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Sample records for gamma-ifn-inducible-lysosomal thiol reductase

  1. The Thiol Reductase Activity of YUCCA6 Mediates Delayed Leaf Senescence by Regulating Genes Involved in Auxin Redistribution.

    Cha, Joon-Yung; Kim, Mi R; Jung, In J; Kang, Sun B; Park, Hee J; Kim, Min G; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Auxin, a phytohormone that affects almost every aspect of plant growth and development, is biosynthesized from tryptophan via the tryptamine, indole-3-acetamide, indole-3-pyruvic acid, and indole-3-acetaldoxime pathways. YUCCAs (YUCs), flavin monooxygenase enzymes, catalyze the conversion of indole-3-pyruvic acid (IPA) to the auxin (indole acetic acid). Arabidopsis thaliana YUC6 also exhibits thiol-reductase and chaperone activity in vitro; these activities require the highly conserved Cys-85 and are essential for scavenging of toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the drought tolerance response. Here, we examined whether the YUC6 thiol reductase activity also participates in the delay in senescence observed in YUC6-overexpressing (YUC6-OX) plants. YUC6 overexpression delays leaf senescence in natural and dark-induced senescence conditions by reducing the expression of SENESCENCE-ASSOCIATED GENE 12 (SAG12). ROS accumulation normally occurs during senescence, but was not observed in the leaves of YUC6-OX plants; however, ROS accumulation was observed in YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, which overexpress a mutant YUC6 that lacks thiol reductase activity. We also found that YUC6-OX plants, but not YUC6-OX(C85S) plants, show upregulation of three genes encoding NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductases (NTRA, NTRB, and NTRC), and GAMMA-GLUTAMYLCYSTEINE SYNTHETASE 1 (GSH1), encoding an enzyme involved in redox signaling. We further determined that excess ROS accumulation caused by methyl viologen treatment or decreased glutathione levels caused by buthionine sulfoximine treatment can decrease the levels of auxin efflux proteins such as PIN2-4. The expression of PINs is also reduced in YUC6-OX plants. These findings suggest that the thiol reductase activity of YUC6 may play an essential role in delaying senescence via the activation of genes involved in redox signaling and auxin availability. PMID:27242830

  2. Thioredoxin Reductase Is Essential for Thiol/Disulfide Redox Control and Oxidative Stress Survival of the Anaerobe Bacteroides fragilis▿ †

    Rocha, Edson R.; Tzianabos, Arthur O; Smith, C. Jeffrey

    2007-01-01

    Results of this study showed that the anaerobic, opportunistic pathogen Bacteroides fragilis lacks the glutathione/glutaredoxin redox system and possesses an extensive number of putative thioredoxin (Trx) orthologs. Analysis of the genome sequence revealed six Trx orthologs and an absence of genes required for synthesis of glutathione and glutaredoxins. In addition, it was shown that the thioredoxin reductase (TrxB)/Trx system is the major or sole redox system for thiol/disulfide cellular hom...

  3. Crystal structure of the YffB protein from Pseudomonas aeruginosa suggests a glutathione-dependent thiol reductase function

    Dauter Zbigniew

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The yffB (PA3664 gene of Pseudomonas aeruginosa encodes an uncharacterized protein of 13 kDa molecular weight with a marginal sequence similarity to arsenate reductase from Escherichia coli. The crystal structure determination of YffB was undertaken as part of a structural genomics effort in order to assist with the functional assignment of the protein. Results The structure was determined at 1.0 Å resolution by single-wavelength anomalous diffraction. The fold is very similar to that of arsenate reductase, which is an extension of the thioredoxin fold. Conclusion Given the conservation of the functionally important residues and the ability to bind glutathione, YffB is likely to function as a GSH-dependent thiol reductase.

  4. Location of the redox-active thiols of ribonucleotide reductase: sequences similarity between the Escherichia coli and Lactobacillus leichmannii enzymes

    The redox-active thiols of Escherichia coli ribonucleoside diphosphate reductase and of Lactobacillus leichmannii ribonucleoside triphosphate reductase have been located by a procedure involving (1) prereduction of enzyme with dithiothreitol, (2) specific oxidation of the redox-active thiols by treatment with substrate in the absence of exogenous reductant, (3) alkylation of other thiols with iodoacetamide, and (4) reduction of the disulfides with dithiothreitol and alkylation with [1-14C]iodoacetamide. The dithiothreitol-reduce E. coli B1 subunit is able to convert 3 equiv of CDP to dCDP and is labeled with 5.4 equiv of 14C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 2.8 equiv of 14C is on cysteines-752 and -757 at the C-terminus of B1, while 1.0-1.5 equiv of 14C is on cysteines-222 and -227. It thus appears that two sets of redox-active dithiols are involved in substrate reduction. The L. leichmannii reductase is able to convert 1.1 equiv of CTP to dCTP and is labeled with 2.1 equiv of 14C. Sequencing of tryptic peptides shows that 1.4 equiv of 14C is located on the two cysteines of C-E-G-G-A-C-P-I-K. This peptide shows remarkable and unexpected similarity to the thiol-containing region of the C-terminal peptide of E. coli B1, C-E-S-G-A-C-K-I

  5. The first echinoderm gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) identified from sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus).

    Ren, Chunhua; Chen, Ting; Jiang, Xiao; Luo, Xing; Wang, Yanhong; Hu, Chaoqun

    2015-01-01

    Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) has been described as a key enzyme that facilitating the processing and presentation of major histocompatibility complex class II-restricted antigen in mammals. In this study, the first echinoderm GILT named StmGILT was identified from sea cucumber (Stichopus monotuberculatus). The StmGILT cDNA is 1529 bp in length, containing a 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of 87 bp, a 3'-UTR of 674 bp and an open reading frame (ORF) of 768 bp that encoding a protein of 255 amino acids with a deduced molecular weight of 27.82 kDa and a predicted isoelectric point of 4.73. The putative StmGILT protein possesses all the main characteristics of known GILT proteins, including a signature sequence, a reductase active site CXXC, twelve conserved cysteines, and two potential N-linked glycosylation sites. For the gene structure, StmGILT contains four exons separated by three introns. In the promoter region of StmGILT gene, an NF-κB binding site and an IFN-γ activation site were found. The thiol reductase activity of recombinant StmGILT protein was also demonstrated in this study. In addition, the highest level of mRNA expression was noticed in coelomocytes of S. monotuberculatus. In in vitro experiments performed in coelomocytes, the expression of StmGILT mRNA was significantly up-regulated by lipopolysaccharides (LPS), inactivated bacteria or polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid [poly (I:C)] challenge, suggested that the sea cucumber GILT might play critical roles in the innate immune defending against bacterial and viral infections. PMID:25449705

  6. Increase in thiol oxidative stress via glutathione reductase inhibition as a novel approach to enhance cancer sensitivity to X-ray irradiation.

    Zhao, Yong; Seefeldt, Teresa; Chen, Wei; Carlson, Laura; Stoebner, Adam; Hanson, Sarah; Foll, Ryan; Matthees, Duane P; Palakurthi, Srinath; Guan, Xiangming

    2009-07-15

    Depletion of the reduced form of glutathione (GSH) has been extensively studied for its effect on sensitizing cancer to radiation. However, little is known about the effects of thiol oxidative stress created through an increase in glutathione disulfide (GSSG) on cancer sensitivity to radiation. In this study, an increase in GSSG was effectively created using 2-acetylamino-3-[4-(2-acetylamino-2-carboxyethylsulfanylthiocarbonylamino)phenylthiocarbamoylsulfanyl]propionic acid (2-AAPA), an irreversible glutathione reductase (GR) inhibitor. Our results demonstrate that the GSSG increase significantly enhanced cancer sensitivity to X-ray irradiation in four human cancer cell lines (A431, MCF7, NCI-H226, and OVCAR-3). When cells were pretreated with 2-AAPA followed by X-ray irradiation, the IC(50) values for X-ray irradiation of A431, MCF7, NCI-H226, and OVCAR-3 cells were reduced, from 24.2 +/- 2.8, 42.5 +/- 3.0, 43.0 +/- 3.6, and 27.8+/-3.5 Gy to 6.75 +/- 0.9, 8.1 +/- 1.1, 6.75 +/- 1.0, and 12.1 +/- 1.7 Gy, respectively. The synergistic effects observed from the combination of X-rays plus 2-AAPA were comparable to those from the combination of X-rays plus buthionine sulfoximine, a reference compound known to increase cancer sensitivity to radiation. The synergistic effect was correlated with an increase in cell thiol oxidative stress, which was reflected by a five-to sixfold increase in GSSG and 25% increase in total disulfides. No change in GSH or total thiols was observed as a result of GR inhibition. PMID:19397999

  7. Increase in Thiol Oxidative Stress via Glutathione Reductase Inhibition as a Novel Approach to Enhance Cancer Sensitivity to X-Ray Irradiation

    Zhao, Yong; Seefeldt, Teresa; Chen, Wei; Carlson, Laura; Stoebner, Adam; Hanson, Sarah; Foll, Ryan; Matthees, Duane P.; Palakurthi, Srinath; Guan, Xiangming

    2009-01-01

    Depletion of reduced form glutathione (GSH) has been extensively studied for its effect on sensitizing cancer to radiation. However, little is known about the effect of thiol oxidative stress created through an increase in glutathione disulfide (GSSG) on cancer sensitivity to radiation. In this study, an increase in GSSG was effectively created by 2-acetylamino-3-[4-(2-acetylamino-2-carboxyethylsulfanylthiocarbonylamino)phenylthiocarbamoylsulfanyl]propionic acid (2-AAPA), an irreversible glut...

  8. Thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes

    Fahey, Robert C.

    1986-01-01

    The present studies have shown that GSH metabolism arose in the purple bacteria and cyanobacteria where it functions to protect against oxygen toxicity. Evidence was obtained indicating that GSH metabolism was incorporated into eucaryotes via the endosymbiosis giving rise to mitochrondria and chloroplasts. Aerobic bacteria lacking GSH utilize other thiols for apparently similar functions, the thiol being coenzyme A in Gram positive bacteria and chi-glutamylcysteine in the halobacteria. The thiol biochemistry of prokaryotes is thus seen to be much more highly diversified than that of eucaryotes and much remains to be learned about this subject.

  9. Cell surface thiol isomerases may explain the platelet-selective action of S-nitrosoglutathione

    Xiao, Fang; Gordge, Michael P

    2011-01-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) at low concentration inhibits platelet aggregation without causing vasodilation, suggesting platelet-selective nitric oxide delivery. The mechanism of this selectivity is unknown, but may involve cell surface thiol isomerases, in particular protein disulphide isomerase (csPDI) (EC 5.3.4.1). We have now compared csPDI expression and activity on platelets, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, and the dependence on thiol reductase activity of these cell...

  10. Thiols and radiosensitivity

    The role played by non-protein (NPSH) and protein sulfhydryls (PSH) in hypoxic and aerated cell radiosensitivity was investigated using human skin fibroblasts derived from patients affected with 5-oxoprolinuria. These cells have lowered levels of the enzyme GSH-synthetase which results in a decreased concentration of glutathione. Six cell lines were studied; GM3877 and GM3878, SR and SUR from a single family and OB and AB from a French family. Only GM3877, with GSH levels of 0.6 nmoles/mg protein and NPSH levels of 4 nmoles/mg protein, was found to exhibit a reduced OER of 1.8. Experiments are now in progress to investigate the effect of depleting thiol levels with the ∫-glutamyl cysteine synthetase inhibitor DL Buthionine-SR-sulfoximine to determine if the OER is further reduced, especially in the cell line which already has a lowered OER. The results are discussed with a view toward developing a model which takes into account the role of thiols and DNA repair processes in the resistance of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation

  11. Composite materials having thiol groups

    A composite material having thiol groups comprises a rigid support material. The composite material may comprise a deformable gel (eg agarose) having thiol groups retained within the pore structure of a porous rigid support material (e.g. Kieselghur). The particles of composite material are used to prepare a radioactive gold isotope from a mercury 'parent' isotope. (author)

  12. Histochemical Localization of Glutathione Dependent NBT-Reductase in Mouse Skin

    2001-01-01

    Objective Localization of the glutathione dependent Nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reductase in fresh frozen sections of mouse skin and possible dependence of NBT reductase on tissue thiol levels has been investigated. Methods The fresh frozen tissue sections (8m thickness) were prepared and incubated in medium containing NBT, reduced glutathione (GSH) and phosphate buffer. The staining for GSH was performed with mercury orange. Results  The activity of the NBT-reductase in mouse skin has been found to be localized in the areas rich in glutathione and actively proliferating area of the skin. Conclusion The activity of the NBT-reductase seems to be dependent on the glutathione contents.

  13. Cell surface thiol isomerases may explain the platelet-selective action of S-nitrosoglutathione.

    Xiao, Fang; Gordge, Michael P

    2011-10-30

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) at low concentration inhibits platelet aggregation without causing vasodilation, suggesting platelet-selective nitric oxide delivery. The mechanism of this selectivity is unknown, but may involve cell surface thiol isomerases, in particular protein disulphide isomerase (csPDI) (EC 5.3.4.1). We have now compared csPDI expression and activity on platelets, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, and the dependence on thiol reductase activity of these cell types for NO uptake from GSNO. csPDI expression was measured by flow cytometry and its reductase activity using the pseudosubstrate dieosin glutathione disulphide. This activity assay was adapted and validated for 96-well plate format. Flow cytometry revealed csPDI on all three cell types, but percentage positivity of expression was higher on platelets than on vascular cells. Consistent with this, thiol isomerase-related reductase activity was higher on platelets (Pionomycin) increased csPDI activity on both platelets and smooth muscle cells, but not on endothelium. Intracellular NO delivery from GSNO was greater in platelets than in vascular cells (Pselective actions of GSNO and help define its antithrombotic potential. PMID:21642008

  14. Thiol redox homeostasis in neurodegenerative disease

    Gethin J. McBean

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This review provides an overview of the biochemistry of thiol redox couples and the significance of thiol redox homeostasis in neurodegenerative disease. The discussion is centred on cysteine/cystine redox balance, the significance of the xc− cystine–glutamate exchanger and the association between protein thiol redox balance and neurodegeneration, with particular reference to Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and glaucoma. The role of thiol disulphide oxidoreductases in providing neuroprotection is also discussed.

  15. Thiol/Disulfide system plays a crucial role in redox protection in the acidophilic iron-oxidizing bacterium Leptospirillum ferriphilum.

    Javiera Norambuena

    Full Text Available Thiol/disulfide systems are involved in the maintenance of the redox status of proteins and other molecules that contain thiol/disulfide groups. Leptospirillum ferriphilum DSM14647, an acidophilic bacterium that uses Fe(2+ as electron donor, and withstands very high concentrations of iron and other redox active metals, is a good model to study how acidophiles preserve the thiol/disulfide balance. We studied the composition of thiol/disulfide systems and their role in the oxidative stress response in this extremophile bacterium. Bioinformatic analysis using genomic data and enzymatic assays using protein extracts from cells grown under oxidative stress revealed that the major thiol/disulfide system from L. ferriphilum are a cytoplasmic thioredoxin system (composed by thioredoxins Trx and thioredoxin reductase TR, periplasmic thiol oxidation system (DsbA/DsbB and a c-type cytochrome maturation system (DsbD/DsbE. Upon exposure of L. ferriphilum to reactive oxygen species (ROS-generating compounds, transcriptional activation of the genes encoding Trxs and the TR enzyme, which results in an increase of the corresponding activity, was observed. Altogether these data suggest that the thioredoxin-based thiol/disulfide system plays an important role in redox protection of L. ferriphilum favoring the survival of this microorganism under extreme environmental oxidative conditions.

  16. Thiol isomerases in thrombus formation

    Furie, Bruce; Flaumenhaft, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Protein disulfide isomerase, ERp5 and ERp57, among perhaps other thiol isomerases, are important for the initiation of thrombus formation. Using the laser injury thrombosis model in mice to induce in vivo arterial thrombus formation, it was shown that thrombus formation is associated with PDI secretion by platelets, that inhibition of PDI blocked platelet thrombus formation and fibrin generation, and that endothelial cell activation leads to PDI secretion. Similar results using this and other...

  17. The role of glutathione reductase and related enzymes on cellular redox homoeostasis network.

    Couto, Narciso; Wood, Jennifer; Barber, Jill

    2016-06-01

    In this review article we examine the role of glutathione reductase in the regulation, modulation and maintenance of cellular redox homoeostasis. Glutathione reductase is responsible for maintaining the supply of reduced glutathione; one of the most abundant reducing thiols in the majority of cells. In its reduced form, glutathione plays key roles in the cellular control of reactive oxygen species. Reactive oxygen species act as intracellular and extracellular signalling molecules and complex cross talk between levels of reactive oxygen species, levels of oxidised and reduced glutathione and other thiols, and antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione reductase determine the most suitable conditions for redox control within a cell or for activation of programmed cell death. Additionally, we discuss the translation and expression of glutathione reductase in a number of organisms including yeast and humans. In yeast and human cells, a single gene expresses more than one form of glutathione reductase, destined for residence in the cytoplasm or for translocation to different organelles; in plants, however, two genes encoding this protein have been described. In general, insects and kinetoplastids (a group of protozoa, including Plasmodia and Trypanosoma) do not express glutathione reductase or glutathione biosynthetic enzymes. Instead, they express either the thioredoxin system or the trypanothione system. The thioredoxin system is also present in organisms that have the glutathione system and there may be overlapping functions with cross-talk between the two systems. Finally we evaluate therapeutic targets to overcome oxidative stress associated cellular disorders. PMID:26923386

  18. The effect of copper and gallium compounds on ribonucleotide reductase

    Narasimhan, J.

    1992-01-01

    The mode of action of copper complexes (CuL and CuKTS) and gallium compounds (gallium nitrate and citrate) in cytotoxicity was studied. The effects of these agents on the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase was investigated by monitoring the tyrosyl free radical present in the active site of the enzyme through electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Ribonucleotide reductase, a key enzyme in cellular proliferation, consists of two subunits. M1, a dimer of molecular weight 170,000 contains the substrate and effector binding sites. M2, a dimer of molecular weight 88,000, contains non-heme iron and tyrosyl free radical essential for the activity of the enzyme. In studies using copper complexes, the cellular oxidative chemistry was examined by ESR studies on adduct formation with membranes, and oxidation of thiols. Membrane thiols were oxidized through the reduction of the ESR signal of the thiol adduct and the analysis of sulfhydryl content. Using the radiolabel [sup 59]Fe, the inhibitory action of copper thiosemicarbazones on cellular iron uptake was shown. The inhibitory action of CuL on ribonucleotide reductase was shown by the quenching of the tyrosyl free radical on the M2 subunit. The hypothesis that gallium directly interacts with the M2 subunit of the enzyme and displaces the iron from it was proven. The tyrosyl free radical signal from cell lysates was inhibited by the direct addition of gallium compounds. Gallium content in the cells was measured by a fluorimetric method, to ensure the presence of sufficient amounts of gallium to compete with the iron in the M2 subunit. The enzyme activity, measured by the conversion of [sup 14]C-CDP to the labeled deoxy CDP, was inhibited by the addition of gallium nitrate in a cell free assay system. The immunoprecipitation studies of the [sup 59]Fe labeled M2 protein using the monoclonal antibody directed against this subunit suggested that gallium releases iron from the M2 subunit.

  19. Histochemical Localization of Glutathione Dependent NBT—Reductase in Mouse Skin

    YOESHWERSHUKLA

    2001-01-01

    Objective:Localization of the glutathione dependent Nitroblue tetrazolium(NBT) reductase in fresh frozen sections of mouse skin and possible dependence of NBT reductase on tissue thiol levels has been investigated.Methods:The fresh frozen tissue sections(8m thickness)were prepared and incuated in medium containing NBT,reduced glutathione(GSH) and Phosphate uffer,The staining for GSH was performed with mercury orange.Results:The activity of the NBT-reductase in mouse skin has een found to be localized in the areas rich in glutatione and actively proliferating area of the skin.Conclusion:The activity of the NBT-reductase seems to be dependent on the glutatione contents.

  20. Thiol-sensitive promoters of Escherichia coli.

    Javor, G T; Stringer, C D; Ryu, J.

    1988-01-01

    Mu dX(lac) insertion mutants of Escherichia coli CSH50 in which the expression of the lacZ gene was sensitive to the presence of exogenous 1-thioglycerol or dithiothreitol were isolated. Both stimulatory and inhibitory mutants were found. The existence of several thiol-sensitive promoters suggests that exogenous thiols may provoke global stress responses in E. coli.

  1. Entamoeba thiol-based redox metabolism: A potential target for drug development.

    Jeelani, Ghulam; Nozaki, Tomoyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Amebiasis is an intestinal infection widespread throughout the world caused by the human pathogen Entamoeba histolytica. Metronidazole has been a drug of choice against amebiasis for decades despite its low efficacy against asymptomatic cyst carriers and emergence of resistance in other protozoa with similar anaerobic metabolism. Therefore, identification and characterization of specific targets is urgently needed to design new therapeutics for improved treatment against amebiasis. Toward this goal, thiol-dependent redox metabolism is of particular interest. The thiol-dependent redox metabolism in E. histolytica consists of proteins including peroxiredoxin, rubrerythrin, Fe-superoxide dismutase, flavodiiron proteins, NADPH: flavin oxidoreductase, and amino acids including l-cysteine, S-methyl-l-cysteine, and thioprolines (thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acids). E. histolytica completely lacks glutathione and its metabolism, and l-cysteine is the major intracellular low molecular mass thiol. Moreover, this parasite possesses a functional thioredoxin system consisting of thioredoxin and thioredoxin reductase, which is a ubiquitous oxidoreductase system with antioxidant and redox regulatory roles. In this review, we summarize and highlight the thiol-based redox metabolism and its control mechanisms in E. histolytica, in particular, the features of the system unique to E. histolytica, and its potential use for drug development against amebiasis. PMID:26775086

  2. Reaction of alkylcobalamins with thiols

    Carbon-13 NMR spectroscopy and phosphorus-31 NMR spectroscopy have been used to study the reaction of several alkylcobalamins with 2-mercaptoethanol. At alkaline pH, when the thiol is deprotonated, the alkyl-transfer reactions involve a nucleophilic attack of the thiolate anion on the Co-methylene carbon of the cobalamins, yielding alkyl thioethers and cob(II)alamin. In these nucleophilic displacement reactions cob(I)alamin is presumably formed as an intermediate. The higher alkylcobalamins react more slowly than methylcobalamin. The lower reactivity of ethyl- and propylcobalamin is probably the basis of the inhibition of the corrinoid-dependent methyl-transfer systems by propyl iodide. The transfer of the upper nucleoside ligand of adenosylcobalamin to 2-mercaptoethanol is a very slow process; S-adenosylmercaptoethanol and cob(II)alamin are the final products of the reaction. The dealkylation of (carboxymethyl)cobalamin is a much more facile reaction. At alkaline pH S-(carboxymethyl)mercaptoethanol and cob(II)alamin are produced, while at pH values below 8 the carbon-cobalt bond is cleaved reductively to acetate and cob(II)alamin. The reductive cleavage of the carbon-cobalt bond of (carboxymethyl)cobalamin by 2-mercaptoethanol is extremely fast when the cobalamin is in the base-off form. Because the authors have been unable to detect trans coordination of 2-mercaptoethanol, they favor a mechanism that involves a hydride attack on the Co-methylene carbon of (carboxymethyl) rather than a trans attack of the thiol on the cobalt atom

  3. Induction of Glutathione Synthesis and Glutathione Reductase Activity by Abiotic Stresses in Maize and Wheat

    Gabor Kocsy; Gabriella Szalai; Gabor Galiba

    2002-01-01

    The effect of different abiotic stresses (extreme temperatures and osmotic stress) on the synthesis of glutathione and hydroxymethylglutathione, on the ratio of the reduced to oxidised forms of these thiols (GSH/GSSG, hmGSH/hmGSSG), and on the glutathione reductase (GR) activity was studied in maize and wheat genotypes having different sensitivity to low temperature stress. Cold treatment induced a greater increase in total glutathione (TG) content and in GR activity in tolerant genotypes of ...

  4. The Effects of Acrolein on Peroxiredoxins, Thioredoxins, and Thioredoxin Reductase in Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells

    Myers, Charles R.; Myers, Judith M.

    2008-01-01

    Inhalation is a common form of exposure to acrolein, a toxic reactive volatile aldehyde that is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. Bronchial epithelial cells would be directly exposed to inhaled acrolein. The thioredoxin (Trx) system is essential for the maintenance of cellular thiol redox balance, and is critical for cell survival. Normally, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) maintains the cytosolic (Trx1) and mitochondrial (Trx2) thioredoxins in the reduced state, and the thioredoxins keep the...

  5. Evaluation and Control of Thiol-ene/Thiol-epoxy Hybrid Networks

    Carioscia, Jacquelyn A.; Stansbury, Jeffrey W.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2007-01-01

    The development of thiol-ene/thiol-epoxy hybrid networks offers the advantage of tailorable polymerization kinetics while producing a highly crosslinked, high Tg polymer that has significantly reduced shrinkage stress. Stoichiometric mixtures of pentaerythritol tetra(3-mercaptopropionate) (PETMP)/triallyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-trione (TATATO) (thiol-ene, mixture 1) and PETMP/bisphenol a diglycidyl ether (BADGE) (thiol-epoxy, mixture 2) were prepared and hybrid mixtures of 75/25, 50/50, 25/75, ...

  6. Thiol-reactivity of the fungicide maneb

    James R. Roede

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Maneb (MB is a manganese-containing ethylene bis-dithiocarbamate fungicide that is implicated as an environmental risk factor for Parkinson's disease, especially in combination with paraquat (PQ. Dithiocarbamates inhibit aldehyde dehydrogenases, but the relationship of this to the combined toxicity of MB + PQ is unclear because PQ is an oxidant and MB activates Nrf2 and increases cellular GSH without apparent oxidative stress. The present research investigated the direct reactivity of MB with protein thiols using recombinant thioredoxin-1 (Trx1 as a model protein. The results show that MB causes stoichiometric loss of protein thiols, reversibly dimerizes the protein and inhibits its enzymatic activity. MB reacted at similar rates with low-molecular weight, thiol-containing chemicals. Together, the data suggest that MB can potentiate neurotoxicity of multiple agents by disrupting protein thiol functions in a manner analogous to that caused by oxidative stress, but without GSH depletion.

  7. Thiol-reactivity of the fungicide maneb.

    Roede, James R; Jones, Dean P

    2014-01-01

    Maneb (MB) is a manganese-containing ethylene bis-dithiocarbamate fungicide that is implicated as an environmental risk factor for Parkinson's disease, especially in combination with paraquat (PQ). Dithiocarbamates inhibit aldehyde dehydrogenases, but the relationship of this to the combined toxicity of MB + PQ is unclear because PQ is an oxidant and MB activates Nrf2 and increases cellular GSH without apparent oxidative stress. The present research investigated the direct reactivity of MB with protein thiols using recombinant thioredoxin-1 (Trx1) as a model protein. The results show that MB causes stoichiometric loss of protein thiols, reversibly dimerizes the protein and inhibits its enzymatic activity. MB reacted at similar rates with low-molecular weight, thiol-containing chemicals. Together, the data suggest that MB can potentiate neurotoxicity of multiple agents by disrupting protein thiol functions in a manner analogous to that caused by oxidative stress, but without GSH depletion. PMID:24936438

  8. Hypochlorite-induced oxidation of thiols

    Davies, Michael Jonathan; Hawkins, C L

    2000-01-01

    -molecular-weight thiols such as reduced glutathione (GSH), and sulfur-containing amino acids in proteins, are major targets for HOCl. Radicals have not generally been implicated as intermediates in thiol oxidation by HOCl, though there is considerable literature evidence for the involvement of radicals in the metal ion......-, thermal- or UV light-catalysed decomposition of sulfenyl or sulfonyl chlorides which are postulated intermediates in thiol oxidation. In this study we show that thiyl radicals are generated on reaction of a number of low-molecular-weight thiols with HOCl. With sub-stoichiometric amounts of HOCl, relative...... for the involvement of sulfenyl chlorides (RSCl) in the formation of these radicals, and studies with an authentic sulfenyl chloride have demonstrated that this compound readily decomposes in thermal-, metal-ion- or light-catalysed reactions to give thiyl radicals. The formation of thiyl radicals on oxidation...

  9. Coenzyme A disulfide reductase, the primary low molecular weight disulfide reductase from Staphylococcus aureus. Purification and characterization of the native enzyme.

    delCardayre, S B; Stock, K P; Newton, G L; Fahey, R C; Davies, J E

    1998-03-01

    The human pathogen Staphylococcus aureus does not utilize the glutathione thiol/disulfide redox system employed by eukaryotes and many bacteria. Instead, this organism produces CoA as its major low molecular weight thiol. We report the identification and purification of the disulfide reductase component of this thiol/disulfide redox system. Coenzyme A disulfide reductase (CoADR) catalyzes the specific reduction of CoA disulfide by NADPH. CoADR has a pH optimum of 7.5-8.0 and is a dimer of identical subunits of Mr 49,000 each. The visible absorbance spectrum is indicative of a flavoprotein with a lambdamax = 452 nm. The liberated flavin from thermally denatured enzyme was identified as flavin adenine dinucleotide. Steady-state kinetic analysis revealed that CoADR catalyzes the reduction of CoA disulfide by NADPH at pH 7.8 with a Km for NADPH of 2 muM and for CoA disulfide of 11 muM. In addition to CoA disulfide CoADR reduces 4,4'-diphosphopantethine but has no measurable ability to reduce oxidized glutathione, cystine, pantethine, or H2O2. CoADR demonstrates a sequential kinetic mechanism and employs a single active site cysteine residue that forms a stable mixed disulfide with CoA during catalysis. These data suggest that S. aureus employs a thiol/disulfide redox system based on CoA/CoA-disulfide and CoADR, an unorthodox new member of the pyridine nucleotide-disulfide reductase superfamily. PMID:9488707

  10. Genomics and X-ray microanalysis indicate that Ca2+ and thiols mediate the aggregation and adhesion of Xylella fastidiosa

    Leite B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of the genome sequence of the bacterial plant pathogen Xylella fastidiosa, the causal agent of citrus variegated chlorosis, is accelerating important investigations concerning its pathogenicity. Plant vessel occlusion is critical for symptom development. The objective of the present study was to search for information that would help to explain the adhesion of X. fastidiosa cells to the xylem. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that adhesion may occur without the fastidium gum, an exopolysaccharide produced by X. fastidiosa, and X-ray microanalysis demonstrated the presence of elemental sulfur both in cells grown in vitro and in cells found inside plant vessels, indicating that the sulfur signal is generated by the pathogen surface. Calcium and magnesium peaks were detected in association with sulfur in occluded vessels. We propose an explanation for the adhesion and aggregation process. Thiol groups, maintained by the enzyme peptide methionine sulfoxide reductase, could be active on the surface of the bacteria and appear to promote cell-cell aggregation by forming disulfide bonds with thiol groups on the surface of adjacent cells. The enzyme methionine sulfoxide reductase has been shown to be an auxiliary component in the adhesiveness of some human pathogens. The negative charge conferred by the ionized thiol group could of itself constitute a mechanism of adhesion by allowing the formation of divalent cation bridges between the negatively charged bacteria and predominantly negatively charged xylem walls.

  11. Molecular study of DNA radioprotection by thiols

    Savoye, C.; Charlier, M.; Spotheim-Maurizot, M. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 45 - Orleans-la-Source (France); Swenberg, C. [ACRD, Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute, Bethesda (United States); Sabattier, R. [Centre Hospitalier Regional d`Orleans, 45 (France)

    1997-03-01

    Polyamines (PA) are natural components of mammalian cells, essential for growth processes. Since a decrease of the cellular level of PA increases the effect of radiotherapy on tumour cells, we have supposed that PA may act as DNA radioprotectors. The search of non-toxic agents that protect specifically normal cells led to the discovery of the agent WR-2721 used now in cancer cancer therapy under the name Ethyol (Amifostine) and of the agent WR-151327. Both have a chemical structure close to that of natural PA. The main radioprotective metabolites of these agents are the thiols WR>61065 and WR-151326. We have compared here here the protective effects of these thiols to those of another simpler thiol, the cysteamine, and of a related PA, the putrescine, on the number and location of fast neutrons-induced DNA strand breaks. (authors)

  12. Glutathione reductase: solvent equilibrium and kinetic isotope effects

    Glutathione reductase catalyzes the NADPH-dependent reduction of oxidized glutathione (GSSG). The kinetic mechanism is ping-pong, and we have investigated the rate-limiting nature of proton-transfer steps in the reactions catalyzed by the spinach, yeast, and human erythrocyte glutathione reductases using a combination of alternate substrate and solvent kinetic isotope effects. With NADPH or GSSG as the variable substrate, at a fixed, saturating concentration of the other substrate, solvent kinetic isotope effects were observed on V but not V/K. Plots of Vm vs mole fraction of D2O (proton inventories) were linear in both cases for the yeast, spinach, and human erythrocyte enzymes. When solvent kinetic isotope effect studies were performed with DTNB instead of GSSG as an alternate substrate, a solvent kinetic isotope effect of 1.0 was observed. Solvent kinetic isotope effect measurements were also performed on the asymmetric disulfides GSSNB and GSSNP by using human erythrocyte glutathione reductase. The Km values for GSSNB and GSSNP were 70 microM and 13 microM, respectively, and V values were 62 and 57% of the one calculated for GSSG, respectively. Both of these substrates yield solvent kinetic isotope effects greater than 1.0 on both V and V/K and linear proton inventories, indicating that a single proton-transfer step is still rate limiting. These data are discussed in relationship to the chemical mechanism of GSSG reduction and the identity of the proton-transfer step whose rate is sensitive to solvent isotopic composition. Finally, the solvent equilibrium isotope effect measured with yeast glutathione reductase is 4.98, which allows us to calculate a fractionation factor for the thiol moiety of GSH of 0.456

  13. Human brain aldehyde reductases: relationship to succinic semialdehyde reductase and aldose reductase.

    Hoffman, P L; Wermuth, B; von Wartburg, J P

    1980-08-01

    Human brain contains multiple forms of aldehyde-reducing enzymes. One major form (AR3), as previously shown, has properties that indicate its identity with NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase isolated from brain and other organs of various species; i.e., low molecular weight, use of NADPH as the preferred cofactor, and sensitivity to inhibition by barbiturates. A second form of aldehyde reductase ("SSA reductase") specifically reduces succinic semialdehyde (SSA) to produce gamma-hydroxybutyrate. This enzyme form has a higher molecular weight than AR3, and uses NADH as well as NADPH as cofactor. SSA reductase was not inhibited by pyrazole, oxalate, or barbiturates, and the only effective inhibitor found was the flavonoid quercetine. Although AR3 can also reduce SSA, the relative specificity of SSA reductase may enhance its in vivo role. A third form of human brain aldehyde reductase, AR2, appears to be comparable to aldose reductases characterized in several species, on the basis of its activity pattern with various sugar aldehydes and its response to characteristic inhibitors and activators, as well as kinetic parameters. This enzyme is also the most active in reducing the aldehyde derivatives of biogenic amines. These studies suggest that the various forms of human brain aldehyde reductases may have specific physiological functions. PMID:6778961

  14. Characterization of a Novel Dithiocarbamate Glutathione Reductase Inhibitor and Its Use as a Tool to Modulate Intracellular Glutathione*

    Seefeldt, Teresa; Zhao, Yong; Chen, Wei; Raza, Ashraf S.; Carlson, Laura; Herman, Jocqueline; Stoebner, Adam; Hanson, Sarah; Foll, Ryan; Guan, Xiangming

    2009-01-01

    Thiol redox state (TRS) is an important parameter to reflect intracellular oxidative stress and is associated with various normal and abnormal biochemical processes. Agents that can be used to increase intracellular TRS will be valuable tools in TRS-related research. Glutathione reductase (GR) is a critical enzyme in the homeostasis of TRS. The enzyme catalyzes the reduction of GSSG to GSH to maintain a high GSH:GSSG ratio. Inhibition of the enzyme can be used to incre...

  15. Microfluidic devices using thiol-ene polymers

    Bou, Simon J. M. C.; Ellis, Amanda V.

    2013-12-01

    Here, a new polymeric microfluidic platform using off-stoichiometric thiol-ene (OSTE) polymers was developed. Thiolene polymers were chosen as they afford rapid UV curing, low volume shrinkage and optical transparency for use in microfluidic devices. Three different off-stoichiometric thiol-ene polymers with 30% excess allyl, 50% excess thiol and a 90% excess thiol (OSTE Allyl-30, OSTE-50 and OSTE-90, respectively) were fabricated. Attenuated reflectance Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and solid-state cross polarisation-magic angle spinning (CP-MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy confirmed which functional groups (thiol or allyl) were present in excess in the OSTE polymers. The polymers were shown to have a more hydrophilic surface (water contact angle of 65°+/- 3) compared to polydimethylsiloxane (water contact angle of 105° +/- 5). Testing of the mechanical properties showed the glass transition temperatures to be 15.09 °C, 43.15 °C and, 57.48 °C for OSTE-90, OSTE Allyl-30 and, OSTE-50, respectively. The storage modulus was shown to be less than 10 MPa for the OSTE-90 polymer and approximately 1750 MPa for the OSTE Allyl-30 and OSTE-50 polymers. The polymers were then utilised to fabricate microfluidic devices via soft lithography practices and devices sealed using a one-step UV lamination "click" reaction technique. Finally, gold nanoparticles were used to form gold films on the OSTE-90 and OSTE-50 polymers as potential electrodes. Atomic force microscopy and sheet resistances were used to characterise the films.

  16. Functional and Structural Characterization of a Thiol Peroxidase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Rho,B.; Hung, L.; Holton, J.; Vigil, D.; Kim, S.; Park, M.; Terwilliger, T.; Pedelacq, j.

    2006-01-01

    A thiol peroxidase (Tpx) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis was functionally analyzed. The enzyme shows NADPH-linked peroxidase activity using a thioredoxin-thioredoxin reductase system as electron donor, and anti-oxidant activity in a thiol-dependent metal-catalyzed oxidation system. It reduces H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, t-butyl hydroperoxide, and cumene hydroperoxide, and is inhibited by sulfhydryl reagents. Mutational studies revealed that the peroxidatic (Cys60) and resolving (Cys93) cysteine residues are critical amino acids for catalytic activity. The X-ray structure determined to a resolution of 1.75 Angstroms shows a thioredoxin fold similar to that of other peroxiredoxin family members. Superposition with structural homologues in oxidized and reduced forms indicates that the M. tuberculosis Tpx is a member of the atypical two-Cys peroxiredoxin family. In addition, the short distance that separates the Ca atoms of Cys60 and Cys93 and the location of these cysteine residues in unstructured regions may indicate that the M. tuberculosis enzyme is oxidized, though the side-chain of Cys60 is poorly visible. It is solely in the reduced Streptococcus pneumoniae Tpx structure that both residues are part of two distinct helical segments. The M. tuberculosis Tpx is dimeric both in solution and in the crystal structure. Amino acid residues from both monomers delineate the active site pocket.

  17. Quantifying the global cellular thiol-disulfide status

    Hansen, Rosa E; Roth, Doris; Winther, Jakob R

    2009-01-01

    It is widely accepted that the redox status of protein thiols is of central importance to protein structure and folding and that glutathione is an important low-molecular-mass redox regulator. However, the total cellular pools of thiols and disulfides and their relative abundance have never been...... determined. In this study, we have assembled a global picture of the cellular thiol-disulfide status in cultured mammalian cells. We have quantified the absolute levels of protein thiols, protein disulfides, and glutathionylated protein (PSSG) in all cellular protein, including membrane proteins. These data...... cell types. However, when cells are exposed to a sublethal dose of the thiol-specific oxidant diamide, PSSG levels increase to >15% of all protein cysteine. Glutathione is typically characterized as the "cellular redox buffer"; nevertheless, our data show that protein thiols represent a larger active...

  18. Protein Thiols as an Indication of Oxidative Stress

    Yousef Rezaei Chianeh; Krishnananda Prabhu

    2014-01-01

    Thiol is an organic compound that contain sulphhydryl group that have a critical role in preventing any involvement of oxidative stress in the cell. These defensive functions are generally considered to be carried out by the low molecular weight thiol glutathione and by cysteine residues in the active sites of proteins such as thioredoxin and peroxiredoxin. In addition, there are thiols exposed on protein surfaces that are not directly involved with protein function, although they can intera...

  19. Tunable degradation of maleimide-thiol adducts in reducing environments

    Baldwin, Aaron D.; Kiick, Kristi L.

    2011-01-01

    Addition chemistries are widely used in preparing biological conjugates, and in particular, maleimide-thiol adducts have been widely employed. Here we show that the resulting succinimide thioether formed by a Michael type addition of a thiol to N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), generally accepted as stable, can in fact undergo retro and exchange reactions in the presence of other thiol compounds at physiological pH and temperature, offering a novel strategy for controlled release. Model studies (1H NMR...

  20. Copper complexation by thiol compounds in estuarine waters

    Laglera, L.M.; van den Berg, C.M.G.

    2003-01-01

    The stability of copper complexes with thiol substances in estuarine waters was determined for the first time using a new procedure based on cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV). The free thiol concentration was monitored during titrations with copper in the presence of a competing ligand salicylaldoxime (SA); concentrations of copper-complexing ligands and conditional stability constants were determined simultaneously but independently. The decrease in the free thiol concentration with incre...

  1. Designed Chemical Intervention with Thiols for Prophylactic Contraception

    Monika Sharma; Lokesh Kumar; Ashish Jain; Vikas Verma; Vikas Sharma; Bhavana Kushwaha; Nand Lal; Lalit Kumar; Tara Rawat; Dwivedi, Anil K.; Jagdamba P Maikhuri; Sharma, Vishnu L.; Gopal Gupta

    2013-01-01

    Unlike somatic cells, sperm have several-fold more available-thiols that are susceptible to redox-active agents. The present study explains the mechanism behind the instant sperm-immobilizing and trichomonacidal activities of pyrrolidinium pyrrolidine-1-carbodithioate (PPC), a novel thiol agent rationally created for prophylactic contraception by minor chemical modifications of some known thiol drugs. PPC, and its three derivatives (with potential active-site blocked by alkylation), were synt...

  2. Thiol-containing polymeric embedding materials for nanoskiving

    Mays, Robin L.; Pourhossein, Parisa; Savithri, Dhanalekshmi; Genzer, Jan; Chiechi, Ryan C.; Dickey, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the characterization of new embedding resins for nanoskiving (ultramicrotomy) that contain thiols. Nanoskiving is a technique to produce nanoscale structures using an ultramicrotome to section thin films of materials (e. g., gold) embedded in polymer. Epoxies are used typically as embedding resins for microtomy. Epoxies, however, do not adhere well to gold or other smooth metallic structures that are used commonly for nanoskiving. Thiol-ene and thiol-epoxy polymers provid...

  3. Thiol groups of gizzard myosin heavy chains

    Bailin, G.

    1986-05-01

    Proteolysis of phosphorylated and /sup 3/H-labeled dinitrophenylated chicken gizzard myosin with trypsin released major fragments of M/sub r/ 25,000, 50,000 and 66,000 in a 1:1 ratio. They contained 57% of the dinitrophenyl (N/sub 2/ph) group bound to thiols of the heavy chains; 28% of the label was bound to the light chains. The fragments of M/sub r/ 25,000 and M/sub r/ 66,000 were dinitrophenylated predominantly when the K/sup +/-ATPase activity was inhibited. Thiolysis of phosphorylated and dinitrophenylated myosin with 2-mercaptoethanol removed 60% and 25% of the N/sub 2/ph group from the N-terminal and M/sub r/ 66,000 fragments of the heavy chain, respectively, when 48% of the K/sup +/-ATPase activity was restored. Papain proteolysis of the tryptic digest of modified myosin released a C-terminal segment from the fragment of M/sub r/ 66,000 and it contained most of the remaining label. Proteolysis of /sup 3/H-labeled dinitrophenylated myosin alone resulted in the same digestion pattern but less of the label was bound to the heavy chain fragments. In this case, restoration of enzymic activity occurred in thiolyzed dinitrophenylated myosin when the N/sub 2/ph group was removed from the light chains, predominantly. Conformational changes in gizzard myosin, mediated by phosphorylation, altered the reactivity of the thiols in specific fragments of the heavy chain. Thiol groups of the N- and C-terminal heavy chain regions are involved in maintaining the ATPase activity of myosin.

  4. Thiol-ene-based monolithic microreactors

    Novotný, Jakub; Lafleur, J. P.; Kutter, J. P.

    Brno : Institute of Analytical Chemistry AS CR, 2014 - (Foret, F.; Křenková, J.; Drobníková, I.; Guttman, A.; Klepárník, K.), s. 53-55 ISBN 978-80-904959-2-0. [CECE 2014. International Interdisciplinary Meeting on Bioanalysis /11./. Brno (CZ), 20.10.2014-22.10.2014] Institutional support: RVO:68081715 Keywords : thiol-ene * monolith * enzyme immobilization Subject RIV: CB - Analytical Chemistry, Separation http://www.ce-ce.org/CECE2014/CECE%202014%20proceedings_full.pdf

  5. Genetics Home Reference: sepiapterin reductase deficiency

    Skip to main content Your Guide to Understanding Genetic Conditions Enable Javascript for addthis links to activate. ... Conditions Genes Chromosomes & mtDNA Resources Help Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions sepiapterin reductase deficiency sepiapterin reductase ...

  6. Studies on alterations of the 86-rubidium efflux from rat pancreatic islets caused by thiol and thiol oxidants

    The following findings were revealed by this study: 1) Oxidation-reduction (redox) of the intracellular system of glutathione influences the potassium efflux by way of an increase in the 86-rubidium efflux brought about by the oxidation of intracellular thiols. 2) The 86-rubidium efflux is not subject to change by oxidation of extracellular thiols located in the membrane, nor can it in any way be influenced by reduced glutathione of exogenous origin. 3) The potassium efflux from rat pancreatic islets, being generally known to trigger the electric activities of the beta-cell, is controlled by the oxidation-reduction of intracellular thiols rather than by that of extracellular thiols. (TRV)

  7. Serum paraoxonase activity and protein thiols in patients with hyperlipidemia

    Mungli Prakash; Jeevan K Shetty; Sudeshna Tripathy; Pannuri Vikram; Manish Verma

    2009-01-01

    Objective: In the present study we evaluated the paraoxonase activity and protein thiols level in south Indian population with newly diagnosed hyperlipidemia. Methods: The study was conducted on 55 newly diagnosed hyperlipidemic pa-tients and 57 healthy controls. Serum paraoxonase activity and protein thiols were estimated by spectrophotometeric method and lipid profile by enzymatic kinetic assay method. Results: Serum paraoxonase activity, protein thiols and high density lipoprotein levels were low and total cholesterol, triglycerides and low density lipoprutein levels were high in patients with hyperlipidemia compared to healthy controls ( P < 0.01 ). Serum paranxonase activity correlated positively with protein thiols and high density lipoprotein (P<0.01). Conclusion: Decreased paraoxonase activity and protein thiols were found in patients with hyperlipi-demia. This may indicate the susceptibility of this population to accelerated atherogenesis and protein oxidation.

  8. Quantification of protein-derived thiols during atmosphere-controlled brewing in laboratory scale

    Murmann, Anne Nordmark; Andersen, Preben; Mauch, Alexander;

    2016-01-01

    . Fermentation caused an increase in free thiols, and the balance between free and total thiols was shifted toward a higher degree of free thiols. This was explained by either a reducing effect of fermentation or secretion of thiol-containing compounds from yeast. The efficiency of sulfite to reduce reversibly...

  9. Surface functionalized thiol-ene waveguides for fluorescence biosensing in microfluidic devices

    Feidenhans'l, Nikolaj Agentoft; Lafleur, Josiane P.; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    -ene waveguides were fabricated from 40% excess thiol thiol-ene to ensure the presence of thiol functional groups at the surface of the waveguide. Biotin alkyne was photografted at specific locations using a photomask, directly at the interface between the microfluidic channel and the thiol-ene waveguide prior to...

  10. Thiol-based redox signaling in the nitrogen-fixing symbiosis

    Pierre eFrendo

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In nitrogen poor soils legumes establish a symbiotic interaction with rhizobia that results in the formation of root nodules. These are unique plant organs where bacteria differentiate into bacteroids, which express the nitrogenase enzyme complex that reduces atmospheric N2 to ammonia. Nodule metabolism requires a tight control of the concentrations of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS so that they can perform useful signaling roles while avoiding nitro-oxidative damage. In nodules a thiol-dependent regulatory network that senses, transmits and responds to redox changes is starting to be elucidated. A combination of enzymatic, immunological, pharmacological and molecular analyses has allowed to conclude that glutathione and its legume-specific homolog, homoglutathione, are abundant in meristematic and infected cells, their spatio-temporally distribution is correlated with the corresponding (homoglutathione synthetase activities, and are crucial for nodule development and function. Glutathione is at high concentrations in the bacteroids and at moderate amounts in the mitochondria, cytosol and nuclei. Less information is available on other components of the network. The expression of multiple isoforms of glutathione peroxidases, peroxiredoxins, thioredoxins, glutaredoxins and NADPH-thioredoxin reductases has been detected in nodule cells using antibodies and proteomics. Peroxiredoxins and thioredoxins are essential to regulate and in some cases to detoxify RONS in nodules. Further research is necessary to clarify the regulation of the expression and activity of thiol redox-active proteins in response to abiotic, biotic and developmental cues, their interactions with downstream targets by disulfide-exchange reactions, and their participation in signaling cascades. The availability of mutants and transgenic lines will be crucial to facilitate systematic investigations into the function of the various proteins in the legume

  11. Fatty acyl-CoA reductase

    Reiser, Steven E.; Somerville, Chris R.

    1998-12-01

    The present invention relates to bacterial enzymes, in particular to an acyl-CoA reductase and a gene encoding an acyl-CoA reductase, the amino acid and nucleic acid sequences corresponding to the reductase polypeptide and gene, respectively, and to methods of obtaining such enzymes, amino acid sequences and nucleic acid sequences. The invention also relates to the use of such sequences to provide transgenic host cells capable of producing fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes.

  12. Mechanism-based inhibition of a mutant Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase (cysteine-225----serine) by its substrate CDP.

    Mao, S. S.; Johnston, M I; Bollinger, J M; Stubbe, J.

    1989-01-01

    The B1 subunit of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase (EC 1.17.4.1) has been overexpressed using the pT7-5/pGP1-2 system developed by Tabor and Richardson [Tabor, S. & Richardson, C. (1985) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 82, 1074-1078]. This method has allowed the preparation of two mutant B1 subunits in which two of the four thiols postulated to be within the active site of the enzyme, Cys-225 and Cys-759, have been changed to serines. Incubation of the [Ser225]B1 mutant with the B2 subuni...

  13. Community Analysis of a Mercury Hot Spring Supports Occurrence of Domain-Specific Forms of Mercuric Reductase

    Simbahan, Jessica; Kurth, Elizabeth; Schelert, James; Dillman, Amanda; Moriyama, Etsuko; Jovanovich, Stevan; Blum, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Mercury is a redox-active heavy metal that reacts with active thiols and depletes cellular antioxidants. Active resistance to the mercuric ion is a widely distributed trait among bacteria and results from the action of mercuric reductase (MerA). Protein phylogenetic analysis of MerA in bacteria indicated the occurrence of a second distinctive form of MerA among the archaea, which lacked an N-terminal metal recruitment domain and a C-terminal active tyrosine. To assess the distribution of the ...

  14. Molecular modeling, structural analysis and identification of ligand binding sites of trypanothione reductase from Leishmania mexicana

    Ozal Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    Background & objectives: Trypanothione reductase (TR) is a member of FAD-dependent NADPH oxidoreductase protein family and it is a key enzyme which connects the NADPH and the thiol-based redox system. Inhibition studies indicate that TR is an essential enzyme for parasite survival. Therefore, it is an attractive target enzyme for novel drug candidates. There is no structural model for TR of Leishmania mexicana (LmTR) in the protein databases. In this work, 3D structure of TR from L. mexicana ...

  15. Glutathione reductase gsr-1 is an essential gene required for Caenorhabditis elegans early embryonic development.

    Mora-Lorca, José Antonio; Sáenz-Narciso, Beatriz; Gaffney, Christopher J; Naranjo-Galindo, Francisco José; Pedrajas, José Rafael; Guerrero-Gómez, David; Dobrzynska, Agnieszka; Askjaer, Peter; Szewczyk, Nathaniel J; Cabello, Juan; Miranda-Vizuete, Antonio

    2016-07-01

    Glutathione is the most abundant thiol in the vast majority of organisms and is maintained in its reduced form by the flavoenzyme glutathione reductase. In this work, we describe the genetic and functional analysis of the Caenorhabditis elegans gsr-1 gene that encodes the only glutathione reductase protein in this model organism. By using green fluorescent protein reporters we demonstrate that gsr-1 produces two GSR-1 isoforms, one located in the cytoplasm and one in the mitochondria. gsr-1 loss of function mutants display a fully penetrant embryonic lethal phenotype characterized by a progressive and robust cell division delay accompanied by an aberrant distribution of interphasic chromatin in the periphery of the cell nucleus. Maternally expressed GSR-1 is sufficient to support embryonic development but these animals are short-lived, sensitized to chemical stress, have increased mitochondrial fragmentation and lower mitochondrial DNA content. Furthermore, the embryonic lethality of gsr-1 worms is prevented by restoring GSR-1 activity in the cytoplasm but not in mitochondria. Given the fact that the thioredoxin redox systems are dispensable in C. elegans, our data support a prominent role of the glutathione reductase/glutathione pathway in maintaining redox homeostasis in the nematode. PMID:27117030

  16. Facially amphiphilic thiol capped gold and silver nanoparticles

    Shreedhar Bhata; Uday Maitra

    2008-11-01

    A series of bile acid-derived facially amphiphilic thiols have been used to cap sliver and gold nanoparticles. The self-assembling properties of these steroid-capped nanoparticles have been investigated and reported in this article.

  17. Intracellular thiols: involvement in drug metabolism and radiation response

    Nitro compunds are activated by coupled enzyme reactions to oxygen reactive intermediates leading to the formation of peroxide, under aerobic conditions, and to the depletion of thiols, under anaerobic conditions. Some nitro compounds as substrates for glutathione-S-transferase, show peroxide production without prior thiol removal. Other drugs reacting spontaneouly with glutathione also produce peroxide. Glutathione plays an important role in the metabolism of the nitrocompounds either by directly reacting with them or their reduced intermediates such as the nitroso, nitro and hydroxyl radical. In the case of misonidazole, protection against their cytotoxic effects can be achieved by the addition of exogenous thiols such as glutathione or cysteamine. Results indicate that oxygen and peroxide electrodes provide convenient means for measuring the products of metabolic activation of nitro compounds. Mechanisms are proposed whereby protein, nonprotein and glutathione thiols can interact with drug radicals or with DNA radicals. 60 references, 14 figures, 5 tables

  18. Facially amphiphilic thiol capped gold and silver nanoparticles

    Bhat, Shreedhar; Maitra, Uday

    2008-01-01

    A series of bile acid-derived facially amphiphilic thiols have been used to cap sliver and gold nanoparticles. The self-assembling properties of these steroid-capped nanoparticles have been investigated and reported in this article.

  19. Reversible inactivation of CO dehydrogenase with thiol compounds

    Highlights: • Rather large thiols (e.g. coenzyme A) can reach the active site of CO dehydrogenase. • CO- and H2-oxidizing activity of CO dehydrogenase is inhibited by thiols. • Inhibition by thiols was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. • Thiols coordinate the Cu ion in the [CuSMo(=O)OH] active site as a third ligand. - Abstract: Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CO dehydrogenase) from Oligotropha carboxidovorans is a structurally characterized member of the molybdenum hydroxylase enzyme family. It catalyzes the oxidation of CO (CO + H2O → CO2 + 2e− + 2H+) which proceeds at a unique [CuSMo(=O)OH] metal cluster. Because of changing activities of CO dehydrogenase, particularly in subcellular fractions, we speculated whether the enzyme would be subject to regulation by thiols (RSH). Here we establish inhibition of CO dehydrogenase by thiols and report the corresponding Ki-values (mM): L-cysteine (5.2), D-cysteine (9.7), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (8.2), D,L-homocysteine (25.8), L-cysteine–glycine (2.0), dithiothreitol (4.1), coenzyme A (8.3), and 2-mercaptoethanol (9.3). Inhibition of the enzyme was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of thiol-inhibited CO dehydrogenase revealed a bimetallic site in which the RSH coordinates to the Cu-ion as a third ligand ([MoVI(=O)OH(2)SCuI(SR)S-Cys]) leaving the redox state of the Cu(I) and the Mo(VI) unchanged. Collectively, our findings establish a regulation of CO dehydrogenase activity by thiols in vitro. They also corroborate the hypothesis that CO interacts with the Cu-ion first. The result that thiol compounds much larger than CO can freely travel through the substrate channel leading to the bimetallic cluster challenges previous concepts involving chaperone function and is of importance for an understanding how the sulfuration step in the assembly of the bimetallic cluster might proceed

  20. Reversible inactivation of CO dehydrogenase with thiol compounds

    Kreß, Oliver [Department of Microbiology, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Gnida, Manuel [Department of Chemistry, University of Paderborn, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Pelzmann, Astrid M. [Department of Microbiology, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany); Marx, Christian [Institute of Biochemistry and Biophysics, Friedrich-Schiller-University of Jena, 07745 Jena (Germany); Meyer-Klaucke, Wolfram [Department of Chemistry, University of Paderborn, 33098 Paderborn (Germany); Meyer, Ortwin, E-mail: Ortwin.Meyer@uni-bayreuth.de [Department of Microbiology, University of Bayreuth, 95440 Bayreuth (Germany)

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • Rather large thiols (e.g. coenzyme A) can reach the active site of CO dehydrogenase. • CO- and H{sub 2}-oxidizing activity of CO dehydrogenase is inhibited by thiols. • Inhibition by thiols was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. • Thiols coordinate the Cu ion in the [CuSMo(=O)OH] active site as a third ligand. - Abstract: Carbon monoxide dehydrogenase (CO dehydrogenase) from Oligotropha carboxidovorans is a structurally characterized member of the molybdenum hydroxylase enzyme family. It catalyzes the oxidation of CO (CO + H{sub 2}O → CO{sub 2} + 2e{sup −} + 2H{sup +}) which proceeds at a unique [CuSMo(=O)OH] metal cluster. Because of changing activities of CO dehydrogenase, particularly in subcellular fractions, we speculated whether the enzyme would be subject to regulation by thiols (RSH). Here we establish inhibition of CO dehydrogenase by thiols and report the corresponding K{sub i}-values (mM): L-cysteine (5.2), D-cysteine (9.7), N-acetyl-L-cysteine (8.2), D,L-homocysteine (25.8), L-cysteine–glycine (2.0), dithiothreitol (4.1), coenzyme A (8.3), and 2-mercaptoethanol (9.3). Inhibition of the enzyme was reversed by CO or upon lowering the thiol concentration. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) of thiol-inhibited CO dehydrogenase revealed a bimetallic site in which the RSH coordinates to the Cu-ion as a third ligand ([Mo{sup VI}(=O)OH{sub (2)}SCu{sup I}(SR)S-Cys]) leaving the redox state of the Cu(I) and the Mo(VI) unchanged. Collectively, our findings establish a regulation of CO dehydrogenase activity by thiols in vitro. They also corroborate the hypothesis that CO interacts with the Cu-ion first. The result that thiol compounds much larger than CO can freely travel through the substrate channel leading to the bimetallic cluster challenges previous concepts involving chaperone function and is of importance for an understanding how the sulfuration step in

  1. Oxidative Thiol Modifications in Pro- and Eukaryotic Organisms

    Brandes, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Cystein spielt eine wichtige Rolle in der Biochemie vieler Proteine. Aufgrund der Redox-Eigenschaften und der hohen Reaktivität der freien Thiol-Gruppe sowie dessen Fähigkeit Metallionen zu koordinieren, ist Cystein oft Bestandteil von katalytischen Zentren vieler Enzyme. Zudem lassen sich Cysteine durch reaktive Sauerstoff- und Stickstoffspezies leicht reversibel oxidativ modifizieren. In den letzten Jahren wurde gezeigt, dass Proteine redox-bedingte Thiol-Modifikationen nutzen, um Veränderu...

