Black), two European taurine (Friesian and Charolais), two African taurine (Baoule and N'Dama) and two zebu breeds (Sahiwal and Ongole). For each breed, observed (Ho) and expected (He) heterozygosities as well as the mean number of alleles (MNA) across the nine loci were calculated between pairs of populations were also estimated and a UPGMA tree was constructed. The heterozygosities (Ho and He) in Mongolian cattle populations are similar to those obtained in Northeast Asian taurine breeds but the values are higher compared to the ones obtained for the European and African taurine breeds. The Mongol cattle in North Hangay has the highest corrected MNA value (all animals or 28 animals only). The UPGMA tree, built with the Reynolds' genetic distances, shows all six Northeast Asian cattle populations clustering into one group linked to the two European taurine breed. Interestingly, the two populations of the Mongol cattle are not closely related to each other. However, bootstrap values between the Northeast Asian taurine breeds, with the exception of the bootstrap value between Yanbian and Hanwoo, are relatively low, therefore the relationship between the Northeast Asian populations should be taken with caution. Fst values between the three Mongolian cattle populations are significant (P < 0.01), with the Govi Altay population being more differentiated from the North Hangay population than from the Khalkhun Golun breed (data not shown). Our data suggest that the traditional classification of Govi Altay and North Hangay populations as one breed, the Mongol cattle, should be revisited

  11. Genetic diversity and genetic relationships in Hyacinthaceae in India using RAPD and SRAP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehan, Tabassum; Vashishtha, Amit; Yadav, S R; Lakhanpaul, Suman

    2014-01-01

    Genetic diversity and relationship among three genera namely Drimia, Dipcadi and Ledebouria of Hyacinthaceae in India was studied using RAPD and SRAP markers. Twenty one RAPD primers and nine SRAP were used for analyzing 41 accessions. RAPD gave an average 12.6 markers per primer, while SRAP generated 10.1 markers per primer pair. The family emerged very diverged with high polymorphism. The study resolved the three genera into monophyletic groups corresponding to three subfamilies; Urginoideae, Hyacinthoideae and Ornithogaloideae. Drimia wightii emerged a very distinct species and species specific markers were obtained with both marker systems. AMOVA analysis also revealed the genera to be quite well diverged. The two markers showed high correlation (r = 0.932) in Mantel matrix crresspondance test. The combined data also showed a very good correlation with the respective markers individually. PMID:24554844

  12. Genetic diversity of Heterobasidion spp. in Scots pine, Norway spruce and European silver fir stands

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr ?akomy; Zbigniew Broda; Antoni Werner

    2007-01-01

    Investigations of genetic diversity of Heterobasidion spp. in Scots pine, Norway spruce and European silver fir stands indicated that almost all of identified genets occurring in those stands were small and occupied only a single stump. In some cases two, three or even four genets could effectively exist in an individual stump. Genetic similarity of H. annosum s.s. genets varied from 0% to 62%, H. parviporum from 0% to 38% and H. abietinum from 0% to 55%. The oldest and biggest genet was foun...

  13. Algal diversity in flowing waters at an acidic mine drainage "barrens" in central Pennsylvania, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasanna, Radha; Ratha, Sachitra Kumar; Rojas, Claudia; Bruns, Mary Ann

    2011-11-01

    Microscopic investigations were undertaken to decipher the diversity in the lotic algal communities from acidic waters (pH 2.4-3.2) flowing overland in sheets and channels at an acid mine drainage (AMD) barrens near Kylertown, PA, USA. Microscopic observations, supplemented with taxonomic keys, aided in identification of the dominant algae, and measurement of carbon from adjacent soils was undertaken. The unicellular protist Euglena sp. was most abundant in slower flowing waters (i.e., pool near point of emergence and surficial flow sheets), while Ulothrix sp. was most abundant in faster flowing water from the central stream channel. A diverse range of unicellular microalgae such as Chlorella, Cylindrocystis, Botryococcus, and Navicula and several filamentous forms identified as Microspora, Cladophora, and Binuclearia were also recorded. The observed high algal diversity may be related to the long duration of AMD flow at this site which has led to the development of adapted algal communities. The comparatively higher carbon content in soil materials adjacent to slower flowing water sampling locations provides evidence for the important role of algae as primary producers in this extreme environment. PMID:22038419

  14. Reduction of Genetic Diversity of the Harpy Eagle in Brazilian Tropical Forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation intensify the effects of genetic drift and endogamy, reducing genetic variability of populations with serious consequences for wildlife conservation. The Harpy Eagle (Harpia harpyja) is a forest dwelling species that is considered near threatened and suffers from habitat loss in the forests of the Neotropical region. In this study, 72 historical and current samples were assessed using eight autosomal microsatellite markers to investigate the distribution of genetic diversity of the Harpy Eagle of the Amazonian and Atlantic forests in Brazil. The results showed that the genetic diversity of Harpy Eagle decreased in the regions where deforestation is intense in the southern Amazon and Atlantic Forest. PMID:26871719

  15. Genetic diversity measures of local European beef cattle breeds for conservation purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pereira Albano

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study was undertaken to determine the genetic structure, evolutionary relationships, and the genetic diversity among 18 local cattle breeds from Spain, Portugal, and France using 16 microsatellites. Heterozygosities, estimates of Fst, genetic distances, multivariate and diversity analyses, and assignment tests were performed. Heterozygosities ranged from 0.54 in the Pirenaica breed to 0.72 in the Barrosã breed. Seven percent of the total genetic variability can be attributed to differences among breeds (mean Fst = 0.07; P

  16. Genetic Phylogeny and Diversity of some Romanian Silkworms Based on RAPD Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia Maria Furdui

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers were used in the present study to analyze genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships among some race and hybrids of Romanian Bombyx mori. DNA from 8 hybrids and 1 race was amplified with 35 highly polymorphic RAPD primers, of which 21 markers generated polymorphic bands that were used to analyze genetic phylogeny and diversity. A total of 921 polymorphic bands were detected and UPGMA cluster analysis of Jaccard’s genetic distance grouped silkworm strains on the basis of their origin, obtaining a dendogram reflecting their genetic relationship.

  17. Reduction of Genetic Diversity of the Harpy Eagle in Brazilian Tropical Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banhos, Aureo; Hrbek, Tomas; Sanaiotti, Tânia M; Farias, Izeni Pires

    2016-01-01

    Habitat loss and fragmentation intensify the effects of genetic drift and endogamy, reducing genetic variability of populations with serious consequences for wildlife conservation. The Harpy Eagle (Harpia harpyja) is a forest dwelling species that is considered near threatened and suffers from habitat loss in the forests of the Neotropical region. In this study, 72 historical and current samples were assessed using eight autosomal microsatellite markers to investigate the distribution of genetic diversity of the Harpy Eagle of the Amazonian and Atlantic forests in Brazil. The results showed that the genetic diversity of Harpy Eagle decreased in the regions where deforestation is intense in the southern Amazon and Atlantic Forest. PMID:26871719

  18. Assessment of genetic diversity of Typha angustifolia in the development of cattail stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae Geun Kim*

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Typha angustifolia has ecological characteristics of clonal growth similar to Phragmites australis. The plant spreads byclonal growth and seed dispersal. In this study, for the three stands which have different settlement age at the Baksiljiwetland in Korea, genetic diversity was estimated by random amplification of polymorphic DNA analysis to evaluate thechange in genetic diversity of T. angustifolia during stand development in the same population. Stand (ST 1 was the oldestand ST 4 was the youngest. ST 5 was in a small ditch out of the Baksilji. Although the ST 1, ST 2, and ST 3 did not differsignificantly in vegetational or physical environment, the genetic diversity estimated according to Nei’s gene diversity(h and the Shannon index (i increased in the order of ST 1 < ST 2 < ST 3 contrary to formative age. The genetic diversityof ST 4 was much higher than that of the other three stands. ST 4 has similar abiotic environmental conditions withslight T. angustifolia dominance, and seems to be in the early establishment stage. ST 5 differed from the other stands invegetational and soil environments, which can result in stressful cattail conditions. Even though the ST 5 stand was notyounger than the ST 4 stand, ST 5 showed the highest genetic diversity. Our results indicate that after early settlement ofthe T. angustifolia population, genetic diversity within the species decreased over time and that the decreasing pattern ofgenetic diversity within T. angustifolia stands is not likely to occur under stressful conditions.

  19. Assessment of genetic diversity in Venezuelan rice cultivars using simple sequence repeats markers

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Thaura, Ghneim Herrera; Duina, Posso Duque; Iris, Pérez Almeida; Gelis, Torrealba Núñez; Alejandro J, Pieters; César P, Martinez; Joe M, Tohme.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In Venezuela, pedigree analyses indicate that the rice varieties currently under cultivation are closely related. Effective breeding programs, based on knowledge of the genetic diversity of cultivars, are needed to broaden the genetic bases of rice germplasm in the country. In this study, we used a [...] set of 48 simple-sequence-repeat (SSR) markers to assess the genetic diversity of 11 Venezuelan rice cultivars, released by the National Rice Breeding Program between 1978 and 2007. A total of 203 alleles were detected, the number of alleles (NA) per marker ranged from 2 to 9, with an average of 4.23. The average genic diversity (H) over all SSR loci for the 18 genotypes was 0.524, ranging from 0.105 to 0.815. Positive correlations were found between H at each locus, NA, the allele size range and the maximum number of repeats. Venezuelan cultivars showed lower H (mean = 0.37) and NA (total = 124, mean = 2.58) than the whole sample. UPGMA-cluster-analysis based on genetic distance coefficients clearly separated all the genotypes, and showed that the Venezuelan rice varieties are closely related. Molecular identification of 7 Venezuelan cultivars could be done with 9 primers pairs which produced 10 genotype-specific-alleles. Although the genetic diversity was low, SSRs proved to be an efficient tool in assessing the genetic diversity of rice genotypes. Implications of the low genetic diversity detected and relatedness of Venezuelan cultivars are discussed.

  20. Life history influences how fire affects genetic diversity in two lizard species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Annabel L; Bull, C Michael; Gardner, Michael G; Driscoll, Don A

    2014-05-01

    'Fire mosaics' are often maintained in landscapes to promote successional diversity in vegetation with little understanding of how this will affect ecological processes in animal populations such as dispersal, social organization and re-establishment. To investigate these processes, we conducted a replicated, spatiotemporal landscape genetics study of two Australian woodland lizard species [Amphibolurus norrisi (Agamidae) and Ctenotus atlas (Scincidae)]. Agamids have a more complex social and territory structure than skinks, so fire might have a greater impact on their population structure and thus genetic diversity. Genetic diversity increased with time since fire in C. atlas and decreased with time since fire in A. norrisi. For C. atlas, this might reflect its increasing population size after fire, but we could not detect increased gene flow that would reduce the loss of genetic diversity through genetic drift. Using landscape resistance analyses, we found no evidence that postfire habitat succession or topography affected gene flow in either species and we were unable to distinguish between survival and immigration as modes of postfire re-establishment. In A. norrisi, we detected female-biased dispersal, likely reflecting its territorial social structure and polygynous mating system. The increased genetic diversity in A. norrisi in recently burnt habitat might reflect a temporary disruption of its territoriality and increased male dispersal, a hypothesis that was supported with a simulation experiment. Our results suggest that the effects of disturbance on genetic diversity will be stronger for species with territorial social organization. PMID:24750427

  1. Genetic diversity and population structure of Bretschneidera sinensis, an endangered species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gangbiao Xu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Amounts and distribution of intraspecific genetic variation provide benchmarks for developing conservation strategies. Bretschneidera sinensis is a monotypic relic species listed in the First Grade of the List of Wild Plants Under State Protection (First Batch in China. We examined the genetic diversity and genetic structure of 219 B. sinensis individuals sampled from 15 natural populations distributed in Hunan, Jiangxi, Guangdong, Guangxi, and Guizhou using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR markers generated by seven ISSR primers. The percentage of polymorphic bands (PPB at the species and population level was 74.42% and 38.06%, respectively. Shannon’s index (I of phenotypic diversity at the species and population level was 0.3630 and 0.2081, respectively, and Nei’s genetic diversity (He at the species and population level was 0.2397 and 0.1405, respectively. These results indicate that B. sinensis contains relatively high levels of genetic diversity. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA and estimates of the coefficient of genetic differentiation based on phenotypic diversity index also indicated high levels of population subdivision (GST = 0.2973; FST = 0.4267 in the species. Analysis of the ISSR data using UPGMA further revealed that populations were genetically clustered into two groups, while a Mantel test showed that genetic divergence was significantly correlated with geographical distance among populations (Mantel test; r = 0.3096, P = 0.008. We conclude from our results that B. sinensis is not endangered due to low evolutionary potential stemming from low genetic diversity, but by habitat destruction coupled with a low reproductive capacity, poor adaptability and weak competitiveness. The Mt. Yangming, Mt. Mangshan, Ruyang, and Mt. Bamianshan populations of the species with higher genetic diversity should be given priority for conservation, and inbreeding depression monitoring should be conducted.

  2. Genetic diversity in caribou linked to past and future climate change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yannic, Glenn; Pellissier, Loïc; Ortego, Joaquín; Lecomte, Nicolas; Couturier, Serge; Cuyler, Christine; Dussault, Christian; Hundertmark, Kris J.; Irvine, R. Justin; Jenkins, Deborah A.; Kolpashikov, Leonid; Mager, Karen; Musiani, Marco; Parker, Katherine L.; Røed, Knut H.; Sipko, Taras; Þórisson, Skarphéðinn G.; Weckworth, Byron V.; Guisan, Antoine; Bernatchez, Louis; Côté, Steeve D.

    2014-02-01

    Climate-driven range fluctuations during the Pleistocene have continuously reshaped species distribution leading to populations of contrasting genetic diversity. Contemporary climate change is similarly influencing species distribution and population structure, with important consequences for patterns of genetic diversity and species' evolutionary potential. Yet few studies assess the impacts of global climatic changes on intraspecific genetic variation. Here, combining analyses of molecular data with time series of predicted species distributions and a model of diffusion through time over the past 21kyr, we unravel caribou response to past and future climate changes across its entire Holarctic distribution. We found that genetic diversity is geographically structured with two main caribou lineages, one originating from and confined to Northeastern America, the other originating from Euro-Beringia but also currently distributed in western North America. Regions that remained climatically stable over the past 21kyr maintained a high genetic diversity and are also predicted to experience higher climatic stability under future climate change scenarios. Our interdisciplinary approach, combining genetic data and spatial analyses of climatic stability (applicable to virtually any taxon), represents a significant advance in inferring how climate shapes genetic diversity and impacts genetic structure.

  3. Genetic diversity in three natural populations of Pitcairnia flammea (l.) John (Bromeliaceae) estimated by ISSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza-Sobreira, F B; Souza, G B; Rosado, C C G; Miranda, F D; Soares, T C B; Gontijo, A B P L

    2015-01-01

    Bromeliads are greatly represented in the Atlantic Forest, although many species are threatened with extinction owing to habitat fragmentation and intense extraction for ornamental purposes. Therefore, it is necessary to conduct studies generating knowledge about genetic diversity and the distribution of this diversity among and within natural populations to establish conservation strategies. These studies can be performed with the use of molecular markers. Molecular markers are advantageous for studies of natural populations, for conservation programs, and to aid in properly classifying plant species. This study aimed to evaluate the genetic diversity among and within natural populations of Pitcairnia flammea, occurring in three fragments of the Atlantic Forest in the southern State of Espírito Santo through the use of inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. DNA samples from 55 individuals were amplified with 18 ISSR primers, generating 180 bands, 159 of which were polymorphic. The Shannon genetic diversity index ranged from 0.348 to 0.465, with an average of 0.412. The Bayesian approach for the molecular data indicated the existence of two genetic groups. Analysis of molecular variance indicated the existence of 90.3% diversity within the population and 9.74% among populations. The amount of genetic differentiation of populations was moderate (0.0974), indicating that gene flow rates may be enough to counteract the effects of genetic drift. Greater genetic variability found in population B indicates that this area is an important source of genetic variability. PMID:26634557

  4. Effect of mining landscape history on local species diversity: a case study of the Yimin open-pit coal mine in Inner Mongolia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarula Kang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The exploration and utilization of mineral resources accelerates local economic and social development and simultaneously exacerbates the effects of climate and landscape changes, resulting in landscape fragmentation. Landscape change is widely considered as a major threat to species loss at a regional and global scale. However, how species diversity responds to landscape changes on a temporal scale has usually been ignored. In this study, we explored relationships between landscape and biodiversity (species level and functional group level during different years (1975, 1990, 2000 and 2010 at the Yimin open-pit coal mine, a mine that has been exploited for more than 30 years and that has produced obvious fragmentation effects on the landscape in Hulunbuir City. The ongoing patterns of transformation of the landscape were measured using the landscape dominance index, the habitat integral index of connectivity (IIC, and the habitat probability of connectivity (PC at seven different spatial scales. The main results were as follows: The present species diversity is significantly correlated with the landscape pattern indices of previous and earlier mining at a medium-sized spatial scale (4–8 km buffers. Different plant functional groups responded in various ways to changing landscape patterns. The species richness of perennial rhizome grasses was significantly correlated with the present small-scale landscape pattern (1–3 km, and the species richness of perennial forbs was significantly correlated with the previous and earlier mining large-scale landscape patterns (4–10 km. Perennial bunchgrasses were not significantly correlated with landscape patterns. We concluded that the time lag expressed by changes in plant species diversity occurred in response to changing patterns of construction and configurations of habitats in the landscape. The regional species pool determined the local species diversity. The connected habitat patches within a 4–8 km buffer region represented the principal species pool. The propagation strategies and dispersal traits of various functional groups were important mechanisms maintaining species diversity in a fragmented area.

  5. Genetic diversity and relationship of chicory (Cichorium intybus L.) using sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, X Y; Zhang, X Q; Bai, S Q; Huang, L K; Luo, X M; Ji, Y; Jiang, L F

    2014-01-01

    Chicory is a crop with economically important roles and is cultivated worldwide. The genetic diversity and relationship of 80 accessions of chicories and endives were evaluated by sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) markers to provide a theoretical basis for future breeding programs in China. The polymorphic rate was 96.83%, and the average polymorphic information content was 0.323, suggesting the rich genetic diversity of chicory. The genetic diversity degree of chicory was higher (GS = 0.677) than that of endive (GS = 0.701). The accessions with the highest genetic diversity (effective number of alleles, NE = 1.609; Nei's genetic diversity, H = 0.372; Shannon information index, I = 0.556) were from Italy. The richest genetic diversity was revealed in a chicory line (NE = 1.478, H = 0.289, I = 0.443) among the 3 types (line, wild, and cultivar). The chicory genetic structure of 8 geographical groups showed that the genetic differentiation coefficient (GST) was 14.20% and the number of immigrants per generation (Nm) was 3.020. A GST of 6.80% and an Nm of 6.853 were obtained from different types. This observation suggests that these chicory lines, especially those from the Mediterranean region, have potential for providing rich genetic resources for further breeding programs, that the chicory genetic structure among different countries obviously differs with a certain amount of gene flow, and that SRAP markers could be applied to analyze genetic relationships and classifications of Cichorium intybus and C. endivia. PMID:25299087

  6. Comparative genetic diversity and genetic structure of three chinese silkworm species Bombyx mori L. (Lepidoptera: Bombycidae), Antheraea pernyi Guérin-Meneville and Samia cynthia ricini donovan (Lepidoptera: Saturniidae)

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Yan-Qun, Liu; Li, Qin; Yu-Ping, li; Huan, Wang; Run-Xi, Xia; Yong-Hong, Qi; Xi-Sheng, li; Cheng, Lu; Zhong-Huai, Xiang.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity and genetic structure of three Chinese silkworm species Bombyx mori L., Antheraea pernyi Guérin-Meneville and Samia cynthia ricini Donovan were comparatively assessed based on RAPD markers. At the species level, A. pernyi and B. mori showed high levels of genetic diversity, whe [...] reas S. cynthia ricini showed low level of genetic diversity. However, at the strain level, A. pernyi had relatively highest genetic diversity and B. mori had lowest genetic diversity. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) suggested that 60% and 72% of genetic variation resided within strains in A. pernyi and S. cynthia ricini, respectively, whereas only 16% of genetic variation occurred within strains in B. mori. In UPGMA dendrogram, individuals of A. pernyi and B. mori formed the strain-specific genetic clades, whereas those of S. cynthia ricini were distributed in a mixed way. The implications of these results for the conservation and utilization in breeding programs of three silkworm species are discussed.

  7. Extremely low effective population sizes, genetic structuring and reduced genetic diversity in a threatened bumblebee species, Bombus sylvarum (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, J S; Knight, M E; Darvill, B; Goulson, D

    2006-12-01

    Habitat fragmentation may severely affect survival of social insect populations as the number of nests per population, not the number of individuals, represents population size, hence they may be particularly prone to loss of genetic diversity. Erosion of genetic diversity may be particularly significant among social Hymenoptera such as bumblebees (Bombus spp.), as this group may be susceptible to diploid male production, a suggested direct cost of inbreeding. Here, for the first time, we assess genetic diversity and population structuring of a threatened bumblebee species (Bombus sylvarum) which exists in highly fragmented habitat (rather than oceanic) islands. Effective population sizes, estimated from identified sisterhoods, were very low (range 21-72) suggesting that isolated populations will be vulnerable to loss of genetic variation through drift. Evidence of significant genetic structuring between populations (theta = 0.084) was found, but evidence of a bottleneck was detected in only one population. Comparison across highly fragmented UK populations and a continental population (where this species is more widespread) revealed significant differences in allelic richness attributable to a high degree of genetic diversity in the continental population. While not directly related to population size, this is perhaps explained by the high degree of isolation between UK populations relative to continental populations. We suggest that populations now existing on isolated habitat islands were probably linked by stepping-stone populations prior to recent habitat loss. PMID:17107471

  8. Covering chemical diversity of genetically-modified tomatoes using metabolomics for objective substantial equivalence assessment [Metabolonote

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Sample Set Information ID SE53 Title Covering chemical diversity of genetically-modified tomatoe ... mment The raw data files are available at DROM Met web ... site in PRIMe database of RIKEN. The original pape ...

  9. DEVELOPMENT OF AQUATIC MODELS FOR TESTING THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN GENETIC DIVERSITY AND POPULATION EXTINCTION RISK

    Science.gov (United States)

    The relationship between population adaptive potential and extinction risk in a changing environment is not well understood. Although the expectation is that genetic diversity is directly related to the capacity of populations to adapt, the statistical and predictive aspects of ...

  10. Diversidad y estructura genética de Pinus johannis / Genetic diversity and genetic structure in Pinus johannis

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Verónica, García-Gómez; Carlos, Ramírez-Herrera; Celestino, Flores-López; Javier, López-Upton.

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pinus johannis M.-F. Robert-Passini es un pino piñonero endémico de México que crece en poblaciones pequeñas. El objetivo del presente estudio fue estimar el nivel de la diversidad genética y el grado de diferenciación entre poblaciones en la distribución natural de P. johannis. Se recolectaron estr [...] óbilos maduros de 130 árboles de cuatro poblaciones. El genotipo de cada árbol se determinó en una muestra de seis megagametofitos y se analizaron nueve sistemas enzimáticos con 16 loci. En las cuatro poblaciones el número de alelos varió de 31 a 35. El número promedio de alelos por locus fue 2.1 y el porcentaje promedio de loci polimórficos 88. La heterocigosidad promedio fue 0.231, y la heterocigosidad promedio esperada fue 0.245. Un déficit de individuos heterocigóticos (F IS = 0.116 y F IT = 0.176) se encontró en las cuatro poblaciones juntas y en cada una de ellas. La diferenciación genética entre poblaciones fue moderada (F ST = 0.062).La diversidad genética en P. johannis fue alta con un nivel moderado de diferenciación entre poblaciones. Abstract in english Pinus johannis M.-F. Robert-Passini is an endemic pinion nut pine of Mexico that grows in small populations. The objective of this study was to estimate the level of genetic diversity and degree of differentiation among populations in the natural distribution of P. johannis. Mature strobili were col [...] lected from 130 tree of four populations. The genotype of each tree was determined in a sample of six megagametophytes, and nine enzyme systems with 16 loci were analyzed. In the four populations the number of alleles varied from 31 to 35. The average number of alleles per locus was 2.1, and the average percentage of polymorphic loci was 88 %. Average heterozygosity was 0.231, and expected average heterozygosity was 0.245. A deficit of heterozygous individuals (F IS = 0.116 and F IT = 0.176) was found in the four populations together and in each of them. The genetic differentiation among populations was moderate (F ST = 0.062).Genetic diversity of P. johannis was high with a moderate level of differentiation among populations.