  2. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions. PMID:8597660

  3. Protein Thiols as an Indication of Oxidative Stress

    Yousef Rezaei Chianeh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Thiol is an organic compound that contain sulphhydryl group that have a critical role in preventing any involvement of oxidative stress in the cell. These defensive functions are generally considered to be carried out by the low molecular weight thiol glutathione and by cysteine residues in the active sites of proteins such as thioredoxin and peroxiredoxin. In addition, there are thiols exposed on protein surfaces that are not directly involved with protein function, although they can interact with the intracellular environment.The process of protection of the cell against an oxidative damage occur by thiol and cystein residue that has a low molecular weight. These residue are present in the active sites of a protein like, peroxiredoxin and thioredoxin. Apart from intracellular antioxidant defense mechanism by protein thiol, there are presence of thiol in outer surface of protein that are not involved with the function of protein, even though they can interact with intracellular part of the cell. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2014; 23(3.000: 443-456

  4. Interfacial thiol-ene photoclick reactions for forming multilayer hydrogels.

    Shih, Han; Fraser, Andrew K; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2013-03-13

    Interfacial visible light-mediated thiol-ene photoclick reactions were developed for preparing step-growth hydrogels with multilayer structures. The effect of a noncleavage type photoinitiator eosin-Y on visible-light-mediated thiol-ene photopolymerization was first characterized using in situ photorheometry, gel fraction, and equilibrium swelling ratio. Next, spectrophotometric properties of eosin-Y in the presence of various relevant macromer species were evaluated using ultraviolet-visible light (UV-vis) spectrometry. It was determined that eosin-Y was able to reinitiate the thiol-ene photoclick reaction, even after light exposure. Because of its small molecular weight, most eosin-Y molecules readily leached out from the hydrogels. The diffusion of residual eosin-Y from preformed hydrogels was exploited for fabricating multilayer step-growth hydrogels. Interfacial hydrogel coating was formed via the same visible-light-mediated gelation mechanism without adding fresh initiator. The thickness of the thiol-ene gel coating could be easily controlled by adjusting visible light exposure time, eosin-Y concentration initially loaded in the core gel, or macromer concentration in the coating solution. The major benefits of this interfacial thiol-ene coating system include its simplicity and cytocompatibility. The formation of thiol-ene hydrogels and coatings neither requires nor generates any cytotoxic components. This new gelation chemistry may have great utilities in controlled release of multiple sensitive growth factors and encapsulation of multiple cell types for tissue regeneration. PMID:23384151

  5. Short communication: characterization of soluble thiols in bovine milk.

    Niero, G; De Marchi, M; Masi, A; Penasa, M; Cassandro, M

    2015-09-01

    Antioxidants are molecules essential for the maintenance of cell homeostasis and their intake through the diet has positive effects on human health. Among antioxidants, low-molecular-weight (LMW) thiols represent an important class of compounds. The aim of this study was to identify LMW thiols in bovine milk. A total of 96 individual milk samples from Brown Swiss, Holstein-Friesian, Alpine Grey, and Simmental cattle breeds were collected in 8 herds. The LMW thiols were extracted from the soluble fraction of milk and, following a derivatization protocol, they were separated by reverse phase HPLC and detected fluorimetrically. Six thiol species were detected and 2, glutathione (GSH) and cysteine-glycine (Cys-Gly), were identified and quantified. Regardless of the breed, the average concentration of Cys-Gly in milk was greater than that of GSH. Overall, milk from dual-purpose breeds (Simmental and Alpine Grey) was richer in LMW thiols than milk from dairy cows (Holstein-Friesian and Brown Swiss). Glutathione and Cys-Gly, closely linked metabolically, were strongly correlated. Pearson correlations of Cys-Gly with protein and casein contents were moderately low, and no relationship was found between GSH and milk chemical composition. Future research should focus on the identification of all detected LMW thiol species. PMID:26188581

  6. Designed Chemical Intervention with Thiols for Prophylactic Contraception.

    Monika Sharma

    Full Text Available Unlike somatic cells, sperm have several-fold more available-thiols that are susceptible to redox-active agents. The present study explains the mechanism behind the instant sperm-immobilizing and trichomonacidal activities of pyrrolidinium pyrrolidine-1-carbodithioate (PPC, a novel thiol agent rationally created for prophylactic contraception by minor chemical modifications of some known thiol drugs. PPC, and its three derivatives (with potential active-site blocked by alkylation, were synthesized and evaluated against live human sperm and metronidazole-susceptible and resistant Trichomonas vaginalis, in vitro. Sperm hexokinase activity was evaluated by coupled enzyme assay. PPC irreversibly immobilized 100% human sperm in ∼30 seconds and totally eliminated Trichomonas vaginalis more efficiently than nonoxynol-9 and metronidazole. It significantly inhibited (P<0.001 thiol-sensitive sperm hexokinase. However, the molecule completely lost all its biological activities once its thiol group was blocked by alkylation. PPC was subsequently formulated into a mucoadhesive vaginal film using GRaS excipients and evaluated for spermicidal and microbicidal activities (in vitro, and contraceptive efficacy in rabbits. PPC remained fully active in quick-dissolving, mucoadhesive vaginal-film formulation, and these PPC-films significantly reduced pregnancy and fertility rates in rabbits. The films released ∼90% of PPC in simulated vaginal fluid (pH 4.2 at 37°C in 5 minutes, in vitro. We have thus discovered a common target (reactive thiols on chiefly-anaerobic, redox-sensitive cells like sperm and Trichomonas, which is susceptible to designed chemical interference for prophylactic contraception. The active thiol in PPC inactivates sperm and Trichomonas via interference with crucial sulfhydryl-disulfide based reactions, e.g. hexokinase activation in human sperm. In comparison to non-specific surfactant action of OTC spermicide nonoxynol-9, the action of

  7. The impact of thiol peroxidases on redox regulation.

    Flohé, Leopold

    2016-01-01

    The biology of glutathione peroxidases and peroxiredoxins is reviewed with emphasis on their role in metabolic regulation. Apart from their obvious function in balancing oxidative challenge, these thiol peroxidases are not only implicated in orchestrating the adaptive response to oxidative stress, but also in regulating signaling triggered by hormones, growth factors and cytokines. The mechanisms presently discussed comprise dampening of redox-sensitive regulatory processes by elimination of hydroperoxides, suppression of lipoxygenase activity, committing suicide to save H2O2 for signaling, direct binding to receptors or regulatory proteins in a peroxidase activity-independent manner, or acting as sensors for hydroperoxides and as transducers of oxidant signals. The various mechanistic proposals are discussed in the light of kinetic data, which unfortunately are scarce. Taking into account pivotal criteria of a meaningful regulatory circuit, kinetic plausibility and specificity, the mechanistic concepts implying a direct sensor/transducer function of the thiol peroxidases appear most appealing. With rate constants for the reaction with hydroperoxide of 10(5)-10(8) M(-1) s(-1), thiol peroxidases are qualified as kinetically preferred hydroperoxide sensors, and the ability of the oxidized enzymes to react with defined protein thiols lends specificity to the transduction process. The versatility of thiol peroxidases, however, allows multiple ways of interaction with regulatory pathways. PMID:26291534

  8. Designed Chemical Intervention with Thiols for Prophylactic Contraception.

    Sharma, Monika; Kumar, Lokesh; Jain, Ashish; Verma, Vikas; Sharma, Vikas; Kushwaha, Bhavana; Lal, Nand; Kumar, Lalit; Rawat, Tara; Dwivedi, Anil K; Maikhuri, Jagdamba P; Sharma, Vishnu L; Gupta, Gopal

    2013-01-01

    Unlike somatic cells, sperm have several-fold more available-thiols that are susceptible to redox-active agents. The present study explains the mechanism behind the instant sperm-immobilizing and trichomonacidal activities of pyrrolidinium pyrrolidine-1-carbodithioate (PPC), a novel thiol agent rationally created for prophylactic contraception by minor chemical modifications of some known thiol drugs. PPC, and its three derivatives (with potential active-site blocked by alkylation), were synthesized and evaluated against live human sperm and metronidazole-susceptible and resistant Trichomonas vaginalis, in vitro. Sperm hexokinase activity was evaluated by coupled enzyme assay. PPC irreversibly immobilized 100% human sperm in ∼30 seconds and totally eliminated Trichomonas vaginalis more efficiently than nonoxynol-9 and metronidazole. It significantly inhibited (Pnonoxynol-9, the action of thiol-active PPC is apparently much more specific, potent and safe. PPC presents a proof-of-concept for prophylactic contraception via manipulation of thiols in vagina for selective targeting of sperm and Trichomonas, and qualifies as a promising lead for the development of dually protective vaginal-contraceptive. PMID:23826278

  9. Protection by thiols against poisoning by radiomimetic agents. Chapter 8

    A review is presented of reports of studies aimed at detecting a protective effect of thiols against radiomimetic alkylating agents such as those used in cancer therapy (nitrogen mustards (HN2), sarcolysine, busulfan, etc.). Protection by thiols against alkylating agents has been observed in mammals, plant cells, bacteria, isolated mammalian cells and in model systems. The lack of correlation between the protective power of various thiols against radiomimetic agents and ionizing radiations indicates that different mechanisms are involved. Studies have been made of the toxicity of the protector and the competition factor, increased excretion of detoxication products of alkylating agents, decreased alkylation of DNA and RNA both in vivo and in vitro, the protection of hematopoietic tissues, tumours and the adrenal cortex, and the modification of the effects of nitrosoalkylamines, carbon tetrachloride and fungistatics by thiols. The restriction of DNA alkylation by the competitive removal of radiomimetic agents is thought to account for the protective effect of thiols against radiomimetic agents. (U.K.)

  10. Thiol and non-thiol antioxidants effect radiation damage expressed by IEC-6 cells

    Full text: The epithelial lining of the GI mucosal surface is traditionally viewed as a passive barrier serving a largely protective function. Recently, enterocytes have been seen to function as sensitive indicators of oxidative stress, with defined responses to shifts in the oxidative balance. Radiation damage, long recognized as the result of the generation of reactive oxygen species, would theoretically be modulated by the presence of radical scavenging anti-oxidants. Cultures of IEC-6 cells, a model for the gastrointestinal epithelium were found to have lower numbers of adherent cells in response either n-acetyl cysteine (NAC) or l-ascorbate in the medium. In both cases the response was dose dependent, with inhibition in response to l-ascorbate well established by 48 hours. However, in contrast to the thiol antioxidant NAC where a late recovery was observed at high dose, no statistically significant increase in adherent cell numbers were observed with high dose l-ascorbate, and adherent cell numbers actually fell off with time. Exposure to antioxidants potentiated the damage from x-ray irradiation further reducing cell numbers. While we have previously shown that this damage was not associated with mitotic delay or inhibition of proliferation, the mechanism of this response remains undefined. Non-adherent cells were found to increase with dose in the presence of antioxidants with those cells having morphology consistent with apoptotic cells including nuclear condensation, and blabbing. Annexin V cells increased in the non-adherent cell layer, but the numbers did not seem to account for the severe reduction in cell numbers observed. It has been suggested that a p53 mutation alters the response to oxidative damage in these cells via a thiol containing motif sensitive to the cellular glutathione pool resulting in an automatic signal to release from the basement membrane, however it does not explain the similarity in effects to ascorbate

  11. Effect of γ-irradiation on thiol compounds in grapefruit

    The effect of 60Co γ-irradiation on thiol compounds in grapefruit was investigated. Thiols were separated by HPLC and measured with a fluorescence detector. Reduced glutathione (GSH), cysteine (CySH), cysteinylglycine (CySGly), and a number of unknown peaks were observed in unirradiated grapefruit. GSH was the main thiol at an average concentration of 143.3 μM. GSH content exponentially decreased with increased radiation doses, and after 100 krad only 80% of the original remained. The G value based on the result of 100 krad was 0.29. Authentic GSH in water or citrate buffer (pH 3) was converted mainly to its oxidized form (GSSG) with γ-irradiated grapefruits showed no equivalent increase, however

  12. Resistivity of thiol-modified gold thin films

    In this work, we study the effect of thiol self assembled monolayers on the electrical resistivity of metallic thin films. The analysis is based on the Fuchs–Sondheimer–Lucas theory and on electrical transport measurements. We determined resistivity change due to dodecanethiol adsorption on gold thin films. For this purpose, we controlled the deposition and annealing temperatures of the films to change the surface topography and to diminish the effect of electron grain boundary scattering. Results show that the electrical response to the absorption of thiols strongly depends on the initial topography of the surface. - Highlights: • We study the effect of self assembled monolayers on the resistivity of thin films. • Fuchs–Sondheimer theory reproduces the resistivity increase due to thiol deposition. • We determined resistivity change due to dodecanethiol deposition on gold thin films. • The electrical response strongly depends on the substrate surface topography

  13. Effect of gamma irradiation on thiol compounds in grapefruit

    The effect of 60Co γ-irradiation on thiol compounds in grapefruit was investigated. Thiols were separated by HPLC and measured with a fluorescence detector. Reduced glutathione (GSH), cysteine (CySH), cysteinylglycine (CySGly), and a number of unknown peaks were observed in unirradiated grapefruit. GSH was the main thiol at an average concentration of 143.3 μM. GSH content exponentially decreased with increased radiation doses, and after 100 krad only 80% of the original remained. The G value based on the result of 100 krad was 0.29. Authentic GSH in water or citrate buffer (pH 3) was converted mainly to its oxidized form (GSSG) with γ-irradiation. GSSG in irradiated grapefruits showed no equivalent increase, however. (author)

  14. Interaction of thiols and non-thiol ·OH scavengers in the modification of radiation-induced DNA damage

    Oxygen has long been known to sensitize cells to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation and is widely believed to do so by the fixation of potentially reversible radical damage to cellular DNA. A number of studies have suggested that this widely observed oxygen enhancement of cell killing requires the presence of reduced thiols. Published in vitro studies of the modification of DNA damage by glutathione or other thiols have generally shown peak oxygen enhancement ratios (OERs) much higher than those observed for cell killing. However, these studies measured loss of DNA transforming activity or induction of single-strand DNA breaks (SSBs), related endpoints which are not thought to represent lethal lesions, rather than double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are generally believed to be the dominant lethal lesions from ionizing radiation. In addition, non-thiol scavengers of OH radicals were not generally present. There is also evidence that, in addition to their protective effects, some non-thiol ·OH scavengers can produce radicals which are damaging to DNA under anoxic conditions. In the present investigation, the authors have adapted a previously used in vitro model system to simultaneously investigate the effects on radiation-induced single- and double-strand DNA breaks of various combinations of glutathione and glycerol, a widely used non-thiol scavenger, in the presence and absence of oxygen

  15. Identification, Characterization, and Classification of Genes Encoding Perchlorate Reductase

    Bender, Kelly S.; Shang, Ching; Chakraborty, Romy; Belchik, Sara M.; Coates, John D.; Achenbach, Laurie A.

    2005-01-01

    The reduction of perchlorate to chlorite, the first enzymatic step in the bacterial reduction of perchlorate, is catalyzed by perchlorate reductase. The genes encoding perchlorate reductase (pcrABCD) in two Dechloromonas species were characterized. Sequence analysis of the pcrAB gene products revealed similarity to α- and β-subunits of microbial nitrate reductase, selenate reductase, dimethyl sulfide dehydrogenase, ethylbenzene dehydrogenase, and chlorate reductase, all of which are type II m...

  16. 5-Furan-2yl[1,3,4]oxadiazole-2-thiol, 5-Furan-2yl-4H [1,2,4] triazole-3-thiol and Their Thiol-Thione Tautomerism

    A. Cansız

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available 5-Furan-2-yl[1,3,4]oxadiazole-2-thiol (Ia and 5-furan-2-yl-4H-[1,2,4]-triazole-3-thiol (Ib were synthesized from furan-2-carboxylic acid hydrazide. Mannich basesand methyl derivatives were then prepared. The structures of the synthesized compoundswere confirmed by elemental analyses, IR and 1H-NMR spectra. Their thiol-thione tautomericequilibrium is described.

  17. Sepiapterin Reductase Deficiency: Mimic of Cerebral Palsy

    J Gordon Millichap

    2012-01-01

    Researchers at University of California at San Diego, and 22 other US national and international centers studied the clinical, biochemical, and molecular findings in a cohort of 38 patients with sepiapterin reductase deficiency (SRD).

  18. Naphthalimide Scaffold Provides Versatile Platform for Selective Thiol Sensing and Protein Labeling.

    Zhou, Pengcheng; Yao, Juan; Hu, Guodong; Fang, Jianguo

    2016-04-15

    Reversible thiol modifications are fundamental of cellular redox regulation. Specific thiol detection, including thiol sensing and protein thiols labeling, is critical to study such modifications. We reported the discovery of 4-methylsulfonyl-N-n-butyl-1,8-naphthalimide (MSBN), a highly selective fluorogenic probe for thiols based on the 1,8-naphthalimide scaffold. Thiols react with MSBN nearly quantitatively via nucleophilic aromatic substitution to replace the methylsulfonyl group and restore the quenched fluorescence (>100-fold increase). MSBN was employed to selectively image thiols in live cells and specifically label protein thiols with a turn-on signal to determine diverse reversible protein thiol modifications. In addition, we introduced a bulky group into the MSBN as a mass tag to create a probe MSBN-TPP, which readily discriminates the reduced thioredoxin from the oxidized one. The specific reaction of MSBN with thiols and the easy manipulation of the naphthalimide unit enable MSBN a versatile scaffold in developing novel probes for thiol-based protein bioconjugation and studying various thiol modifications. PMID:26813105

  19. Visible light-initiated interfacial thiol-norbornene photopolymerization for forming islet surface conformal coating

    Shih, Han; Mirmira, Raghavendra G.; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2014-01-01

    A cytocompatible visible light-mediated interfacial thiol-norbornene photopolymerization scheme was developed for creating hydrogel conformal coating on pancreatic islets. The step-growth thiol-norbornene reaction affords high consistency and tunability in gel coating thickness. Furthermore, isolated islets coated with thiol-norbornene gel maintained their viability and function in vitro.

  20. Multiple aldehyde reductases of human brain.

    Hoffman, P L; Wermuth, B; von Wartburg, J P

    1980-01-01

    Human brain contains four forms of aldehyde reducing enzymes. One major activity, designated AR3, has properties indicating its identity with the NADPH-dependent aldehyde reductase, EC 1.1.1.2. The other major form of human brain enzyme, AR1, which is also NADPH-dependent, reduces both aldehyde and ketone-containing substrates, including vitamin K3 (menadione) and daunorubicin, a cancer chemotherapeutic agent. This enzyme is very sensitive to inhibition by the flavonoids quercitrin and quercetine, and may be analogous to a daunorubicin reductase previously described in liver of other species. One minor form of human brain aldehyde reductase, AR2, demonstrates substrate specificity and inhibitor sensitivity which suggest its similarity to aldose reductases found in lens and other tissues of many species. This enzyme, which can also use NADH as cofactor to some extent, is the most active in reducing the aldehyde derivatives of the biogenic amines. The fourth human brain enzyme ("SSA reductase") differs from the other forms in its ability to use NADH as well as or better than NADPH as cofactor, and in its molecular weight, which is nearly twice that of the other forms. It is quite specific for succinic semialdehyde (SSA) as substrate, and was found to be significantly inhibited only by quercetine and quercitrin. AR3 can also reduce SSA, and both enzymes may contribute to the production of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in vivo. These results indicate that the human brain aldehyde reductases can play relatively specific physiologic roles. PMID:7424738

  1. Preparation of Novel Hydrolyzing Urethane Modified Thiol-Ene Networks

    Bridget S. Confait

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Novel tetra-functional hydrolyzing monomers were prepared from the reaction of TEOS and select alkene-containing alcohols, ethylene glycol vinyl ether or 2-allyloxy ethanol, and combined with trimethylolpropane tris(3-mercaptopropionate (tri-thiol in a thiol-ene “click” polymerization reaction to produce clear, colorless thiol-ene networks using both radiation and thermal-cure techniques. These networks were characterized for various mechanical characteristics, and found to posses Tg’s (DSC, hardness, tack, and thermal stability (TGA consistent with their molecular structures. A new ene-modified urethane oligomer was prepared based on the aliphatic polyisocyanate Desmodur® N 3600 and added to the thiol-ene hydrolyzable network series in increasing amounts, creating a phase-segregated material having two Tg’s. An increase in water absorption in the ene-modified urethane formulations leading to a simultaneous increase in the rate of hydrolysis was supported by TGA data, film hardness measurements, and an NMR study of closely related networks. This phenomenon was attributed to the additional hydrogen bonding elements and polar functionality brought to the film with the addition of the urethane segment. SEM was utilized for visual analysis of topographical changes in the film’s surface upon hydrolysis and provides support for surface-driven erosion. Coatings prepared in this study are intended for use as hydrolyzing networks for marine coatings to protect against ship fouling.

  2. Arsenate reduction: thiol cascade chemistry with convergent evolution.

    Messens, Joris; Silver, Simon

    2006-09-01

    The frequent abundance of arsenic in the environment has guided the evolution of enzymes for the reduction of arsenate. The arsenate reductases (ArsC) from different sources have unrelated sequences and structural folds, and can be divided into different classes on the basis of their structures, reduction mechanisms and the locations of catalytic cysteine residues. The thioredoxin-coupled arsenate reductase class is represented by Staphylococcus aureus pI258 ArsC and Bacillus subtilis ArsC. The ArsC from Escherichia coli plasmid R773 and the eukaryotic ACR2p reductase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae represent two distinct glutaredoxin-linked ArsC classes. All are small cytoplasmic redox enzymes that reduce arsenate to arsenite by the sequential involvement of three different thiolate nucleophiles that function as a redox cascade. In contrast, the ArrAB complex is a bacterial heterodimeric periplasmic or a surface-anchored arsenate reductase that functions as a terminal electron acceptor and transfers electrons from the membrane respiratory chain to arsenate. Finally, the less well documented arsenate reductase activity of the monomeric arsenic(III) methylase, which is an S-adenosylmethionine (AdoMet)-dependent methyltransferase. After each oxidative methylation cycle and before the next methylation step, As(V) is reduced to As(III). Methylation by this enzyme is also considered an arsenic-resistance mechanism for bacteria, fungi and mammals. PMID:16905151

  3. Structural and mechanistic insights on nitrate reductases.

    Coelho, Catarina; Romão, Maria João

    2015-12-01

    Nitrate reductases (NR) belong to the DMSO reductase family of Mo-containing enzymes and perform key roles in the metabolism of the nitrogen cycle, reducing nitrate to nitrite. Due to variable cell location, structure and function, they have been divided into periplasmic (Nap), cytoplasmic, and membrane-bound (Nar) nitrate reductases. The first crystal structure obtained for a NR was that of the monomeric NapA from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans in 1999. Since then several new crystal structures were solved providing novel insights that led to the revision of the commonly accepted reaction mechanism for periplasmic nitrate reductases. The two crystal structures available for the NarGHI protein are from the same organism (Escherichia coli) and the combination with electrochemical and spectroscopic studies also lead to the proposal of a reaction mechanism for this group of enzymes. Here we present an overview on the current advances in structural and functional aspects of bacterial nitrate reductases, focusing on the mechanistic implications drawn from the crystallographic data. PMID:26362109

  4. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe-S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  5. Respiratory arsenate reductase as a bidirectional enzyme

    Richey, C.; Chovanec, P.; Hoeft, S.E.; Oremland, R.S.; Basu, P.; Stolz, J.F.

    2009-01-01

    The haloalkaliphilic bacterium Alkalilimnicola ehrlichii is capable of anaerobic chemolithoautotrophic growth by coupling the oxidation of arsenite (As(III)) to the reduction of nitrate and carbon dioxide. Analysis of its complete genome indicates that it lacks a conventional arsenite oxidase (Aox), but instead possesses two operons that each encode a putative respiratory arsenate reductase (Arr). Here we show that one homolog is expressed under chemolithoautotrophic conditions and exhibits both arsenite oxidase and arsenate reductase activity. We also demonstrate that Arr from two arsenate respiring bacteria, Alkaliphilus oremlandii and Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3, is also biochemically reversible. Thus Arr can function as a reductase or oxidase. Its physiological role in a specific organism, however, may depend on the electron potentials of the molybdenum center and [Fe–S] clusters, additional subunits, or constitution of the electron transfer chain. This versatility further underscores the ubiquity and antiquity of microbial arsenic metabolism.

  6. Radical Scavenging Efficacy of Thiol Capped Silver Nanoparticles

    Kumudini Chandraker; Sandeep Kumar Vaishanav; Rekha Nagwanshi; Manmohan L Satnami

    2015-12-01

    Radical scavenging efficacy of L-cysteine (L-Cys), glutathione (GSH) and thioctic acid (TA) in the presence of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were determined by 1,1-diphenyl 2-picryl hydrazil (DPPH), nitric oxide (NO) and hydroxyl (OH) radicals as spectrophotometric assay. The hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) scavenging efficacy has been determined by titration method. Ascorbic acid has been used as standard for all radical scavenging efficacies. In general, antioxidant activity decreases in the presence of AgNPs. The covalent interactions of thiols (-SH) were found to be a key factor for the decreases in scavenging activity. The effect of thiol concentrations has been discussed. The size and shape of the nanoparticles and AgNP-SR interactions have been characterized through Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, respectively.

  7. EUV negative-resist based on thiol-yne system

    Shirai, Masamitsu; Maki, Koichi; Okamura, Haruyuki; Kaneyama, Koji; Itani, Toshiro

    2011-04-01

    Non-conventional chemically amplified (CA) negative resist for EUV lithography was studied. We have designed negative-tone EUV resist based on thiol-yne stepwise radical reactions. OH groups of poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS) were modified with functional units bearing C-C triple bond structure. Resist was formulated as a mixture of modified-PHS, multifunctional thiol compound, and photoradical generator. The present resist was developable with standard 2.38 wt% TMAH aq. solution. Photo-sensitivity of the resist was obtained on irradiation at 254 nm and 13.5 nm. The resist was highly sensitive to EUV exposure. The sensitivity and the contrast were affected by the structure of modified-PHS and process conditions.

  8. Water electrolyte promoted oxidation of functional thiol groups.

    Lauwers, K; Breynaert, E; Rombouts, I; Delcour, J A; Kirschhock, C E A

    2016-04-15

    The formation of disulfide bonds is of the utmost importance for a wide range of food products with gluten or globular proteins as functional agents. Here, the impact of mineral electrolyte composition of aqueous solutions on thiol oxidation kinetics was studied, using glutathione (GSH) and cysteine (CYS) as model systems. Interestingly, the oxidation rate of both compounds into their corresponding disulfides was significantly higher in common tap water than in ultrapure water. The systematic study of different electrolyte components showed that especially CaCl2 improved the oxidation rate of GSH. However, this effect was not observed for CYS, which indicated a strong impact of the local chemical environment on thiol oxidation kinetics. PMID:26675862

  9. Functional graphene by thiol-ene click chemistry.

    Luong, Nguyen Dang; Sinh, Le Hoang; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Campell, Joseph; Seppälä, Jukka

    2015-02-16

    Thiol-ene click reaction was successfully employed for chemical modification of graphene oxide (GO) by one-step synthesis. Herein, 2,2-azobis(2-methylpropionitrile) (AIBN) was used as thermal catalyst and cysteamine hydrochloride (HS-(CH2 )2 -NH2 HCl) was used as thiol-containing compound, which is incorporated to GO surface upon reaction with the C=C bonds. The hydrochloride acts as protecting group for the amine, which is finally eliminated by adding sodium hydroxide. The modified GO contains both S- and N-containing groups (NS-GO). We found that NS-GO sheets form good dispersion in water, ethanol, and ethylene glycol. These graphene dispersions can be processed into functionalized graphene film. Besides, it was demonstrated that NS-GO was proved to be an excellent host matrix for platinum nanoparticles. The developed method paves a new way for graphene modification and its functional nanocomposites. PMID:25580698

  10. Functional Conducting Polymers via Thiol-ene Chemistry

    Martin, David C.; Feldman, Kathleen E.

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate here that thiol-ene chemistry can be used to provide side-chain functionalized monomers based on 3,4-propylenedioxythiophene (ProDOT) containing ionic, neutral, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic side chains. All reactions gave high yields and purification could generally be accomplished through precipitation. These monomers were polymerized either chemically or electro-chemically to give soluble materials or conductive films, respectively. This strategy provides for facile tuning of...

  11. Investigation of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticle sensors for gas analysis

    Stephens, Jared S.

    Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air and exhaled breath by sensor array is a very useful testing technique. It can provide non-invasive, fast, inexpensive testing for many diseases. Breath analysis has been very successful in identifying cancer and other diseases by using a chemiresistor sensor or array with gold nanoparticles to detect biomarkers. Acetone is a biomarker for diabetes and having a portable testing device could help to monitor diabetic and therapeutic progress. An advantage to this testing method is it is conducted at room temperature instead of 200 degrees Celsius. 3. The objective of this research is to determine the effect of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles based on sensor(s) detection of VOCs. The VOCs to be tested are acetone, ethanol, and a mixture of acetone and ethanol. Each chip is tested under all three VOCs and three concentration levels (0.1, 1, and 5.0 ppm). VOC samples are used to test the sensors' ability to detect and differentiate VOCs. Sensors (also referred to as a chip) are prepared using several types of thiol derivatized gold nanoparticles. The factors are: thiol compound and molar volume loading of the thiol in synthesis. The average resistance results are used to determine the VOC selectivity of the sensors tested. The results show a trend of increasing resistance as VOC concentration is increased relative to dry air; which is used as baseline for VOCs. Several sensors show a high selectivity to one or more VOCs. Overall the 57 micromoles of 4-methoxy-toluenethiol sensor shows the strongest selectivity for VOCs tested. 3. Gerfen, Kurt. 2012. Detection of Acetone in Air Using Silver Ion Exchanged ZSM-5 and Zinc Oxide Sensing Films. Master of Science thesis, University of Louisville.

  12. Trichuris suis: thiol protease activity from adult worms.

    Hill, D E; Sakanari, J A

    1997-01-01

    Trichuris suis, the whipworm of swine, causes anemia, weight loss, anorexia, mucohemorrhagic diarrhea, and death in heavy infections. A zinc metalloprotease has been suggested to play a role in the severe enteric pathology associated with infection and the infiltration of opportunistic bacteria into deeper tissues in the swine colon. In this study, a thiol protease from gut extracts of adult T. suis and from excretory/secretory components (E/S) of adult worms was characterized using fluorogenic peptide substrates and protein substrate gels. The protease cleaved the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC, and this cleavage was completely inhibited by the thiol protease inhibitors E-64, leupeptin, Z-Phe-Ala-CH2F, and Z-Phe-Arg-CH2F. Gelatin substrate gels and fluorescence assays using both the gut and the stichosome extracts and E/S revealed enhanced activity when 2 mM dithiothreitol or 5 mM cysteine was included in the incubation buffer, and optimal activity was seen over a pH range of 5.5 to 8.5. Incubation of gut extracts or E/S material with inhibitors of aspartic, serine, or metalloproteases had no effect on the cleavage of Z-Phe-Arg-AMC. Thiol protease activity was found in extracts of gut tissue but not in the extracts of stichocytes of adult worms. N-terminal amino acid sequencing of the protease revealed sequence homologies with cathepsin B-like thiol protease identified from parasitic and free-living nematodes. PMID:9024202

  13. Water electrolyte promoted oxidation of functional thiol groups

    Lauwers, Karl; Breynaert, Eric; Rombouts, Ine; Delcour, Jan; Kirschhock, Christine

    2016-01-01

    The formation of disulfide bonds is of the utmost importance for a wide range of food products with gluten or globular proteins as functional agents. Here, the impact of mineral electrolyte composition of aqueous solutions on thiol oxidation kinetics was studied, using glutathione (GSH) and cysteine (CYS) as model systems. Interestingly, the oxidation rate of both compounds into their corresponding disulfides was significantly higher in common tap water than in ultrapure water. The systematic...

  14. Isoquinoline-mediated S-vinylation and N-vinylation of benzo[d]oxazole-2-thiol and benzo[d]thiazole-2-thiol

    Issa Yavari; Samira Nasiri-Gheidari; Anvar Mirzaei

    2012-01-01

    An effective route to S-vinylated andN-vinylated benzo[d]oxazole-2(3H)-thiones and benzo[d]thiazole-2(3H)-thionesis described via reaction ofacetylenic esters and benzo[d] oxazole-2-thiol and benzo [d]thiazole-2-thiol in the presence of 15 mol% of isoquinoline.

  15. 21 CFR 864.7375 - Glutathione reductase assay.

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Glutathione reductase assay. 864.7375 Section 864... reductase assay. (a) Identification. A glutathione reductase assay is a device used to determine the... fluorescence and photometry. The results of this assay are used in the diagnosis of liver disease,...

  16. Characterization of the chlorate reductase from Pseudomonas chloritidismutans

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.; Schiltz, E.; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    A chlorate reductase has been purified from the chlorate-reducing strain Pseudomonas chloritidismutans. Comparison with the periplasmic (per)chlorate reductase of strain GR-1 showed that the cytoplasmic chlorate reductase of P. chloritidismutans reduced only chlorate and bromate. Differences were al

  17. Decreased antimony uptake and overexpression of genes of thiol metabolism are associated with drug resistance in a canine isolate of Leishmania infantum.

    Gómez Pérez, Verónica; García-Hernandez, Raquel; Corpas-López, Victoriano; Tomás, Ana M; Martín-Sanchez, Joaquina; Castanys, Santiago; Gamarro, Francisco

    2016-08-01

    Visceral leishmaniasis (VL) caused by the protozoan parasite Leishmania infantum, is one of the most important zoonotic diseases affecting dogs and humans in the Mediterranean area. The presence of infected dogs as the main reservoir host of L. infantum is regarded as the most significant risk for potential human infection. We have studied the susceptibility profile to antimony and other anti-leishmania drugs (amphotericin B, miltefosine, paromomycin) in Leishmania infantum isolates extracted from a dog before and after two therapeutic interventions with meglumine antimoniate (subcutaneous Glucantime(®), 100 mg/kg/day for 28 days). After the therapeutic intervention, these parasites were significantly less susceptible to antimony than pretreatment isolate, presenting a resistance index of 6-fold to Sb(III) for promastigotes and >3-fold to Sb(III) and 3-fold to Sb(V) for intracellular amastigotes. The susceptibility profile of this resistant L. infantum line is related to a decreased antimony uptake due to lower aquaglyceroporin-1 expression levels. Additionally, other mechanisms including an increase in thiols and overexpression of enzymes involved in thiol metabolism, such as ornithine decarboxylase, trypanothione reductase, mitochondrial tryparedoxin and mitochondrial tryparedoxin peroxidase, could contribute to the resistance as antimony detoxification mechanisms. A major contribution of this study in a canine L. infantum isolate is to find an antimony-resistant mechanism similar to that previously described in other human clinical isolates. PMID:27317865

  18. Operation of trans-thylakoid thiol-metabolizing pathways in photosynthesis

    Karamoko, Mohamed; Gabilly, Stéphane T.; Hamel, Patrice P.

    2013-01-01

    Thiol oxidation to disulfides and the reverse reaction, i.e., disulfide reduction to free thiols, are under the control of catalysts in vivo. Enzymatically assisted thiol-disulfide chemistry is required for the biogenesis of all energy-transducing membrane systems. However, until recently, this had only been demonstrated for the bacterial plasma membrane. Long considered to be vacant, the thylakoid lumen has now moved to the forefront of photosynthesis research with the realization that its p...

  19. Mercuric reductase activity and evidence of broad-spectrum mercury resistance among clinical isolates of rapidly growing mycobacteria

    Resistance to mercury was evaluated in 356 rapidly growing mycobacteria belonging to eight taxonomic groups. Resistance to inorganic Hg2+ ranged from 0% among the unnamed third biovariant complex of Mycobacterium fortuitum to 83% among M. chelonae-like organisms. With cell extracts and 203Hg(NO3)2 as the substrate, mercuric reductase (HgRe) activity was demonstrable in six of eight taxonomic groups. HgRe activity was inducible and required NADPH or NADH and a thiol donor for optimai activity. Species with HgRe activity were also resistant to organomercurial compounds, including phenylmercuric acetate. Attempts at intraspecies and intragenus transfer of HgRe activity by conjugation or transformation were unsuccessful. Mercury resistance is common in rapidly growing mycobacteria and appears to function via the same inducible enzyme systems already defined in other bacterial species. This system offers potential as a strain marker for epidemiologic investigations and for studying genetic systems in rapidly growing mycobacteria

  20. Ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase: a catalytically active dithiol group links photoreduced ferredoxin to thioredoxin functional in photosynthetic enzyme regulation

    The mechanism by which the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system activates the target enzyme, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, was investigated by analyzing the sulfhydryl status of individual protein components with [14C]iodoacetate and monobromobimane. The data indicate that ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR)--an iron-sulfur enzyme present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms--is the first member of a thiol chain that links light to enzyme regulation. FTR possesses a catalytically active dithiol group localized on the 13 kDa (similar) subunit, that occurs in all species investigated and accepts reducing equivalents from photoreduced ferredoxin and transfers them stoichiometrically to the disulfide form of thioredoxin m. The reduced thioredoxin m, in turn, reduces NADP-malate dehydrogenase, thereby converting it from an inactive (S-S) to an active (SH) form. The means by which FTR is able to combine electrons (from photoreduced ferredoxin) with protons (from the medium) to reduce its active disulfide group remains to be determined

  1. A Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Lysosomal Thiols in Live Cells and Tissues

    Fan, Jiangli; Han, Zhichao; Kang, Yao; Peng, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Lysosome-specific fluorescent probes are exclusive to elucidate the functions of lysosomal thiols. Moreover, two-photon microscopy offers advantages of less phototoxicity, better three dimensional spatial localization, deeper penetration depth and lower self-absorption. However, such fluorescent probes for thiols are still rare. In this work, an efficient two-photon fluorophore 1,8-naphthalimide-based probe conjugating a 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride and morpholine was designed and synthesized, which exhibited high selectivity and sensitivity towards lysosomal thiols by turn-on fluorescence method quantitatively and was successfully applied to the imaging of thiols in live cells and tissues by two-photon microscopy. PMID:26794434

  2. A Two-Photon Fluorescent Probe for Lysosomal Thiols in Live Cells and Tissues

    Fan, Jiangli; Han, Zhichao; Kang, Yao; Peng, Xiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Lysosome-specific fluorescent probes are exclusive to elucidate the functions of lysosomal thiols. Moreover, two-photon microscopy offers advantages of less phototoxicity, better three dimensional spatial localization, deeper penetration depth and lower self-absorption. However, such fluorescent probes for thiols are still rare. In this work, an efficient two-photon fluorophore 1,8-naphthalimide-based probe conjugating a 2,4-dinitrobenzenesulfonyl chloride and morpholine was designed and synthesized, which exhibited high selectivity and sensitivity towards lysosomal thiols by turn-on fluorescence method quantitatively and was successfully applied to the imaging of thiols in live cells and tissues by two-photon microscopy.

  3. Crystal Growth of Thiol-Stabilized Gold Nanoparticles by Heat-Induced Coalescence

    Moon SookYoung

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract A monolayer of dodecanethiol-stabilized gold nanoparticles changed into two-dimensional and three-dimensional self-organized structures by annealing at 323 K. Subsequent crystal growth of gold nanoparticles occurred. Thiol molecules, although chemisorbed, form relatively unstable bonds with the gold surface; a few thiols desorbed from the surface and oxidized to disulfides at 323 K, because the interaction energy between thiol macromolecules is larger than that between a thiol and a nanoparticle. The gold nanoparticles approached each other and grew into large single or twinned crystals because of the van der Waals attraction and the heat generated by the exothermic formation of disulfides.

  4. Transsulfuration pathway thiols and methylated arginines: the Hunter Community Study.

    Arduino A Mangoni

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serum homocysteine, when studied singly, has been reported to be positively associated both with the endogenous nitric oxide synthase inhibitor asymmetric dimethylarginine [ADMA, via inhibition of dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase (DDAH activity] and with symmetric dimethylarginine (SDMA. We investigated combined associations between transsulfuration pathway thiols, including homocysteine, and serum ADMA and SDMA concentrations at population level. METHODS: Data on clinical and demographic characteristics, medication exposure, C-reactive protein, serum ADMA and SDMA (LC-MS/MS, and thiols (homocysteine, cysteine, taurine, glutamylcysteine, total glutathione, and cysteinylglycine; capillary electrophoresis were collected from a sample of the Hunter Community Study on human ageing [n = 498, median age (IQR = 64 (60-70 years]. RESULTS: REGRESSION ANALYSIS SHOWED THAT: a age (P = 0.001, gender (P = 0.03, lower estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, P = 0.08, body mass index (P = 0.008, treatment with beta-blockers (P = 0.03, homocysteine (P = 0.02, and glutamylcysteine (P = 0.003 were independently associated with higher ADMA concentrations; and b age (P = 0.001, absence of diabetes (P = 0.001, lower body mass index (P = 0.01, lower eGFR (P<0.001, cysteine (P = 0.007, and glutamylcysteine (P < 0.001 were independently associated with higher SDMA concentrations. No significant associations were observed between methylated arginines and either glutathione or taurine concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: After adjusting for clinical, demographic, biochemical, and pharmacological confounders the combined assessment of transsulfuration pathway thiols shows that glutamylcysteine has the strongest and positive independent associations with ADMA and SDMA. Whether this reflects a direct effect of glutamylcysteine on DDAH activity (for ADMA and/or cationic amino acid transport requires further investigations.

  5. Functional Conducting Polymers via Thiol-ene Chemistry

    David C. Martin

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate here that thiol-ene chemistry can be used to provide side-chain functionalized monomers based on 3,4-propylenedioxythiophene (ProDOT containing ionic, neutral, hydrophobic, and hydrophilic side chains. All reactions gave high yields and purification could generally be accomplished through precipitation. These monomers were polymerized either chemically or electro-chemically to give soluble materials or conductive films, respectively. This strategy provides for facile tuning of the solubility, film surface chemistry, and film morphology of this class of conducting polymers.

  6. "Oxygen Sensing" by Na,K-ATPase: These Miraculous Thiols.

    Bogdanova, Anna; Petrushanko, Irina Y; Hernansanz-Agustín, Pablo; Martínez-Ruiz, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Control over the Na,K-ATPase function plays a central role in adaptation of the organisms to hypoxic and anoxic conditions. As the enzyme itself does not possess O2 binding sites its "oxygen-sensitivity" is mediated by a variety of redox-sensitive modifications including S-glutathionylation, S-nitrosylation, and redox-sensitive phosphorylation. This is an overview of the current knowledge on the plethora of molecular mechanisms tuning the activity of the ATP-consuming Na,K-ATPase to the cellular metabolic activity. Recent findings suggest that oxygen-derived free radicals and H2O2, NO, and oxidized glutathione are the signaling messengers that make the Na,K-ATPase "oxygen-sensitive." This very ancient signaling pathway targeting thiols of all three subunits of the Na,K-ATPase as well as redox-sensitive kinases sustains the enzyme activity at the "optimal" level avoiding terminal ATP depletion and maintaining the transmembrane ion gradients in cells of anoxia-tolerant species. We acknowledge the complexity of the underlying processes as we characterize the sources of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species production in hypoxic cells, and identify their targets, the reactive thiol groups which, upon modification, impact the enzyme activity. Structured accordingly, this review presents a summary on (i) the sources of free radical production in hypoxic cells, (ii) localization of regulatory thiols within the Na,K-ATPase and the role reversible thiol modifications play in responses of the enzyme to a variety of stimuli (hypoxia, receptors' activation) (iii) redox-sensitive regulatory phosphorylation, and (iv) the role of fine modulation of the Na,K-ATPase function in survival success under hypoxic conditions. The co-authors attempted to cover all the contradictions and standing hypotheses in the field and propose the possible future developments in this dynamic area of research, the importance of which is hard to overestimate. Better understanding of the processes

  7. Study of Highly Selective and Efficient Thiol Derivatization using Selenium Reagents by Mass Spectrometry

    Xu, Kehua; Zhang, Yun W.; Tang, Bo; Laskin, Julia; Roach, Patrick J.; Chen, Hao

    2010-08-15

    Biological thiols are critical physiological components and their detection often involves derivatization. This paper reports a systemic mass spectrometry (MS) investigation of the cleavage of Se-N bond by thiol to form a new Se-S bond, the new selenium chemistry for thiol labeling. Our data shows that the reaction is highly selective, rapid, reversible and efficient. For instance, among twenty amino acids, only cysteine was found to be reactive with Se-N containing reagents and the reaction takes place in seconds. By adding dithiothreitol (DTT), the newly formed Se-S bond of peptides/proteins can be reduced back to free thiol. The high selectivity and excellent reversibility of the reaction provide potential of using this chemistry for selective identification of thiol compounds or enriching and purifying thiol peptides/proteins. In addition, the derivatized thiol peptides have interesting dissociation behavior, which is tunable using different selenium reagents. For example, by introducing an adjacent nucleophilic group into the selenium reagent in the case of using ebselen, the reaction product of ebselen with glutathione (GSH) is easy to lose the selenium tag upon collision-induced dissociation (CID), which is useful to "fish out" those peptides containing free cysteine residues by precursor ion scan. By contrast, the selenium tag of N-(phenylseleno) phthalimide reagent can be stable and survive in CID process, which would be of value in pinpointing thiol location using a top-down proteomic approach. Also, the high conversion yield of the reaction allows the counting of total number of thiol in proteins. We believe that ebselen or N-(phenylseleno) phthalimide as tagging thiol-protein reagents will have important applications in both qualitative and quantitative analysis of different thiol-proteins derived from living cells by MS method.

  8. Regeneration of thiol-functionalized mesostructured silica adsorbents of mercury

    Arencibia, Amaya; Aguado, José; Arsuaga, Jesús M.

    2010-06-01

    The regeneration of thiol-functionalized SBA-15 adsorbents of mercury is presented in this article. The influence of temperature and pH on the adsorption process was studied. The effect due to the presence of complexing agents in aqueous solution on the desorption step was also evaluated. Hg(II) maximum adsorption capacities at different temperatures ranging from 20 °C to 60 °C were obtained and it was found that temperature does not affect the adsorption process. Mercury adsorption capacity was also determined in the presence of HNO 3 and HCl up to 3 M concentration. The comparison of the results showed that whereas hydrochloric acid exhibits an appreciable capacity to regenerate the thiol-functionalized SBA-15 adsorbent, the nitric acid results inefficient. The difference was attributed to the mercury complexing ability of chloride anion. Four complexing compounds, KBr, KSCN, (NH 2) 2CS, and HBr were tested for desorbing mercury in regeneration experiments. All agents were able to remove significant amounts of adsorbed mercury, being hydrobromic acid the complexing compound that yields the best results.

  9. Electrodeposition of gold templated by patterned thiol monolayers

    She, Zhe; Di Falco, Andrea; Hähner, Georg; Buck, Manfred

    2016-06-01

    The electrochemical deposition of Au onto Au substrates modified by self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was studied by linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Patterned SAMs exhibiting electrochemical contrast were prepared by two different methods. One used microcontact printing (μCP) to generate a binary SAM of ω-(4‧-methyl-biphenyl-4-yl)-propane thiol (CH3-C6H4-C6H4-(CH2)3-SH, MBP3) and octadecane thiol (CH3(CH2)17SH, ODT). Templated by the SAM, a gold microelectrode structure was electrodeposited featuring a line 15 μm wide and 3 mm long. After transfer to an epoxy substrate the structure proved to be electrically conductive across the full length. The other patterning method applied electron beam lithography (EBL) where electrochemical contrast was achieved by crosslinking molecules in a single component SAM of MBP3. An electron dose above 250 mC/cm2 results in a high deposition contrast. The choice of parameters for the deposition/lift-off process is found to be more critical for Au compared to Cu studied previously. The origin of the differences and implications for nanoscale patterning are discussed.

  10. Direct thiol-ene photocoating of polyorganosiloxane microparticles.

    Kuttner, Christian; Maier, Petra C; Kunert, Carmen; Schlaad, Helmut; Fery, Andreas

    2013-12-31

    This work presents the modification of polyorganosiloxane microparticles by surface-initiated thiol-ene photochemistry. By this photocoating, we prepared different core/shell particles with a polymeric shell within narrow size distributions (PDI = 0.041-0.12). As core particle, we used highly monodisperse spherical polyorganosiloxane particles prepared from (3-mercaptopropyl)trimethoxysilane (MPTMS) with a radius of 0.49 μm. We utilize the high surface coverage of mercaptopropyl functions to generate surface-localized radicals upon irradiation with UVA-light without additional photoinitiator. The continuous generation of radicals was followed by a dye degradation experiment (UV/vis spectroscopy). Surface-localized radicals were used as copolymer anchoring sites ("grafting-onto" deposition of different PB-b-PS diblock copolymers) and polymerization initiators ("grafting-from" polymerization of PS). Photocoated particles were characterized for their morphology (SEM, TEM), size, and size distribution (DLS). For PS-coated particles, the polymer content (up to 24% in 24 h) was controlled by the polymerization time upon UVA exposure. The coating thickness was evaluated by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) using a simple analytical core/shell model. Raman spectroscopy was applied to directly follow the time-dependent consumption of thiols by photoinitiation. PMID:24320891

  11. Molecular modeling, structural analysis and identification of ligand binding sites of trypanothione reductase from Leishmania mexicana

    Ozal Mutlu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: Trypanothione reductase (TR is a member of FAD-dependent NADPH oxidoreductase protein family and it is a key enzyme which connects the NADPH and the thiol-based redox system. Inhibition studies indicate that TR is an essential enzyme for parasite survival. Therefore, it is an attractive target enzyme for novel drug candidates. There is no structural model for TR of Leishmania mexicana (LmTR in the protein databases. In this work, 3D structure of TR from L. mexicana was identified by template-based in silico homology modeling method, resultant model was validated, structurally analyzed and possible ligand binding pockets were identified. Methods: For computational molecular modeling study, firstly, template was identified by BLAST search against PDB database. Multiple alignments were achieved by ClustalW2. Molecular modeling of LmTR was done and possible drug targeting sites were identified. Refinement of the model was done by performing local energy minimization for backbone, hydrogen and side chains. Model was validated by web-based servers. Results: A reliable 3D model for TR from L. mexicana was modeled by using L. infantum trypanothione reductase (LiTR as a template. RMSD results according to C-alpha, visible atoms and backbone were 0.809 Å, 0.732 Å and 0.728 Å respectively. Ramachandran plot indicates that model shows an acceptable stereochemistry. Conclusion: Modeled structure of LmTR shows high similarity with LiTR based on overall structural features like domains and folding patterns. Predicted structure will provide a source for the further docking studies of various peptide-based inhibitors.

  12. Antioxidant generation and regeneration in lipid bilayers: the amazing case of lipophilic thiosulfinates and hydrophilic thiols.

    Zheng, Feng; Pratt, Derek A

    2013-09-25

    We demonstrate that the garlic-derived chemopreventive agent allicin and the related anamu-derived petivericin are poor radical-trapping antioxidants in lipid bilayers, but that the in situ reaction of a lipophilic analog and a hydrophilic thiol yields an extremely potent radical-trapping antioxidant that can be recycled in the presence of excess thiol. PMID:23938951

  13. A fluorescent probe which allows highly specific thiol labeling at low pH

    Nielsen, Jonas W.; Jensen, Kristine Steen; Hansen, Rosa E.; Gotfredsen, Charlotte Held; Winther, Jakob R.

    2012-01-01

    Determination of the thiol-disulfide status in biological systems is challenging as redox pools are easily perturbed during sample preparation. This is particularly pertinent under neutral to mildly alkaline conditions typically required for alkylation of thiols. Here we describe the synthesis an...

  14. EFFECTS OF ATMOSPHERIC H2S ON THIOL COMPOSITION OF CROP PLANTS

    BUWALDA, F; DE KOK, LJ; Stulen, I.

    1993-01-01

    Exposure of crop plants to H2S resulted in an increase in thiol level and a change in the composition of the thiol pool. Non-leguminous species accumulated cysteine and glutathione in the light, whereas in the dark, substantial amounts of gamma-glutamyl-cysteine were also detected. In leguminous spe

  15. Rapid photochemical surface patterning of proteins in thiol-ene based microfluidic devices

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Kwapiszewski, Radoslaw; Jensen, Thomas G.; Kutter, Jörg P.

    " and "ene" monomers present in the microfluidic chip bulk material provides a simple and efficient way of tuning the chip's surface chemistry. Here, thiol-ene chips displaying an excess of functional thiol groups at their surfaces are functionalized with biotin and streptavidin in a controlled fashion...

  16. Rapid photochemical surface patterning of proteins in thiol-ene based microfluidic devices

    Lafleur, Josiane P.; Kwapiszewski, Radoslaw; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam; Kutter, Jörg Peter

    ” and “ene” monomers present in the microfluidic chip bulk material provides a simple and efficient way of tuning the chip’s surface chemistry. Here, thiol-ene chips displaying an excess of functional thiol groups at their surfaces are functionalized with biotin and streptavidin in a controlled fashion...

  17. Lithium BINOL Phosphate Catalyzed Desymmetrization of meso-Epoxides with Aromatic Thiols

    Ingle, Gajendrasingh; Mormino, Michael G.; Antilla, Jon C.

    2014-01-01

    A highly enantioselective method for desymmetrization of meso-epoxides using thiols is reported. This is the first example of epoxide activation achieved using metal BINOL phosphates. The reaction has a broad scope in terms of epoxide substrates and aromatic thiol nucleophiles. The resulting β-hydroxyl sulfides are obtained in excellent yield and enantioselectivity.

  18. Mechanism-based inhibition of a mutant Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase (cysteine-225 → serine) by its substrate CDP

    The B1 subunit of Escherichia coli ribonucleotide reductase has been overexpressed using the pT7-5/pGP1-2 system developed by Tabor and Richardson. This method has allowed the preparation of two mutant B1 subunits in which two of the four thiols postulated to be within the active site of the enzyme, Cys-225 and Cys-759, have been changed to serines. Incubation of the [Ser225]B1 mutant with the B2 subunit, [U-14C]CDP, and the allosteric effector ATP results in production of cytosine, destruction of the tyrosyl radical in B2, radiolabeling of the protein, and cleavage of the B1 subunit into two pieces of 26 and 61.5 kDa. This process is independent of the identity of reductant. The [Ser759]B1 mutant reduces CDP in the presence of thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase at 7.7% the rate of wild-type B1. When dithiothreitol is utilized as reductant, however, the rate of CDP reduction with [Ser759]B1 is identical to that observed with wild type

  19. Thiol-independent activity of a cholesterol-binding enterohemolysin produced by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli

    Figueirêdo P.M.S.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Enterohemolysin produced by Escherichia coli associated with infant diarrhea showed characteristics similar to those of thiol-activated hemolysins produced by Gram-positive bacteria, including inactivation by cholesterol, lytic activity towards eukaryotic cells and thermoinstability. However, enterohemolysin activity was not inactivated by oxidation or by SH group-blocking agents (1 mM HgCl2, 1 mM iodoacetic acid and the hemolysin (100 µg/ml was not lethal to mice, in contrast to the lethality of the thiol-activated hemolysin family to animals. Earlier reports showed that intravenous injection of partially purified streptolysin O preparations (0.2 µg was rapidly lethal to mice. These results suggest that E. coli enterohemolysin is not a thiol-activated hemolysin, despite its ability to bind cholesterol, probably due to the absence of free thiol-group(s that characterize the active form of the thiol-activated hemolysin molecule.

  20. SCREENING OF HMG CO A REDUCTASE INHIBITOR PRODUCING MARINE ACTINOMYCETES

    SRINU, PHANI BHUSHAN,MOGES, SRILAKSHMI, SANKAR, PRABHAKAR,LAKSHMINARAYANA

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present study was screening of 3-hydroxy-3- methyl glutaryl Co A (HMG CoA) reductase inhibitor producing marine actinomycetes. A total of 65 morphologically different actinomycetes were screened for HMG CoA reductase inhibitor production in a two stage submerged fermentation and evaluated for HMG CoA reductase inhibitor activity by agar diffusion and thin layer chromatography technique using lovostatin as a control. Among 65 marine Actinomycete strains, only one strain pr...

  1. Characterization of the chlorate reductase from Pseudomonas chloritidismutans

    Wolterink, A.F.W.M.; Schiltz, E; Hagedoorn, P.L.; Hagen, W.R.; Kengen, S.W.M.; Stams, A.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    A chlorate reductase has been purified from the chlorate-reducing strain Pseudomonas chloritidismutans. Comparison with the periplasmic (per)chlorate reductase of strain GR-1 showed that the cytoplasmic chlorate reductase of P. chloritidismutans reduced only chlorate and bromate. Differences were also found in N-terminal sequences, molecular weight, and subunit composition. Metal analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements showed the presence of iron and molybdenum, which are al...

  2. Characterization of the Chlorate Reductase from Pseudomonas chloritidismutans

    2003-01-01

    A chlorate reductase has been purified from the chlorate-reducing strain Pseudomonas chloritidismutans. Comparison with the periplasmic (per)chlorate reductase of strain GR-1 showed that the cytoplasmic chlorate reductase of P. chloritidismutans reduced only chlorate and bromate. Differences were also found in N-terminal sequences, molecular weight, and subunit composition. Metal analysis and electron paramagnetic resonance measurements showed the presence of iron and molybdenum, which are al...

  3. HPLC analysis of nonprotein thiols in planktonic diatoms: Pool size, redox state and response to copper and cadmium exposure

    Rijstenbil, J.W.; Wijnholds, J.A.

    1996-01-01

    A sensitive method was developed to analyze low molecular weight thiols involved in metal homeostasis and detoxification in phytoplankton. The aims of this study were to (1) separate and measure all relevant thiols in a single HPLC run; (2) measure redox states of the thiols and (3) identify specifi

  4. Thiol-Disulfide Exchange between Glutaredoxin and Glutathione

    Iversen, Rasmus; Andersen, Peter Anders; Jensen, Kristine Steen;

    2010-01-01

    Glutaredoxins are ubiquitous thiol-disulfide oxidoreductases which catalyze the reduction of glutathione-protein mixed disulfides. Belonging to the thioredoxin family, they contain a conserved active site CXXC motif. The N-proximal active site cysteine can form a mixed disulfide with glutathione or...... an intramolecular disulfide with the C-proximal cysteine. The C-proximal cysteine is not known to be involved in the catalytic mechanism. The stability of the mixed disulfide with glutathione has been investigated in detail using a mutant variant of yeast glutaredoxin 1, in which the C......-proximal active site cysteine has been replaced with serine. The exchange reaction between the reduced protein and oxidized glutathione leading to formation of the mixed disulfide could readily be monitored by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) due to the enthalpic contributions from the noncovalent...

  5. Towards thiol functionalization of vanadium pentoxide nanotubes using gold nanoparticles

    Template-directed synthesis is a promising route to realize vanadate-based 1-D nanostructures, an example of which is the formation of vanadium pentoxide nanotubes and associated nanostructures. In this work, we report the interchange of long-chained alkyl amines with alkyl thiols. This reaction was followed using gold nanoparticles prepared by the Chemical Liquid Deposition (CLD) method with an average diameter of ∼0.9nm and a stability of ∼85 days. V2O5 nanotubes (VOx-NTs) with lengths of ∼2μm and internal hollow diameters of 20-100nm were synthesized and functionalized in a Au-acetone colloid with a nominal concentration of ∼4x10-3mol dm-3. The interchange reaction with dodecylamine is found only to occur in polar solvents and incorporation of the gold nanoparticles is not observed in the presence of n-decane

  6. Induction of Glutathione Synthesis and Glutathione Reductase Activity by Abiotic Stresses in Maize and Wheat

    Gábor Kocsy

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different abiotic stresses (extreme temperatures and osmotic stress on the synthesis of glutathione and hydroxymethylglutathione, on the ratio of the reduced to oxidised forms of these thiols (GSH/GSSG, hmGSH/hmGSSG, and on the glutathione reductase (GR activity was studied in maize and wheat genotypes having different sensitivity to low temperature stress. Cold treatment induced a greater increase in total glutathione (TG content and in GR activity in tolerant genotypes of both species than in sensitive ones. The GSH/GSSG and hmGSH/hmGSSG ratios were increased by this treatment only in the frost-tolerant wheat variety. High-temperature stress increased the TG content and the GSH/GSSG ratio only in the chilling-sensitive maize genotype, but GR activity was greater after this treatment in both maize genotypes. Osmotic stress resulted in a great increase in the TG content in wheat and the GR activity in maize. The amount of total hydroxymethylglutathione increased following all stress treatments. These results indicate the involvement of these antioxidants in the stress responses of wheat and maize.

  7. Functional thioredoxin reductase from pathogenic and free-living Leptospira spp.

    Sasoni, Natalia; Iglesias, Alberto A; Guerrero, Sergio A; Arias, Diego G

    2016-08-01

    Low molecular mass thiols and antioxidant enzymes have essential functions to detoxify reactive oxygen and nitrogen species maintaining cellular redox balance. The metabolic pathways for redox homeostasis in pathogenic (Leptospira interrogans) and free-living (Leptospira biflexa) leptospires species were not functionally characterized. We performed biochemical studies on recombinantly produced proteins to in depth analyze kinetic and structural properties of thioredoxin reductase (LinTrxR) and thioredoxin (LinTrx) from L. interrogans, and two TrxRs (LbiTrxR1 and LbiTrxR2) from L. biflexa. All the TrxRs were characterized as homodimeric flavoproteins, with LinTrxR and LbiTrxR1 catalyzing the NADPH dependent reduction of LinTrx and DTNB. The thioredoxin system from L. interrogans was able to use glutathione disulfide, lipoamide disulfide, cystine and bis-γ-glutamyl cysteine and homologous peroxiredoxin as substrates. Classic TrxR activity of LinTrxR2 had not been evidenced in vitro, but recombinant Escherichia coli cells overexpressing LbiTrxR2 showed high tolerance to oxidative stress. The enzymatic systems herein characterized could play a key role for the maintenance of redox homeostasis and the function of defense mechanisms against reactive oxidant species in Leptospira spp. Our results contribute to the general knowledge about redox biochemistry in these bacteria, positioning TrxR as a critical molecular target for the development of new anti-leptospiral drugs. PMID:27178006

  8. Mercury Binding Sites in Thiol-Functionalized Mesostructured Silica

    Thiol-functionalized mesostructured silica with anhydrous compositions of (SiO2)1-x(LSiO1.5)x, where L is a mercaptopropyl group and x is the fraction of functionalized framework silicon centers, are effective trapping agents for the removal of mercuric(II) ions from water. In the present work, we investigate the mercury-binding mechanism for representative thiol-functionalized mesostructures by atomic pair distribution function (PDF) analysis of synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction data and by Raman spectroscopy. The mesostructures with wormhole framework structures and compositions corresponding to x = 0.30 and 0.50 were prepared by direct assembly methods in the presence of a structure-directing amine porogen. PDF analyses of five mercury-loaded compositions with Hg/S ratios of 0.50-1.30 provided evidence for the bridging of thiolate sulfur atoms to two metal ion centers and the formation of chain structures on the pore surfaces. We find no evidence for Hg-O bonds and can rule out oxygen coordination of the mercury at greater than the 10% level. The relative intensities of the PDF peaks corresponding to Hg-S and Hg-Hg atomic pairs indicate that the mercury centers cluster on the functionalized surfaces by virtue of thiolate bridging, regardless of the overall mercury loading. However, the Raman results indicate that the complexation of mercury centers by thiolate depends on the mercury loading. At low mercury loadings (Hg/S (le) 0.5), the dominant species is an electrically neutral complex in which mercury most likely is tetrahedrally coordinated to bridging thiolate ligands, as in Hg(SBut)2. At higher loadings (Hg/S 1.0-1.3), mercury complex cations predominate, as evidenced by the presence of charge-balancing anions (nitrate) on the surface. This cationic form of bound mercury is assigned a linear coordination to two bridging thiolate ligands.

  9. Structure and mechanism of dimethylsulfoxide reductase, a molybdopterin-containing enzyme of DMSO reductase family

    Full text: Apart from nitrogenase, enzymes containing molybdenum are members of a superfamily, the molybdopterin-containing enzymes. Most of these enzymes catalyse an oxygen atom transfer and two electron transfer reaction. During catalysis the Mo at the active site cycles between the Mo(VI) and Mo(IV) states. The DMSO reductase family of molybdopterin-containing enzymes all contain a bis(molybdopterin guanine dinucleotide)Mo cofactor and over thirty examples have now been described. Over the last five years crystal structures of dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase and four other enzymes of the DMSO reductase family have revealed that enzymes of this family have a similar tertiary structure. The Mo atom at the active site is coordinated by four thiolate ligands provided by the dithiolene side chains of the two MGD molecules of the bis(MGD)Mo cofactor as well as a ligand provided by an amino acid side chain. In addition, an oxygen atom in the form of an oxo, hydroxo or aqua group is also coordinated to the Mo atom. In the case of dimethylsulfoxide reductase X-ray crystallography of the product-reduced species and Raman spectroscopy has demonstrated that the enzyme contains a single exchangeable oxo group that is H-bonded to W116

  10. Structure and function of NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase and nitric oxide synthase reductase domain

    NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) and the nitric oxide synthase (NOS) reductase domains are members of the FAD-FMN family of proteins. The FAD accepts two reducing equivalents from NADPH (dehydrogenase flavin) and FMN acts as a one-electron carrier (flavodoxin-type flavin) for the transfer from NADPH to the heme protein, in which the FMNH ·/FMNH2 couple donates electrons to cytochrome P450 at constant oxidation-reduction potential. Although the interflavin electron transfer between FAD and FMN is not strictly regulated in CPR, electron transfer is activated in neuronal NOS reductase domain upon binding calmodulin (CaM), in which the CaM-bound activated form can function by a similar mechanism to that of CPR. The oxygenated form and spin state of substrate-bound cytochrome P450 in perfused rat liver are also discussed in terms of stepwise one-electron transfer from CPR. This review provides a historical perspective of the microsomal mixed-function oxidases including CPR and P450. In addition, a new model for the redox-linked conformational changes during the catalytic cycle for both CPR and NOS reductase domain is also discussed

  11. Thiol redox biology of trypanosomatids and potential targets for chemotherapy.

    Leroux, Alejandro E; Krauth-Siegel, R Luise

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosomatids are the causative agents of African sleeping sickness, Chagas' disease, and the different forms of leishmaniasis. This family of protozoan parasite possesses a trypanothione-based redox metabolism that provides the reducing equivalents for various vital processes such as the biosynthesis of DNA precursors and the detoxification of hydroperoxides. Almost all enzymes of the redox pathway proved to be essential and therefore fulfil one crucial prerequisite for a putative drug target. Trypanothione synthetase and trypanothione reductase are present in all trypanosomatids but absent from the mammalian host which, in addition to the essentiality, renders them highly specific. The chemotherapy research on both enzymes is further supported by the availability of high-throughput screening techniques and crystal structures. In this review we focus on the recent advances and limitations in the development of lead compounds targeting trypanothione synthetase and trypanothione reductase. We present an overview of the available inhibitors and discuss future perspectives including other components of the parasite-specific redox pathway. PMID:26592324

  12. Genetic identification of a respiratory arsenate reductase

    Saltikov, Chad W.; Newman, Dianne K.

    2003-01-01

    For more than a decade, it has been recognized that arsenate [H2AsO41-; As(V)] can be used by microorganisms as a terminal electron acceptor in anaerobic respiration. Given the toxicity of arsenic, the mechanistic basis of this process is intriguing, as is its evolutionary origin. Here we show that a two-gene cluster (arrAB; arsenate respiratory reduction) in the bacterium Shewanella sp. strain ANA-3 specifically confers respiratory As(V) reductase activity. Mutants with in-frame deletions of...