  11. Genetic diversity of Annona crassiflora (Annonaceae) in northern Minas Gerais State.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cota, L G; Vieira, F A; Melo Júnior, A F; Brandão, M M; Santana, K N O; Guedes, M L; Oliveira, D A

    2011-01-01

    Genetic diversity analyses of tropical tree species are relevant to landscape management, plant genetic resource inventory, and biological conservation of threatened species. Annona crassiflora is an endangered fruit tree native to the Cerrado biome that is threatened by reduction of natural populations and fruit extraction. We examined the intra- and interpopulational genetic diversity of this species in the northern region of Minas Gerais State. Seventy-two individuals from four natural populations were genotyped using RAPD markers. We found moderate genetic diversity among populations, with Shannon's I index varying between 0.31 and 0.44, and Nei's genetic diversity (H(E)) for the population set equal to 0.31. AMOVA indicated a greater genetic variation within (77.38%) rather than among populations (22.62%), tending towards isolation by distance (Mantel's r = 0.914; P = 0.089). Nei's genetic identity estimates among populations revealed a hierarchical pattern of genetic similarity of form [(CA1, CA2), MC], [(GM)], corroborating the high genetic differentiation between spatially isolated populations. PMID:21968724

  12. Patterns of ancestry and genetic diversity in reintroduced populations of the slimy sculpin: Implications for conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, D.D.; Miller, L.M.; Vondracek, B.

    2010-01-01

    Reintroductions are a common approach for preserving intraspecific biodiversity in fragmented landscapes. However, they may exacerbate the reduction in genetic diversity initially caused by population fragmentation because the effective population size of reintroduced populations is often smaller and reintroduced populations also tend to be more geographically isolated than native populations. Mixing genetically divergent sources for reintroduction purposes is a practice intended to increase genetic diversity. We documented the outcome of reintroductions from three mixed sources on the ancestral composition and genetic variation of a North American fish, the slimy sculpin (Cottus cognatus). We used microsatellite markers to evaluate allelic richness and heterozygosity in the reintroduced populations relative to computer simulated expectations. Sculpins in reintroduced populations exhibited higher levels of heterozygosity and allelic richness than any single source, but only slightly higher than the single most genetically diverse source population. Simulations intended to mimic an ideal scenario for maximizing genetic variation in the reintroduced populations also predicted increases, but they were only moderately greater than the most variable source population. We found that a single source contributed more than the other two sources at most reintroduction sites. We urge caution when choosing whether to mix source populations in reintroduction programs. Genetic characteristics of candidate source populations should be evaluated prior to reintroduction if feasible. When combined with knowledge of the degree of genetic distinction among sources, simulations may allow the genetic diversity benefits of mixing populations to be weighed against the risks of outbreeding depression in reintroduced and nearby populations. ?? 2010 US Government.

  13. High genetic diversity of Plasmodium vivax on the north coast of Papua New Guinea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnott, Alicia; Barnadas, Celine; Senn, Nicolas; Siba, Peter; Mueller, Ivo; Reeder, John C; Barry, Alyssa E

    2013-07-01

    Despite having the highest Plasmodium vivax burden in the world, molecular epidemiological data from Papua New Guinea (PNG) for this parasite remain limited. To investigate the molecular epidemiology of P. vivax in PNG, 574 isolates collected from four catchment sites in East Sepik (N = 1) and Madang (N = 3) Provinces were genotyped using the markers MS16 and msp1F3. Genetic diversity and prevalence of P. vivax was determined for all sites. Despite a P. vivax infection prevalence in the East Sepik (15%) catchments less than one-half the prevalence of the Madang catchments (27-35%), genetic diversity was similarly high in all populations (He = 0.77-0.98). High genetic diversity, despite a marked difference in infection prevalence, suggests a large reservoir of diversity in P. vivax populations of PNG. Significant reductions in transmission intensity may, therefore, be required to reduce the diversity of parasite populations in highly endemic countries such as PNG. PMID:23690553

  14. Multiple factors affect diversity and abundance of ammonia-oxidizing microorganisms in iron mine soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yi; Si, Yan-Xiao; Hong, Chen; Li, Yang

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia oxidation by microorganisms is a critical process in the nitrogen cycle. In this study, four soil samples collected from a desert zone in an iron-exploration area and others from farmland and planted forest soil in an iron mine surrounding area. We analyzed the abundance and diversity of ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) in iron-mining area near the Miyun reservoir using ammonia monooxygenase. A subunit gene (amoA) as molecular biomarker. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction was applied to explore the relationships between the abundance of AOA and AOB and soil physicochemical parameters. The results showed that AOA were more abundant than AOB and may play a more dominant role in the ammonia-oxidizing process in the whole region. PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the structural changes of AOA and AOB. The results showed that AOB were much more diverse than AOA. Nitrosospira cluster three constitute the majority of AOB, and AOA were dominated by group 1.1b in the soil. Redundancy analysis was performed to explore the physicochemical parameters potentially important to AOA and AOB. Soil characteristics (i.e. water, ammonia, organic carbon, total nitrogen, available phosphorus, and soil type) were proposed to potentially contribute to the distributions of AOB, whereas Cd was also closely correlated to the distributions of AOB. The community of AOA correlated with ammonium and water contents. These results highlight the importance of multiple drivers in microbial niche formation as well as their affect on ammonia oxidizer composition, both which have significant consequences for ecosystem nitrogen functioning. PMID:25860433

  15. Genetic Diversity in Napier Grass (Pennisetum purpureum) Assessed by SSR Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Geofrey Kawube; Titus Alicai; Bramwel Wanjala; Moses Njahira; Juma Awalla; Robert Skilton

    2015-01-01

    Understanding of genetic diversity among Napier grass is very important for selection and improvement of Napier grass breeding population. This study determined the genetic diversity among the farmer preferred, wild (local) and selected ILRI gene-bank Napier grass clones using 23 SSR markers selected from pearl millet, maize and sorghum. The results indicated polymorphism among the SSR markers, revealing a total of 339 alleles of which 27.1% alleles were unique, occurring either only in local...

  16. Genetic Diversity in Jatropha curcas L. Assessed with SSR and SNP Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Juan M. Montes; Frank Technow; Matthias Martin; Klaus Becker

    2014-01-01

    Jatropha curcas L. (jatropha) is an undomesticated plant that has recently received great attention for its utilization in biofuel production, rehabilitation of wasteland, and rural development. Knowledge of genetic diversity and marker-trait associations is urgently needed for the design of breeding strategies. The main goal of this study was to assess the genetic structure and diversity in jatropha germplasm with co-dominant markers (Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) and Single Nucleotide Polym...

  17. Global to local genetic diversity indicators of evolutionary potential in tree species within and outside forests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Lars; Aravanopoulos, Filippos; Bennadji, Zohra; Changtragoon, Suchitra; Fady, Bruno; Kjær, Erik Dahl; Loo, Judy; Ramamonjisoa, Lolona; Vendramin, Giovanni G.

    2014-01-01

    There is a general trend of biodiversity loss at global, regional, national and local levels. To monitor this trend, international policy processes have created a wealth of indicators over the last two decades. However, genetic diversity indicators are regrettably absent from comprehensive bio-monitoring schemes. Here, we provide a review and an assessment of the different attempts made to provide such indicators for tree genetic diversity from the global level down to the level of the managemen...

  18. Distinguishing between hot-spots and melting-pots of genetic diversity using haplotype connectivity

    OpenAIRE

    Emerson Brent C; Spillner Andreas; Nguyen Binh; Moulton Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Abstract We introduce a method to help identify how the genetic diversity of a species within a geographic region might have arisen. This problem appears, for example, in the context of identifying refugia in phylogeography, and in the conservation of biodiversity where it is a factor in nature reserve selection. Complementing current methods for measuring genetic diversity, we analyze pairwise distances between the haplotypes of a species found in a geographic region and derive a quantity, c...

  19. Genetic diversity and population structure of the Guinea pig (Cavia porcellus, Rodentia, caviidae) in Colombia

    OpenAIRE

    William Burgos-Paz; Mario Cerón-Muñoz; Carlos Solarte-Portilla

    2011-01-01

    The aim was to establish the genetic diversity and population structure of three guinea pig lines, from seven production zones located in Nariño, southwest Colombia. A total of 384 individuals were genotyped with six microsatellite markers. The measurement of intrapopulation diversity revealed allelic richness ranging from 3.0 to 6.56, and observed heterozygosity (Ho) from 0.33 to 0.60, with a deficit in heterozygous individuals. Although statistically significant (p < 0.05), genetic differen...

  20. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Rice Pathogen Ustilaginoidea virens in China

    OpenAIRE

    Sun, Xianyun; Kang, Shu; Zhang, Yongjie; Tan, Xinqiu; Yu, Yufei; He, Haiyong; Zhang, Xinyu; Liu, Yongfeng; Wang, Shu; Sun, Wenxian; CAI, LEI; LI, SHAOJIE

    2013-01-01

    Rice false smut caused by the fungal pathogen Ustilaginoideavirens is becoming a destructive disease throughout major rice-growing countries. Information about its genetic diversity and population structure is essential for rice breeding and efficient control of the disease. This study compared the genome sequences of two U. virens isolates. Three SNP-rich genomic regions were identified as molecular markers that could be used to analyze the genetic diversity and population structure of U. vi...

  1. Genetic diversity and germplasm conservation of three minor Andean tuber crop species

    OpenAIRE

    Malice M.; Baudoin JP.

    2009-01-01

    In traditional Andean agrosystems, three minor tuber crop species are of regional or local importance: oca (Oxalis tuberosa Molina), ulluco (Ullucus tuberosus Caldas) and mashua (Tropaeolum tuberosum Ruiz and Pav.). Genetic diversity within these species is very large and could result from the high ecological and cultural variability that characterizes the Andean area. Nowadays, many anthropic or ecological factors cause the loss of diversity and contribute to genetic erosion. The development...

  2. Genome-wide distribution of genetic diversity and linkage disequilibrium in elite sugar beet germplasm

    OpenAIRE

    Weißleder Knuth; Lühmann Ann-Katrin; Li Jinquan; Stich Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Characterization of population structure and genetic diversity of germplasm is essential for the efficient organization and utilization of breeding material. The objectives of this study were to (i) explore the patterns of population structure in the pollen parent heterotic pool using different methods, (ii) investigate the genome-wide distribution of genetic diversity, and (iii) assess the extent and genome-wide distribution of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in elite sugar b...

  3. Genetic Diversity Within and Among Populations of Roseroot (Rhodiola rosea L.) Based on Molecular Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Zsuzsanna GYORGY; Maria SZABO; Dmitry BACHAROV; PEDRYC, Andrzej

    2012-01-01

    Rhodiola rosea L. is a perennial adaptogenic medicinal plant found in cool climate of the northern hemisphere. The species is very diverse both in terms of morphological characteristics and in the content of the pharmacologically active substances. The genetic diversity of four geographically distant roseroot populations was studied with ISSR and SSR markers. Using 7 ISSR primers 64 DNA fragments were generated and 85,94% of those were found to be polymorphic, indicating high genetic variabil...

  4. Genetic diversity of taro, Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott, in Southeast Asia and the Pacific

    OpenAIRE

    Kreike, N.; H. J. Van Eck; Lebot, V.

    2004-01-01

    The genetic diversity of 255 taro (Colocasia esculenta) accessions from Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia, the Philippines, Papua New Guinea and Vanuatu was studied using AFLPs. Three AFLP primer combinations generated a total of 465 scorable amplification products. The 255 accessions were grouped according to their country of origin, to their ploidy level (diploid or triploid) and to their habitat—cultivated or wild. Gene diversity within these groups and the genetic distance between th...

  5. On the Consequences of Purging and Linkage on Fitness and Genetic Diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Bersabé; Armando Caballero; Andrés Pérez-Figueroa; Aurora García-Dorado

    2016-01-01

    Using computer simulation we explore the consequences of linkage on the inbreeding load of an equilibrium population, and on the efficiency of purging and the loss of genetic diversity after a reduction in population size. We find that linkage tends to cause increased inbreeding load due to the build up of coupling groups of (partially) recessive deleterious alleles. It also induces associative overdominance at neutral sites but rarely causes increased neutral genetic diversity in equilibrium...

  6. Genetic Diversity Analysis of Highly Incomplete SNP Genotype Data with Imputations: An Empirical Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Fu, Yong-Bi

    2014-01-01

    Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) recently has emerged as a promising genomic approach for assessing genetic diversity on a genome-wide scale. However, concerns are not lacking about the uniquely large unbalance in GBS genotype data. Although some genotype imputation has been proposed to infer missing observations, little is known about the reliability of a genetic diversity analysis of GBS data, with up to 90% of observations missing. Here we performed an empirical assessment of accuracy in gen...

  7. Genetic diversity in Silene sennenii Pau (Caryophyllaceae) assayed through DNA-based techniques

    OpenAIRE

    López-Vinyallonga, Sara; López-Pujol, Jordi; Martinell, M. C.; Massó, S.; Blanché, C.

    2012-01-01

    [EN]Genetic diversity in Silene sennenii Pau (Caryophylaceae) asayed through DNA-based techniques.— Silene sennenii is a narrow endemic species from the NE of the Iberian Peninsula. It is considered as EN (“Endangered”) according to the IUCN criteria and is under legal protection in Catalonia. In the present work we report an assay using three different approaches for surveying the genetic diversity in this rare, endangered campion: analysis of chloroplast haplotypes, AFLPs and transferabilit...

  8. A first assessment of the genetic diversity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in Cambodia.

    OpenAIRE

    Sola Christophe; Gicquel Brigitte; Refregier Guislaine; Heng Seiha; Le Moullec Stéphanie; Zhang Jian; Guillard Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cambodia is among the 22 high-burden TB countries, and has one of the highest rates of TB in South-East Asia. This study aimed to describe the genetic diversity among clinical Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) isolates collected in Cambodia and to relate these findings to genetic diversity data from neighboring countries. Methods We characterized by 24 VNTR loci genotyping and spoligotyping 105 Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates collected between 2007 and ...

  9. Do Farmers reduce genetic diversity when they domesticate tropical trees? a case study from Amazonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Hollingsworth, P.M.; Dawson, I.K.; Goodall-Copestake, W.P.; Richardson, J E; J.C. Weber; Sotelo Montes, C.; Pennington, R.T.

    2005-01-01

    Agroforestry ecosystems may be an important resource for conservation and sustainable use of tropical trees, but little is known of the genetic diversity they contain. Inga edulis, a widespread indigenous fruit tree in South America, is used as a model to assess the maintenance of genetic diversity in five planted vs. five natural stands in the Peruvian Amazon. Analysis of five SSR (simple sequence repeat) loci indicated lower allelic variation in planted stands [mean corrected allelic richne...

  10. Genetic Diversity of Dalmatian Sage (Salvia officinalis L.) as Assessed by RAPD Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Zlatko Liber; Vesna Židovec; Sandro Bogdanovi?; Ivan Radosavljevi?; Monika Pruša; Maja Filipovi?; Ines Han Dovedan; Marija Jug-Dujakovi?; Zlatko Šatovi?

    2014-01-01

    Dalmatian or common sage (Salvia officinalis L.) is an outcrossing plant species native to East Adriatic coast. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA markers (RAPD) were used to analyze genetic diversity and structure of ten natural populations from the East-Adriatic coastal region. The highest genetic diversity was found in populations from the central and south Dalmatia, while the highest frequency down-weighted marker values were found in the northernmost populations and the southern most inlan...

  11. Genetic diversity and population structuring of Schistosoma mansoni in a Brazilian village

    OpenAIRE

    Thiele, E.A.; Sorensen, R.E.; A Gazzinelli; Minchella, D.J.

    2007-01-01

    The digenean trematode Schistosoma mansoni is responsible for chronic schistosomiasis worldwide and in Brazil alone an estimated 35 million people are at risk. To evaluate epidemiological patterns among human definitive hosts, we assessed genetic diversity and population subdivision of S. mansoni infrapopulations in human hosts from the highly endemic village of Virgem das Graças in the state of Minas Gerais, Brazil. We believe this is the largest such survey to date. Genetic diversity of par...

  12. Genetic diversity characterization of cassava cultivars (Manihot esculenta Crantz.: I RAPD markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo Carlos

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available RAPD markers were used to investigate the genetic diversity of 31 Brazilian cassava clones. The results were compared with the genetic diversity revealed by botanical descriptors. Both sets of variates revealed identical relationships among the cultivars. Multivariate analysis of genetic similarities placed genotypes destinated for consumption "in nature" in one group, and cultivars useful for flour production in another. Brazil?s abundance of landraces presents a broad dispersion and is consequently an important resource of genetic variability. The botanical descriptors were not able to differentiate thirteen pairs of cultivars compared two-by-two, while only one was not differentiated by RAPD markers. These results showed the power of RAPD markers over botanical descriptors in studying genetic diversity, identifying duplicates, as well as validating, or improving a core collection. The latter is particularly important in this vegetatively propagated crop.

  13. Feature Reduction Based on Genetic Algorithm and Hybrid Model for Opinion Mining

    OpenAIRE

    P.Kalaivani; K. L. Shunmuganathan

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid growth of websites and web form the number of product reviews is available on the sites. An opinion mining system is needed to help the people to evaluate emotions, opinions, attitude, and behavior of others, which is used to make decisions based on the user preference. In this paper, we proposed an optimized feature reduction that incorporates an ensemble method of machine learning approaches that uses information gain and genetic algorithm as feature reduction techniques. We ...

  14. Effect of Genetically Modified Poplars on Soil Microbial Communities during the Phytoremediation of Waste Mine Tailings?†

    OpenAIRE

    Hur, Moonsuk; Kim, Yongho; Song, Hae-Ryong; Kim, Jong Min; Choi, Young Im; Yi, Hana

    2011-01-01

    The application of transgenic plants to clean up environmental pollution caused by the wastes of heavy metal mining is a promising method for removing metal pollutants from soils. However, the effect of using genetically modified organisms for phytoremediation is a poorly researched topic in terms of microbial community structures, despite the important role of microorganisms in the health of soil. In this study, a comparative analysis of the bacterial and archaeal communities found in the rh...

  15. Effect of host-plant genetic diversity on oak canopy arthropod community structure in central Mexico

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Efraín, Tovar-Sánchez; Leticia, Valencia-Cuevas; Patricia, Mussali-Galante; Rolando, Ramírez-Rodríguez; Elgar, Castillo-Mendoza.

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recently it has been proposed that the genetic diversity of foundation species influences the structure and function of the community by creating locally stable conditions for other species and modulating ecosystem dynamics. Oak species are an ideal system to test this hypothesis because [...] many of them have a wide geographical distribution, and they are dominant elements of the forest canopy. In this study we explored the response of canopy arthropod community structure (diversity and biomass) to the level of genetic diversity of Quercus crassipes and Q. rugosa, two important canopy species. Also, we examined the effect of oak species and locality on some community structure parameters (diversity, biomass, rare species, and richness of arthropod fauna) of canopy arthropods. In total, 160 canopies were fogged in four localities at the Mexican Valley (ten trees per species per locality per season) RESULTS: Q. crassipes registered the highest number of rare species, diversity index, biomass, and richness in comparison with Q. rugosa. We found a positive and significant relationship between genetic diversity parameters and canopy arthropod diversity. However, canopy arthropod biomass registered an inverse pattern. Our results support the hypothesis that the genetic diversity of the host-plant species influences the assemblage of the canopy arthropod community CONCLUSIONS: The pattern found in our study provides a powerful tool when trying to predict the effects of the genetic diversity of the host-plant species on different community structure parameters, which permits assignment of a new conservation status to foundation species based on their genetic diversity.

  16. Reconstruction time of a mine through reliability analysis and genetic algorithms

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    M., Kumral.

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available A mining system consists of many sub-systems such as drilling, blasting, loading, hauling, ventilation, hoisting and supporting. During mining operation, these sub-systems may experience various problems that stop the operation because of possible environmental, equipment and safety issues. In order [...] to ensure delivery contracts in the required quality and safe mining medium, the operation should be, at least, performed in the specified reliability level of the system. If the system reliability decreases below the specified level, there will be safety and financial losses for the mining company. Therefore, the mine should be maintained by a reconstruction procedure to guarantee the operation continuity. Given that each sub-system has a different reliability function and maintenance cost, the determination of reconstruction time will be a complicated decision making problem. In this paper, the determination of reconstruction time is formulated as a nonlinear optimization problem and solved by genetic algorithms (GA). A case study was conducted to demonstrate the performance of the approach for an underground operation. The results showed that the approach could be used to determine the best action time.

  17. Lack of genetic diversity across diverse immune genes in an endangered mammal, the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Katrina M; Wright, Belinda; Grueber, Catherine E; Hogg, Carolyn; Belov, Katherine

    2015-08-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii) is threatened with extinction due to the spread of devil facial tumour disease. Polymorphisms in immune genes can provide adaptive potential to resist diseases. Previous studies in diversity at immune loci in wild species have almost exclusively focused on genes of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC); however, these genes only account for a fraction of immune gene diversity. Devils lack diversity at functionally important immunity loci, including MHC and Toll-like receptor genes. Whether there are polymorphisms at devil immune genes outside these two families is unknown. Here, we identify polymorphisms in a wide range of key immune genes, and develop assays to type single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within a subset of these genes. A total of 167 immune genes were examined, including cytokines, chemokines and natural killer cell receptors. Using genome-level data from ten devils, SNPs within coding regions, introns and 10 kb flanking genes of interest were identified. We found low polymorphism across 167 immune genes examined bioinformatically using whole-genome data. From this data, we developed long amplicon assays to target nine genes. These amplicons were sequenced in 29-220 devils and found to contain 78 SNPs, including eight SNPS within exons. Despite the extreme paucity of genetic diversity within these genes, signatures of balancing selection were exhibited by one chemokine gene, suggesting that remaining diversity may hold adaptive potential. The low functional diversity may leave devils highly vulnerable to infectious disease, and therefore, monitoring and preserving remaining diversity will be critical for the long-term management of this species. Examining genetic variation in diverse immune genes should be a priority for threatened wildlife species. This study can act as a model for broad-scale immunogenetic diversity analysis in threatened species. PMID:26119928

  18. High genetic diversity in the endangered and narrowly distributed amphibian species Leptobrachium leishanense.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Luo, Zhenhua; Zhao, Mian; Wu, Hua

    2015-09-01

    Threatened species typically have a small or declining population size, which make them highly susceptible to loss of genetic diversity through genetic drift and inbreeding. Genetic diversity determines the evolutionary potential of a species; therefore, maintaining the genetic diversity of threatened species is essential for their conservation. In this study, we assessed the genetic diversity of the adaptive major histocompatibility complex (MHC) genes in an endangered and narrowly distributed amphibian species, Leptobrachium leishanense in Southwest China. We compared the genetic variation of MHC class I genes with that observed in neutral markers (5 microsatellite loci and cytochrome b gene) to elucidate the relative roles of genetic drift and natural selection in shaping the current MHC polymorphism in this species. We found a high level of genetic diversity in this population at both MHC and neutral markers compared with other threatened amphibian species. Historical positive selection was evident in the MHC class I genes. The higher allelic richness in MHC markers compared with that of microsatellite loci suggests that selection rather than genetic drift plays a prominent role in shaping the MHC variation pattern, as drift can affect all the genome in a similar way but selection directly targets MHC genes. Although demographic analysis revealed no recent bottleneck events in L. leishanense, additional population decline will accelerate the dangerous status for this species. We suggest that the conservation management of L. leishanense should concentrate on maximizing the retention of genetic diversity through preventing their continuous population decline. Protecting their living habitats and forbidding illegal hunting are the most important measures for conservation of L. leishanense. PMID:26037662

  19. Genetic diversity of Norway spruce [Picea abies (L. Karst.] in Romanian Carpathians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raul Gheorghe Radu

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of Romanian most important coniferous tree species, the Norway spruce, was estimated by means of allozyme markers. A total of 695 adult trees sampled from eleven populations grouped in six mountainous areas in the Romanian Carpathians were analyzed. In three metapopulations (Maramure?, Post?var and Parâng, to evaluate the influence of altitudinal gradient on genetic diversity, samples were collected from populations located at high and low altitude. At other location (ApuseniMountains we compared the narrow-crown biotype (Picea abies var. columnaris and the pyramidal crown biotype (Picea abies var. pyramidalis and explored the genetic structure of peat bog ecotype. By analyzing 7 enzyme systems and 12 enzyme coding loci, a total of 38 allelic variants have been detected. The mean value of polymorphic loci for the six sites was 86.1%, ranging between 83.3% and 91.7% and the mean expected heterozygosity was 0.115, resulting in a moderate level of genetic diversity. The highest genetic diversity (He = 0.134 was found in the narrow-crown spruce population. Apuseni metapopulation showed the highest genetic diversity (He = 0.125, being the most valuable for conservation of genetic resources. The small value of fixation index (FST = 0.009 indicates a low genetic differentiation between the six sites and AMOVA test revealed a very high level of genetic diversity within population (99%. Comparative analysis of genetic parameters showed small differences between high and low altitude populations at each site, probably due to the neutral character of the markers analyzed and the effect of gene flow between gradiental populations.

  20. Genetic diversity and structure analysis based on hordein protein polymorphism in barley landrace populations from jordan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordan is unanimously considered to be one of the centers of genetic diversity for barley, where wild and landraces of barley has been grown under different climatic conditions. The genetic diversity and genetic structure based on hordein polymorphism was assessed in 90 different accessions collected from four different sites of Jordan. A-PAGE was used to reveal hordein polymorphism among the genotypes. A total of 29 distinct bands were identified, out of them 9 bands were distinguished for D, 11 for C, and 9 for the B hordein regions. The observed genetic similarity was an exceptionally high between the populations than expected, which is probably due to high gene flow estimated between them. The genetic diversity parameters were not differ largely among the populations, indicating that local selection of a particular site did not play a key role in shaping genetic diversity. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed significant population structure when accessions were structured according to population site. There was 94% of hordein variation resided within the populations and only 8% present among the populations. Both Bayesian and Principale Coordinate Analysis (PCoA) concordantly demonstrated admixture genotypes of the landraces barley populations. Consequently, none of the population found to be clustered separately according to its population site. It is concluded that this approach can be useful to explore the germplasm for genetic diversity but perhaps is not suitable for determining phylogenic relations in barley. (author)

  1. Relationship between the genetic diversity of Artemisia halodendron and climatic factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wenda; Zhao, Xueyong; Zhao, Xin; Li, Yuqiang; Lian, Jie; Yun, Jianying

    2014-02-01

    Artemisia halodendron (Asteraceae) is a dominant sand-fixing semi-shrub species native to the Horqin Sandy Land of northeastern China. In this study, we evaluated levels of genetic variation within and among sampled A. halodendron populations from two different hydrothermal regions of the Horqin Sandy Land using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. We also investigated possible relationships between genetic diversity of this species and climatic factors. Our analysis revealed that A. halodendron is highly genetically diverse, with populations from a low hydrothermal level region having higher genetic diversity index values than those from a high hydrothermal level region. An analysis of molecular variation (AMOVA) revealed relatively high levels (>89.83%) of within-population genetic variation. Based on cluster analysis, the 13 studied A. halodendron populations can be clustered into two clades. Genetic diversities of all populations have been influenced by many climatic factors, and Nei's genetic diversity (h) is strongly correlated with annual temperature range (ART). These results have important implications for restoration and management of degraded ecosystems in arid and semi-arid areas.

  2. Genetic Diversity in Commercial Rapeseed (Brassica napus L. Varieties from Turkey as Revealed by RAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem ÖZBEK

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available In cultivated commercial crop species, genetic diversity tends to decrease because of the extensive breeding processes. Therefore, germplasm of commercial crop species, such as Brassica napus L. should be evaluated and the genotypes, which have higher genetic diversity index, should be addressed as potential parental cross materials in breeding programs. In this study, the genetic diversity was analysed by using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis (RAPD technique in nine Turkish commercial rapeseed varieties. The RAPD primers (10-mer oligonucleotides produced 51 scorable loci, 31 loci of which were polymorphic (60.78% and 20 loci (39.22% were monomorphic The RAPD bands were scored as binary matrix data and were analysed using POPGENE version 1.32. At locus level, the values of genetic diversity within population (Hs and total (HT were 0.15 and 0.19 respectively. The genetic differentiation (GST and the gene flow (Nm values between the populations were 0.20 and 2.05 respectively. The mean number of alleles (na, the mean number of effective alleles (nae, and the mean value of genetic diversity (He were 2.00, 1.26, and 0.19 respectively. According to Pearson’s correlation, multiple regression and principal component analyses, eco-geographical conditions in combination had significant effect on genetic indices of commercial B. napus L. varieties were discussed.

  3. The Systems Genetics Resource: A Web Application to Mine Global Data for Complex Disease Traits

    OpenAIRE

    Van Nas, Atila; Pan, Calvin; Ingram-Drake, Leslie A; Ghazalpour, Anatole; Drake, Thomas A; Sobel, Eric M.; Papp, Jeanette C; Lusis, Aldons J

    2013-01-01

    The Systems Genetics Resource (SGR) (http://systems.genetics.ucla.edu) is a new open-access web application and database that contains genotypes and clinical and intermediate phenotypes from both human and mouse studies. The mouse data include studies using crosses between specific inbred strains and studies using the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. SGR is designed to assist researchers studying genes and pathways contributing to complex disease traits, including obesity, diabetes, atherosclero...

  4. Analysis of Fungicide Sensitivity and Genetic Diversity among Colletotrichum Species in Sweet Persimmon

    OpenAIRE

    Gang, Geun-Hye; Cho, Hyun Ji; Kim, Hye Sun; Kwack, Yong-Bum; Kwak, Youn-Sig

    2015-01-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides (C. gloeosporioides; Teleomorph: Glomerella cingulata), is the most destructive disease that affects sweet persimmon production worldwide. However, the biology, ecology, and genetic variations of C. gloeosporioides remain largely unknown. Therefore, in this study, the development of fungicide resistance and genetic diversity among an anthracnose pathogen population with different geographical origins and the exposure of this population to ...

  5. Genetic diversity provides opportunities for improvement of fresh-cut pepper quality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Extensive genetic diversity present in the Capsicum genepool has been utilized extensively to improve pepper disease resistance, fruit quality and varied yield attributes. Little attention has been dedicated to genetic enhancement of pepper fresh-cut quality. We evaluated pepper accessions with dive...

  6. Genetic diversity of four protected indigenous chicken breeds in China using microsatellite markers

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Lin, Wei; Bin, Chen; Xiao-ying, Li; Sheng-gui, Liu; Jing-jing, Wang.

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity of four protected indigenous chicken breeds was evaluated with 25 microsatellite markers. Polymorphism information content (PIC), heterozygosity with the estimator of genetic differentiation F ST and Nei's genetic distance were evaluated. The results showed that these four prot [...] ected local chicken populations showed high levels of diversity. The proportion of inter-population subdivision among the four protected local chicken populations was 16.0%. The average heterozygosity was 0.514, 0.581, 0.567 and 0.589 in Dongan, Xuefeng black-bone, Xianghuang and Taoyuan chickens, respectively, while the average PIC estimates were 0.455, 0.581, 0.557 and 0.576. A phylogenetic tree was constructed using genetic distance and the neighbour-joining method. Its topology reflects the general pattern of genetic differentiation among the four chicken breeds. The results also showed high genetic diversity and genetic variation among all the breeds. The information about the four local breeds estimated by microsatellite analysis may be useful as an initial guide for the effective conservation of chicken genetic diversity and developing conservation strategies.

  7. Social Organization of Crop Genetic Diversity. The G × E × S Interaction Model

    OpenAIRE

    Geo Coppens d’Eeckenbrugge; Christian Leclerc

    2011-01-01

    A better knowledge of factors organizing crop genetic diversity in situ increases the efficiency of diversity analyses and conservation strategies, and requires collaboration between social and biological disciplines. Four areas of anthropology may contribute to our understanding of the impact of social factors on crop diversity: ethnobotany, cultural, cognitive and social anthropology. So far, most collaborative studies have been based on ethnobotanical methods, focusing on farmers’ individu...

  8. Restriction of Francisella novicida Genetic Diversity during Infection of the Vector Midgut

    OpenAIRE

    Reif, Kathryn E.; Palmer, Guy H.; Crowder, David W.; Ueti, Massaro W; Noh, Susan M

    2014-01-01

    The genetic diversity of pathogens, and interactions between genotypes, can strongly influence pathogen phenotypes such as transmissibility and virulence. For vector-borne pathogens, both mammalian hosts and arthropod vectors may limit pathogen genotypic diversity (number of unique genotypes circulating in an area) by preventing infection or transmission of particular genotypes. Mammalian hosts often act as “ecological filters” for pathogen diversity, where novel variants are frequently elimi...

  9. Entropy and Information Approaches to Genetic Diversity and its Expression: Genomic Geography

    OpenAIRE

    William B. Sherwin

    2010-01-01

    This article highlights advantages of entropy-based genetic diversity measures, at levels from gene expression to landscapes. Shannon’s entropy-based diversity is the standard for ecological communities. The exponentials of Shannon’s and the related “mutual information” excel in their ability to express diversity intuitively, and provide a generalised method of considering microscopic behaviour to make macroscopic predictions, under given conditions. The hierarchical nature of entropy and inf...

  10. Genetic Diversity, Population Structure, and Resistance to Phytophthora capsici of a Worldwide Collection of Eggplant Germplasm

    OpenAIRE

    Naegele, Rachel P.; Boyle, Samantha; Quesada-Ocampo, Lina M; Hausbeck, Mary K.

    2014-01-01

    Eggplant (Solanum melongena L.) is an important solanaceous crop with high phenotypic diversity and moderate genotypic diversity. Ninety-nine genotypes of eggplant germplasm (species (S. melongena, S. incanum, S. linnaeanum and S. gilo), landraces and heirloom cultivars) from 32 countries and five continents were evaluated for genetic diversity, population structure, fruit shape, and disease resistance to Phytophthora fruit rot. Fruits from each line were measured for fruit shape and evaluate...

  11. An Analysis of Genetic Diversity Across the Maize Genome Using Microsatellites

    OpenAIRE

    Vigouroux, Yves; Mitchell, Sharon; Matsuoka, Yoshihiro; Hamblin, Martha; Kresovich, Stephen; Smith, J Stephen C; Jaqueth, Jennifer; Smith, Oscar S (Howie); Doebley, John

    2005-01-01

    How domestication bottlenecks and artificial selection shaped the amount and distribution of genetic variation in the genomes of modern crops is poorly understood. We analyzed diversity at 462 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites spread throughout the maize genome and compared the diversity observed at these SSRs in maize to that observed in its wild progenitor, teosinte. The results reveal a modest genome-wide deficit of diversity in maize relative to teosinte. The relative defi...

  12. SELF-ADAPTATION MECHANISM TO CONTROL THE DIVERSITY OF THE POPULATION IN GENETIC ALGORITHM

    OpenAIRE

    Chaiwat Jassadapakorn; Prabhas Chongstitvatana

    2011-01-01

    One of the problems in applying Genetic Algorithm is that there is some situation where the evolutionary process converges too fast to a solution which causes it to be trapped in local optima. To overcome this problem, a proper diversity in the candidate solutions must be determined. Most existing diversity-maintenance mechanisms require a problem specific knowledge to setup parameters properly. This work proposes a method to control diversity of the population without expli...

  13. [Genetic diversity analysis of Andrographis paniculata in China based on SRAP and SNP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rong; Wang, Xiao-Yun; Song, Yu-Ning; Zhu, Yun-feng; Wang, Peng-liang; Li, Min; Zhong, Guo-Yue

    2014-12-01

    In order to reveal genetic diversity of domestic Andrographis paniculata and its impact on quality, genetic backgrounds of 103 samples from 7 provinces in China were analyzed using SRAP marker and SNP marker. Genetic structures of the A. paniculata populations were estimated with Powermarker V 3.25 and Mega 6.0 software, and polymorphic SNPs were identified with CodonCode Aligner software. The results showed that the genetic distances of domestic A. paniculata germplasm ranged from 0. 01 to 0.09, and no polymorphic SNPs were discovered in coding sequence fragments of ent-copalyl diphosphate synthase. A. paniculata germplasm from various regions in China had poor genetic diversity. This phenomenon was closely related to strict self-fertilization and earlier introduction from the same origin. Therefore, genetic background had little impact on variable qualities of A. paniculata in domestic market. Mutation breeding, polyploid breeding and molecular breeding were proposed as promising strategies in germplasm innovation. PMID:25911801

  14. Diversity of acidophilic prokaryotes at two acid mine drainage sites in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aytar, P?nar; Kay, Catherine Melanie; Mutlu, Mehmet Burçin; Çabuk, Ahmet; Johnson, David Barrie

    2015-04-01

    The biodiversity of acidophilic prokaryotes in two acidic (pH 2.8-3.05) mine drainage (AMD) sites (Balya and Çan) in Turkey was examined using a combined cultivation-based and cultivation-independent approach. The latter included analyzing microbial diversity using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), terminal restriction enzyme fragment length polymorphism (`T-RFLP), and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Numbers of cultivatable heterotrophic acidophilic bacteria were over an order of magnitude greater than those of chemolithotrophic acidophiles in both AMD ponds examined. Isolates identified as strains of Acidithiobacillus ferrivorans, Acidiphilium organovorum, and Ferrimicrobium acidiphilum were isolated from the Balya AMD pond, and others identified as strains of Leptospirillum ferriphilum, Acidicapsa ligni, and Acidiphilium rubrum from Çan AMD. Other isolates were too distantly related (from analysis of their 16S rRNA genes) to be identified at the species level. Archaeal diversity in the two ponds appeared to be far more limited. T-RFLP and qPCR confirmed the presence of Ferroplasma-like prokaryotes, but no archaea were isolated from the two sites. qPCR generated semiquantitative data for genera of some of the iron-oxidizing acidophiles isolated and/or detected, suggesting the order of abundance was Leptospirillum?>?Ferroplasma?>?Acidithiobacillus (Balya AMD) and Ferroplasma?>?Leptospirillum?>?Acidithiobacillus (Çan AMD). PMID:25380633

  15. Study of Genetic Diversity and Relationships of Diploid and Tetraploid Annual Medics Using Microsatellite Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Mohammadi

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Annual medics are used for hey production, soil protection, biological fixation of N2 and green manure. In the present study, the inter and intra specific genetic diversity and relatedness of 4 diploid and two tetraploid (M. rugosa and M. scutellata annual medics were evaluated using microsatellite markers. PCR analysis was performed on genomic DNA from individual plant and PCR products were detected using standard polyacrylamide sequencing gel. Totally twenty five polymorphic alleles were observed in the studied species. Average intra-specific genetic diversity ranged from zero (0.0 in both M. rugosa and M. scutellata to 0.114 in M. minima species, and the level of genetic diversity was similar in both M. orbicularis and M. truncatula species. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA was used to partition the overall genetic diversity into within and among species, and between diploids and tetraploids. The results revealed significant (P<0.05 inter and intra-specific genetic variation. Pairwise comparisons based on Fst indicated significant differences among all of the species. Clustering analysis using UPGMA algorithm based on coancestary coefficient revealed a clear genetic relationship among species. The hypothesis on a common origin of two tetraploid species was supported by UPGMA clustering and phylogenetic analysis. The high level of Genetic diversity in spiny pod species respect to spineless pod species suggested the high importance of species with spiny pods in annual medics evolution. The findings support the usefulness of microsatellite markers for assessing inter and intra specific genetic diversity, differentiation and genetic relationships.

  16. Induced genetic diversity in mungbean (Vigna radiata L. Wilczek)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Variability and genetic divergence for 8 economically important metric traits were studied in 34 micromutants of mungbean and 2 base genotypes. Primary branches, pods per cluster and clusters per plant showed high heritability with high genetic advance. On the basis of D2-values, micromutants could be grouped into 9 clusters, indicating that mutation is effective in creating genetic divergence. Primary branches, pods per cluster and days to maturity contributed maximum to the divergence of the micromutants. Thus hybridization among the selected micro-mutants would have maximum chance for generation of variability with transgressive segregants of partical utility. (author). 5 tabs., 6 refs

  17. Diversity and population structure of a dominant deciduous tree based on morphological and genetic data

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Qin-di; Jia, Rui-Zhi; MENG Chao; Ti, Chao-Wen; Wang, Yi-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Acer grosseri, an economically and ecologically important maple species, is mainly distributed in North China. Based on Sequence Related Amplified Polymorphism (SRAP) markers and morphological characters, A. grosseri shows rich genetic diversity. Less genetic differentiation occurred between than within natural populations. All studied populations of A. grosseri formed two main clusters. There was no significant correlation between genetic and geographical distances among populations. The bio...

  18. Genetic diversity and structure of Astrocaryum jauari (Mart.) palm in two Amazon river basins

    OpenAIRE

    Liliane D. Santos Oliveira; Santiago L. Ferreyra Ramos; Maria T. Gomes Lopes; Gabriel Dequigiovanni; Elizabeth Ann Veasey; Jeferson L. Vasconcelos de Macêdo; Jacqueline S. Batista; Kyara M. Formiga; Ricardo Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Astrocaryum jauari is a non-domesticated palm that is exploited by poachers. Our objective was to investigate the organization of the genetic diversity and structure of three A. jauari populations. The study was carried out in the state of Amazonas, between the municipalities of Coari and Manaus. Nine microsatellite loci were used for the genetic analyses. High genetic variation was found, with a mean number of alleles per locus varying from 3.9 to 4.4. The average observed hetero...

  19. High and Distinct Range-Edge Genetic Diversity despite Local Bottlenecks

    OpenAIRE

    Assis, Jorge; Castilho Coelho, Nelson; Alberto, Filipe; Valero, Myriam; Raimondi, Pete; Reed, Dan; Alvares Serrão, Ester

    2013-01-01

    The genetic consequences of living on the edge of distributional ranges have been the subject of a largely unresolved debate. Populations occurring along persistent low latitude ranges (rear-edge) are expected to retain high and unique genetic diversity. In contrast, currently less favourable environmental conditions limiting population size at such range-edges may have caused genetic erosion that prevails over past historical effects, with potential consequences on reducing...

  20. Assessment of the Genetic Diversity in Forest Tree Populations Using Molecular Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Ilga Porth; El-Kassaby, Yousry A.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular markers have proven to be invaluable tools for assessing plants’ genetic resources by improving our understanding with regards to the distribution and the extent of genetic variation within and among species. Recently developed marker technologies allow the uncovering of the extent of the genetic variation in an unprecedented way through increased coverage of the genome. Markers have diverse applications in plant sciences, but certain marker types, due to their inherent characterist...

  1. Genetic Diversity and Dynamics of Sinorhizobium meliloti Populations Nodulating Different Alfalfa Cultivars in Italian Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Carelli, Maria; Gnocchi, Stefano; Fancelli, Silvia; Mengoni, Alessio; Paffetti, Donatella; SCOTTI, Carla; Bazzicalupo, Marco

    2000-01-01

    We analyzed the genetic diversity of 531 Sinorhizobium meliloti strains isolated from nodules of Medicago sativa cultivars in two different Italian soils during 4 years of plant growth. The isolates were analyzed for DNA polymorphism with the random amplified polymorphic DNA method. The populations showed a high level of genetic polymorphism distributed throughout all the isolates, with 440 different haplotypes. Analysis of molecular variance allowed us to relate the genetic structure of the ...

  2. High Genetic Diversity and Structured Populations of the Oriental Fruit Moth in Its Range of Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Yan; Peng, Xiong; Liu, Gaoming; Pan, Hongyan; DORN, SILVIA; Chen, Maohua

    2013-01-01

    The oriental fruit moth Grapholita (?=?Cydia) molesta is a key fruit pest globally. Despite its economic importance, little is known about its population genetics in its putative native range that includes China. We used five polymorphic microsatellite loci and two mitochondrial gene sequences to characterize the population genetic diversity and genetic structure of G. molesta from nine sublocations in three regions of a major fruit growing area of China. Larval samples were collected through...

  3. Genetic structure and diversity of the endangered growling grass frog in a rapidly urbanizing region

    OpenAIRE

    Keely, Claire C.; Hale, Joshua M.; Heard, Geoffrey W.; Kirsten M. Parris; Sumner, Joanna; Hamer, Andrew J.; Melville, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Two pervasive and fundamental impacts of urbanization are the loss and fragmentation of natural habitats. From a genetic perspective, these impacts manifest as reduced genetic diversity and ultimately reduced genetic viability. The growling grass frog (Litoria raniformis) is listed as vulnerable to extinction in Australia, and endangered in the state of Victoria. Remaining populations of this species in and around the city of Melbourne are threatened by habitat loss, degradation and fragmenta...

  4. Prioritization based on neutral genetic diversity may fail to conserve important characteristics in cattle breeds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, S J G; Lenstra, J A; Deeming, D C; Holm, Lars-Erik

    2012-01-01

    Conservation of the intraspecific genetic diversity of livestock species requires protocols that assess between-breed genetic variability and also take into account differences among individuals within breeds. Here, we focus on variation between breeds. Conservation of neutral genetic variation has been seen as promoting, through linkage processes, the retention of useful and potentially useful variation. Using public information on beef cattle breeds, with a total of 165 data sets each relating...