  13. Determination of thiol functional groups on bacteria and natural organic matter in environmental systems

    Anandha Rao, Balaji [ORNL; Lin, Hui [ORNL; Liang, Liyuan [ORNL; Gu, Baohua [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Organic thiols (R-SH) are known to react and form complexes with some toxic soft metals such as mercury (Hg) in both biotic and abiotic systems. However, a clear understanding of these interactions is currently limited because quantifying thiols in environmental matrices is difficult due to their low abundance, susceptibility to oxidation, and measurement interference by non-thiol compounds in samples. Here, we report a fluorescence-labeling method using a maleimide containing probe, ThioGlo-1 (TG-1), to determine total thiols directly on bacterial cells and natural organic matter (NOM). We systematically evaluated the optimal thiol labeling conditions and interference from organic compounds such as disulfide, methionine, thiourea, and amine, and inorganic ions such as Na+, K+, Ca2+, Fe2+, Cl-, SO42-, HCO3-, and SCN-, and found that the method is highly sensitive and selective. Only relatively high levels of sulfide (S2-) and sulfite (SO32-) significantly interfere with the thiol analysis. The method was successful in determining thiols in a bacterium Geobacter sulfurreducens PCA and its mutants in a phosphate buffered saline solution. The measured value of ~2.1 104 thiols cell-1 (or ~0.07 mol g-1 wet cells) is in good agreement with that observed during reactions between Hg and PCA cells. Using the standard addition, we determined the total thiols of two reference NOM samples, the reduced Elliot soil humic acid and Suwanee River NOM, to be 3.6 and 0.7 mol g-1, respectively, consistent with those obtained based on their reactions with Hg.

  14. Influence of N,N-dimethylaniline on the association of phenobarbital-induced cytochrome P-450 and NADPH-cytochrome c(P-450) reductase in a reconstituted rabbit liver microsomal enzyme system.

    Hlavica, P; Golly, I; Wolf, J

    1987-09-01

    N,N-Dimethylaniline when added to reaction mixtures provokes deviation from Michaelis-Menten law of the interaction kinetics of NADPH-cytochrome c(P-450) reductase (NADPH:ferrihaemoprotein oxidoreductase, EC 1.6.2.4) with highly purified phenobarbital-induced rabbit liver microsomal cytochrome P-450 (P-450LM2). This phenomenon is not associated with the low-to-high spin transition in the iron-coordination sphere of the haemoprotein, as elicited by the arylamine. Substrate-triggered departure from linearity of the kinetics is abolished by inclusion into the assay media of p-chloromercuribenzoate, hinting at a vital role in the process of thiols. Similarly, the parabolic progress curve (nH = 1.7) is transformed to a straight line (nH = 1.01) when the N-terminal reductase-binding domain in the P-450LM2 molecule is selectively blocked through covalent attachment of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC); such a modification does not alter the affinity of the haemoprotein for the amine substrate. Steady-state fluorescence polarization measurements reveal that N,N-dimethylaniline perturbs the motional properties of the fluorophore-bearing reductase-binding region, suggesting the induction of a conformational change. Summarizing these results, the data possibly indicate N,N-dimethylaniline-induced cooperativity in the association of reductase with P-450LM2. PMID:3113486

  15. Der Thiol:Disulfid-Redox Metabolismus und der Blaulichtrezeptor Lmo0799 von Listeria monocytogenes

    Ondrusch, Nicolai

    2010-01-01

    Der Thiol-Redox-Metabolismus, der in allen lebenden Zellen zu finden ist, wirkt oxidativem Stress entgegen. Des Weiteren dient er auch der Aufrechterhaltung der intrazellulären Thiol:Disulfid-Balance, die wiederum für die Funktion vieler Proteine essentiell ist. Auch stellt er Reduktionsäquivalente für die Produktion von Desoxyribonucleotiden für die DNA-Synthese bereit und hilft oxidierte Proteine zu reparieren. Der Thiol:Disulfid-Redox-Metabolismus (TDRM) unterscheidet sich von anderen meta...

  16. Synthesis of coordination compounds of copper(II) and 1.2.4-triazole thiol-5

    Present work is devoted to synthesis of coordination compounds of copper(II) and 1.2.4-triazole thiol-5. New coordination compounds of copper(II) and 1.2.4-triazole thiol-5 in aqueous-ethanol medium at molar ration Cu:L from 1:1 till 1:4, where L-1.2.4-triazole thiol-5 are synthesized. Composition and structure of synthesized coordination compounds are defined by means of chemical analysis, infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray phase analysis methods.

  17. Quinoline-2-thiol Derivatives as Fluorescent Sensors for Metals, pH and HNO

    Naphtali A. O’Connor

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available A tautomeric equilibrium exists for quinoline-2-thiol and quinoline-2(1H-thione. Quantum mechanical calculations predict the thione is the major tautomer and this is confirmed by the absorption spectra. The utility of quinolone-2-thiol/quinoline-2(1H-thione as a chromophore for developing fluorescent sensors is explored. No fluorescence is observed when excited at absorption maxima, however a fluorescence increase is observed when exposed to HNO, a molecule of import as a cardiovascular therapeutic. Alkylated quinoline-2-thiol derivatives are found to be fluorescent and show a reduction in fluorescence when exposed to metals and changes in pH.

  18. Thiazolidine-Protected β-Thiol Asparagine: Applications in One-Pot Ligation-Desulfurization Chemistry.

    Sayers, Jessica; Thompson, Robert E; Perry, Kristen J; Malins, Lara R; Payne, Richard J

    2015-10-01

    The synthesis of a β-thiol asparagine derivative bearing a novel (2,4,6-trimethoxyphenyl)thiazolidine protecting group is described. The efficient incorporation of the amino acid into the N-termini of peptides is demonstrated as well as the utility of the β-thiol asparagine moiety for rapid ligation reactions with peptide thioesters. The streamlined synthesis of native peptide products could be accomplished using a one-pot radical desulfurization of the β-thiol auxiliary following the ligation event. The utility of the amino acid is highlighted in the efficient one-pot assembly of the HIV entry inhibitor enfuvirtide. PMID:26398220

  19. Membrane-associated chromate reductase activity from Enterobacter cloacae.

    P. C. Wang; Mori, T.; Toda, K.; Ohtake, H

    1990-01-01

    Washed cells of Enterobacter cloacae HO1 reduced hexavalent chromium (chromate: CrO4(2-) anaerobically. Chromate reductase activity was preferentially associated with the membrane fraction of the cells. Right-side-out membrane vesicles prepared from E. cloacae cells showed high chromate reductase activities when ascorbate-reduced phenazine methosulfate was added as an electron donor.

  20. Canopy and seasonal profiles of nitrate reductase in soybeans

    Harper, J.E.; Hageman, R.H.

    1972-01-01

    Nitrate reductase activity of soybeans (Glycine max L. Merr.) was evaluated in soil plots and outdoor hydroponic gravel culture systems throughout the growing season. Nitrate reductase profiles within the plant canopy were also established. Mean activity per gram fresh weight per hour of the entire plant canopy was highest in the seedling stage while total activity (activity per gram fresh weight per hour times the total leaf weight) reached a maximum when plants were in the full bloom to midpod fill stage. Nitrate reductase activity per gram fresh weight per hour was highest in the uppermost leaf just prior to full expansion and declined with leaf positions lower in the canopy. Total nitrate reductase activity per leaf was also highest in the uppermost fully expanded leaf during early growth stages. Maximum total activity shifted to leaf positions lower in the plant canopy with later growth stages. Nitrate reductase activity of soybeans grown in hydroponic systems was significantly higher than activity of adjacent soil grown plants at later growth stages, which suggested that under normal field conditions the potential for nitrate utilization may not be realized. Nitrate reductase activity per gram fresh weight per hour and nitrate content were positively correlated over the growing season with plants grown in either soil or solution culture. Computations based upon the nitrate reductase assay of plants grown in hydroponics indicated that from 1.7 to 1.8 grams N could have been supplied to the plant via the nitrate reductase process. 11 references, 9 figures, 3 tables.

  1. Preparation and Preliminary Dielectric Characterization of Structured C60-Thiol-Ene Polymer Nanocomposites Assembled Using the Thiol-Ene Click Reaction

    Hanaa M. Ahmed

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Fullerene-containing materials have the ability to store and release electrical energy. Therefore, fullerenes may ultimately find use in high-voltage equipment devices or as super capacitors for high electric energy storage due to this ease of manipulating their excellent dielectric properties and their high volume resistivity. A series of structured fullerene (C60 polymer nanocomposites were assembled using the thiol-ene click reaction, between alkyl thiols and allyl functionalized C60 derivatives. The resulting high-density C60-urethane-thiol-ene (C60-Thiol-Ene networks possessed excellent mechanical properties. These novel networks were characterized using standard techniques, including infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC, dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA, and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA. The dielectric spectra for the prepared samples were determined over a broad frequency range at room temperature using a broadband dielectric spectrometer and a semiconductor characterization system. The changes in thermo-mechanical and electrical properties of these novel fullerene-thiol-ene composite films were measured as a function of the C60 content, and samples characterized by high dielectric permittivity and low dielectric loss were produced. In this process, variations in chemical composition of the networks were correlated to performance characteristics.

  2. Atmospheric reactivity of alcohols, thiols and fluoroalcohols with chlorine atoms

    Garzon Ruiz, Andres

    Alcohols, thiols and fluoroalcohols are volatile organic compounds (VOCs) which are emitted to the atmosphere from both natural (vegetation, oceans, volcanoes, etc.) and anthropogenic sources (fuels, solvents, wastewater, incinerators, refrigerants, etc.). These pollutants can be eliminated from the troposphere by deposition on the terrestrial surface, direct photolysis or reaction with different tropospheric oxidants. Reactions of VOCs with tropospheric oxidants are involved in the well-known atmospheric phenomenon of photochemical smog or the production of tropospheric ozone. The oxidation of these VOCs in the troposphere is mainly initiated by reaction with OH radicals during the daytime and with NO radicals at night. However, in recent years, the oxidation by chlorine atoms (Cl) has gained great importance in the study of atmospheric reactions because they may exert some influence in the boundary layer, particularly in marine and coastal environments. In general, Cl atoms are much more reactive species than OH and NO; radicals and therefore low concentrations of Cl may compete with OH and NO3 in hydrocarbon oxidation processes. The main source of tropospheric Cl atoms is believed to be the photolysis of chlorine-containing molecules generated by heterogeneous reactions of sea salt aerosols. It has also been proposed that Cl atoms, produced in the photolysis of Cl2 emitted from industrial processes, may enhance hydrocarbon oxidation rates and ozone production in urban environments. In this work, a kinetic, theoretical and mechanistic study of the reaction of several alcohols, thiols, and fluoroalcohols with Cl atoms has been carried out. Pulsed laser photolysis-fluorescence resonance (PLP-RF) technique was used for the kinetic study as a function of temperature and pressure. An environmental chamber-Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) system was also employed in the kinetic studies. Tropospheric lifetimes of these pollutants were estimated using obtained kinetic

  3. Thiol-activated serine proteinases from nymphal hemolymph of the African migratory locust, Locusta migratoria migratorioides.

    Hanzon, Jacob; Smirnoff, Patricia; Applebaum, Shalom W; Mattoo, Autar K; Birk, Yehudith

    2003-02-01

    Two unique serine proteinase isoenzymes (LmHP-1 and LmHP-2) were isolated from the hemolymph of African migratory locust (Locusta migratoria migratorioides) nymphs. Both have a molecular mass of about 23 kDa and are activated by thiol-reducing agents. PMSF abolishes enzymes activity only after thiol activation, while the cysteine proteinase inhibitors E-64, iodoacetamide, and heavy metals fail to inhibit the thiol-activated enzymes. The N-terminal sequence was determined for the more-abundant LmHP-2 isoenzyme. It exhibits partial homology to that of other insect serine proteinases and similar substrate specificity and inhibition by the synthetic and protein trypsin inhibitors pABA, TLCK, BBI, and STI. The locust trypsins LmHP-1 and LmHP-2 constitute a new category of serine proteases wherein the active site of the enzyme is exposed by thiol activation without cleavage of peptide bonds. PMID:12559979

  4. Performance comparison of acrylic and thiol-acrylic resins in two-photon polymerization.

    Jiang, Lijia; Xiong, Wei; Zhou, Yushen; Liu, Ying; Huang, Xi; Li, Dawei; Baldacchini, Tommaso; Jiang, Lan; Lu, Yongfeng

    2016-06-13

    Microfabrication by two-photon polymerization is investigated using resins based on thiol-ene chemistry. In particular, resins containing different amounts of a tetrafunctional acrylic monomer and a tetrafunctional thiol molecule are used to create complex microstructures. We observe the enhancement of several characteristics of two-photon polymerization when using thiol-acrylic resins. Specifically, microfabrication is carried out using higher writing velocities and it produces stronger polymeric microstructures. Furthermore, the amount of shrinkage typically observed in the production of three-dimensional microstructures is reduced also. By means of microspectrometry, we confirm that the thiol-acrylate mixture in TPP resins promote monomer conversion inducing a higher degree of cross-linked network formation. PMID:27410383

  5. AFM-assisted fabrication of thiol SAM pattern with alternating quantified surface potential

    Simons Janet

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thiol self-assembled monolayers (SAMs are widely used in many nano- and bio-technology applications. We report a new approach to create and characterize a thiol SAMs micropattern with alternating charges on a flat gold-coated substrate using atomic force microscopy (AFM and Kelvin probe force microscopy (KPFM. We produced SAMs-patterns made of alternating positively charged, negatively charged, and hydrophobic-terminated thiols by an automated AFM-assisted manipulation, or nanografting. We show that these thiol patterns possess only small topographical differences as revealed by AFM, and distinguished differences in surface potential (20-50 mV, revealed by KPFM. The pattern can be helpful in the development of biosensor technologies, specifically for selective binding of biomolecules based on charge and hydrophobicity, and serve as a model for creating surfaces with quantified alternating surface potential distribution.

  6. Application of metal-modified silica gels as sorbents for alkane-thiols

    In order to elaborate high effective method of purification of industry wastes from alkane-thiols the sorption properties of silica gels modified by ions of heavy metals are studied. The optimal conditions of sorption are defined.

  7. Degradable thiol-acrylate hydrogels as tunable matrices for three-dimensional hepatic culture.

    Hao, Yiting; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2014-11-01

    A degradable poly(ethylene glycol)-diacrylate (PEGDA) hydrogel system was developed using simple macromer formulations and visible light initiated thiol-acrylate photopolymerization. In addition to PEGDA, other components in this gelation system include eosin-Y as a photo-sensitizer, bi-functional thiol (dithiothreitol, DTT) as a dual-purpose co-initiator and cross-linker, and N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP) as a co-monomer. Gelation was achieved through a mixed-mode step-chain growth polymerization mechanism under bright visible light exposure. Increasing photo-sensitizer or NVP concentrations accelerated photo-crosslinking and increased final gel stiffness. Increasing bi-functional thiol content in the prepolymer solution only increased gel stiffness to some degree. As the concentration of thiol surpassed certain range, thiol-mediated chain-transfer events caused thiol-acrylate gels to form with lower degree of cross-linking. Pendant peptide, such as integrin ligand RGDS, was more effectively immobilized in the network via a thiol-acrylate reaction (using thiol-bearing peptide Ac-CRGDS. Underline indicates cross-linkable motif) than through homo-polymerization of acrylated peptide (e.g., acryl-RGDS). The incorporation of pendant peptide comes with the expense of a lower degree of gel cross-linking, which was rectified by increasing co-monomer NVP content. Without the use of any readily degradable macromer, these visible light initiated mixed-mode cross-linked hydrogels degraded hydrolytically due to the formation of thiol-ether-ester bonds following thiol-acrylate reactions. An exponential growth relationship was identified between the hydrolytic degradation rate and bifunctional thiol content in the prepolymer solution. Finally, we evaluated the cytocompatibility of these mixed-mode cross-linked degradable hydrogels using in situ encapsulation of hepatocellular carcinoma Huh7 cells. Encapsulated Huh7 cells remained alive and proliferated as time to form cell clusters

  8. Visible light cured thiol-vinyl hydrogels with tunable degradation for 3D cell culture

    Hao, Yiting; Shih, Han; Muňoz, Zachary; Kemp, Arika; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2013-01-01

    We report here a synthetically simple yet highly tunable and diverse visible light mediated thiol-vinyl gelation system for fabricating cell-instructive hydrogels. Gelation was achieved via a mixed-mode step-and-chain-growth photopolymerization using functionalized 4-arm poly(ethylene glycol) as backbone macromer, eosin-Y as photosensitizer, and di-thiol containing molecule as dual purpose co-initiator/cross-linker. N-vinylpyrrolidone (NVP) was used to accelerate gelation kinetics and to adju...

  9. Optimization of Optical Properties of Polycarbonate Film with Thiol Gold-Nanoparticles

    Claudio Larosa; Enrico Stura; Roberto Eggenhöffner; Claudio Nicolini

    2009-01-01

    A new nanostructured composite film based on thiol gold nanoparticles dispersed in polycarbonate and prepared by evaporating a solution of 1-dodecanthiol gold nanoparticles and polycarbonate was developed for applications as optical lenses. Lenses with superior mechanical properties, coloring and UV ray absorption and with the same transparency as the matrix were obtained. The supporting highly transparent polycarbonate matrix and the chloroform solution of thiol gold nanoparticles, 3 nm mean...

  10. A Versatile Synthetic Extracellular Matrix Mimic via Thiol-Norbornene Photopolymerization

    Fairbanks, Benjamin D.; Schwartz, Michael P.; Halevi, Alexandra E.; Nuttelman, Charles R.; Bowman, Christopher N.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2009-01-01

    Synthetic hydrogels with engineered, cell-mediated degradation sites are an important category of biomimetic materials. Here, hydrogels are synthesized by a step-growth reaction mechanism via a radically mediated thiol-norbornene (thiol-ene) photopolymerization. This reaction combines the advantages of ideal, homogeneous polymer network formation, facile incorporation of peptides without post-synthetic modification, and spatial and temporal control over the network evolution into a single sys...

  11. Interfacial thiol-ene photo-click reactions for forming multilayer hydrogels

    Shih, Han; Fraser, Andrew K.; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Interfacial visible light-mediated thiol-ene photo-click reactions were developed for preparing step-growth hydrogels with multilayer structures. The effect of a non-cleavage type photoinitiator eosin-Y on visible light-mediated thiol-ene photopolymerization was first characterized using in situ photo-rheometry, gel fraction, and equilibrium swelling ratio. Next, spectrophotometric properties of eosin-Y in the presence of various relevant macromer species were evaluated using UV/Vis spectrome...

  12. Thiol Modification of Psyllium Husk Mucilage and Evaluation of Its Mucoadhesive Applications

    Meenakshi Bhatia; Munish Ahuja

    2013-01-01

    Thiol functionalization of psyllium was carried out to enhance its mucoadhesive potential. Thiolation of psyllium was achieved by esterification with thioglycolic acid. Thiolation was observed to change the surface morphology of psyllium from fibrous to granular and result in a slight increase in the crystallinity and swelling. Thiolated psyllium was found to contain 3.282 m moles of thiol groups/g of the polymer. Mucoadhesive applications of thiolated psylium were explored by formulating ge...

  13. Endoplasmic Reticulum Thiol Oxidase Deficiency Leads to Ascorbic Acid Depletion and Noncanonical Scurvy in Mice

    Zito, Ester; Hansen, Henning Gram; Yeo, Giles S.H.; Fujii, Junichi; Ron, David

    2012-01-01

    Summary Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) thiol oxidases initiate a disulfide relay to oxidatively fold secreted proteins. We found that combined loss-of-function mutations in genes encoding the ER thiol oxidases ERO1α, ERO1β, and PRDX4 compromised the extracellular matrix in mice and interfered with the intracellular maturation of procollagen. These severe abnormalities were associated with an unexpectedly modest delay in disulfide bond formation in secreted proteins but a profound, 5-fold lower pr...

  14. Expression, purification, crystallization and initial X-ray diffraction analysis of thiol peroxidase from Yersinia pseudotuberculosis

    Recombinant thiol peroxidase from Y. pseudotuberculosis has been purified and crystallized in three crystal forms. Thiol peroxidase is an atypical 2-Cys peroxiredoxin that reduces alkyl hydroperoxides. Wild-type and C61S mutant protein have been recombinantly expressed in Escherichia coli and purified using nickel-affinity chromatography. Initial crystallization trials yielded three crystal forms in three different space groups (P21, P64 and P212121) both in the presence and the absence of DTT

  15. Purification, Characterization, and Effect of Thiol Compounds on Activity of the Erwinia carotovora L-Asparaginase

    Suchita C. Warangkar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available L-asparaginase was extracted from Erwinia carotovora and purified by ammonium sulfate fractionation (60–70%, Sephadex G-100, CM cellulose, and DEAE sephadex chromatography. The apparent Mr of enzyme under nondenaturing and denaturing conditions was 150 kDa and 37±0.5 kDa, respectively. L-asparaginase activity was studied in presence of thiols, namely, L-cystine (Cys, L-methionine (Met, N-acetyl cysteine (NAC, and reduced glutathione (GSH. Kinetic parameters in presence of thiols (10–400 M showed an increase in Vmax values (2000, 2223, 2380, 2500, and control 1666.7 moles mg−1min−1 and a decrease in K values (0.086, 0.076, 0.062, 0.055 and control 0.098 mM indicating nonessential mode of activation. KA values displayed propensity to bind thiols. A decrease in Vmax/K ratio in concentration plots showed inverse relationship between free thiol groups (NAC and GSH and bound thiol group (Cys and Met. Enzyme activity was enhanced in presence of thiol protecting reagents like dithiothreitol (DTT, 2-mercaptoethanol (2-ME, and GSH, but inhibited by p-chloromercurybenzoate (PCMB and iodoacetamide (IA.

  16. Interfacial thiol-ene photo-click reactions for forming multilayer hydrogels

    Shih, Han; Fraser, Andrew K.; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Interfacial visible light-mediated thiol-ene photo-click reactions were developed for preparing step-growth hydrogels with multilayer structures. The effect of a non-cleavage type photoinitiator eosin-Y on visible light-mediated thiol-ene photopolymerization was first characterized using in situ photo-rheometry, gel fraction, and equilibrium swelling ratio. Next, spectrophotometric properties of eosin-Y in the presence of various relevant macromer species were evaluated using UV/Vis spectrometry. It was determined that eosin-Y was able to re-initiate thiol-ene photo-click reaction even after light exposure. Due to its small molecular weight, most eosin-Y molecules readily leached out from the hydrogels. The diffusion of residual eosin-Y from pre-formed hydrogels was exploited for fabricating multilayer step-growth hydrogels. Interfacial hydrogel coating was formed via the same visible light-mediated gelation mechanism without adding fresh initiator. The thickness of the thiol-ene gel coating could be easily controlled by adjusting visible light exposure time, eosin-Y concentration initially loaded in the core gel, or macromer concentration in the coating solution. The major benefits of this interfacial thiol-ene coating system include its simplicity and cytocompatibility. The formation of thiol-ene hydrogels and coatings neither requires nor generates any cytotoxic components. This new gelation chemistry may have great utilities in controlled release of multiple sensitive growth factors and encapsulation of multiple cell types for tissue regeneration. PMID:23384151

  17. Oxidative stress and decreased thiol level in patients with migraine: cross-sectional study.

    Eren, Yasemin; Dirik, Ebru; Neşelioğlu, Salim; Erel, Özcan

    2015-12-01

    Although migraine is a neurological disorder known since long, its physiopathology remains unclear. Recent studies suggest that migraine is associated with oxidative stress; however, they report divergent results. The aim of the present study was to evaluate total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), oxidative stress index (OSI), and serum thiol level in migraine patients with or without aura. The study group consisted of 141 migraine patients. The control group included 70 healthy subjects. TAS, TOS, OSI were evaluated using a method developed by Erel. Serum thiol level was measured using the Hu method. No difference was found in TAS, TOS, OSI between the patients and controls. The level of thiol was significantly lower in patients than in controls. Negative correlations were detected between thiol level and Migraine Disability Assessment score in patients. Although TAS, TOS, and OSI were similar to those of the control group, serum thiol level, an important marker of antioxidant capacity, was significantly lower in migraines compared with controls, and caused more serious disability. Novel treatment approaches may be developed based on these data, and compounds containing thiol, such as alpha lipoic acid and N-acetyl cysteine, may be used in prophylaxis. PMID:25595415

  18. Oligomerization of Indole Derivatives with Incorporation of Thiols

    Jarl E.S. Wikberg

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Two molecules of indole derivative, e.g. indole-5-carboxylic acid, reacted with one molecule of thiol, e.g. 1,2-ethanedithiol, in the presence of trifluoroacetic acid to yield adducts such as 3-[2-(2-amino-5-carboxyphenyl-1-(2-mercaptoethylthioethyl]-1Hindole-5-carboxylic acid. Parallel formation of dimers, such as 2,3-dihydro-1H,1'H-2,3'-biindole-5,5'-dicarboxylic acid and trimers, such as 3,3'-[2-(2-amino-5-carboxyphenyl ethane-1,1-diyl]bis(1H-indole-5-carboxylic acid of the indole derivatives was also observed. Reaction of a mixture of indole and indole-5-carboxylic acid with 2-phenylethanethiol proceeded in a regioselective way, affording 3-[2-(2-aminophenyl-1-(phenethylthioethyl]-1H-indole-5-carboxylic acid. An additional product of this reaction was 3-[2-(2-aminophenyl-1-(phenethylthioethyl]-2,3-dihydro-1H,1'H-2,3'-biindole-5'-carboxylic acid, which upon standing in DMSO-d6 solution gave 3-[2-(2-aminophenyl-1-(phenethylthioethyl]-1H,1'H-2,3'-biindole-5'-carboxylic acid. Structures of all compounds were elucidated by NMR, and a mechanism for their formation was suggested.

  19. Cytokinin Determines Thiol-Mediated Arsenic Tolerance and Accumulation.

    Mohan, Thotegowdanapalya C; Castrillo, Gabriel; Navarro, Cristina; Zarco-Fernández, Sonia; Ramireddy, Eswarayya; Mateo, Cristian; Zamarreño, Angel M; Paz-Ares, Javier; Muñoz, Riansares; García-Mina, Jose M; Hernández, Luis E; Schmülling, Thomas; Leyva, Antonio

    2016-06-01

    The presence of arsenic in soil and water is a constant threat to plant growth in many regions of the world. Phytohormones act in the integration of growth control and stress response, but their role in plant responses to arsenic remains to be elucidated. Here, we show that arsenate [As(V)], the most prevalent arsenic chemical species in nature, causes severe depletion of endogenous cytokinins (CKs) in the model plant Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We found that CK signaling mutants and transgenic plants with reduced endogenous CK levels showed an As(V)-tolerant phenotype. Our data indicate that in CK-depleted plants exposed to As(V), transcript levels of As(V)/phosphate-transporters were similar or even higher than in wild-type plants. In contrast, CK depletion provoked the coordinated activation of As(V) tolerance mechanisms, leading to the accumulation of thiol compounds such as phytochelatins and glutathione, which are essential for arsenic sequestration. Transgenic CK-deficient Arabidopsis and tobacco lines show a marked increase in arsenic accumulation. Our findings indicate that CK is an important regulatory factor in plant adaptation to arsenic stress. PMID:27208271

  20. Human erythrocyte thiol methyltransferase: radiochemical microassay and biochemical properties

    A radiochemical microassay for the measurement of thiol methyltransferase (TMT) activity in human red blood cell (RBC) membranes has been developed. Both 2-mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol were used as substrates for the enzyme. The pH optimum of the reaction was approximately 9.0 when glycine-NaOH was used as a buffer. The apparent Michaelis-Menten (Ksub(M)) value for the methyl donor for the reaction, S-adenosyl-L-methionine, was 43 μmol/l. Human RBC TMT activity was neither activated nor inhibited by Ca2+, Mg2+, or tropolone, but the enzyme was inhibited by SKF 525A and by reagents that react with sulfhydryl grcups. The mean TMT activity in blood from 289 randomly selected adult white subjects was 10.93 +- 3.22 units per mg protein (mean +- S.D.). The activity was the same in samples from men and women. The results of experiments in which TMT activity was measured in mixtures of RBC membranes with relatively ''low'' and relatively ''high'' activities provided no evidence that individual variations in the enzyme activity were due to variations in endogenous TMT activators or inhibitors. (Auth.)

  1. Solution structure of an arsenate reductase-related protein, YffB, from Brucella melitensis, the etiological agent responsible for brucellosis

    B. melitensis is a NIAID Category B microorganism that is responsible for brucellosis and is a potential agent for biological warfare. Here, the solution structure of the 116-residue arsenate reductase-related protein Bm-YffB (BR0369) from this organism is reported. Brucella melitensis is the etiological agent responsible for brucellosis. Present in the B. melitensis genome is a 116-residue protein related to arsenate reductases (Bm-YffB; BR0369). Arsenate reductases (ArsC) convert arsenate ion (H2AsO4−), a compound that is toxic to bacteria, to arsenite ion (AsO2−), a product that may be efficiently exported out of the cell. Consequently, Bm-YffB is a potential drug target because if arsenate reduction is the protein’s major biological function then disabling the cell’s ability to reduce arsenate would make these cells more sensitive to the deleterious effects of arsenate. Size-exclusion chromatography and NMR spectroscopy indicate that Bm-YffB is a monomer in solution. The solution structure of Bm-YffB shows that the protein consists of two domains: a four-stranded mixed β-sheet flanked by two α-helices on one side and an α-helical bundle. The α/β domain is characteristic of the fold of thioredoxin-like proteins and the overall structure is generally similar to those of known arsenate reductases despite the marginal sequence similarity. Chemical shift perturbation studies with 15N-labeled Bm-YffB show that the protein binds reduced glutathione at a site adjacent to a region similar to the HX3CX3R catalytic sequence motif that is important for arsenic detoxification activity in the classical arsenate-reductase family of proteins. The latter observation supports the hypothesis that the ArsC-YffB family of proteins may function as glutathione-dependent thiol reductases. However, comparison of the structure of Bm-YffB with the structures of proteins from the classical ArsC family suggest that the mechanism and possibly the function of Bm-YffB and other

  2. Molecular modeling of the reductase domain to elucidate the reaction mechanism of reduction of peptidyl thioester into its corresponding alcohol in non-ribosomal peptide synthetases

    Lee Gwang

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPSs are multienzymatic, multidomain megasynthases involved in the biosynthesis of pharmaceutically important nonribosomal peptides. The peptaibol synthetase from Trichoderma virens (TPS is an important member of the NRPS family that exhibits antifungal properties. The majority of the NRPSs terminate peptide synthesis with the thioesterase (TE domain, which either hydrolyzes the thioester linkage, releasing the free peptic acid, or catalyzes the intramolecular macrocyclization to produce a macrolactone product. TPS is an important NRPS that does not encompass a TE domain, but rather a reductase domain (R domain to release the mature peptide product reductively with the aid of a NADPH cofactor. However, the catalytic mechanism of the reductase domain has not yet been elucidated. Results We present here a three-dimensional (3D model of the reductase domain based on the crystal structure of vestitone reductase (VR. VR belongs to the short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase (SDR superfamily and is responsible for the nicotinamide dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH-dependent reduction of the substrate into its corresponding secondary alcohol product. The binding sites of the probable linear substrates, alamethicin, trichotoxin, antiamoebin I, chrysopermin C and gramicidin, were identified within the modeled R domain using multiple docking approaches. The docking results of the ligand in the active site of the R domain showed that reductase side chains have a high affinity towards ligand binding, while the thioester oxygen of each substrate forms a hydrogen bond with the OH group of Tyr176 and the thiol group of the substrate is closer to the Glu220. The modeling and docking studies revealed the reaction mechanism of reduction of thioester into a primary alcohol. Conclusion Peptaibol biosynthesis incorporates a single R domain, which appears to catalyze the four-electron reduction reaction of a peptidyl

  3. Thioredoxin f1 and NADPH-Dependent Thioredoxin Reductase C Have Overlapping Functions in Regulating Photosynthetic Metabolism and Plant Growth in Response to Varying Light Conditions

    Thormählen, Ina; Meitzel, Tobias; Groysman, Julia; Öchsner, Alexandra Bianca; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Naranjo, Belén; Cejudo, Francisco J; Geigenberger, Peter

    2015-01-01

    . In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants, combined, but not single, deficiencies of Trx f1 and NTRC led to severe growth inhibition and perturbed light acclimation, accompanied by strong impairments of Calvin-Benson cycle activity and starch accumulation. Light activation of key enzymes of these...... pathways, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, was almost completely abolished. The subsequent increase in NADPH-NADP(+) and ATP-ADP ratios led to increased nitrogen assimilation, NADP-malate dehydrogenase activation, and light vulnerability of photosystem I core proteins. In an......Two different thiol redox systems exist in plant chloroplasts, the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (Trx) system, which depends on ferredoxin reduced by the photosynthetic electron transport chain and, thus, on light, and the NADPH-dependent Trx reductase C (NTRC) system, which relies on NADPH and thus may...

  4. Structure and expression of human dihydropteridine reductase

    Dihydropteridine reductase catalyzes the NADH-mediated reduction of quinonoid dihydrobiopterin and is an essential component of the pterindependent aromatic amino acid hydroxylating systems. A cDNA for human DHPR was isolated from a human liver cDNA library in the vector λgt11 using a monospecific antibody against sheep DHPR. The nucleic acid sequence and amino acid sequence of human DHPR were determined from a full-length clone. A 112 amino acid sequence of sheep DHPR was obtained by sequencing purified sheep DHPR. This sequence is highly homologous to the predicted amino acid sequence of the human protein. Gene transfer of the recombinant human DHPR into COS cells leads to expression of DHPR enzymatic activity. These results indicate that the cDNA clone identified by antibody screening is an authentic and full-length cDNA for human DHPR

  5. Nitrite Reductase Activity in Engineered Azurin Variants.

    Berry, Steven M; Strange, Jacob N; Bladholm, Erika L; Khatiwada, Balabhadra; Hedstrom, Christine G; Sauer, Alexandra M

    2016-05-01

    Nitrite reductase (NiR) activity was examined in a series of dicopper P.a. azurin variants in which a surface binding copper site was added through site-directed mutagenesis. Four variants were synthesized with copper binding motifs inspired by the catalytic type 2 copper binding sites found in the native noncoupled dinuclear copper enzymes nitrite reductase and peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase. The four azurin variants, denoted Az-NiR, Az-NiR3His, Az-PHM, and Az-PHM3His, maintained the azurin electron transfer copper center, with the second designed copper site located over 13 Å away and consisting of mutations Asn10His,Gln14Asp,Asn16His-azurin, Asn10His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, Gln8Met,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, and Gln8His,Gln14His,Asn16His-azurin, respectively. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, EPR spectroscopy, and electrochemistry of the sites demonstrate copper binding as well as interaction with small exogenous ligands. The nitrite reduction activity of the variants was determined, including the catalytic Michaelis-Menten parameters. The variants showed activity (0.34-0.59 min(-1)) that was slower than that of native NiRs but comparable to that of other model systems. There were small variations in activity of the four variants that correlated with the number of histidines in the added copper site. Catalysis was found to be reversible, with nitrite produced from NO. Reactions starting with reduced azurin variants demonstrated that electrons from both copper centers were used to reduce nitrite, although steady-state catalysis required the T2 copper center and did not require the T1 center. Finally, experiments separating rates of enzyme reduction from rates of reoxidation by nitrite demonstrated that the reaction with nitrite was rate limiting during catalysis. PMID:27055058

  6. The arsenic hyperaccumulating Pteris vittata expresses two arsenate reductases

    Patrizia Cesaro; Chiara Cattaneo; Elisa Bona; Graziella Berta; Maria Cavaletto

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic reduction of arsenate to arsenite is the first known step in arsenate metabolism in all organisms. Although the presence of one mRNA arsenate reductase (PvACR2) has been characterized in gametophytes of P. vittata, no arsenate reductase protein has been directly observed in this arsenic hyperaccumulating fern, yet. In order to assess the possible presence of arsenate reductase in P. vittata, two recombinant proteins, ACR2-His6 and Trx-His6-S-Pv2.5–8 were prepared in Escherichia coli...

  7. Small-scale polymer structures enabled by thiol-ene copolymer systems

    Kasprzak, Scott Edward

    2009-12-01

    The research described herein is aimed at exploring the thermomechanical properties of thiol-ene polymers in bulk form, investigating the ability of thiol-ene polymers to behave desirably as photolithographic media, and providing the first characterization of the mechanical properties of two-photon stereolithography-produced polymer structures. The thiol-ene polymerization reaction itself is well-characterized and described in the literature, but the thermomechanical properties of thiol-ene and thiol-ene/acrylate polymers still require more rigorous study. Understanding the behavior of thiol-ene networks is a crucial step towards their expanded use in bulk form, and particularly in specialized applications such as shape memory devices. Additionally, the thiol-ene polymerization reaction mechanism exhibits unique properties which make these polymers well suited to photolithography, overcoming the typical dichotomy of current materials which either exhibit excellent photolithographic behavior or have controllable properties. Finally, before two-photon stereolithography can create mechanisms and devices which can serve any mechanically functional role, the mechanical properties of the polymers they produce must be quantitatively characterized, which is complicated by the extremely small scale at which these structures are produced. As such, mechanical characterization to date has been strictly qualitative. Fourier transfer infrared spectroscopy revealed functional group conversion information and sol-fraction testing revealed the presence of unconverted monomer and impurities, while dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and tensile testing revealed the thermomechanical responses of the systems. Nanoindentation was employed to characterize the mechanical properties of micrometer-scale polymer structures produced by two-photon stereolithography. Optical and electron microscopy were exploited to provide both quantitative and qualitative evaluations of thiol-ene/acrylate and

  8. A Study of Functional Polymer Colloids Prepared Using Thiol-Ene/Yne Click Chemistry

    Durham, Olivia Z.

    This project demonstrates the first instance of thiol-ene chemistry as the polymerization method for the production of polymer colloids in two-phase heterogeneous suspensions, miniemulsions, and emulsions. This work was also expanded to thiol-yne chemistry for the production of polymer particles containing increased crosslinking density. The utility of thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistries for polymerization and polymer modification is well established in bulk systems. These reactions are considered 'click' reactions, which can be defined as processes that are both facile and simple, offering high yields with nearly 100% conversion, no side products, easy product separation, compatibility with a diverse variety of commercially available starting materials, and orthogonality with other chemistries. In addition, thiol-ene and thiol-yne chemistry follow a step-growth mechanism for the development of highly uniform polymer networks, where polymer growth is dependent on the coupling of functional groups. These step-growth polymerization systems are in stark contrast to the chain-growth mechanisms of acrylic and styrenic monomers that have dominated the field of conventional heterogeneous polymerizations. Preliminary studies evaluated the mechanism of particle production in suspension and miniemulsion systems. Monomer droplets were compared to the final polymer particles to confirm that particle growth occurred through the polymerization of monomer droplets. Additional parameters examined include homogenization energy (mechanical mixing), diluent species and concentration, and monomer content. These reactions were conducted using photoinitiation to yield particles in a matter of minutes with diameters in the size range of several microns to hundreds of microns in suspensions or submicron particles in miniemulsions. Improved control over the particle size and size distribution was examined through variation of reaction parameters. In addition, a method of seeded suspension

  9. Synthesis of alkenyl sulfides through the iron-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of vinyl halides with thiols.

    Lin, Yun-Yung; Wang, Yu-Jen; Lin, Che-Hung; Cheng, Jun-Hao; Lee, Chin-Fa

    2012-07-20

    We report here the iron-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of alkyl vinyl halides with thiols. While many works are devoted to the coupling of thiols with alkyl vinyl iodides, interestingly, the known S-vinylation of vinyl bromides and chlorides is limited to 1-(2-bromovinyl)benzene and 1-(2-chlorovinyl)benzene. Investigation on the coupling reaction of challenging alkyl vinyl bromides and chlorides with thiols is rare. Since the coupling of 1-(2-bromovinyl)benzene and 1-(2-chlorovinyl)benzene with thiols can be performed in the absence of any catalyst, here we focus on the coupling of thiols with alkyl vinyl halides. This system is generally reactive for alkyl vinyl iodides and bromides to provide the products in good yields. 1-(Chloromethylidene)-4-tert-butyl-cyclohexane was also coupled with thiols, giving the targets in moderate yields. PMID:22708836

  10. Covalent thiol adducts arising from reactive intermediates of cocaine biotransformation.

    Schneider, Kevin J; DeCaprio, Anthony P

    2013-11-18

    Exposure to cocaine results in the depletion of hepatocellular glutathione and macromolecular protein binding in humans. Such cocaine-induced responses have generally been attributed to oxidative stress and reactive metabolites resulting from oxidative activation of the cocaine tropane nitrogen. However, little conclusive data exists on the mechanistic pathways leading to protein modification or the structure and specificity of cocaine-derived adduction products. We now report a previously uncharacterized route of cocaine bioactivation leading to the covalent adduction of biological thiols, including cysteine and glutathione. Incubation of cocaine with biological nucleophiles in an in vitro biotransformation system containing human liver microsomes identified a monooxygenase-mediated event leading to the oxidation of, and subsequent sulfhydryl addition to, the cocaine aryl moiety. Adduct structures were confirmed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high resolution, high mass accuracy mass spectrometry. Examination of assays containing transgenic bactosomes expressing single human cytochrome P450 isoforms determined the role of P450s 1A2, 2C19, and 2D6 in the oxidation process resulting in adduct formation. P450-catalyzed aryl epoxide formation and subsequent attack by free nucleophilic moieties is consistent with the resulting adduct structures, mechanisms of formation, and the empirical observation of multiple structural and stereo isomers. Analogous adduction mechanisms were maintained across all sulfhydryl-containing nucleophile models examined; N-acetylcysteine, glutathione, and a synthetic cysteine-containing hexapeptide. Predictive in silico calculations of molecular reactivity and electrophilicity/nucleophilicity were compared to the results of in vitro assay incubations in order to better understand the adduction process using the principles of hard and soft acid and base (HSAB) theory. This study elucidated a novel metabolic

  11. Electrochemistry behavior of endogenous thiols on fluorine doped tin oxide electrodes

    Rojas, Luciana; Molero, Leonard; Tapia, Ricardo A.; Rio, Rodrigo del; Valle, M. Angelica del; Antilen, Monica [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Casilla 306, Correo 22, Macul, Santiago (Chile); Armijo, Francisco, E-mail: jarmijom@uc.cl [Departamento de Quimica Inorganica, Facultad de Quimica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile, Av Vicuna Mackenna 4860, Casilla 306, Correo 22, Macul, Santiago (Chile)

    2011-10-01

    Highlights: > The first time that fluorine doped tin oxide electrodes are used for the electrooxidation of endogenous thiols. > Low potentials of electrooxidation were obtained for the different thiols. > The electrochemical behavior of thiols depends on the pH and the ionic electroactive species, the electrooxidation proceeds for a process of adsorption of electroactive species on FTO and high values the heterogeneous electron tranfer rate constant of the reaction were obtained. - Abstract: In this work the electrochemical behavior of different thiols on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) electrodes is reported. To this end, the mechanism of electrochemical oxidation of glutathione (GSH), cysteine (Cys), homocysteine (HCys) and acetyl-cysteine (ACys) at different pH was investigated. FTO showed electroactivity for the oxidation of the first three thiols at pH between 2.0 and 4.0, but under these conditions no acetyl-cysteine oxidation was observed on FTO. Voltammetric studies of the electro-oxidation of GSH, Cys and HCys showed peaks at about 0.35, 0.29, and 0.28 V at optimum pH 2.4, 2.8 and 3.4, respectively. In addition, this study demonstrated that GSH, Cys and HCys oxidation occurs when the zwitterion is the electro-active species that interact by adsorption on FTO electrodes. The overall reaction involves 4e{sup -}/4H{sup +} and 2e{sup -}/2H{sup +}, respectively, for HCys and for GSH and Cys and high heterogeneous electron transfer rate constants. Besides, the use of FTO for the determination of different thiols was evaluated. Experimental square wave voltammetry shows a linear current vs. concentrations response between 0.1 and 1.0 mM was found for HCys and GSH, indicating that these FTO electrodes are promising candidates for the efficient electrochemical determination of these endogenous thiols.

  12. Regulation of ribonucleotide reductase by Spd1 involves multiple mechanisms

    Nestoras, Konstantinos; Mohammed, Asma Hadi; Schreurs, Ann-Sofie; Fleck, Oliver; Watson, Adam T; Poitelea, Marius; O'Shea, Charlotte; Chahwan, Charly; Holmberg, Christian; Kragelund, Birthe B; Nielsen, Olaf; Osborne, Mark; Carr, Antony M; Liu, Cong

    2010-01-01

    The correct levels of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates and their relative abundance are important to maintain genomic integrity. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) regulation is complex and multifaceted. RNR is regulated allosterically by two nucleotide-binding sites, by transcriptional control, and...

  13. Structural features of the ribonucleotide reductase of Aujeszky's disease virus.

    Kaliman, A V; Boldogköi, Z; Fodor, I

    1994-01-01

    A gene construct of the Aujeszky's disease virus (ADV) genome was prepared and the DNA fragment encoding the ribonucleotide reductase was structurally characterized. We determined the entire DNA sequence of two adjacent open reading frames of the ribonucleotide reductase genes with the intergenic sequence of nine base pairs. From the sequence analysis we predict that Aujeszky's disease virus encodes a ribonucleotide reductase which comprises two polypeptides--large and small subunits, with sizes of 835 and 303 amino acids, respectively. Nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the large and small subunits of the Aujeszky's disease virus ribonucleotide reductase have been compared with that of other herpesviruses, and structural features of both proteins have been characterized. PMID:7810419

  14. Aldose reductase inhibitory activity and antioxidant capacity of pomegranate extracts

    Karasu, Çimen; CUMAOĞLU, Ahmet; Gürpinar, Ali Rifat; Kartal, Murat; Kovacikova, Lucia; Milackova, Ivana; Stefek, Milan

    2012-01-01

    The pomegranate, Punica granatum L., has been the subject of current interest as a medicinal agent with wide-ranging therapeutic indications. In the present study, pomegranate ethanolic seed and hull extracts were tested, in comparison with a commercial sample, for the inhibition of aldose reductase, an enzyme involved in the etiology of diabetic complications. In vitro inhibition of rat lens aldose reductase was determined by a conventional method. Pomegranate ethanolic hull extract and comm...

  15. Evaluation of Thiol Raman Activities and pKa Values Using Internally Referenced Raman-Based pH Titration.

    Suwandaratne, Nuwanthi; Hu, Juan; Siriwardana, Kumudu; Gadogbe, Manuel; Zhang, Dongmao

    2016-04-01

    Thiols, including organothiol and thiol-containing biomolecules, are among the most important classes of chemicals that are used broadly in organic synthesis, biological chemistry, and nanosciences. Thiol pKa values are key indicators of thiol reactivity and functionality. Reported herein is an internally referenced Raman-based pH titration method that enables reliable quantification of thiol pKa values for both mono- and dithiols in water. The degree of thiol ionization is monitored directly using the peak intensity of the S-H stretching feature in the 2600 cm(-1) region relative to an internal reference peak as a function of the titration solution's pH. The thiol pKa values and Raman activity relative to its internal reference were then determined by curve fitting the experimental data with equations derived on the basis of the Henderson-Hasselbalch equation. Using this Raman titration method, we determined for the first time the first and second thiol pKa values for 1,2-benzenedithiol in water. This Raman-based method is convenient to implement, and its underlying theory is easy to follow. It should therefore have broad application for thiol pKa determinations and verification. PMID:26956547

  16. Facile homolytic CS bond breaking: the reaction of 2-propene-1-thiol on Mo(110)

    Wiegand, B. C.; Friend, C. M.; Uvdal, P.; Napier, M. E.

    1996-06-01

    Investigations of 2-propene-1-thiol on Mo(110) show that the facility for thiol desulfurization correlates with the homolytic CS bond strength of the thiol. A substantial amount of CS bond scission occurs upon adsorption of 2-propene-1-thiol on Mo(110) at 120 K based on X-ray photoelectron data. 2-Propene-1-thiol has an extremely weak CS bond because of the resonance stabilization of the allyl radical. Propene, the product of 2-propene-1-thiol hydrogenolysis, evolves into the gas phase in the range 160-250 K; the propene evolution being controlled by the rate of desorption. Vibrational (electron energy loss) spectra are consistent with formation of 2-propene-1-thiolate via SH bond cleavage, as well as hydrocarbon fragments at low temperature. A large fraction of the thiolate desulfurizes at 120 K to afford propene. A second hydrocarbon species is formed in the range 160-200 K, characterized by a low-frequency CH stretch mode at 2770 cm -1, which reacts further below 250 K. The CC bond in the thiol and in the propene product leads to a greater degree of non-selective reaction than is anticipated from a comparison of saturated thiols. Only in the order of 50% of the thiol reacts to afford propene, despite the facility for CS bond scission.

  17. An overview on 5alpha-reductase inhibitors.

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Thareja, Suresh; Verma, Abhilasha; Bhardwaj, Tilak Raj; Kumar, Manoj

    2010-02-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is the noncancerous proliferation of the prostate gland associated with benign prostatic obstruction and lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS) such as frequency, hesitancy, urgency, etc. Its prevalence increases with age affecting around 70% by the age of 70 years. High activity of 5alpha-reductase enzyme in humans results in excessive dihydrotestosterone levels in peripheral tissues and hence suppression of androgen action by 5alpha-reductase inhibitors is a logical treatment for BPH as they inhibit the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. Finasteride (13) was the first steroidal 5alpha-reductase inhibitor approved by U.S. Food and Drug Administration (USFDA). In human it decreases the prostatic DHT level by 70-90% and reduces the prostatic size. Dutasteride (27) another related analogue has been approved in 2002. Unlike Finasteride, Dutasteride is a competitive inhibitor of both 5alpha-reductase type I and type II isozymes, reduced DHT levels >90% following 1 year of oral administration. A number of classes of non-steroidal inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have also been synthesized generally by removing one or more rings from the azasteroidal structure or by an early non-steroidal lead (ONO-3805) (261). In this review all categories of inhibitors of 5alpha-reductase have been covered. PMID:19879888

  18. Regulative roles of glutathione reductase and four glutaredoxins in glutathione redox, antioxidant activity, and iron homeostasis of Beauveria bassiana.

    Zhang, Long-Bin; Tang, Li; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-07-01

    Multiple glutaredoxins (Grx) and glutathione reductase (Glr) are vital for the thiol-disulfide redox system in budding yeast but generally unexplored in filamentous fungi. Here we characterized the Beauveria bassiana redox system comprising dithiol Grx1, monothiol Grx2-4, Grx-like Grx5, and Glr orthologue. Each grx or glr deletion was compensated by increased transcripts of some other grx genes in normal cultures. Particularly, grx3 compensated the absence of grx1, grx2, grx5, or glr under oxidative stress while its absence was compensated only by undeletable grx4 under normal conditions but by most of other undeleted grx and glr genes in response to menadione. Consequently, the redox state was disturbed in Δglr more than in Δgrx3 but not in Δgrx1/2/5. Superoxide dismutases were more active in normal Δgrx1-3 cultures but less in Δgrx5 or Δglr response to menadione. Total catalase activity increased differentially in all the mutant cultures stressed with or without H2O2 while total peroxidase activity decreased more in the normal or H2O2-stressed culture of Δglr than of Δgrx3. Among the mutants, Δgrx3 showed slightly increased sensitivity to menadione or H2O2; Δglr exhibited greater sensitivity to thiol-oxidizing diamide than thiol-reducing 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene as well as increased sensitivity to the two oxidants. Intriguingly, all the mutants grew slower in a Fe(3+)-inclusive medium perhaps due to elevated transcripts of two Fe(3+) transporter genes. More or fewer phenotypes linked with biocontrol potential were altered in four deletion mutants excluding Δgrx5. All the changes were restored by targeted gene complementation. Overall, Grx3 played more critical role than other Grx homologues in the Glr-dependent redox system of the fungal entomopathogen. PMID:26969041

  19. Proteinase from germinating bean cotyledons. Evidence for involvement of a thiol group in catalysis.

    Csoma, C; Polgár, L

    1984-09-15

    To degrade storage proteins germinating seeds synthesize proteinases de novo that can be inhibited by thiol-blocking reagents [Baumgartner & Chrispeels (1977) Eur. J. Biochem. 77, 223-233]. We have elaborated a procedure for isolation of such a proteinase from the cotyledons of Phaseolus vulgaris. The purification procedure involved fractionation of the cotyledon homogenate with acetone and with (NH4)2SO4 and successive chromatographies on DEAE-cellulose, activated thiol-Sepharose Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200. The purified enzyme has an Mr of 23,400, proved to be highly specific for the asparagine side chain and blocking of its thiol group resulted in loss of the catalytic activity. The chemical properties of the thiol group of the bean enzyme were investigated by acylation with t-butyloxycarbonyl-L-asparagine p-nitro-phenyl ester and by alkylations with iodoacetamide and iodoacetate. Deviations from normal pH-rate profile were observed, which indicated that the thiol group is not a simple functional group, but constitutes a part of an interactive system at the active site. The pKa value for acylation and the magnitude of the rate constant for alkylation with iodoacetate revealed that the bean proteinase possesses some properties not shared by papain and the other cysteine proteinases studied to date. PMID:6385962

  20. Radiosensitization by misonidazole during recovery of cellular thiols following depletion by BSO or DEM

    V79 cells have been depleted of their endogenous thiols by treatment with 100 microM BSO for 16-18 hr, or 0.5 mM DEM for 1 hr. The recovery of cellular thiols after removal of the drugs was determined by h.p.l.c. or flow cytometry and the sensitizer enhancement ratio for 100 microM misonidazole was measured as a function of time after removal of the drugs. The SER of 1.2 for control (hypoxic) cells increased to 1.8 for BSO treated (hypoxic) cells and 2.2 for DEM treated ones, when thiol levels were below 10% of controls. The SER and thiol levels returned to control values within 5 hr of removing DEM. After BSO there was little change during the first 5 hr and then a gradual return to normal values by 24 hrs. The major fall in the SER after removal of the drugs occurred as the cellular thiols increased to 60% of control values

  1. Pore surface engineering in a zirconium metal–organic framework via thiol-ene reaction

    Gui, Bo; Hu, Guiping; Zhou, Tailin; Wang, Cheng, E-mail: chengwang@whu.edu.cn

    2015-03-15

    A porous olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework, denoted as UiO-68-allyl, has been constructed. Our results clearly demonstrated that the surface of UiO-68-allyl could be decorated with organic molecule (ethanethiol) via thiol-ene reaction. More importantly, the crystallinity of the framework were maintained during the post-synthetic modification process. However, the microporosity of the framework is retained but the surface area decreased, due to the grafting of ethylthio groups into the pores. From our studies, we can conclude that the strategy of post-synthetic modification of UiO-68-allyl via thiol-ene reaction may be general. Furthermore, we may anchor other desired functional group onto the pore walls in Zr-MOFs via thiol-ene reaction, enabling more potential applications. - graphical abstract: In this manuscript, we reported the post-synthetic modification of an olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework via thiol-ene reaction. - Highlights: • A porous olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework has been constructed. • The surface of olefin-functionalized Zr-MOF could be decorated with organic molecules via thiol-ene reaction. • The crystallinity and permanent porosity of the framework were maintained during the post-synthetic modification process.

  2. Characterization of photopolymerizable nanoparticle-(thiol-ene) polymer composites for volume holographic recording at 404 nm

    Kawana, Masaru; Takahashi, Jun-ichiro; Yasui, Satoru; Tomita, Yasuo

    2014-05-01

    We report on volume holographic recording in thiol-ene based nanoparticle-polymer composites (NPCs) at a wavelength of 404 nm by using a highly coherent blue diode laser. We study the photopolymerization dynamics of two types of thiol-ene based NPCs doped with different blue-sensitive initiator/sensitizer systems (Darocur ® TPO and Irgacure ® 784/BzO2) at various doping concentrations. We also characterize a volume holographic grating recorded in these two types of thiol-ene based NPCs. Such material characterization includes the refractive index modulation, the material recording sensitivity and polymerization shrinkage. It is shown that Darocur R _ TPO provides larger refractive index modulation and higher material recording sensitivity than those with Irgacure ® 784/BzO2 but these two blue-sensitive initiator/sensitizer systems amount to meeting the requirements of the refractive index modulation and the material recording sensitivity for holographic data storage. However, it is found that shrinkage reduction of a volume grating recorded in these two types of thiol-ene based NPCs at 404 nm is not as effective as the same thiol-ene based NPC doped with Irgacure ® 784/BzO2 at 532 nm.

  3. Pore surface engineering in a zirconium metal–organic framework via thiol-ene reaction

    A porous olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework, denoted as UiO-68-allyl, has been constructed. Our results clearly demonstrated that the surface of UiO-68-allyl could be decorated with organic molecule (ethanethiol) via thiol-ene reaction. More importantly, the crystallinity of the framework were maintained during the post-synthetic modification process. However, the microporosity of the framework is retained but the surface area decreased, due to the grafting of ethylthio groups into the pores. From our studies, we can conclude that the strategy of post-synthetic modification of UiO-68-allyl via thiol-ene reaction may be general. Furthermore, we may anchor other desired functional group onto the pore walls in Zr-MOFs via thiol-ene reaction, enabling more potential applications. - graphical abstract: In this manuscript, we reported the post-synthetic modification of an olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework via thiol-ene reaction. - Highlights: • A porous olefin-functionalized Zr(IV)-based metal–organic framework has been constructed. • The surface of olefin-functionalized Zr-MOF could be decorated with organic molecules via thiol-ene reaction. • The crystallinity and permanent porosity of the framework were maintained during the post-synthetic modification process

  4. Binding of Fidarestat Stereoisomers with Aldose Reductase

    Dae-Sil Lee

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available The stereospecificity in binding to aldose reductase (ALR2 of two fidarestat {6-fluoro-2',5'-dioxospiro[chroman-4,4'-imidazolidine]-2-carboxamide} stereoisomers [(2S,4Sand (2R,4S] has been investigated by means of molecular dynamics simulations using freeenergy integration techniques. The difference in the free energy of binding was found to be2.0 ± 1.7 kJ/mol in favour of the (2S,4S-form, in agreement with the experimentalinhibition data. The relative mobilities of the fidarestats complexed with ALR2 indicate alarger entropic penalty for hydrophobic binding of (2R,4S-fidarestat compared to (2S,4S-fidarestat, partially explaining its lower binding affinity. The two stereoisomers differmainly in the orientation of the carbamoyl moiety with respect to the active site and rotationof the bond joining the carbamoyl substituent to the ring. The detailed structural andenergetic insights obtained from out simulations allow for a better understanding of thefactors determining stereospecific inhibitor-ALR2 binding in the EPF charges model.

  5. Aldose reductase inhibitory compounds from Xanthium strumarium.

    Yoon, Ha Na; Lee, Min Young; Kim, Jin-Kyu; Suh, Hong-Won; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-09-01

    As part of our ongoing search for natural sources of therapeutic and preventive agents for diabetic complications, we evaluated the inhibitory effects of components of the fruit of Xanthium strumarium (X. strumarium) on aldose reductase (AR) and galactitol formation in rat lenses with high levels of glucose. To identify the bioactive components of X. strumarium, 7 caffeoylquinic acids and 3 phenolic compounds were isolated and their chemical structures were elucidated on the basis of spectroscopic evidence and comparison with published data. The abilities of 10 X. strumarium-derived components to counteract diabetic complications were investigated by means of inhibitory assays with rat lens AR (rAR) and recombinant human AR (rhAR). From the 10 isolated compounds, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate showed the most potent inhibition, with IC₅₀ values of 0.30 and 0.67 μM for rAR and rhAR, respectively. In the kinetic analyses using Lineweaver-Burk plots of 1/velocity and 1/substrate, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate showed competitive inhibition of rhAR. Furthermore, methyl-3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinate inhibited galactitol formation in the rat lens and in erythrocytes incubated with a high concentration of glucose, indicating that this compound may be effective in preventing diabetic complications. PMID:23604720

  6. Aldose reductase mediates retinal microglia activation.

    Chang, Kun-Che; Shieh, Biehuoy; Petrash, J Mark

    2016-04-29

    Retinal microglia (RMG) are one of the major immune cells in charge of surveillance of inflammatory responses in the eye. In the absence of an inflammatory stimulus, RMG reside predominately in the ganglion layer and inner or outer plexiform layers. However, under stress RMG become activated and migrate into the inner nuclear layer (INL) or outer nuclear layer (ONL). Activated RMG in cell culture secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines in a manner sensitive to downregulation by aldose reductase inhibitors. In this study, we utilized CX3CR1(GFP) mice carrying AR mutant alleles to evaluate the role of AR on RMG activation and migration in vivo. When tested on an AR(WT) background, IP injection of LPS induced RMG activation and migration into the INL and ONL. However, this phenomenon was largely prevented by AR inhibitors or in AR null mice, or was exacerbated in transgenic mice that over-express AR. LPS-induced increases in ocular levels of TNF-α and CX3CL-1 in WT mice were substantially lower in AR null mice or were reduced by AR inhibitor treatment. These studies demonstrate that AR expression in RMG may contribute to the proinflammatory phenotypes common to various eye diseases such as uveitis and diabetic retinopathy. PMID:27033597

  7. Modulation of cell surface protein free thiols: a potential novel mechanism of action of the sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide.

    Jolanta Skalska

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There has been much interest in targeting intracellular redox pathways as a therapeutic approach for cancer. Given recent data to suggest that the redox status of extracellular protein thiol groups (i.e. exofacial thiols effects cell behavior, we hypothesized that redox active anti-cancer agents would modulate exofacial protein thiols. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To test this hypothesis, we used the sesquiterpene lactone parthenolide, a known anti-cancer agent. Using flow cytometry, and western blotting to label free thiols with Alexa Fluor 633 C(5 maleimide dye and N-(biotinoyl-N-(iodoacetyl ethylendiamine (BIAM, respectively, we show that parthenolide decreases the level of free exofacial thiols on Granta mantle lymphoma cells. In addition, we used immuno-precipitation techniques to identify the central redox regulator thioredoxin, as one of the surface protein thiol targets modified by parthenolide. To examine the functional role of parthenolide induced surface protein thiol modification, we pretreated Granta cells with cell impermeable glutathione (GSH, prior to exposure to parthenolide, and showed that GSH pretreatment; (a inhibited the interaction of parthenolide with exofacial thiols; (b inhibited parthenolide mediated activation of JNK and inhibition of NFkappaB, two well established mechanisms of parthenolide activity and; (c blocked the cytotoxic activity of parthenolide. That GSH had no effect on the parthenolide induced generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species supports the fact that GSH had no effect on intracellular redox. Together these data support the likelihood that GSH inhibits the effect of parthenolide on JNK, NFkappaB and cell death through its direct inhibition of parthenolide's modulation of exofacial thiols. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Based on these data, we postulate that one component of parthenolide's anti-lymphoma activity derives from its ability to modify the redox state of critical

  8. Enhancement in the Glass Transition Temperature in Latent Thiol-Epoxy Click Cured Thermosets

    Dailyn Guzmán

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Tri and tetrafunctional thiol were used as curing agent for diglycidyl ether of bisphenol A (DGEBA catalyzed by a commercially available amine precursor, LC-80. Triglycidyl isocianurate (TGIC was added in different proportions to the mixture to increase rigidity and glass transition temperature (Tg. The cooperative effect of increasing functionality of thiol and the presence of TGIC in the formulation leads to an increased Tg without affecting thermal stability. The kinetics of the curing of mixtures was studied by calorimetry under isothermal and non-isothermal conditions. The latent characteristics of the formulations containing amine precursors were investigated by rheometry and calorimetry. The increase in the functionality of the thiol produces a slight decrease in the storage lifetime of the mixture. The materials obtained with tetrathiol as curing agent showed the highest values of Young’s modulus and Tg.