  5. Description and analysis of genetic diversity among squash accessions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios L. Tsivelikas

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the part of the squash core collection, maintained in the Greek Gene Bank, was assessed using the morphological and molecular data. Sixteen incompletely classified accessions of the squash were characterized along with an evaluation of their resistance against two isolates of Fusarium oxysporum. A molecular analysis using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD markers was also performed, revealing high level of polymorphism. To study the genetic diversity among the squash accessions, a clustering procedure using Unweighed Pair Group Method and Arithmetic Average (UPGMA algorithm was also adopted. Two independent dendrograms, one for the morphophysiological and one for molecular data were obtained, classifying the accessions into two and three main clusters, respectively. Despite the different number of the clusters there were many similarities between these two dendrograms, and a third dendrogram resulting from their combination was also produced, based on Gower's distance and UPGMA clustering algorithm. In order to determine the optimal number of clusters, the upper tail approach was applied. The more reliable clustering of the accessions was accomplished using RAPD markers as well as the combination of the two different data sets, classifying the accessions into three significantly different groups. These groups corresponded to the three different cultivated species of C. maxima Duch., C. moschata Duch., and C. pepo L. The same results were also obtained using Principal Component Analysis.A abobrinha de inverno compõe um cultivo agrícola com valor econômico determinado exercendo, no entanto, um papel importante em zonas caracterizadas por um cultivo menos intensivo. Na Grécia, o cultivo da abobrinha se baseia, principalmente, em variedades locais conservadas a muitos anos por agricultores locais. Uma parte do cultivo nuclear da abobrinha, que é conservada pelo Banco Grego de Genes, foi melhorada utilizando-se dados morfológicos e moleculares, especialmente dezesseis cultivos de abobrinha classificados incompletamente, que foram diferenciados apenas com base em características morfológicas, em relação a uma avaliação à resistência contra o Fusarium Oxysporum, em dois isolamentos. Foi realizada uma análise molecular utilizando DNA Polimórficos Casual Amplificados índices (RAPDs, revelando um alto nível de polimorfismo. Para estudar a diversidade genética entre a coleção de abobrinhas, um procedimento de agrupamento foi realizado usando-se o algoritmo U.P.G.M.A. Dois dendrogramas independentes, um morfofisiológico e outro para dados moleculares, foram coletados, classificando as coleções em dois e três grupos básicos, respectivamente. Apesar do número diferente dos grupos, foram introduzidas muitas semelhanças entre os dois dendrogramas e um terceiro dendrograma foi produzido como resultado da combinação dos dois primeiros, baseado na distância de Gower e no algoritmo de agrupamento U.P.G.M.A. Para determinar o número ótimo dos grupos, a aproximação "upper tail" foi aplicada. O grupo mais aceitável das coleções foi conseguido usando-se índices RAPD, assim como a combinação dos dois grupos de dados diferentes, classificando as coleções em três grupos consideravelmente diferentes. Os grupos que correspondem às três espécies cultivadas diferentemente, que correspondem às três espécies cultivadas diferentemente por C.máxima Duch., C.moschata Duch. e C. pepo L. além disso, os mesmos resultados foram conseguidos usando-se a "Principal Component Analysis".

  6. Description and analysis of genetic diversity among squash accessions

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Athanasios L., Tsivelikas; Olga, Koutita; Anastasia, Anastasiadou; George N., Skaracis; Ekaterini, Traka-Mavrona; Metaxia, Koutsika-Sotiriou.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available A abobrinha de inverno compõe um cultivo agrícola com valor econômico determinado exercendo, no entanto, um papel importante em zonas caracterizadas por um cultivo menos intensivo. Na Grécia, o cultivo da abobrinha se baseia, principalmente, em variedades locais conservadas a muitos anos por agricul [...] tores locais. Uma parte do cultivo nuclear da abobrinha, que é conservada pelo Banco Grego de Genes, foi melhorada utilizando-se dados morfológicos e moleculares, especialmente dezesseis cultivos de abobrinha classificados incompletamente, que foram diferenciados apenas com base em características morfológicas, em relação a uma avaliação à resistência contra o Fusarium Oxysporum, em dois isolamentos. Foi realizada uma análise molecular utilizando DNA Polimórficos Casual Amplificados índices (RAPDs), revelando um alto nível de polimorfismo. Para estudar a diversidade genética entre a coleção de abobrinhas, um procedimento de agrupamento foi realizado usando-se o algoritmo U.P.G.M.A. Dois dendrogramas independentes, um morfofisiológico e outro para dados moleculares, foram coletados, classificando as coleções em dois e três grupos básicos, respectivamente. Apesar do número diferente dos grupos, foram introduzidas muitas semelhanças entre os dois dendrogramas e um terceiro dendrograma foi produzido como resultado da combinação dos dois primeiros, baseado na distância de Gower e no algoritmo de agrupamento U.P.G.M.A. Para determinar o número ótimo dos grupos, a aproximação "upper tail" foi aplicada. O grupo mais aceitável das coleções foi conseguido usando-se índices RAPD, assim como a combinação dos dois grupos de dados diferentes, classificando as coleções em três grupos consideravelmente diferentes. Os grupos que correspondem às três espécies cultivadas diferentemente, que correspondem às três espécies cultivadas diferentemente por C.máxima Duch., C.moschata Duch. e C. pepo L. além disso, os mesmos resultados foram conseguidos usando-se a "Principal Component Analysis". Abstract in english In this work, the part of the squash core collection, maintained in the Greek Gene Bank, was assessed using the morphological and molecular data. Sixteen incompletely classified accessions of the squash were characterized along with an evaluation of their resistance against two isolates of Fusarium [...] oxysporum. A molecular analysis using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers was also performed, revealing high level of polymorphism. To study the genetic diversity among the squash accessions, a clustering procedure using Unweighed Pair Group Method and Arithmetic Average (UPGMA) algorithm was also adopted. Two independent dendrograms, one for the morphophysiological and one for molecular data were obtained, classifying the accessions into two and three main clusters, respectively. Despite the different number of the clusters there were many similarities between these two dendrograms, and a third dendrogram resulting from their combination was also produced, based on Gower's distance and UPGMA clustering algorithm. In order to determine the optimal number of clusters, the upper tail approach was applied. The more reliable clustering of the accessions was accomplished using RAPD markers as well as the combination of the two different data sets, classifying the accessions into three significantly different groups. These groups corresponded to the three different cultivated species of C. maxima Duch., C. moschata Duch., and C. pepo L. The same results were also obtained using Principal Component Analysis.

  7. Genetic diversity of Heterobasidion spp. in Scots pine, Norway spruce and European silver fir stands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr ?akomy

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of genetic diversity of Heterobasidion spp. in Scots pine, Norway spruce and European silver fir stands indicated that almost all of identified genets occurring in those stands were small and occupied only a single stump. In some cases two, three or even four genets could effectively exist in an individual stump. Genetic similarity of H. annosum s.s. genets varied from 0% to 62%, H. parviporum from 0% to 38% and H. abietinum from 0% to 55%. The oldest and biggest genet was found in laying fir log and overgrew the wood for at least 14 years. This genet belonged to H. abietinum. The size of genets was related to thinning operation, spore dispersal, age of stand or competition in wood colonization.

  8. Measurement of quantitative species diversity on reclaimed coal mine lands: A brief overview of the Wyoming regulatory proposal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Wyoming Land Quality Division (LQD) Coal Rules and Regulations require mine operators to specify quantitative procedures for evaluating postmining species diversity and composition. Currently, permit commitments range from deferring to commit to a quantitative procedure until some future date to applying various similarity/diversity indices for comparison of reclaimed lands to native vegetation communities. Therefore, the LQD began trying to develop a standardized procedure to evaluate species diversity and composition, while providing operator flexibility. Review of several technical publications on the use of similarity and diversity indices, and other measurement techniques indicate that a consensus has not been reached on which procedure is most appropriate for use on reclaimed mine lands. In addition, implementation of many of the recommended procedures are not practical with regards to staff and data limitations. As a result, the LQD has developed an interim procedure, based on site-specific baseline data, to evaluate postmining species diversity and composition success with respect to bond release requests. This paper reviews many of the recommended procedures, outlines some of the pros and cons, and provides a specific example of how the proposed interim procedure was applied to an actual coal mine permit. Implementation of this or a similar procedure would allow for site-specific standardization of permits and regulatory requirements, thus reducing review time and reducing some of the subjectivity surrounding a component of the Wyoming bond release requirements

  9. Population structure and genetic diversity of black redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei) in a highly fragmented watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, S.M.; Wilson, C.C.; Mandrak, N.E.; Carl, L.M.

    2008-01-01

    Dams have the potential to affect population size and connectivity, reduce genetic diversity, and increase genetic differences among isolated riverine fish populations. Previous research has reported adverse effects on the distribution and demographics of black redhorse (Moxostoma duquesnei), a threatened fish species in Canada. However, effects on genetic diversity and population structure are unknown. We used microsatellite DNA markers to assess the number of genetic populations in the Grand River (Ontario) and to test whether dams have resulted in a loss of genetic diversity and increased genetic differentiation among populations. Three hundred and seventy-seven individuals from eight Grand River sites were genotyped at eight microsatellite loci. Measures of genetic diversity were moderately high and not significantly different among populations; strong evidence of recent population bottlenecks was not detected. Pairwise FST and exact tests identified weak (global FST = 0.011) but statistically significant population structure, although little population structuring was detected using either genetic distances or an individual-based clustering method. Neither geographic distance nor the number of intervening dams were correlated with pairwise differences among populations. Tests for regional equilibrium indicate that Grand River populations were either in equilibrium between gene flow and genetic drift or that gene flow is more influential than drift. While studies on other species have identified strong dam-related effects on genetic diversity and population structure, this study suggests that barrier permeability, river fragment length and the ecological characteristics of affected species can counterbalance dam-related effects. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  10. Genetic diversity of Sardinian goat population based on microsatellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Carta

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the last century, the selection for production traits of the main livestock species has led to a reduction in number of local populations with consequent loss of genetic variability. In Sardinia, the genetic improvement strategy has been based on selection for the local pure breed in sheep, whereas in the other species (cattle, swine and goat, an often unplanned crossbreeding with improved breeds has been applied.

  11. Molecular Genetic Diversity of the Gyeongju Donggyeong Dog in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Eun-Woo; CHOI, Seong-Kyoon; CHO, Gil-Jae

    2014-01-01

    The present study was conducted to analyze the genetic characteristics of the Donggyeong dog and establish parentage conservation systems for it by using 10 microsatellite markers recommended by the International Society for Animal Genetics (ISAG). A total of 369 dogs from 12 dog breeds including the Donggyeong dog were genotyped using 10 microsatellite loci. The number of alleles per locus varied from 5 to 10 with a mean value of 7.6 in the Donggyeong dog. The observed hete...

  12. Genetic diversity among sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) varieties using molecular markers

    OpenAIRE

    John J. Riascos; Jorge I. Victoria; Fernando Angel

    2007-01-01

    The genetic base of today's sugarcane cultivars appears to be narrow and could be the reason for current slow progress in improving sugarcane crops. Sixty-three primer pairs (producing 263 polymorphic fragments) flanking simple sequence repeats or micro-satellites were used for assessing the genetic variability of five S. officinarum clones and 33 sugarcane cultivars used in CENICAÑA breeding projects, selected for their economic and agronomic im-portance in several Central and South-American...

  13. Spectrum of genetic diversity and networks of clonal organisms

    OpenAIRE

    Rozenfeld, Alejandro F.; Arnaud-Haond, Sophie; Hernández-García, Emilio; Eguíluz, Víctor M; Matías, Manuel A; Serrão, Ester A.; Duarte, Carlos M.

    2007-01-01

    Clonal reproduction characterizes a wide range of species including clonal plants in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems, and clonal microbes, such as bacteria and parasitic protozoa, with a key role in human health and ecosystem processes. Clonal organisms present a particular challenge in population genetics because, in addition to the possible existence of replicates of the same genotype in a given sample, some of the hypotheses and concepts underlying classical population genetics models a...

  14. Genetic Diversity in Mazandaranian Native Cattle: A Comparison with Holstein Cattle, using ISSR Marker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Pashaei

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was carried out to investigate genetic diversity in Mazandaranian native cattle population comparised to the Holstein breed, using Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR marker. A total of 175 animals, including 71 native and 104 cattle of Holstein breed were screened. The extraction of DNA samples were carried out, using modified salting out method. A 19-mer oligonucleotide, (GA9C, was used as primer in PCR reactions. The PCR products showed 15 different fragments with length ranged from 120 to1600 bp in the two breeds.. Genetic variation indexes, including effective number of alleles, Shannon index, Nei’s gene diversity and standard genetic distance were estimated, using POPGene software. Generally, the estimated genetic variation indexes showed low levels of diversity in the two breeds. However, Nei's gene diversity and Shannon index estimation was observed almost two folds in native cattle compared to Holstein breed. Less levels of diversity in Holstein cattle may be because of applying intensive selection programs. Conversely, native cattle have been less affected by selection. Therefore, it seems that Mazandaranian native cattle probably are better for breeding programs than Holstein cattle. Results showed that ISSR Markers are reliable and can be used in genetic diversity investigations.

  15. Genetic diversity and structure found in samples of Eritrean bread wheat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Desta, Zeratsion Abera; Orabi, Jihad

    2014-01-01

    Genetic diversity and structure plays a key role in the selection of parents for crosses in plant breeding programmes. The aim of the present study was to analyse the genetic diversity and structure of Eritrean bread wheat accessions. We analysed 284 wheat accessions from Eritrea using 30 simple sequence repeat markers. A total of 539 alleles were detected. The allele number per locus ranged from 2 to 21, with a mean allele number of 9.2. The average genetic diversity index was 0.66, with values ranging from 0.01 to 0.89. Comparing the three genomes of wheat, the B genome had the highest genetic diversity (0.66) and the D genome the lowest diversity (0.61). A STRUCTURE analysis based on the Bayesian model-based cluster analysis followed by a graphical representation of the distances by non-parametric multidimensional scaling revealed a distinct partition of the Eritrean wheat accessions into two major groups. This is the first report of the genetic diversity and structure of Eritrean bread wheat. © 2013 NIAB.

  16. Stress-related hormones and genetic diversity in sea otters (Enhydra lutris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, S.; Monson, D.; Ballachey, B.; Jameson, R.; Wasser, S.K.

    2009-01-01

    Sea otters (Enhydra lutris) once ranged throughout the coastal regions of the north Pacific, but were extirpated throughout their range during the fur trade of the 18th and 19th centuries, leaving only small, widely scattered, remnant populations. All extant sea otter populations are believed to have experienced a population bottleneck and thus have lost genetic variation. Populations that undergo severe population reduction and associated inbreeding may suffer from a general reduction in fitness termed inbreeding depression. Inbreeding depression may result in decreased testosterone levels in males, and reduced ability to respond to stressful stimuli associated with an increase in the stress-related adrenal glucocorticoid hormones, cortisol and corticosterone. We investigated correlations of testosterone, cortisol, and corticosterone with genetic diversity in sea otters from five populations. We found a significant negative correlation between genetic diversity and both mean population-level (r2 = 0.27, P < 0.001) and individual-level (r2 = 0.54, P < 0.001) corticosterone values, as well as a negative correlation between genetic diversity and cortisol at the individual level (r2 = 0.17, P = 0.04). No relationship was found between genetic diversity and testosterone (P = 0.57). The strength of the correlations, especially with corticosterone, suggests potential negative consequences for overall population health, particularly for populations with the lowest genetic diversity. ?? 2009 by the Society for Marine Mammalogy.

  17. Low genetic diversity in Melanaphis sacchari aphid populations at the worldwide scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nibouche, Samuel; Fartek, Benjamin; Mississipi, Stelly; Delatte, Hélène; Reynaud, Bernard; Costet, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    Numerous studies have examined the genetic diversity and genetic structure of invading species, with contrasting results concerning the relative roles of genetic diversity and phenotypic plasticity in the success of introduced populations. Increasing evidence shows that asexual lineages of aphids are able to occupy a wide geographical and ecological range of habitats despite low genetic diversity. The anholocyclic aphid Melanaphis sacchari is a pest of sugarcane and sorghum which originated in the old world, was introduced into the Americas, and is now distributed worldwide. Our purpose was to assess the genetic diversity and structuring of populations of this species according to host and locality. We used 10 microsatellite markers to genotype 1333 individuals (57 samples, 42 localities, 15 countries) collected mainly on sugarcane or sorghum. Five multilocus lineages (MLL) were defined, grouping multilocus genotypes (MLG) differing by only a few mutations or scoring errors. Analysis of a 658 bp sequence of mitochondrial COI gene on 96 individuals revealed five haplotypes, with a mean divergence of only 0.19 %. The distribution of MLL appeared to be strongly influenced by geography but not by host plant. Each of the five MLL grouped individuals from (A) Africa, (B) Australia, (C) South America, the Caribbean and the Indian Ocean including East Africa, (D) USA, and (E) China. The MLL A and C, with a wide geographic distribution, matched the definition of superclone. Among aphids, M. sacchari has one of the lowest known rates of genetic diversity for such a wide geographical distribution. PMID:25148510

  18. Ancient Male Recombination Shaped Genetic Diversity of Neo-Y Chromosome in Drosophila albomicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satomura, Kazuhiro; Tamura, Koichiro

    2016-02-01

    Researchers studying Y chromosome evolution have drawn attention to neo-Y chromosomes in Drosophila species due to their resembling the initial stage of Y chromosome evolution. In the studies of neo-Y chromosome of Drosophila miranda, the extremely low genetic diversity observed suggested various modes of natural selection acting on the nonrecombining genome. However, alternative possibility may come from its peculiar origin from a single chromosomal fusion event with male achiasmy, which potentially caused and maintained the low genetic diversity of the neo-Y chromosome. Here, we report a real case where a neo-Y chromosome is in transition from an autosome to a typical Y chromosome. The neo-Y chromosome of Drosophila albomicans harbored a rich genetic diversity comparable to its gametologous neo-X chromosome and an autosome in the same genome. Analyzing sequence variations in 53 genes and measuring recombination rates between pairs of loci by cross experiments, we elucidated the evolutionary scenario of the neo-Y chromosome of D. albomicans having high genetic diversity without assuming selective force, i.e., it originated from a single chromosomal fusion event, experienced meiotic recombination during the initial stage of evolution and diverged from neo-X chromosome by the suppression of recombination tens or a few hundreds of thousand years ago. Consequently, the observed high genetic diversity on the neo-Y chromosome suggested a strong effect of meiotic recombination to introduce genetic variations into the newly arisen sex chromosome. PMID:26494844

  19. Stable genetic diversity despite parasite and pathogen spread in honey bee colonies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jara, Laura; Muñoz, Irene; Cepero, Almudena; Martín-Hernández, Raquel; Serrano, José; Higes, Mariano; De la Rúa, Pilar

    2015-10-01

    In the last decades, the rapid spread of diseases, such as varroosis and nosemosis, associated with massive honey bee colonies mortality around the world has significantly decreased the number and size of honey bee populations and possibly their genetic diversity. Here, we compare the genetic diversity of Iberian honey bee colonies in two samplings performed in 2006 and 2010 in relation to the presence of the pathogenic agents Nosema apis, Nosema ceranae, and Varroa destructor in order to determine whether parasite and pathogen spread in honey bee colonies reflects changes in genetic diversity. We found that the genetic diversity remained similar, while the incidence of N. ceranae increased and the incidence of N. apis and V. destructor decreased slightly. These results indicate that the genetic diversity was not affected by the presence of these pathogenic agents in the analyzed period. However, the two groups of colonies with and without Nosema/Varroa detected showed significant genetic differentiation (G test). A detailed analysis of the allelic segregation of microsatellite loci in Nosema/Varroa-negative colonies and parasitized ones revealed two outlier loci related to genes involved in immune response.

  20. Hitchhiker’s guide to genetic diversity in socially structured populations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. PREMO

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available When selection increases the frequency of a beneficial gene substitution it can also increase the frequencies of linked neutral alleles through a process called genetic hitchhiking. A model built to investigate reduced genetic diversity in Pleistocene hominins shows that genetic hitchhiking can have a strong effect on neutral diversity in the presence of culturally mediated migration. Under conditions in which genetic and cultural variants are transmitted symmetrically, neutral genes may also hitchhike to higher frequencies on the coattails of adaptive cultural traits through a process called cultural hitchhiking. Cultural hitchhiking has been proposed to explain why some species of matrilineal whales display relatively low levels of mitochondrial DNA diversity, and it may be applicable to humans as well. This paper provides a critical review of recent models of both types of hitch­­hi­king in socially structured populations. The models’ assumptions and predictions are compared and discussed in the hope that studies of reduced genetic diversity in humans might improve our understanding of reduced genetic diversity in other species, and vice versa [Current Zoology 58 (1: 287-297, 2012].

  1. Endemic and widespread coral reef fishes have similar mitochondrial genetic diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrieu-Trottin, Erwan; Maynard, Jeffrey; Planes, Serge

    2014-12-22

    Endemic species are frequently assumed to have lower genetic diversity than species with large distributions, even if closely related. This assumption is based on research from the terrestrial environment and theoretical evolutionary modelling. We test this assumption in the marine environment by analysing the mitochondrial genetic diversity of 33 coral reef fish species from five families sampled from Pacific Ocean archipelagos. Surprisingly, haplotype and nucleotide diversity did not differ significantly between endemic and widespread species. The probable explanation is that the effective population size of some widespread fishes locally is similar to that of many of the endemics. Connectivity across parts of the distribution of the widespread species is probably low, so widespread species can operate like endemics at the extreme or isolated parts of their range. Mitochondrial genetic diversity of many endemic reef fish species may not either limit range size or be a source of vulnerability. PMID:25355471

  2. Genetic diversity loss in a biodiversity hotspot: ancient DNA quantifies genetic decline and former connectivity in a critically endangered marsupial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacioni, Carlo; Hunt, Helen; Allentoft, Morten E; Vaughan, Timothy G; Wayne, Adrian F; Baynes, Alexander; Haouchar, Dalal; Dortch, Joe; Bunce, Michael

    2015-12-01

    The extent of genetic diversity loss and former connectivity between fragmented populations are often unknown factors when studying endangered species. While genetic techniques are commonly applied in extant populations to assess temporal and spatial demographic changes, it is no substitute for directly measuring past diversity using ancient DNA (aDNA). We analysed both mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and nuclear microsatellite loci from 64 historical fossil and skin samples of the critically endangered Western Australian woylie (Bettongia penicillata ogilbyi), and compared them with 231 (n = 152 for mtDNA) modern samples. In modern woylie populations 15 mitochondrial control region (CR) haplotypes were identified. Interestingly, mtDNA CR data from only 29 historical samples demonstrated 15 previously unknown haplotypes and detected an extinct divergent clade. Through modelling, we estimated the loss of CR mtDNA diversity to be between 46% and 91% and estimated this to have occurred in the past 2000-4000 years in association with a dramatic population decline. In addition, we obtained near-complete 11-loci microsatellite profiles from 21 historical samples. In agreement with the mtDNA data, a number of 'new' microsatellite alleles was only detected in the historical populations despite extensive modern sampling, indicating a nuclear genetic diversity loss >20%. Calculations of genetic diversity (heterozygosity and allelic rarefaction) showed that these were significantly higher in the past and that there was a high degree of gene flow across the woylie's historical range. These findings have an immediate impact on how the extant populations are managed and we recommend the implementation of an assisted migration programme to prevent further loss of genetic diversity. Our study demonstrates the value of integrating aDNA data into current-day conservation strategies. PMID:26497007

  3. Effect of fluoride pollution on genetic diversity of a medicinal tree, Syzygium cumini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Suphiya; Baunthiyal, Mamta; Kumari, Alka; Sharma, Vinay

    2012-07-01

    Syzygium cumini Linn. (Myrtaceae) is a medicinal tree (Jamun) used worldwide in treatment of diabetes. However, no molecular data is available on genetic polymorphism and its relationship, if any with fluoride pollution. In the present study, the genetic variability of two populations of S. cumini growing in fluoride rich soils and normal soils located in Rajasthan and Haryana regions of India, respectively was determined using random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers. Different measures of diversity in Rajasthan populations: Shannon's index of phenotypic diversity (I) = 0.440; Nei's genetic diversity (h) = 0.292; effective number of alleles per locus (Ne) = 1.497; total species diversity (Hsp) = 0.307 and within population diversity (Hpop) = 0.158 showed high diversity in comparison to Haryana populations. Thus, it seems that Rajasthan population responds with increased genetic variation resulting possibly from new mutation that affect allele frequencies as a consequence of adaptation to contaminated environment. This may imply that the increased diversity levels may act as a buffer to combat fluoride stress. Cluster analysis and principal component analysis (PCA) results showed mixing between the populations. PMID:23360002

  4. Genetic diversity of domestic pigs as revealed by microsatellites: a mini review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Moran

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Of the several hundred breeds of pigs in the world, many are in danger of extinction and others are threatened by inefficient use or loss due to cross breeding. Special efforts are required to conserve these genetic resources for food security and rural development but it is not possible to conserve all breeds. Microsatellites, which are short tandem nucleotide repeats found scattered throughout the genome of eukaryotes, have been used to evaluate genetic diversity present within livestock populations to assist in rationalising breed conservation programmes and ensure the greatest possible conservation of diversity. This review provides insights into the use of microsatellite markers to reveal origin, genetic structure and diversity within and across various domestic pig breeds around the world. However, in future, microsatellites may be replaced by panels of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP markers for genome-wide population genetic analysis. Meanwhile, microsatellites are still widely employed and for some species may never be replaced by SNP.