  9. Diamond surface functionalization with biomimicry – Amine surface tether and thiol moiety for electrochemical sensors

    Sund, James B., E-mail: jim@jamessund.com [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Causey, Corey P. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Wolter, Scott D. [Department of Physics, Elon University, Elon, NC 27244 (United States); Parker, Charles B., E-mail: charles.parker@duke.edu [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Stoner, Brian R. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Research Triangle Institute (RTI) International, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States); Toone, Eric J. [Departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Glass, Jeffrey T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Duke University, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Highlights: • Diamond surfaces were functionalized with organic molecules using a novel approach. • Used biomimicry to select a molecule to bind NO, similar to the human body. • Molecular orbital theory predicted the molecule-analyte oxidation behavior. • A thiol moiety was attached to an amine surface tether on the diamond surface. • XPS analysis verified each surface functionalization step. - Abstract: The surface of conducting diamond was functionalized with a terminal thiol group that is capable of binding and detecting nitrogen–oxygen species. The functionalization process employed multiple steps starting with doped diamond films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by hydrogen termination and photochemical attachment of a chemically protected amine alkene. The surface tether was deprotected to reveal the amine functionality, which enabled the tether to be extended with surface chemistry to add a terminal thiol moiety for electrochemical sensing applications. Each step of the process was validated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis.

  10. UV-Induced Tetrazole-Thiol Reaction for Polymer Conjugation and Surface Functionalization.

    Feng, Wenqian; Li, Linxian; Yang, Chengwu; Welle, Alexander; Trapp, Oliver; Levkin, Pavel A

    2015-07-20

    A UV-induced 1,3-dipolar nucleophilic addition of tetrazoles to thiols is described. Under UV irradiation the reaction proceeds rapidly at room temperature, with high yields, without a catalyst, and in both polar protic and aprotic solvents, including water. This UV-induced tetrazole-thiol reaction was successfully applied for the synthesis of small molecules, protein modification, and rapid and facile polymer-polymer conjugation. The reaction has also been demonstrated for the formation of micropatterns by site-selective surface functionalization. Superhydrophobic-hydrophilic micropatterns were successfully created by sequential modifications of a tetrazole-modified porous polymer surface with hydrophobic and hydrophilic thiols. A biotin-functionalized surface could be fabricated in aqueous solutions under long-wavelength UV irradiation. PMID:26059870

  11. Thiol peptides induction in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum (Banks ex Koenig) in response to cadmium exposure

    Alvarez-Legorreta, Teresa [Departamento de Recursos del Mar, CINVESTAV-IPN, Unidad Merida, Apdo. Postal 73-Cordemex, Merida, Yucatan 97310 (Mexico); Mendoza-Cozatl, David; Moreno-Sanchez, Rafael [Departamento de Bioquimica, Instituto Nacional de Cardiologia, Mexico D.F. 14080 (Mexico); Gold-Bouchot, Gerardo [Departamento de Recursos del Mar, CINVESTAV-IPN, Unidad Merida, Apdo. Postal 73-Cordemex, Merida, Yucatan 97310 (Mexico)], E-mail: gold@mda.cinvestav.mx

    2008-01-20

    Trace metal accumulation and thiol compounds synthesis as induced by cadmium exposure was studied in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum. Shoots were exposed for 24, 48, 96 and 144 h to several CdCl{sub 2} concentrations (0, 30, 50 and 70 {mu}M). Levels of cadmium, cysteine, glutathione (GSH), {gamma}-glutamylcysteine ({gamma}-EC), and phytochelatin-like peptides were determined in green blades, live sheaths and root/rhizomes tissues. Metal accumulation was dependent on Cd concentration and type of tissue, with green blades showing the highest content followed by live sheaths and root/rhizomes. All tissues experienced an increase in thiol-containing compounds as a response to cadmium exposure. Live sheaths showed the highest levels of cysteine, GSH and {gamma}-EC. This is the first report of induction of thiol peptides, presumably phytochelatins, by a trace metal in a sea grass species.

  12. Isolation of mammalian cell variants with enhanced endogenous thiol content at low survival levels following irradiation

    Approximately half of a group of Chinese hamster V79 cell clones isolated from radiation survivors at low surviving fractions had significantly higher endogenous levels of non-protein and protein thiols than unirradiated cells. A similar group of cell lines cloned from unirradiated cells had thiol levels in the same range as the original unirradiated population. In some cases, clones isolated following irradiation are also more resistant to misonidazole toxicity and to radiation. This phenotype can persist through many cell generations for weeks or months of continuous growth; however, in many clones with altered phenotypes isolated following irradiation, reversion to the same phenotype as that of unirradiated populations has been observed. Induction of elevated thiol levels in tumours by radiotherapy could reduce both efficacy of the radiation itself and of radiation-modifying or chemotherapeutic drugs given in combination with radiation. (author)

  13. Diamond surface functionalization with biomimicry – Amine surface tether and thiol moiety for electrochemical sensors

    Highlights: • Diamond surfaces were functionalized with organic molecules using a novel approach. • Used biomimicry to select a molecule to bind NO, similar to the human body. • Molecular orbital theory predicted the molecule-analyte oxidation behavior. • A thiol moiety was attached to an amine surface tether on the diamond surface. • XPS analysis verified each surface functionalization step. - Abstract: The surface of conducting diamond was functionalized with a terminal thiol group that is capable of binding and detecting nitrogen–oxygen species. The functionalization process employed multiple steps starting with doped diamond films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by hydrogen termination and photochemical attachment of a chemically protected amine alkene. The surface tether was deprotected to reveal the amine functionality, which enabled the tether to be extended with surface chemistry to add a terminal thiol moiety for electrochemical sensing applications. Each step of the process was validated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis

  14. Competitive reduction of perferrylmyoglobin radicals by protein thiols and plant phenols.

    Jongberg, Sisse; Lund, Marianne N; Skibsted, Leif H; Davies, Michael J

    2014-11-19

    Radical transfer from perferrylmyoglobin to other target species (myofibrillar proteins, MPI) and bovine serum albumin (BSA), extracts from green tea (GTE), maté (ME), and rosemary (RE), and three phenolic compounds, catechin, caffeic acid, and carnosic acid) was investigated by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy to determine the concentrations of plant extracts required to protect against protein oxidation. Blocking of MPI thiol groups by N-ethylmaleimide was found to reduce the rate of reaction of MPI with perferrylmyoglobin radicals, signifying the importance of protein thiols as radical scavengers. GTE had the highest phenolic content of the three extracts and was most effective as a radical scavenger. IC50 values indicated that the molar ratio between phenols in plant extract and MPI thiols needs to be >15 in order to obtain efficient protection against protein-to-protein radical transfer in meat. Caffeic acid was found most effective among the plant phenols. PMID:25343706

  15. Thiol peptides induction in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum (Banks ex Koenig) in response to cadmium exposure

    Trace metal accumulation and thiol compounds synthesis as induced by cadmium exposure was studied in the seagrass Thalassia testudinum. Shoots were exposed for 24, 48, 96 and 144 h to several CdCl2 concentrations (0, 30, 50 and 70 μM). Levels of cadmium, cysteine, glutathione (GSH), γ-glutamylcysteine (γ-EC), and phytochelatin-like peptides were determined in green blades, live sheaths and root/rhizomes tissues. Metal accumulation was dependent on Cd concentration and type of tissue, with green blades showing the highest content followed by live sheaths and root/rhizomes. All tissues experienced an increase in thiol-containing compounds as a response to cadmium exposure. Live sheaths showed the highest levels of cysteine, GSH and γ-EC. This is the first report of induction of thiol peptides, presumably phytochelatins, by a trace metal in a sea grass species

  16. Mutations in the RAM network confer resistance to the thiol oxidant 4,4'-dipyridyl disulfide

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Winther, Jakob R; Thorsen, Michael; Kielland-Brandt, Morten C

    2008-01-01

    Thiol oxidants are expected to have multiple effects in living cells. Hence, mutations giving resistance to such agents are likely to reveal important targets and/or mechanisms influencing the cellular capacity to withstand thiol oxidation. A screen for mutants resistant to the thiol......-specific oxidant dipyridyl disulfide (DPS) yielded tao3-516, which is impaired in the function of the RAM signaling network protein Tao3/Pag1p. We suggest that the DPS-resistance of the tao3-516 mutant might be due to deficient cell-cycle-regulated production of the chitinase Cts1p, which functions in post...... might relate to bypass for abnormal septum-associated protein sorting. The broad resistance toward oxidants (DPS, diamide and H(2)O(2)) of the Deltacts1 strain links cell wall function to the resistance to oxidative stress and suggests the existence of targets that are common for these oxidants....

  17. Characterization of volume holographic recording in photopolymerizable nanoparticle-(thiol-ene) polymer composites at 404 nm

    Kawana, Masaru; Takahashi, Jun-ichiro; Yasui, Satoru; Tomita, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    We report on the photopolymerization dynamics and the volume holographic recording properties of a thiol-ene based nanoparticle-polymer composite (NPC) doped with a blue-sensitive photoinitiator, Darocur® TPO, by using a highly coherent blue diode laser operating at a wavelength of 404 nm. Our study indicates that volume gratings recorded in the NPC amount to meeting the material requirements of refractive index modulation and material recording sensitivity for holographic data storage media. It is also found that polymerization shrinkage of recorded NPC gratings is higher than that of the same thiol-ene based NPC with a green (523 nm)-sensitive photoinitiator, Irgacure® 784/BzO2. We attribute such a difference in shrinkage to the photopolymerization dynamics at these recording wavelengths. We show that this shrinkage increase at 404 nm can be mitigated to some extent by controlling the thiol-ene stoichiometry in the NPC.

  18. Transcripts of Anthocyanidin Reductase and Leucoanthocyanidin Reductase and Measurement of Catechin and Epicatechin in Tartary Buckwheat

    Yeon Bok Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Anthocyanidin reductase (ANR and leucoanthocyanidin reductase (LAR play an important role in the monomeric units biosynthesis of proanthocyanidins (PAs such as catechin and epicatechin in several plants. The aim of this study was to clone ANR and LAR genes involved in PAs biosynthesis and examine the expression of these two genes in different organs under different growth conditions in two tartary buckwheat cultivars, Hokkai T8 and T10. Gene expression was carried out by quantitative real-time RT-PCR, and catechin and epicatechin content was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The expression pattern of ANR and LAR did not match the accumulation pattern of PAs in different organs of two cultivars. Epicatechin content was the highest in the flowers of both cultivars and it was affected by light in only Hokkai T8 sprouts. ANR and LAR levels in tartary buckwheat might be regulated by different mechanisms for catechin and epicatechin biosynthesis under light and dark conditions.

  19. Equine 5α-reductase activity and expression in epididymis.

    Corbin, C J; Legacki, E L; Ball, B A; Scoggin, K E; Stanley, S D; Conley, A J

    2016-10-01

    The 5α-reductase enzymes play an important role during male sexual differentiation, and in pregnant females, especially equine species where maintenance relies on 5α-reduced progesterone, 5α-dihydroprogesterone (DHP). Epididymis expresses 5α-reductases but was not studied elaborately in horses. Epididymis from younger and older postpubertal stallions was divided into caput, corpus and cauda and examined for 5α-reductase activity and expression of type 1 and 2 isoforms by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Metabolism of progesterone and testosterone to DHP and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), respectively, by epididymal microsomal protein was examined by thin-layer chromatography and verified by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Relative inhibitory potencies of finasteride and dutasteride toward equine 5α-reductase activity were investigated. Pregnenolone was investigated as an additional potential substrate for 5α-reductase, suggested previously from in vivo studies in mares but never directly examined. No regional gradient of 5α-reductase expression was observed by either enzyme activity or transcript analysis. Results of PCR experiments suggested that type 1 isoform predominates in equine epididymis. Primers for the type 2 isoform were unable to amplify product from any samples examined. Progesterone and testosterone were readily reduced to DHP and DHT, and activity was effectively inhibited by both inhibitors. Using epididymis as an enzyme source, no experimental evidence was obtained supporting the notion that pregnenolone could be directly metabolized by equine 5α-reductases as has been suggested by previous investigators speculating on alternative metabolic pathways leading to DHP synthesis in placenta during equine pregnancies. PMID:27466384

  20. Radiosensitization by oxygen and radioprotection by Thiols: Experimental evaluation of a theoretical model

    The general purpose of the investigations presented in this thesis was a further elucidation of the mechanism by which oxygen sensitizes cells and tissues to radiation. Recently, the 'X model' was put forward as an explanation for the oxygen effect. The model postulated that oxygen and cellular thiols compete for radiation induced target radicals, oxygen fixing and thiols repairing the radiation damage, the latter, however, with the reservation that only a certain proportion of the damage is reparable. The study summarized in the thesis was performed with the aim of testing the validity of the model by a comparative analysis of the theoretical predictions with experimental observations. Human fibroblasts and Chinese hamster cells in culture were used as experimental cell material. The thiol level of the cells varied either due to a genetic damage, or to treatment with buthionine sulphoximine (BSO) which decreased the thiol content, or to treatment with dithiothreitol or N-acetylcysteine which increased it. Exposures to radiation were made in severe hypoxia or in the presence of oxygen in varying concentrations. The yield of DNA breaks, expressing the effect of the initial radical reactions and, in a few cases, clonogenic survival, expressing also the effect of additional superimposed enzymatic repair processes, were chosen as measure of the radiation response. Four different predictions of the X model were tested experimentally. In all cases a good general agreement between the pattern of the radiation response, predicted by the X model, and the experimental observations was found. In contrast, major differences were noted between the experimental data and the prediction of an alternative model in which, as opposed to the X model, radiation induced radical damage is assumed to be reparable by thiols in full. The validity of the X model, indicated by these investigations suggests that, in general two types of damage are produced by radiation, only one of which can

  1. Stretching of BDT-gold molecular junctions: Thiol or thiolate termination?

    Souza, Amaury De Melo

    2014-01-01

    It is often assumed that the hydrogen atoms in the thiol groups of a benzene-1,4-dithiol dissociate when Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions are formed. We demonstrate, by stability and transport property calculations, that this assumption cannot be made. We show that the dissociative adsorption of methanethiol and benzene-1,4-dithiol molecules on a flat Au(111) surface is energetically unfavorable and that the activation barrier for this reaction is as high as 1 eV. For the molecule in the junction, our results show, for all electrode geometries studied, that the thiol junctions are energetically more stable than their thiolate counterparts. Due to the fact that density functional theory (DFT) within the local density approximation (LDA) underestimates the energy difference between the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital and the highest occupied molecular orbital by several electron-volts, and that it does not capture the renormalization of the energy levels due to the image charge effect, the conductance of the Au-benzene-1,4-dithiol-Au junctions is overestimated. After taking into account corrections due to image charge effects by means of constrained-DFT calculations and electrostatic classical models, we apply a scissor operator to correct the DFT energy level positions, and calculate the transport properties of the thiol and thiolate molecular junctions as a function of the electrode separation. For the thiol junctions, we show that the conductance decreases as the electrode separation increases, whereas the opposite trend is found for the thiolate junctions. Both behaviors have been observed in experiments, therefore pointing to the possible coexistence of both thiol and thiolate junctions. Moreover, the corrected conductance values, for both thiol and thiolate, are up to two orders of magnitude smaller than those calculated with DFT-LDA. This brings the theoretical results in quantitatively good agreement with experimental data.

  2. Kinetics and Thioredoxin Specificity of Thiol Modulation of the Chloroplast H+-ATPase

    Schwarz, Oliver; Schürmann, Peter; Strotmann, Heinrich

    2007-01-01

    The kinetics of thiol modulation of the chloroplast H+-ATPase (CF0CF1) in membrana were analyzed by employing thioredoxins that were kept reduced by 0.1 mM dithiothreitol. The kinetics of thiol modulation depend on the extent of the proton gradient. The process is an exponential function of the thioredoxin concentration and reaction time and can be described by an irreversible second order reaction. The results indicate that the formation of the complex between thioredoxin and CF0CF1 is slow ...

  3. Diamond surface functionalization with biomimicry - Amine surface tether and thiol moiety for electrochemical sensors

    Sund, James B.; Causey, Corey P.; Wolter, Scott D.; Parker, Charles B.; Stoner, Brian R.; Toone, Eric J.; Glass, Jeffrey T.

    2014-05-01

    The surface of conducting diamond was functionalized with a terminal thiol group that is capable of binding and detecting nitrogen-oxygen species. The functionalization process employed multiple steps starting with doped diamond films grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition followed by hydrogen termination and photochemical attachment of a chemically protected amine alkene. The surface tether was deprotected to reveal the amine functionality, which enabled the tether to be extended with surface chemistry to add a terminal thiol moiety for electrochemical sensing applications. Each step of the process was validated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis.

  4. Mechanism of misonidazole linked cytotoxicity and altered radiation response: role of cellular thiols

    The effectiveness of misonidazole as a hypoxic radiosensitizer of mammalian cells is increased by prolonged exposure of hypoxic cells to the drug. It was found that drug intermediates might react with endogenous non-protein thiols (NPSH). These thiols function to protect the cell against deleterious intermediates that could otherwise attach and modify critical macromolecules such as DNA, RNA and protein. This paper presents studies on the effects of misonidazole, as well as newly developed hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, in an attempt to (1) identify the alterations in the NPSH, and (2) elucidate the role that the changes in NPSH play in cytotoxic and radiosensitizing effects of nitro compounds

  5. Thiol-Disulfide Interchange in the Tocinoic Acid/Glutathione System During Freezing and Drying

    THING, METTE; Zhang, Jun; LAURENCE, JENNIFER; Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2010-01-01

    Thiol-disulfide interchange (“disulfide scrambling”) is a common mechanism of covalent aggregation for protein drugs. Using tocinoic acid (cyclo-S-Cys-Tyr-Ile-Gln-Asn-Cys-(S); TA(ox)) and glutathione (γGlu-Cys-Gly; GSH), our previous work demonstrated that thiol/disulfide interchange is affected by lyophilization in a manner consistent with irreversible and regioselective loss of TA(ox) (Zhang et al., 2009, J Pharm Sci 98/9: 3312–3318). Here, we explore the contributions of stages of the lyop...

  6. Importance of thiols in the repair mechanisms of DNA containing AP (apurinic or apyrimidinic) sites.

    Bailly, V; Verly, W G

    1988-01-01

    Addition of thiol compounds containing an anionic group to the 3'-terminal unsaturated sugar of the 5' fragment obtained from an oligonucleotide containing an AP site cleaved by beta-elimination, can be followed by gel electrophoresis. The technique enables to distinguish between two mechanisms of cleavage of the C3'-O-P bond 3' to an AP site: hydrolysis or beta-elimination. Addition of thiols to the double-bond of the 3'-terminal sugar resulting from beta-elimination prevents a subsequent de...

  7. Gold Nanoparticles Protected with Thiol-Derivatized Amphiphilic Poly( -caprolactone)-b-poly(acrylic acid)

    Javakhishvili, Irakli; Hvilsted, Søren

    2008-01-01

    Amphiphilic poly(c-caprolactone)-b-poly(acrylic acid) (HS-PCL-b-PAA) bearing thiol functionality at the PCL terminal has been synthesized by a combination of ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of c-caprolactone (c-CL), esterification of hydroxy chain end with protected mercaptoacetic acid, subsequ......Amphiphilic poly(c-caprolactone)-b-poly(acrylic acid) (HS-PCL-b-PAA) bearing thiol functionality at the PCL terminal has been synthesized by a combination of ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of c-caprolactone (c-CL), esterification of hydroxy chain end with protected mercaptoacetic acid...

  8. Straightforward synthesis of deuterated precursors to demonstrate the biogenesis of aromatic thiols in wine.

    Roland, Aurélie; Schneider, Rémi; Razungles, Alain; Le Guernevé, Christine; Cavelier, Florine

    2010-10-13

    Straightforward synthesis of labeled S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-glutathione and S-4-(4-methylpentan-2-one)-glutathione has been developed through a conjugate addition optimization study. Sauvignon blanc fermentation experiments with the [(2)H(10)] S-4-(4-methylpentan-2-one)-glutathione used as a tracer released the corresponding deuterated thiol, thus proving the direct relationship with the 4-mercapto-4-methylpentan-2-one under enological conditions. The conversion yield of such transformation was estimated to be close to 0.3%, opening an avenue for additional study on varietal thiol biogenesis. PMID:20825191

  9. NMR study of 2-amino-cyclo-hexane thiols N-substituted

    Considering that thiols and mainly β-aminoacids are been successful in research aiming the discovering of new substances with protective actions against the radiation effects on living being, 2-amine-cyclo-hexane thiols N-alkyl-substituted were synthesized and submitted to to biological tests. The reactions were planned to favor the SN 2 mechanism, in order to obtain the respective trans isomers from each β-aminothiol (nonpolar medium; solvent: benzene or hexane). This work presents the results obtained in the NMR study of four by products of this class

  10. Metal triflate-mediated coupling of allylgermanes with thiols: a facile route to thiogermanes.

    Kuciński, K; Pawluć, P; Hreczycho, G

    2015-06-28

    A novel coupling reaction of thiols with (2-methylallyl)germanes catalyzed by metal triflates has been developed. This reaction provides a direct and efficient method to afford thiogermanes and opens a valuable and general synthetic route for the Ge-S cross-coupling with the elimination of isobutylene as a single by-product. Scandium(iii) triflate demonstrates the highest catalytic activity among the tested triflates. All reactions were carried out under extremely mild conditions to give thiogermanes in excellent yields. This Ge-S coupling reaction shows high generality for the variety of thiols. PMID:26006777

  11. Poly(ethylene glycol)-based thiol-ene hydrogel coatings: curing chemistry, aqueous stability, and potential marine antifouling applications

    Lundberg, P.; Bruin, A.; Klijnstra, J.W.; Nyström, A.M.; Johansson, M.; Malkoch, M.; Hult, A.

    2010-01-01

    Photocured thiol-ene hydrogel coatings based on poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) were investigated for marine antifouling purposes. By varying the PEG length, vinylic end-group, and thiol cross-linker, a library of hydrogel coatings with different structural composition was efficiently accomplished, with

  12. Volume holographic recording in photopolymerizable nanocomposite materials based on radical-mediated thiol-yne step-growth polymerizations

    Mitsube, Ken; Nishimura, Yuki; Takayama, Shingo; Nagaya, Kohta; Tomita, Yasuo

    2013-05-01

    We propose the use of radical-mediated thiol-yne step-growth photopolymerizations for volume holographic recording in NPC films to overcome the drawback of low crosslinking densities but retain the advantage of low shrinkage in the thiol-ene photopolymerizations. The thiol-yne photopolymerization mechanism is different from the thiol-ene photopolymeriztions in the sense that each alkyne functional group can react consecutively with two thiol functional groups. We show that thiol-yne based NPC films dispersed with silica nanoparticles give the saturated refractive index change as large as 0.008 and the material recording sensitivity as high as 2005 cm/J at a wavelength of 532 nm, larger than the minimum acceptable values of 0.005 and 500 cm/J, respectively, for holographic data storage. We also show that the shrinkage of a recorded hologram can be as low as that of thiol-ene based NPC films and that the thermal stability is improved better. In addition, we demonstrate digital data page recording in thiol-yne based NPC films, showing a low symbol error rate and a high signal-to-noise ratio to be 2.8×10-4 and 8, respectively.

  13. Rapid and simple preparation of thiol-ene emulsion-templated monoliths and their application as enzymatic microreactors

    Lafleur, Josiane P; Senkbeil, Silja; Novotny, Jakub;

    2015-01-01

    electron microscopy showed that the methanol-based emulsion templating process resulted in a network of highly interconnected and regular thiol-ene beads anchored solidly inside thiol-ene microchannels. Surface area measurements indicate that the monoliths are macroporous, with no or little micro- or...

  14. Induction of Thioredoxin Reductase 1 by Korean Red Ginseng Water Extract Regulates Cytoprotective Effects on Human Endothelial Cells

    Hye Rim Park

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Korean Red Ginseng is a popular herbal medicine and is widely used in many food products. KRG has biological benefits related to vascular diseases including diabetes, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and other cardiac diseases and KRG has antioxidant and anti-hyperlipidemic actions. KRG decreases the level of oxidative stress and suppresses proinflammatory cytokines and cell adhesion molecules, thus protecting endothelial dysfunction. Mammalian Thioredoxin reductase 1 is an NADPH-dependent selenoprotein, essential for antioxidant defense and DNA synthesis and repair, that regulates the redox system by modulating redox-sensitive transcription factors and thiol-containing proteins. Here, we show that KRG water extract increases the expression of TrxR1 in human umbilical vein endothelial cells via the p38 and PKC-δ signaling pathways. The induction of TrxR1 expression by KRG was confirmed by Western blot analysis and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. However, the increase in TrxR1 expression was abolished by specific silencing of the p38 and PKC-δ genes. In addition, we demonstrated that auranofin, a TrxR1 inhibitor, weakens the protective effect of KRG against H2O2-induced cell death as measured by the terminal transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay. These results suggest that KRG may have protective effects in vascular diseases by upregulating TrxR1 in endothelial cells, thereby inhibiting the generation of reactive oxygen species and cell death.

  15. Ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase: a catalytically active dithiol group links photoreduced ferredoxin to thioredoxin functional in photosynthetic enzyme regulation

    Droux, M.; Miginiac-Maslow, M.; Jacquot, J.P.; Gadal, P.; Crawford, N.A.; Kosower, N.S.; Buchanan, B.B.

    1987-07-01

    The mechanism by which the ferredoxin-thioredoxin system activates the target enzyme, NADP-malate dehydrogenase, was investigated by analyzing the sulfhydryl status of individual protein components with (/sup 14/C)iodoacetate and monobromobimane. The data indicate that ferredoxin-thioredoxin reductase (FTR)--an iron-sulfur enzyme present in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms--is the first member of a thiol chain that links light to enzyme regulation. FTR possesses a catalytically active dithiol group localized on the 13 kDa (similar) subunit, that occurs in all species investigated and accepts reducing equivalents from photoreduced ferredoxin and transfers them stoichiometrically to the disulfide form of thioredoxin m. The reduced thioredoxin m, in turn, reduces NADP-malate dehydrogenase, thereby converting it from an inactive (S-S) to an active (SH) form. The means by which FTR is able to combine electrons (from photoreduced ferredoxin) with protons (from the medium) to reduce its active disulfide group remains to be determined.

  16. The role of biliverdin reductase in colorectal cancer

    In recent years, the effects of biliverdin and bilirubin have been studied extensively, and an inhibitory effect of bile pigments in cancer progression has been proposed. In this study we focused on the effects of biliverdin reductase, the enzyme that converts biliverdin to bilirubin, in colorectal cancer. For in vitro experiments we used a human colorectal carcinoma cell line and transfected it with an expression construct of shRNA specific for biliverdin reductase, to create cells with stable knock-down of enzyme expression. Cell proliferation was analyzed using the CASY model TT cell counting device. Western blot protein analysis was performed to study intracellular signaling cascades. Samples of human colorectal cancer were analyzed using immunohistochemistry. We were able to confirm the antiproliferative effects of bile pigments on cancer cells in vitro. However, this effect was attenuated in biliverdin reductase knock down cells. ERK and Akt activation seen under biliverdin and bilirubin treatment was also reduced in biliverdin reductase deficient cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples from patients with colorectal cancer showed elevated biliverdin reductase levels. High enzyme expression was associated with lower overall and disease free patient survival. We conclude that BVR is required for bile pigment mediated effects regarding cancer cell proliferation and modulation of intracellular signaling cascades. The role of BVR overexpression in vivo and its exact influence on cancer progression and patient survival need to be further investigated. (author)

  17. Formation of Underbrushes on thiolated Poly (ethylene glycol) PEG monolayers by Oligoethylene glycol (OEG) terminated Alkane Thiols on Gold

    Lokanathan, Arcot R.

    2011-01-01

    Adding underbrushes of oligoethylene glycol (OEG) to monolayers of long chain PEG molecules on a surface is one of the strategies [1] in designing a suitable platform for antifouling purpose, where it is possible to have high graft density and molecular conformational freedom[4] simultaneously......, there by maximal retention of activity of covalently immobilised antifouling enzyme [2] on PEG surfaces along with resistance to protein adsorption[3]. Here we present some our studies on the addition of OEG thiol molecules over a self assembled monolayer of PEG thiol on gold. The kinetics of addition...... of OEG thiol to monolayers of PEG thiol was followed using X- ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), which indicated the time point of maximum graft density and beyond this time point there was predominant desorption of OEG thiol as indicated by the C/O ratio. The initial increase in graft density was...

  18. Intramolecular electron transfer in Pseudomonas aeruginosa cd(1) nitrite reductase

    Farver, Ole; Brunori, Maurizio; Cutruzzolà, Francesca;

    2009-01-01

    The cd(1) nitrite reductases, which catalyze the reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide, are homodimers of 60 kDa subunits, each containing one heme-c and one heme-d(1). Heme-c is the electron entry site, whereas heme-d(1) constitutes the catalytic center. The 3D structure of Pseudomonas aeruginosa...... nitrite reductase has been determined in both fully oxidized and reduced states. Intramolecular electron transfer (ET), between c and d(1) hemes is an essential step in the catalytic cycle. In earlier studies of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme, we observed that a marked negative cooperativity is...... controlling this internal ET step. In this study we have investigated the internal ET in the wild-type and His369Ala mutant of P. aeruginosa nitrite reductases and have observed similar cooperativity to that of the Pseudomonas stutzeri enzyme. Heme-c was initially reduced, in an essentially diffusion...

  19. Aldo keto reductases 1B in endocrinology and metabolism

    AntoineMartinez

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aldose reductase (human AKR1B1/mouse Akr1b3 has been the focus of many research because of its role in diabetic complications. The starting point of these alterations is the massive entry of glucose in polyol pathway where it is converted into sorbitol by this enzyme. However, the issue of aldose reductase function in non-diabetic condition remains unresolved. Aldose reductase-like enzymes (AKR1B10, Akr1b7 and Akr1b8 are highly related isoforms often co-expressed with bona fide aldose reductase, making functional analysis of one or the other isoform a challenging task. AKR1B/Akr1b members share at least 65% protein identity and the general ability to reduce many redundant substrates such as aldehydes provided from lipid peroxidation, steroids and their by-products and xenobiotics in vitro. Based on these properties, AKR1B/Akr1b are generally considered as detoxifying enzymes. Considering that divergences should be more informative than similarities to help understanding their physiological functions, we chose to review specific hallmarks of each human/mouse isoforms by focusing on tissue distribution and specific mechanisms of gene regulation. Indeed, although the aldose reductase shows ubiquitous expression, aldose reductase-like proteins exhibit tissue-specific patterns of expression. We focused on 3 organs where certain isoforms are enriched, the adrenal gland, enterohepatic and adipose tissues and tried to connect recent enzymatic and regulation data with endocrine and metabolic functions of these organs. We presented recent mouse models showing unsuspected physiological functions in the regulation of glucido-lipidic metabolism and adipose tissue homeostasis. Beyond the widely accepted idea that AKR1B/Akr1b are detoxification enzymes, these recent reports provide growing evidences that they are able to modify or generate signal molecules. This conceptually shifts this class of enzymes from unenviable status of scavenger to upper class of

  20. Expression and site-directed mutagenesis of human dihydrofolate reductase

    A procaryotic high-level expression vector for human dihydrofolate reductase has been constructed and the protein characterized as a first step toward structure-function studies of this enzyme. A vector bearing the tac promoter, four synthetic oligodeoxynucleotides, and a restriction fragment from the dihydrofolate reductase cDNA were ligated in a manner which optimized the transcriptional and translational frequency of the enzyme mRNA. The reductase, comprising ca. 17% of the total soluble protein in the host bacteria, was purified to apparent homogeneity as determined by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and characterized by amino acid composition, partial amino acid sequence, and steady-sate kinetic analysis. This expression vector has been used as a template for double-stranded plasmid DNA site-specific mutagenesis. Functional studies on a Cys-6 → Ser-6 mutant enzyme support the contention that Cys-6 is obligatory for organomercurial activation of human dihydrofolate reductase. The Ser-6 mutant enzyme was not activated to any extent following a 24-h incubation with p-(hydroxymercuri)benzoate and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (reduced) (NADPH), whereas the k/sub cat/ for Cys-6 reductase increased 2-fold under identical conditions. The specific activities of the Cys-6 and Ser-6 enzymes were virtually identical as determined by methotrexate titration as were the K/sub m/ values for both dihydrofolate and NADPH. The Ser-6 mutant showed a decreased temperature stability and was more sensitive to inactivation by α-chymotrypsin when compared to the wild-type enzyme. These results suggest that the Ser-6 mutant reductase is conformationally altered relative to the Cys-6 native enzyme

  1. Influence cadmium ions on the synthesis of thiol compounds for flax

    Olga Krystofova; Václav Diopan; Jiří Baloun; Vojtech Adam; Rene Kizek

    2010-01-01

    Evaluation of the effectiveness of phytoremediation technologies isvery difficult. One way to quickly and inexpensively identifyphytoremediation potential of plants is found easily detectablemarker. In our study, we examined the content of thiol compoundsin plants, of Flax effects of various concentrations of cadmium ions.

  2. Passivation of copper surfaces for selective-area ALD using a thiol self-assembled monolayer

    Färm, Elina; Vehkamäki, Marko; Ritala, Mikko; Leskelä, Markku

    2012-07-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of 1-dodecanethiol (CH3(CH2)11SH) were prepared from the vapor phase and used as a passivation layer for selective-area ALD. Thiol SAMs have commonly been prepared by immersing the substrates into a solution containing alkyl thiols. Formation of SAMs from the vapor phase, however, has advantages compared to liquid phase preparation. Passivation of surface can be done as a part of the ALD process forming a SAM first and then continuing with the common ALD process. SAMs can also be applied to three-dimensional structures relying on chemical selectivity of the thiol SAM formation. For example in the copper damascene process the thiol SAMs should form only on the copper surface but not on the insulators. In this study, the SAMs were prepared by placing the substrate and the alkylthiol to the reaction chamber and heating the system to the temperature of 73 °C. Preparation time varied from 0.5 to 24 h. Passivation properties of SAMs were tested with ALD iridium and polyimide processes. Iridium was deposited at 250  ° C for 500 cycles and polyimide at 160  ° C for 20 cycles.

  3. Inhibition of a biological sulfide oxidation under haloalkaline conditions by thiols and diorgano polysulfanes

    Roman, Pawel; Lipińska, Joanna; Bijmans, Martijn F.M.; Sorokin, Dimitry Y.; Keesman, Karel J.; Janssen, Albert J.H.

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach has been developed for the simultaneous description of reaction kinetics to describe the formation of polysulfide and sulfate anions from the biological oxidation of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) using a quick, sulfide-dependent respiration test. Next to H2S, thiol

  4. Biotechnological removal of H2S and thiols from sour gas streams under haloalkaline conditions

    Roman, P.

    2016-01-01

    Biotechnological removal of H2S and thiols from sour gas streams under haloalkaline conditions Paweł Roman Abstract Biological removal of H2S from sour gas streams became popular in recent years because of high process efficiency and low operational costs. To expand

  5. Quantitative interpretation of the transition voltages in gold-poly(phenylene) thiol-gold molecular junctions

    Wu, Kunlin

    2013-01-01

    The transition voltage of three different asymmetric Au/poly(phenylene) thiol/Au molecular junctions in which the central molecule is either benzene thiol, biphenyl thiol, or terphenyl thiol is investigated by first-principles quantum transport simulations. For all the junctions, the calculated transition voltage at positive polarity is in quantitative agreement with the experimental values and shows weak dependence on alterations of the Au-phenyl contact. When compared to the strong coupling at the Au-S contact, which dominates the alignment of various molecular orbitals with respect to the electrode Fermi level, the coupling at the Au-phenyl contact produces only a weak perturbation. Therefore, variations of the Au-phenyl contact can only have a minor influence on the transition voltage. These findings not only provide an explanation to the uniformity in the transition voltages found for π-conjugated molecules measured with different experimental methods, but also demonstrate the advantage of transition voltage spectroscopy as a tool for determining the positions of molecular levels in molecular devices. © 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  6. Endothelium-dependent vasorelaxation in inhibited by in vivo depletion of vascular thiol levels

    Laursen, J B; Boesgaard, S; Trautner, S; Rubin, I; Poulsen, H E; Aldershvile, J

    2001-01-01

    ) affected by BSO (BSO: 4415 +/- 123, control: 4105 +/- 455 counts/mg; n = 6) in rat aorta. It is concluded that in vivo thiol depletion results in endothelial dysfunction and a reduced receptor-mediated vascular relaxation. This effect is caused by reduced endothelial NO formation....

  7. Gold Nanoparticles Protected with Thiol-Derivatized Amphiphilic Poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-b-poly(acrylic acid)

    Javakhishvili, Irakli; Hvilsted, Søren

    2009-01-01

    Amphiphilic poly(epsilon-caprolactone)-b-poly(acrylic acid) (HS-PCL-b-PAA) with a thiol functionality in the PCL terminal has been prepared in a novel synthetic cascade. Initially, living anionic ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of epsilon-caprolactone (epsilon-CL) employing the difunctional...

  8. Investigations of thiol-modified phenol derivatives for the use in thiol–ene photopolymerizations

    Sebastian Reinelt

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Thiol–ene photopolymerizations gain a growing interest in academic research. Coatings and dental restoratives are interesting applications for thiol–ene photopolymerizations due to their unique features. In most studies the relative flexible and hydrophilic ester derivative, namely pentaerythritoltetra(3-mercaptopropionate (PETMP, is investigated as the thiol component. Thus, in the present study we are encouraged to investigate the performance of more hydrophobic ester-free thiol-modified bis- and trisphenol derivatives in thiol–ene photopolymerizations. For this, six different thiol-modified bis- and trisphenol derivatives exhibiting four to six thiol groups are synthesized via the radical addition of thioacetic acid to suitable allyl-modified precursors and subsequent hydrolysis. Compared to PETMP better flexural strength and modulus of elasticity are achievable in thiol–ene photopolymerizations employing 1,3,5-triallyl-1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-trione (TATATO as the ene derivative. Especially, after storage in water, the flexural strength and modulus of elasticity is twice as high compared to the PETMP reference system.

  9. Synthesis and Microstructural Investigations of Organometallic Pd(II Thiol-Gold Nanoparticles Hybrids

    Cervellino Antonio

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this work the synthesis and characterization of gold nanoparticles functionalized by a novel thiol-organometallic complex containing Pd(II centers is presented. Pd(II thiol,trans, trans-[dithiolate-dibis(tributylphosphinedipalladium(II-4,4′-diethynylbiphenyl] was synthesized and linked to Au nanoparticles by the chemical reduction of a metal salt precursor. The new hybrid made of organometallic Pd(II thiol-gold nanoparticles, shows through a single S bridge a direct link between Pd(II and Au nanoparticles. The size-control of the Au nanoparticles (diameter range 2–10 nm was achieved by choosing the suitable AuCl4 −/thiol molar ratio. The size, strain, shape, and crystalline structure of these functionalized nanoparticles were determined by a full-pattern X-ray powder diffraction analysis, high-resolution TEM, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Photoluminescence spectroscopy measurements of the hybrid system show emission peaks at 418 and 440 nm. The hybrid was exposed to gaseous NO x with the aim to evaluate the suitability for applications in sensor devices; XPS measurements permitted to ascertain and investigate the hybrid –gas interaction.

  10. Thimerosal Exposure and the Role of Sulfation Chemistry and Thiol Availability in Autism

    Mark R. Geier

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Autism spectrum disorder (ASD is a neurological disorder in which a significant number of the children experience a developmental regression characterized by a loss of previously acquired skills and abilities. Typically reported are losses of verbal, nonverbal, and social abilities. Several recent studies suggest that children diagnosed with an ASD have abnormal sulfation chemistry, limited thiol availability, and decreased glutathione (GSH reserve capacity, resulting in a compromised oxidation/reduction (redox and detoxification capacity. Research indicates that the availability of thiols, particularly GSH, can influence the effects of thimerosal (TM and other mercury (Hg compounds. TM is an organomercurial compound (49.55% Hg by weight that has been, and continues to be, used as a preservative in many childhood vaccines, particularly in developing countries. Thiol-modulating mechanisms affecting the cytotoxicity of TM have been identified. Importantly, the emergence of ASD symptoms post-6 months of age temporally follows the administration of many childhood vaccines. The purpose of the present critical review is provide mechanistic insight regarding how limited thiol availability, abnormal sulfation chemistry, and decreased GSH reserve capacity in children with an ASD could make them more susceptible to the toxic effects of TM routinely administered as part of mandated childhood immunization schedules.

  11. Influence cadmium ions on the synthesis of thiol compounds for flax

    Olga Krystofova

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of the effectiveness of phytoremediation technologies isvery difficult. One way to quickly and inexpensively identifyphytoremediation potential of plants is found easily detectablemarker. In our study, we examined the content of thiol compoundsin plants, of Flax effects of various concentrations of cadmium ions.

  12. Mercury and non-protein thiol compounds in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica.

    Ferrat, Lila; Gnassia-Barelli, Mauricette; Pergent-Martini, Christine; Roméo, Michèle

    2003-01-01

    Mercury concentrations, non-protein thiol levels and the enzyme activities of glutathione-S-transferase (GST) were measured in the blades and sheaths of the marine phanerogam Posidonia oceanica. The seagrass was collected in January and June and at three sites: the Bay of Rosignano (Italy) known for its mercury contamination, the north of the Lérins islands (Bay of Cannes, France), the Bay of Tonnara (Corsica, France). The two latter sites are considered as free of any known industrial inputs. Mercury concentrations and GST activities in both tissues were always higher in samples from Rosignano, particularly in June. Non-protein thiol levels were significantly higher in the blades than in the sheaths of P. oceanica from Tonnara and Lérins. In contrast, at Rosignano, the sheaths presented a significantly higher non-protein thiol concentration than the blades, particularly in June. Levels in the sheaths appeared to increase with the degree of pollution. Western Blot performed on sheaths of P. oceanica collected in June at Rosignano and Lérins revealed a characteristic band of GSTs at 31 kDa, proving the presence of the GST enzyme in this tissue. Mercury seemed to exert an influence upon non-protein thiol metabolism, including GST induction, in P. oceanica collected from the NW Mediterranean. PMID:12524027

  13. GC/MS DETERMINATION OF 1-P-MENTHEN-8-THIOL IN GRAPEFRUIT JUICE

    P-menthene-8-thiol is a very potent aroma compound found in grapefruit juice. It currently is not measured commercially because it is present in only trace quantities and due to the fact that it requires an expensive specialized detector. However, in this report, it is shown that utilizing a stand...

  14. Development of ionic gels using thiol-based monomers in ionic liquid

    Ahmed, Kumkum; Naga, Naofumi; Kawakami, Masaru; Furukawa, Hidemitsu

    2016-04-01

    Ionic gels (IGs) using ionic liquids (ILs) can propose diverse applications in the field of optics, sensors and separation have opened wide prospects in materials science. ILs have attracted remarkable interest for gel polymer electrolytes and batteries based on their useful properties such as non-volatility, non-flammability, a wide electrochemical window, high thermal stability and a high ionic conductivity. The formation of gel in IL media makes it possible to immobilize ILs within organic or inorganic matrices and to take advantage of their unique properties in the solid state, thus eliminating some shortcomings related to shaping and risk of leakage. In this work for the first time we used multifunctional thiol monomers having uniform structure and good compatibility with the IL of our interest. Therefore we focused on developing thiol monomer-based IGs using multifunctional thiol monomers and acrylate crosslinkers utilizing thiol-ene reaction between monomer and crosslinking molecules in an IL medium and characterize their physico-chemical properties like thermal, conductive, mechanical properties etc.. This work has been focused mainly to improve the mechanical strength of IGs and make prospects of IGs in tribology and lubricants.

  15. Nanoparticles under the light: click functionalization by photochemical thiol-yne reaction, towards double click functionalization.

    Demay-Drouhard, Paul; Nehlig, Emilie; Hardouin, Julie; Motte, Laurence; Guénin, Erwann

    2013-06-24

    A light click away: The first application of the thiol-yne reaction to nanoparticle functionalization is described (see figure). This metal-free click chemistry approach is compatible with the addition of various molecules at the surface and can be combined with CuAAC methodology to perform chemoselective double functionalization. PMID:23744751

  16. Association of bilirubin and protein thiols in relation to copper and ceruloplasmin in hyperbilirubinemic patients

    Mungli Prakash; Jeevan K Shetty; Roshan D'Souza; Suhasa Upadhya; Vijay Kumar

    2009-01-01

    Objective:Bilirubin is a double edged sword in biological system,acting as a toxic molecule and cytoprotecrant.Unconjugated bilirubin is proved to show antioxidant activity in vitro and in vivo.In the current work we tried to know the relationship between both conjugated and unconjugated bilirubin with copper and protein thiols in patients with hyperbilirnbinemia.Methods:Study was conducted on 56 hyperbilirubinemic cases and 56 healthy controls.Serum copper,ceruloplasmin,protein thiols,total bilirubin,conjugated and unconjugated bilirubin,unconjugated bilimbin/albumin ratio,total protein,albumin,AST,ALT and ALP were estimated.Results:There was significant increase in serum copper,total bilirubin,conjugated and unconjugated bilimbin.uriconjugated bilirubin/albumin ratio,AST,ALT,and ALP,and decrease in serum ceruloplasmin,protein thiols,total protein,and albumin in hyperbilimbinemic cases when compared to healthy controls.Conjugated bilimbin correlated positively with liver enzymes AST and ALP,and negatively with protein thials,total protein and albumin.Unconjugated bilirubin correlated positively with ALT.Protein thiols correlated negatively with copper and positively with ceruloplasmin,and also correlated negativelv with liver enzymes like AST,ALT and ALP,and positively with total protein and albumin.Conclusion:Combination of elevated levels of trace elements like copper and availability of reducing agent like bilimbin may prove deleterious by generating free radicals.

  17. Synthesis of Novel Fluorescence reagents and Their Application in Determination of Thiol Compounds

    LIANG Shu-Cai; WANG Hong; ZHANG Hua-Shan; HU Xian-Ming

    2003-01-01

    @@ The identification and determination of thiol compounds is essential both for the clinical diagnosis and the con trol of diseases because alteration of their concentrations in biological systems are somehow responsive for some diseases such as myocardial infarction, diabetes, peripheral vascular and so on. [1

  18. Thiols as biomarkers of heavy metal tolerance in the aquatic macrophytes of Middle Urals, Russia.

    Borisova, Galina; Chukina, Nadezda; Maleva, Maria; Kumar, Adarsh; Prasad, M N V

    2016-10-01

    Aquatic macrophytes, viz. Sagittaria sagittifolia L., Lemna gibba L., Elodea canadensis Michx., Batrachium trichophyllum (Chaix.) Bosch., Ceratophyllum demersum L. and Potamogeton sp. (P. perfoliatus L., P. alpinus Balb., P. crispus L., P. berchtoldii Fieber, P. friesii Rupr., P. pectinatus L.) were collected from 11 sites for determining their metal accumulation and thiols content. Cu(2+), Ni(2+), Mn(2+), Zn(2+), and Fe(3+) exceeded maximum permissible concentrations in chosen sites. Significant transfer of metals from water to leaves is observed in the order of Ni(2+) < Cu(2+) < Zn(2+) < Fe(3+) < Mn(2+). The maximum variation of bioconcentration factor was noticed for manganese. The accumulation of heavy metals in leaves was correlated with non-protein and protein thiols, confirming their important role in metal tolerance. The largest contribution was provided by Cu(2+) (on the average r = 0.88, p < 0.05), which obviously can be explained as an important role of these ions in thiols synthesis. Increased synthesis of thiols in the leaves allows the usage of SH-containing compounds as biomarkers of metal tolerance. Considering accumulation of metals and tolerance, B. trichophyllum, C. demersum and L. gibba are the most suitable species for phytoremediation of highly multimetal contamination, while E. canadensis and some species of Potamageton are suitable for moderately metal-polluted sites. PMID:27167595

  19. Effect of vanadium on nitrate reductase activity in tomato leaves

    J. Buczek

    2015-01-01

    The activity of nitrate reductase in cell-free extracts from tomato leaves is completely inhibited by 100 μM NaVO3 or VOCl2. In experiments in vivo vanadium ions inhibit the activity of the enzyme in 50 to 60 per cent. Addition of l mM vanadium to the medium on which tomato seedlings are grown causes after 24 h almost complete inhibition of nitrate reductase activity in cell-free extracts of the enzyme. Inhibition with vanadium may be abolished in experiments in vitro if the extract is treate...

  20. The intramolecular electron transfer between copper sites of nitrite reductase

    Farver, O; Eady, R R; Abraham, Z H;

    1998-01-01

    The intramolecular electron transfer (ET) between the type 1 Cu(I) and the type 2 Cu(II) sites of Alcaligenes xylosoxidans dissimilatory nitrite reductase (AxNiR) has been studied in order to compare it with the analogous process taking place in ascorbate oxidase (AO). This internal process is......(I) and the trinuclear copper centre in ascorbate oxidase, and the characteristics of the internal ET processes of these enzymes are compared. The data are consistent with the faster ET observed in nitrite reductase arising from a more advantageous entropy of activation when compared with ascorbate...

  1. Transdermal thiol-acrylate polyethylene glycol hydrogel synthesis using near infrared light

    Chung, Solchan; Lee, Hwangjae; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Kim, Min-Gon; Lee, Luke P.; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-07-01

    Light-induced polymerization has been widely applied for hydrogel synthesis, which conventionally involves the use of ultraviolet or visible light to activate a photoinitiator for polymerization. However, with these light sources, transdermal gelation is not efficient and feasible due to their substantial interactions with biological systems, and thus a high power is required. In this study, we used biocompatible and tissue-penetrating near infrared (NIR) light to remotely trigger a thiol-acrylate reaction for efficient in vivo gelation with good controllability. Our gelation system includes gold nanorods as a photothermal agent, a thermal initiator, diacrylate polyethylene glycol (PEG), and thiolated PEG. Irradiation with a low-power NIR laser (0.3 W cm-2) could induce gelation via a mixed-mode reaction with a small increase in temperature (~5 °C) under the optimized conditions. We also achieved successful transdermal gelation via the NIR-assisted photothermal thiol-acryl reactions. This new type of NIR-assisted thiol-acrylate polymerization provides new opportunities for in situ hydrogel formation for injectable hydrogels and delivery of drugs/cells for various biomedical applications.Light-induced polymerization has been widely applied for hydrogel synthesis, which conventionally involves the use of ultraviolet or visible light to activate a photoinitiator for polymerization. However, with these light sources, transdermal gelation is not efficient and feasible due to their substantial interactions with biological systems, and thus a high power is required. In this study, we used biocompatible and tissue-penetrating near infrared (NIR) light to remotely trigger a thiol-acrylate reaction for efficient in vivo gelation with good controllability. Our gelation system includes gold nanorods as a photothermal agent, a thermal initiator, diacrylate polyethylene glycol (PEG), and thiolated PEG. Irradiation with a low-power NIR laser (0.3 W cm-2) could induce gelation

  2. Artificial electron donors for nitrate and nitrite reductases usable as mediators in amperometric biosensors

    Strehlitz, B. (Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany)); Gruendig, B. (Institut fuer Chemo- und Biosensorik, Muenster-Roxel (Germany)); Vorlop, K.D. (Bundesforschungsanstalt fuer Landwirtschaft, Braunschweig (Germany). Inst. fuer Technologie); Bartholmes, P. (Witten-Herdecke Univ., Witten (Germany). Inst. fuer Biochemie); Kotte, H. (Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany)); Stottmeister, U. (Umweltforschungszentrum Leipzig-Halle GmbH, Leipzig (Germany))

    1994-07-01

    Various nitrate and nitrite reductases are capable of accepting electrons from artificial donors. Combining these redox active donors with an amperometric redox electrode which is covered with an immobilized layer of such a nitrate or nitrite reductase, new enzyme sensors can be created for the detection of nitrate or nitrite, respectively. A range of suitable electron donors for nitrate reductases and nitrite reductase from different sources have been selected and characterized by electrochemical methods. (orig.)

  3. Acetate- and thiol-capped monodisperse ruthenium nanoparticles: XPS, XAS, and HRTEM studies.

    Chakroune, Nassira; Viau, Guillaume; Ammar, Souad; Poul, Laurence; Veautier, Delphine; Chehimi, Mohamed M; Mangeney, Claire; Villain, Françoise; Fiévet, Fernand

    2005-07-19

    Monodisperse ruthenium nanoparticles were prepared by reduction of RuCl3 in 1,2-propanediol. The mean particle size was controlled by appropriate choice of the reduction temperature and the acetate ion concentration. Colloidal solutions in toluene were obtained by coating the metal particles with dodecanethiol. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XANES and EXAFS for the Ru K-absorption edge) were performed on particles of two different diameters, 2 and 4 nm, and in different environments, polyol/acetate or thiol. For particles stored in polyol/acetate XPS studies revealed superficial oxidation limited to one monolayer and a surface coating containing mostly acetate ions. Analysis of the EXAFS spectra showed both oxygen and ruthenium atoms around the ruthenium atoms with a Ru-Ru coordination number N smaller than the bulk value, as expected for fine particles. In the case of 2 nm acetate-capped particles N is consistent with particles made up of a metallic core and an oxidized monolayer. For 2 nm thiol-coated particles, a Ru-S bond was evidenced by XPS and XAS. For the 4 nm particles XANES and XPS studies showed that most of the ruthenium atoms are in the zerovalent state. Nevertheless, in both cases, when capped with thiol, the Ru-Ru coordination number inferred from EXAFS is much smaller than for particles of the same size stored in polyol. This is attributed to a structural disorganization of the particles by thiol chemisorption. HRTEM studies confirm the marked dependence of the structural properties of the ruthenium particles on their chemical environment; they show the acetate-coated particles to be single crystals, whereas the thiol-coated particles appear to be polycrystalline. PMID:16008388

  4. Cooperative functions of manganese and thiol redox system against oxidative stress in human spermatozoa

    Amrit Kaur Bansal

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: In this study, the effects of 0.1 mM Mn 2+ on thiol components (total thiols [TSH], glutathione reduced [GSH], glutathione oxidized [GSSG] and redox ratio [GSH/ GSSG] have been determined in human spermatozoa. Settings and Design: The subjects of the study were healthy males having more than 75% motility and 80 x 10 6 sperms/mL. Materials and Methods: Fresh semen was suspended in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS (pH 7.2 and this suspension was divided into eight equal fractions. All fractions, control (containing PBS and experimental (treated/untreated with [ferrous ascorbate, FeAA - 200 FeSO 4 μM, 1000 μM ascorbic acid, nicotine (0.5 mM and FeAA + nicotine], supplemented/unsupplemented with Mn 2+ [0.1 mM], were incubated for 2 h at 378C. These fractions were assessed for determining the thiol components. Statistical Analysis: The data were statistically analyzed by Students " t" test. Results and Conclusions: Ferrous ascorbate, nicotine and ferrous ascorbate + nicotine induced oxidative stress and decreased GSH and redox ratio (GSH/GSSG ratio but increased the TSH and GSSG levels. Mn 2+ supplementation improved TSH, GSH and redox ratio (GSH/GSSG but decreased the GSSG level under normal and oxidative stress conditions. Thiol groups serve as defense mechanisms of sperm cells to fight against oxidative stress induced by stress inducers such as ferrous ascorbate, nicotine and their combination (ferrous ascorbate + nicotine. In addition, Mn 2+ supplementation maintains the thiol level by reducing oxidative stress.

  5. Inhibition of Albendazole and Oxfendazole on the Activity of Fumaric Reductase in Cysticercus cellulosae

    GAO Xue-jun; LI Qing-zhang; LI Xia

    2004-01-01

    The activity of fumaric reductase in Cysticercus cellulosae tissue homogenate with albendazole and oxfendazole individually was detected. Results showed that the two kinds of drugs both could inhabite the activity of fumaric reductase. The results indicate that the mechanism of action of benzimidazole carbamate drugs is probably inhabiting the complex of fumaric reductase noncompetently, thus lead to the exhaostion of energy and death.

  6. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 1: Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors as a result of hydrogen sulfide (H2S) and low-molecular-weight thiols are commonly encountered in wine production. These odors are usually removed by the process of Cu(II) fining, a process that remains poorly understood. The present study aims to elucidate the underlying mechanisms by which Cu(II) interacts with H2S and thiol compounds (RSH) under wine-like conditions. Copper complex formation was monitored along with H2S, thiol, oxygen, and acetaldehyde concentrations after the addition of Cu(II) (50 or 100 μM) to air-saturated model wine solutions containing H2S, cysteine, 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, or 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol (300 μM each). The presence of H2S and thiols in excess to Cu(II) led to the rapid formation of ∼1.4:1 H2S/Cu and ∼2:1 thiol/Cu complexes, resulting in the oxidation of H2S and thiols and reduction of Cu(II) to Cu(I), which reacted with oxygen. H2S was observed to initially oxidize rather than form insoluble copper sulfide. The proposed reaction mechanisms provide insight into the extent to which H2S can be selectively removed in the presence of thiols in wine. PMID:27133282

  7. Determination of thiol metabolites in human urine by stable isotope labeling in combination with pseudo-targeted mass spectrometry analysis

    Liu, Ping; Qi, Chu-Bo; Zhu, Quan-Fei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-02-01

    Precursor ion scan and multiple reaction monitoring scan (MRM) are two typical scan modes in mass spectrometry analysis. Here, we developed a strategy by combining stable isotope labeling (IL) with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) under double precursor ion scan (DPI) and MRM for analysis of thiols in 5 types of human cancer urine. Firstly, the IL-LC-DPI-MS method was applied for non-targeted profiling of thiols from cancer samples. Compared to traditional full scan mode, the DPI method significantly improved identification selectivity and accuracy. 103 thiol candidates were discovered in all cancers and 6 thiols were identified by their standards. It is worth noting that pantetheine, for the first time, was identified in human urine. Secondly, the IL-LC-MRM-MS method was developed for relative quantification of thiols in cancers compared to healthy controls. All the MRM transitions of light and heavy labeled thiols were acquired from urines by using DPI method. Compared to DPI method, the sensitivity of MRM improved by 2.1-11.3 folds. In addition, the concentration of homocysteine, γ-glutamylcysteine and pantetheine enhanced more than two folds in cancer patients compared to healthy controls. Taken together, the method demonstrated to be a promising strategy for identification and comprehensive quantification of thiols in human urines.

  8. The design of redox active thiol peroxidase mimics: Dihydrolipoic acid recognition correlates with cytotoxicity and prooxidant action.

    Zadehvakili, B; McNeill, S M; Fawcett, J P; Giles, G I

    2016-03-15

    Redox active molecules containing organoselenium or organotellurium groups catalyse the oxidation of cellular thiols by hydrogen peroxide and are currently being developed as therapeutic agents. Potentially these synthetic thiol peroxidase (TPx) mimics can protect cells from oxidative stress by catalysing the reduction of reactive oxygen species by the cellular thiol glutathione, an activity which mimics the function of the antioxidant enzyme glutathione peroxidase. Alternatively they can act as prooxidants by catalysing the oxidation of essential thiol species within the cell. However the structure-activity relationships which determine the choice of thiol substrate, and hence the overall antioxidant or prooxidant outcome of drug administration, remain unknown. We report the first study that relates the pharmacological properties of TPx mimics with their solubility and catalytic activity using different thiol substrates. We used a series of structurally related compounds PhMCnH2n+1 (M=Se, Te; n=4-7) and investigated their ability to catalyse the oxidation of the cellular thiols glutathione and dihydrolipoic acid by hydrogen peroxide. The resulting rate constants (kobs) were then related to compound cytotoxicity and antioxidant versus prooxidant action in A549 cancer cells. The results show that the dihydrolipoic acid kobs values correlate with both cytotoxicity and prooxidant function. This enabled us to define a relationship, IC50=10+280e(-5(DHLA)(kobs)()), which allows the prediction of TPx mimic cytotoxicity. In contrast, hydrophobicity and glutathione kobs were unrelated to the compounds' redox pharmacology. PMID:26801688

  9. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels.

    Smith, M Ryan; Vayalil, Praveen K; Zhou, Fen; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R; Golzarian, Hafez; Nijampatnam, Bhavitavya; Oliver, Patsy G; Smith, Robin A J; Murphy, Michael P; Velu, Sadanandan E; Landar, Aimee

    2016-08-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP), decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231) breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR) in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10µM) of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC) protein levels, although other protein levels were unaffected. This study

  10. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    M. Ryan Smith

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compound, iodobutyl triphenylphosphonium (IBTP, decreased mitochondrial metabolism and ATP in MDA-MB 231 (MB231 breast adenocarcinoma cells up to 6 days after an initial 24 h treatment. Mitochondrial thiol modification also depressed oxygen consumption rates (OCR in a dose-dependent manner to a greater extent than a non-thiol modifying analog, suggesting that thiol reactivity is an important factor in the inhibition of cancer cell metabolism. In non-tumorigenic MCF-10A cells, IBTP also decreased OCR; however the extracellular acidification rate was significantly increased at all but the highest concentration (10 µM of IBTP indicating that thiol modification can have significantly different effects on bioenergetics in tumorigenic versus non-tumorigenic cells. ATP and other adenonucleotide levels were also decreased by thiol modification up to 6 days post-treatment, indicating a decreased overall energetic state in MB231 cells. Cellular proliferation of MB231 cells was also inhibited up to 6 days post-treatment with little change to cell viability. Targeted metabolomic analyses revealed that thiol modification caused depletion of both Krebs cycle and glutaminolysis intermediates. Further experiments revealed that the activity of the Krebs cycle enzyme, aconitase, was attenuated in response to thiol modification. Additionally, the inhibition of glutaminolysis corresponded to decreased glutaminase C (GAC protein levels, although other protein levels were

  11. Sepiapterin reductase deficiency an autosomal recessive DOPA-responsive dystonia

    N.G. Abeling; M. Duran; H.D. Bakker; L. Stroomer; B. Thony; N. Blau; J. Booij; B.T. Poll-The

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of a 14-year-old girl with a new homoallelic mutation in the sepiapterin reductase (SR) gene is reported. Initially she presented at the age of 2 with hypotonia and mild cognitive developmental delay, and was diagnosed as having mild methylmalonic aciduria, which was recently identifie

  12. Thioredoxin and NADP-thioredoxin reductase from cultured carrot cells

    Johnson, T. C.; Cao, R. Q.; Kung, J. E.; Buchanan, B. B.

    1987-01-01

    Dark-grown carrot (Daucus carota L.) tissue cultures were found to contain both protein components of the NADP/thioredoxin system--NADP-thioredoxin reductase and the thioredoxin characteristic of heterotrophic systems, thioredoxin h. Thioredoxin h was purified to apparent homogeneity and, like typical bacterial counterparts, was a 12-kdalton (kDa) acidic protein capable of activating chloroplast NADP-malate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.82) more effectively than fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (EC 3.1.3.11). NADP-thioredoxin reductase (EC 1.6.4.5) was partially purified and found to be an arsenite-sensitive enzyme composed of two 34-kDa subunits. Carrot NADP-thioredoxin reductase resembled more closely its counterpart from bacteria rather than animal cells in acceptor (thioredoxin) specificity. Upon greening of the cells, the content of NADP-thioredoxin-reductase activity, and, to a lesser extent, thioredoxin h decreased. The results confirm the presence of a heterotrophic-type thioredoxin system in plant cells and raise the question of its physiological function.

  13. Bidirectional catalysis by copper-containing nitrite reductase

    Wijma, HJ; Canters, GW; de Vries, S; Verbeet, MP

    2004-01-01

    The copper-containing nitrite reductase from Alcaligenes faecalis S-6 was found to catalyze the oxidation of nitric oxide to nitrite, the reverse of its physiological reaction. Thermodynamic and kinetic constants with the physiological electron donor pseudoazurin were determined for both directions

  14. Thioredoxin reductase from s. Coelicolor as a drug target

    Koháryová, M.; Brynda, Jiří; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Kollárová, M.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 282, Suppl 1 (2015), s. 396. ISSN 1742-464X. [Congress of the Federation of European Biochemical Societies (FEBS) - The Biochemical Basis of Life /40./. 04.07.2015-09.07.2015, Berlin] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : thioredoxin reductase * protein structure * drugs Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  15. Isolation and expression of the Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase gene

    Edman, J C; Edman, U; Cao, Mi-Mi;

    1989-01-01

    Pneumocystis carinii dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR; 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate: NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.3) cDNA sequences have been isolated by their ability to confer trimethoprim resistance to Escherichia coli. Consistent with the recent conclusion that P. carinii is a member of the Fungi...

  16. Fatty Acyl-CoA Reductase 1 Deficiency

    Charles N Swisher

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from Erlangen, Germany; Calgary, CA; and Kafranbel, Syria, identified mutations in the gene, fatty acyl-CoA reductase 1 (FAR1 deficiency, adding to three other genes involved in plasmalogen biosynthesis, in two families affected by severe intellectual disability, early-onset epilepsy, microcephaly, congenital cataracts, growth retardation, and spasticity.

  17. Crystal structures of pinoresinol-lariciresinol and phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductases and their relationship to isoflavone reductases

    Min, Tongpil; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Bedgar, Diana L.; Youn, Buhyun; Lawrence, Paulraj K.; Gang, David R.; Halls, Steven C.; Park, HaJeung; Hilsenbeck, Jacqueline L.; Davin, Laurence B.; Lewis, Norman G.; Kang, ChulHee

    2003-01-01

    Despite the importance of plant lignans and isoflavonoids in human health protection (e.g. for both treatment and prevention of onset of various cancers) as well as in plant biology (e.g. in defense functions and in heartwood development), systematic studies on the enzymes involved in their biosynthesis have only recently begun. In this investigation, three NADPH-dependent aromatic alcohol reductases were comprehensively studied, namely pinoresinol-lariciresinol reductase (PLR), phenylcoumaran benzylic ether reductase (PCBER), and isoflavone reductase (IFR), which are involved in central steps to the various important bioactive lignans and isoflavonoids. Of particular interest was in determining how differing regio- and enantiospecificities are achieved with the different enzymes, despite each apparently going through similar enone intermediates. Initially, the three-dimensional x-ray crystal structures of both PLR_Tp1 and PCBER_Pt1 were solved and refined to 2.5 and 2.2 A resolutions, respectively. Not only do they share high gene sequence similarity, but their structures are similar, having a continuous alpha/beta NADPH-binding domain and a smaller substrate-binding domain. IFR (whose crystal structure is not yet obtained) was also compared (modeled) with PLR and PCBER and was deduced to have the same overall basic structure. The basis for the distinct enantio-specific and regio-specific reactions of PCBER, PLR, and IFR, as well as the reaction mechanism and participating residues involved (as identified by site-directed mutagenesis), are discussed.

  18. The interplay between thiol-compounds against chromium (VI) in the freshwater green alga Monoraphidium convolutum: Toxicology, photosynthesis, and oxidative stress at a glance

    In this paper, the multifaceted Cr(VI) toxicity over the freshwater green alga Monoraphidium convolutum was assessed by concomitantly monitoring thiol-dependent redox balances, photosynthesis activity and growth-survival scores. Control group showed exponential growth rate at (5.78 ± 0.29) division/day until 8th day with linear increasing chlorophyll a/protein ratios (CHLa/PROT) throughout the period. Cultures of M. convolutum were exposed for 5 days to Cr(VI) concentrations from 0 up to 100 mg/L showing that CHLa/PROT ratios were sensibly affected, in agreement to the calculated LC50,48h (5.38 ± 0.72) mg/L from the concentration-response curve of cell mortality after 48 h. Regarding photosynthesis effects, Cr(VI) concentrations >1.0 mg/L showed significant increases in short-term (after 2 h) electron transfer rates (ETR) and quantum yields of photosystem II (ΦPSII), followed by subsequent decline of both parameters after 48 and 72 h. Biochemical analyses showed that maximal GSH concentrations in algal cultures were observed upon 1 mg Cr(VI)/L and higher dichromate concentrations dramatically increased the activity of antioxidant GSH-dependent enzymes ascorbate peroxidase and glutathione reductase. However, no variation was observed in the cellular GSH levels, whereas GSSG and lipid peroxidation indexes abruptly increased upon 10 mg Cr(VI)/L exposure. Altogether, plant physiology, photosynthesis and biochemical data suggest that the GSH-dependent antioxidant system is capable to sustain M. convolutum viability through efficient photosynthesis activity and adequate antioxidant responses up to Cr(VI) concentrations of 1.0 mg/L, when redox unbalances were first evidenced.

  19. Odorant Screening and Quantitation of Thiols in Carmenere Red Wine by Gas Chromatography-Olfactometry and Stable Isotope Dilution Assays.

    Pavez, Carolina; Agosin, Eduardo; Steinhaus, Martin

    2016-05-01

    The sensory impact of thiols in Vitis vinifera 'Carmenere' red wines was evaluated. For this purpose, aroma extract dilution analysis was applied to the thiols isolated from a Carmenere red wine by affinity chromatography with a mercurated agarose gel. Results revealed the presence of four odorants, identified as 2-furanylmethanethiol, 3-sulfanylhexyl acetate, 3-sulfanyl-1-hexanol, and 2-methyl-3-sulfanyl-1-butanol, with the latter being described here for the first time in Carmenere red wines. Quantitation of the four thiols in the Carmenere wine screened by aroma extract dilution analysis and in three additional Carmenere wines by stable isotope dilution assays resulted in concentrations above the respective orthonasal odor detection threshold values. Triangle tests applied to wine model solutions with and without the addition of the four thiols showed significant differences, thus suggesting that the compounds do have the potential to influence the overall aroma of red wine. PMID:27070203

  20. Functionalization of embedded thiol-ene waveguides for evanescent wave-induced fluorescence detection in a microfluidic device

    Feidenhans, Nikolaj A.; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam; Lafleur, Josiane P.; Kutter, Jörg P.

    functionalized with biotin using photografting. The biotin was used for immobilization of fluorescently labelled streptavidin, and experiments revealed a linear correlation between streptavidin concentration and fluorescent intensity. To further demonstrate the attractiveness of using thiol-ene for optofluidic...

  1. Enantioselective syntheses and sensory properties of 2-methyl-tetrahydrofuran-3-thiol acetates.

    Dai, Yifeng; Shao, Junqiang; Yang, Shaoxiang; Sun, Baoguo; Liu, Yongguo; Ning, Ting; Tian, Hongyu

    2015-01-21

    The enantioselective synthesis of four stereoisomers of 2-methyl-tetrahydrofuran-3-thiol acetate was achieved. The two enantiomers of the important intermediate cis-2-methyl-3-hydroxy-tetrahydrofuran were obtained by Sharpless asymmetric dihydroxylation (AD), whereas the two enantiomers of trans-2-methyl-3-hydroxy-tetrahydrofuran were derived from the corresponding optically active cis-isomers by Mitsunobu reaction. Each stereoisomer of 2-methyl-3-hydroxy-tetrahydrofuran went through mesylation and nucleophilic substitution to afford the corresponding product with specific configuration. (2R,3S)- and (2R,3R)-2-methyl-tetrahydrofuran-3-thiol acetate were obtained in 80% ee, whereas the (2S,3R)- and (2S,3S)-isomers were in 62% ee. The odor properties of the synthesized four stereoisomers were evaluated by gas chromatography-olfactometry (GC-O), which revealed perceptible differences among stereoisomers both in odor features and in intensities. PMID:25560460

  2. Thiol-ene Photocrosslinking of Cytocompatible Resilin-Like Polypeptide-PEG Hydrogels.

    McGann, Christopher L; Dumm, Rebekah E; Jurusik, Anna K; Sidhu, Ishnoor; Kiick, Kristi L

    2016-01-01

    A range of chemical strategies have been used for crosslinking recombinant polypeptide hydrogels, although only a few have employed photocrosslinking approaches. Here, we capitalize on the novel insect protein, resilin, and the versatility of click reactions to introduce a resilin-like polypeptide (RLP) that is capable of photoinitiated thiol-ene crosslinking. Lysine residues of the RLP were functionalized with norbornene acid as confirmed via 1H-NMR spectroscopy. The RLPNs were subsequently photocrosslinked with multi-arm PEG thiols in the presence of a photoinitiator to form elastic hybrid hydrogels. The crosslinking reaction and resulting RLP-PEG networks demonstrated cytocompatibility with human mesenchymal stem cells in both 2D cell-adhesion and 3D photoencapsulation studies. PMID:26435299

  3. Diazomethyl ketone substrate derivatives as active-site-directed inhibitors of thiol proteases. Papain

    Leary, R.; Larsen, D.; Watanabe, H.; Shaw, E.

    1977-12-27

    The diazomethyl ketones of z-Phe and z-Phe-Phe inactivate papain by a stoichiometric reaction at the active-center thiol. Since the reagents are stable in mercaptoethanol, their reaction with papain is judged to be the result of complex formation characteristic of affinity-labeling reagents. The diazomethyl ketones react by a mechanism different from that of chloromethyl ketones, since the pH dependence of their inactivation of papain is different, the rate increasing with decreasing pH. This relationship has been observed in other cases, such as the reaction of azaserine with glutamine amidotransferases (Buchanan, J. M. (1973), Adv. Enzmol. Relat. Areas Mol. Biol. 39, 91), and is interpreted as an indication of reaction with a thiol group in its protonated form.

  4. Thiol modification of psyllium husk mucilage and evaluation of its mucoadhesive applications.

    Bhatia, Meenakshi; Ahuja, Munish

    2013-01-01

    Thiol functionalization of psyllium was carried out to enhance its mucoadhesive potential. Thiolation of psyllium was achieved by esterification with thioglycolic acid. Thiolation was observed to change the surface morphology of psyllium from fibrous to granular and result in a slight increase in the crystallinity and swelling. Thiolated psyllium was found to contain 3.282 m moles of thiol groups/g of the polymer. Mucoadhesive applications of thiolated psylium were explored by formulating gels using metronidazole as the model drug. On comparative evaluation thiolated psyllium gels showed 3-fold higher mucoadhesive strength than the psyllium gels as determined by modified physical balance using chicken buccal pouch. The results of in vitro release study revealed that thiolated psyllium gels provided a prolonged release of metronidazole. Further, the psyllium and thiolated psyllium gels were found to release the drug following first-order kinetics by combination of polymer relaxation and diffusion through the matrix. PMID:24348147

  5. Thiol Modification of Psyllium Husk Mucilage and Evaluation of Its Mucoadhesive Applications

    Meenakshi Bhatia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thiol functionalization of psyllium was carried out to enhance its mucoadhesive potential. Thiolation of psyllium was achieved by esterification with thioglycolic acid. Thiolation was observed to change the surface morphology of psyllium from fibrous to granular and result in a slight increase in the crystallinity and swelling. Thiolated psyllium was found to contain 3.282 m moles of thiol groups/g of the polymer. Mucoadhesive applications of thiolated psylium were explored by formulating gels using metronidazole as the model drug. On comparative evaluation thiolated psyllium gels showed 3-fold higher mucoadhesive strength than the psyllium gels as determined by modified physical balance using chicken buccal pouch. The results of in vitro release study revealed that thiolated psyllium gels provided a prolonged release of metronidazole. Further, the psyllium and thiolated psyllium gels were found to release the drug following first-order kinetics by combination of polymer relaxation and diffusion through the matrix.

  6. Characterization of Helicobacter pylori adhesin thiol peroxidase (HP0390) purified from Escherichia coli

    Huyen Thi Minh Nguyen; Kwang-Ho Nam; Yasar Saleem; Key-Sun Kim

    2010-06-01

    The antioxidant protein, adhesin thiol peroxidase (HpTpx or HP0390), plays an important role in enabling Helicobacter pylori to survive gastric oxidative stress. The bacterium colonizes the host stomach and produces gastric cancer. However, little information is available about the biochemical characteristics of HpTpx. We expressed recombinant HpTpx in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and characterized it. The results showed that HpTpx existed in a monomeric hydrodynamic form and the enzyme fully retained its peroxidase and antioxidant activities. The catalytic reaction of the enzyme was similar to an atypical 2-cysteine peroxiredoxin (Prx). The conformation of the enzyme was observed in the presence and absence of dithiothreitol (DTT); similar to other known thiol peroxidases, conformational change was observed in HpTpx by the addition of DTT.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of thiol-functionalized polymer as binder in conductive ink

    Lee, Jungmin; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2011-04-01

    The technology of electrical printing has received industrial and scientific attention due to wide variety of application such as sensors, radio frequency identification cards (RFIDs), flexible display, and flexible solar cell. Especially a roll to roll gravure printing technique has been useful for mass production of electrical products. For the more high quality of conductive ink, the compatibility of organic binder and inorganic filler is very important. In this study, Thiol-functionalized polymer and core-shell conductive nanoparticles were used as the binder and filler. The thiol moieties in binder contribute to functionality of the synthesized polymer. Also, the conductivity and viscosity of synthesized ink and compatibility of filler with binder were characterized in various conditions.

  8. Modification of porous silicon rugate filters through thiol-yne photochemistry

    Porous silicon (PSi) has a considerable potential as biosensor platform. In particular, the ability to modify the surface chemistry of porous silicon is of interest. Here we present a generic method to modify the surface of porous silicon through thiol-yne photochemistry initiated by a radical initiator. Firstly, a freshly etched porous silicon substrate is modified through thermal hydrosilylation with 1,8-nonadiyne to passivate the surface and introduce alkyne functionalities. The alkyne functional surface could then be further reacted with thiol species in the presence of a radical initiator and UV light. Functionalization of the PSi rugate filter is followed with optical reflectivity measurements as well as high resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS)

  9. Monitoring of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell proliferation on thiol-modified planar gold microelectrodes using impedance spectroscopy

    Heiskanen, Arto; Spegel, Christer F; Kostesha, Natalie;

    2008-01-01

    value of R,, showed over 560% increase with respect to the value obtained on the same thiol-modified electrode without cells. It was demonstrated that real-time monitoring of S. cerevisiae proliferation, with frequency-normalized imaginary admittance (real capacitance) as the indicator, was possible......An impedance spectroscopic study of the interaction between thiol-modified Au electrodes and Saccharomyces cerevisiae of strain EBY44 revealed that the cells formed an integral part of the interface, modulating the capacitive properties until a complete monolayer was obtained, whereas the charge...... transfer resistance (R-ct) to the redox process of [Fe(CN)6](3-14-) showed a linear relationship to the number of cells even beyond the monolayer coverage. R,, showed strong pH dependence upon increasing the pH of the utilized buffer to 7.2. Upon addition of S. cerevisiae cells at pH 7.2, the obtained...

  10. The effects of acrolein on peroxiredoxins, thioredoxins, and thioredoxin reductase in human bronchial epithelial cells

    Inhalation is a common form of exposure to acrolein, a toxic reactive volatile aldehyde that is a ubiquitous environmental pollutant. Bronchial epithelial cells would be directly exposed to inhaled acrolein. The thioredoxin (Trx) system is essential for the maintenance of cellular thiol redox balance, and is critical for cell survival. Normally, thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) maintains the cytosolic (Trx1) and mitochondrial (Trx2) thioredoxins in the reduced state, and the thioredoxins keep the peroxiredoxins (Prx) reduced, thereby supporting their peroxidase function. The effects of acrolein on TrxR, Trx and Prx in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) cells were determined. A 30-min exposure to 5 μM acrolein oxidized both Trx1 and Trx2, although significant effects were noted for Trx1 at even lower acrolein concentrations. The effects on Trx1 and Trx2 could not be reversed by treatment with disulfide reductants. TrxR activity was inhibited 60% and >85% by 2.5 and 5 μM acrolein, respectively. The endogenous electron donor for TrxR, NADPH, could not restore its activity, and activity did not recover in cells during a 4-h acrolein-free period in complete medium. The effects of acrolein on TrxR and Trx therefore extend beyond the duration of exposure. While there was a strong correlation between TrxR inhibition and Trx1 oxidation, the irreversible effects on Trx1 suggest direct effects of acrolein rather than loss of reducing equivalents from TrxR. Trx2 did not become oxidized until ≥90% of TrxR was inhibited, but irreversible effects on Trx2 also suggest direct effects of acrolein. Prx1 (cytosolic) and Prx3 (mitochondrial) shifted to a largely oxidized state only when >90 and 100% of their respective Trxs were oxidized. Prx oxidation was readily reversed with a disulfide reductant, suggesting that Prx oxidation resulted from lack of reducing equivalents from Trx and not direct reaction with acrolein. The effects of acrolein on the thioredoxin system and

  11. Pyridine Nucleotide Complexes with Bacillus anthracis Coenzyme A-Disulfide Reductase: A Structural Analysis of Dual NAD(P)H Specificity

    Wallen,J.; Paige, C.; Mallett, T.; Karplus, P.; Claiborne, A.

    2008-01-01

    We have recently reported that CoASH is the major low-molecular weight thiol in Bacillus anthracis, and we have now characterized the kinetic and redox properties of the B. anthracis coenzyme A-disulfide reductase (CoADR, BACoADR) and determined the crystal structure at 2.30 Angstroms resolution. While the Staphylococcus aureus and Borrelia burgdorferi CoADRs exhibit strong preferences for NADPH and NADH, respectively, B. anthracis CoADR can use either pyridine nucleotide equally well. Sequence elements within the respective NAD(P)H-binding motifs correctly reflect the preferences for S. aureus and Bo. burgdorferi CoADRs, but leave questions as to how BACoADR can interact with both pyridine nucleotides. The structures of the NADH and NADPH complexes at ca. 2.3 Angstroms resolution reveal that a loop consisting of residues Glu180-Thr187 becomes ordered and changes conformation on NAD(P)H binding. NADH and NADPH interact with nearly identical conformations of this loop; the latter interaction, however, involves a novel binding mode in which the 2'-phosphate of NADPH points out toward solvent. In addition, the NAD(P)H-reduced BACoADR structures provide the first view of the reduced form (Cys42-SH/CoASH) of the Cys42-SSCoA redox center. The Cys42-SH side chain adopts a new conformation in which the conserved Tyr367'-OH and Tyr425'-OH interact with the nascent thiol(ate) on the flavin si-face. Kinetic data with Y367F, Y425F, and Y367, 425F BACoADR mutants indicate that Tyr425' is the primary proton donor in catalysis, with Tyr367' functioning as a cryptic alternate donor in the absence of Tyr425'.

  12. Labelling by 3H-N-ethylmaleimide of diamide-oxidized thiol groups in sheep red blood cell (SRBC) membranes

    Exposure of SRBC to the thiol oxidant diamide activates K:Cl cotransport, reversed upon metabolic restoration of cellular glutathione suggesting redox control of the K:Cl cotransporter, as well as by subsequent exposure to dithiothreitol (DTT). The thiols crucial for activation may be either on the transporter or on a membrane or cytoplasmic regulator. To test this hypothesis, the authors attempted to label with 3H-N-ethylmaleimide (3H-NEM) the thiols protected by diamide oxidation and reduced subsequently by DTT. SRBC were first treated with a diamide concentration activating K:Cl cotransport, followed by a second exposure to unlabeled (cold) NEM to block any non-oxidized thiol, and then hemolyzed to obtain white ghosts. The ghosts were again treated with cold NEM and after reduction by DTT exposed to 3H-NEM with and without cold NEM. Saturation labelling by 3H-NEM of diamide protected groups occurred in the range of CTT concentrations inactivating the diamide-stimulated K:Cl cotransport. Saturation labelling with 3H-NEM occurred at about 25μM NEM suggesting a Ki of less than 10μM NEM. The number of diamide protected thiols was about 5-10,000/cell membrane. At 100μM 3H-NEM, SRBC not treated with diamide possess at least 100,000 thiols cell and this number is likely to rise by tenfold at higher NEM concentrations. Thus, diamide protected about 1/1,000 of the membrane thiols in both genetically low and high K SRBC, assayed under conditions where K:Cl cotransport is activated in intact cells. Therefore, at least some of the thiols crucial for potential regulation of K:Cl cotransport reside within the plasma membrane

  13. Thiol-ene microfluidic devices for microchip electrophoresis: Effects of curing conditions and monomer composition on surface properties.

    Tähkä, Sari M; Bonabi, Ashkan; Nordberg, Maria-Elisa; Kanerva, Meeri; Jokinen, Ville P; Sikanen, Tiina M

    2015-12-24

    Thiol-ene polymer formulations are raising growing interest as new low-cost fabrication materials for microfluidic devices. This study addresses their feasibility for microchip electrophoresis (MCE) via characterization of the effects of UV curing conditions and aging on the surface charge and wetting properties. A detailed comparison is made between stoichiometric thiol-ene (1:1) and thiol-ene formulations bearing 50% molar excess of allyls ("enes"), both prepared without photoinitiator or other polymer modifiers. Our results show that the surface charge of thiol-ene 1:1 increases along with increasing UV exposure dose until a threshold (here, about 200J/cm(2)), whereas the surface charge of thiol-ene 2:3 decreases as a function of increasing UV dose. However, no significant change in the surface charge upon storage in ambient air was observed over a period of 14 days (independent of the curing conditions). The water contact angles of thiol-ene 2:3 (typically 70-75°) were found to be less dependent on the UV dose and storing time. Instead, water contact angles of thiol-ene 1:1 slightly decrease (from initial 90 to 95° to about 70°) as a function of UV increasing exposure dose and storing time. Most importantly, both thiol-ene formulations remain relatively hydrophilic over extended periods of time, which favors their use in MCE applications. Here, MCE separation of biologically active peptides and selected fluorescent dyes is demonstrated in combination with laser-induced fluorescence detection showing high separation efficiency (theoretical plates 8200 per 4cm for peptides and 1500-2700 per 4cm for fluorescent dyes) and lower limits of detection in the sub-μM (visible range) or low-μM (near-UV range) level. PMID:26654831

  14. A study of oxidative stress, thiol proteins and role of vitamin E supplementation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD

    Anita M. Raut

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Lipid peroxide plays an important role in inflammatory lung disease. Increased epithelial permeability produced by cigarette smoke is likely to be mediated through depletion of thiol proteins. Imbalance between oxidants and thiol proteins is also an established fact in these patients. Materials & methods: In the present study 30 healthy non-smokers were served as controls and 20 patients with stable COPD were included. Their base line clinical examination, Malondialdehyde (MDA as an oxidant, alpha tocopherol and erythrocyte superoxide dismutase (SOD as an antioxidants and thiol proteins levels were measured. All above parameters were repeated after 12 weeks of supplementation with 400 IU of vitamin E daily. Results: We observed that the mean malondialdehyde levels in these patients at base line were high (p<0.001 than Control Plasma alpha-tocopherol, SOD and thiol proteins levels were low (p<0.001 in the patients compared to controls. Exogenous vitamin E (400 IU twice daily Supplementation did not bring about any significant change in plasma Erythrocyte Superoxide Dismutase and vitamin E. But slight increase in the plasma thiol proteins levels was seen. The present study shows that initially the plasma lipid peroxide (MDA levels were high antioxidant (alpha- tocopherol, SOD and thiol proteins were low in patients with COPD. Exogenous supplementation with vitamin E increases slightly thiol proteins levels and brings down the levels of MDA showing attenuation of further damage. Conclusion: Our study confirmed the existence of oxidative stress and and the augmentation of antioxidant defenses as shown by slight increase in thiol proteins level. The antioxidant therapy is adjunct in lung disease patients and opens a promising field in prevention of oxidative stress related complications in these patients.

  15. Thiol anchoring and catalysis of gold nanoparticles at the liquid interface of thin-organic film-modified electrodes

    Mirceski, Valentin; Aleksovska, Angela; Pejova, Biljana; Ivanovski, Vladimir; Mitrova, Biljana; Mitreska, Nikolina; Gulaboski, Rubin

    2014-01-01

    The deposition of in-situ formed gold nanoparticles at the liquid/liquid (L/L) interface is studied by means of thin-organic-film-modified electrodes (TFE). The degree of ordering and aggregation of gold nanoparticles can be tuned by adding a lipophilic and hydrophilic thiol in the organic and aqueous phase, respectively. The ordered thiol-anchored gold nanoparticles exhibit pronounced catalytic effect toward electron-transfer reactions across the L/L interface.

  16. A Dendritic Thioester Hydrogel Based on Thiol-Thioester Exchange as a Dissolvable Sealant System for Wound Closure

    Ghobril, Cynthia; Charoen, Kristie; Rodriguez, Edward K.; Nazarian, Ara; Grinstaff, Mark W.

    2013-01-01

    A dissolvable dendritic thioester hydrogel based on thiol-thioester exchange for wound closure is reported. The hydrogel sealant adheres strongly to tissues, closes an ex vivo vein puncture, and withstands high pressures placed on a wound. The hydrogel sealant can be completely washed off upon exposure to thiolates based on thiol-thioester exchange and allow gradual wound re-exposure during definitive surgical care.

  17. Cytoplasmic glutathione redox status determines survival upon exposure to the thiol-oxidant 4,4'-dipyridyl disulfide

    López-Mirabal, H Reynaldo; Thorsen, Michael; Kielland-Brandt, Morten C;

    2007-01-01

    Dipyridyl disulfide (DPS) is a highly reactive thiol oxidant that functions as electron acceptor in thiol-disulfide exchange reactions. DPS is very toxic to yeasts, impairing growth at low micromolar concentrations. The genes TRX2 (thioredoxin), SOD1 (superoxide dismutase), GSH1 (gamma-glutamyl-c...... sensitivity. DPS seems to induce a specific disulfide stress, where an increase in the cytoplasmic/nuclear GSSG/GSH ratio results in putative DPS target(s) becoming sensitive to DPS. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-May...

  18. Antiviral effects of a thiol protease inhibitor on foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    Kleina, L G; Grubman, M J

    1992-01-01

    The thiol protease inhibitor E-64 specifically blocks autocatalytic activity of the leader protease of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) and interferes with cleavage of the structural protein precursor in an in vitro translation assay programmed with virion RNA. Experiments with FMDV-infected cells and E-64 or a membrane-permeable analog, E-64d, have confirmed these results and demonstrated interference in virus assembly, causing a reduction in virus yield. In addition, there is a lag in th...

  19. Ruthenium(III Chloride Catalyzed Acylation of Alcohols, Phenols, and Thiols in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids

    Mingzhong Cai

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Ruthenium(III chloride-catalyzed acylation of a variety of alcohols, phenols, and thiols was achieved in high yields under mild conditions (room temperature in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6]. The ionic liquid and ruthenium catalyst can be recycled at least 10 times. Our system not only solves the basic problem of ruthenium catalyst reuse, but also avoids the use of volatile acetonitrile as solvent.

  20. Regulation of pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase activity by protein thiol-disulfide exchange.

    Pettit, F H; Humphreys, J; Reed, L J

    1982-01-01

    Endogenous kinase activity of highly purified pyruvate dehydrogenase complex from bovine kidney is markedly inhibited by N-ethylmaleimide and by certain disulfides. Inhibition by disulfides is highly specific and is reversed by thiols. 5,5'-Dithiobis(2-nitrobenzoate) is the most potent inhibitor, showing significant inhibition at a concentration as low as 1 microM. Cystamine, oxidized glutathione, pantethine, lipoic acid, lipoamide, ergothionine, insulin, oxytocin, and vasopressin were ineffe...

  1. Protection against cerebral malaria by the low-molecular-weight thiol pantethine

    Penet, Marie-France; Abou-Hamdan, Mhamad; Coltel, Nicolas; Cornille, Emilie; Grau, Georges E.; de Reggi, Max; Gharib, Bouchra

    2008-01-01

    We report that administration of the low-molecular-weight thiol pantethine prevented the cerebral syndrome in Plasmodium berghei ANKA-infected mice. The protection was associated with an impairment of the host response to the infection, with in particular a decrease of circulating microparticles and preservation of the blood–brain barrier integrity. Parasite development was unaffected. Pantethine modulated one of the early steps of the inflammation–coagulation cascade, i.e., the transbilayer ...

  2. Michael addition of thiols, carbon nucleophiles and amines to dehydroamino acid and dehydropeptide derivatives

    Ferreira, Paula M.T.; Maia, Hernâni L. S.; Monteiro, Luís S.; Sacramento, Joana

    2001-01-01

    Michael additions of nitrogen heterocycles, thiols, carbon nucleophiles and amines to dehydroalanine derivatives, including a glycyldehydroalanine peptide, were performed in fair to good yields. Dehydroaminobutyric acid derivatives reacted only with the stronger nucleophiles but in considerably lower yields and often no reaction was observed with the corresponding dehydrophenylalanine derivatives. When a tosyl group was bonded to the nitrogen atom of the dehydroamino acid, in some cases the a...

  3. Dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands as a "working form" of endogenous nitric oxide.

    Vanin, Anatoly F

    2016-04-01

    The material presented herein is an overview of the results obtained by our research team during the many years' study of biological activities and occurrence of dinitrosyl iron complexes (DNIC) with thiol-containing ligands in human and animal organisms. With regard to their dose dependence and vast diversity of biological activities, DNIC are similar to the system of endogenous NO, one of the most universal regulators of biological processes. The role of biologically active components in DNIC is played by their iron-dinitrosyl fragments, [Fe(NO)2], endowed with the ability to generate neutral NO molecules and nitrosonium ions (NO(+)). Their release is effected by heme-and thiol-containing proteins, which fulfill the function of biological targets and acceptors of NO and NO(+). Beneficial regulatory effects of DNIC on physiological and metabolic processes are numerous and diverse and include, among other things, lowering of arterial pressure and accelerated healing of skin wounds. In the course of fast decomposition of their Fe(NO)2 fragments (e.g., in the presence of iron chelators), DNIC produce adverse (cytotoxic) effects, which can best be exemplified by their ability to suppress the development of experimental endometriosis in animals. In animal tissues, DNIC with thiol-containing ligands are predominantly represented by the binuclear form, which, contrary to mononuclear DNIC detectable by the 2.03 signal, is EPR-silent. The ample body of evidence on biological activities and occurrence of DNIC gained so far clearly demonstrates that in human and animal organisms DNIC with thiol-containing ligands represent a "working form" of the system of endogenous NO responsible for its accumulation and stabilization in animal tissues as well as its further transfer to its biological targets. PMID:26820635

  4. Liquid-Crystalline Thiol- and Disulfide-Based Dendrimers for the Functionalization of Gold Nanoparticles

    Frein, Stéphane; Boudon, Julien; Vonlanthen, Mireille; Scharf, Toral; Barberá, Joaquín; Süss-Fink, Georg; Bürgi, Thomas; Deschenaux, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Liquid-crystalline dendrons carrying either a thiol or disulfide function which display nematic, smectic A, columnar, or chiral nematic phases have been synthesized. Their mesomorphic properties are in agreement with the nature of the mesogenic units and structure of the dendrons. The first-generation poly(aryl ester) dendron containing two cyanobiphenyl mesogenic units was used to functionalize gold nanoparticles. For full coverage, a smectic-like supramolecular organization on the nanometer...

  5. Ruthenium(III) Chloride Catalyzed Acylation of Alcohols, Phenols, and Thiols in Room Temperature Ionic Liquids

    Mingzhong Cai; Pingping Wang; Wenyan Hao; Zhiwen Xi

    2009-01-01

    Ruthenium(III) chloride-catalyzed acylation of a variety of alcohols, phenols, and thiols was achieved in high yields under mild conditions (room temperature) in the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF6]). The ionic liquid and ruthenium catalyst can be recycled at least 10 times. Our system not only solves the basic problem of ruthenium catalyst reuse, but also avoids the use of volatile acetonitrile as solvent.

  6. Profiling protein thiol oxidation in tumor cells using sulfenic acid-specific antibodies

    Seo, Young Ho; Carroll, Kate S.

    2009-01-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) functions as a second messenger that can activate cell proliferation through chemoselective oxidation of cysteine residues in signaling proteins. The connection between H2O2 signaling, thiol oxidation, and activation of growth pathways has emerged as fertile ground for the development of strategies for cancer treatment. Central to achieving this goal is the development of tools and assays that facilitate characterization of the molecular events associated with tumorig...

  7. Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Novel Thiol-Derivatized Ibuprofen Monolayer Protected Gold Clusters

    A series of new thiol-derivatized ibuprofen monolayer protected gold clusters have been prepared by amidation of ibuprofen with alkyl alcohol or aminophenol affording the carboxamide, N-hydroxyalkyl amide 2, and N-hydroxyphenyl amide 6, which were then tosylate with p-toluenesulfonyl chloride at hydroxyl group to give 3 and 7. Reactions of 3 and 7 with NaSH afforded the mercapto derivatives 4 and 8. Conducting Brust’s reaction with a 3:1 mole ratio of thiolate ibuprofen/ AuCl4- yielded polydisperse thiol-derivatized ibuprofen-MPCs 5 and 9. All compounds have been identified by NMR, MS, UV, and IR spectroscopies. Compounds 4 and 8 and the MPCs 5 and 9 have been investigated by using the method of 1H NMR spectroscopy. The broadening of the signals from 0.8 to 2.0 ppm in 1H NMR spectrum of MPCs 5 and 9 confirmed the success of the conjugation of thiol-containing derivatives with nano gold cluster.

  8. Fabrication of PEG-carboxymethylcellulose hydrogel by thiol-norbornene photo-click chemistry.

    Lee, Sora; Park, Young Hwan; Ki, Chang Seok

    2016-02-01

    Both poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) are biocompatible polymers, which have been widely utilized in biomedical fields. In this study, we demonstrated the fabrication of pH-sensitive PEG-CMC hydrogels based on thiol-norbornene photo-click reaction and characterized their properties, such as swelling ratio, stiffness, degradation, and protein drug release. For the hydrogel fabrication, tetra-arm PEG and CMC were functionalized with norbornene groups and thiol groups, respectively. The hydrogels fabricated with varying concentration (0-3%) of CMCSH and a fixed concentration (4%) of PEG4NB by orthogonal step-growth photopolymerization showed high gel fractions (∼0.85). The presence of CMCSH in hydrogel did not affected gel point (∼4 s) but significantly prolonged completion time of gelation. Swelling ratios of PEG-CMC increased from ∼32 to ∼60 and the shear elastic modulus decreased from ∼3000 to ∼600 Pa with an increase of CMCSH content (0-3%). PEG-CMC hydrogel containing more CMCSH not only underwent slower hydrolytic bulk degradation but also showed a slower BSA release in acidic condition. These results indicate thiol-norbornene PEG-CMC hydrogel has potential as pH-sensitive protein drug carrier. PMID:26616448

  9. Surface modification of CdS quantum dots using thiols-structural and photophysical studies

    This study is aimed at identifying a suitable organic thiol for CdS by studying its structural, thermal and photophysical characteristics. Quantum dots of the II-VI semiconductor CdS, in the size regime of 2.0-3.3 nm, were prepared in the cubic phase by a wet chemical method. Five organic thiols were used for capping: (i) 1,4-dithiothreitol (DTT), (ii) 2-mercaptoethanol (ME), (iii) cysteine (Cys), (iv) methionine (Meth), and (v) glutathione (GSH). Structural studies were carried out by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which revealed the cubic phase of CdS. Optical properties were studied by FT-IR, UV-visible and fluorescence spectroscopic techniques, and a comparison was made between uncapped and capped CdS. FT-IR studies suggested two different bonding mechanisms of the capping agents with the CdS. GSH and DTT capped CdS showed significant decrease in absorption wavelengths. An increase in band gap was observed in two cases: when (i) capped and (ii) decreased in size. The band gap was increased from 2.50 eV for the uncapped to 2.77 eV for the DTT capped CdS. DTT was found to be the best capping agent for CdS among these five organic thiols in two aspects: (i) yielding lower grain size in cubic phase, and (ii) good fluorescence properties with efficient quenching of the surface traps.

  10. Optimization of Optical Properties of Polycarbonate Film with Thiol Gold-Nanoparticles

    Claudio Larosa

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available A new nanostructured composite film based on thiol gold nanoparticles dispersed in polycarbonate and prepared by evaporating a solution of 1-dodecanthiol gold nanoparticles and polycarbonate was developed for applications as optical lenses. Lenses with superior mechanical properties, coloring and UV ray absorption and with the same transparency as the matrix were obtained. The supporting highly transparent polycarbonate matrix and the chloroform solution of thiol gold nanoparticles, 3 nm mean size, was mixed according to a doping protocol employing different concentrations of thiol gold nanoparticles vs. polycarbonate. The presence of nanoparticles in the polymer films was confirmed by the spectrophotometric detection of the characteristic absorbance marker peak at 540–580 nm. The nanostructured films obtained show a better coverage in the UV-vis range (250–450 nm even at very low doping ratios, of the order of 1:1,000. These results offer a very promising approach towards the development of efficient nanostructured materials for applications to optical lenses.

  11. Polyhedral Oligomeric Silsesquioxane-Containing Thiol-ene Fibers with Tunable Thermal and Mechanical Properties.

    Fang, Yichen; Ha, Heonjoo; Shanmuganathan, Kadhiravan; Ellison, Christopher J

    2016-05-01

    Polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxanes (POSS) are versatile inorganic-organic hybrid building blocks that have potential applications as reinforcement nanofillers, thermal stabilizers, and catalyst supports for metal nanoparticles. However, fabrication of fibrous materials with high POSS content has been a challenge because of the aggregation and solubility limits of POSS units. In this paper, we describe a robust and environmentally friendly fabrication approach of inorganic-organic hybrid POSS fibers by integrating UV initiated thiol-ene polymerization and centrifugal fiber spinning. The use of monomeric liquids in this approach not only reduces the consumption of heat energy and solvent, but it also promotes homogeneous mixing of organic and inorganic components that allows integration of large amount of POSS (up to 80 wt %) into the polymer network. The POSS containing thiol-ene fibers exhibited enhanced thermomechanical properties compared to purely organic analogs as revealed by substantial increases in residual weight and a factor of 4 increase in modulus after thermal treatment at 1000 °C. This simple fabrication approach combined with the tunability in fiber properties afforded by tailoring monomer composition make POSS containing thiol-ene fibers attractive candidates for catalyst supports and filtration media, particularly in high-temperature and harsh environments. PMID:27057758

  12. [Mono- and Binuclear Dinitrosyl Iron Complexes with Thiol-containing Ligands in Various Biosystems].

    Vanin, A F; Mikoyan, V D; Kubrina, L N; Borodulin, R R; Burgova, E N

    2015-01-01

    It has been shown that dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands, bound with modified bovine serum albumin with high amount of thiol groups, appeared in baker yeast or in animal tissues in the presence of exogenous or endogenous nitric oxide, respectively, are represented predominantly by EPR-silent binuclear form. This form can be transformed into EPR-active mononuclear form of dinitrosyl iron complexes with an increase in pH to basic values, into EPR-active form of mononuclear iron nitrosyl complexes in case of bielectronic recovery of the binuclear form of dinitrosyl iron complexes or under the action of dithiocarbamate derivatives. The latter induced the transformation of dinitrosyl iron complexes into EPR-active mononitrosyl iron complexes with dithiocarbamates. A significant amount of binuclear dinitrosyl iron complexes with thiol-containing ligands in living systems and identical biological activity of these complexes and endogenous nitric oxide systems allow of considering endogenous binuclear dinitrosyl iron complexes as a "working form" of endogenous nitric oxide recognized now as a universal regulator of biological processes. PMID:26394474

  13. Design, Synthesis, and Characterization of Novel Thiol-Derivatized Ibuprofen Monolayer Protected Gold Clusters

    Kuan-Han Lee

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A series of new thiol-derivatized ibuprofen monolayer protected gold clusters have been prepared by amidation of ibuprofen with alkyl alcohol or aminophenol affording the carboxamides, N-hydroxyalkyl amide 2, and N-hydroxyphenyl amide 6, which were then tosylated with p-toluenesulfonyl chloride at hydroxyl group to give 3 and 7. Reactions of 3 and 7 with NaSH afforded the mercapto derivatives 4 and 8. Conducting Brust’s reaction with a 3 : 1 mole ratio of thiolate ibuprofen/AuCl4- yielded polydisperse thiol-derivatized ibuprofen-MPCs 5 and 9. All compounds have been identified by NMR, MS, UV, and IR spectroscopies. Compounds 4 and 8 and the MPCs 5 and 9 have been investigated by using the method of 1H NMR spectroscopy. The broadening of the signals from 0.8 to 2.0 ppm in 1H NMR spectrum of MPCs 5 and 9 confirmed the success of the conjugation of thiol-containing derivatives with nanogold cluster.

  14. Purification and characterization of thiols in an arsenic hyperaccumulator under arsenic exposure.

    Zhang, Weihua; Cai, Yong

    2003-12-15

    Pteris vittata (Chinese brake fern) is the first reported arsenic hyperaccumulator. To investigate the arsenic tolerance mechanism in this plant, reversed-phase HPLC with postcolumn derivatization was used to analyze the thiols induced under arsenic exposure. A major thiol in the plant leaflets was found to be responsive to arsenic exposure. The arsenic-induced compound was purified on a large scale by combining covalent chromatography and preparative reversed-phase HPLC. About 2 mg of this compound was isolated from 1 kg of fresh leaflets. The purified arsenic-induced compound was characterized using electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. A molecular ion (M + 1) of 540 and fragments were obtained, which indicated that the arsenic-induced thiol was a phytochelatin with two subunits (PC(2)). Compared to the classical methods for purification of phytochelatins, this new method is more specific, simple, and rapid and is suitable for purification of PCs in a large scale as well as sample preparation for mass spectrometry analysis. PMID:14670068

  15. Thiol-containing degradable poly(thiourethane-urethane)s for tissue engineering.

    Eglin, David; Griffon, Stéphane; Alini, Mauro

    2010-01-01

    Poly(thiourethane-urethane)s with varying amounts of sulphur were synthesised by a two-step polycondensation consisting of the sequential addition of 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate and bis(2-mercaptoethyl) ether in a poly(epsilon-caprolactone) diol solution. Polymers prepared had high weight-average molecular weight and typical microdomains separation, as shown by size-exclusion chromatography and thermal analysis. Polymer surfaces were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. The quantification of thiol groups at the surface was assessed using a fluorescent assay. Thiol concentration ranged between 7 and 14 nmol/cm, and was directly related to the amount of sulphur introduced in the polymerization and the macromolecule chains orientation at the surfaces. A preliminary in vitro degradation study and a proliferation assay were performed. The poly(thiourethane-urethane)s may have important applications as biodegradable and biocompatible materials for cartilage and bone tissue engineering. The surface thiol groups add the prospect of further functionalization. This is an important benefit compared to biodegradable poly(urethane)s that usually present low biological activity. PMID:20233504

  16. Synthesis of thiol-functionalized spent grain as a novel adsorbent for divalent metal ions.

    Chai, Liyuan; Li, Qingzhu; Zhu, Yonghua; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Qingwei; Wang, Yunyan; Yang, Zhihui

    2010-08-01

    Spent grain (SG) was functionalized with thioglycolic acid in N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) medium using sodium bisulfate monohydrate (NaHSO(4).H(2)O) as a catalyst, followed by treatment with sodium sulfide nonahydrate (Na(2)S.9H(2)O). Characterization of thiol-functionalized spent grain (TFSG) was performed using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. These analytical results revealed the emergence of S-H and C=O groups after the chemical modification, indicating that thiol groups were successfully grafted onto TFSG. As compared with SG, TFSG showed significant improvement in terms of metal loading capacity. Typically, adsorption capacity for Zn(2+) was increased from 125.76 mg g(-1) of SG to 227.37 mg g(-1) of TFSG, which was confirmed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis. This increase may be attributed to both the formation of ester linkage and the grafting of thiol groups onto TFSG. The experimental results indicate that TFSG is a promising adsorbent for removal heavy metals from contaminated water. PMID:20338755

  17. Photoinduced Cross-Linking of Dynamic Poly(disulfide) Films via Thiol Oxidative Coupling.

    Feillée, Noémi; Chemtob, Abraham; Ley, Christian; Croutxé-Barghorn, Céline; Allonas, Xavier; Ponche, Arnaud; Le Nouen, Didier; Majjad, Hicham; Jacomine, Léandro

    2016-01-01

    Initially developed as an elastomer with an excellent record of barrier and chemical resistance properties, poly(disulfide) has experienced a revival linked to the dynamic nature of the S-S covalent bond. A novel photobase-catalyzed oxidative polymerization of multifunctional thiols to poly(disulfide) network is reported. Based solely on air oxidation, the single-step process is triggered by the photodecarboxylation of a xanthone acetic acid liberating a strong bicyclic guanidine base. Starting with a 1 μm thick film based on trithiol poly(ethylene oxide) oligomer, the UV-mediated oxidation of thiols to disulfides occurs in a matter of minutes both selectively, i.e., without overoxidation, and quantitatively as assessed by a range of spectroscopic techniques. Thiolate formation and film thickness determine the reaction rates and yield. Spatial control of the photopolymerization serves to generate robust micropatterns, while the reductive cleavage of S-S bridges allows the recycling of 40% of the initial thiol groups. PMID:26502361

  18. Depletion of bovine pituitary prolactin by cysteamine involves a thiol:disulfide mechanism

    Cysteamine [2-aminoethanethiol (CySH)] reduces measurable PRL concentrations in vivo and in vitro. Since secretion is also inhibited, CySH may block conversion from a poorly assayable hormone storage form(s) to readily assayable, releasable PRL. This would represent a previously unrecognized mechanism for secretory regulation. We undertook the present study to identify the sites involved in the loss of measurable PRL (depletion) induced by cysteamine. The disulfide cystamine was ineffective on secretory granules unless combined with reduced glutathione, indicating the generation of the active CySH-thiol form. Pretreatment of granules with thiol-blocking agents resulted in dose-dependent enhancement of CySH inhibition, achieving nearly complete inhibition with 5 mM iodoacetamide. In contrast, pretreatment with reduced glutathione or dithiothreitol, respectively, impaired or abolished the CySH effect. These data suggest that the mechanism by which CySH causes PRL depletion is mediated by granule disulfides and the -SH of CySH. The regulation of thiol:disulfide equilibria appears to be an important determinant of the detectability of PRL storage forms and of their secretion

  19. DNA repair by thiols in air shows two radicals make a double-strand break

    Using agarose gel electrophoresis, we have measured the yields of DNA single- and double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) for plasmid DNA γ-irradiated in aerobic aqueous solution. The presence during irradiation of either of the thiols cysteamine or N-(2-thioethyl)-1,3-diaminopropane (WR-1065) resulted in a concentration-dependent decrease in the yield of SSBs and a much greater decrease in the yield of DSBs. This large differential protective effect was not produced by thioethers or an alcohol of structural similarity to the two thiols, suggesting that repair of DSB radical precursors by thiols is more efficient than for SSB precursors. These observations suggest the existence of a diradical intermediate in the formation of DSBs. The results argue against a major contribution by a single radical mechanism involving interstrand radical transfer via hydrogen abstraction by a peroxyl intermediate, since the half-life of this radical transfer reaction appears to be significantly greater than the lifetime of the intermediate. 35 refs., 7 figs

  20. Establishment of a derivatization method to quantify thiol function in sulfur-containing plasma polymer films.

    Thiry, Damien; Francq, Remy; Cossement, Damien; Guerin, David; Vuillaume, Dominique; Snyders, Rony

    2013-10-29

    Thiol-supported surfaces draw more and more interest in numerous fields of applications from biotechnology to catalysis. Among the various strategies to generate such surfaces, the plasma polymerization of a thiol-containing molecule appears to be one of the ideal candidates. Nevertheless, considering such an approach, a careful characterization of the material surface chemistry is necessary. In this work, an original chemical derivatization method aiming to quantitatively probe the -SH functions in plasma polymers was established using N-ethylmaleimide as a labeling molecule. The method was qualitatively and quantitatively validated on self-assembled monolayers of 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane exhibiting a -SH-terminated group used as "model" surface. For a quantitative determination of the -SH content in propanethiol plasma polymers, the kinetics of the reaction was investigated. The latter is described as a two-step mechanism, namely a fast surface reaction followed by a diffusion-limited one. The density of -SH groups deduced from the derivatization method (~4%) is in good agreement with typical values measured in some other plasma polymer families. The whole set of our data opens up new possibilities for optimizing the -SH content in thiol-based plasma polymer films. PMID:24066612

  1. The critical role of the cellular thiol homeostasis in cadmium perturbation of the lung extracellular matrix

    Cadmium (Cd) inhalation can result in emphysema. Cd exposure of rat lung fibroblasts (RFL6) enhanced levels of metal scavenging thiols, e.g., metallothionein (MT) and glutathione (GSH), and the heavy chain of γ-glutamylcysteine synthetase (γ-GCS), a key enzyme for GSH biosynthesis, concomitant with downregulation of lysyl oxidase (LO), a copper-dependent enzyme for crosslinking collagen and elastin in the extracellular matrix (ECM). Cd downregulation of LO in treated cells was closely accompanied by suppression of synthesis of collagen, a major structure component of the lung ECM. Using rats intratracheally instilled with cadmium chloride (30 μg, once a week) as an animal model, we further demonstrated that although 2-week Cd instillation induced a non-significant change in the lung LO activity and collagen synthesis, 4- and 6-week Cd instillation resulted in a steady decrease in the lung LO and collagen expression. The lung MT and total GSH levels were both upregulated upon the long-term Cd exposure. Emphysematous lesions were generated in lungs of 6-week Cd-dosed rats. Increases of cellular thiols by transfection of cells with MT-II expression vectors or treatment of cells with GSH monoethyl ester, a GSH delivery system, markedly inhibited LO mRNA levels and catalytic activities in the cell model. Thus, Cd upregulation of cellular thiols may be a critical cellular event facilitating downregulation of LO, a potential mechanism for Cd-induced emphysema.

  2. Transdermal thiol-acrylate polyethylene glycol hydrogel synthesis using near infrared light.

    Chung, Solchan; Lee, Hwangjae; Kim, Hyung-Seok; Kim, Min-Gon; Lee, Luke P; Lee, Jae Young

    2016-08-01

    Light-induced polymerization has been widely applied for hydrogel synthesis, which conventionally involves the use of ultraviolet or visible light to activate a photoinitiator for polymerization. However, with these light sources, transdermal gelation is not efficient and feasible due to their substantial interactions with biological systems, and thus a high power is required. In this study, we used biocompatible and tissue-penetrating near infrared (NIR) light to remotely trigger a thiol-acrylate reaction for efficient in vivo gelation with good controllability. Our gelation system includes gold nanorods as a photothermal agent, a thermal initiator, diacrylate polyethylene glycol (PEG), and thiolated PEG. Irradiation with a low-power NIR laser (0.3 W cm(-2)) could induce gelation via a mixed-mode reaction with a small increase in temperature (∼5 °C) under the optimized conditions. We also achieved successful transdermal gelation via the NIR-assisted photothermal thiol-acryl reactions. This new type of NIR-assisted thiol-acrylate polymerization provides new opportunities for in situ hydrogel formation for injectable hydrogels and delivery of drugs/cells for various biomedical applications. PMID:27389611

  3. Thiol proteinase inhibitor - Oryzacystatin. Molecular cloning and expression in E. coli

    Insect depredation is a major reason for the reduction in crop yields world-wide. Promising results have already been achieved with transgenic plants expression cowpea trypsin inhibitor (CpTI) genes and modified delta-endotoxin genes. Insects, in general, hydrolyse ingested proteins with a variety of proteinase. The effect of the serine proteinase inhibitor against Lepidopteran insects is probably caused by the preponderance of serine type gut proteinase and a luminal pH in the neutral to alkaline range. On the other hand, the insect orders Coleoptera and Hemiptera have gut pHs in the mildly acidic range and commonly have thiol type gut proteinases. Plant transformation with a gene coding for a thiol proteinase inhibitor has been suggested as a strategy for interfering with the digestive physiology of Coleopteran and Hemipteran insects. Co-transformation of both the serine proteinase inhibitor and the thiol proteinase inhibitor genes might result in a broader spectrum of activity and increased durability of protection

  4. Protective effects of exogenous glutathione and related thiol compounds against drug-induced liver injury.

    Masubuchi, Yasuhiro; Nakayama, Junpei; Sadakata, Yuka

    2011-01-01

    An overdose of acetaminophen (APAP) causes liver injury both in experimental animals and humans. N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is clinically used as an antidote for APAP intoxication, and it is thought to act by providing cysteine as a precursor of glutathione, which traps a reactive metabolite of APAP. Other hepatoprotective mechanisms of NAC have also been suggested. Here, we examined the effects of thiol compounds with different abilities to restore hepatic glutathione, on hepatotoxicity of APAP and furosemide in mice. Overnight-fasted male CD-1 mice were given APAP or furosemide intraperitoneally. NAC, cysteine, glutathione, or glutathione-monoethyl ester was administered concomitantly with APAP or furosemide. All thiol compounds used in this study effectively protected mice against APAP-induced liver injury. Only glutathione-monoethyl ester completely prevented APAP-induced early hepatic glutathione depletion. Cysteine also significantly restored hepatic glutathione levels. NAC partially restored glutathione levels. Exogenous glutathione had no effect on hepatic glutathione loss. NAC and glutathione highly stimulated the hepatic expression of cytokines, particularly interleukin-6, which might be involved in the alleviation of APAP hepatotoxicity. Furosemide-induced liver injury, which does not accompany hepatic glutathione depletion, was also attenuated by NAC and exogenous glutathione, supporting their protective mechanisms other than replenishment of glutathione. In conclusion, exogenous thiols could alleviate drug-induced liver injury. NAC and glutathione might exert their effects, at least partially, via mechanisms that are independent of increasing hepatic glutathione, but probably act through cytokine-mediated and anti-inflammatory mechanisms. PMID:21372386

  5. Characterization of plasma thiol redox potential in a common marmoset model of aging

    James R. Roede

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Due to its short lifespan, ease of use and age-related pathologies that mirror those observed in humans, the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus is poised to become a standard nonhuman primate model of aging. Blood and extracellular fluid possess two major thiol-dependent redox nodes involving cysteine (Cys, cystine (CySS, glutathione (GSH and glutathione disulfide (GSSG. Alteration in these plasma redox nodes significantly affects cellular physiology, and oxidation of the plasma Cys/CySS redox potential (EhCySS is associated with aging and disease risk in humans. The purpose of this study was to determine age-related changes in plasma redox metabolites and corresponding redox potentials (Eh to further validate the marmoset as a nonhuman primate model of aging. We measured plasma thiol redox states in marmosets and used existing human data with multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS to model the relationships between age and redox metabolites. A classification accuracy of 70.2% and an AUC of 0.703 were achieved using the MARS model built from the marmoset redox data to classify the human samples as young or old. These results show that common marmosets provide a useful model for thiol redox biology of aging.

  6. Resin-assisted enrichment of thiols as a general strategy for proteomic profiling of cysteine-based reversible modifications

    Guo, Jia [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Gaffrey, Matthew J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Su, Dian [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Genentech Inc., South San Francisco, CA (United States); Liu, Tao [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Camp, David G. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Smith, Richard D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Qian, Weijun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-12-12

    Reversible modifications on cysteine thiols play a significant role in redox signaling and regulation. A number of reversible redox modifications, including disulfide formation, S-nitrosylation, and S-glutathionylation, have been recognized for their significance in various physiological and pathological processes. Here we describe in detail a resin-assisted thiol-affinity enrichment protocol for both biochemical and proteomics applications. This protocol serves as a general approach for specific isolation of thiol-containing proteins or peptides derived from reversible redox-modified proteins. This approach utilizes thiol-affinity resins to directly capture thiol-containing proteins or peptides through a disulfide exchange reaction followed by on-resin protein digestion and on-resin multiplexed isobaric labeling to facilitate LC-MS/MS based quantitative site-specific analysis of redox modifications. The overall approach requires a much simpler workflow with increased specificity compared to the commonly used biotin switch technique. By coupling different selective reduction strategies, the resin-assisted approach provides the researcher with a useful tool capable of enriching different types of reversible modifications on protein thiols. Procedures for selective enrichment and analyses of S-nitrosylation and total reversible cysteine oxidation are presented to demonstrate the utility of this general strategy.

  7. Inelastic Tunneling Spectroscopy of Gold-Thiol and Gold-Thiolate Interfaces in Molecular Junctions: The Role of Hydrogen

    Demir, Firuz

    2012-01-01

    It is widely believed that when a molecule with thiol (S-H) end groups bridges a pair of gold electrodes, the S atoms bond to the gold and the thiol H atoms detach from the molecule. However, little is known regarding the details of this process, its time scale, and whether molecules with and without thiol hydrogen atoms can coexist in molecular junctions. Here we explore theoretically how inelastic tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) can shed light on these issues. We present calculations of the geometries, low bias conductances and IETS of propanedithiol and propanedithiolate molecular junctions with gold electrodes. We show that IETS can distinguish between junctions with molecules having no, one or two thiol hydrogen atoms. We find that in most cases the single-molecule junctions in the IETS experiment of Hihath et al. [Nano Lett. 8, 1673 (2008)] had no thiol H atoms, but that a molecule with a single thiol H atom may have bridged their junction occasionally. We also consider the evolution of the IETS spectrum ...

  8. Rapid Identification of Aldose Reductase Inhibitory Compounds from Perilla frutescens

    Soon Sung Lim; Ji Hun Paek; Kuk Hyun Shin; Young-Hee Kang; Jae-Yong Lee

    2013-01-01

    The ethyl acetate (EtOAc) soluble fraction of methanol extracts of Perilla frutescens (P. frutescens) inhibits aldose reductase (AR), the key enzyme in the polyol pathway. Our investigation of inhibitory compounds from the EtOAc soluble fraction of P. frutescens was followed by identification of the inhibitory compounds by a combination of HPLC microfractionation and a 96-well enzyme assay. This allowed the biological activities to be efficiently matched with selected HPLC peaks. Structural a...

  9. Determination of plasma gluthatione reductase enzyme activity in osteoporotic women

    Sadeghi N; Oveisi M.R.; Jannat B.; Hajimahmoodi M; Jamshidi A.R; Sajadian Z.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Osteoporosis is a disease of high prevalence with increased bone loss. Free radicals have been proved to be involved in bone resorption. Glutathione reductase (GR) plays an essential role in cell defense against reactive oxygen metabolites by sustaining the reduced status of an important antioxidant, glutathione. In the present study GR activity of plasma as an antioxidant enzyme in relation to Bone Mineral Density (BMD) was investigated.Material and Method: GR activity was measur...

  10. Internal electron transfer within mitochondrial succinate-cytochrome C reductase

    Internal electron transfer within succinate-cytochrome C reductase from pigeon breast muscle mitochondria was followed by the pulse radiolytic technique. The electron equivalent is transferred from an unknown donor to b type cytochrome(s), in a first order process with a rate constant of: 660 +- 150s-1. This process might be the rate determining step of electron transfer in mitochondria, since it is similar in rate to the turnover number of the mitochondrial respiratory chain

  11. Aldo-keto reductase (AKR) superfamily: Genomics and annotation

    Mindnich Rebekka D; Penning Trevor M

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Aldo-keto reductases (AKRs) are phase I metabolising enzymes that catalyse the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (phosphate) (NAD(P)H)-dependent reduction of carbonyl groups to yield primary and secondary alcohols on a wide range of substrates, including aliphatic and aromatic aldehydes and ketones, ketoprostaglan-dins, ketosteroids and xenobiotics. In so doing they functionalise the carbonyl group for conjugation (phase II enzyme reactions). Although functionally diverse, AK...

  12. Characterization of a salt-induced DhAHP, a gene coding for alkyl hydroperoxide reductase, from the extremely halophilic yeast Debaryomyces hansenii

    Ku Maurice SB

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Debaryomyces hansenii is one of the most salt tolerant species of yeast and has become a model organism for the study of tolerance mechanisms against salinity. The goal of this study was to identify key upregulated genes that are involved in its adaptation to high salinity. Results By using forward subtractive hybridization we have cloned and sequenced DhAHP from D. hansenii that is significantly upregulated during salinity stress. DhAHP is orthologous to the alkly hydroperoxide reductase of the peroxiredoxin gene family, which catalyzes the reduction of peroxides at the expense of thiol compounds. The full-lengthed cDNA of DhAHP has 674 bp of nucleotide and contains a 516 bp open reading frame (ORF encoding a deduced protein of 172 amino acid residues (18.3 kDa. D. hansenii Ahp is a cytosolic protein that belongs to the Ahp of the 1-Cys type peroxiredoxins. Phylogentically, the DhAhp and Candida albicans Ahp11 (Swiss-Prot: Q5AF44 share a common ancestry but show divergent evolution. Silence of its expression in D. hansenii by RNAi resulted in decreased tolerance to salt whereas overexpression of DhAHP in D. hansenii and the salt-sensitive yeasts Saccharomyces cereviasiae and Pichia methanolica conferred a higher tolerance with a reduced level of reactive oxygen species. Conclusion In conclusion, for the first time our study has identified alkly hydroperoxide reductase as a key protein involved in the salt tolerance of the extremely halophilic D. hansenii. Apparently, this enzyme plays a multi-functional role in the yeast's adaptation to salinity; it serves as a peroxidase in scavenging reactive oxygen species, as a molecular chaperone in protecting essential proteins from denaturation, and as a redox sensor in regulating H2O2-mediated cell defense signaling.

  13. Phosphoglycerate kinase acts in tumour angiogenesis as a disulphide reductase

    Lay, Angelina J.; Jiang, Xing-Mai; Kisker, Oliver; Flynn, Evelyn; Underwood, Anne; Condron, Rosemary; Hogg, Philip J.

    2000-12-01

    Disulphide bonds in secreted proteins are considered to be inert because of the oxidizing nature of the extracellular milieu. An exception to this rule is a reductase secreted by tumour cells that reduces disulphide bonds in the serine proteinase plasmin. Reduction of plasmin initiates proteolytic cleavage in the kringle 5 domain and release of the tumour blood vessel inhibitor angiostatin. New blood vessel formation or angiogenesis is critical for tumour expansion and metastasis. Here we show that the plasmin reductase isolated from conditioned medium of fibrosarcoma cells is the glycolytic enzyme phosphoglycerate kinase. Recombinant phosphoglycerate kinase had the same specific activity as the fibrosarcoma-derived protein. Plasma of mice bearing fibrosarcoma tumours contained several-fold more phosphoglycerate kinase, as compared with mice without tumours. Administration of phosphoglycerate kinase to tumour-bearing mice caused an increase in plasma levels of angiostatin, and a decrease in tumour vascularity and rate of tumour growth. Our findings indicate that phosphoglycerate kinase not only functions in glycolysis but is secreted by tumour cells and participates in the angiogenic process as a disulphide reductase.