  5. Genetic diversity in natural populations of Theobroma subincanum Mart. in the Brazilian Amazon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas, L H; Giustina, L D; Luz, L N; Karsburg, I V; Pereira, T N S; Rossi, A A B

    2013-01-01

    The genus Theobroma, recently reclassified in the family Malvaceae, comprises some species with high economic potential, including the cupuí, Theobroma subincanum Mart., which has not yet been domesticated, and whose genetics and population structure are mostly unknown. This study aimed to assess the population structure and genetic diversity in natural populations of T. subincanum Mart., using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. A total of 59 individuals were sampled in three geographically separate populations, CFA, CMN, and CPT. Nei's genetic distance was estimated to characterize populations with the use of 13 polymorphic primers. The analysis of molecular variance revealed that the variability between populations (51.71%) was higher than that within populations (48.29%). Among the three populations, CPT showed the highest diversity index and percentage of polymorphism. The ISSR molecular markers were efficient and presented sufficient polymorphism to estimate genetic diversity in populations of T. subincanum Mart. PMID:24301761

  6. Assessment of genetic diversity in maize inbred lines using RAPD markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Cristina Bruel

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available RAPD molecular markers were used to analyze genetic diversity between 16 corn lines. Twenty-two primerswere used resulting in the amplification of 265 fragments, of which 237 (84.44% were polymorphic. Using the UPGMAmethod the genetic associations obtained showed 5 distinct heterotic groups. A principal coordinates analysis also showed anassociation of lines in 5 groups, in agreement with the results observed in the dendrogram. A bootstrap procedure wasapplied to verify whether the amount of markers used was sufficient to ensure reliability of the results, the procedure showeda coefficient of variation of 8.3%, suggesting that the markers were sufficient to assess genetic diversity between the analyzedlines. The high rate of polymorphism between lines revealed by RAPD markers indicated that the method is efficient to analyzegenetic diversity in corn lines and that the genetic divergence can be used to establish consistent heterotic groups between cornlines.

  7. The genetic diversity of the mangrove kandelia obovata in China revealed by ISSR analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The genetic diversity of 7 populations of Kandelia obovata in China was characterized using inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) technique. A total of 50 primers were screened, of which 9 polymorphic and informative patterns were selected to determine genetic relationships. ISSR amplification was conducted on 140 individuals from 7 populations, and 88 polymorphic loci were detected from 106 total loci. The total percentage of polymorphic loci (PPL) was 83.02%. The percentage of PPL at the population level ranged from 32.08% to 47.17%, with an average of 39.89%. Nei's gene diversity (H) and Shannon's information index (I) of K. obovata at the species level were 0.3631 and 0.5203, respectively. The genetic differentiation coefficient (Gst) among populations was 0.5548. Among populations component accounted for 55.48% of the total variation, whereas the within populations component accounted for 44.52%, suggesting that genetic differentiation among K. obovata populations was relatively high. The gene flow among populations was 0.4012, indicating that gene flow was low among geographically diverse populations of K. obovata. The results of the genetic diversity and cluster analysis suggest that geographical isolation of K. obovata populations mainly results in low gene flow and random genetic drift, leading to genetic differentiation. (author)

  8. Greater Genetic Diversity in Spatially Restricted Coral Reef Fishes Suggests Secondary Contact among Differentiated Lineages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Julian Caley

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of genetic diversity is a central goal of conservation. It is the raw material for evolutionary change and if lost, can accelerate extinction of species. According to theory, total genetic diversity should be less in species with restricted ranges and in populations on the margins of distributional ranges, making such species or populations more vulnerable to environmental perturbations. Using mtDNA and nuclear Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR data we investigated how the genetic diversity and structure of three con-generic species pairs of coral reef fishes (Pomacentridae was related to species’ range size and position of populations within these ranges. Estimates of genetic structure did not differ significantly among species, but mtDNA and nucDNA genetic diversities were up to 10 times greater in spatially restricted species compared to their widespread congeners. In two of the three species pairs, the distribution of genetic variation indicated secondary contact among differentiated lineages in the spatially restricted species. In contrast, the widespread species displayed a typical signature of population expansion suggesting recent genetic bottlenecks, possibly associated with the (re colonization of the Great Barrier Reef. These results indicate that historical processes, involving hybridization and founder effects, possibly associated with Pleistocene sea level fluctuations, have differentially influenced the widespread and spatially restricted coral reef damselfish species studied here.

  9. Low genetic diversity and minimal population substructure in the endangered Florida manatee: implications for conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Kimberly Pause; Hunter, Margaret E.; Bonde, Robert K.; Austin, James D.; Clark, Ann Marie; Beck, Cathy A.; McGuire, Peter M.; Oli, Madan K.

    2012-01-01

    Species of management concern that have been affected by human activities typically are characterized by low genetic diversity, which can adversely affect their ability to adapt to environmental changes. We used 18 microsatellite markers to genotype 362 Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris), and investigated genetic diversity, population structure, and estimated genetically effective population size (Ne). The observed and expected heterozygosity and average number of alleles were 0.455 ± 0.04, 0.479 ± 0.04, and 4.77 ± 0.51, respectively. All measures of Florida manatee genetic diversity were less than averages reported for placental mammals, including fragmented or nonideal populations. Overall estimates of differentiation were low, though significantly greater than zero, and analysis of molecular variance revealed that over 95% of the total variance was among individuals within predefined management units or among individuals along the coastal subpopulations, with only minor portions of variance explained by between group variance. Although genetic issues, as inferred by neutral genetic markers, appear not to be critical at present, the Florida manatee continues to face demographic challenges due to anthropogenic activities and stochastic factors such as red tides, oil spills, and disease outbreaks; these can further reduce genetic diversity of the manatee population.

  10. Measurement of genetic diversity of virulence in populations of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debabrata Nayak

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This work was designed to ascertain the extent of genetic diversity in the pathogen population of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo, the causal organism of bacterial blight of rice. The virulence of 52 strains of Xoo, collected from 12 rice growing states of India, were clip-inoculated on 16 rice genotypes possessing known genes for resistance. Based on the genetic distance, estimated by multivariate analysis isolates of Xoo could be classified into 13 clusters and five broad groups. The genetic variability of virulence in populations of Xoo was also measured by estimation of diversity indices viz. Shannon’s information function (H’, Levin’s diversity index (B, Hill’s generalized entropy (H2, trophic diversity index (D, dominance of virulence factors (?, the index of evenness or equitability (JH,, genetic richness index (d and normalized pathotypic diversity index (Hn. Wide genetic diversity in the pathogen populations from the country as well as from the eastern and southern regions was indicated by high estimates of H', B, H2, D, ?, d and low JH,. High estimates of Hn were attained for almost all populations of Xoo. With regard to the states, genotypic and pathotypic diversities were high in Andhra Pradesh and Orissa, while pathotypic diversity was high in the pathogen population from Gujarat, Punjab, Madhya Pradesh, Uttar Pradesh and Tamil Nadu. The existence of high diversities and the grouping of the pathogen isolates into clusters of similar in virulence facilitated a better understanding of the population structure of Xoo, to guide regional rice breeding programs and the deployment of resistance genes in disease control strategy.

  11. Entropy and Information Approaches to Genetic Diversity and its Expression: Genomic Geography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William B. Sherwin

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available This article highlights advantages of entropy-based genetic diversity measures, at levels from gene expression to landscapes. Shannon’s entropy-based diversity is the standard for ecological communities. The exponentials of Shannon’s and the related “mutual information” excel in their ability to express diversity intuitively, and provide a generalised method of considering microscopic behaviour to make macroscopic predictions, under given conditions. The hierarchical nature of entropy and information allows integrated modeling of diversity along one DNA sequence, and between different sequences within and among populations, species, etc. The aim is to identify the formal connections between genetic diversity and the flow of information to and from the environment.

  12. Evaluation of genetic diversity in Piper spp using RAPD and SRAP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Y; Liu, J-P

    2011-01-01

    Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) analysis were applied to 74 individual plants of Piper spp in Hainan Island. The results showed that the SRAP technique may be more informative and more efficient and effective for studying genetic diversity of Piper spp than the RAPD technique. The overall level of genetic diversity among Piper spp in Hainan was relatively high, with the mean Shannon diversity index being 0.2822 and 0.2909, and the mean Nei's genetic diversity being 0.1880 and 0.1947, calculated with RAPD and SRAP data, respectively. The ranges of the genetic similarity coefficient were 0.486-0.991 and 0.520-1.000 for 74 individual plants of Piper spp (the mean genetic distance was 0.505 and 0.480) and the within-species genetic distance ranged from 0.063 to 0.291 and from 0.096 to 0.234, estimated with RAPD and SRAP data, respectively. These genetic indices indicated that these species are closely related genetically. The dendrogram generated with the RAPD markers was topologically different from the dendrogram based on SRAP markers, but the SRAP technique clearly distinguished all Piper spp from each other. Evaluation of genetic variation levels of six populations showed that the effective number of alleles, Nei's gene diversity and the Shannon information index within Jianfengling and Diaoluoshan populations are higher than those elsewhere; consequently conservation of wild resources of Piper in these two regions should have priority. PMID:22179965

  13. Small population size and extremely low levels of genetic diversity in island populations of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlan, Elise; Stoklosa, J; Griffiths, J; Gust, N; Ellis, R; Huggins, R M; Weeks, A R

    2012-01-01

    Genetic diversity generally underpins population resilience and persistence. Reductions in population size and absence of gene flow can lead to reductions in genetic diversity, reproductive fitness, and a limited ability to adapt to environmental change increasing the risk of extinction. Island populations are typically small and isolated, and as a result, inbreeding and reduced genetic diversity elevate their extinction risk. Two island populations of the platypus, Ornithorhynchus anatinus, exist; a naturally occurring population on King Island in Bass Strait and a recently introduced population on Kangaroo Island off the coast of South Australia. Here we assessed the genetic diversity within these two island populations and contrasted these patterns with genetic diversity estimates in areas from which the populations are likely to have been founded. On Kangaroo Island, we also modeled live capture data to determine estimates of population size. Levels of genetic diversity in King Island platypuses are perilously low, with eight of 13 microsatellite loci fixed, likely reflecting their small population size and prolonged isolation. Estimates of heterozygosity detected by microsatellites (HE= 0.032) are among the lowest level of genetic diversity recorded by this method in a naturally outbreeding vertebrate population. In contrast, estimates of genetic diversity on Kangaroo Island are somewhat higher. However, estimates of small population size and the limited founders combined with genetic isolation are likely to lead to further losses of genetic diversity through time for the Kangaroo Island platypus population. Implications for the future of these and similarly isolated or genetically depauperate populations are discussed. PMID:22837830

  14. Genetic diversity, population structure, conservation and utilization of Theobroma cacao L., genetic resources in the Dominican Republic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacao (Theobroma cacao L.) is a significant agricultural commodity in the Dominican Republic, which ranks 11th in the world and number one in organic cacao exports. In an effort to identify propagation mistakes, and estimate genetic diversity and population structure in cacao germplasm accessions a...

  15. Estimation of Genetic Diversity of Four Chrysanthemum Mini Cultivars Using RAPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chatterjee

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study was to estimate the genetic relationship among the different Chrysanthemum cultivars with relation to their morphological and biochemical characteristics and geographical distribution. DNA fingerprinting using RAPD is very easy and inexpensive way to study the genetic diversity. Genetic distance between four mini Chrysanthemum cultivars was studied through RAPD analysis. Total of 40 primers have been screened from which four have been trailed for all the four genotypes. Similarity among the cultivars was very high showing low genetic diversity, which is quite expected. One of these primers can differentiate cultivars from each other. So RAPD can be used successfully to estimate the genetic distance and also for the species identification.

  16. Genetic diversity detection of the domestic horse (Equus caballus by genes associated with coat color

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luz Correa A

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To assess the population structure and genetic diversity in populations of domestic horse (Equus caballus in the municipality Cienaga de Oro-Córdoba (Colombia. Materials and methods. Random sampling were conducted between August and October 2013, in adult animals on farms seven districts, which was carried out phenotypic characterization of each animal, based on autosomal markers encoding morphological Extension (E , Agouti (A, Cream (C, White (W, Gray (G, Tobiano (TO, Overo (O and Roan (RN. Population genetic parameters: allele frequency, genetic diversity, gene flow, Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and genetic distance were calculated through the program POPGENE 1.31; the genetic structure was assessed using the program FSTAT v. 2.9.3.2. Results. 341 individuals were analyzed in the seven populations studied, where the Extension gene Was the MOST faq frequently as the Overo and Tobiano genes showed the lowest values. Insignificant values of genetic variability and population recorded a global level, likewise, low genetic differentiation among populations, accompanied by a high gene flow was obtained; an excess of heterozygotes at population and global level was observed; to this is added the presence of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in all populations relative to the markers studied and low genetic distance values were reported. Conclusions. The populations are highly genetically related, a situation that may result from the existing geographical proximity between them, favoring genetic exchange and the establishment of a metapopulation.

  17. Enhancing genetic diversity through induced mutagenesis in vegetatively propagated plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventionally, crop improvement strategies rely not only on the availability of heritable genetic variations within utilisable genetic backgrounds but also on the transferability of the traits they control through hybridizations between the parental stocks. Procedures for producing hybrids of sexually reproducing plants are routine while for vegetatively propagated plants, hybridizations are usually impractical. The improvement of crops that lack botanical seeds necessitate therefore alternative strategies for generating and utilizing genetic variations. Induced mutagenesis generates allelic variants of genes that modulate the expression of traits. Some of the major drawbacks to the widespread use of induced mutations for vegetatively propagated plants include the difficulties of heterozygosity of the genetic backgrounds; the incidence of chimeras; and the confounding effects of linkage drags in putative mutants. In general, the inherent inefficiencies of the economies of time and space associated with induced mutagenesis are further exacerbated in vegetatively propagated crops mostly on account of the need for continual propagation. We highlight the mitigating roles on these drawbacks of the judicious integration of validated biotechnologies and other high throughput forward genetics assays in induced mutagenesis pipelines. Using cassava and banana as models, we demonstrate the use of cellular and tissue biology to achieve homozygosity, minimise or eliminate chimeras, and significantly shorten the duration of the generation of mutants. Additionally, the use of these biotechnologies to attain significantly reduced propagation footprints while evaluating putative mutants without compromising population size is also presented. We also posit that molecular biology approaches, especially reverse genetics and transcriptome assays, contributes significantly to enhancing the efficiency levels of the induced mutagenesis processes. The implications for crop improvement and functional genomics via the concerted application of biotechnologies in the generation, identification, and the tagging of mutation events in the genomes of vegetatively propagated crops are also discussed. (author)

  18. Enhancing Genetic Diversity Through Induced Mutagenesis in Vegetatively Propagated Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventionally, crop improvement strategies rely not only on the availability of heritable genetic variations within utilizable genetic backgrounds, but also on the transferability of the traits they control through hybridizations between the parental stocks. Procedures for producing hybrids of sexually reproducing plants are routine, while for vegetatively propagated plants, hybridizations are usually impractical. Therefore, the improvement of crops that lack botanical seeds necessitates alternative strategies for generating and utilizing genetic variations. Induced mutagenesis generates allelic variants of genes that modulate the expression of traits. Some of the major drawbacks to the widespread use of induced mutations for vegetatively propagated plants include the difficulties of heterozygosity of the genetic backgrounds, the incidence of chimeras and the confounding effects of linkage drags in putative mutants. In general, the inherent inefficiencies of time and space economies associated with induced mutagenesis are further exacerbated in vegetatively propagated crops mostly on account of the need for continual propagation. We highlight the mitigating roles on these drawbacks of judicious integration of validated biotechnologies and other high throughput forward genetics assays in induced mutagenesis pipelines. Using cassava and banana as models, we demonstrate the use of cell and tissue biology to achieve homozygosity, minimize or eliminate chimeras, and significantly shorten the duration of the generation of mutants. Additionally, use of these biotechnologies to attain significantly reduced propagation footprints while evaluating putative mutants without compromising population size is also presented. We also posit that molecular biology approaches, especially reverse genetics and transcriptome assays, contribute significantly to enhancing the efficiency levels of the induced mutagenesis processes. The implications for crop improvement and functional genomics via the concerted application of biotechnologies in the generation, identification, and tagging of mutation events in the genomes of vegetatively propagated crops are also discussed. (author)

  19. High genetic diversity and small genetic variation among populations of Magnolia wufengensis (Magnoliaceae), revealed by ISSR and SRAP marker

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Liyuan, Chen; Faju, Chen; Suichao, He; Luyi, Ma.

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background Genetic diversity and genetic variation of 10 populations and subpopulations of Magnolia wufengensis, a new and endangered endemic species, were examined by inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) molecular markers. Compared with other endang [...] ered endemic Magnolia taxa, M. wufengensis holds a relatively high level of genetic variation. Result Total genetic diversity was found to be 87.7% for ISSR and 88.0% for SRAP markers. For polymorphic loci (P), the effective mean number of alleles (Ae) was 1.414 for ISSR markers and 1.458 for SRAP markers, while the mean expected heterozygosity (H) was 0.256 using ISSR and 0.291 for SRAP markers. Within-population variation was estimated for P as 74.9% using ISSR and 74.6% with SRAP markers; the number of alleles Ae was 1.379 with ISSR and 1.397 for SRAP and H 0.235 with ISSR and 0.247 for SRAP markers. Conclusion The analysis of molecular variation of both ISSR and SRAP marker systems indicated that most genetic variation is within populations, with values of 90.64% and 82.92% respectively. Mantel tests indicated a moderate association between the two marker systems and a low correlation between genetic and geographic distances. High levels of genetic diversity and low levels of population divergence suggest that genetic drift is not currently of great concern for this species. Severe habitat loss and fragmentation, predominantly ascribed to anthropogenic pressures, caused in-situ developing restriction of this species. Action for conserving this rare species for its long-term survival should be taken immediately.

  20. Genetic diversity in Algerian sheep breeds, using microsatellite markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two breeds - Ouled-Djellal and Hamra (85 animals) - were genotyped for 12 microsatellites using PCR and sequencing. Allele number and frequency were calculated, and 141 different alleles were found for these microsatellites, reflecting high genetic variability within these breeds. This study is being extended to other Algerian breeds to estimate variability and genetic distances between them. In parallel, blood samples from the various breeds are being collected to build up a DNA bank. The results should support establishment of a strategy to promote the use and development of locally adapted sheep resources. (author)

  1. Phosphorylation networks regulating JNK activity in diverse genetic backgrounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bakal, Chris; Linding, Rune; Llense, Flora; Heffern, Elleard; Martin-Blanco, Enrique; Pawson, Tony; Perrimon, Norbert

    2008-01-01

    Cellular signaling networks have evolved to enable swift and accurate responses, even in the face of genetic or environmental perturbation. Thus, genetic screens may not identify all the genes that regulate different biological processes. Moreover, although classical screening approaches have...... succeeded in providing parts lists of the essential components of signaling networks, they typically do not provide much insight into the hierarchical and functional relations that exist among these components. We describe a high-throughput screen in which we used RNA interference to systematically inhibit...

  2. Multiscale analysis of Hymenocallis coronaria (Amaryllidaceae) genetic diversity, genetic structure, and gene movement under the influence of unidirectional stream flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markwith, Scott H; Scanlon, Michael J

    2007-02-01

    Understanding gene movement patterns in unidirectional flow environments and their effect on patterns of genetic diversity and genetic structure is necessary to manage these systems. Hypotheses and models to explain genetic patterns in streams are rare, and the results of macrophyte studies are inconsistent. This study addresses Ritland's (Canadian Journal of Botany 67: 2017-2024) unidirectional diversity hypothesis, the one-dimensional stepping stone model, and the metapopulation model within and among populations. Hymenocallis coronaria, an aquatic macrophyte of rocky river shoals of the SE USA, was sampled in four river basins. Within populations and among populations <16.2 km apart had significant isolation by distance. However, the rate of gene flow decay was not consistent with a one-dimensional stepping stone model, nor was evidence strong or consistent for Ritland's hypothesis. Some evidence indicates that localized metapopulation processes may be affecting genetic diversity and structure; however, gene flow patterns inconsistent with the assumptions of the linear and unidirectional models are also a possible influence. We discuss three variants on the one-dimensional stepping stone model. Future research in linear environments should examine the expectations of these models. This study is also one of the first efforts to calculate population genetic parameters using a new program, TETRASAT. PMID:21642217

  3. Diversity and genetic structure in natural populations of Hancornia speciosa var. speciosa Gomes in northeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgia Vilela Martins

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Hancornia speciosa Gomes is a fruit tree native from Brazil that belongs to Apocinaceae family, and is popularly known as Mangabeira. Its fruits are widely consumed raw or processed as fruit jam, juices and ice creams, which have made it a target of intense exploitation. The extractive activities and intense human activity on the environment of natural occurrence of H. speciosa has caused genetic erosion in the species and little is known about the ecology or genetic structure of natural populations. The objective of this research was the evaluation of the genetic diversity and genetic structure of H. speciosa var. speciosa. The genetic variability was assessed using 11 allozyme loci with a sample of 164 individuals distributed in six natural populations located in the States of Pernambuco and Alagoas, Northeastern Brazil. The results showed a high level of genetic diversity within the species (e= 0.36 seeing that the most of the genetic variability of H. speciosa var. speciosa is within its natural populations with low difference among populations ( or = 0.081. The inbreeding values within ( = -0.555 and among populations ( =-0.428 were low showing lacking of endogamy and a surplus of heterozygotes. The estimated gene flow ( m was high, ranging from 2.20 to 13.18, indicating to be enough to prevent the effects of genetic drift and genetic differentiation among populations. The multivariate analyses indicated that there is a relationship between genetic and geographical distances, which was confirmed by a spatial pattern analysis using Mantel test (r = 0.3598; p = 0.0920 with 1000 random permutations. The high genetic diversity index in these populations indicates potential for in situ genetic conservation.

  4. Genetic diversity and relationships among Italian Merino derived breeds assessed by microsatellites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Maria Sarti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The conservation of genetic variability is one of the main objectives in the field of genetics applied to domestic livestock. Among molecular markers, microsatellites are particularly appreciated and widely utilized for the study of animal genome. In this study a genetic characterization of three Italian Merino derived sheep breeds was carried out by 30 microsatellites markers; the genetic relationships between these breeds and the Spanish ancestors were also investigated. All the microsatellites examined resulted polymorphic and a total of 375 alleles were detected. FIS values of the three Italian Merinos demonstrate a low level of inbreeding. The results show a good genetic variability of all the studied breeds; at the same time, the genetic identity of each breed is confirmed. These molecular data can be utilized to improve the present selection schemes and the plans to preserve genetic diversity.

  5. The Loss of Genetic Diversity: An Impending Global Issue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, James P.

    Definitions of biosphere and ecosystem are provided as the basis for understanding a problem that threatens to become (or already is) a global issue, namely, human activity which results in reducing the diversity of life forms present in the biosphere as an ecosystem. Two aspects of this problem are: (1) the growth of human populations worldwide…

  6. Genetic Diversity Analysis of CIMMYT Bread Wheat (Triticum aestivum L. Lines by SRAP Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ertugrul FILIZ

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic diversity is one of the key factors for the improvement of many crop plants including wheat. Many wheat scientistshave studied genetic diversity in wheat germplasm using different molecular markers which have provided a powerfulapproach to analyze genetic relationships among wheat germplasms. In this study, genetic diversity of CIMMYT(International maize and wheat improvement center bread wheat lines collected from Russia was evaluated using 30sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP primer combinations. 686 DNA band was obtained from the 23 primercombinations and approximately 90% of them were found to be polymorphic. Ratio of polymorphic loci, Shannon'sdiversity index and gene diversity were found 82.61%, 0.39 and 0.26 respectively. The three main clusters were found byusing UPGMA (Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean cluster analysis method and the average rate ofgenetic similarity with 0.462. Two main clusters were shown in principal component analysis (PCA which is consistentwith the result of UPGMA. It can be concluded that SRAP markers can be used for wheat genetic diversity studies and havepotential linkage mapping, molecular characterizations and marker assisted selection (MAS breeding.