  14. Perchlorate Reductase Is Distinguished by Active Site Aromatic Gate Residues.

    Youngblut, Matthew D; Tsai, Chi-Lin; Clark, Iain C; Carlson, Hans K; Maglaqui, Adrian P; Gau-Pan, Phonchien S; Redford, Steven A; Wong, Alan; Tainer, John A; Coates, John D

    2016-04-22

    Perchlorate is an important ion on both Earth and Mars. Perchlorate reductase (PcrAB), a specialized member of the dimethylsulfoxide reductase superfamily, catalyzes the first step of microbial perchlorate respiration, but little is known about the biochemistry, specificity, structure, and mechanism of PcrAB. Here we characterize the biophysics and phylogeny of this enzyme and report the 1.86-Å resolution PcrAB complex crystal structure. Biochemical analysis revealed a relatively high perchlorate affinity (Km = 6 μm) and a characteristic substrate inhibition compared with the highly similar respiratory nitrate reductase NarGHI, which has a relatively much lower affinity for perchlorate (Km = 1.1 mm) and no substrate inhibition. Structural analysis of oxidized and reduced PcrAB with and without the substrate analog SeO3 (2-) bound to the active site identified key residues in the positively charged and funnel-shaped substrate access tunnel that gated substrate entrance and product release while trapping transiently produced chlorate. The structures suggest gating was associated with shifts of a Phe residue between open and closed conformations plus an Asp residue carboxylate shift between monodentate and bidentate coordination to the active site molybdenum atom. Taken together, structural and mutational analyses of gate residues suggest key roles of these gate residues for substrate entrance and product release. Our combined results provide the first detailed structural insight into the mechanism of biological perchlorate reduction, a critical component of the chlorine redox cycle on Earth. PMID:26940877

  15. Cloning and sequence of the human adrenodoxin reductase gene

    Adrenodoxin reductase is a flavoprotein mediating electron transport to all mitochondrial forms of cytochrome P450. The authors cloned the human adrenodoxin reductase gene and characterized it by restriction endonuclease mapping and DNA sequencing. The entire gene is approximately 12 kilobases long and consists of 12 exons. The first exon encodes the first 26 of the 32 amino acids of the signal peptide, and the second exon encodes the remainder of signal peptide and the apparent FAD binding site. The remaining 10 exons are clustered in a region of only 4.3 kilobases, separated from the first two exons by a large intron of about 5.6 kilobases. Two forms of human adrenodoxin reductase mRNA, differing by the presence or absence of 18 bases in the middle of the sequence, arise from alternate splicing at the 5' end of exon 7. This alternately spliced region is directly adjacent to the NADPH binding site, which is entirely contained in exon 6. The immediate 5' flanking region lacks TATA and CAAT boxes; however, this region is rich in G+C and contains six copies of the sequence GGGCGGG, resembling promoter sequences of housekeeping genes. RNase protection experiments show that transcription is initiated from multiple sites in the 5' flanking region, located about 21-91 base pairs upstream from the AUG translational initiation codon

  16. Influence of extra-cellular and intra-cellular acting thiol oxidants on the 45calcium uptake by the islets of Langerhans of the rat

    The glucose-stimulated calcium uptake by the islets of Langerhans is dependent on the intra-cellular GSH/GSSG ratios. The inhibition of calcium uptake is not the consequence of a direct oxidation of membrane-fixed thiol groups. In contrast, direct oxidation of extra cellular thiols leads to an increase in calcium uptake when intra-cellular oxidation is simultaneously prevented. Since this effect only occurs at high intra-cellular GSH/GSSG ratios it can be assumed that the redox state of extra-cellular thiols is dependent on the redox state of the intra-cellular GSH/GSSG ratios. These findings support the theory that the oxidation of extra-cellular thiols by thiol oxidants leads to an increase in calcium uptake and that the extent of uptake is higher, the more the redox state of the extra-cellular thiols tends towards the reduced state prior to oxidation. (orig./MG)

  17. Immunological comparison of the NADH:nitrate reductase from different cucumber tissues

    Jolanta Marciniak; Grażyna Kłobus; Józef Buczek; Tadeusz Stefaniak; Jarosław Mazur

    2014-01-01

    Soluble nitrate reductase from cucumber roots (Cucumis sativus L.) was isolated and purified with blue-Sepharose 4B. Specific antibodies against the NR protein were raised by immunization of a goat. Using polyclonal antibodies anti-NR properties of the nitrate reductase from various cucumber tissues were examined. Experiments showed difference in immuno-logical properties of nitrate reductase (NR) from cotyledon roots and leaves.

  18. Immunological comparison of the NADH:nitrate reductase from different cucumber tissues

    Jolanta Marciniak

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Soluble nitrate reductase from cucumber roots (Cucumis sativus L. was isolated and purified with blue-Sepharose 4B. Specific antibodies against the NR protein were raised by immunization of a goat. Using polyclonal antibodies anti-NR properties of the nitrate reductase from various cucumber tissues were examined. Experiments showed difference in immuno-logical properties of nitrate reductase (NR from cotyledon roots and leaves.

  19. Thiols screened by the neocarzinostatin protein for preserving or detoxifying its bound enediyne antibiotic.

    Chi, Hung-Wen; Huang, Chun-Chi; Chin, Der-Hang

    2012-05-14

    Neocarzinostatin is an antibiotic chromoprotein produced by Streptomyces carzinostaticus. Its enediyne-containing chromophore exhibits high DNA cleavage activity and belongs to one of the most potent categories of antitumor agents. The labile chromophore is readily inactivated by environmental thiols including the most abundant glutathione. How the microorganism preserves the secreted antibiotic and at the same time is immune to its toxicity are of interest. Site-directed mutagenesis studies of the neocarzinostatin protein have shown that residues D33 and D99 play primary and secondary roles, respectively, in preserving neocarzinostatin from acidic glutathione whereas D79 and other residues around the opening of the binding cleft have an insignificant effect. Biothiol analyses revealed that cells of S. carzinostaticus produced no glutathione, but instead neutral mycothiol, which is known to serve functions analogous to glutathione. Mycothiol was the only neutral-charged thiol produced by the organism; all other identified biothiols carried at least partial negative charges. When the bacteria were cultured under conditions that stimulated the biosynthesis of neocarzinostatin, the yield of mycothiol increased significantly, which suggests mycothiol-dependent cellular detoxification. Treating neocarzinostatin samples with the cell extract that retained active sulfhydryls led to efficient drug inactivation, which indicates that mycothiol is allowed to approach the protein-bound chromophore. The anionic side-chains of D33 and D99 in the neocarzinostatin protein played two critical roles in a single thiol-screening operation: Preserving the antibiotic for defense and survival by rejecting the ubiquitous glutathione through charge-charge repulsion in the outer-cell environment and detoxifying the toxin in the inner-cell body for self-resistance by accepting the cell-produced neutral mycothiol. PMID:22473745

  20. Quantification of Polyfunctional Thiols in Wine by HS-SPME-GC-MS Following Extractive Alkylation

    Lauren E. Musumeci

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of key odorous polyfunctional volatile thiols in wines (3-mercaptohexanol (3-MH, 3-mercaptohexylacetate (3-MHA, and 4-mercapto-4-methyl-2-pentanone (4-MMP are challenging due to their high reactivity and ultra-trace concentrations, especially when using conventional gas-chromatography electron impact mass spectrometry (GC-EI-MS. We describe a method in which thiols are converted to pentafluorobenzyl (PFB derivatives by extractive alkylation and the organic layer is evaporated prior to headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME and GC-EI-MS analysis. Optimal parameters were determined by response surface area modeling. The addition of NaCl solution to the dried SPME vials prior to extraction resulted in up to less than fivefold improvement in detection limits. Using 40 mL wine samples, limits of detection for 4-MMP, 3-MH, and 3-MHA were 0.9 ng/L, 1 ng/L, and 17 ng/L, respectively. Good recovery (90%–109% and precision (5%–11% RSD were achieved in wine matrices. The new method was used to survey polyfunctional thiol concentrations in 61 commercial California and New York State wines produced from V. vinifera (Riesling, Gewürztraminer, Cabernet Sauvignon, Sauvignon blanc and non-varietal rosé wines, V. labruscana (Niagara, and Vitis spp. (Cayuga White. Mean 4-MMP concentrations in New York Niagara (17 ng/L were not significantly different from concentrations in Sauvignon blanc, but were significantly higher than 4-MMP in other varietal wines.

  1. Salivary thiol levels and periodontal parameters assessed with a chromogenic strip.

    Khocht, Ahmed; Seyedain, Merriam; Hardan, Samia; Gaughan, John; Suzuki, Jon B

    2013-08-01

    Periodontitis tends to be associated with bacteria that use sulfate as an energy source and produce thiol compounds that contain sulfhydryl (-SH) groups. This study used a chromogenic thiol-detecting strip to investigate whole saliva -SH concentration (SS) in subjects with and without periodontal disease. Ninety-six subjects were enrolled; all underwent periodontal evaluations, including plaque index (PI), gingival index (GI), probing depth measurements (PD), and attachment levels (AL). Subjects were divided into 3 groups: those who were periodontally healthy (n = 17), those with gingivitis (n = 54), and those with periodontitis (n = 25). Of the 96 subjects, 33% (n = 32) were cigarette smokers. A chromogenic strip was used to collect a whole saliva sample from the mouth. Color reaction was scored based on a color chart. Good-to-moderate correlations were found between SS scores and PI (r = 0.47, P = 0.0001), GI (r = 0.45, P = 0.0001), PD (r = 0.42, P = 0.0001), and AL (r = 0.30, P = 0.002). Analysis of variance showed significant differences in SS scores among the 3 study groups (P = 0.0001); post-hoc analysis showed higher SS scores in subjects with periodontitis than in those without (P = 0.05). Logistic regression, adjusting for smoking, showed the odds ratio of periodontitis increased by a factor of 12.76 for each increase of one unit of measure of SS. These results indicate that assessing whole saliva thiol levels with a chromogenic strip could be used as a screening test for periodontal diseases. PMID:23928440

  2. Advantages and drawbacks of Thiol-ene based resins for 3D-printing

    Leonards, Holger; Engelhardt, Sascha; Hoffmann, Andreas; Pongratz, Ludwig; Schriever, Sascha; Bläsius, Jana; Wehner, Martin; Gillner, Arnold

    2015-03-01

    The technology of 3D printing is conquering the world and awakens the interest of many users in the most varying of applications. New formulation approaches for photo-sensitive thiol-ene resins in combination with various printing technologies, like stereolithography (SLA), projection based printing/digital light processing (DLP) or two-photon polymerization (TPP) are presented. Thiol-ene polymerizations are known for its fast and quantitative reaction and to form highly homogeneous polymer networks. As the resins are locally and temporally photo-curable the polymerization type is very promising for 3D-printing. By using suitable wavelengths, photoinitiator-free fabrication is feasible for single- and two photon induced polymerization. In this paper divinyl ethers of polyethylene glycols in combination with star-shaped tetrathiols were used to design a simple test-system for photo-curable thiol-ene resins. In order to control and improve curing depth and lateral resolution in 3D-polymerization processes, either additives in chemical formulation or process parameters can be changed. The achieved curing depth and resolution limits depend on the applied fabrication method. While two-/multiphoton induced lithography offers the possibility of micron- to sub-micron resolution it lacks in built-up speed. Hence single-photon polymerization is a fast alternative with optimization potential in sub-10-micron resolution. Absorber- and initiator free compositions were developed in order to avoid aging, yellowing and toxicity of resulting products. They can be cured with UV-laser radiation below 300 nm. The development at Fraunhofer ILT is focusing on new applications in the field of medical products and implants, technical products with respect to mechanical properties or optical properties of 3D-printed objects. Recent process results with model system (polyethylene glycol divinylether/ Pentaerithrytol tetrakis (3-mercaptopropionat), Raman measurements of polymer conversion

  3. Energy of the Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital, Thiol Reactivity, and Toxicity of Three Monobrominated Water Disinfection Byproducts

    Pals, Justin A.; Wagner, Elizabeth D.; Plewa, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Disinfection of drinking water protects public health against waterborne pathogens. However, during disinfection, toxic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are formed. Exposure to DBPs was associated with increased risk of bladder cancer in humans. DBPs are generated at concentrations below their carcinogenic potencies; it is unclear how exposure leads to adverse health outcomes. We used computational estimates of the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (ELUMO) to predict thiol reactivity and additive toxicity among soft electrophile DBPs. Bromoacetic acid (BAA) was identified as non-thiol-reactive, which was supported by in chemico and in vitro data. Bromoacetonitrile (BAN) and bromoacetamide (BAM) were thiol-reactive. Genotoxicity induced by these compounds was reduced by increasing the thiol pool with N-acetyl l-cysteine (NAC), while NAC had little effect on BAA. BAN and BAM shared depletion of glutathione (GSH) or cellular thiols as a molecular initiating event (MIE), whereas BAA induces toxicity through another pathway. Binary mixtures of BAM and BAN expressed a potentiating effect in genotoxicity. We found that soft electrophile DBPs could be an important predictor of common mechanism groups that demonstrated additive toxicity. In silico estimates of ELUMO could be used to identify the most relevant DBPs that are the forcing factors of the toxicity of finished drinking waters. PMID:26854864

  4. Synthesis and Optical Properties of Thiol Functionalized CdSe/ZnS (Core/Shell Quantum Dots by Ligand Exchange

    Huaping Zhu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The colloidal photoluminescent quantum dots (QDs of CdSe (core and CdSe/ZnS (core/shell were synthesized at different temperatures with different growth periods. Optical properties (i.e., UV/Vis spectra and photoluminescent emission spectra of the resulting QDs were investigated. The shell-protected CdSe/ZnS QDs exhibited higher photoluminescent (PL efficiency and stability than their corresponding CdSe core QDs. Ligand exchange with various thiol molecules was performed to replace the initial surface passivation ligands, that is, trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO and trioctylphosphine (TOP, and the optical properties of the surface-modified QDs were studied. The thiol ligand molecules in this study included 1,4-benzenedimethanethiol, 1,16-hexadecanedithiol, 1,11-undecanedithiol, biphenyl-4,4′-dithiol, 11-mercapto-1-undecanol, and 1,8-octanedithiol. After the thiol functionalization, the CdSe/ZnS QDs exhibited significantly enhanced PL efficiency and storage stability. Besides surface passivation effect, such enhanced performance of thiol-functionalized QDs could be due to cross-linked assembly formation of dimer/trimer clusters, in which QDs are linked by dithiol molecules. Furthermore, effects of ligand concentration, type of ligand, and heating on the thiol stabilization of QDs were also discussed.

  5. Energy of the Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital, Thiol Reactivity, and Toxicity of Three Monobrominated Water Disinfection Byproducts.

    Pals, Justin A; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2016-03-15

    Disinfection of drinking water protects public health against waterborne pathogens. However, during disinfection, toxic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are formed. Exposure to DBPs was associated with increased risk of bladder cancer in humans. DBPs are generated at concentrations below their carcinogenic potencies; it is unclear how exposure leads to adverse health outcomes. We used computational estimates of the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (ELUMO) to predict thiol reactivity and additive toxicity among soft electrophile DBPs. Bromoacetic acid (BAA) was identified as non-thiol-reactive, which was supported by in chemico and in vitro data. Bromoacetonitrile (BAN) and bromoacetamide (BAM) were thiol-reactive. Genotoxicity induced by these compounds was reduced by increasing the thiol pool with N-acetyl l-cysteine (NAC), while NAC had little effect on BAA. BAN and BAM shared depletion of glutathione (GSH) or cellular thiols as a molecular initiating event (MIE), whereas BAA induces toxicity through another pathway. Binary mixtures of BAM and BAN expressed a potentiating effect in genotoxicity. We found that soft electrophile DBPs could be an important predictor of common mechanism groups that demonstrated additive toxicity. In silico estimates of ELUMO could be used to identify the most relevant DBPs that are the forcing factors of the toxicity of finished drinking waters. PMID:26854864

  6. New aspects of the radiation chemistry of thiols and disulfides in aqueous solutions

    The reactivity of thiyl radicals with regard to H atom abstraction at C-H bonds is briefly recalled. - Oxygenated aqueous solutions of 1,4-dithiothreitol have been radiolyzed. It has been found that the superoxide anion associates with the thiolate form and in a chain reaction brings about the oxidation of this dithiol, the product being 4,5-dihydroxy-1,2-dithian. - A study of the radiolysis of 2-mercaptoethanol shows the existence of a species (RSOO ·) which can transform unimolecularly (into RS (O) O·), but also reacts with the thiol. As products alongside the disulfide, sulfonic acid and sulfuric acid are also observed

  7. Characterization of thiol-functionalised silica films deposited on electrode surfaces

    Ivana Cesarino

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Thiol-functionalised silica films were deposited on various electrode surfaces (gold, platinum, glassy carbon by spin-coating sol-gel mixtures in the presence of a surfactant template. Film formation occurred by evaporation induced self-assembly (EISA involving the hydrolysis and (cocondensation of silane and organosilane precursors on the electrode surface. The characterization of such material was performed by IR spectroscopy, thermogravimetry (TG, elemental analysis (EA, atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and cyclic voltammetry (CV.

  8. Self-consistent GW calculations of electronic transport in thiol- and amine-linked molecular junctions

    Strange, M.; Rostgaard, Carsten; Hakkinen, H.;

    2011-01-01

    suggest that more complex gold-thiolate structures where the thiolate anchors are chemically passivated by Au adatoms are responsible for the measured conductance. Analysis of the energy level alignment obtained with DFT, Hartree-Fock, and GW reveals the importance of self-interaction corrections......The electronic conductance of a benzene molecule connected to gold electrodes via thiol, thiolate, or amino anchoring groups is calculated using nonequilibrium Green functions in combination with the fully self-consistent GW approximation for exchange and correlation. The calculated conductance of...

  9. Subcellular Localization of Thiol-Capped CdTe Quantum Dots in Living Cells

    Chen Ji-Yao

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Internalization and dynamic subcellular distribution of thiol-capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs in living cells were studied by means of laser scanning confocal microscopy. These unfunctionalized QDs were well internalized into human hepatocellular carcinoma and rat basophilic leukemia cells in vitro. Co-localizations of QDs with lysosomes and Golgi complexes were observed, indicating that in addition to the well-known endosome-lysosome endocytosis pathway, the Golgi complex is also a main destination of the endocytosed QDs. The movement of the endocytosed QDs toward the Golgi complex in the perinuclear region of the cell was demonstrated.

  10. X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy studies of thiol-capped copper nanoparticles

    Monodisperse Copper nanoparticles with controllable sizes of 0.6 and 1.8nm were synthesized via modifying Brust-Schiffrin two-phase method. This route involves a slow reduction of [TOA]2[CuBr4] precursor in toluene, with particles sizes rationally controlled by the S/Cu ratio. Size-dependent inter-atomic distance contraction in the thiol-capped copper nanoparticles was investigated by Extended X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (EXAFS). The analysis revealed a shortened Cu-Cu inter-atomic distance, indicating strong surface interaction, in accord with the larger effect expected for ultrasmall particals (<2nm).

  11. Subcellular Localization of Thiol-Capped CdTe Quantum Dots in Living Cells

    Zhang, Yu; Mi, Lan; Xiong, Rongling; Wang, Pei-Nan; Chen, Ji-Yao; Yang, Wuli; Wang, Changchun; Peng, Qian

    2009-07-01

    Internalization and dynamic subcellular distribution of thiol-capped CdTe quantum dots (QDs) in living cells were studied by means of laser scanning confocal microscopy. These unfunctionalized QDs were well internalized into human hepatocellular carcinoma and rat basophilic leukemia cells in vitro. Co-localizations of QDs with lysosomes and Golgi complexes were observed, indicating that in addition to the well-known endosome-lysosome endocytosis pathway, the Golgi complex is also a main destination of the endocytosed QDs. The movement of the endocytosed QDs toward the Golgi complex in the perinuclear region of the cell was demonstrated.

  12. Kinetic and Thermodynamic Aspects of Cellular Thiol-Disulfide Redox Regulation

    Jensen, Kristine Steen; Hansen, Rosa Erritzøe; Winther, Jakob R

    2009-01-01

    Regulation of intracellular thiol-disulfide redox status is an essential part of cellular homeostasis. This involves the regulation of both oxidative and reductive pathways, production of oxidant scavengers and, importantly, the ability of cells to respond to changes in the redox environment. In...... the cytosol regulatory disulfide bonds are typically formed in spite of the prevailing reducing conditions and may thereby function as redox switches. Such disulfide bonds are protected from enzymatic reduction by kinetic barriers and are thus allowed to exist long enough to elicit the signal. Factors...

  13. The reaction of Grignard reagents with Bunte salts: a thiol-free synthesis of sulfides.

    Reeves, Jonathan T; Camara, Kaddy; Han, Zhengxu S; Xu, Yibo; Lee, Heewon; Busacca, Carl A; Senanayake, Chris H

    2014-02-21

    S-Alkyl, S-aryl, and S-vinyl thiosulfate sodium salts (Bunte salts) react with Grignard reagents to give sulfides in good yields. The S-alkyl Bunte salts are prepared from odorless sodium thiosulfate by an SN2 reaction with alkyl halides. A Cu-catalyzed coupling of sodium thiosulfate with aryl and vinyl halides was developed to access S-aryl and S-vinyl Bunte salts. The reaction is amenable to a broad structural array of Bunte salts and Grignard reagents. Importantly, this route to sulfides avoids the use of malodorous thiol starting materials or byproducts. PMID:24512478

  14. biliverdin. Is there a role for biliverdin reductase?

    AndreasDaiber

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen species (ROS and signaling events are involved in the pathogenesis of endothelial dysfunction and represent a major contribution to vascular regulation. Molecular signaling is highly dependent on reactive oxygen species. But depending on the amount of ROS production it might have toxic or protective effects. Despite a large number of negative outcomes in large clinical trials (e.g. HOPE, HOPE-TOO, antioxidant molecules and agents are important players to influence the critical balance between production and elimination of RONS. However, chronic systemic antioxidant therapy lacks clinical efficacy, probably by interfering with important physiological redox signaling pathways. Therefore, it may be a much more promising attempt to induce intrinsic antioxidant pathways in order to increase the antioxidants not systemically but at the place of oxidative stress and complications. Among others, heme oxygenase (HO has been shown to be important for attenuating the overall production of ROS in a broad range of disease states through its ability to degrade heme and to produce carbon monoxide (CO, biliverdin/bilirubin, and the release of free iron with subsequent ferritin induction. With the present review we would like to highlight the important antioxidant role of the heme oxygenase system and especially discuss the contribution of the biliverdin, bilirubin and biliverdin reductase to these beneficial effects. The bilierdin reductase was reported to confer an antioxidant redox amplification cycle by which low, physiological bilirubin concentrations confer potent antioxidant protection via recycling of biliverdin from oxidized bilirubin by the biliverdin reductase, linking this sink for oxidants to the NADPH pool. To date the existence and role of this antioxidant redox cycle is still under debate and we present and discuss the pros and cons as well as our own findings on this topic.

  15. Autoimmunity in Membranous Nephropathy Targets Aldose Reductase and SOD2

    Prunotto, Marco; Carnevali, Maria Luisa; Candiano, Giovanni; Murtas, Corrado; Bruschi, Maurizio; Corradini, Emilia; Trivelli, Antonella; Magnasco, Alberto; Petretto, Andrea; Santucci, Laura; Mattei, Silvia; Gatti, Rita; Scolari, Francesco; Kador, Peter; Allegri, Landino

    2010-01-01

    Glomerular targets of autoimmunity in human membranous nephropathy are poorly understood. Here, we used a combined proteomic approach to identify specific antibodies against podocyte proteins in both serum and glomeruli of patients with membranous nephropathy (MN). We detected specific anti–aldose reductase (AR) and anti–manganese superoxide dismutase (SOD2) IgG4 in sera of patients with MN. We also eluted high titers of anti-AR and anti-SOD2 IgG4 from microdissected glomeruli of three biopsi...

  16. Applications of Carboxylic Acid Reductases in Oleaginous Microbes

    Resch, Michael G.; Linger, Jeffrey; McGeehan, John; Tyo, Keith; Beckham, Gregg

    2016-04-24

    Carboxylic acid reductases (CARs) are recently emerging reductive enzymes for the direct production of aldehydes from biologically-produced carboxylic acids. Recent work has demonstrated that these powerful enzymes are able to reduce a very broad range of volatile- to long-chain fatty acids as well as aromatic acids. Here, we express four CAR enzymes from different fungal origins to test their activity against fatty acids commonly produced in oleaginous microbes. These in vitro results will inform metabolic engineering strategies to conduct mild biological reduction of carboxylic acids in situ, which is conventionally done via hydrotreating catalysis at high temperatures and hydrogen pressures.

  17. Mediated electrochemistry of dimethyl sulfoxide reductase promoted by carbon nanotubes

    BERNHARDT; Paul; V

    2010-01-01

    Mediated electrochemistry of dimethyl sulfoxide reductase from Rhodobacter capsulatus (DMSOR) which is immobilized on a bare glassy carbon (GC) electrode and a carbon nanotube (CNT)-modified GC electrode was studied using the Co complex (trans-6,13-dimethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradecane-6,13-diamine)cobalt(III) ([Co(trans-diammac)] +) as a mediator.The cyclic voltammograms of different electrodes were carried out at different substrate (DMSO) concentrations.The results demonstrated that the catalytic current was increased by employing CNT as a promoter.

  18. Vibrio harveyi Nitroreductase Is Also a Chromate Reductase

    Kwak, Young Hak; Lee, Dong Seok; Kim, Han Bok

    2003-01-01

    The chromate reductase purified from Pseudomonas ambigua was found to be homologous with several nitroreductases. Escherichia coli DH5α and Vibrio harveyi KCTC 2720 nitroreductases were chosen for the present study, and their chromate-reducing activities were determined. A fusion between glutathione S-transferase (GST) and E. coli DH5α NfsA (GST-EcNfsA), a fusion between GST and E. coli DH5α NfsB (GST-EcNfsB), and a fusion between GST and V. harveyi KCTC 2720 NfsA (GST-VhNfsA) were prepared f...

  19. Pulse radiolysis studies on superoxide reductase from Treponema pallidum.

    Nivière, V; Lombard, M.; Fontecave, M.; Houée-Levin, C

    2001-01-01

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are small metalloenzymes, which catalyze reduction of O2*- to H2O2. The reaction of the enzyme from Treponema pallidum with superoxide was studied by pulse radiolysis methods. The first step is an extremely fast bi-molecular reaction of the ferrous center with O2, with a rate constant of 6 x 10 (8) M(-1) s(-1). A first intermediate is formed which is converted to a second one with a slower rate constant of 4800 s(-1). This latter value is 10 times higher than the ...

  20. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency presenting as a rash.

    Crushell, Ellen

    2012-09-01

    We report on the case of a 2-year-old girl recently diagnosed with Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) deficiency who originally presented in the neonatal period with a distinctive rash. At 11 weeks of age she developed seizures, she had acquired microcephaly and developmental delay. The rash deteriorated dramatically following commencement of phenobarbitone; both rash and seizures abated following empiric introduction of pyridoxine and folinic acid as treatment of possible vitamin responsive seizures. We postulate that phenobarbitone in combination with MTHFR deficiency may have caused her rash to deteriorate and subsequent folinic acid was helpful in treating the rash and preventing further acute neurological decline as commonly associated with this condition.

  1. CdS quantum dots for measurement of the size-dependent optical properties of thiol capping

    The optical- and size-dependent properties of CdS quantum dots (QDs) were analyzed in the presence and absence of different capping agents in aqueous medium. The QDs have been characterized by UV–Vis, Photoluminescence, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Fluorescence lifetime measurements. QDs with the presence of thiol group in cubic phase with small grain size were observed in XRD and decrease in particle size of the same with increase in band gap is deduced through UV–Vis and XRD studies. The FT-IR spectrum confirms the interaction of thiol group with CdS. Fluorescence lifetime of capped QDs was higher compared to uncapped CdS QDs. The surface passivation of thiol group on CdS is shown in photoluminescence studies.Graphical Abstract

  2. The compromise of dynamic disulfide/thiol homeostasis as a biomarker of oxidative stress in trichloroethylene exposure.

    Bal, C; Büyükşekerci, M; Koca, C; Ağış, E R; Erdoğan, S; Baran, P; Gündüzöz, M; Yilmaz, Öh

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate disulfide/thiol homeostasis in trichloroethylene (TCE) exposure. The study was carried out in 30 nonsmoker TCE-exposed workers with a variety of occupations. Additionally, 30 healthy nonsmoker volunteers were recruited as the control group. TCE exposure was determined by measuring urinary trichloroacetic acid (TCA) concentration. Median urinary TCA levels of exposed workers (20.5 mg/L) were significantly higher than control subjects (5 mg/L). Thiol and disulfide concentrations were determined using a novel automated method. Disulfide/thiol ratio was significantly higher in the exposed group (p TCE-exposed workers. We predict that in TCE-exposed workers this disturbance can be a therapeutic target, and the efficiency of the treatment can easily be monitored by the novel method we used. PMID:26429930

  3. Estimation of antiradiative properties of thiols according to the deviation of the radical yield from the additivity rule

    The formation of the radicals in binary solutions of alkanes, alcohols and acids based on thiols has been investigated. It is established that in all the systems a disturbance of the additivity rule for the whole radical yield (Gsub(R)) takes place. On the example of the system 2-propanol-ethanethiol, it is shown that with an increasing of the thiol electron share (esub(T)) from 0.1 to 0.9, the whole radical yield of the alcohol, thiyl and molecular ion-radicals decreases from 3.8 to 0.5x=1/100 ev. Moreover, the yield value reaches a maximal deviation from the additivity rule at esub(T)=0.2. This is a measure of antiradiative properties of thiols concerning alcohols. (author)

  4. Antioxidative Mechanisms of Sulfite and Protein-Derived Thiols during Early Stages of Metal Induced Oxidative Reactions in Beer.

    Lund, Marianne N; Krämer, Anna C; Andersen, Mogens L

    2015-09-23

    The radical-mediated reactions occurring during the early stages of beer storage were studied by following the rate of oxygen consumption, radical formation as detected by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and concentrations of the antioxidant compounds sulfite and thiols. Addition of either Fe(III) or Fe(II) had similar effects, indicating that a fast redox equilibrium is obtained between the two species in beer. Addition of iron in combination with hydrogen peroxide gave the most pronounced levels of oxidation due to a direct initiation of ethanol oxidation through generation of hydroxyl radicals by the Fenton reaction. The concentration of sulfite decreased more than the thiol concentration, suggesting that thiols play a secondary role as antioxidants by mainly quenching 1-hydroxyethyl radicals that are intermediates in the oxidation of ethanol. Increasing the temperature had a minor effect on the rate of oxygen consumption. PMID:26325117

  5. Chitosan scaffold modified with D-(+) raffinose and enriched with thiol-modified gelatin for improved osteoblast adhesion.

    Galli, C; Parisi, L; Elviri, L; Bianchera, A; Smerieri, A; Lagonegro, P; Lumetti, S; Manfredi, E; Bettini, R; Macaluso, G M

    2016-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether chitosan-based scaffolds modified with D-(+) raffinose and enriched with thiol-modified gelatin could selectively improve osteoblast adhesion and proliferation. 2, 3 and 4.5% chitosan films were prepared. Chitosan suitability for tissue engineering was confirmed by protein adsorption assay. Scaffolds were incubated with a 2.5 mg ml(-1) BSA solution and the decrease of protein content in the supernatants was measured by spectrophotometry. Chitosan films were then enriched with thiol-modified gelatin and their ability to bind BSA was also measured. Then, 2% chitosan discs with or without thiol-modified gelatin were used as culture substrates for MC3T3-E1 cells. After 72 h cells were stained with trypan blue or with calcein AM and propidium iodide for morphology, viability and proliferation assays. Moreover, cell viability was measured at 48, 72, 96 and 168 h to obtain a growth curve. Chitosan films efficiently bound and retained BSA proportionally to the concentration of chitosan discs. The amount of protein retained was higher on chitosan enriched with thiol-modified gelatin. Moreover, chitosan discs allowed the adhesion and the viability of cells, but inhibited their proliferation. The functionalization of chitosan with thiol-modified gelatin enhanced cell spreading and proliferation. Our data confirm that chitosan is a suitable material for tissue engineering. Moreover, our data show that the enrichment of chitosan with thiol-modified gelatin enhances its biological properties. PMID:26836318

  6. Reaction Mechanisms of Metals with Hydrogen Sulfide and Thiols in Model Wine. Part 2: Iron- and Copper-Catalyzed Oxidation.

    Kreitman, Gal Y; Danilewicz, John C; Jeffery, David W; Elias, Ryan J

    2016-05-25

    Sulfidic off-odors arising during wine production are frequently removed by Cu(II) fining. In part 1 of this study ( 10.1021/acs.jafc.6b00641 ), the reaction of H2S and thiols with Cu(II) was examined; however, the interaction of iron and copper is also known to play an important synergistic role in mediating non-enzymatic wine oxidation. The interaction of these two metals in the oxidation of H2S and thiols (cysteine, 3-sulfanylhexan-1-ol, and 6-sulfanylhexan-1-ol) was therefore examined under wine-like conditions. H2S and thiols (300 μM) were reacted with Fe(III) (100 or 200 μM) alone and in combination with Cu(II) (25 or 50 μM), and concentrations of H2S and thiols, oxygen, and acetaldehyde were monitored over time. H2S and thiols were shown to be slowly oxidized in the presence of Fe(III) alone and were not bound to Fe(III) under model wine conditions. However, Cu(II) added to model wine containing Fe(III) was quickly reduced by H2S and thiols to form Cu(I) complexes, which then rapidly reduced Fe(III) to Fe(II). Oxidation of Fe(II) in the presence of oxygen regenerated Fe(III) and completed the iron redox cycle. In addition, sulfur-derived oxidation products were observed, and the formation of organic polysulfanes was demonstrated. PMID:27133088

  7. Novel technological strategies to enhance tropical thiol precursors in winemaking by-products.

    Román Villegas, Tomás; Tonidandel, Loris; Fedrizzi, Bruno; Larcher, Roberto; Nicolini, Giorgio

    2016-09-15

    Grape pomace is a winemaking by-product that can be used to extract oenological tannins. Recently, some grape skin tannins were shown to contain very high amounts of two polyfunctional thiol precursors (3-S-glutathionylhexan-1-ol, 3-S-cysteinylhexan-1-ol) whose free forms are responsible for appreciated tropical-like flavours. This study shows that an oxidative treatment (no SO2) of white grape pomace and the presence of grape leaves and stems can increase the content of the above mentioned precursors. Moreover, it shows significant differences between Sauvignon Blanc, Gewuerztraminer and Mueller-Thurgau grape pomace for the 3-mercaptohexan-1-ol precursors and 4-S-cysteinyl-4-methylpentan-2-one. The grape cultivar is crucial, but the technological ability of enhancing the level of the volatile thiol precursors simply by treating the grape marc in different ways is a promising and powerful tool for the production of potentially flavouring tannins intended for food and beverage industry. PMID:27080874

  8. pH-sensitive photoluminescence for aqueous thiol-capped CdTe nanocrystals

    Xu Shuhong; Wang Chunlei; Wang Zhuyuan; Cui Yiping [Advanced Photonics Center, School of Electronic Science and Engineering, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096 (China); Zhang Hao; Yang Bai, E-mail: cyp@seu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Supramolecular Structure and Materials, College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2011-08-05

    pH-sensitive photoluminescence (PL) is an important property of aqueous nanocrystals (NCs) towards NCs-based intelligent applications. Previous works mainly focused on the effect of pH during NC growth process on PL of the aqueous NCs. The effect of pH during application process on PL of as-prepared NCs is still not fully understood. In this work, we brought out a general mechanism for the pH-sensitive PL behaviors of as-prepared aqueous CdTe NCs capped by aqueous thiol ligands, such as carboxylic-acid-terminated 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and thioglycolic acid (TGA) ligands, hydroxyl-terminated 1-thioglycerol (TG) ligands and amine-terminated 2-mercaptoethylamine (MA) ligands. A major contribution of this work is finding the key role of ligand terminal groups in the diffuse process of free Cd-ligand complexes toward NCs. This terminal group effect is the main reason for PL alteration of NCs during pH adjustment process. Besides the terminal group effect, PL of aqueous NCs is also affected by the aggregation effect, the thiol group effect and the counter ion effect. These effects make different contributions to PL of NCs at different pH ranges. By using this mechanism, we successfully explained the complex pH-sensitive PL behaviors of MPA, TGA, TG and MA-capped CdTe NCs.

  9. pH-sensitive photoluminescence for aqueous thiol-capped CdTe nanocrystals

    pH-sensitive photoluminescence (PL) is an important property of aqueous nanocrystals (NCs) towards NCs-based intelligent applications. Previous works mainly focused on the effect of pH during NC growth process on PL of the aqueous NCs. The effect of pH during application process on PL of as-prepared NCs is still not fully understood. In this work, we brought out a general mechanism for the pH-sensitive PL behaviors of as-prepared aqueous CdTe NCs capped by aqueous thiol ligands, such as carboxylic-acid-terminated 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and thioglycolic acid (TGA) ligands, hydroxyl-terminated 1-thioglycerol (TG) ligands and amine-terminated 2-mercaptoethylamine (MA) ligands. A major contribution of this work is finding the key role of ligand terminal groups in the diffuse process of free Cd-ligand complexes toward NCs. This terminal group effect is the main reason for PL alteration of NCs during pH adjustment process. Besides the terminal group effect, PL of aqueous NCs is also affected by the aggregation effect, the thiol group effect and the counter ion effect. These effects make different contributions to PL of NCs at different pH ranges. By using this mechanism, we successfully explained the complex pH-sensitive PL behaviors of MPA, TGA, TG and MA-capped CdTe NCs.

  10. Effects of polyamines and thiols on the radiation sensitivity of bacterial transforming DNA

    The effects of polyamines on the loss of biological activity of bacterial transforming DNA irradiated in the absence and presence of sulphydryl-containing compounds has been investigated. When O2-saturated DNA solutions are irradiated, the degree of radioprotection by polyamines generally correlates with the efficiency of scavenging of OH· radicals. In N2 the protection does not show that correlation; several possible reasons are discussed. With the exception of spermine, the polyamines are slightly more protective of oxygenated DNA than of hypoxic DNA. When DNA is irradiated in the presence of both polyamines and thiols, the combined protection is usually greater than that exhibited by either agent alone. When irradiation is in oxygen, the combined agents appear to operate by the same mechanism, namely OH· radical scavenging. In N2-saturated solutions, polyamines and dithiothreitol appear to act by different, non-interactive mechanisms; however WR1065 and polyamines may radioprotect by the same mechanism. The results suggest that polyamines may reduce the ability of some thiols to radioprotect DNA. (author)

  11. Transcriptional activation by heat and cold of a thiol protease gene in tomato. [Lycopersicon esculentum

    Schaffer, M.A.; Fischer, R.L. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA))

    1990-08-01

    We previously determined that low temperature induces the accumulation in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) fruit of a cloned mRNA, designated C14, encoding a polypeptide related to thiol proteases. We now demonstrate that C14 mRNA accumulation is a response common to both high (40{degree}C) and low (4{degree}C) temperature stresses. Exposure of tomato fruit to 40{degree}C results in the accumulation of C14 mRNA, by 8 hours. This response is more rapid than that to 4{degree}C, but slower than the induction of many heat shock messages by 40{degree}C, and therefore unique. We have also studied the mechanism by which heat and cold exposure activate C14 gene expression. Both high and low temperature regulate protease gene expression through transcriptional induction of a single C14 gene. A hypothesis for the function of C14 thiol protease gene expression in response to heat and cold is discussed.

  12. Thiol-modified gold nanoparticles deposited on silica support using dip coating

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Thin layers of gold were deposited on glass substrate. • Layers were modified by two different ligands, 1,4-dithiothreitol and L-glutathione. • Red shift of SPR band was observed in spectra after modification of Au by thiols. • Charge transfer between Au and S atoms leads to ferromagnetic behaviour of samples. - Abstract: In our work, we have prepared thin layers of gold nanoparticles deposited via dip coating technique on silica glass substrate. The prepared thin layers were modified by two different ligands, namely 1,4-dithiothreitol (sample Au-DTT NPs) and L-glutathione (sample Au-GSH NPs). The spectral, structural and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were investigated. The modification of Au nanoparticles with thiol ligands leads to change of their plasmon resonance fields, as indicated by UV–vis spectra. The magnetic measurements showed that the magnetization of the samples is composed from two magnetic contributions: diamagnetic contribution and low field ferromagnetic contribution. Our experimental results show that the charge transfer between Au and S atoms gives rise to the ferromagnetic behaviour of prepared thin layers

  13. Fluorescent sensors for selective detection of thiols: expanding the intramolecular displacement based mechanism to new chromophores.

    Niu, Li-Ya; Zheng, Hai-Rong; Chen, Yu-Zhe; Wu, Li-Zhu; Tung, Chen-Ho; Yang, Qing-Zheng

    2014-03-21

    Biological thiols, including cysteine (Cys), homocystein (Hcy) and glutathione (GSH), play crucial roles in maintaining the appropriate redox status of biological systems. An abnormal level of biothiols is associated with different diseases, therefore, the discrimination between them is of great importance. Herein, we present two fluorescent sensors for selective detection of biothiols based on our recently reported intramolecular displacement mechanism. We expanded this mechanism to commercially available chromophores, 4-chloro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-Cl) and heptamethine cyanine dye IR-780. The sensors operate by undergoing displacement of chloride by thiolate. The amino groups of Cys/Hcy further replace the thiolate to form amino-substituted products, which exhibit dramatically different photophysical properties compared to sulfur-substituted products from the reaction with GSH. NBD-Cl is highly selective towards Cys/Hcy and exhibits significant fluorescence enhancement. IR-780 showed a variation in its fluorescence ratio towards Cys over other thiols. Both of the sensors can be used for live-cell imaging of Cys. The wide applicability of the mechanism may provide a powerful tool for developing novel fluorescent sensors for selective detection of biothiols. PMID:24466567

  14. Immobilization of Cysteine-Tagged Proteins on Electrode Surfaces by Thiol-Ene Click Chemistry.

    Zhang, Lin; Vilà, Neus; Klein, Tobias; Kohring, Gert-Wieland; Mazurenko, Ievgen; Walcarius, Alain; Etienne, Mathieu

    2016-07-13

    Thiol-ene click chemistry can be exploited for the immobilization of cysteine-tagged dehydrogenases in an active form onto carbon electrodes (glassy carbon and carbon felt). The electrode surfaces have been first modified with vinylphenyl groups by electrochemical reduction of the corresponding diazonium salts generated in situ from 4-vinylaniline. The grafting process has been optimized in order to not hinder the electrochemical regeneration of NAD(+)/NADH cofactor and soluble mediators such as ferrocenedimethanol and [Cp*Rh(bpy)Cl](+). Having demonstrated the feasibility of thiol-ene click chemistry for attaching ferrocene moieties onto those carbon surfaces, the same approach was then applied to the immobilization of d-sorbitol dehydrogenases with cysteine tag. These proteins can be effectively immobilized (as pointed out by XPS), and the cysteine tag (either 1 or 2 cysteine moieties at the N terminus of the polypeptide chain) was proven to maintain the enzymatic activity of the dehydrogenase upon grafting. The bioelectrode was applied to electroenzymatic enantioselective reduction of d-fructose to d-sorbitol, as a case study. PMID:27299176

  15. Thiol-modified gold nanoparticles deposited on silica support using dip coating

    Magura, Jozef [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Moyzesova 11, SK-041 54 Košice (Slovakia); Zeleňáková, Adriana [Department of Condensed Matter Physics, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Park Angelinum 9, 041 54 Košice (Slovakia); Zeleňák, Vladimír, E-mail: vladimir.zelenak@upjs.sk [Department of Inorganic Chemistry, Faculty of Science, P.J. Šafárik University, Moyzesova 11, SK-041 54 Košice (Slovakia); Kaňuchová, Maria [Institute of Montaneous Sciences and Environmental Protection, Technical University of Košice, Park Komenského 19, 043 84 Košice (Slovakia)

    2014-10-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Thin layers of gold were deposited on glass substrate. • Layers were modified by two different ligands, 1,4-dithiothreitol and L-glutathione. • Red shift of SPR band was observed in spectra after modification of Au by thiols. • Charge transfer between Au and S atoms leads to ferromagnetic behaviour of samples. - Abstract: In our work, we have prepared thin layers of gold nanoparticles deposited via dip coating technique on silica glass substrate. The prepared thin layers were modified by two different ligands, namely 1,4-dithiothreitol (sample Au-DTT NPs) and L-glutathione (sample Au-GSH NPs). The spectral, structural and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were investigated. The modification of Au nanoparticles with thiol ligands leads to change of their plasmon resonance fields, as indicated by UV–vis spectra. The magnetic measurements showed that the magnetization of the samples is composed from two magnetic contributions: diamagnetic contribution and low field ferromagnetic contribution. Our experimental results show that the charge transfer between Au and S atoms gives rise to the ferromagnetic behaviour of prepared thin layers.

  16. Thiol peroxidase-like activity of some intramolecularly coordinated diorganyl diselenides

    Sangit Kumar; Harkesh B Singh

    2005-11-01

    Several new diaryl diselenides having intramolecular coordinating groups have been synthesized by ortho-lithiation/Na2Se2 routes in good yield. Bis[2-(N-phenylferrocenecarboxamide)] diselenide (10), bis[2-(N-tert-butylferrocenecarboxamide)] diselenide (11), ()()-bis[2(--phenethylferrocenecarboxamide)] diselenide (12) were synthesized by the ortho-lithiation route. Bis[2-(N,N-dimethylaminomethylnaphthyl)] diselenide (13) was synthesized by lithium/bromide exchange reaction whereas bis(2,4-dinitrophenyl) diselenide (14) was prepared by the reaction of disodium diselenide with 2,4- dinitro-1-chlorobenzene. Thiol peroxidase-like activities of the diorganodiselenides have been evaluated by using H2O2 as substrate and PhSH as cosubstrate. Diselenides (13) and (14) with dimethylaminomethyl- or nitro-donor groups in close proximity to selenium, show much better thiol peroxidase-like activities compared to diselenides 10-12 with amide donor groups. Cyclic voltammetry study of diselenides 10-12 derived from redox-active ferrocenamide has been carried out.

  17. Effect of thiol reagents on functional properties and heme oxidation in the hemoglobin of Geochelone carbonaria.

    Torsoni, M A; Viana, R I; Barros, B F; Stoppa, G; Cesquini, M; Ogo, S H

    1996-10-01

    The reaction of thiol reagents with G. carbonaria hemoglobin was studied, and the oxygen equilibrium and kinetic of oxidation of derivatives determined. The oxygen affinity and kinetic of oxidation of hemoglobin derivatives were modified to various extents depending on the nature of thiol reagents used. Diamide yielded approximately 80% polymeric hemoglobin, although the oxidation kinetic, and the functional properties, were practically invariant (T1/2 = 10.0 min.; P50 = 5.0 mm Hg at pH 7.4; alkaline Bohr effect = -0.64). Iodoacetamide did not modify the electrophoretic pattern significantly, although all the free SH groups of hemoglobin were alkylated. A P50 of 2.5 mmHg at pH 7.4 and the Bohr effect of -0.15 were obtained; the T1/2 of about 6.4 min. was shorter than that for un-modified Hb. Similar T1/2 were obtained for Hb treated with oxidized glutathione, which produced polymeric Hb and glutathionyl-Hb. The oxygen binding characteristics showed that both of Hb derivatives, glutathionyl-Hb and polymeric Hb, maintain the capacity to transport the gas. PMID:8896757

  18. Mechanistic insights on the hydrodesulfurization of biphenyl-2-thiol with nickel compounds.

    Torres-Nieto, Jorge; Brennessel, William W; Jones, William D; García, Juventino J

    2009-03-25

    The reactivity of the nickel(I) dimer [(dippe)Ni(mu-H)](2) (1) with biphenyl-2-thiol was explored with the aim of clarifying the key step of sulfur extrusion during the hydrodesulfurization process using dibenzothiophene (DBT). These reactions were monitored by variable temperature NMR experiments which allowed the complete characterization and isolation of [(dippe)(2)Ni(2)(mu-H)(mu-S-2-biphenyl)] (3). The latter compound evolves to the terminal nickel-hydride [(dippe)Ni (eta(1)-C-2-biphenyl)(H)] (4) and transient [(dippe)NiS] (5), to ultimately yield [(dippe)(2)Ni(2)(mu-S)] (2) and biphenyl as the resulting HDS products. The reactivity of 1 and biphenyl-2-thiol was examined using different ratios of reactants, which allowed preparation of [(dippe)Ni(eta(1)-S-biphenyl-2-thiolate)(2)] (6) when using an excess of this substrate. The reactivity of 6 with 1 was addressed, yielding compound 2 and an equivalent amount of biphenyl. PMID:19292493

  19. Masked thiol sugars: chemical behavior and synthetic applications of S-glycopyranosyl-N-monoalkyl dithiocarbamates.

    Megia-Fernandez, Alicia; de la Torre-Gonzalez, Diego; Parada-Aliste, Jose; Lopez-Jaramillo, Francisco Javier; Hernandez-Mateo, Fernando; Santoyo-Gonzalez, Francisco

    2014-02-01

    The chemical behavior of S-glycopyranosyl-N-monoalkyl dithiocarbamates (DTCs) as masked 1-glycosyl thiols, easily prepared by the nucleophilic displacement of 1-halo sugars with dithiocarbamate salts of primary amines, has been studied and synthetically exploited. This behavior relies on the abstraction of the proton of the carbamate functionality that allows controlled access to thiolate sugar intermediates. The basic character of the DTC salts used as reagents leads to thiolates that evolve in situ to symmetrical diglycosyldisulfides (DGDSs) when long reaction times are allowed. Alternatively, controlled unmasking of the thiolate function can be efficiently attained by treatment with an external base of isolated anomeric glycosyl DTCs, the formation of which is prevalent when using short reaction times. In this manner, a second methodology for the preparation of symmetrical DGDSs and a chemical protocol for the S-glycosylation of any electrophilic substrate are established. The applications of this last strategy for the preparation of thioglycosyl vinyl sulfones, thiodisaccharides, and S-linked homo- and heterodivalent neoglycoconjugates are described as a proof-of-concept of the great potential of the sugar DTCs in any chemical scenario in which the covalent attachment of a thiol sugar is required. The evaluation of the biological functionality of some divalent sulfurated sugar systems is also described. PMID:24282075

  20. Biostability enhancement of oil core - polysaccharide multilayer shell via photoinitiator free thiol-ene 'click' reaction.

    Calcagno, Vincenzo; Vecchione, Raffaele; Sagliano, Angela; Carella, Antonio; Guarnieri, Daniela; Belli, Valentina; Raiola, Luca; Roviello, Antonio; Netti, Paolo A

    2016-06-01

    Layer-by-layer of polyelectrolytes has emerged as one of the easiest and most controlled techniques to deposit ultrathin polymer layers mainly driven by electrostatic interactions. However, this kind of interaction results to be weak and easily breakable in physiological environment. Here we report on the preparation of nanocapsules completely made of natural biomaterials: a lipophilic core (soybean oil and egg lecithin as surfactant) as nanometric template and a polysaccharide-based multilayer shell (glycol chitosan and heparin) covalently cross-linked. We first modified glycol chitosan with a thiol moiety and heparin with an alkene moiety, respectively, and then we built a polymer multilayer film with a covalent cross-linkage among layers, exploiting the light initiated thiol-ene reaction, known as click chemistry. We showed the possibility to perform the covalent cross-linkage without any photoinitiator or metal catalyst, thus avoiding cytotoxic effects and further purification steps. The so realized nanocapsules resulted to be stable and completely biocompatible and, therefore, of interest for the biotechnology fields, mainly for drug delivery. PMID:26962765

  1. Reaction of [3H]-taurine maleimide with platelet surface thiols

    Taurine Maleimide (2-maleimidoethanesulfonate, TM) was synthesized from [2-3H]-taurine and methoxycarbonylmaleimide (MCM). The yield of a 1 μmol synthesis approached 100% (based on taurine) when MCM was used in 4-fold excess. The product (TM*) was purified by ion exchange chromatography. TM* reacted irreversibly with thiol groups on the surface of washed human platelets, leading to incorporation of radioactivity into platelet pellets. Incorporation was blocked by cysteine, mercuribenzenesulfonate (MBS), dithiobisnitrobenzoate, and N-ethylmaleimide, but not by taurine or by inhibitors of anion transport. Reaction of TM* with platelets showed the dependence on time and concentration characteristics of a bimolecular reaction. The number of reactive sites ranged from 1 to 5 x 105/platelet, and the apparent rate constant from 1 to 3 x 103/(M x min). TM was less effective than MBS as an inhibitor of platelet aggregation induced by several agents. TM had no effect on the uptake of serotonin, taurine, or phosphate by the platelets, processes which are sensitive to MBS. These differences, considered with the similarity in size and charge of TM and MBS, suggest that classes of thiols defined as exofacial by their accessibility to MBS can differ substantially in their reactivity with other impermeant reagents

  2. Facile Fabrication of Polymerizable Ionic Liquid Based-Gel Beads via Thiol-ene Chemistry.

    Taghavikish, Mona; Subianto, Surya; Dutta, Naba Kumar; Choudhury, Namita Roy

    2015-08-12

    Multipurpose gel beads prepared from natural or synthetic polymers have received significant attention in various applications such as drug delivery, coatings, and electrolytes because of their versatility and unique performance as micro- and nanocontainers.1 However, comparatively little work has been done on poly(ionic liquid)-based materials despite their unique ionic characteristics. Thus, in this contribution we report the facile preparation of polymerizable ionic liquid-based gel beads using thiol-ene click chemistry. This novel system incorporates pentaerythritol tetra (3-mercaptopropionate) (PETKMP) and 1,4-di(vinylimidazolium) butane bisbromide in a thiol-ene-based photopolymerization to fabricate the gel beads. Their chemical structure, thermal and mechanical properties have been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA). The gel beads possess low Tg and their ionic functionalities attribute self-healing properties and their ability to uptake small molecules or organic compounds offers their potential use as pH sensing material and macrocontainers. PMID:26171715

  3. Thermal stabilization and plasticization of poly(vinyl chloride) by ester thiols: Update and current status

    Poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) is one of the most important medical plastics. Recently, however, the safety of flexible PVC containing the common plasticizer, di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, has been called into question. Widely used heat stabilizers for PVC that incorporate toxic heavy metals also have fallen into disfavor. In order to address these problems, we have synthesized and tested, as potential replacements, several organic thiols that contain one or more carboxylate ester functions and thus are highly compatible with the polymer. When introduced into PVC at high loading levels (e.g., 30-35 parts by weight), the ester thiols are extremely effective as heat stabilizers and also useful as primary plasticizers. When used at a low loading level (e.g., 3 parts by weight), they still are excellent heat stabilizers for both plasticized and rigid PVC. Importantly, their high potency is achieved in the absence of any costabilizers that incorporate heavy metals. Their syntheses are simple and straightforward, and their odors are not offensive, because their volatilities are low. Described here are some typical results obtained with this new additive technology, which was licensed for commercialization in 2005

  4. Evaluation of 5α-reductase inhibitory activity of certain herbs useful as antiandrogens.

    Nahata, A; Dixit, V K

    2014-08-01

    This study demonstrates 5α-reductase inhibitory activity of certain herbs useful in the management of androgenic disorders. Ganoderma lucidum (Curtis) P. Karst (GL), Urtica dioica Linn. (UD), Caesalpinia bonducella Fleming. (CB), Tribulus terrestris Linn. (TT), Pedalium murex Linn. (PM), Sphaeranthus indicus Linn. (SI), Cuscuta reflexa Roxb. (CR), Citrullus colocynthis Schrad. (CC), Benincasa hispida Cogn. (BH), Phyllanthus niruri Linn. (PN) and Echinops echinatus Linn. (EE) were included in the study. Petroleum ether, ethanol and aqueous extracts of these herbs were tested for their 5α-reductase inhibitory activity against the standard 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride. A biochemical method to determine the activity of 5α-reductase was used to evaluate the inhibition of different extracts to the enzyme. The optical density (OD) value of each sample was measured continuously with ultraviolet spectrophotometer for the reason that the substrate NADPH has a specific absorbance at 340 nm. As the enzyme 5α-reductase uses NADPH as a substrate, so in the presence of 5α-reductase inhibitor, the NADPH concentration will increase with the function of time. This method thus implicates the activity of 5α-reductase. The method proved to be extremely useful to screen the herbs for their 5α-reductase inhibitory potential. GL, UD, BH, SI and CR came out to be promising candidates for further exploring their antiandrogenic properties. PMID:23710567

  5. Determination of the specific activities of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and B by capillary electrophoresis

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method for the determination of methionine sulfoxide reductase A and methionine sulfoxide reductase B activities in mouse liver is described. The method is based on detection of the 4-(dimethylamino)azobenzene-4’-sulfonyl derivative of L-methionine (dabsyl Met), the ...

  6. Sucrose mimics the light induction of Arabidopsis nitrate reductase gene transcription

    Cheng, Chi-Lien; Acedo, Gregoria N; Kristensen, Michael;

    1992-01-01

    Nitrate reductase, the first enzyme in nitrate assimilation, is located at the crossroad of two energy-consuming pathways: nitrate assimilation and carbon fixation. Light, which regulates the expression of many higher-plant carbon fixation genes, also regulates nitrate reductase gene expression. ...

  7. Use of a continuous-flow microreactor for thiol-ene functionalization of RAFT-derived poly(butyl acrylate)

    Vandenbergh, Joke; Junkers, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    This study describes the synthesis of functionalized RAFT-derived poly(n-butyl acrylate) polymers via the use of a continuous-flow microreactor, in which aminolysis as well as thiol-ene reactions are executed in reaction times of just 20 minutes. Poly(n-butyl acrylate) (M-n = 3800 g mol(-1), PDI = 1.10) with a trithiocarbonate end group was prepared via a conventional RAFT process. The polymer was then functionalized via aminolysis/thiol-ene reactions in the micro-flow reactor with isobornyl ...

  8. Shift-multiplexed holographic digital data page storage in a nanoparticle-(thiol-ene) polymer composite film.

    Momose, Keisuke; Takayama, Shingo; Hata, Eiji; Tomita, Yasuo

    2012-06-15

    We demonstrate shift-multiplexed holographic storage of 180 digital data pages with low symbol-error rates in a thick (250 μm) SiO2 nanoparticle-polymer composite film using step-growth thiol-ene photopolymerization. A two-dimensional 2:4 modulation code was employed for formatting digital data pages in order to reduce the average intensity of code block without decreasing the coding efficiency. This study clearly shows the feasibility of the thiol-ene based nanoparticle-polymer composite system as a holographic data storage medium. PMID:22739871

  9. Functions of Flavin Reductase and Quinone Reductase in 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol Degradation by Cupriavidus necator JMP134▿

    Belchik, Sara Mae; Xun, Luying

    2007-01-01

    The tcpRXABCYD operon of Cupriavidus necator JMP134 is involved in the degradation of 2,4,6-trichlorophenol (2,4,6-TCP), a toxic pollutant. TcpA is a reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH2)-dependent monooxygenase that converts 2,4,6-TCP to 6-chlorohydroxyquinone. It has been implied via genetic analysis that TcpX acts as an FAD reductase to supply TcpA with FADH2, whereas the function of TcpB in 2,4,6-TCP degradation is still unclear. In order to provide direct biochemical evidence for t...

  10. MEK2 regulates ribonucleotide reductase activity through functional interaction with ribonucleotide reductase small subunit p53R2

    Piao, Chunmei; Youn, Cha-Kyung; Jin, Min; Yoon, Sang Pil; Chang, In-Youb; Lee, Jung Hee; You, Ho Jin

    2012-01-01

    The p53R2 protein, a newly identified member of the ribonucleotide reductase family that provides nucleotides for DNA damage repair, is directly regulated by p53. We show that p53R2 is also regulated by a MEK2 (ERK kinase 2/MAP kinase kinase 2)-dependent pathway. Increased MEK1/2 phosphorylation by serum stimulation coincided with an increase in the RNR activity in U2OS and H1299 cells. The inhibition of MEK2 activity, either by treatment with a MEK inhibitor or by transfection with MEK2 siRN...

  11. The effect of ionic and non-ionic surfactants on the growth, nitrate reductase and nitrite reductase activities of Spirodela polyrrhiza (L. Schleiden

    Józef Buczek

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Inclusion into the medium of 5 mg•dm-3 of non-ionic (ENF or ionic (DBST surfactant caused 50-60% inhibition of nitrite reductase MR activity in S. polyrrhiza. At the same time, increased accumulation of NO2- in the plant tissues and lowering of the total and soluble protein contents were found. DBST also lowered the nitrate reductase (NR activity and the dry mass of the plants.

  12. Co-Expression of Monodehydroascorbate Reductase and Dehydroascorbate Reductase from Brassica rapa Effectively Confers Tolerance to Freezing-Induced Oxidative Stress

    Shin, Sun-Young; Kim, Myung-Hee; Kim, Yul-Ho; Park, Hyang-Mi; Yoon, Ho-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Plants are exposed to various environmental stresses and have therefore developed antioxidant enzymes and molecules to protect their cellular components against toxicity derived from reactive oxygen species (ROS). Ascorbate is a very important antioxidant molecule in plants, and monodehydroascorbate reductase (MDHAR; EC 1.6.5.4) and dehydroascorbate reductase (DHAR; EC 1.8.5.1) are essential to regeneration of ascorbate for maintenance of ROS scavenging ability. The MDHAR and DHAR genes from ...

  13. Optimisation of nitrate reductase enzyme activity to synthesise silver nanoparticles.

    Khodashenas, Bahareh; Ghorbani, Hamid Reza

    2016-06-01

    Today, the synthesis of silver nanoparticles (Ag NPs) is very common since it has many applications in different areas. The synthesis of these nanoparticles is done by means of physical, chemical, or biological methods. However, due to its inexpensive and environmentally friendly features, the biological method is more preferable. In the present study, using nitrate reductase enzyme available in the Escherichia coli (E. coli) bacterium, the biosynthesis of Ag NPs was investigated. In addition, the activity of the nitrate reductase enzyme was optimised by changing its cultural conditions, and the effects of silver nitrate (AgNO3) concentration and enzyme amount on nanoparticles synthesis were studied. Finally, the produced nanoparticles were studied using ultraviolet -visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer, dynamic light scattering technique, and transmission electron microscopy. UV-Visible spectrophotometric study showed the characteristic peak for Ag NPs at wavelength 405-420 nm for 1 mM metal precursor solution (AgNO3) with 1, 5, 10, and 20 cc supernatant and 435 nm for 0.01M AgNO3 with 20 cc supernatant. In this study, it was found that there is a direct relationship between the AgNO3 concentration and the size of produced Ag NPs. PMID:27256897

  14. Azotobacter vinelandii NADPH:ferredoxin reductase cloning, sequencing, and overexpression.

    Isas, J M; Yannone, S M; Burgess, B K

    1995-09-01

    Azotobacter vinelandii ferredoxin I (AvFdI) controls the expression of another protein that was originally designated Protein X. Recently we reported that Protein X is a NADPH-specific flavoprotein that binds specifically to FdI (Isas, J.M., and Burgess, B.K. (1994) J. Biol. Chem. 269, 19404-19409). The gene encoding this protein has now been cloned and sequenced. Protein X is 33% identical and has an overall 53% similarity with the fpr gene product from Escherichia coli that encodes NADPH:ferredoxin reductase. On the basis of this similarity and the similarity of the physical properties of the two proteins, we now designate Protein X as A. vinelandii NADPH:ferredoxin reductase and its gene as the fpr gene. The protein has been overexpressed in its native background in A. vinelandii by using the broad host range multicopy plasmid, pKT230. In addition to being regulated by FdI, the fpr gene product is overexpressed when A. vinelandii is grown under N2-fixing conditions even though the fpr gene is not preceded by a nif specific promoter. By analogy to what is known about fpr expression in E. coli, we propose that FdI may exert its regulatory effect on fpr by interacting with the SoxRS regulon. PMID:7673160

  15. Nitrate metabolism in tobacco leaves overexpressing Arabidopsis nitrite reductase.

    Davenport, Susie; Le Lay, Pascaline; Sanchez-Tamburrrino, Juan Pablo

    2015-12-01

    Primary nitrogen assimilation in plants includes the reduction of nitrite to ammonium in the chloroplasts by the enzyme nitrite reductase (NiR EC:1.7.7.1) or in the plastids of non-photosynthetic organs. Here we report on a study overexpressing the Arabidopsis thaliana NiR (AtNiR) gene in tobacco plants under the control of a constitutive promoter (CERV - Carnation Etched Ring Virus). The aim was to overexpress AtNiR in an attempt to alter the level of residual nitrite in the leaf which can act as precursor to the formation of nitrosamines. The impact of increasing the activity of AtNiR produced an increase in leaf protein and a stay-green phenotype in the primary transformed AtNiR population. Investigation of the T1 homozygous population demonstrated elevated nitrate reductase (NR) activity, reductions in leaf nitrite and nitrate and the amino acids proline, glutamine and glutamate. Chlorophyl content of the transgenic lines was increased, as evidenced by the stay-green phenotype. This reveals the importance of NiR in primary nitrogen assimilation and how modification of this key enzyme affects both the nitrogen and carbon metabolism of tobacco plants. PMID:26447683

  16. Pinpointing a Mechanistic Switch Between Ketoreduction and "Ene" Reduction in Short-Chain Dehydrogenases/Reductases.

    Lygidakis, Antonios; Karuppiah, Vijaykumar; Hoeven, Robin; Ní Cheallaigh, Aisling; Leys, David; Gardiner, John M; Toogood, Helen S; Scrutton, Nigel S

    2016-08-01

    Three enzymes of the Mentha essential oil biosynthetic pathway are highly homologous, namely the ketoreductases (-)-menthone:(-)-menthol reductase and (-)-menthone:(+)-neomenthol reductase, and the "ene" reductase isopiperitenone reductase. We identified a rare catalytic residue substitution in the last two, and performed comparative crystal structure analyses and residue-swapping mutagenesis to investigate whether this determines the reaction outcome. The result was a complete loss of native activity and a switch between ene reduction and ketoreduction. This suggests the importance of a catalytic glutamate vs. tyrosine residue in determining the outcome of the reduction of α,β-unsaturated alkenes, due to the substrate occupying different binding conformations, and possibly also to the relative acidities of the two residues. This simple switch in mechanism by a single amino acid substitution could potentially generate a large number of de novo ene reductases. PMID:27411040

  17. Trypanothione Reductase: A Viable Chemotherapeutic Target for Antitrypanosomal and Antileishmanial Drug Design

    M. Omar F. Khan

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis are two debilitating disease groups caused by parasites of Trypanosoma and Leishmania spp. and affecting millions of people worldwide. A brief outline of the potential targets for rational drug design against these diseases are presented, with an emphasis placed on the enzyme trypanothione reductase. Trypanothione reductase was identified as unique to parasites and proposed to be an effective target against trypanosomiasis and leishmaniasis. The biochemical basis of selecting this enzyme as a target, with reference to the simile and contrast to human analogous enzyme glutathione reductase, and the structural aspects of its active site are presented. The process of designing selective inhibitors for the enzyme trypanothione reductase has been discussed. An overview of the different chemical classes of inhibitors of trypanothione reductase with their inhibitory activities against the parasites and their prospects as future chemotherapeutic agents are briefl y revealed.

  18. Functional complementation of a nitrate reductase defective mutant of a green alga Dunaliella viridis by introducing the nitrate reductase gene.

    Sun, Yu; Gao, Xiaoshu; Li, Qiyun; Zhang, Qingqi; Xu, Zhengkai

    2006-08-01

    Nitrate reductase (NR) catalyzes NAD (P) H dependent reduction of nitrate to nitrite. Transformation systems have been established in several species of green algae by nitrate reductase gene functional complementation. In this report, an endogenous NR cDNA (3.4 kb) and a genomic fragment (14.6 kb) containing the NR gene (DvNIA1) were isolated from the D. viridis cDNA and genomic libraries respectively. Southern blot and Northern blot analyses showed that this gene exists as a single copy in D. viridis and is induced by nitrate. To obtain a NR defective mutant as a recipient strain, D. viridis cells were treated with a chemical mutagen and then cultured on a chlorate-containing plate to enrich chlorate tolerant mutants. Southern analysis showed that one isolate, B14, had a deletion in the DvNIA1 gene region. Using electroporation conditions determined in this laboratory, plasmid pDVNR containing the intact DvNIA1 gene has been electroporated into the defective mutant B14. Strains retaining a nitrate assimilation phenotype were obtained from nitrate plates after spreading the electroporated cells. In some individual strains, transcription of the introduced gene was detected. NR activity in these strains was slightly higher than that in the defective B14 cell, but excretion of nitrite into culture media was almost as high as that of the wild-type cell. Possible episomal presence of the introduced DNA in D. viridis is discussed. PMID:16797881

  19. Vibrio harveyi Nitroreductase Is Also a Chromate Reductase

    Kwak, Young Hak; Lee, Dong Seok; Kim, Han Bok

    2003-01-01

    The chromate reductase purified from Pseudomonas ambigua was found to be homologous with several nitroreductases. Escherichia coli DH5α and Vibrio harveyi KCTC 2720 nitroreductases were chosen for the present study, and their chromate-reducing activities were determined. A fusion between glutathione S-transferase (GST) and E. coli DH5α NfsA (GST-EcNfsA), a fusion between GST and E. coli DH5α NfsB (GST-EcNfsB), and a fusion between GST and V. harveyi KCTC 2720 NfsA (GST-VhNfsA) were prepared for their overproduction and easy purification. GST-EcNfsA, GST-EcNFsB, and GST-VhNFsA efficiently reduced nitrofurazone and 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) as their nitro substrates. The Km values for GST-EcNfsA, GST-EcNfsB, and GST-VhNfsA for chromate reduction were 11.8, 23.5, and 5.4 μM, respectively. The Vmax values for GST-EcNfsA, GST-EcNfsB, and GST-VhNfsA were 3.8, 3.9, and 10.7 nmol/min/mg of protein, respectively. GST-VhNfsA was the most effective of the three chromate reductases, as determined by each Vmax/Km value. The optimal temperatures of GST-EcNfsA, GST-EcNfsB, and GST-VhNfsA for chromate reduction were 55, 30, and 30°C, respectively. Thus, it is confirmed that nitroreductase can also act as a chromate reductase. Nitroreductases may be used in chromate remediation. GST-EcNfsA, GST-EcNfsB, and GST-VhNfsA have a molecular mass of 50 kDa and exist as a monomer in solution. Thin-layer chromatography showed that GST-EcNfsA, GST-EcNfsB, and GST-VhNfsA contain FMN as a cofactor. GST-VhNfsA reduced Cr(VI) to Cr(III). Cr(III) was much less toxic to E. coli than Cr(VI). PMID:12902220

  20. Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutathione reductase activity in methemoglobin reduction by methylene blue and cyst amine: study on glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase-deficient individuals, on normal subjects and on riboflavin-treated subjects

    Benedito Barraviera

    1988-10-01

    Full Text Available The authors have standardized methods for evaluation of the activity of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and of glutathione reductase. The general principle of the first method was based on methemoglobin formation by sodium nitrite followed by stimulation of the glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase with methylene blue. Forty six adults (23 males and 23 females were studied. Subjects were not G6PD deficient and were aged 20 to 30 years. The results showed that methemoglobin reduction by methylene blue was 154.40 and 139.90 mg/min (p<0.05 for males and females, respectively, in whole blood, and 221.10 and 207.85 mg/min (n.s., respectively, in washed red cells. These data showed that using washed red cells and 0.7g% sodium nitrite concentration produced no differences between sexes and also shortened reading time for the residual amount of methemoglobin to 90 minutes. Glutathione reductase activity was evaluated on the basis of the fact that cystamine (a thiol agent binds to the SH groups of hemoglobin, forming complexes. These complexes are reversed by the action of glutathione reductase, with methemoglobin reduction occurring simultaneously with this reaction. Thirty two adults (16 males and 16 females were studied. Subjects were not G6PD deficient and were aged 20 to 30 years. Methemoglobin reduction by cystamine was 81.27 and 91.13 mg/min (p<0.01 for males and females, respectively. These data showed that using washed red cells and 0.1 M cystamine concentration permits a reading of the residual amount of methemoglobin at 180 minutes of incubation. Glutathione reductase activity was evaluated by methemoglobin reduction by cystamine in 14 females before and after treatment with 10 mg riboflavin per day for 8 days. The results were 73.69 and 94.26 jug/min (p<0.01 before and after treatment, showing that riboflavin treatment increase glutathione reductase activity even in normal individuals. Three Black G6PD-deficient individuals (2 males and 1

  1. Redox Reactivity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Induces the Formation of Disulfide Bridges in Thiol-Containing Biomolecules.

    Rollin-Genetet, Françoise; Seidel, Caroline; Artells, Ester; Auffan, Mélanie; Thiéry, Alain; Vidaud, Claude

    2015-12-21

    The redox state of disulfide bonds is implicated in many redox control systems, such as the cysteine-cystine couple. Among proteins, ubiquitous cysteine-rich metallothioneins possess thiolate metal binding groups susceptible to metal exchange in detoxification processes. CeO2 NPs are commonly used in various industrial applications due to their redox properties. These redox properties that enable dual oxidation states (Ce(IV)/Ce(III)) to exist at their surface may act as oxidants for biomolecules. The interaction among metallothioneins, cysteine, and CeO2 NPs was investigated through various biophysical approaches to shed light on the potential effects of the Ce(4+)/Ce(3+) redox system on the thiol groups of these biomolecules. The possible reaction mechanisms include the formation of a disulfide bridge/Ce(III) complex resulting from the interaction between Ce(IV) and the thiol groups, leading to metal unloading from the MTs, depending on their metal content and cluster type. The formation of stable Ce(3+) disulfide complexes has been demonstrated via their fluorescence properties. This work provides the first evidence of thiol concentration-dependent catalytic oxidation mechanisms between pristine CeO2 NPs and thiol-containing biomolecules. PMID:26566067

  2. DEPLETION OF CELLULAR PROTEIN THIOLS AS AN INDICATOR OF ARYLATION IN ISOLATED TROUT HEPATOCYTES EXPOSED TO 1,4-BENZOQUINONE

    A method for the measurement of protein thiols (PrSH), un-reacted as well as oxidized, i.e. dithiothreitol recoverable, was adapted for the determination of PrSH depletion in isolated rainbow trout hepatocytes exposed to an arylating agent, 1,4-benzoquinone (BQ). Toxicant analysi...

  3. Inhibition of mitochondrial permeability transition by low pH is associated with less extensive membrane protein thiol oxidation.

    Teixeira, B M; Kowaltowski, A J; Castilho, R F; Vercesi, A E

    1999-12-01

    Ca2+ and inorganic phosphate-induced mitochondrial swelling and membrane protein thiol oxidation, which are associated with mitochondrial permeability transition, are inhibited by progressively decreasing the incubation medium pH between 7.2 and 6.0. Nevertheless, the detection of mitochondrial H2O2 production under these conditions is increased. Permeability transition induced by phenylarsine oxide, which promotes membrane protein thiol cross-linkage in a process independent of Ca2+ or reactive oxygen species, is also strongly inhibited in acidic incubation media. In addition, we observed that the decreased protein thiol reactivity with phenylarsine oxide or phenylarsine oxide-induced swelling at pH 6.0 is reversed by diethyl pyrocarbonate, in a hydroxylamine-sensitive manner. These results provide evidence that the inhibition of mitrochondrial permeability transition observed at lower incubation medium pH is mediated by a decrease in membrane protein thiol reactivity, related to the protonation of protein histidyl residues. PMID:10841269

  4. LOW TEMPERATURE “CLICK” WAFER BONDING OF OFF-STOICHIOMETRY THIOL-ENE (OSTE) POLYMERS TO SILICON

    Carlborg, Carl Fredrik; Saharil, Farizah; Haraldsson, Tommy; van der Wijngaart, Wouter

    2011-01-01

    We present a low temperature (< 37°C) wafer-scale microfluidic batch packaging process using covalent, dry bonding of offstoichiometry thiol-ene polymers (OSTE), enabling rapid, bio-compatible integration of fluidics on wafer-scale in combination with excellent polymer properties.

  5. Chemo-enzymatic synthesis of α-terpineol thioacetate and thiol derivatives and their use as flavouring compounds.

    Bel-Rhlid, Rachid; Fleury Rey, Yvette; Welti, Dieter; Fumeaux, René; Moine, Deborah

    2015-01-01

    Reaction of (R,S)-α-terpineol with thioacetic acid in food-grade n-hexane resulted into two α-terpineol thioacetate derivatives with the same molecular weight. After 5 h of reaction time, (R,S)-α-terpineol was completely transformed and the mixture analysed by different chromatographic techniques. The aroma character of the α-terpineol thioacetates was described as exotic, sweet, blackcurrant, roasted and sulphury. Of eight lipases and two esterases assayed, only non-immobilized pig liver esterase (PLE) hydrolysed α-terpineol thioacetates into the corresponding α-terpineol thiols. When reactions were performed in 0.2 m phosphate buffer at pH 8.0 and 30 °C with non-immobilized PLE, α-terpineol thiols were produced in an optimal yield of 88% after 24 h of reaction time. The aroma character of α-terpineol thiols was described as green, exotic and fresh grapefruit. Flavouring powders were prepared by freeze-drying the α-terpineol thioacetates and α-terpineol thiols in the presence of maltodextrine. Preliminary applications showed that these flavouring preparations could be used to improve the flavour quality of lighter cooked notes and tropical fruit aromas. PMID:25400090

  6. Thiol accumulation and cysteine desulfhydrase activity in H2S-fumigated leaves and leaf homogenates of cucurbit plants

    Schütz, Bärbel; De Kok, Luit J.; Rennenberg, Heinz

    1991-01-01

    Fumigation of both, cucurbit plants and cucurbit leaf homogenates with hydrogen sulfide (H2S) resulted in an increase in soluble thiol, mainly glutathione and cysteine. In leaf homogenates this increase was counteracted or prevented by the addition at 1 mM of inhibitors of pyridoxalphosphate depende

  7. Designing Visible Light-Cured Thiol-Acrylate Hydrogels for Studying the HIPPO Pathway Activation in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells.

    Lin, Tsai-Yu; Bragg, John C; Lin, Chien-Chi

    2016-04-01

    Various polymerization mechanisms have been developed to prepare peptide-immobilized poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels, a class of biomaterials suitable for studying cell biology in vitro. Here, a visible light mediated thiol-acrylate photopolymerization scheme is reported to synthesize dually degradable PEG-peptide hydrogels with controllable crosslinking and degradability. The influence of immobilized monothiol pendant peptide is systematically evaluated on the crosslinking of these hydrogels. Further, methods are proposed to modulate hydrogel crosslinking, including adjusting concentration of comonomer or altering the design of multifunctional peptide crosslinker. Due to the formation of thioether ester bonds, these hydrogels are hydrolytically degradable. If the dithiol peptide linkers used are susceptible to protease cleavage, these thiol-acrylate hydrogels can be designed to undergo partial proteolysis. The differences between linear and multiarm PEG-acrylate (i.e., PEGDA vs PEG4A) are also evaluated. Finally, the use of the mixed-mode thiol-acrylate PEG4A-peptide hydrogels is explored for in situ encapsulation of hepatocellular carcinoma cells (Huh7). The effects of matrix stiffness and integrin binding motif (e.g., RGDS) on Huh7 cell growth and HIPPO pathway activation are studied using PEG4A-peptide hydrogels. This visible light poly-merized thiol-acrylate hydrogel system represents an alternative to existing light-cured hydrogel platforms and shall be useful in many biomedical applications. PMID:26709469

  8. Ultrasound-Accelerated Synthesis of Asymmetrical Thiosulfonate S-Esters by Base-Promoted Reaction of Sulfonyl Chlorides with Thiols

    Pham, Hien Thi; Nguyen, Ngoc-Lan Thi; Duus, Fritz;

    2015-01-01

    Amberlyst A-26, Mg-Al hydrotalcite, potassium fluoride absorbed on alumina, triethylamine and pyridine have been tested as base catalysts and reagents for the reaction of sulfonyl chlorides with thiols to prepare thiosulfonate S-esters. The reactions were performed under solvent-free conditions or...

  9. Prebiotic Amino Acid Thioester Synthesis: Thiol-Dependent Amino Acid Synthesis from Formose substrates (Formaldehyde and Glycolaldehyde) and Ammonia

    Weber, Arthur L.

    1998-01-01

    Formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde (substrates of the formose autocatalytic cycle) were shown to react with ammonia yielding alanine and homoserine under mild aqueous conditions in the presence of thiol catalysts. Since similar reactions carried out without ammonia yielded alpha-hydroxy acid thioesters, the thiol-dependent synthesis of alanine and homoserine is presumed to occur via amino acid thioesters-intermediates capable of forming peptides. A pH 5.2 solution of 20 mM formaldehyde, 20 mM glycolaldehyde, 20 mM ammonium chloride, 23 mM 3-mercaptopropionic acid, and 23 mM acetic acid that reacted for 35 days at 40 C yielded (based on initial formaldehyde) 1.8% alanine and 0.08% homoserine. In the absence of thiol catalyst, the synthesis of alanine and homoserine was negligible. Alanine synthesis required both formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde, but homoserine synthesis required only glycolaldehyde. At 25 days the efficiency of alanine synthesis calculated from the ratio of alanine synthesized to formaldehyde reacted was 2.1%, and the yield (based on initial formaldehyde) of triose and tetrose intermediates involved in alanine and homoserine synthesis was 0.3 and 2.1%, respectively. Alanine synthesis was also seen in similar reactions containing only 10 mM each of aldehyde substrates, ammonia, and thiol. The prebiotic significance of these reactions that use the formose reaction to generate sugar intermediates that are converted to reactive amino acid thioesters is discussed.

  10. Conserved water-mediated H-bonding dynamics of catalytic Asn 175 in plant thiol protease

    Tapas K Nandi; Hridoy R Bairagya; Bishnu P Mukhopadhyay; K Sekar; Dipankar Sukul; Asim K Bera

    2009-03-01

    The role of invariant water molecules in the activity of plant cysteine protease is ubiquitous in nature. On analysing the 11 different Protein DataBank (PDB) structures of plant thiol proteases, the two invariant water molecules W1 and W2 (W220 and W222 in the template 1PPN structure) were observed to form H-bonds with the Ob atom of Asn 175. Extensive energy minimization and molecular dynamics simulation studies up to 2 ns on all the PDB and solvated structures clearly revealed the involvement of the H-bonding association of the two water molecules in fixing the orientation of the asparagine residue of the catalytic triad. From this study, it is suggested that H-bonding of the water molecule at the W1 invariant site better stabilizes the Asn residue at the active site of the catalytic triad.

  11. Thiol-modified gold nanoparticles deposited on silica support using dip coating

    Magura, Jozef; Zeleňáková, Adriana; Zeleňák, Vladimír; Kaňuchová, Maria

    2014-10-01

    In our work, we have prepared thin layers of gold nanoparticles deposited via dip coating technique on silica glass substrate. The prepared thin layers were modified by two different ligands, namely 1,4-dithiothreitol (sample Au-DTT NPs) and L-glutathione (sample Au-GSH NPs). The spectral, structural and magnetic properties of the prepared samples were investigated. The modification of Au nanoparticles with thiol ligands leads to change of their plasmon resonance fields, as indicated by UV-vis spectra. The magnetic measurements showed that the magnetization of the samples is composed from two magnetic contributions: diamagnetic contribution and low field ferromagnetic contribution. Our experimental results show that the charge transfer between Au and S atoms gives rise to the ferromagnetic behaviour of prepared thin layers.

  12. Thiol reductive stress induces cellulose-anchored biofilm formation in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    Trivedi, Abhishek; Mavi, Parminder Singh; Bhatt, Deepak; Kumar, Ashwani

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) forms biofilms harbouring antibiotic-tolerant bacilli in vitro, but the factors that induce biofilm formation and the nature of the extracellular material that holds the cells together are poorly understood. Here we show that intracellular thiol reductive stress (TRS) induces formation of Mtb biofilms in vitro, which harbour drug-tolerant but metabolically active bacteria with unchanged levels of ATP/ADP, NAD+/NADH and NADP+/NADPH. The development of these biofilms requires DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. Transcriptional analysis suggests that Mtb modulates only ∼7% of its genes for survival in biofilms. In addition to proteins, lipids and DNA, the extracellular material in these biofilms is primarily composed of polysaccharides, with cellulose being a key component. Our results contribute to a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying Mtb biofilm formation, although the clinical relevance of Mtb biofilms in human tuberculosis remains unclear. PMID:27109928

  13. Surface analysis of gold nanoparticles functionalized with thiol-modified glucose SAMs for biosensor applications.

    Valentina eSpampinato

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, Time of Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (ToF-SIMS, Principal Component Analysis (PCA and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS have been used to characterize the surface chemistry of gold substrates before and after functionalization with thiol-modified glucose self-assembled monolayers and subsequent biochemical specific recognition of maltose binding protein (MBP.The results indicate that the surface functionalization is achieved both on flat and nanoparticles gold substrates thus showing the potential of the developed system as biodetection platform. Moreover, the method presented here has been found to be a sound and valid approach to characterize the surface chemistry of nanoparticles functionalized with large molecules.Both techniques were proved to be very useful tools for monitoring all the functionalization steps, including the investigation of the biological behaviour of the glucose-modified particles in presence of the maltose binding protein.

  14. Hmb(off/on) as a switchable thiol protecting group for native chemical ligation.

    Qi, Yun-Kun; Tang, Shan; Huang, Yi-Chao; Pan, Man; Zheng, Ji-Shen; Liu, Lei

    2016-05-01

    A new thiol protecting group Hmb(off/on) is described, which has a switchable activity that may be useful in the chemical synthesis of proteins. When placed on the side chain of Cys, Cys(Hmb(off)) is stable to trifluoroacetic acid (TFA) in the process of solid-phase peptide synthesis. When Cys(Hmb(off)) is treated with neutral aqueous buffers, it is cleanly converted to acid-labile Cys(Hmb(on)), which can later be fully deprotected by TFA to generate free Cys. The utility of Cys(Hmb(off/on)) is demonstrated by the chemical synthesis of an erythropoietin segment, EPO[Cys(98)-Arg(166)]-OH through native chemical ligation. PMID:27102373

  15. Single molecular switch based on thiol tethered iron(II)clathrochelate on gold

    Molecular electronics has been associated with high density nano-electronic devices. Developments of molecular electronic devices were based on reversible switching of molecules between the two conductive states. In this paper, self-assembled monolayers of dodecanethiol (DDT) and thiol tethered iron(II)clathrochelate (IC) have been prepared on gold film. The electrochemical and electronic properties of IC molecules inserted into the dodecanethiol monolayer (IC-DDT SAM) were investigated using voltammetric, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and cross-wire tunneling measurements. The voltage triggered switching behaviour of IC molecules on mixed SAM was demonstrated. Deposition of polyaniline on the redox sites of IC-DDT SAM using electrochemical polymerization of aniline was performed in order to confirm that this monolayer acts as nano-patterned semiconducting electrode surface.

  16. Synthesis and structure design of new bio-based elastomers via Thiol-ene-Click Reactions.

    Khan, Shafiullah; Wang, Zhao; Wang, Runguo; Zhang, Liqun

    2016-10-01

    The additions of 2-mercaptoethanol to (S)-(-)-limonene via click reaction is described as an adaptable and efficient way to obtain alcohol functionalized renewable monomer for the synthesis of new cross-linkable bio-based elastomers. Thiol first reacted with the limonene endocyclic double bond and then reacted with the exocyclics double bond to form the difunctional monomer. The structure of the monomer was determined by using FTIR, (1)H NMR and mass spectrometry. Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA) and Differential Scanning Calorimetrys (DSC) characterization exposed that this monomer could be used to synthesize elastomers with excellent and adaptable thermal properties. The molecular weight of the synthesized elastomer could reach 186kDaa via melting polycondensation route and the structure-properties relationship was deliberated. Finally, these elastomers were mixed with dicumyl peroxide (DCP) to form cross-linked elastomers with certain mechanical property, and the gel contents of the elastomers were confirmed by using Soxhlet extraction method. PMID:27287154

  17. Spectroscopic and electrochemical study of CdTe nanocrystals capped with thiol mixtures

    Matos, Charlene R. S.; Souza, Helio O., Jr.; Candido, Luan P. M.; Costa, Luiz P.; Santos, Francisco A.; Alencar, Marcio A. R. C.; Abegao, Luis M. G.; Rodrigues, Jose J., Jr.; Midori Sussuchi, Eliana; Gimenez, Iara F.

    2016-06-01

    Here we report the aqueous synthesis of CdTe nanocrystals capped with 3-mercaptopropionic acid (MPA) and the evaluation of the effect of mixing different thiols with MPA on the spectroscopic and electrochemical properties. Additional ligands were cysteine (CYS) and glutathione (GSH). CYS and GSH produce opposite effects on the photoluminescence quantum yield (QY) with a decrease and increase in QY in comparison to MPA, respectively. All samples exhibited monoexponential photoluminescence decays indicating the presence of high-quality nanocrystals. Electrochemical measurements evidenced the presence of several redox peaks and allowed the calculation of the electrochemical band gaps, which were in agreement with the values estimated from absorption spectra and reflected differences in nanocrystal size.

  18. The enhanced cytotoxicity of misonidazole in the thiol depleted state - An oxygen dependent mechanism

    Incubating A549 cells in the presence of L-buthionine-S, R-sulfoximine and misonidazole under aerobic conditions results in lowered rates of cell growth and greater cytotoxicity than is seen with either drug alone. The authors previously demonstrated the accumulation of hydrogen peroxide from cells treated with misonidazole following the inhibition of GSH-peroxidase with thiol depleting agents. They hypothesize that the enhancement of misonidazole toxicity by L-BSO results from the increased exposure to hydrogen peroxide, and the possible formation of the highly reactive hydroxyl radical in the presence of trace metals via Fenton chemistry. Support for this hypothesis comes from their observations that addition of radical scavengers (such as SOD and catalase) and nutritional antioxidants (vitamin E) to the culture medium will partially inhibit the cytotoxic effects. Further work is being done to measure the products of reaction of toxic oxygen species with cellular macromolecules, i.e. lipids

  19. Oxidative damage induced by herbicides is mediated by thiol oxidation and hydroperoxides production.

    Braconi, Daniela; Bernardini, Giulia; Fiorani, Mara; Azzolini, Catia; Marzocchi, Barbara; Proietti, Fabrizio; Collodel, Giulia; Santucci, Annalisa

    2010-08-01

    Toxicological and environmental issues are associated with the extensive use of agricultural pesticides, although the knowledge of their toxic effects as commercial formulations is still far from being complete. This work investigated the impact of three herbicides as commercial formulations on the oxidative status of a wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. With yeast being a well-established model of eukaryotic cells, especially as far as regards the stress response, these results may be indicative of potential damages on higher eukaryotes. It was found that herbicide-mediated toxicity towards yeast cells could be the result of an increased production of hydroperoxides (like in the case of the herbicides Pointer and Silglif) or advanced oxidation protein products and lipid peroxidation (especially in the case of the herbicide Proper Energy). Through a redox-proteomic approach it was found also that, besides a common signature, each herbicide showed a specific pattern for protein thiols oxidation. PMID:20528566

  20. Theoretical study of sulfur L-edge XANES of thiol protected gold nanoparticles.

    Nardelli, A; Fronzoni, G; Stener, M

    2011-01-14

    The Scalar Relativistic-Zero Order Regular Approximation-Time Dependent Density Functional Theory has been employed to study the sulfur L-edge XANES spectrum of the [Au(25)(SCH(3))(18)](+) model cluster, with the aim to reproduce and rationalize previous experimental data. The salient experimental features are properly described by the present calculation. The model cluster contains two different types of bidentate "staple" ligand thiol fragments, and it has been possible to assign the spectral features according to the different location of the initial core orbital on one of the two different fragments. This finding suggests that in the real nanoparticle two different non-equivalent type of sulfur bidentate ligands are present, arranged with the typical staple geometry. PMID:21031214

  1. Analysis of citrate-capped gold and silver nanoparticles by thiol ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis

    We report on the capillary electrophoretic behavior of citrate-capped gold and silver nanoparticles in aqueous medium when applying a ligand-exchange surface reaction with thiols. Gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) of similar size (39 ± 6 and 41 ± 7 nm, respectively) and shape were synthesized, covered with a citrate shell, and characterized by microscopic and spectroscopic techniques. The analysis of these NPs by CE was accomplished by using a buffer solution (pH 9.7; 40 mM SDS, 10 mM CAPS; 0.1 % methanol) containing the anions of thioctic acid or thiomalic acid. These are capable of differently interacting with the surface of the AuNPs and AgNPs and thus introducing additional negative charges. This results in different migration times due to the formation of differently charged nanoparticles. (author)

  2. Structure of a bacterial homologue of vitamin K epoxide reductase

    Li, Weikai; Schulman, Sol; Dutton, Rachel J.; Boyd, Dana; Beckwith, Jon; Rapoport, Tom A. (Harvard-Med); (HHMI)

    2010-03-19

    Vitamin K epoxide reductase (VKOR) generates vitamin K hydroquinone to sustain {gamma}-carboxylation of many blood coagulation factors. Here, we report the 3.6 {angstrom} crystal structure of a bacterial homologue of VKOR from Synechococcus sp. The structure shows VKOR in complex with its naturally fused redox partner, a thioredoxin-like domain, and corresponds to an arrested state of electron transfer. The catalytic core of VKOR is a four transmembrane helix bundle that surrounds a quinone, connected through an additional transmembrane segment with the periplasmic thioredoxin-like domain. We propose a pathway for how VKOR uses electrons from cysteines of newly synthesized proteins to reduce a quinone, a mechanism confirmed by in vitro reconstitution of vitamin K-dependent disulphide bridge formation. Our results have implications for the mechanism of the mammalian VKOR and explain how mutations can cause resistance to the VKOR inhibitor warfarin, the most commonly used oral anticoagulant.

  3. Aspects of Ribonucleotide Reductase Regulation and Genome Stability

    Nielsen, Helena Berner Nedergaard

    In all living cells, synthesis of the DNA building blocks, deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs), is tightly regulated to ensure a precise DNA replication to maintain genomic stability. Ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) is the enzyme responsible for reducing ribonucleotides to their deoxy forms....... RNR consists of two subunits: R1 and R2, both of which are essential. The activity of RNR is strictly regulated to control the dNTP pool, both by allosteric feedback control and transcriptional and translational controls. Four inhibitory proteins of RNR have been identified in yeast: Spd1 in fission...... yeast, and Sml1, Hug1, and Dif1 in budding yeast. An elevated, as well as a reduced dNTP pool is shown to lead to an increase in spontaneous mutation rates, hence regulation of RNR is very important in order to maintain genomic stability. No human inhibitory proteins have yet been identified to regulate...

  4. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria;

    2008-01-01

    disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences. The...... present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and......Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar...

  5. Crystal structure of isoflavone reductase from alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Wang, Xiaoqiang; He, Xianzhi; Lin, Jianqiao; Shao, Hui; Chang, Zhenzhan; Dixon, Richard A

    2006-05-19

    Isoflavonoids play important roles in plant defense and exhibit a range of mammalian health-promoting activities. Isoflavone reductase (IFR) specifically recognizes isoflavones and catalyzes a stereospecific NADPH-dependent reduction to (3R)-isoflavanone. The crystal structure of Medicago sativa IFR with deletion of residues 39-47 has been determined at 1.6A resolution. Structural analysis, molecular modeling and docking, and comparison with the structures of other NADPH-dependent enzymes, defined the putative binding sites for co-factor and substrate and potential key residues for enzyme activity and substrate specificity. Further mutagenesis has confirmed the role of Lys144 as a catalytic residue. This study provides a structural basis for understanding the enzymatic mechanism and substrate specificity of IFRs as well as the functions of IFR-like proteins. PMID:16600295

  6. Pulse radiolysis studies on superoxide reductase from Treponema pallidum

    Nivière, V; Fontecave, M; Houée-Levin, C

    2015-01-01

    Superoxide reductases (SORs) are small metalloenzymes, which catalyze reduction of O2*- to H2O2. The reaction of the enzyme from Treponema pallidum with superoxide was studied by pulse radiolysis methods. The first step is an extremely fast bi-molecular reaction of the ferrous center with O2, with a rate constant of 6 x 10 (8) M(-1) s(-1). A first intermediate is formed which is converted to a second one with a slower rate constant of 4800 s(-1). This latter value is 10 times higher than the corresponding one previously reported in the case of SOR from Desulfoarculus baarsii. The reconstituted spectra for the two intermediates are consistent with formation of transient iron-peroxide species.

  7. Two methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) polymorphisms, schizophrenia and bipolar disorder

    Jönsson, Erik G; Larsson, Kristina; Vares, Maria; Hansen, Thomas; Wang, August G; Djurovic, Srdjan; Rønningen, Kjersti S; Andreassen, Ole A; Agartz, Ingrid; Werge, Thomas; Terenius, Lars; Hall, Håkan

    disorder. In a replication attempt the MTHFR C677T and A1298C SNPs were analyzed in three Scandinavian schizophrenia case-control samples. In addition, Norwegian patients with bipolar disorder were investigated. There were no statistically significant allele or genotype case-control differences. The...... present Scandinavian results do not verify previous associations between the putative functional MTHFR gene polymorphisms and schizophrenia or bipolar disorder. However, when combined with previous studies in meta-analyses there is still evidence for association between the MTHFR C677T polymorphism and......Recent meta-analyses of the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase gene (MTHFR) have suggested association between two of its functional single gene polymorphisms (SNPs; C677T and A1298C) and schizophrenia. Studies have also suggested association between MTHFR C677T and A1298C variation and bipolar...

  8. Thiol click modification of cyclic disulfide containing biodegradable polyurethane urea elastomers.

    Fang, Jun; Ye, Sang-Ho; Wang, Jing; Zhao, Ting; Mo, Xiumei; Wagner, William R

    2015-05-11

    Although the thiol click reaction is an attractive tool for postpolymerization modification of thiolmers, thiol groups are easily oxidized, limiting the potential for covalent immobilization of bioactive molecules. In this study, a series of biodegradable polyurethane elastomers incorporating stable cyclic disulfide groups was developed and characterized. These poly(ester urethane)urea (PEUU-SS) polymers were based on polycaprolactone diol (PCL), oxidized dl-dithiothreitol (O-DTT), lysine diisocyanate (LDI), or butyl diisocyanate (BDI), with chain extension by putrescine. The ratio of O-DTT:PCL was altered to investigate different levels of potential functionalization. PEG acrylate was employed to study the mechanism and availability of both bulk and surface click modification of PEUU-SS polymers. All synthesized PEUU-SS polymers were elastic with breaking strengths of 38-45 MPa, while the PEUU-SS(LDI) polymers were more amorphous, possessing lower moduli and relatively small permanent deformations versus PEUU-SS(BDI) polymers. Variable bulk click modification of PEUU-SS(LDI) polymers was achieved by controlling the amount of reduction reagent, and rapid reaction rates occurred using a one-pot, two-step process. Likewise, surface click reaction could be carried out quickly under mild, aqueous conditions. Furthermore, a maleimide-modified affinity peptide (TPS) was successfully clicked on the surface of an electrospun PEUU-SS(BDI) fibrous sheet, which improved endothelial progenitor cell adhesion versus corresponding unmodified films. The cyclic disulfide containing biodegradable polyurethanes described provide an option for cardiovascular and other soft tissue regenerative medicine applications where a temporary, elastic scaffold with designed biofunctionality from a relatively simple click chemistry approach is desired. PMID:25891476

  9. Potentiometric determination of trace amounts of volatile thiols in natural gas

    A potentiometric titration method was developed for the determination of volatile thiols in natural gas. An apparatus was devised for the quantitative absorption of volatile thiols. The measurements were performed in an ethanolic ammonium buffer solution containing a known amount of silver nitrate as supporting electrolyte. The excess silver was precipitated by a known amount of potassium iodide. The excess of iodide was back titrated potentiometrically with a standard solution of silver nitrate. The direct titration of the excess silver ions with a standard solution of potassium iodide gave a poor accuracy compared with the back titration method. Iodide selective electrode was employed as an indicator electrode and a silver-silver chloride electrode as reference electrode. The accuracy and reproducibility of the method were established by preparing several synthetic samples in which ethanthiol containing from 346.61 to 12.11 μUg mercaptan sulfur was taken as standard nitrogen as carrier gas with an optimum flow rate of 31.5 L/hr. The results obtained expressed in the form of Grans plot showed an error ranging from 0.16 to 2.39% by weight and the relative standard deviation did not exceed 2.20%. The amount of mercaptan sulfur determined in Iraqi natural gas taken directly in a cylinder from Dora refinery, Baghdad, Iraq, and after six months of storage we 23.15 Ug/L and 21.25 Ug/L respectively with a relative standard deviation not exceeded 1%. The interferences of hydrogen sulfide could be eliminated by absorption in cadimium acetate containing solution. Other sulfur containing compounds e.g. disulfides, sulfoxides which may be present in natural gas do not interfere with the analysis

  10. The "Gln-Type" Thiol Dioxygenase from Azotobacter vinelandii is a 3-Mercaptopropionic Acid Dioxygenase.

    Pierce, Brad S; Subedi, Bishnu P; Sardar, Sinjinee; Crowell, Joshua K

    2015-12-29

    Cysteine dioxygenase (CDO) is a non-heme iron enzyme that catalyzes the O2-dependent oxidation of l-cysteine to produce cysteinesulfinic acid. Bacterial CDOs have been subdivided as either "Arg-type" or "Gln-type" on the basis of the identity of conserved active site residues. To date, "Gln-type" enzymes remain largely uncharacterized. It was recently noted that the "Gln-type" enzymes are more homologous with another thiol dioxygenase [3-mercaptopropionate dioxygenase (MDO)] identified in Variovorax paradoxus, suggesting that enzymes of the "Gln-type" subclass are in fact MDOs. In this work, a putative "Gln-type" thiol dioxygenase from Azotobacter vinelandii (Av) was purified to homogeneity and characterized. Steady-state assays were performed using three substrates [3-mercaptopropionic acid (3mpa), l-cysteine (cys), and cysteamine (ca)]. Despite comparable maximal velocities, the "Gln-type" Av enzyme exhibited a specificity for 3mpa (kcat/KM = 72000 M(-1) s(-1)) nearly 2 orders of magnitude greater than those for cys (110 M(-1) s(-1)) and ca (11 M(-1) s(-1)). Supporting X-band electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies were performed using nitric oxide (NO) as a surrogate for O2 binding to confirm obligate-ordered addition of substrate prior to NO. Stoichimetric addition of NO to solutions of 3mpa-bound enzyme quantitatively yields an iron-nitrosyl species (Av ES-NO) with EPR features consistent with a mononuclear (S = (3)/2) {FeNO}(7) site. Conversely, two distinct substrate-bound conformations were observed in Av ES-NO samples prepared with cys and ca, suggesting heterogeneous binding within the enzymatic active site. Analytical EPR simulations are provided to establish the relative binding affinity for each substrate (3map > cys > ca). Both kinetic and spectroscopic results presented here are consistent with 3mpa being the preferred substrate for this enzyme. PMID:26624219

  11. Atomistic simulations of thiol-terminated modifiers for hybrid photovoltaic interfaces

    Malloci, G. [Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Unità di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria, I-09042 Monserrato (Italy); Petrozza, A. [Center for Nano Science and Technology @Polimi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Pascoli 70/3, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Mattoni, A., E-mail: mattoni@iom.cnr.it [Istituto Officina dei Materiali (CNR-IOM), Unità di Cagliari, Cittadella Universitaria, I-09042 Monserrato (Italy)

    2014-06-02

    Small aromatic molecules such as benzene or pyridine derivatives are often used as interface modifiers (IMs) at polymer/metal oxide hybrid interfaces. We performed a theoretical investigation on prototypical thiol-terminated IMs aimed at improving the photovoltaic performances of poly(3-hexylthiophene)/TiO{sub 2} devices. By means of first-principles calculations in the framework of the density functional theory we investigate 3-furanthiol (3FT), 4-mercaptobenzoicacid (4MB), and 6-isoquinolinethiol (6QT) molecules. We discuss the role of these molecules as modifiers alternative to 4-mercaptopyridine (4MP) which has recently shown to induce a large improvement in the overall power conversion efficiency of mesoporous films of TiO{sub 2} infiltrated by poly(3-hexylthiophene). The IMs investigated are expected to keep the beneficial features of 4MP giving at the same time the possibility to further tune the interlayer properties (e.g., its thickness, stability, and density). Dense interlayers of 6QT turn out to be slightly unstable since the titania substrate induces a compressive strain in the molecular film. On the contrary, we predict very stable films for both 3FT and 4MB molecules, which makes them interesting candidates for future experimental investigations. - Highlights: • We performed a theoretical investigation on thiol-terminated interface modifiers. • We investigate 3-furanthiol (3FT), 4-mercaptobenzoicacid (4MB), and 6-isoquinolinethiol molecules. • We discuss the role of these molecules as modifiers alternative to 4-mercaptopyridine. • Dense interlayers of 6-isoquinolinethiol turn out to be slightly unstable. • We predict very stable self-assembled thin-films for both 3FT and 4MB molecules.

  12. Amino acid-incorporated polymer network by thiol-ene polymerization

    R. Yokose

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Triallyl L-alanine (A3A and triallyl L-phenylalanine (A3F were synthesized by reactions of L-alanine and L-phenylalanine with allyl bromide in the presence of sodium hydroxide, respectively. Thiol-ene thermal polymerization of A3A or A3F with pentaerythritol-based primary tetrathiol (pS4P or pentaerythritol-based secondary tetrathiol (S4P at allyl/SH 1/1 in the presence of 2,2'-azobis(isobutyronitrile produced an amino acid-incorporated polymer network (A3ApS4P, A3A-S4P or A3F-S4P. Although the thermally cured resins were homogeneous and flat films, the corresponding thiol-ene photopolymerization did not give a successful result. Degree of swelling for each thermally cured film in N,Ndimethylformamide was much higher than that in water. The glass transition and 5% weight loss temperatures (Tg and T5 of A3F-pS4P and A3F-S4P were higher than those of A3A-pS4P and A3A-S4P, respectively. Also, A3F-pS4P and A3F-S4P exhibited much higher tensile strengths and moduli than A3A-pS4P and A3A-S4P did, respectively. Consequently, A3FpS4P displayed the highest Tg (38.7°C, T5 (282.0°C, tensile strength (9.5 MPa and modulus (406 MPa among all the thermally cured resins.

  13. Differential regulation of tissue thiol-disulfide redox status in a murine model of peritonitis

    Benton Shana M

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glutathione (GSH/glutathione disulfide (GSSG and cysteine (Cys/cystine (CySS are major redox pools with important roles in cytoprotection. We determined the impact of septic peritonitis on thiol-disulfide redox status in mice. Methods FVB/N mice (6–12 week old; 8/group underwent laparotomy with cecal ligation and puncture (CLP or laparotomy alone (control. Sections of ileum, colon, lung and liver were obtained and GSH, GSSG, Cys and CySS concentrations determined by HPLC 24 h after laparotomy. Redox potential [Eh in millivolts (mV] of the GSH/GSSG and Cys/CySS pools was calculated using the Nernst equation. Data were analyzed by ANOVA (mean ± SE. Results GSH/GSSG Eh in ileum, colon, and liver was significantly oxidized in septic mice versus control mice (ileum: septic −202±4 versus control −228±2 mV; colon: -195±8 versus −214±1 mV; and liver: -194±3 vs. -210±1 mV, all Ph was unchanged with CLP, while liver and lung Cys/CySS Eh became significantly more reducing (liver: septic = −103±3 versus control −90±2 mV; lung: -101±5 versus −81±1 mV, each P Conclusions Septic peritonitis induced by CLP oxidizes ileal and colonic GSH/GSSG redox but Cys/CySS Eh remains unchanged in these intestinal tissues. In liver, CLP oxidizes the GSH/GSSG redox pool and CyS/CySS Eh becomes more reducing; in lung, CLP does not alter GSH/GSSG Eh, and Cys/CySS Eh is less oxidized. CLP-induced infection/inflammation differentially regulates major thiol-disulfide redox pools in this murine model.

  14. Disulfide Sensitivity in the Env Protein Underlies Lytic Inactivation of HIV-1 by Peptide Triazole Thiols.

    Bailey, Lauren D; Kalyana Sundaram, Ramalingam Venkat; Li, Huiyuan; Duffy, Caitlin; Aneja, Rachna; Rosemary Bastian, Arangassery; Holmes, Andrew P; Kamanna, Kantharaju; Rashad, Adel A; Chaiken, Irwin

    2015-12-18

    We investigated the mode of action underlying lytic inactivation of HIV-1 virions by peptide triazole thiol (PTT), in particular the relationship between gp120 disulfides and the C-terminal cysteine-SH required for virolysis. Obligate PTT dimer obtained by PTT SH cross-linking and PTTs with serially truncated linkers between pharmacophore isoleucine-ferrocenyltriazole-proline-tryptophan and cysteine-SH were synthesized. PTT variants showed loss of lytic activity but not binding and infection inhibition upon SH blockade. A disproportionate loss of lysis activity vs binding and infection inhibition was observed upon linker truncation. Molecular docking of PTT onto gp120 argued that, with sufficient linker length, the peptide SH could approach and disrupt several alternative gp120 disulfides. Inhibition of lysis by gp120 mAb 2G12, which binds at the base of the V3 loop, as well as disulfide mutational effects, argued that PTT-induced disruption of the gp120 disulfide cluster at the base of the V3 loop is an important step in lytic inactivation of HIV-1. Further, PTT-induced lysis was enhanced after treating virus with reducing agents dithiothreitol and tris (2-carboxyethyl)phosphine. Overall, the results are consistent with the view that the binding of PTT positions the peptide SH group to interfere with conserved disulfides clustered proximal to the CD4 binding site in gp120, leading to disulfide exchange in gp120 and possibly gp41, rearrangement of the Env spike, and ultimately disruption of the viral membrane. The dependence of lysis activity on thiol-disulfide interaction may be related to intrinsic disulfide exchange susceptibility in gp120 that has been reported previously to play a role in HIV-1 cell infection. PMID:26458166

  15. Thiol-Activatable Triplet-Triplet Annihilation Upconversion with Maleimide-Perylene as the Caged Triplet Acceptor/Emitter.

    Mahmood, Zafar; Zhao, Jianzhang

    2016-01-15

    Efficient thiol-activated triplet-triplet annihilation (TTA) upconversion system was devised with maleimide-caged perylene (Py-M) as the thiol-activatable triplet acceptor/emitter and with diiodoBodipy as the triplet photosensitizer. The photophysical processes were studied with steady-state UV-vis absorption spectroscopy, fluorescence spectroscopy, electrochemical properties, and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The triplet acceptor/emitter Py-M shows week fluorescence (ΦF = 0.8%), and no upconversion (ΦUC = 0%) was observed. The quenching of fluorescence of Py-M is due to photoinduced electron-transfer (PET) process from perylene to maleimide-caging unit, which quenches the singlet excited state of perylene. The fluorescence of Py-M was enhanced by 200-fold (ΦF = 97%) upon addition of thiols such as 2-mercaptoethanol, and the ΦUC was increased to 5.9%. The unique feature of this thiol-activated TTA upconversion is that the activation is based on addition reaction of the thiols with the caged acceptor/emitter, and no side products were formed. The previously reported cleavage approach gives side products which are detrimental to the TTA upconversion. With nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy, we found that the triplet excited state of Py-M was not quenched by any PET process, which is different from singlet excited state (fluorescence) of Py-M. The results are useful for study of the triplet excited states of organic chromophores and for activatable TTA upconversion. PMID:26694534

  16. Thiomers: Influence of molecular mass and thiol group content of poly(acrylic acid) on efflux pump inhibition.

    Grabovac, Vjera; Laffleur, Flavia; Bernkop-Schnürch, Andreas

    2015-09-30

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of molecular mass and thiol group content of poly(acrylic acid)-cysteine conjugates on the permeation of sulforhodamine 101 and penicillin G. acting as substrates for multidrug resistance-associated protein 2 efflux pump. Poly(acrylic acids) of 2 kDa, 100 kDa, 250 kDa, 450 kDa and 3000 kDa were conjugated with cysteine. The thiol group content of all these polymers was in the range from 343.3 ± 48.4 μmol/g to 450.3 ± 76.1 μmol/g. Transport studies were performed on rat small intestine mounted in Ussing-type chambers. Since 250 kDa poly(acrylic acid) showed the highest permeation enhancing effect, additionally thiolated 250 kDa polyacrylates displaying 157.2 μmol/g, 223.0 ± 18.1 and 355.9 μmol/g thiol groups were synthesized in order to investigate the influence of thiol group content on the permeation enhancement. The permeation of sulforhodamine was 3.93- and 3.85-fold improved using 250 kDa poly(acrylic acid)-cysteine conjugate exhibiting 355.9 ± 39.5 μmol/g and 223.0 ± 18.1 μmol/g thiol groups. Using the same conjugates the permeation of penicillin G was 1.70- and 1.59-fold improved, respectively. The study demonstrates that thiolated poly(acrylic acid) inhibits Mrp2 mediated transport and that the extent of inhibition depends on the molecular mass and degree of thiolation of the polymer. PMID:26238816

  17. Double edge redox-implications for the interaction between endogenous thiols and copper ions: In vitro studies.

    Carrasco-Pozo, Catalina; Aliaga, Margarita E; Olea-Azar, Claudio; Speisky, Hernán

    2008-11-15

    The present study investigated the redox-consequences of the interaction between various endogenous thiols (RSH)-glutathione, cysteine, homocysteine, gamma-glutamyl-cysteine, and cysteinyl-glycine- and Cu(2+) ions, in terms of their free radical-scavenging, ascorbate-oxidizing and O2(*-)-generating properties of the resulting mixtures. Upon a brief incubation (3-30 min) with Cu(2+), the free radical-scavenging properties (towards ABTS(*)(+) and DPPH(*)) and thiol-titratable groups of the RSH added to the mixtures decreased significantly. Remarkably, both effects were only partial, even in the presence of a large molar Cu(2+)-excess, and were unaffected despite increasing the incubation time. At equimolar concentrations, the RSH/Cu(2+) mixtures led to the formation of (EPR paramagnetic) Cu(II)-complexes that were time-stable and ascorbate-reducible, but redox-inactive towards oxygen. In turn, at a slight molar thiol-excess (3:1), the mixtures resulted in the formation of time-stable Cu(I)-complexes (EPR silent) that were unreactive towards ascorbate and oxygen. The only exception was seen for the thiol, glutathione, whose mixture with Cu(2+) mixture displayed a O2(*-)-generating capacity (cytochrome c- and lucigenin-reduction). The data indicate that, depending on their molar ratio, the interaction between Cu(2+) and the tested thiols would give place to mixtures containing either: (i) time-stable and ascorbate-reducible Cu(II)-complexes which display free radical-scavenging properties, or (ii) time-stable but redox-inactive towards oxygen Cu(I)-complexes. Among the latter, the only exception was that of glutathione. PMID:18926709

  18. Toward the Facile and Ecofriendly Fabrication of Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells via Thiol Coadsorbent Assistance.

    Chang, Jia-Yaw; Li, Chen-Hei; Chiang, Ya-Han; Chen, Chia-Hung; Li, Pei-Ni

    2016-07-27

    This paper reports a facile and environmentally friendly approach to the preparation of highly efficient quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) based on a combination of aqueous CuInS2 quantum dots (QDs) and thiol coadsorbents. The photovoltaic properties of the QDSSCs were found to be dependent on the type and concentration of the thiol coadsorbent. The incorporation of thiol coadsorbents results in improved JSC and VOC because (1) they provide disulfide reductants during the QD sensitization process and (2) the coadsorbent molecules are anchored on the TiO2 surface, thus affecting the movement of the conduction band of TiO2. To the best of the our knowledge, this is the first demonstrated use of various thiol coadsorbents as reducing agents in the fabrication of high-efficiency QDSSCs. CuInS2 QDSSCs fabricated with the assistance of thioglycolic acid coadsorbents exhibited efficiencies as high as 5.90%, which is 20 times higher than that of the control device without thiol coadsorbents (0.29%). In addition, the photovoltaic properties of a device fabricated using the colloidal CuInS2 QDs coated with different bifunctional linkers were investigated for comparison. The versatility of this facile fabrication process was demonstrated in the preparation of solar cells sensitized with aqueous AgInS2 or CdSeTe QDs. The AgInS2 QDSSC showed a conversion efficiency of 2.72%, which is the highest reported for Ag-based metal sulfides QDSSCs thus far. PMID:27405921

  19. Isolation and characterization of nitric oxide reductase from Paracoccus halodenitrificans.

    Sakurai, N; Sakurai, T

    1997-11-11

    Nitric oxide reductase was isolated from the membrane fraction of a denitrifying bacterium, Paracoccus halodenitrificans, in the presence of n-dodecyl beta-D-maltoside. A relatively simple and effective procedure to purify NO reductase using DEAE-Toyopearl and hydroxyapatite (ceramic) chromatographies has been developed. The enzyme consisted of two subunits with molecular masses of 20 and 42 kDa associated with the c-type heme and two b-type hemes, respectively. The optical and magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectra of the oxidized (as isolated) and reduced enzymes indicated that the heme c is in the low-spin state and the hemes b are in the high- and low-spin states. The EPR spectrum also showed the presence of the split high-spin component (g perpendicular = 6.6, 6.0) and two low spin components (gz,y,x = 2.96, 2.26, 1.46, gz = 3.59). Although the presence of an extra iron was suggested from atomic absorption spectroscopy, a non-heme iron could not be detected by colorimetric titrations using ferene and 2-(5-nitro-2-pyridylazo)- 5-(N-propyl-N-sulfopropylamino)phenolate (PAPS). One of the extra signals at g = 4.3 and 2.00 might come from a non-heme iron, while they may originate from an adventitious iron and a certain nonmetallic radical, respectively. When CO acted on the reduced enzyme, both of the low-spin hemes were not affected, and when NO acted on the reduced enzyme, the optical and MCD spectra were of a mixture of the oxidized and reduced enzymes. Consequently, the reduction of NO was supposed to take place at the high-spin heme b. The heme c and the low-spin heme b centers were considered to function as electron mediators during the intermolecular and intramolecular processes. PMID:9374857

  20. Identification of imine reductase-specific sequence motifs.

    Fademrecht, Silvia; Scheller, Philipp N; Nestl, Bettina M; Hauer, Bernhard; Pleiss, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Chiral amines are valuable building blocks for the production of a variety of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and other specialty chemicals. Only recently, imine reductases (IREDs) were discovered which catalyze the stereoselective reduction of imines to chiral amines. Although several IREDs were biochemically characterized in the last few years, knowledge of the reaction mechanism and the molecular basis of substrate specificity and stereoselectivity is limited. To gain further insights into the sequence-function relationships, the Imine Reductase Engineering Database (www.IRED.BioCatNet.de) was established and a systematic analysis of 530 putative IREDs was performed. A standard numbering scheme based on R-IRED-Sk was introduced to facilitate the identification and communication of structurally equivalent positions in different proteins. A conservation analysis revealed a highly conserved cofactor binding region and a predominantly hydrophobic substrate binding cleft. Two IRED-specific motifs were identified, the cofactor binding motif GLGxMGx5 [ATS]x4 Gx4 [VIL]WNR[TS]x2 [KR] and the active site motif Gx[DE]x[GDA]x[APS]x3 {K}x[ASL]x[LMVIAG]. Our results indicate a preference toward NADPH for all IREDs and explain why, despite their sequence similarity to β-hydroxyacid dehydrogenases (β-HADs), no conversion of β-hydroxyacids has been observed. Superfamily-specific conservations were investigated to explore the molecular basis of their stereopreference. Based on our analysis and previous experimental results on IRED mutants, an exclusive role of standard position 187 for stereoselectivity is excluded. Alternatively, two standard positions 139 and 194 were identified which are superfamily-specifically conserved and differ in R- and S-selective enzymes. Proteins 2016; 84:600-610. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26857686

  1. Fatty acyl-CoA reductases of birds

    Hellenbrand Janine

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Birds clean and lubricate their feathers with waxes that are produced in the uropygial gland, a holocrine gland located on their back above the tail. The type and the composition of the secreted wax esters are dependent on the bird species, for instance the wax ester secretion of goose contains branched-chain fatty acids and unbranched fatty alcohols, whereas that of barn owl contains fatty acids and alcohols both of which are branched. Alcohol-forming fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR catalyze the reduction of activated acyl groups to fatty alcohols that can be esterified with acyl-CoA thioesters forming wax esters. Results cDNA sequences encoding fatty acyl-CoA reductases were cloned from the uropygial glands of barn owl (Tyto alba, domestic chicken (Gallus gallus domesticus and domestic goose (Anser anser domesticus. Heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae showed that they encode membrane associated enzymes which catalyze a NADPH dependent reduction of acyl-CoA thioesters to fatty alcohols. By feeding studies of transgenic yeast cultures and in vitro enzyme assays with membrane fractions of transgenic yeast cells two groups of isozymes with different properties were identified, termed FAR1 and FAR2. The FAR1 group mainly synthesized 1-hexadecanol and accepted substrates in the range between 14 and 18 carbon atoms, whereas the FAR2 group preferred stearoyl-CoA and accepted substrates between 16 and 20 carbon atoms. Expression studies with tissues of domestic chicken indicated that FAR transcripts were not restricted to the uropygial gland. Conclusion The data of our study suggest that the identified and characterized avian FAR isozymes, FAR1 and FAR2, can be involved in wax ester biosynthesis and in other pathways like ether lipid synthesis.

  2. Evidence for a hexaheteromeric methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase in Moorella thermoacetica.

    Mock, Johanna; Wang, Shuning; Huang, Haiyan; Kahnt, Jörg; Thauer, Rudolf K

    2014-09-01

    Moorella thermoacetica can grow with H₂ and CO₂, forming acetic acid from 2 CO₂ via the Wood-Ljungdahl pathway. All enzymes involved in this pathway have been characterized to date, except for methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MetF). We report here that the M. thermoacetica gene that putatively encodes this enzyme, metF, is part of a transcription unit also containing the genes hdrCBA, mvhD, and metV. MetF copurified with the other five proteins encoded in the unit in a hexaheteromeric complex with an apparent molecular mass in the 320-kDa range. The 40-fold-enriched preparation contained per mg protein 3.1 nmol flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), 3.4 nmol flavin mononucleotide (FMN), and 110 nmol iron, almost as predicted from the primary structure of the six subunits. It catalyzed the reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate with reduced benzyl viologen but not with NAD(P)H in either the absence or presence of oxidized ferredoxin. It also catalyzed the reversible reduction of benzyl viologen with NADH (diaphorase activity). Heterologous expression of the metF gene in Escherichia coli revealed that the subunit MetF contains one FMN rather than FAD. MetF exhibited 70-fold-higher methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase activity with benzyl viologen when produced together with MetV, which in part shows sequence similarity to MetF. Heterologously produced HdrA contained 2 FADs and had NAD-specific diaphorase activity. Our results suggested that the physiological electron donor for methylenetetrahydrofolate reduction in M. thermoacetica is NADH and that the exergonic reduction of methylenetetrahydrofolate with NADH is coupled via flavin-based electron bifurcation with the endergonic reduction of an electron acceptor, whose identity remains unknown. PMID:25002540

  3. Nitrite and nitrous oxide reductase regulation by nitrogen oxides in Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106.

    Sabaty, M; Schwintner, C; Cahors, S; Richaud, P; Verméglio, A

    1999-10-01

    We have cloned the nap locus encoding the periplasmic nitrate reductase in Rhodobacter sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106. A mutant with this enzyme deleted is unable to grow under denitrifying conditions. Biochemical analysis of this mutant shows that in contrast to the wild-type strain, the level of synthesis of the nitrite and N(2)O reductases is not increased by the addition of nitrate. Growth under denitrifying conditions and induction of N oxide reductase synthesis are both restored by the presence of a plasmid containing the genes encoding the nitrate reductase. This demonstrates that R. sphaeroides f. sp. denitrificans IL106 does not possess an efficient membrane-bound nitrate reductase and that nitrate is not the direct inducer for the nitrite and N(2)O reductases in this species. In contrast, we show that nitrite induces the synthesis of the nitrate reductase. PMID:10498715

  4. The use of 5-alpha reductase inhibitors for the prevention of prostate cancer.

    Yu, Eun-mi; El-Ayass, Walid; Aragon-Ching, Jeanny B

    2010-07-01

    The use of 5-alpha-reductase inhibitors has been studied not only in benign prostatic hyperplasia, but as a chemopreventive strategy in prostate cancer. Both finasteride and dutasteride, 5 alpha-reductase inhibitors (5ARI), have been shown to decrease the risk of prostate cancer. The results of the REDUCE trial using the dual alpha-reductase isoenzyme inhibitor dutasteride, has recently been published by Andriole et al. in the New England Journal of Medicine. Certain considerations regarding its use and applicability to men with high risk of developing prostate cancer are herein discussed. PMID:20574153

  5. Characterization and regulation of Leishmania major 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase

    Montalvetti, A; Pena Diaz, Javier; Hurtado, R;

    2000-01-01

    In eukaryotes the enzyme 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase catalyses the synthesis of mevalonic acid, a common precursor to all isoprenoid compounds. Here we report the isolation and overexpression of the gene coding for HMG-CoA reductase from Leishmania major. The protein from...... Leishmania lacks the membrane domain characteristic of eukaryotic cells but exhibits sequence similarity with eukaryotic reductases. Highly purified protein was achieved by ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by chromatography on hydroxyapatite. Kinetic parameters were determined for the protozoan...

  6. Virtual screening of plant derived compounds for aldose reductase inhibition using molecular docking.

    Muppalaneni, Naresh Babu; Rao, Allam Appa

    2012-01-01

    The role of the aldose reductase in type 2 diabetes is widely described. Therefore, it is of interest to identify plant derived compounds to inhibit its activity. We studied the protein-ligand interaction of 267 compounds from different parts of seven plants (Allium sativum, Coriandrum sativum, Dacus carota, Murrayyakoneigii, Eucalyptus, Calendula officinalis and Lycopersicon esculentum) with aldose reductase as the target protein. Molecular docking and re-scoring of top ten compounds (using GOLD, AutoDock Vina, eHiTS, PatchDock and MEDock) followed by rank-sum technique identified compound allium38 with high binding affinity for aldose reductase. PMID:23275691

  7. Steroidal pyrazolines evaluated as aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibitors for chemoprevention of cancer.