  7. SCoT marker for the assessment of genetic diversity in saudi arabian date palm cultivars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Different types of molecular markers based on DNA have been used for the assessment of genetic diversity in the plant species. Start Codon Targeted Polymorphism (SCoT) marker has recently become the marker of choice in genetic diversity studies. SCoT marker was used for the assessment of genetic diversity in Saudi Arabian date palm cultivars. The percentage of polymorphic loci (PPL) at population level ranged from 3.28 to 13.11 with an average of 7.10. The Neis gene diversity (h) and Shannons Information index (I) were 0.033 and 0.046, respectively. However, at cultivar level, PPL, Neis gene diversity (h) and Shannons Information index (I) were 42.62, 0.090 and 0.155, respectively. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) showed 48% of variation within the populations, whereas 52% was found among the populations. A hierarchical analysis of molecular variance revealed level of genetic differentiation among populations (52% of total variance, P = 0.001), consistent with the gene differentiation coefficient (Gst = 0.631). Unweighted pair group method of arithmetic averages (UPGMA) cluster analysis of the SCoT marker data divided the six cultivars and their populations into five main clusters at 0.95 genetic similarity coefficient level. (author)

  8. Female promiscuity is positively associated with neutral and selected genetic diversity in passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gohli, Jostein; Anmarkrud, Jarl A; Johnsen, Arild; Kleven, Oddmund; Borge, Thomas; Lifjeld, Jan T

    2013-05-01

    Passerine birds show large interspecific variation in extrapair paternity rates. There is accumulating evidence that such promiscuous behavior is driven by indirect, genetic benefits to females. Sexual selection theory distinguishes between two types of genetic benefits, additive and nonadditive effects, mediated by preferences for good and compatible genes, respectively. Good genes preferences should imply directional selection and mating skew among males, and thus reduced genetic diversity in the population. In contrast, compatible genes preferences should give balancing selection that retains genetic diversity. Here, we test how well these predictions fit with patterns of variation in genetic diversity and promiscuity levels among passerine birds. We found that more promiscuous species had higher nucleotide diversity at autosomal introns, but not at Z-chromosome introns. We also found that major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class IIB alleles had higher sequence diversity, and therefore should recognize a broader spectrum of pathogens, in more promiscuous species. Our results suggest that female promiscuity targets a multitude of autosomal genes for their nonadditive, compatibility benefits. Also, as immunity genes seem to be of particular importance, we hypothesize that interspecific variation in female promiscuity among passerine birds has arisen in response to the strength of pathogen-mediated selection. PMID:23617917

  9. Genetic diversity in different populations of sloths assessed by DNA fingerprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MORAES N.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we analyzed a population of Bradypus torquatus with individuals originally distributed in different localities of Bahia, and two populations of B. variegatus with individuals from Bahia and São Paulo States. Using the DNA fingerprinting method, we assessed the genetic variability within and between populations. Analysis of the DNA profiles revealed genetic similarity indices ranging from 0.34 ± 0.07 to 0.87 ± 0.04. Similar low levels of genetic variability were found only in isolated mammalian populations or among related individuals. This study presents the first analyses of genetic diversity in sloth populations.

  10. Bovine coronaviruses from the respiratory tract: Antigenic and genetic diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovine corona viruses (BoCV) isolated from respiratory tract, nasal swab and broncho alveolar washing fluid samples were evaluated for genetic and antigenic differences. These BoCV from the respiratory tract of healthy and clinically ill cattle with BRD signs were compared to reference and vaccine ...

  11. Genetic diversity in Chilean populations of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia B Cárcamo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss, was first introduced in Chile between 1905 and 1920 and is currently widely distributed in Chile from Antofagasta (23°S to Patagonia (55°S. The broad range of the geographic and climatic distributions of this species in Chile offers a unique opportunity to study the effect of naturalization of an introduced species on its genetic variability. It is of particular importance to observe the genetic variability of populations in the northern range of this species distribution, in a transition zone where a Mediterranean-type climate changes to an arid climate. The present study analyzed allozymic variability and distribution within and between populations of O. mykiss from the river basins of Elqui and Limari rivers, and six culture strains, using starch-gel protein electrophoresis. Populations were found to be in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and the average values of He (0.045, polymorphism (13.9% and allele per locus (1.19 are similar to rainbow trout in its native distributional range. About 77.8% of the genetic variability was within population, similar to the variability reported for wild populations in the northern hemisphere. However, a marked genetic differentiation between wild populations was also found. This is likely to be the consequence of initial founder effects followed by subsequent introgression of resident populations caused by reseeding with trout of different origins in both basins.

  12. Analysis of population structure and genetic diversity of Egyptian and exotic rice (Oryza sativa L.) genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salem, Khaled F M; Sallam, Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the population structure and genetic diversity is a very important goal to improve the economic value of crops. In rice, a loss of genetic diversity in the last few centuries is observed. To address this challenge, a set of 22 lines from three different regions - India (two), and Philippines (six), and Egypt (14) - were used to assess the genetic diversity and the features of population structure. These genotypes were analyzed using 106 SSR alleles that showed a clear polymorphism among the lines. Genetic diversity was estimated based on the number of different alleles, polymorphism information content (PIC), and gene diversity. A total of 106 SSR alleles was identified from the 23 SSR loci and used to study the population structure and carry out a cluster analysis. All SSR loci showed a wide range of the number of different alleles extended from two (one loci) to seven alleles (three loci). Five and eight loci showed high PIC and gene diversity (?0.70), respectively. The results of population structure are in agreement with cluster analysis results. Both analyses revealed two different subpopulations (G1 and G2) with different genetic properties in number of private alleles, number of different alleles (Na), number of effective alleles (Ne), expected heterozygosity (He), and Shannon's Information Index (SII). Our findings indicate that five SSR loci (RM 111, RM 307, RM 22, RM 19, and RM 271) could be used in breeding programs to enhance the marker-assisted selection through QTL mapping and association studies. A high genetic diversity found between genotypes which can be exploited to improve and produce rice cultivars for important traits (e.g. high agronomic features and tolerance to biotic or/and abiotic stresses). PMID:26727453

  13. Genetic diversity and demographic instability in Riftia pachyptila tubeworms from eastern Pacific hydrothermal vents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lutz Richard A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deep-sea hydrothermal vent animals occupy patchy and ephemeral habitats supported by chemosynthetic primary production. Volcanic and tectonic activities controlling the turnover of these habitats contribute to demographic instability that erodes genetic variation within and among colonies of these animals. We examined DNA sequences from one mitochondrial and three nuclear gene loci to assess genetic diversity in the siboglinid tubeworm, Riftia pachyptila, a widely distributed constituent of vents along the East Pacific Rise and Galápagos Rift. Results Genetic differentiation (FST among populations increased with geographical distances, as expected under a linear stepping-stone model of dispersal. Low levels of DNA sequence diversity occurred at all four loci, allowing us to exclude the hypothesis that an idiosyncratic selective sweep eliminated mitochondrial diversity alone. Total gene diversity declined with tectonic spreading rates. The southernmost populations, which are subjected to superfast spreading rates and high probabilities of extinction, are relatively homogenous genetically. Conclusions Compared to other vent species, DNA sequence diversity is extremely low in R. pachyptila. Though its dispersal abilities appear to be effective, the low diversity, particularly in southern hemisphere populations, is consistent with frequent local extinction and (recolonization events.

  14. Genetic diversity of native potatoes (Solanumspp. conserved in landraces from Peru

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julián Soto

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the genetic diversity of 79 accessions of native potato varieties (Solanum spp. using 18 microsatellite markers. A random sample from Ayacucho, Cajamarca, Cusco, Huancavelica and Puno from "chacras" of farmers who collaborated with the "In situ conservation of native crops and wild relatives" were used. 17 markers amplified one single polymorphic locus, the mean number of alleles per locus was 8.79. The mean similarity was 0.62 and clustering indexes varied between 0.41 and 0.98. 19 loci showed a total of 166 alleles. Cuzco had the highest number of alleles (130 alleles. Of the 166 characterized alleles, 72 alleles (43.37% were common or shared with 5 sampling sites. Puno had the highest number of exclusive alleles (8 alleles. The 42 varieties of S. tuberosum subsp. andigena showed a mean diversity of 0.74 and 18 varieties of S. x chauchaan average diversity of 0.70. Polymorphism (PIC = 0.55 to 0.85 and genetic diversity indices show that microsatellites evaluated can identify high levels of genetic diversity, but also are not sufficient to discriminate differentiated by origin or species groups. Our analyzes indicate a high genetic diversity and are consistent with inventories and morphological characterizations performed in situ, we can also conclude that there would be a common pool of genes would be found widely distributed among the regions studied.

  15. Species and genetic diversity in the genus Drosophila inhabiting the Indian subcontinent

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Bashisth N. Singh

    2015-06-01

    Biodiversity is the sum total of all living things on the earth with particular reference to the profound variety in structure, function and genetic constitution. It includes both number and frequency of species or genes in a given assemblage and the variety of resulting ecosystems in a region. It is usually considered at three different levels: genetic, species and ecological diversities. Genus Drosophila belongs to the family Drosophilidae (class Insecta, order Diptera), characterized by rich species diversity at global level and also in India, which is a megadiverse country. At global level, more than 1500 species have been described and several thousands estimated. Hawaiian Islands are particularly rich in species diversity with more than 500 species which provides a unique opportunity to study evolution in genus Drosophila. About 150 species of Drosophila have been reported from India. Certain species of Drosophila found in India have been investigated for genetic diversity within the species. In this regard, Drosophila ananassae is noteworthy. It is a cosmopolitan and domestic species with common occurrence in India and is endowed with many genetic peculiarities. Population genetics and evolutionary studies in this species have revealed as to how genetic diversity within a species play an important role in adaptation of populations to varying environments. In addition, the work carried on D. melanogaster, D. nasuta, D. bipectinata and certain other species in India has shown that these species vary in degree and pattern of genetic diversity, and have evolved different mechanisms for adjusting to their environments. The ecological adaptations to various kinds of stress studied in certain species of Drosophila inhabiting the Indian subcontinent are also discussed.

  16. Genetic diversity in populations of asexual and sexual bag worm moths (Lepidoptera: Psychidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mappes Johanna

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite the two-fold cost of sex, most of the higher animals reproduce sexually. The advantage of sex has been suggested to be its ability, through recombination, to generate greater genetic diversity than asexuality, thus enhancing adaptation in a changing environment. We studied the genetic diversity and the population structure of three closely related species of bag worm moths: two strictly sexual (Dahlica charlottae and Siederia rupicolella and one strictly asexual (D. fennicella. These species compete for the same resources and share the same parasitoids. Results Allelic richness was comparable between the sexual species but it was higher than in the asexual species. All species showed high heterozygote deficiency and a large variation was observed among FIS values across loci and populations. Large genetic differentiation was observed between populations confirming the poor dispersal ability of these species. The asexual species showed lower genotype diversity than the sexual species. Nevertheless, genotype diversity was high in all asexual populations. Conclusion The three different species show a similar population structure characterised by high genetic differentiation among populations and low dispersal. Most of the populations showed high heterozygote deficiency likely due to the presence of null alleles at most of the loci and/or to the Wahlund effect. Although the parthenogenetic D. fennicella shows reduced genetic diversity compared to the sexual species, it still shows surprisingly high genotype diversity. While we can not totally rule out the presence of cryptic sex, would explain this high genotype diversity, we never observed sex in the parthenogenetic D. fennicella, nor was there any other evidence of this. Alternatively, a non-clonal parthenogenetic reproduction, such as automictic thelytoky, could explain the high genotypic diversity observed in D. fennicella.

  17. Assessing the Genetic Diversity in Crops with Molecular Markers: Theory and Experimental Results with CIMMYT Wheat and Maize Elite Germplasm and Genetic Resources

    OpenAIRE

    Reif, Jochen Christoph

    2004-01-01

    Genetic diversity is a valuable natural resource and plays a key role in future breeding progress. Germplasm collections as a source of genetic diversity must be well-characterized for an efficient management and effective exploitation. The advent of PCR-based molecular markers such as sim-ple sequence repeats (SSRs) has created an opportunity for fine-scale genetic characterization of germplasm collections. The objective of this research was to optimize the utilization of genetic re-sources ...

  18. Genetic diversity in Napier grass (Pennisetum purpureum) cultivars: implications for breeding and conservation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wanjala, Bramwel W; Obonyo, Meshack; Wachira, Francis N; Muchugi, Alice; Mulaa, Margaret; Harvey, Jagger; Skilton, Robert A; Proud, Janice; Hanson, Jean

    2013-01-01

    Napier grass is an important forage crop for dairy production in the tropics; as such, its existing genetic diversity needs to be assessed for conservation. The current study assessed the genetic variation of Napier grass collections from selected regions in Eastern Africa and the International Livestock Research Institute Forage Germplasm-Ethiopia. The diversity of 281 cultivars was investigated using five selective amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers and classical population genetic parameters analysed using various software. The number of bands generated was 216 with fragments per primer set ranging from 50 to 115. Mean percentage polymorphic loci was 63.40. Genetic diversity coefficients based on Nei's genetic diversity ranged from 0.0783 to 0.2142 and Shannon's information index ranged from 0.1293 to 0.3445. The Fst value obtained was moderately significant (Fst = 0.1688). Neighbour-joining analysis gave two distinct clusters which did not reflect geographical locations. Analysis of molecular variance showed all variance components to be highly significant (P < 0.001), indicating more variation within (91 %) than between populations (9 %). Results suggested moderate genetic differentiation among Napier grass populations sampled, which could imply a high germplasm exchange within the region. The AFLP markers used in this study efficiently discriminate among cultivars and could be useful in identification and germplasm conservation. PMID:23671788

  19. Genetic Diversity of Dalmatian Sage (Salvia officinalis L. as Assessed by RAPD Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zlatko Liber

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Dalmatian or common sage (Salvia officinalis L. is an outcrossing plant species native to East Adriatic coast. Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA markers (RAPD were used to analyze genetic diversity and structure of ten natural populations from the East-Adriatic coastal region. The highest genetic diversity was found in populations from the central and south Dalmatia, while the highest frequency down-weighted marker values were found in the northernmost populations and the southern most inland population. Although analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA revealed that most of the genetic diversity was attributable to differences among individuals within populations, highly significant ?ST values suggested the existence of genetic differentiation among populations. By assuming Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium within populations, the calculated FST value among population was moderate. Bayesian model-based clustering method revealed that at K = 2 all individuals belonging to two northern populations were assigned to a separate cluster from the individuals belonging to the rest of the population. At K = 3, the newly formed cluster grouped the majority of individuals belonging to populations from central Dalmatia. The high correlation between matrices of genetic and geographical distances showed that isolation by distance may play a considerable role in overall structuring of the genetic diversity.

  20. Single nucleotide polymorphisms for assessing genetic diversity in castor bean (Ricinus communis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabinowicz Pablo D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Castor bean (Ricinus communis is an agricultural crop and garden ornamental that is widely cultivated and has been introduced worldwide. Understanding population structure and the distribution of castor bean cultivars has been challenging because of limited genetic variability. We analyzed the population genetics of R. communis in a worldwide collection of plants from germplasm and from naturalized populations in Florida, U.S. To assess genetic diversity we conducted survey sequencing of the genomes of seven diverse cultivars and compared the data to a reference genome assembly of a widespread cultivar (Hale. We determined the population genetic structure of 676 samples using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs at 48 loci. Results Bayesian clustering indicated five main groups worldwide and a repeated pattern of mixed genotypes in most countries. High levels of population differentiation occurred between most populations but this structure was not geographically based. Most molecular variance occurred within populations (74% followed by 22% among populations, and 4% among continents. Samples from naturalized populations in Florida indicated significant population structuring consistent with local demes. There was significant population differentiation for 56 of 78 comparisons in Florida (pairwise population ϕPT values, p Conclusion Low levels of genetic diversity and mixing of genotypes have led to minimal geographic structuring of castor bean populations worldwide. Relatively few lineages occur and these are widely distributed. Our approach of determining population genetic structure using SNPs from genome-wide comparisons constitutes a framework for high-throughput analyses of genetic diversity in plants, particularly in species with limited genetic diversity.

  1. Intraspecific genetic diversity and composition modify species-level diversity-productivity relationships

    OpenAIRE

    Schöb, Christian; Kerle, Sarah; Karley, Alison J.; Morcillo, Luna; Pakeman, Robin J; Newton, Adrian C.; Brooker, Rob W

    2015-01-01

    Biodiversity regulates ecosystem functions such as productivity, and experimental studies of species mixtures have revealed selection and complementarity effects driving these responses. However, the impacts of intraspecific genotypic diversity in these studies are unknown, despite it forming a substantial part of the biodiversity. In a glasshouse experiment we constructed plant communities with different levels of barley (Hordeum vulgare) genotype and weed species diversity and assessed thei...

  2. Microsatellite analysis of genetic diversity and genetic structure in five consecutive breeding generations of mandarin fish Siniperca chuatsi (Basilewsky).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, T L; Guo, W J; Liang, X F; Yang, M; Lv, L Y; Tian, C X; Song, Y; Zhao, C; Sun, J

    2015-01-01

    In this report, 10 polymorphic microsatellites were applied to assess the genetic diversity and genetic differentiation of 5 consecutive breeding generations of mandarin fish, Siniperca chuatsi (Basilewsky). The results from total number of alleles, average polymorphism information content, and average homozygosity and heterozygosity showed that the genetic diversity of the breeding population was decreasing. The genetic identity between F1 and its descendant generations (F2, F3, F4, F5) decreased (from 0.9248 to 0.8803), while the genetic distance (from 0.0782 to 0.1275) and fixation index (from 0.03796 to 0.07393) increased. The allele frequency of SS181-235 and SS211-246 changed regularly in the 5 breeding generations, and they may be negatively associated with the selected trait, which needs to be confirmed by further research. Our study indicated that selective breeding was an efficient strategy for mandarin fish. In the process of breeding, some deleterious genes were phased out, and the genetic structure of the breeding populations became stable. PMID:25867407

  3. Genetic and molecular diversity in nondeletion Hb H disease

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    Restriction endonuclease mapping of nondeletion alpha-thalassemia determinants from a variety of racial groups showed no detectable abnormalities within a 40-kilobase region of the zeta-alpha globin gene cluster. By using a zeta-specific probe, we defined three different types of interactions that give rise to Hb H disease, each involving a nondeletion alpha-thalassemia haplotype. mRNA analysis showed further diversity within these groups, indicating that there are at least three nondeletion ...

  4. Genetic diversity of Gallibacterium anatis isolates from different chicken flocks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, A.M.; Torpdahl, Mia; Christensen, H.; Olsen, J.E.; Bisgaard, M.

    2003-01-01

    Amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs) were used to characterize the genotypic diversity of a total of 114 Gallibacterium anatis isolates originating from a reference collection representing 15 biovars from four countries and isolates obtained from tracheal and cloacal swab samples of chickens from an organic, egg-producing flock and a layer parent flock. A subset of strains was also characterized by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and biotyping. The organic flock isolates were charact...

  5. Genetic calibration of species diversity among North America's freshwater fishes

    OpenAIRE

    April, Julien; Mayden, Richard L; Hanner, Robert H.; Bernatchez, Louis

    2011-01-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are being heavily exploited and degraded by human activities all over the world, including in North America, where fishes and fisheries are strongly affected. Despite centuries of taxonomic inquiry, problems inherent to species identification continue to hamper the conservation of North American freshwater fishes. Indeed, nearly 10% of species diversity is thought to remain undescribed. To provide an independent calibration of taxonomic uncertainty and to establish a mor...

  6. Low genetic diversity and intrapopulation spatial genetic structure of the Atlantic Forest tree, Esenbeckia leiocarpa Engl. (Rutaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Forti

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Studies on population genetics are the key to designing effective in situ management plans for tree species, in particular, those subjected to pressure from anthropogenic processes, such as forest fragmentation and logging. To investigate genetic diversity, inbreeding and intrapopulation spatial genetic structure (SGS in a fragmented population of the insect-pollinated tropical tree, Esenbeckia leiocarpa, we developed specific microsatellite markers for this species and mapped and sampled 100 individuals in a forest plot. Two issues were addressed in particular: (i the level of genetic diversity, inbreeding and effective population size, (ii whether intrapopulation spatial genetic structure exists. Among the 14 loci developed, we only used the three that presented polymorphism to estimate the genetic parameters. Genetic diversity was low, whereby the average number of alleles per locus (A was 3.3 and observed (H0 and expected heterozygosities (He were 0.336 and 0.298, respectively. The average fixation index was significantly higher than zero (F = 0.112, suggesting inbreeding. Significant SGS was found up to 7 m and between 31 to 38 m, indicating that trees growing within these distances may be related. Estimates of the effective population size indicated that the 100 sampled trees correspond to 14 individuals that are neither related nor inbred. Our results suggest that the microsatellite markers developed in this study are suitable for studies on geneticdiversity and structure, mating systems, gene flow and SGS in this species.

  7. Genetic diversity and population structure of Siberian apricot (Prunus sibirica L.) in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ming; Zhao, Zhong; Miao, Xingjun; Zhou, Jingjing

    2014-01-01

    The genetic diversity and population genetic structure of 252 accessions from 21 Prunus sibirica L. populations were investigated using 10 ISSR, SSR, and SRAP markers. The results suggest that the entire population has a relatively high level of genetic diversity, with populations HR and MY showing very high diversity. A low level of inter-population genetic differentiation and a high level of intra-population genetic differentiation was found, which is supported by a moderate level of gene flow, and largely attributable to the cross-pollination and self-incompatibility reproductive system. A STRUCTURE (model-based program) analysis revealed that the 21 populations can be divided into two main groups, mainly based on geographic differences and genetic exchanges. The entire wild Siberia apricot population in China could be divided into two subgroups, including 107 accessions in subgroup (SG) 1 and 147 accessions in SG 2. A Mantel test revealed a significant positive correlation between genetic and geographic distance matrices, and there was a very significant positive correlation among three marker datasets. Overall, we recommend a combination of conservation measures, with ex situ and in situ conservation that includes the construction of a core germplasm repository and the implement of in situ conservation for populations HR, MY, and ZY. PMID:24384840

  8. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Siberian apricot (Prunus sibirica L. in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity and population genetic structure of 252 accessions from 21 Prunus sibirica L. populations were investigated using 10 ISSR, SSR, and SRAP markers. The results suggest that the entire population has a relatively high level of genetic diversity, with populations HR and MY showing very high diversity. A low level of inter-population genetic differentiation and a high level of intra-population genetic differentiation was found, which is supported by a moderate level of gene flow, and largely attributable to the cross-pollination and self-incompatibility reproductive system. A STRUCTURE (model-based program analysis revealed that the 21 populations can be divided into two main groups, mainly based on geographic differences and genetic exchanges. The entire wild Siberia apricot population in China could be divided into two subgroups, including 107 accessions in subgroup (SG 1 and 147 accessions in SG 2. A Mantel test revealed a significant positive correlation between genetic and geographic distance matrices, and there was a very significant positive correlation among three marker datasets. Overall, we recommend a combination of conservation measures, with ex situ and in situ conservation that includes the construction of a core germplasm repository and the implement of in situ conservation for populations HR, MY, and ZY.

  9. Suitability of blood protein polymorphisms in assessing genetic diversity in indigenous sheep in Kenya

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge of genetic diversity is important as it forms the basis for designing breeding programmes and making rational decisions on sustainable utilization of animal genetic resources. This study was designed to assess the efficiency of blood protein polymorphism as a rapid tool for assessing genetic diversity, using seven blood proteins (transferrin, albumin, haemoglobin, esterase A, esterase C, carbonic anhydrase and X-protein) and 457 indigenous fat-tailed (351) and fat-rumped (106) hair sheep in Kenya from 7 populations, with 40 Merino as controls. Transferrin was analysed using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and starch gel electrophoresis was used to analyse the other six loci. Of the seven loci analysed, two - carbonic anhydrase and X-protein - could not be interpreted. The five interpretable markers, however, showed low levels of polymorphism in allele numbers and heterozygosity. Multilocus mean FST values of 0.083 indicated a moderate genetic differentiation between the populations analysed. The Dm and Da genetic distance estimates showed the indigenous sheep populations in Kenya to be closely related genetically, with the dendrogram failing to resolve indigenous sheep into fat-tailed sheep and fat-rumped hair sheep. Due to its costs and modest equipment demands, blood protein polymorphism can be used as a rapid tool to assess genetic diversity and prioritize breeds to be analysed by microsatellite DNA markers. (author)

  10. Genetic diversity in introduced golden mussel populations corresponds to vector activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghabooli, Sara; Zhan, Aibin; Sardiña, Paula; Paolucci, Esteban; Sylvester, Francisco; Perepelizin, Pablo V; Briski, Elizabeta; Cristescu, Melania E; MacIsaac, Hugh J

    2013-01-01

    We explored possible links between vector activity and genetic diversity in introduced populations of Limnoperna fortunei by characterizing the genetic structure in native and introduced ranges in Asia and South America. We surveyed 24 populations: ten in Asia and 14 in South America using the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase subunit I (COI) gene, as well as eight polymorphic microsatellite markers. We performed population genetics and phylogenetic analyses to investigate population genetic structure across native and introduced regions. Introduced populations in Asia exhibit higher genetic diversity (H(E)?=?0.667-0.746) than those in South America (H(E)?=??0.519-0.575), suggesting higher introduction effort for the former populations. We observed pronounced geographical structuring in introduced regions, as indicated by both mitochondrial and nuclear markers based on multiple genetic analyses including pairwise ?(ST), F(ST), bayesian clustering method, and three-dimensional factorial correspondence analyses. Pairwise F(ST) values within both Asia (F(ST)?=?0.017-0.126, P?=?0.000-0.009) and South America (F(ST)?=0.004-0.107, P?=?0.000-0.721) were lower than those between continents (F(ST)?=?0.180-0.319, P?=?0.000). Fine-scale genetic structuring was also apparent among introduced populations in both Asia and South America, suggesting either multiple introductions of distinct propagules or strong post-introduction selection and demographic stochasticity. Higher genetic diversity in Asia as compared to South America is likely due to more frequent propagule transfers associated with higher shipping activities between source and donor regions within Asia. This study suggests that the intensity of human-mediated introduction vectors influences patterns of genetic diversity in non-indigenous species. PMID:23533614

  11. Effects of metapopulation processes on measures of genetic diversity.

    OpenAIRE

    Pannell, J. R.; Charlesworth, B.

    2000-01-01

    Many species persist as a metapopulation under a balance between the local extinction of subpopulations or demes and their recolonization through dispersal from occupied patches. Here we review the growing body of literature dealing with the genetic consequences of such population turnover. We focus our attention principally on theoretical studies of a classical metapopulation with a 'finite-island' model of population structure, rather than on 'continent-island' models or 'source-sink' model...

  12. Y genetic variation and phenotypic diversity in health and disease

    OpenAIRE

    Case, Laure K; Teuscher, Cory

    2015-01-01

    Sexually dimorphic traits arise through the combined effects of sex hormones and sex chromosomes on sex-biased gene expression, and experimental mouse models have been instrumental in determining their relative contribution in modulating sex differences. A role for the Y chromosome (ChrY) in mediating sex differences outside of development and reproduction has historically been overlooked due to its unusual genetic composition and the predominant testes-specific expression of ChrY-encoded gen...

  13. Genetic Diversity of the Allodeterminant alr2 in Hydractinia symbiolongicarpus

    OpenAIRE

    Rosengarten, Rafael D; Moreno, Maria A.; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Buss, Leo W; Dellaporta, Stephen L.

    2010-01-01

    Hydractinia symbiolongicarpus, a colonial cnidarian (class Hydrozoa) epibiont on hermit crab shells, is well established as a model for genetic studies of allorecognition. Recently, two linked loci, allorecognition (alr) 1 and alr2, were identified by positional cloning and shown to be major determinants of histocompatibility. Both genes encode putative transmembrane proteins with hypervariable extracellular domains similar to immunoglobulin (Ig)-like domains. We sought to characterize the na...

  14. GENETIC DIVERSITY OF FLEXIVIRUSES INFECTING POME FRUIT TREES

    OpenAIRE

    Gadiou, S; Kundu, JK; Paunovic, S; Garcia-Diez, P; Komorowska, B.; Gospodaryk, A; Handa, A.; Massart, S.; Birisik, N; Takur, PD; Polischuk, V

    2010-01-01

    Three amplicons corresponding to the variable genome regions of Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV), Apple stem grooving virus (ASGV) and Apple stem pitting virus (ASPV) were sequenced from different apple cultivars and geographic areas in Europe and Asia. Multiple alignments of nucleotide sequence of these isolates with those from databases showed a very high divergence. Genetic variability at the nucleotide level among ACSLV and ASPV isolates was very high, ranging from 83.5 to 85.0% an...

  15. Genetic diversity of soybean accessions using seed storage proteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soybean, Glycine max (L) Merrill, is the most important grain legume in the world that has a fairly wide range of adaptations to different climatic conditions. The present study was conducted to assess genetic variations on 139 Soybean genotypes collected from different countries including Australia, Brazil, India, Japan, Pakistan, Tiwan, USA, Yugoslavia and China. A total of 17 bands have been identified for 139 Soybean genotypes which include 9 monomorphic bands and 8 polymorphic bands. Total number of bands was found highest for India (215) while these were lowest for Yugoslavia (33). Cluster analysis, clustered these accessions into 10 clusters without having any indication of grouping on the basis of their relationships to their regions. Pairwise comparisons based on Nei and Li similarities for inter-population genetic distances of soybean accessions ranged from 0.14 to 1.12. Genetic distances for soybean germplasm from different countries were found highest for Brazil (0.97+-0.03) while it was lowest for Taiwan (0.91+-0.02). Clustering for Soybean groups was clustered into three clusters including Korea, Taiwan in the first group while Yugoslavia and Japan were clustered in the second group. The third cluster was comprised of Soybean genotypes from China, Pakistan, USA, India Brazil and Australia. Total seed storage protein variation was partitioned by AMOVA on the basis of their origins into within-population and among-population components which revealed 10.00% of the total variation resided among countries and 90.0% within countries. Genetic patterns obtained from this study can help soybean breeders to make better plan for selecting germplasm from wide sources for a specific purposes. (author)

  16. Diversity, Epidemiology, and Genetics of Class D  -Lactamases

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Class D ?-lactamase-mediated resistance to ?-lactams has been increasingly reported during the last decade. Those enzymes also known as oxacillinases or OXAs are widely distributed among Gram negatives. Genes encoding class D ?-lactamases are known to be intrinsic in many Gram-negative rods, including Acinetobacter baumannii and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, but play a minor role in natural resistance phenotypes. The OXAs (ca. 150 variants reported so far) are characterized by an important genetic ...

  17. Molecular characterization and genetic diversity of Prunus rootstocks

    OpenAIRE

    Bouhadida, Mariem; Casas Cendoya, Ana María; Gonzalo Pascual, María José; Arús, Pere; Moreno Sánchez, María Ángeles; Gogorcena Aoiz, Yolanda

    2009-01-01

    Twenty microsatellite primer pairs, previously developed in peach, were used to characterize and to explore genetic relationships among 44 clones, representing three groups of rootstocks defined as: (1) Peach-based rootstocks (Prunus dulcis x P. persica, P. persica x P. davidiana); (2) Myrobalan - Marianna plums (P. cerasifera, and interspecific hybrids having P. cerasifera as a parent); and (3) Slow growing plums (P. insititia, P. domestica, and P. domestica x P. spinosa). Eighteen SSR marke...

  18. Global and local genetic diversity at two microsatellite loci in Plasmodium vivax parasites from Asia, Africa and South America

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, Mette L; Ranjitkar, Samir; Rajakaruna, Rupika S; Amerasinghe, Priyanie H; Konradsen, Flemming; Morales, Francisco; Ord, Rosalyn; Pearce, Richard; Leslie, Toby; Rowland, Mark; Gadalla, Nahla; Bygbjerg, Ib C; Alifrangis, Michael; Roper, Cally

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Even though Plasmodium vivax has the widest worldwide distribution of the human malaria species and imposes a serious impact on global public health, the investigation of genetic diversity in this species has been limited in comparison to Plasmodium falciparum. Markers of genetic diversity are vital to the evaluation of drug and vaccine efficacy, tracking of P. vivax outbreaks, and assessing geographical differentiation between parasite populations. METHODS: The genetic diversity of ...

  19. Genetic diversity analysis of sugarcane ( Saccharum sp.) clones using simple sequence repeat markers of sugarcane and rice

    OpenAIRE

    G.Banumathi , V.Krishnasamy, M.Maheswaran, R.Samiyappan, P.Govindaraj and N.Kumaravadivel

    2010-01-01

    Molecular markers are powerful tools, which help in differentiating plant varieties at the DNA level and have been widelyused for genetic diversity studies in a number of crop species'. Understanding the genetic diversity of available clones of S.officinarum and S. spontaneum will be helpful in breeding programs. In the present study, a set of 48 sugarcane clones fromNational Hybridization Garden, Sugarcane Breeding Institute, Coimbatore was subjected to genetic diversity analysisinvolving 40...

  20. Landscape prerequisites for the survival of a modelled metapopulation and its neutral genetic diversity are affected by climate change

    OpenAIRE

    Cobben, M.M.P.; Verboom, J.; Opdam, P.F.M.; Hoekstra, R.F.; Jochem, R.; Smulders, M.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In response to climate change a species may move, adapt, or go extinct. For the adaptability of a population its genetic diversity is essential, but climate change-induced range shifts can cause a loss of genetic diversity. We investigated how landscape structure affects the level and distribution of genetic diversity in metapopulations subject to climate change-induced range shifts. For this we used the spatially explicit, individual-based model METAPHOR which simulates metapopulation demogr...

  1. Mining the human genome after Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Barbara J

    2014-07-01

    The Supreme Court's recent decision in Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics portrays the human genome as a product of nature. This frames medical genetics as an extractive industry that mines a natural resource to produce valuable goods and services. Natural resource law offers insights into problems medical geneticists can expect after this decision and suggests possible solutions. Increased competition among clinical laboratories offers various benefits but threatens to increase fragmentation of genetic data resources, potentially causing waste in the form of lost opportunities to discover the clinical significance of particular gene variants. The solution lies in addressing legal barriers to appropriate data sharing. Sustainable discovery in the field of medical genetics can best be achieved through voluntary data sharing rather than command-and-control tactics, but voluntary mechanisms must be conceived broadly to include market-based approaches as well as donative and publicly funded data commons. The recently revised Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act Privacy Rule offers an improved--but still imperfect--framework for market-oriented data sharing. This article explores strategies for addressing the Privacy Rule's remaining defects. America is close to having a legal framework that can reward innovators, protect privacy, and promote needed data sharing to advance medical genetics. PMID:24357850

  2. Self-Adaptation Mechanism to Control the Diversity of the Population in Genetic Algorithm

    CERN Document Server

    Jassadapakorn, Chaiwat; 10.5121/ijcsit.2011.3409

    2011-01-01

    One of the problems in applying Genetic Algorithm is that there is some situation where the evolutionary process converges too fast to a solution which causes it to be trapped in local optima. To overcome this problem, a proper diversity in the candidate solutions must be determined. Most existing diversity-maintenance mechanisms require a problem specific knowledge to setup parameters properly. This work proposes a method to control diversity of the population without explicit parameter setting. A self-adaptation mechanism is proposed based on the competition of preference characteristic in mating. It can adapt the population toward proper diversity for the problems. The experiments are carried out to measure the effectiveness of the proposed method based on nine well-known test problems. The performance of the adaptive method is comparable to traditional Genetic Algorithm with the best parameter setting.

  3. Assessment of genetic diversity and population structure of Vietnamese indigenous cattle populations by microsatellites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pham, Lan Doan; Do, Duy Ngoc; Binh, Nguyen Trong; Nam, Le Quang; Ba, Nguyen Van; Thuy, Tran Thi Thu; Hoan, Tran Xuan; Cuong, Vu Chi; Kadarmideen, Haja

    2013-01-01

    indigenous cattle populations, using microsatellite markers. A total of 410 individuals from six indigenous cattle populations and an exotic breed was characterized using 27 microsatellite markers A total of 362 alleles was detected and the number of alleles per locus ranged from 8 (INRA005 and ILSTS005) to...... 17 (ETH185). The level of gene diversity was high indicated by a mean expected heterozygosity (He) across populations and loci of 0.73. Level of inbreeding (mean FIS=0.05) and genetic differentiation (mean FST=0.04) was moderate. The phylogenetic tree based on Reynolds genetic distance reflected...... of genetic diversity and distinct genetic structures. Based on these results, we recommend that for conservation homogenous populations (Nghe An, Thanh Hoa and Phu Yen) can be grouped to reduce costs and U Dau Riu, Lang Son and Ha Giang populations should be conserved separately to avoid loss of...

  4. Glacial refugia and modern genetic diversity of 22 western North American tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, David R; Hamann, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    North American tree species, subspecies and genetic varieties have primarily evolved in a landscape of extensive continental ice and restricted temperate climate environments. Here, we reconstruct the refugial history of western North American trees since the last glacial maximum using species distribution models, validated against 3571 palaeoecological records. We investigate how modern subspecies structure and genetic diversity corresponds to modelled glacial refugia, based on a meta-analysis of allelic richness and expected heterozygosity for 473 populations of 22 tree species. We find that species with strong genetic differentiation into subspecies had widespread and large glacial refugia, whereas species with restricted refugia show no differentiation among populations and little genetic diversity, despite being common over a wide range of environments today. In addition, a strong relationship between allelic richness and the size of modelled glacial refugia (r(2) = 0.55) suggest that population bottlenecks during glacial periods had a pronounced effect on the presence of rare alleles. PMID:25761711

  5. Genetic Diversity of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma and Opportunities for Precision Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Erik S; O'Reilly, Eileen M; Brody, Jonathan R; Witkiewicz, Agnieszka K

    2016-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) have a poor prognosis despite new treatments; approximately 7% survive for 5 years. Although there have been advances in systemic, primarily cytotoxic, therapies, it has been a challenge to treat patients with PDA using targeted therapies. Sequence analyses have provided a wealth of information about the genetic features of PDA and have identified potential therapeutic targets. Preclinical and early-phase clinical studies have found specific pathways could be rationally targeted; it might also be possible to take advantage of the genetic diversity of PDAs to develop therapeutic agents. The genetic diversity and instability of PDA cells have long been thought of as obstacles to treatment, but are now considered exploitable features. We review the latest findings in pancreatic cancer genetics and the promise of targeted approaches in PDA therapy. PMID:26385075

  6. Genetic diversity of Tunisian figs (Ficus carica L.) as revealed by nuclear microsatellites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saddoud, O; Chatti, K; Salhi-Hannachi, A; Mars, M; Rhouma, A; Marrakchi, M; Trifi, M

    2007-09-01

    The present study portrays the achievement of the genetic polymorphism surveying and the establishment of an ecotypes identification key on the basis of simple sequence repeats data. Seventy-two Tunisian fig ecotypes in situ and ex situ conserved were analyzed using six microsatellite loci. A total of 58 alleles and 124 genotypes were revealed and permitted to evidence high degree of genetic diversity mainly explained at the intra group level. Cluster analysis based on genetic distances proved that a typical continuous genetic diversity characterizes the local germplasm. In addition, the microsatellite multilocus genotyping has permitted to unambiguously distinguish 70 well-defined ecotypes (resolving power of 97.22%). Data are discussed in relation with the reliability of the used markers to check the conformity of the plant material and to rationally manage the conservation of this crop. PMID:17850599

  7. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of North China Mountain Walnut Revealed by ISSR

    OpenAIRE

    Aiqing Ji; Yina Wang; Guoliang Wu; Wenjiang Wu; Hongyan Yang; Qihai Wang

    2014-01-01

    North China Mountain Walnut (NCMW) is one of the ancestors of extant cultivated species, and a valuable gene resource for resistance breeding of walnut in China. Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) primers were designed to evaluate the level and pattern of genetic diversity in eight populations of NCMW. Nine ISSR primers yielded 91 amplification products with different sizes, of which 84 (92.31%) were polymorphic. A high species-level genetic diversity was detected with Nei’s (H = 0.2592) and...

  8. Genetic Diversity among Flue-cured Tobacco Cultivars Based on RAPD and AFLP Markers

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Han Yao, Zhang; Xiao Zhen, Liu; Chuan Sheng, He; Yu Ming, Yang.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to study the genetic diversity among flue-cured tobacco cultivars. RAPD and AFLP analyses were used to assess the genetic similarity among selected accessions of flue-cured tobacco. Seventy eight RAPD and 154 AFLP polymorphic bands were obtained and used to assess the geneti [...] c diversity among 28 tobacco accessions. The cultivar relationships were estimated through the cluster analysis (UPGMA) based on RAPD data and AFLP data. The accessions were grouped into three major clusters and these shared common ancestry clustered together.

  9. Morphological diversity and genetic differentiation of PO cattle in smallholder farmers

    OpenAIRE

    Hartati; Sumadi .; Subandriyo,; Tety Hartatik

    2016-01-01

    PO cattle is one of  the local cattle with high genetic diversity. The aim of this research was to study genetic diversity of PO cattle in smallholder farmer  based on morfology and molecular markers. This research was conducted at breeding center in East Java and Central Java include Tuban, Lamongan and Blora regency, since June until December 2008.  PO bull used were of 18 months until 24 months of age and cow of 24 months until 36 months of age or at first calving as much as 30 head each l...

  10. Inbreeding and Genetic Diversity in Three Imported Swine Breeds in China Using Pedigree Data

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, G Q; Xue, J.; Lian, M. J.; R. F. Yang; Liu, T. F.; Z. Y. Zeng; Jiang, A. A.; Jiang, Y.Z.; L. Zhu; L. Bai; Wang, Z.; Li, X.W.

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of inbreeding and the loss of genetic diversity is a potential problem in the modern swine breeds in China. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to analyze the pedigrees of Chinese Duroc (CD), Landrace (CL) and Yorkshire (CY) swine to estimate the past and current rates of inbreeding, and to identify the main causes of genetic diversity loss. Pedigree files from CD, CL and CY containing, 4529, 16,776 and 22,600 records, respectively, were analyzed. Pedigree completeness i...

  11. Genetic diversity in a Brazilian bovine herd based on four microsatellite loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almeida Sabrina E. Matos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellites or short tandem repeats (STRs, DNA markers relatively abundant in the genome, have a high degree of polymorphism and therefore great potential for characterizing populations. The present study estimates genetic variability in a set of four microsatellites (BMS3013, BMS3004, HEL10 and TGLA122 in a Brazilian hybrid bovine breed (5/8 Aberdeen Angus x 3/8 Nelore. The objectives were to determine the effect of crossbreeding and selection in these animals' genetic diversity as well as to discover the herd's genetic relationship with that of other breeds. Low diversity was verified in BMS3013 and high diversity was detected in BMS3004, HEL10 and TGLA122. Two alleles in TGLA122 are described here for the first time (TGLA122*155 and TGLA122*163. These genes are possibly characteristics of Zebu animals since they have not been found in other taurine samples so far investigated. Low interpopulational diversity was observed among taurine cattle populations, and clusters obtained on TGLA122 phylogenetic trees agreed with the bovine herd's geographic origin. Therefore, despite TGLA122's high polymorphism and high levels of intrapopulational diversity, the system engenders consistent bovine phylogenies. We detected an intriguingly high similarity between Brangus Ibagé and Red Angus since the former is a hybrid having 3/8 of Nelore genes. Either these animals' environment or genetic selective practices applied to the breed probably favor the Angus genotype.

  12. Rapid anti-pathogen response in ant societies relies on high genetic diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ugelvig, Line V; Kronauer, Daniel Jan Christoph

    2010-01-01

    Social organisms are constantly exposed to infectious agents via physical contact with conspecifics. While previous work has shown that disease susceptibility at the individual and group level is influenced by genetic diversity within and between group members, it remains poorly understood how group-level resistance to pathogens relates directly to individual physiology, defence behaviour and social interactions. We investigated the effects of high versus low genetic diversity on both the individual and collective disease defences in the ant Cardiocondyla obscurior. We compared the antiseptic behaviours (grooming and hygienic behaviour) of workers from genetically homogeneous and diverse colonies after exposure of their brood to the entomopathogenic fungus Metarhizium anisopliae. While workers from diverse colonies performed intensive allogrooming and quickly removed larvae covered with live fungal spores from the nest, workers from homogeneous colonies only removed sick larvae late after infection. This difference was not caused by a reduced repertoire of antiseptic behaviours or a generally decreased brood care activity in ants from homogeneous colonies. Our data instead suggest that reduced genetic diversity compromises the ability of Cardiocondyla colonies to quickly detect or react to the presence of pathogenic fungal spores before an infection is established, thereby affecting the dynamics of social immunity in the colony.

  13. Genetic Diversity in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides from Stylosanthes spp. at Centers of Origin and Utilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeds, P L; Chakraborty, S; Fernandes, C D; d'A Charchar, M J; Ramesh, C R; Kexian, Y; Kelemu, S

    2003-02-01

    ABSTRACT Using molecular markers, this work compares the genetic diversity in Colletotrichum gloeosporioides infecting species of the tropical forage legume Stylosanthes at the center of origin in Brazil and Colombia with that of Australia, China, and India, where Stylosanthes spp. have been introduced for commercial use. There was extensive diversity in the pathogen population from Brazil, Colombia, China, and India. The Australian pathogen population was least diverse probably due to its geographical isolation and effective quarantine. The extensive diversity in China and India means that threats from exotic pathogen races to Stylosanthes pastures can potentially come from countries outside the South American center of origin. In Brazil and India, both with native Stylosanthes populations, a high level of genetic differentiation in the pathogen population was associated with sites where native or naturalized host population was widely distributed. There was limited genetic diversity at germplasm evaluation sites, with a large proportion of isolates having identical haplotypes. This contrasts recent pathogenicity results for 78 of the Brazilian isolates that show hot spots of complex races are more common around research stations where host germplasm are tested, but few are found at sites containing wild host populations. For a pathogen in which the same races arise convergently from different genetic backgrounds, this study highlights the importance of using both virulence and selectively neutral markers to understand pathogen population structure. PMID:18943132

  14. Study of the genetic diversity of almond seedling populations in Morocco: application of chemometric approach

    OpenAIRE

    Kodad, Ossama; Socias i Company, Rafel; Estopañán Muñoz, Gloria; Juan Esteban, Teresa; Oukabli, A., Ahmed; Mamouni, A.

    2011-01-01

    Almond (Prunus amygdalus Batsch) in Morocco is still propagated by farmers mostly from seed, generating a large genetic diversity. Evaluation of the almond diversity in Morocco from the point of view of kernel quality, oil and protein contents, and major fatty acid composition were determined. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to compare the kernel components among 46 genotypes selected from different production regions, as well as five introduced cultivars. Oil and protein contents...

  15. Genetic diversity assessment of Vitis ficifolia Bge. populations from Henan province of China by SRAP markers

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Xiucai; Jiang, Jianfu; Zhang, Ying; Sun, Haisheng; Jiao, Jian; Liu, Chonghuai

    2014-01-01

    Eighteen sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) primer combinations were used to assess the genetic diversity of 126 individuals from five different geographical populations of Vitis ficifolia Bge. The numbers of bands scored per primer combination ranged from 8 to 27, with an average of 18.6 bands. At the population level, the percentage of polymorphic bands (PPB), Nei's gene diversity index (H) and Shannon's information index (I) were the highest in the Shihe (Xinyang) population (7...

  16. The Genetic and Molecular Basis of O-Antigenic Diversity in Burkholderia pseudomallei Lipopolysaccharide

    OpenAIRE

    Tuanyok, Apichai; Stone, Joshua K; Mayo, Mark; Kaestli, Mirjam; Gruendike, Jeffrey; Georgia, Shalamar; Warrington, Stephanie; Mullins, Travis; Allender, Christopher J.; Wagner, David M; Chantratita, Narisara; Peacock, Sharon J.; Currie, Bart J; Keim, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is one of the most important virulence and antigenic components of Burkholderia pseudomallei, the causative agent of melioidosis. LPS diversity in B. pseudomallei has been described as typical, atypical or rough, based upon banding patterns on SDS-PAGE. Here, we studied the genetic and molecular basis of these phenotypic differences. Bioinformatics was used to determine the diversity of genes known or predicted to be involved in biosynthesis of the O-antigenic moiety ...

  17. Genetic subspecies diversity of the chimpanzee CD4 virus-receptor gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvilsom, Christina; Carlsen, Frands; Siegismund, Hans R; Corbet, Sylvie; Nerrienet, Eric; Fomsgaard, Anders

    2008-01-01

    plays a primary role in virus binding and since SIVcpz have been found only in two African chimpanzee subspecies, we characterized the genetic diversity of CD4 receptors in all four recognized subspecies of chimpanzees. We found noticeable variation in the first variable region V1 of CD4 and in intron...... question whether the observed diversity can explain the species-specific differences in susceptibility to and pathogenicity of SIV/HIV....

  18. The Effect of Board Directors from Countries with Different Genetic Diversity Levels on Corporate Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Delis, Manthos; Gaganis, Chrysovalantis; Hasan, Iftekhar; Pasiouras, Fotios

    2015-01-01

    We link genetic diversity in the country of origin of firms’ board members with corporate performance via board members’ nationality. We hypothesize that our approach captures deep-rooted differences in cultural, institutional, social, psychological, physiological, and other traits that cannot be captured by other recently measured indices of diversity. Using a panel of firms listed in the North American and U.K. stock markets, we find that adding board directors from countries with different...

  19. Genetic diversity of anaplasma species major surface proteins and implications for anaplasmosis serodiagnosis and vaccine development

    OpenAIRE

    De La Fuente, J; Lew, A.; Lutz, H; Meli, M. L.; Hofmann-Lehmann, R; Shkap, V; Molad, T.; Mangold, A J; Almazán, C; Naranjo,V.; Gortázar, C; Torina, A; S. Caracappa; García-Pérez, A L; Barral, M

    2005-01-01

    The genus Anaplasma (Rickettsiales: Anaplasmataceae) includes several pathogens of veterinary and human medical importance. An understanding of the diversity of Anaplasma major surface proteins (MSPs), including those MSPs that modulate infection, development of persistent infections, and transmission of pathogens by ticks, is derived in part, by characterization and phylogenetic analyses of geographic strains. Information concerning the genetic diversity of Anaplasma spp. MSPs will likely in...

  20. Assessment of genetic diversity of Haloxylon salicornicum genotypes, a native plant of Kuwait

    OpenAIRE

    F. AL-SALAMEEN; H. AL-HASHASH; S. AL-AMAD

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Haloxylon salicornicum is one of the most important native desert flora scattered in Kuwait. Despite its ecological and economical importance, H. salicornicum is endangered by severe loss. Unless great attention is paid towards its protection and documentation, it faces the danger of extinction. Due to lack of information on the genetic diversity of H. salicornicum, this study attempts to analyse samples collected from nine representative locations from the Kuwait desert. Diversity a...

  1. Genetic diversity and population structure of the Guinea pig (Cavia porcellus, Rodentia, caviidae) in Colombia

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    William, Burgos-Paz; Mario, Cerón-Muñoz; Carlos, Solarte-Portilla.

    Full Text Available The aim was to establish the genetic diversity and population structure of three guinea pig lines, from seven production zones located in Nariño, southwest Colombia. A total of 384 individuals were genotyped with six microsatellite markers. The measurement of intrapopulation diversity revealed allel [...] ic richness ranging from 3.0 to 6.56, and observed heterozygosity (Ho) from 0.33 to 0.60, with a deficit in heterozygous individuals. Although statistically significant (p

  2. Organelle Genetic Diversity and Phylogeography of Scots Pine (Pinus sylvestris L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Valentina FLORAN; Sestras, Radu E.; María Rosario GARCÍA GIL

    2011-01-01

    The paper reviews the present knowledge of Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) diversity, historical and geographical distribution, based on mitochondrial and chloroplast DNA data. The observed differences in the estimates of genetic differentiation between different types of genomes suggest that both pollen and seed contribute significantly to gene flow within species. Organelles’ diversity represents an important criterion which could be later applied in planning for future forest management a...

  3. Characterization of genetic resources of onion (Allium cepa L.) from the Spanish secondary centre of diversity

    OpenAIRE

    Mallor Giménez, Cristina; Carravedo Fantova, Miguel; Estopañán Muñoz, Gloria; Mallor, F.

    2011-01-01

    Onions are the second most-valuable vegetable in the world. Despite its global culinary and economic significance, the knowledge of genetic diversity and resources is limited. The aim of this study was to morphologically and physico-chemically characterize eighty-six onion landraces from Spain, part of the secondary Mediterranean Centre of diversity. The evaluated traits in the bulb included: weight, shape, firmness, soluble solids content (SSC), pungency and sugars content (gluco...

  4. Intraspecific genetic diversity of the oak gall wasp Andricus lucidus (Hymenoptera: Cynipidae) populations in Anatolia

    OpenAIRE

    Mutun, Serap

    2011-01-01

    Intraspecific genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationships of Andricus lucidus haplotypes from Turkey were studied by PCR-RFLP analysis. A total of 26 haplotypes were detected among 144 individuals collected from 9 populations. The estimated average haplotype and nucleotide diversity within populations were 0.8089 and 0.115542, respectively. Nucleotide divergence estimates among the analyzed oak gall wasp populations ranged between 0.012% and 7.3%. Dendrograms indicated that there was a r...

  5. Genetic and morphological diversity of the genus Lampetra (Petromyzontidae) in Europe

    OpenAIRE

    Mateus, Catarina Sofia Pereira

    2013-01-01

    This study aims at contributing to the knowledge on genetic and morphological diversity of European Lampetra. Mitochondrial DNA was used to infer the phylogeography of this genus, and further define conservation units in the Iberian Peninsula. Morphological data was then combined to describe three new species endemic to Portugal. These results support evidence of the high diversity of the Iberian Peninsula, a region that acted as glacial refugium during the Pleistocene glaciations. The analys...

  6. SPAR profiles and genetic diversity amongst pomegranate (Punica granatum L.) genotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Ranade, S. A.; Rana, T. S.; Narzary, D.

    2009-01-01

    We are interested in studying the distribution and range of diversity amongst the pomegranates in India. Single Primer Amplification Reaction (SPAR) profiling using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Directed Amplification of Minisatellite DNA (DAMD) methods enabled the determination of the genetic diversity amongst a total of 64 Indian pomegranate genotypes including 15 wild, 34 semi-wild and 14 cultivated types. SPAR profile data were scored for the computation of pairwise distance...

  7. Patterns of genetic and eco-geographical diversity in Spanish barleys

    OpenAIRE

    Yahiaoui, Samia; igartua Arregui, Ernesto; Moralejo, María Ángeles; Ramsay, L.; Molina-Cano, José Luis; Ciudad, Francisco J.; Lasa Dolhagaray, José Manuel; Gracia Gimeno, María Pilar; Casas Cendoya, Ana María

    2008-01-01

    The pool of Western Mediterranean landraces has been under-utilised for barley breeding so far. The objectives of this study were to assess genetic diversity in a core collection of inbred lines derived from Spanish barley landraces to establish its relationship to barleys from other origins, and to correlate the distribution of diversity with geographical and climatic factors. To this end, 64 SSR were used to evaluate the polymorphism among 225 barley (Hordeum vulgare ssp. vulgare) genotypes...

  8. Social Organization of Crop Genetic Diversity. The G × E × S Interaction Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geo Coppens d’Eeckenbrugge

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available A better knowledge of factors organizing crop genetic diversity in situ increases the efficiency of diversity analyses and conservation strategies, and requires collaboration between social and biological disciplines. Four areas of anthropology may contribute to our understanding of the impact of social factors on crop diversity: ethnobotany, cultural, cognitive and social anthropology. So far, most collaborative studies have been based on ethnobotanical methods, focusing on farmers’ individual motivations and actions, and overlooking the effects of farmer’s social organization per se. After reviewing common shortcomings in studies on sorghum and maize, this article analyzes how social anthropology, through the analysis of intermarriage, residence and seed inheritance practices, can contribute to studies on crop genetic diversity in situ. Crop varieties are thus considered social objects and socially based sampling strategies can be developed. Such an approach is justified because seed exchange is built upon trust and as such seed systems are embedded in a pre-existing social structure and centripetally oriented as a function of farmers’ social identity. The strong analogy between farmers’ cultural differentiation and crop genetic differentiation, both submitted to the same vertical transmission processes, allows proposing a common methodological framework for social anthropology and crop population genetics, where the classical interaction between genetic and environmental factors, G × E, is replaced by a three-way interaction G × E × S, where “S” stands for the social differentiation factors.

  9. Genetic diversity and population structure in Harpadon nehereus based on sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z H; Li, H Y; Qin, Y; Wang, R X

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the genetic diversity among ten populations of the Bombay duck was studied on the basis of sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP). The ten populations were collected from the East China Sea and South China Sea areas. A total of 98 loci were obtained from 292 individuals using eight SRAP primers. The average proportion of polymorphic loci, genetic diversity (H), and Shannon's information index were 75.20%, 0.2478, and 0.3735, respectively. Nei's genetic distance and Shannon's information index between the ten populations ranged from 0.0410 to 0.3841 and from 0.2396 to 0.4506, and the averages Nei's gene diversity index (H = 0.2478) and Shannon's information index (I = 0.3735) at the population level were high. AMOVA showed that most of the variation was within populations (71.74%), and only 28.26% of the variation was between populations. The neighbor-joining tree based on genetic distance revealed that significant genealogical structure existed throughout the examined range of the Bombay duck. The results demonstrated that SRAP marker was an effective tool for the assessment of genetic diversity in the Bombay duck. The results could be used for further protection of the germplasm resource of the Bombay duck. PMID:25117356

  10. Genetic diversity analysis among collected purslane (Portulaca oleracea L.) accessions using ISSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, M Amirul; Juraimi, Abdul Shukor; Rafii, Mohd Yusop; Hamid, Azizah Abdul; Arolu, Ibrahim Wasiu; Abdul Latif, M

    2015-01-01

    Genetic diversity and relationships among 45 collected purslane accessions were evaluated using ISSR markers. The 28 primers gave a total of 167 bands, among which 163 were polymorphic (97.6%). The genetic diversity as estimated by Shannon's information index was 0.513, revealing a quite high level of genetic diversity in the germplasm. The average number of observed allele, effective allele, expected heterozygosity, polymorphic information content (PIC) and Nei's index were 5.96, 1.59, 0.43, 0.35 and 0.35, respectively. The UPGMA dendrogram based on Nei's genetic distance grouped the whole germplasm into 7 distinct clusters. The analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that 89% of total variation occurred within population, while 11% were found among populations. Based on the constructed dendrogram using ISSR markers those accessions that are far from each other by virtue of genetic origin and diversity index (like Ac1 and Ac42; Ac19 and Ac45; Ac9 and Ac23; Ac18 and A25; Ac24 and Ac18) are strongly recommended to select as parent for future breeding program to develop high yielding and stress tolerant purslane variety in contribution to global food security. PMID:25468001

  11. Assessment of genetic diversity in indigenous turmeric (Curcuma longa) germplasm from India using molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Sushma; Singh, Shweta; Sharma, Suresh; Tewari, S K; Roy, R K; Goel, A K; Rana, T S

    2015-04-01

    Curcuma longa L., commonly known as turmeric, is one of the economically and medicinally important plant species. It is predominantly cultivated in the tropical and sub tropical countries. India is the largest producer, and exporter of turmeric in the world, followed by China, Indonesia, Bangladesh and Thailand. In the present study, Directed Amplification of Minisatellite DNA (DAMD) and Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR), methods were used to estimate the genetic variability in indigenous turmeric germplasm. Cumulative data analysis for DAMD (15) and ISSR (13) markers resulted into 478 fragments, out of which 392 fragments were polymorphic, revealing 82 % polymorphism across the turmeric genotypes. Wide range of pairwise genetic distances (0.03-0.59) across the genotypes revealed that these genotypes are genetically quite diverse. The UPGMA dendrogram generated using cumulative data showed significant relationships amongst the genotypes. All 29 genotypes studied grouped into two clusters irrespective of their geographical affiliations with 100 % bootstrap value except few genotypes, suggesting considerable diversity amongst the genotypes. These results suggested that the current collection of turmeric genotypes preserve the vast majority of natural variations. The results further demonstrate the efficiency and reliability of DAMD and ISSR markers in determining the genetic diversity and relationships among the indigenous turmeric germplasm. DAMD and ISSR profiling have identified diverse turmeric genotypes, which could be further utilized in various genetic improvement programmes including conventional as well as marker assisted breeding towards development of new and desirable turmeric genotypes. PMID:25964716

  12. Ancient DNA, climatic change, and loss of genetic diversity in an endemic Patagonian mammal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Y.; Lacey, E.; Ramakrishnan, U.; Pearson, O.; Hadly, E.

    2004-12-01

    Understanding the response of animal populations to climatic change is essential for the future maintenance of biodiversity. One question that remains difficult to answer, and is particularly important to conservation, is how animals respond over time scales relevant to evolutionary change. Ancient DNA provides a unique opportunity to track animal response to Holocene climate change and to study species replacement patterns and genetic diversity over time. We used ancient DNA to compare response to climatic change in two species, C. sociabilis and C. haigi, over the last 8,000 years. Our study site, Cueva Traful, is a late-Holocene raptor roost in Parque Nacional Nahuel Huapi, Argentina. A lack of genetic diversity in modern C. sociabilis populations is indicative of past bottleneck events and a previous ancient DNA study found that it had remained genetically identical for at least 1000 years in the face of climatic change and human disturbance. Since Cueva Traful goes back further in time, our first goal was to examine genetic diversity in order to place a longer term historical perspective on the modern bottleneck. The second goal was to compare changes in genetic diversity in C. sociabilis to C. haigi a closely related species that may respond differently to climatic change. The use of ancient DNA presents unique challenges due to low copy number, environmental damage to template, and high contamination risk. Despite these challenges, ancient DNA provides a unique perspective on evolutionary history.

  13. Genetic Diversity in Lens Species Revealed by EST and Genomic Simple Sequence Repeat Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikshit, Harsh Kumar; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, Dharmendra; Aski, Muraleedhar Sidaram; Prakash, Prapti; Jain, Neelu; Meena, Suresh; Kumar, Shiv; Sarker, Ashutosh

    2015-01-01

    Low productivity of pilosae type lentils grown in South Asia is attributed to narrow genetic base of the released cultivars which results in susceptibility to biotic and abiotic stresses. For enhancement of productivity and production, broadening of genetic base is essentially required. The genetic base of released cultivars can be broadened by using diverse types including bold seeded and early maturing lentils from Mediterranean region and related wild species. Genetic diversity in eighty six accessions of three species of genus Lens was assessed based on twelve genomic and thirty one EST-SSR markers. The evaluated set of genotypes included diverse lentil varieties and advanced breeding lines from Indian programme, two early maturing ICARDA lines and five related wild subspecies/species endemic to the Mediterranean region. Genomic SSRs exhibited higher polymorphism in comparison to EST SSRs. GLLC 598 produced 5 alleles with highest gene diversity value of 0.80. Among the studied subspecies/species 43 SSRs detected maximum number of alleles in L. orientalis. Based on Nei’s genetic distance cultivated lentil L. culinaris subsp. culinaris was found to be close to its wild progenitor L. culinaris subsp. orientalis. The Prichard’s structure of 86 genotypes distinguished different subspecies/species. Higher variability was recorded among individuals within population than among populations. PMID:26381889

  14. Genetic Diversity of Old Chicken Breeds Kept in Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martino Cassandro

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the genetic variation of five local chicken breeds reared in Poland. Twenty-seven microsatellite markers were investigated in 138 birds belonging to five breeds: Miniature Cochin (MCO, Gold Italian (GI, Green Legged Partridge (GLP, Silver Italian (SI and White Leghorn (WL. One hundred eighty five alleles were detected in the overall population, with a mean number of 6.85 ± 3.32 alleles per locus. For the local breeds, the observed and expected heterozygosity ranged from a minimum of 0.287 to a maximum of 0.458 and from 0.397 to 0.499 for the GI and SI breeds, respectively. The overall population heterozygote deficiency was 0.430, the average Wright’s inbreeding coefficient (FIS was 0.061 and the heterozygote deficiency due to breed subdivision was 0.393. Wright’s fixation index was slightly positive for all breeds excluding MCO (FIS = -0.476 and the estimated molecular inbreeding (fij within breed ranged from 0.296 (GLP and SI to 0.361 (WL evidencing limited coancestry. Mean allelic richness, obtained with rarefaction method based on sixteen observations, was 2.12 being the WL the less variable (1.79. Tomiuk and Loeschcke’s DTL genetic distance values were used to draw a neighbornet network which separated the cluster made of MCO and GLP from the cluster of GI, WL and SI. The results arising from our microsatellites analysis represent a starting point for the valorization of these local Polish chicken breeds for monitoring and preserving their genetic variability.

  15. Land use, genetic diversity and toxicant tolerance in natural populations of Daphnia magna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coors, Anja; Vanoverbeke, Joost; De Bie, Tom; De Meester, Luc

    2009-10-19

    Provided that gene flow is not too high, selection by local environmental conditions in heterogeneous landscapes can lead to genetic adaptation of natural populations to their local habitat. Pollution with anthropogenic toxicants may create pronounced environmental gradients that impose strong local selection pressures. Toxic contaminants may also directly impact genetic structure in natural populations by exhibiting genotoxicity or by causing population declines resulting in genetic bottlenecks. Using populations of Daphnia magna established from the dormant egg banks of ponds located in a landscape dominated by anthropogenic impact, we aimed at detecting evidence for local adaptation to environmental contamination. We explored the relationship between land use around the 10 investigated ponds, population genetic diversity as measured by neutral genetic markers (polymorphic allozymes) and the tolerance of the populations originating from these ponds to acute lethal effects of two model toxicants, the pesticide carbaryl and the metal potassium dichromate. Genetic diversity of the populations as observed by neutral markers tended to be negatively impacted by agricultural land use intensity (Spearman rank correlation, R=-0.614, P=0.059), indicating that genetic bottlenecks may have resulted from anthropogenic impact. We experimentally observed differences in susceptibility to both carbaryl and potassium dichromate among the studied pond populations of D. magna (analysis of deviance, Ppollution and provide evidence that genetic erosion in natural Daphnia populations is related to anthropogenic impact. PMID:19747740

  16. Identifying Genetic Hotspots by Mapping Molecular Diversity of Widespread Trees: When Commonness Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souto, Cintia P; Mathiasen, Paula; Acosta, María Cristina; Quiroga, María Paula; Vidal-Russell, Romina; Echeverría, Cristian; Premoli, Andrea C

    2015-01-01

    Conservation planning requires setting priorities at the same spatial scale at which decision-making processes are undertaken considering all levels of biodiversity, but current methods for identifying biodiversity hotspots ignore its genetic component. We developed a fine-scale approach based on the definition of genetic hotspots, which have high genetic diversity and unique variants that represent their evolutionary potential and evolutionary novelties. Our hypothesis is that wide-ranging taxa with similar ecological tolerances, yet of phylogenetically independent lineages, have been and currently are shaped by ecological and evolutionary forces that result in geographically concordant genetic patterns. We mapped previously published genetic diversity and unique variants of biparentally inherited markers and chloroplast sequences for 9 species from 188 and 275 populations, respectively, of the 4 woody dominant families of the austral temperate forest, an area considered a biodiversity hotspot. Spatial distribution patterns of genetic polymorphisms differed among taxa according to their ecological tolerances. Eight genetic hotspots were detected and we recommend conservation actions for some in the southern Coastal Range in Chile. Existing spatially explicit genetic data from multiple populations and species can help to identify biodiversity hotspots and guide conservation actions to establish science-based protected areas that will preserve the evolutionary potential of key habitats and species. PMID:26245788

  17. CUDA-accelerated genetic feedforward-ANN training for data mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present an implementation of genetic algorithm (GA) training of feedforward artificial neural networks (ANNs) targeting commodity graphics cards (GPUs). By carefully mapping the problem onto the unique GPU architecture, we achieve order-of-magnitude speedup over a conventional CPU implementation. Furthermore, we show that the speedup is consistent across a wide range of data set sizes, making this implementation ideal for large data sets. This performance boost enables the genetic algorithm to search a larger subset of the solution space, which results in more accurate pattern classification. Finally, we demonstrate this method in the context of the 2009 UC San Diego Data Mining Contest, achieving a world-class lift on a data set of 94682 e-commerce transactions.

  18. CUDA-accelerated genetic feedforward-ANN training for data mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patulea, Catalin; Peace, Robert; Green, James, E-mail: cpatulea@sce.carleton.ca, E-mail: rpeace@sce.carleton.ca, E-mail: jrgreen@sce.carleton.ca [School of Systems and Computer Engineering, Carleton University, Ottawa, K1S 5B6 (Canada)

    2010-11-01

    We present an implementation of genetic algorithm (GA) training of feedforward artificial neural networks (ANNs) targeting commodity graphics cards (GPUs). By carefully mapping the problem onto the unique GPU architecture, we achieve order-of-magnitude speedup over a conventional CPU implementation. Furthermore, we show that the speedup is consistent across a wide range of data set sizes, making this implementation ideal for large data sets. This performance boost enables the genetic algorithm to search a larger subset of the solution space, which results in more accurate pattern classification. Finally, we demonstrate this method in the context of the 2009 UC San Diego Data Mining Contest, achieving a world-class lift on a data set of 94682 e-commerce transactions.

  19. Genetic diversity analysis in cuban traditional rice germplasm using micro satellite markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the present study, the potential of micro satellite markers to assess the extent of genetic variability in Cuban traditional rice varieties was proved. The work was aimed at identifying alternative genetic diversity pools in this material in comparison to the most important commercial cultivars used in Cuban rice breeding program. For this, 52 traditional accessions, eleven cultivars representing the most planted Cuban material during the last decades and two parent cultivars were studied

  20. Measurement of genetic diversity of virulence in populations of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae in India

    OpenAIRE

    Debabrata Nayak; Lotan K. Bose; Udaya D. Singh; Sanjay Singh; Parsuram Nayak

    2008-01-01

    This work was designed to ascertain the extent of genetic diversity in the pathogen population of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the causal organism of bacterial blight of rice. The virulence of 52 strains of Xoo, collected from 12 rice growing states of India, were clip-inoculated on 16 rice genotypes possessing known genes for resistance. Based on the genetic distance, estimated by multivariate analysis isolates of Xoo could be classified into 13 clusters and five broad groups. The ge...