    Abdalla, Mohamed M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Bhat, Mashooq A; Amr, Abdel-Galil E; Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M

    2012-05-01

    The aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibition of synthesized heterocyclic pyrazole derivatives fused with steroidal structure for chemoprevention of cancer is reported herein. All compounds were interestingly less toxic than the reference drug (Cyproterone(®)). The aromatase inhibitory activities of these compounds were much more potent than the lead compound resveratrol, which has an IC(50) of 80 μM. In addition, all the compounds displayed potent quinone reductase-2 inhibition. Initially the acute toxicity of the compounds was assayed via the determination of their LD(50). The aromatase and quinone reductase-2 inhibitors resulting from this study have potential value in the treatment and prevention of cancer. PMID:22361454

  8. Hydrogen-transfer and charge transfer in photochemical and high energy radiation induced reactions: effects of thiols. Final report, February 1, 1960-january 31, 1979

    Absorption of ultraviolet or visible light, or high energy radiation, may lead to highly reactive free radicals. Thiols affect the reactions of these radicals in the following ways: (1) transfer of hydrogen from sulfur of the thiol to a substrate radical, converting the radical to a stable molecule, and the thiol to a reactive thiyl radical; and (2) transfer of hydrogen from a substrate radical or molecule to thiyl, regenerating thiol. The thiol is thus used repeatedly and a single molecule may affect the consequences of many quanta. Three effects may ensue, depending upon the system irradiated: (1) the substrate radicals may be converted by thiol-thiyl to the original molecules, and protection against radiation damage is afforded. (2) The radicals may be converted to molecules not identical with the starting materials, and in both cases damage caused by radical combination processes is prevented. (3) Product yields may be increased where the initial radicals might otherwise regenerate starting materials. It was shown that rates of reaction of excited species can be correlated with triplet energies and reduction potentials, and with ionization potentials, that amines are very reactive toward excited carbonyl compounds of all types, and that yields of products from these reactions can be increased by thiols, leading to increased efficiency in utilization of light

  9. Inhibition of glutathione synthesis eliminates the adaptive response of ascitic hepatoma 22 cells to nedaplatin that targets thioredoxin reductase

    Wang, Yijun [School of Tea and Food Science, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036, Anhui (China); Lu, Hongjuan [Productivity Center of Jiangsu Province, Nanjing 210042, Jiangsu (China); Wang, Dongxu; Li, Shengrong; Sun, Kang; Wan, Xiaochun [School of Tea and Food Science, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036, Anhui (China); Taylor, Ethan Will [Department of Nanoscience, Joint School of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, University of North Carolina at Greensboro, Greensboro, NC 27402 (United States); Zhang, Jinsong, E-mail: zjs@ahau.edu.cn [School of Tea and Food Science, Anhui Agricultural University, Hefei 230036, Anhui (China)

    2012-12-15

    Thioredoxin reductase (TrxR) is a target for cancer therapy and the anticancer mechanism of cisplatin involves TrxR inhibition. We hypothesize that the anticancer drug nedaplatin (NDP), an analogue of cisplatin and a second-generation platinum complex, also targets TrxR. Furthermore, we investigate whether the therapeutic efficacy of NDP can be enhanced by simultaneous modulation of 1) TrxR, via NDP, and 2) glutathione (GSH), via the GSH synthesis inhibitor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). Mice bearing ascitic hepatoma 22 (H22) cells were treated with NDP alone or NDP plus BSO. TrxR activity of H22 cells was inhibited by NDP in a dose-dependent manner. A high correlation between the inhibition of TrxR activity at 6 h and the inhibition of ascitic fluid volume at 72 h was established (r = 0.978, p < 0.01). As an adaptive response, the viable ascitic cancer cells after NDP treatment displayed an enlarged cell phenotype, assembled with several-fold more antioxidant enzymes and GSH-predominant non-protein free thiols. This adaptive response was largely eliminated when BSO was co-administered with NDP, leading to the decimation of the H22 cell population without enhancing renal toxicity, since at this dose, NDP did not inhibit renal TrxR activity. In conclusion, the pharmacological effect of NDP involves TrxR inhibition, and the adaptive response of NDP-treated ascitic H22 cells can be efficiently counteracted by BSO. Simultaneous modulation of TrxR and GSH on ascitic H22 cells using NDP plus BSO greatly enhances therapeutic efficacy as compared with the single modulation of TrxR using NDP alone. -- Highlights: ► Nedaplatin at a pharmacological dose inhibits TrxR in cancer cells but not in kidney. ► The nedaplatin-treated cancer cells exhibit adaptive response. ► Buthionine sulfoximine inhibits glutathione in both cancer cells and kidney. ► Buthionine sulfoximine counteracts the adaptive response to the nedaplatin treatment. ► Buthionine sulfoximine does not

  10. A neutral polyacrylate copolymer coating for surface modification of thiol-ene microchannels for improved performance of protein separation by microchip electrophoresis

    Mesbah, Kiarach; Mai, T.D.; Jensen, Thomas Glasdam;

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the behavior of thiol-ene substrates that is a class of promising materials for lab-on-a-chip electrophoresis applications. Two polymeric materials were prepared by copolymerization of N, N-dimethylacrylamide (DMA), (3-(methacryloyl-oxy)propyl)trimethoxysilane (PMA) and 3......-(DMA-PMAMAPS) copolymer were evaluated in terms of surface hydrophilicity, suppression and stability of electro-osmotic flow and prevention of protein adsorption. Surface modification of thiol-ene containing a 20 % excess of thiols with the terpolymer p-(DMA-PMA-MAPS) was found to offer the most stable coating and most...

  11. Dendronization of gold and CdSe/cdS (core-shell) quantum dots with tomalia type, thiol core, functionalized poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrons

    Poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimers containing disulfide cores (i.e., cystamine) and possessing carboxylic acid or hydroxyl terminal groups were reduced with dithiothreitol (DTT) to yield single site, thiol core, functionalized PAMAM dendron reagents. These thiol functionalized dendron reagents were used to surface modify (dendronize) both gold nanoparticles, as well as CdSe/CdS (core-shell) quantum dots (QDs). Dendronization involved self-assembly of the focal point thiol functional dendrons at the metal interface of both gold and CdSe/CdS QDs by ligand exchange of protective surfactants used for their synthesis. The synthesis, characterization and preliminary luminescence studies of these new dendritic hybrids are reported

  12. Association between methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism and age of onset in schizophrenia

    Vares, Maria; Saetre, Peter; Deng, Hong;

    2010-01-01

    Different lines of evidence indicate that methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) functional gene polymorphisms, causative in aberrant folate-homocysteine metabolism, are associated with increased vulnerability to several heritable developmental disorders. Opposing views are expressed...

  13. Redesigning alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases for more efficient biosynthesis of enantiopure isomers.

    Zhang, Rongzhen; Xu, Yan; Xiao, Rong

    2015-12-01

    Alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases predominantly catalyze the asymmetric biosynthesis of optically pure stereoisomers because of their unique chiral constitutions. The enantioselectivities of alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases are substrate- and cofactor-dependent, and therefore they usually catalyze specific reactions with high enantioselectivity under physiological conditions; this may not be suitable for asymmetric biosynthesis with non-natural substrates or non-natural cofactors, and under nonphysiological conditions. It is therefore necessary to modify alcohol dehydrogenases/reductases using various redesigning tools such as directed evolution and rational design, and their combinations, as well as engineering enzyme modules for more efficient production of "non-natural" products. In this article, progress in these aspects of alcohol dehydrogenase/reductase design is reviewed, and future challenges are discussed. PMID:26320091

  14. 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of some steroidal cyanopyridinone derivatives.

    Al-Mohizea, Abdullah M; Al-Omar, Mohamed A; Abdalla, Mohamed M; Amr, Abdel-Galil E

    2012-01-01

    We herein report the 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of some synthesized heterocyclic cyanopyridone and cyanothiopyridone derivatives fused with steroidal structure. Initially the acute toxicity of the compounds was assayed via the determination of their LD(50). All the compounds, except 3b, were interestingly less toxic than the reference drug (Prednisolone(®)). Seventeen heterocyclic derivatives containing a cyanopyridone or cyanothiopyridone rings fused to a steroidal moiety were synthesized and screened for their 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities comparable to that of Anastrozole, Bicalutamide, Efavirenz, Capravirine, Ribavirin, Oseltamivir and Amantadine as the reference drugs. Some of the compounds exhibited better 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities than the reference drugs. The detailed 5α-reductase inhibitors, antiviral and anti-tumor activities of the synthesized compounds were reported. PMID:22057085

  15. Comparison of the Stereospecificity and Immunoreactivity of NADH-Ferricyanide Reductases in Plant Membranes

    Fredlund, Kenneth M.; Struglics, André; Widell, Susanne; ASKERLUND, Per; Kader, Jean-Claude; Møller, Ian M.

    1994-01-01

    The substrate stereospecificity of NADH-ferricyanide reductase activities in the inner mitochondrial membrane and peroxisomal membrane of potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tubers, spinach (Spinacea oleracea L.) leaf plasma membrane, and red beetroot (Beta vulgaris L.) tonoplast were all specific for the [beta]-hydrogen of NADH, whereas the reductases in wheat root (Triticum aestivum L.) endoplasmic reticulum and potato tuber outer mitochondrial membrane were both [alpha]-hydrogen specific. In all...

  16. Nucleotide sequence of a cyanobacterial nifH gene coding for nitrogenase reductase

    Mevarech, Moshe; Rice, Douglas; Haselkorn, Robert

    1980-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of nifH, the structural gene for nitrogenase reductase (component II or Fe protein of nitrogenase) from the cyanobacterium Anabaena 7120 has been determined. Also reported are 194 bases of the 5′-flanking sequence and 170 bases of the 3′-flanking sequence. The predicted amino acid sequence was compared with that determined for the complete nitrogenase reductase of Clostridium pasteurianum and the cysteine-containing peptides of the protein from Azotobacter vinelandii. ...

  17. Overexpression of Soybean Isoflavone Reductase (GmIFR) Enhances Resistance to Phytophthora sojae in Soybean

    Cheng, Qun; Li, Ninghui; Dong, Lidong; Zhang, Dayong; Fan, Sujie; Jiang, Liangyu; Wang, Xin; Xu, Pengfei; Zhang, Shuzhen

    2015-01-01

    Isoflavone reductase (IFR) is an enzyme involved in the biosynthetic pathway of isoflavonoid phytoalexin in plants. IFRs are unique to the plant kingdom and are considered to have crucial roles in plant response to various biotic and abiotic environmental stresses. Here, we report the characterization of a novel member of the soybean isoflavone reductase gene family GmIFR. Overexpression of GmIFR transgenic soybean exhibited enhanced resistance to Phytophthora sojae. Following stress treatmen...

  18. Design and synthesis of hepatoselective, pyrrole-based HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors.

    Pfefferkorn, Jeffrey A; Song, Yuntao; Sun, Kuai-Lin; Miller, Steven R; Trivedi, Bharat K; Choi, Chulho; Sorenson, Roderick J; Bratton, Larry D; Unangst, Paul C; Larsen, Scott D; Poel, Toni-Jo; Cheng, Xue-Min; Lee, Chitase; Erasga, Noe; Auerbach, Bruce; Askew, Valerie; Dillon, Lisa; Hanselman, Jeffrey C; Lin, Zhiwu; Lu, Gina; Robertson, Andrew; Olsen, Karl; Mertz, Thomas; Sekerke, Catherine; Pavlovsky, Alexander; Harris, Melissa S; Bainbridge, Graeme; Caspers, Nicole; Chen, Huifen; Eberstadt, Matthias

    2007-08-15

    This manuscript describes the design and synthesis of a series of pyrrole-based inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. Analogs were optimized using structure-based design and physical property considerations resulting in the identification of 44, a hepatoselective HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor with excellent acute and chronic efficacy in a pre-clinical animal models. PMID:17574412

  19. Protein Method for Investigating Mercuric Reductase Gene Expression in Aquatic Environments

    Ogunseitan, O A

    1998-01-01

    A colorimetric assay for NADPH-dependent, mercuric ion-specific oxidoreductase activity was developed to facilitate the investigation of mercuric reductase gene expression in polluted aquatic ecosystems. Protein molecules extracted directly from unseeded freshwater and samples seeded with Pseudomonas aeruginosa PU21(Rip64) were quantitatively assayed for mercuric reductase activity in microtiter plates by stoichiometric coupling of mercuric ion reduction to a colorimetric redox chain through ...

  20. Molecular pharmacology and antitumor activity of palmarumycin based inhibitors of thioredoxin reductase.

    Powis, Garth; Wipf, Peter; Lynch, Stephen M.; Birmingham, Anne; Kirkpatrick, D. Lynn

    2006-01-01

    The cytosolic thioredoxin (Trx) redox system comprising Trx-1 and the NADPH dependent thioredoxin reductase -1 reductase (TrxR-1) is an important regulator of cell growth and survival. Trx-1 is overexpressed in many human tumors where it is associated with increased cell proliferation, decreased apoptosis and decreased patient survival. We hypothesized that TrxR-1 provides a target to inhibit the activity of overexpressed Trx-1 for the development of novel anticancer agents. We found that the...

  1. Soil acidity as affecting micronutrients concentration, nitrato reductase enzyme activity and yield in upland rice plants

    Edemar Moro; Carlos Alexandre Costa Crusciol; Heitor Cantarella; Adriano Stephan Nascente; Adriana Lima Moro; Fernando Broetto

    2013-01-01

    The lowest grain yield of rice under no-tillage system (NTS) in relation to the conventional system may be due to the predominance nitrate in the soil and the low nitrate reductase activity. Another reason may be caused by micronutrient deficiency because of superficially soil acidity corrections. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the changes caused by soil pH in the N forms in the soil, micronutrients concentration in rice plants, nitrate reductase activity, yield of ric...

  2. INHIBITORY ACTIVITY OF FLAVONOIDS ON THE LENS ALDOSE REDUCTASE OF HEALTHY AND DIABETIC RATS

    M.T. Goodarzi; Zal, F; M. Malakooti; M. R. Safari S. Sadeghian

    2006-01-01

    Aldose reductase is a critical enzyme in the polyol pathway that plays an important role in diabetes mellitus. Inhibition of the activity of this enzyme can prevent cataract in diabetic patients’lenses. In this study the inhibitory effect of two flavonoids, quercetin and naringin, in the activity of aldose reductase in streptozotocin-induced diabetic and healthy rats were investigated. Thirty male rats were divided in six groups. The first, second and third group were healthy rats that receiv...

  3. Glutathione Reductase/Glutathione Is Responsible for Cytotoxic Elemental Sulfur Tolerance via Polysulfide Shuttle in Fungi*

    Sato, Ikuo; Shimatani, Kanami; Fujita, Kensaku; Abe, Tsuyoshi; Shimizu, Motoyuki; Fujii, Tatsuya; Hoshino, Takayuki; Takaya, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    Fungi that can reduce elemental sulfur to sulfide are widely distributed, but the mechanism and physiological significance of the reaction have been poorly characterized. Here, we purified elemental sulfur-reductase (SR) and cloned its gene from the elemental sulfur-reducing fungus Fusarium oxysporum. We found that NADPH-glutathione reductase (GR) reduces elemental sulfur via glutathione as an intermediate. A loss-of-function mutant of the SR/GR gene generated less sulfide from elemental sulf...

  4. Expression of the mouse dihydrofolate reductase complementary deoxyribonucleic acid in simian virus 40 vectors.

    Subramani, S.; Mulligan, R.; Berg, P

    1981-01-01

    A mouse complementary deoxyribonucleic acid segment coding for the enzyme dihydrofolate reductase has been cloned in two general classes of vectors containing simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid: (i) those that can be propagated as virions in permissive cells and (ii) those that can be introduced into and maintained stably in various mammalian cells. Both types of vectors express the mouse dihydrofolate reductase by using signals supplied by simian virus 40 deoxyribonucleic acid sequences. ...

  5. Interaction of Product Analogs with the Active Site of Rhodobacter sphaeroides Dimethylsulfoxide Reductase

    George, Graham N.; Nelson, Kimberly Johnson; Harris, Hugh H.; Doonan, Christian J.; Rajagopalan, K V

    2007-01-01

    We report a structural characterization using X-ray absorption spectroscopy of Rhodobacter sphaeroides dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) reductase reduced with trimethylarsine, and show that this is structurally analogous to the physiologically relevant dimethylsulfide-reduced DMSO reductase. Our data unambiguously indicate that these species should be regarded as formal MoIV species, and indicate a classical coordination complex of trimethylarsine oxide, with no special structural distortions. The si...

  6. In Silico Docking studies of Aldose Reductase Inhibitory activity of selected Flavonoids

    Muthuswamy Umamaheswari; C. S. Aji; Kuppusamy Asokkumar; Thirumalaisamy Sivashanmugam; Varadharajan Subhadradevi; Puliyath Jagannath; Arumugam Madeswaran

    2012-01-01

    New drugs for the inhibition of the enzyme aldose reductase are in development and they have to be screened before being considered for preclinical and clinical evaluation. The current study deals with the evaluation of the cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity of flavonoids using in silico docking studies. In this perspective, flavonoids like Farobin-A, Gericudranin- B, Glaziovianin-A, Rutin, and Xanthotoxin were selected. Epalrestat, a known aldose reductase inhibitor was used as the standard....

  7. Virtual screening of plant derived compounds for aldose reductase inhibition using molecular docking

    Muppalaneni, Naresh Babu; Rao, Allam Appa

    2012-01-01

    The role of the aldose reductase in type 2 diabetes is widely described. Therefore, it is of interest to identify plant derived compounds to inhibit its activity. We studied the protein-ligand interaction of 267 compounds from different parts of seven plants (Allium sativum, Coriandrum sativum, Dacus carota, Murrayyakoneigii, Eucalyptus, Calendula officinalis and Lycopersicon esculentum) with aldose reductase as the target protein. Molecular docking and re-scoring of top ten compounds (using ...

  8. Thiol-thione tautomeric analysis, spectroscopic (FT-IR, Laser-Raman, NMR and UV-vis) properties and DFT computations of 5-(3-pyridyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol molecule

    Gökce, Halil; Öztürk, Nuri; Ceylan, Ümit; Alpaslan, Yelda Bingöl; Alpaslan, Gökhan

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the 5-(3-pyridyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol molecule (C7H6N4S) molecule has been characterized by using FT-IR, Laser-Raman, NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed to investigate the molecular structure (thione-thiol tautomerism), vibrational wavenumbers, electronic transition absorption wavelengths in DMSO solvent and vacuum, proton and carbon-13 NMR chemical shifts and HOMOs-LUMOs energies at DFT/B3LYP/6-311 ++G(d,p) level for all five tautomers of the title molecule. The obtained results show that the calculated vibrational wavenumbers, NMR chemical shifts and UV-vis wavelengths are in a good agreement with experimental data.

  9. Thiol-thione tautomeric analysis, spectroscopic (FT-IR, Laser-Raman, NMR and UV-vis) properties and DFT computations of 5-(3-pyridyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol molecule.

    Gökce, Halil; Öztürk, Nuri; Ceylan, Ümit; Alpaslan, Yelda Bingöl; Alpaslan, Gökhan

    2016-06-15

    In this study, the 5-(3-pyridyl)-4H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thiol molecule (C7H6N4S) molecule has been characterized by using FT-IR, Laser-Raman, NMR and UV-vis spectroscopies. Quantum chemical calculations have been performed to investigate the molecular structure (thione-thiol tautomerism), vibrational wavenumbers, electronic transition absorption wavelengths in DMSO solvent and vacuum, proton and carbon-13 NMR chemical shifts and HOMOs-LUMOs energies at DFT/B3LYP/6-311++G(d,p) level for all five tautomers of the title molecule. The obtained results show that the calculated vibrational wavenumbers, NMR chemical shifts and UV-vis wavelengths are in a good agreement with experimental data. PMID:27054702

  10. INHIBITION OF TYPE I 5α-REDUCTASE BY MEDICINAL PLANT EXTRACTS

    Patil Vijaya

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Type I 5α-reductase has been implicated in skin disorders such as acne, hirsutism and male pattern baldness and its inhibition offers a potential treatment for these disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibition of type I 5α-reductase activity by extracts from Indian medicinal plants. Plant extracts were screened and selected based on their ability to inhibit Propionibacterium acnes and Staphylococcus epidermidis. Since type I 5α-reductase metabolises testosterone to Δ4-androstene-3, 17-dione, the activity of enzyme was determined using RIA for testosterone and Δ4-androstene-3, 17-dione. It was found that methanolic extract of Embelia ribes was a potent inhibitor of type I 5α-reductase (IC50:100μg/mL. Extracts of Vitex negundo, Terminalia chebula, and Terminalia bellerica which also inhibited type I 5α-reductase (IC50: 200-390 μg /mL. Therefore herbal formulation of these plant extracts may be used in the treatment of skin disorders involving type I 5α-reductase.

  11. Nitrate reductase activity and its relationship with applied nitrogen in soybean

    Field experiments were conducted to study the nitrate reductase activity and its relationship to nitrogen by using frame tests (pot without bottom), sand culture and 15N-urea at transplanting in soybean variety Suinong 14. Results showed that the activity of nitrate reductase in leaf changed as a signal peak curve with the soybean growth, lower in vegetative growth phase, higher in reproductive growth period and reached the peak in blooming period, then decreased gradually. Nitrogen application showed obvious effect on the nitrate reductase activity. The activities of nitrate reductase in leaves followed the order of N135 > N90 > N45 > N0 in vegetative growth stage, no clear regularity was found during the whole reproductive growth period. The activities of nitrate reductase in leaves were accorded with the order of upper leaves > mid leaves > lower leaves, and it was very significant differences (P15N labeling method during beginning seed stage and full seed stage shown that 15N abundance in various organs at different node position also followed the same order, suggesting that high level of nitrate reductase activity at upper leaves of soybean promoted the assimilation of NO3-. (authors)

  12. Isobutyraldehyde production from Escherichia coli by removing aldehyde reductase activity

    Rodriguez Gabriel M

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing global demand and reliance on petroleum-derived chemicals will necessitate alternative sources for chemical feedstocks. Currently, 99% of chemical feedstocks are derived from petroleum and natural gas. Renewable methods for producing important chemical feedstocks largely remain unaddressed. Synthetic biology enables the renewable production of various chemicals from microorganisms by constructing unique metabolic pathways. Here, we engineer Escherichia coli for the production of isobutyraldehyde, which can be readily converted to various hydrocarbons currently derived from petroleum such as isobutyric acid, acetal, oxime and imine using existing chemical catalysis. Isobutyraldehyde can be readily stripped from cultures during production, which reduces toxic effects of isobutyraldehyde. Results We adopted the isobutanol pathway previously constructed in E. coli, neglecting the last step in the pathway where isobutyraldehyde is converted to isobutanol. However, this strain still overwhelmingly produced isobutanol (1.5 g/L/OD600 (isobutanol vs 0.14 g/L/OD600 (isobutyraldehyde. Next, we deleted yqhD which encodes a broad-substrate range aldehyde reductase known to be active toward isobutyraldehyde. This strain produced isobutanol and isobutyraldehyde at a near 1:1 ratio, indicating further native isobutyraldehyde reductase (IBR activity in E. coli. To further eliminate isobutanol formation, we set out to identify and remove the remaining IBRs from the E. coli genome. We identified 7 annotated genes coding for IBRs that could be active toward isobutyraldehyde: adhP, eutG, yiaY, yjgB, betA, fucO, eutE. Individual deletions of the genes yielded only marginal improvements. Therefore, we sequentially deleted all seven of the genes and assessed production. The combined deletions greatly increased isobutyraldehyde production (1.5 g/L/OD600 and decreased isobutanol production (0.4 g/L/OD600. By assessing production by

  13. Electronic Transport through Self Assembled Thiol Molecules: Effect of Monolayer Order, Dynamics and Temperature

    Dholakia, Geetha; Fan, Wendy; Meyyappan, M.

    2005-01-01

    We present the charge transport and tunneling conductance of self assembled organic thiol molecules and discuss the influence of order and dynamics in the monolayer on the transport behavior and the effect of temperature. Conjugated thiol molecular wires and organometals such as terpyridine metal complexes provide a new platform for molecular electronic devices and we study their self assembly on Au(111) substrates by the scanning tunneling microscope. Determining the organization of the molecule and the ability to control the nature of its interface with the substrate is important for reliable performance of the molecular electronic devices. By concurrent scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy studies on SAMs formed from oligo (phenelyne ethynelyne) monolayers with and without molecular order, we show that packing and order determine the response of a self assembled monolayer (SAM) to competing interactions. Molecular resolution STM imaging in vacuum shows that the OPES adopt an imcommensurate SAM structure on Au(111) with a rectangular unit cell. Tunneling spectroscopic measurements were performed on the SAM as a function of junction resistance. STS results show that the I-Vs are non linear and asymmetric due to the inherent asymmetry in the molecular structure, with larger currents at negative sample biases. The asymmetry increases with increasing junction resistance due to the asymmetry in the coupling to the leads. This is brought out clearly in the differential conductance, which also shows a gap at the Fermi level. We also studied the effect of order and dynamics in the monolayer on the charge transport and found that competing forces between the electric field, intermolecular interactions, tip-molecule physisorption and substrate-molecule chemisorption impact the transport measurements and its reliability and that the presence of molecular order is very important for reproducible transport measurements. Thus while developing new electronic platforms

  14. Synchrotron radiation based STXM analysis and micro-XRF mapping of differential expression of extracellular thiol groups by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans grown on Fe(2+) and S(0).

    Xia, Jin-Lan; Liu, Hong-Chang; Nie, Zhen-Yuan; Peng, An-An; Zhen, Xiang-Jun; Yang, Yun; Zhang, Xiu-Li

    2013-09-01

    The differential expression of extracellular thiol groups by Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans grown on substrates Fe(2+) and S(0) was investigated by using synchrotron radiation based scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) imaging and microbeam X-ray fluorescence (μ-XRF) mapping. The extracellular thiol groups (SH) were first alkylated by iodoacetic acid forming Protein-SCH2COOH and then the P-SCH2COOH was marked by calcium ions forming P-SCH2COOCa. The STXM imaging and μ-XRF mapping of SH were based on analysis of SCH2COO-bonded Ca(2+). The results indicated that the thiol group content of A. ferrooxidans grown on S(0) is 3.88 times to that on Fe(2+). Combined with selective labeling of SH by Ca(2+), the STXM imaging and μ-XRF mapping provided an in situ and rapid analysis of differential expression of extracellular thiol groups. PMID:23850802

  15. Chemisorption of a thiol-functionalized ruthenium dye on zinc oxide nanoparticles: Implications for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Singh, Jagdeep; Im, Jisun; Whitten, James E.; Soares, Jason W.; Steeves, Diane M.

    2010-09-01

    ZnO is an alternative to TiO 2-based dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Adsorption of cis-ruthenium-bis[2,2'-bipyridine]-bis[4-thiopyridine] onto ZnO nanorods has been studied using X-ray and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopies (XPS and UPS). XPS indicates chemisorption with a surface density of ca. 1 × 10 15 molecules/cm 2, confirming the possibility of using thiol-terminated dyes for ZnO-based DSSC devices. The energy level diagram, based on UPS and absorbance spectroscopy, indicates that the LUMO of this dye is lower in energy than the ZnO conduction band edge, providing minimal enthalpic driving force for photovoltaic electron injection. However, optimization of thiol-functionalized Ru dyes could result in competitive ZnO-based DSSCs.

  16. Facile Synthesis of Prussian Blue Derivate-Modified Mesoporous Material via Photoinitiated Thiol-Ene Click Reaction for Cesium Adsorption.

    Qian, Jun; Ma, Jiaqi; He, Weiwei; Hua, Daoben

    2015-08-01

    A novel strategy to synthesize a functional mesoporous material for efficient removal of cesium is reported. Specifically, Prussian blue derivate-modified SBA-15 (SBA-15@FC) was prepared by photoinitiated thiol-ene reaction between thiol-modified SBA-15 and pentacyano(4-vinyl pyridine)ferrate complex. The effects of weight percentage of the Prussian blue derivate, pH, adsorbent dose, co-existing ions, and initial concentration were evaluated on the adsorption of cesium ions. The adsorption kinetically follows a pseudo-second-order model and reaches equilibrium within 2 h with a high adsorption capacity of about 13.90 mg Cs g(-1) , which indicates that SBA-15@FC is a promising adsorbent to effectively remove cesium from aqueous solutions. PMID:25965318

  17. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and small angle neutron scattering study of thiol capped gold nanoparticles.

    de la Venta, J.; Bouzas, V.; Pucci, A.; Laguna-Marco, M. A.; Haskel, D.; Pinel, E. F.; te Velthuis, S. G. E.; Hoffmann, A.; Lal, J.; Bleuel, M.; Ruggeri, G.; de Julian, C.; Garcia, M. A.; Univ. Complutense de Madrid; Inst. de Magnetismo Aplicado UCM; Univ. Pisa; Univ. di Padova

    2009-11-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) measurements were performed on thiol capped Au nanoparticles (NPs) embedded into polyethylene. An XMCD signal of 0.8 {center_dot} 10{sup -4} was found at the Au L{sub 3} edge of thiol capped Au NPs embedded in a polyethylene matrix for which Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry yielded a saturation magnetization, M{sub s}, of 0.06 emu/g{sub Au}. SANS measurements showed that the 3.2 nm average-diameter nanoparticles are 28% polydispersed, but no detectable SANS magnetic signal was found with the resolution and sensitivity accessible with the neutron experiment. A comparison with previous experiments carried out on Au NPs and multilayers, yield to different values between XMCD signals and magnetization measured by SQUID magnetometer. We discuss the origin of those differences.

  18. X-ray magnetic circular dichroism and small angle neutron scattering studies of thiol capped gold nanoparticles.

    de la Venta, J.; Bouzas, V.; Pucci, A.; Laguna-Marco, M. A.; Haskel, D.; te Velthuis, S. G. E; Hoffmann, A.; Lal, J.; Bleuel, M.; Ruggeri, G.; de Julian Fernandez, C.; Garcia, M. A.; Univ.Complutense de Madrid; Inst. de Magnetismo Aplicado; Univ. of Pisa; Lab. di Magnetismo Molecolare

    2009-01-01

    X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) and Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) measurements were performed on thiol capped Au nanoparticles (NPs) embedded into polyethylene. An XMCD signal of 0.8 {center_dot} 10{sup -4} was found at the Au L{sub 3} edge of thiol capped Au NPs embedded in a polyethylene matrix for which Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) magnetometry yielded a saturation magnetization, M{sub s}, of 0.06 emu/g{sub Au}. SANS measurements showed that the 3.2 nm average-diameter nanoparticles are 28% polydispersed, but no detectable SANS magnetic signal was found with the resolution and sensitivity accessible with the neutron experiment. A comparison with previous experiments carried out on Au NPs and multilayers, yield to different values between XMCD signals and magnetization measured by SQUID magnetometer. We discuss the origin of those differences.

  19. Thiol click chemistry on gold-decorated MoS2: elastomer composites and structural phase transitions

    Topolovsek, Peter; Cmok, Luka; Gadermaier, Christoph; Borovsak, Milos; Kovac, J.; Mrzel, Ales

    2016-05-01

    We show that gold decorated MoS2 flakes are amenable to thiol chemistry by blending them with a cross-linkable thiolated polysiloxane (PMMS). PMMS prevents restacking of dispersed MoS2 when transforming the metallic to the semiconducting phase. Cross-linking PMMS yields an elastomer of good optical quality, containing individual, mostly single-layer MoS2 flakes.We show that gold decorated MoS2 flakes are amenable to thiol chemistry by blending them with a cross-linkable thiolated polysiloxane (PMMS). PMMS prevents restacking of dispersed MoS2 when transforming the metallic to the semiconducting phase. Cross-linking PMMS yields an elastomer of good optical quality, containing individual, mostly single-layer MoS2 flakes. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01490a

  20. Effect of alpha-tocopherol and alpha-tocopheryl quinone on the radiosensitivity of thiol-depleted mammalian cells

    The effect of hypoxic cell radiosensitizers is increased when mammalian cells are depleted of endogenous glutathione by buthionine sulphoximine pre-treatment in vitro; a similar gain has not been observed in tumors in vivo despite evidence of glutathione depletion in vivo following buthionine sulphoximine treatment. However, concentrations of biological reducing agents other than glutathione were not measured in the in vivo experiments. Other reducing agents found in tumors include alpha-tocopherol, which reduces the sensitizing efficiency of nitro-aromatic sensitizers in thiol-depleted mammalian cells. These data suggest that the failure to observe large gains in misonidazole sensitizing efficiency in thiol-depleted tumors in vivo may be due, in part, to the presence of biological reducing agents such as alpha-tocopherol

  1. Effect of alpha-tocopherol and alpha-tocopheryl quinone on the radiosensitivity of thiol-depleted mammalian cells

    Hodgkiss, R.J.; Stratford, M.R.; Watfa, R.R.

    1989-05-01

    The effect of hypoxic cell radiosensitizers is increased when mammalian cells are depleted of endogenous glutathione by buthionine sulphoximine pre-treatment in vitro; a similar gain has not been observed in tumors in vivo despite evidence of glutathione depletion in vivo following buthionine sulphoximine treatment. However, concentrations of biological reducing agents other than glutathione were not measured in the in vivo experiments. Other reducing agents found in tumors include alpha-tocopherol, which reduces the sensitizing efficiency of nitro-aromatic sensitizers in thiol-depleted mammalian cells. These data suggest that the failure to observe large gains in misonidazole sensitizing efficiency in thiol-depleted tumors in vivo may be due, in part, to the presence of biological reducing agents such as alpha-tocopherol.

  2. Characterization of two alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C homologs alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C_H1 and alkyl hydroperoxide reductase C_H2 in Bacillus subtilis

    Mee-Kyung; Cha; Yoo-Jeen; Bae; Kyu-Jeong; Kim; Byung-Joon; Park; Il-Han; Kim

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To identify alkyl hydroperoxide reductase subunit C(AhpC) homologs in Bacillus subtilis(B. subtilis) and to characterize their structural and biochemical properties. AhpC is responsible for the detoxification of reactive oxygen species in bacteria.METHODS: Two AhpC homologs(AhpC_H1 and AhpC_H2) were identified by searching the B. subtilis database; these were then cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. AhpC mutants carrying substitutions of catalytically important Cys residues(C37S, C47 S, C166 S, C37/47 S, C37/166 S, C47/166 S, and C37/47/166 S for AhpC_H1; C52 S, C169 S, and C52/169 S for AhpC_H2) were obtained by site-directed mutagenesis and purified, and their structure-function relationship was analyzed. The B. subtilis ahp C genes were disrupted by the short flanking homology method, and the phenotypes of the resulting AhpC-deficient bacteria were examined.RESULTS: Comparative characterization of AhpC homologs indicates that AhpC_H1 contains an extra C37, which forms a disulfide bond with the peroxidatic C47, and behaves like an atypical 2-Cys AhpC, while AhpC_H2 functions like a typical 2-Cys AhpC. Tryptic digestion analysis demonstrated the presence of intramolecular Cys37-Cys47 linkage, which could be reduced by thioredoxin, resulting in the association of the dimer into higher-molecular-mass complexes. Peroxidase activity analysis of Cys→Ser mutants indicated that three Cys residues were involved in the catalysis. AhpC_H1 was resistant to inactivation by peroxide substrates, but had lower activity at physiological H2O2 concentrations compared to AhpC_H2, suggesting that in B. subtilis, the enzymes may be physiologically functional at different substrate concentrations. The exposure to organic peroxides induced AhpC_H1 expression, while AhpC_H1-deficient mutants exhibited growth retardation in the stationary phase, suggesting the role of AhpC_H1 as an antioxidant scavenger of lipid hydroperoxides and a stress-response factor in B. subtilis

  3. Purification, biochemical and functional characterization of miliin, a new thiol-dependent serine protease isolated from the latex of Euphorbia milii.

    Moro, L P; Murakami, M T; Cabral, H; Vidotto, A; Tajara, E H; Arni, R K; Juliano, L; Bonilla-Rodriguez, G O

    2008-01-01

    Miliin, a new thiol-dependent serine protease purified from the latex of Euphorbia milii possesses a molecular weight of 79 kDa, an isoelectric point of 4.3 and is optimally active at 60 degrees C in the pH range of and 7.5-11.0. Activity tests indicate that milliin is a thiol-dependent serine protease. PMID:18782069

  4. Live-cell imaging of biothiols via thiol/disulfide exchange to trigger the photoinduced electron transfer of gold-nanodot sensor

    Liu, Ching-Ping; Wu, Te-Haw; Liu, Chia-Yeh; Lin, Shu-Yi, E-mail: shuyi@nhri.org.tw

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • The ultrasmall size, PAMAM dendrimer-entrapped Au{sub 8}-clusters were synthesized. • Thiol/disulfide exchange with biothiols to release 2-PyT resulted in quenching. • The sensing platform can detect both low and high molecular weight thiols. • Capable of imaging biothiols including protein thiols in living cells. - Abstract: Biothiols have been reported to involve in intracellular redox-homeostasis against oxidative stress. In this study, a highly selective and sensitive fluorescent probe for sensing biothiols is explored by using an ultrasmall gold nanodot (AuND), the dendrimer-entrapped Au{sub 8}-cluster. This strategy relies upon a thiol/disulfide exchange to trigger the fluorescence change through a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) process between the Au{sub 8}-cluster (as an electron donor) and 2-pyridinethiol (2-PyT) (as an electron acceptor) for sensing biothiols. When 2-PyT is released via the cleavage of disulfide bonds by biothiols, the PET process from the Au{sub 8}-cluster to 2-PyT is initiated, resulting in fluorescence quenching. The fluorescence intensity was found to decrease linearly with glutathione (GSH) concentration (0–1500 μM) at physiological relevant levels and the limit of detection for GSH was 15.4 μM. Compared to most nanoparticle-based fluorescent probes that are limited to detect low molecular weight thiols (LMWTs; i.e., GSH and cysteine), the ultrasmall Au{sub 8}-cluster-based probe exhibited less steric hindrance and can be directly applied in selectively and sensitively detecting both LMWTs and high molecular weight thiols (HMWTs; i.e., protein thiols). Based on such sensing platform, the surface-functionalized Au{sub 8}-cluster has significant promise for use as an efficient nanoprobe for intracellular fluorescence imaging of biothiols including protein thiols in living cells whereas other nanoparticle-based fluorescent probes cannot.

  5. Solvent-free Thia-Michael Addition Reactions Using 3-[Bis(alkylthio)methylene]pentane-2,4-diones as Efficient and Odorless Thiol Equivalents

    LIN Chun; ZHAO Xiao-Liang; OUYANG Yan; YU Hai-Feng; DONG De-Wen

    2008-01-01

    3-[Bis(alkylthio)methylene]pentane-2,4-diones (1a and 1b) have been investigated as nonthiolic and odorless thiol equivalents for thia-Michael addition reactions under solvent-free conditions. Promoted by HCl (aq.), the cleavage of compounds 1 took place, and the in-situ generated thiols underwent facile conjugate addition to α,β-unsaturated carbonyl compounds 2 affording the corresponding β-keto sulfides 3 in high yields.

  6. Radical-Scavenging Activity of Thiols, Thiobarbituric Acid Derivatives and Phenolic Antioxidants Determined Using the Induction Period Method for Radical Polymerization of Methyl Methacrylate

    Seiichiro Fujisawa; Yoshinori Kadoma

    2012-01-01

    The radical-scavenging activities of two thiols, eight (thio)barbituric acid derivatives and six chain-breaking phenolic antioxidants were investigated using the induction period method for polymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA) initiated by thermal decomposition of 2,2’-azobisisobutyronitrile (AIBN) and monitored by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The induction period (IP) for the thiols 2-mercaptoethanol (ME) and 2-mercapto-1-methylimidazole (MMI) was about half that for pheno...

  7. Is Vanadate Reduced by Thiols under Biological Conditions?: Changing The Redox Potential of V(V)/V(IV) by Complexation in Aqueous solution

    Crans, Debbie C.; Zhang, Boyan; Gaidamauskas, Ernestas; Keramidas, Anastasios D.; Willsky, Gail R; Roberts, Chris R.

    2010-01-01

    Although dogma states that vanadate is readily reduced by glutathione, cysteine and other thiols, there are several examples documenting that vanadium(V)-sulfur complexes can form and be observed. This conundrum has impacted life scientists for more than two decades. Investigation of this problem requires an understanding of both the complexes that form from vanadium(IV) and (V) and a representative thiol in aqueous solution. The reactions of vanadate and hydrated vanadyl cation with 2-mercap...

  8. Influence of liposome forms of the rhenium compounds and cis-platin on thiol-disulfide coefficient in the rats’ blood

    I. V. Klenina

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Thiol-disulfide coefficient (TDC and its different modifications in model in vivo were studied. Introduction of the liposome forms of cluster rhenium compounds with organic ligands (CROL leads to both TDC increasing and to the constancy of the TDC. Thus, CROLs aren’t toxic agents and some compounds could mobilize organisms’ thiol defence system. Liposome form of cis-platin leads to the TDC decreasing. Important CROL capacities for its future medical treatment practice were shown.

  9. Resting State and Elementary Steps of the Coupling of Aryl Halides with Thiols Catalyzed by Alkylbisphosphine Complexes of Palladium

    Alvaro, Elsa; Hartwig, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Detailed mechanistic studies on the coupling of aryl halides with thiols catalyzed by palladium complexes of the alkylbisphosphine ligand CyPF-tBu (1-dicyclohexylphosphino-2-di-tert-butylphosphinoethylferrocene) are reported. The elementary steps that constitute the catalytic cycle, i.e. oxidative addition, transmetalation and reductive elimination, have been studied, and their relative rates are reported. Each of the steps of the catalytic process occurs at temperatures that are much lower t...

  10. Cucurbitacin covalent bonding to cysteine thiols: the filamentous-actin severing protein Cofilin1 as an exemplary target

    Gabrielsen, M.; Schuldt, M.; Munro, J; Borucka, D.; Cameron, J.; Baugh, M.; Mleczak, A; Lilla, S.; Morrice, N.; Olson, M.F.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cucurbitacins are a class of triterpenoid natural compounds with potent bioactivities that led to their use as traditional remedies, and which continue to attract considerable attention as chemical biology tools and potential therapeutics. One obvious target is the actin-cytoskeleton; treatment with cucurbitacins results in cytoskeletal rearrangements that impact upon motility and cell morphology. Findings: Cucurbitacin reacted with protein cysteine thiols as well as dithiothr...

  11. Thiol-Disulfide Exchange in Peptides Derived from Human Growth Hormone during Lyophilization and Storage in the Solid State

    Chandrasekhar, Saradha; Topp, Elizabeth M.

    2015-01-01

    Lyophilization (freeze-drying) is frequently used to stabilize protein therapeutics. However, covalent modifications such as thiol-disulfide exchange and disulfide scrambling can occur even in the solid state. The effects of lyophilization and storage of lyophilized powders on the mechanism and kinetics of thioldisulfide exchange have not been elucidated and are explored here. Reaction kinetics were monitored in peptides corresponding to tryptic fragments of human growth hormone (T20 + T20-T2...

  12. Large-Scale Phosphoproteome of Human Whole Saliva Using Disulphide-Thiol-Interchange Covalent Chromatography and Mass Spectrometry

    Salih, Erdjan; Siqueira, Walter L.; Helmerhorst, Eva J.; Oppenheim, Frank G.

    2010-01-01

    Thus far only a handful of phosphoproteins with important biological functions have been identified and characterized in oral fluids and these include some of the abundant protein constituents of saliva. Whole saliva (WS) samples were trypsin digested followed by chemical derivatization using dithiothreitol (DTT) of the phospho-serine/threonine containing peptides. The DTT-phosphopeptides were enriched by covalent disulphide-thiol-interchange chromatography and analysis by nano-flow LC-ESI-MS...

  13. Sensitive colorimetric visualization of perfluorinated compounds using poly(ethylene glycol) and perfluorinated thiols modified gold nanoparticles.

    Niu, Hongyun; Wang, Saihua; Zhou, Zhen; Ma, Yurong; Ma, Xunfeng; Cai, Yaqi

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we have developed a novel sensing strategy employing mixed poly(ethylene glycol)-terminated (PEG-thiols) and perfluoroalkyl-terminated (F-thiols) alkanethiols modified gold nanoparticles (Au@PEG-F NPs) as a probe to detect perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) from water samples. PEG-thiols with high density and long carbon chains make the Au NPs probe well-dispersed in solution and stable even in high concentration of salt solution; F-thiols provide specific fluorous-fluorous interactions to PFCs, which results in adsorption of PFCs on Au@PEG-F NPs. The adsorbed PFCs cause the aggregation of Au@PEG-F NPs probes and thus induce the insolubility of probes and precipitation directly from reaction solution due to the superhydrophobicity of perfluorocarbon monolayers, leading to color and absorbance response of the assay to PFCs. The preparation of the Au@PEG-F NPs probe is very simple, and the colorimetric assay based on this mechanism for the detection of PFCs is selective and convenient. Combined with UV-vis spectrophotometry, the assay demonstrates good sensitivities to PFCs with wide linear range. In the designed concentration range, the response of the colorimetric assay to long-chain PFCs (perfluoroalkyl chain ≥7) is discerned even as the concentration of these PFCs is as low as 10 μg L(-1). This low-cost and sensitive assay shows great potential to measure total PFCs in water samples. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first application of the specific fluorous-fluorous interactions and Au NPs based probes for colorimetric recognition for PFCs. PMID:24684731

  14. Fast and Highly Chemoselective Alkynylation of Thiols with Hypervalent Iodine Reagents Enabled through a Low Energy Barrier Concerted Mechanism

    Frei, Reto; Wodrich, Matthew D.; Hari, Durga Prasad; Borin, Pierre-Antoine; Chauvier, Clément; Waser, Jérôme

    2014-01-01

    Among all functional groups, alkynes occupy a privileged position in synthetic and medicinal chemistry, chemical biology, and materials science. Thioalkynes, in particular, are highly useful, as they combine the enhanced reactivity of the triple bond with a sulfur atom frequently encountered in bioactive compounds and materials. Nevertheless, general methods to access these compounds are lacking. In this article, we describe the mechanism and full scope of the alkynylation of thiols using eth...

  15. Thiol-targeted microspray mass spectrometry of peptides and proteins through on-line EC-tagging

    Dayon, Loïc; Girault, Hubert

    2007-01-01

    Modification strategies targeting specific amino acids in proteins are widespread in proteomic analysis. Cysteine residues have received deep consideration in view of their nucleophilic properties and their occurrence in the proteome. A recently developed micro-electrospray emitter for mass spectrometry was used to electrogenerate species reactive towards specific residues in biomolecules. When spraying L-cysteine in the presence of hydroquinone, the thiol cysteine moiety reacts via a 1,4-Mic...

  16. Thiol-targeted microspray mass spectrometry of peptides and proteins through on-line EC-tagging

    Dayon, Loïc

    2006-01-01

    Modification strategies targeting specific amino acids in proteins are widespread in proteomic analysis. Cysteine residues have received deep consideration in view of their nucleophilic properties and their occurrence in the proteome. A recently developed micro-electrospray emitter for mass spectrometry was used to electrogenerate species reactive towards specific residues in biomolecules. When spraying L-cysteine in the presence of hydroquinone, the thiol cysteine moiety reacts via a 1,4-Mic...

  17. Stabilization/solidification (S/S) of mercury-contaminated hazardous wastes using thiol-functionalized zeolite and Portland cement.

    Zhang, Xin-Yan; Wang, Qi-Chao; Zhang, Shao-Qing; Sun, Xiao-Jing; Zhang, Zhong-Sheng

    2009-09-15

    Stabilization/solidification (S/S) of mercury-containing solid wastes using thiol-functionalized zeolite and cement was investigated in this study. The thiol-functionalized zeolite (TFZ) used in the study was obtained by grafting the thiol group (-SH) to the natural clinoptilolite zeolites, and the mercury adsorption by TFZ was investigated. TFZ was used to stabilize mercury in solid wastes, and then the stabilized wastes were subjected to cement solidification to test the effectiveness of the whole S/S process. The results show that TFZ has a high level of -SH content (0.562 mmol g(-1)) and the adsorption of mercury by TFZ conform to the Freundlich adsorption isotherm. The mercury adsorption capacity is greatly enhanced upon thiol grafting, the maximum of which is increased from 0.041 mmol Hg g(-1) to 0.445 mmol Hg g(-1). TFZ is found to be effective in stabilizing Hg in the waste surrogate. In the stabilization process, the optimum pH for the stabilization reaction is about 5.0. The optimum TFZ dosage is about 5% and the optimum cement dosage is about 100%. Though Cl(-) and PO(4)(3-) have negative effects on mercury adsorption by TFZ, the Portland cement solidification of TFZ stabilized surrogates containing 1000 mg Hg/kg can successfully pass the TCLP leaching test. It can be concluded that the stabilization/solidification process using TFZ and Portland cement is an effective technology to treat and dispose mercury-containing wastes. PMID:19376646

  18. Poly(ethylene glycol) Hydrogels formed by Thiol-Ene Photopolymerization for Enzyme-Responsive Protein Delivery

    Aimetti, Alex A.; Machen, Alexandra J.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2009-01-01

    Degradable hydrogels have been extensively used in biomedical applications such as drug delivery, and recent interest has grown in hydrogels that degrade in recognition of a cellular response. This contribution describes a poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogel platform with human neutrophil elastase (HNE) sensitive peptide cross-links formed using thiol-ene photopolymerization rendering the gel degradable at sites of inflammation. Further, protein therapeutics can be physically entrapped withi...

  19. Mitochondrial thiol modification by a targeted electrophile inhibits metabolism in breast adenocarcinoma cells by inhibiting enzyme activity and protein levels

    M. Ryan Smith; Vayalil, Praveen K.; Fen Zhou; Benavides, Gloria A; Beggs, Reena R.; Hafez Golzarian; Bhavitavya Nijampatnam; Oliver, Patsy G.; Smith, Robin A.J.; Murphy, Michael P.; Velu, Sadanandan E.; Aimee Landar

    2016-01-01

    Many cancer cells follow an aberrant metabolic program to maintain energy for rapid cell proliferation. Metabolic reprogramming often involves the upregulation of glutaminolysis to generate reducing equivalents for the electron transport chain and amino acids for protein synthesis. Critical enzymes involved in metabolism possess a reactive thiolate group, which can be modified by certain oxidants. In the current study, we show that modification of mitochondrial protein thiols by a model compo...

  20. Energy of the Lowest Unoccupied Molecular Orbital, Thiol Reactivity, and Toxicity of Three Monobrominated Water Disinfection Byproducts

    Pals, Justin A.; Wagner, Elizabeth D.; Plewa, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Disinfection of drinking water protects public health against waterborne pathogens. However, during disinfection, toxic disinfection byproducts (DBPs) are formed. Exposure to DBPs was associated with increased risk of bladder cancer in humans. DBPs are generated at concentrations below their carcinogenic potencies; it is unclear how exposure leads to adverse health outcomes. We used computational estimates of the energy of the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (ELUMO) to predict thiol react...

  1. Drastic difference in luminescence stability between amine- and thiol-capped quantum dots treated with CO2

    Vokhmintcev, Kirill V.; Nabiev, Igor R.; Samokhvalov, Pavel S.

    2016-04-01

    Research on the surface chemistry of quantum dots (QDs) has been rapidly developing in recent years, since the understanding of the processes that occur on their surface is prerequisite for successful exploration of the outstanding fluorescence properties and superior stability of these nanomaterials in numerous applications. The lack of stability during long-term storage under atmospheric conditions restricts QD applications. Here, we have investigated the interaction of QDs with carbon dioxide as a model system for studying their long-term storage or operation in atmospheric environment. Quenching of the photoluminescence of CdSe/ZnS semiconductor QDs continuously treated with CO2 has shown that this process depends on the type of the QD surface ligands. The luminescence of QDs capped with amine ligands is quenched to a higher degree, the quenching being caused by the formation of carbamic acid precipitate. The luminescence of QDs capped with thiols remain absolutely stable upon CO2 treatment due to the chemical resistance of thiol functional groups to CO2, which makes this type of QDs suitable for long-term storage and operation under atmospheric conditions. However, further functionalization of such QDs may be difficult, because the strong bond between thiol ligands and QD surface may limit the efficiency of ligand-exchange procedures. A new ligand system of alkylamine salts of fatty acids has been proposed as an alternative to thiols. It has been shown to be inert to CO2, and also can be easily replaced with functional surface ligands. The results are important for development of nextgeneration QDs with superior stability suitable for various applications requiring efficient ligand exchange and operation in the atmospheric environment.

  2. Stress Reduction and Tg Enhancement in Ternary Thiol-Yne-Methacrylate Systems via Addition-fragmentation Chain Transfer

    Park, Hee Young; Kloxin, Christopher J.; Fordney, Mark F.; Bowman, Christopher N.

    2012-01-01

    Since polymerization-induced shrinkage stress is detrimental in many applications, addition-fragmentation chain transfer (AFCT) was employed to induce network relaxation and adaptation that mitigate the shrinkage stress. Here, to form high glass transition temperature, high modulus polymers while still minimizing stress, multifunctional methacrylate monomers were incorporated into allyl sulfide-containing thiol-yne resins to provide simultaneously high glass transition temperatures and a faci...

  3. Binding of Natural and Synthetic Polyphenols to Human Dihydrofolate Reductase

    José Neptuno Rodríguez-López

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR is the subject of intensive investigation since it appears to be the primary target enzyme for antifolate drugs. Fluorescence quenching experiments show that the ester bond-containing tea polyphenols (--epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG and (--epicatechin gallate (ECG are potent inhibitors of DHFR with dissociation constants (KD of 0.9 and 1.8 μM, respectively, while polyphenols lacking the ester bound gallate moiety [e.g., (--epigallocatechin (EGC and (--epicatechin (EC] did not bind to this enzyme. To avoid stability and bioavailability problems associated with tea catechins we synthesized a methylated derivative of ECG (3-O-(3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoyl-(--epicatechin; TMECG, which effectively binds to DHFR (KD = 2.1 μM. In alkaline solution, TMECG generates a stable quinone methide product that strongly binds to the enzyme with a KD of 8.2 nM. Quercetin glucuronides also bind to DHFR but its effective binding was highly dependent of the sugar residue, with quercetin-3-xyloside being the stronger inhibitor of the enzyme with a KD of 0.6 μM. The finding that natural polyphenols are good inhibitors of human DHFR could explain the epidemiological data on their prophylactic effects for certain forms of cancer and open a possibility for the use of natural and synthetic polyphenols in cancer chemotherapy.

  4. Rapid identification of aldose reductase inhibitory compounds from Perilla frutescens.

    Paek, Ji Hun; Shin, Kuk Hyun; Kang, Young-Hee; Lee, Jae-Yong; Lim, Soon Sung

    2013-01-01

    The ethyl acetate (EtOAc) soluble fraction of methanol extracts of Perilla frutescens (P. frutescens) inhibits aldose reductase (AR), the key enzyme in the polyol pathway. Our investigation of inhibitory compounds from the EtOAc soluble fraction of P. frutescens was followed by identification of the inhibitory compounds by a combination of HPLC microfractionation and a 96-well enzyme assay. This allowed the biological activities to be efficiently matched with selected HPLC peaks. Structural analyses of the active compounds were performed by LC-MS(n). The main AR inhibiting compounds were tentatively identified as chlorogenic acid and rosmarinic acid by LC-MS(n). A two-step high speed counter current chromatography (HSCCC) isolation method was developed with a solvent system of n-hexane-ethyl acetate-methanol-water at 1.5:5:1:5, v/v and 3:7:5:5, v/v. The chemical structures of the isolated compounds were determined by (1)H- and (13)C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry (NMR). The main compounds inhibiting AR in the EtOAc fraction of methanol extracts of P. frutescens were identified as chlorogenic acid (2) (IC50 = 3.16 μ M), rosmarinic acid (4) (IC50 = 2.77 μ M), luteolin (5) (IC50 = 6.34 μ M), and methyl rosmarinic acid (6) (IC50 = 4.03 μ M). PMID:24308003

  5. Expression analysis of dihydroflavonol 4-reductase genes in Petunia hybrida.

    Chu, Y X; Chen, H R; Wu, A Z; Cai, R; Pan, J S

    2015-01-01

    Dihydroflavonol 4-reductase (DFR) genes from Rosa chinensis (Asn type) and Calibrachoa hybrida (Asp type), driven by a CaMV 35S promoter, were integrated into the petunia (Petunia hybrida) cultivar 9702. Exogenous DFR gene expression characteristics were similar to flower-color changes, and effects on anthocyanin concentration were observed in both types of DFR gene transformants. Expression analysis showed that exogenous DFR genes were expressed in all of the tissues, but the expression levels were significantly different. However, both of them exhibited a high expression level in petals that were starting to open. The introgression of DFR genes may significantly change DFR enzyme activity. Anthocyanin ultra-performance liquid chromatography results showed that anthocyanin concentrations changed according to DFR enzyme activity. Therefore, the change in flower color was probably the result of a DFR enzyme change. Pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside was found in two different transgenic petunias, indicating that both CaDFR and RoDFR could catalyze dihydrokaempferol. Our results also suggest that transgenic petunias with DFR gene of Asp type could biosynthesize pelargonidin 3-O-glucoside. PMID:25966276

  6. 5alpha-reductase: history and clinical importance.

    Marks, Leonard S

    2004-01-01

    The treatment of men with symptomatic benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) has shifted dramatically from surgery to drug therapy over the past decade. The revolution in BPH treatment began with the discovery of congenital 5alpha-reductase (5AR) deficiency, leading to the appreciation of 2 different androgenic hormones: testosterone, which mediates overt masculinization in the adult male, and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), which mediates prostatic growth, acne, facial beard, and male pattern baldness. Inhibition of DHT in adults results in prostatic shrinkage and symptomatic relief in many men, without the side effects seen with conventional androgen-deprivation therapy. The 5AR inhibitor drugs (finasteride and the dual inhibitor, dutasteride) are able to ablate the accumulation of intraprostatic DHT, the mechanism most responsible for prostate growth and maintenance. Not only may these drugs relieve symptoms, but they may also alter the natural history of the BPH process. Future indications for the 5ARI drugs could include chemoprevention of prostate cancer, prophylaxis of BPH-related complications, and treatment of BPH-associated hematuria. PMID:16985920

  7. Regulation and degradation of HMGCo-A reductase.

    Panda, T; Devi, V Amutha

    2004-12-01

    The enzyme, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) controls the biosynthesis of cholesterol. Hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis are critical health risk factors. One way of controlling these risk factors is to manipulate regulation as well as degradation of HMGR. At present, a class of compounds called statins, which are HMGR inhibitors, are used for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. However, statins suffer major setbacks as their use produces more adverse reactions than the desirable one of inhibiting the enzyme. Genetically engineered forms of HMGR are also studied in primitive life forms like bacteria, but detailed investigation of this enzyme in human systems is certainly required. Extensive studies have been made on the regulatory aspects of this enzyme, but no breakthrough is conspicuous in the clinical background to find an alternative treatment for hypercholesterolemia. The immediate need is to find an alternate way of regulating degradation of the enzyme. This review presents the importance of regulation and degradation of the HMGR enzyme in different systems to gain possible insight into alternative schemes for regulating this enzyme and, if these exist, the feasibility of extending them same to studies in mammalian systems. A high degree of similarity exists between mammalian and yeast HMGR. Detailed studies reported on the regulation and degradation of the yeast enzyme also throw more light on the mammalian system, leading to a better understanding of ways of controlling hypercholesterolemia. PMID:15558272

  8. Methylenetetrahydrofolate Reductase Genotypes, Dietary Habits and Susceptibility to Stomach Cancer

    ChangmingGao; TakezakiToshiro; JianzhongWu; JianhuoDing; YantingLiu; SupingLi; PingSu; XuHu; TianliongXu; HamajimaNobuyuki; TajimaKazuo

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study the relation among methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T genotypes, dietary habits and the risk of stomach cancer (SC).METHODS A case-control study was conducted with 107 cases of SC and 200 population-based controls in Chuzhou district, Huaian, Jiangsu province, China. The epidemiological data were collected, and DNA of peripheral blood leukocytes was obtained from all of the subjects..MTHFR genotypes were detected by PCR-RFLP. RESULTS (1) The prevalence of the MTHFR C/T or T/T genotypes was found to be significantly different between controls (68.5%) and SC cases (79.4%,P=0.0416), the increased risk had an adjusted OR of 1.79 (95%C1:1.01-3.19). (2) Among subjects who had a low intake of garlic or Chinese onion, MTHFR C/T or T/T genotypes significantly increased the risk of developing SC. Among non-tea drinkers or among subjects who had a frequent intakeof meat, the carriers of the MTHFR C/T or T/T genotypes had a higher risk of SC than individuals with the C/C type MTHFR. CONCLUSION The polymorphism of MTHFR C677T was associated with increased risk of developing SC, and that individuals with differing genotypes may have different susceptibilities to SC, based on their exposure level to environmental factors.

  9. Ribonucleotide reductase and cancer: biological mechanisms and targeted therapies.

    Aye, Y; Li, M; Long, M J C; Weiss, R S

    2015-04-16

    Accurate DNA replication and repair is essential for proper development, growth and tumor-free survival in all multicellular organisms. A key requirement for the maintenance of genomic integrity is the availability of adequate and balanced pools of deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates (dNTPs), the building blocks of DNA. Notably, dNTP pool alterations lead to genomic instability and have been linked to multiple human diseases, including mitochondrial disorders, susceptibility to viral infection and cancer. In this review, we discuss how a key regulator of dNTP biosynthesis in mammals, the enzyme ribonucleotide reductase (RNR), impacts cancer susceptibility and serves as a target for anti-cancer therapies. Because RNR-regulated dNTP production can influence DNA replication fidelity while also supporting genome-protecting DNA repair, RNR has complex and stage-specific roles in carcinogenesis. Nevertheless, cancer cells are dependent on RNR for de novo dNTP biosynthesis. Therefore, elevated RNR expression is a characteristic of many cancers, and an array of mechanistically distinct RNR inhibitors serve as effective agents for cancer treatment. The dNTP metabolism machinery, including RNR, has been exploited for therapeutic benefit for decades and remains an important target for cancer drug development. PMID:24909171

  10. Alkyl hydroperoxide reductase: a candidate Helicobacter pylori vaccine.

    O'Riordan, Avril A; Morales, Veronica Athie; Mulligan, Linda; Faheem, Nazia; Windle, Henry J; Kelleher, Dermot P

    2012-06-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the most important etiological agent of chronic active gastritis, peptic ulcer disease and gastric cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of alkyl hydroperoxide reductase (AhpC) and mannosylated AhpC (mAhpC) as candidate vaccines in the C57BL/6J mouse model of H. pylori infection. Recombinant AhpC was cloned, over-expressed and purified in an unmodified form and was also engineered to incorporate N and C-terminal mannose residues when expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Mice were immunized systemically and mucosally with AhpC and systemically with mAhpC prior to challenge with H. pylori. Serum IgG responses to AhpC were determined and quantitative culture was used to determine the efficacy of vaccination strategies. Systemic prophylactic immunization with AhpC/alum and mAhpC/alum conferred protection against infection in 55% and 77.3% of mice, respectively. Mucosal immunization with AhpC/cholera toxin did not protect against infection and elicited low levels of serum IgG in comparison with systemic immunization. These data support the use of AhpC as a potential vaccine candidate against H. pylori infection. PMID:22512976

  11. Loss of quinone reductase 2 function selectively facilitates learning behaviors.

    Benoit, Charles-Etienne; Bastianetto, Stephane; Brouillette, Jonathan; Tse, YiuChung; Boutin, Jean A; Delagrange, Philippe; Wong, TakPan; Sarret, Philippe; Quirion, Rémi

    2010-09-22

    High levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) are associated with deficits in learning and memory with age as well as in Alzheimer's disease. Using DNA microarray, we demonstrated the overexpression of quinone reductase 2 (QR2) in the hippocampus in two models of learning deficits, namely the aged memory impaired rats and the scopolamine-induced amnesia model. QR2 is a cytosolic flavoprotein that catalyzes the reduction of its substrate and enhances the production of damaging activated quinone and ROS. QR2-like immunostaining is enriched in cerebral structures associated with learning behaviors, such as the hippocampal formation and the temporofrontal cortex of rat, mouse, and human brains. In cultured rat embryonic hippocampal neurons, selective inhibitors of QR2, namely S26695 and S29434, protected against menadione-induced cell death by reversing its proapoptotic action. S26695 (8 mg/kg) also significantly inhibited scopolamine-induced amnesia. Interestingly, adult QR2 knock-out mice demonstrated enhanced learning abilities in various tasks, including Morris water maze, object recognition, and rotarod performance test. Other behaviors related to anxiety (elevated plus maze), depression (forced swim), and schizophrenia (prepulse inhibition) were not affected in QR2-deficient mice. Together, these data suggest a role for QR2 in cognitive behaviors with QR2 inhibitors possibly representing a novel therapeutic strategy toward the treatment of learning deficits especially observed in the aged brain. PMID:20861374

  12. Determination of Nitrate Reductase Assay Depending on the Microbial Growth

    A rapid micro-dilution assay for determination of the antimicrobial susceptibility of different bacterial isolates was developed. This assay is based on the ability of the most of viable organisms to reduce nitrates. The MIC or MBC could be determined by nitrate reductase (NR) only after 30 to 90 min of incubation depending on the behaviour of microbial growth. Bacterial viability is detected by a positive nitrite reduction rather than visible turbidity. The nitrate reduction assay was compared with standard micro-assay using 250 isolates of different taxa against 10 antibiotics belonging to different classes. An excellent agreement of 82.5 % was found between the two methods and only 17.5 % of 1794 trials showed difference in the determined MIC by tow-dilution interval above or below the MIC determined by the turbidimetric method under the same test conditions. However, the nitrate reduction assay was more rapid and sensitive in detecting viable bacteria and so, established an accurate estimate of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) or the minimal bacterial concentration (MBC). The nitrate reduction assay offers the additional advantage that it could be used to determine the MBC without having to subculture the broth. 232 cases of resistance were detected by NR and 4 different media were tested for susceptibility test. The bacterial isolates were exposed to ultra violet (UV) light for different period

  13. Aldose reductase inhibition improves nerve conduction velocity in diabetic patients.

    Judzewitsch, R G; Jaspan, J B; Polonsky, K S; Weinberg, C R; Halter, J B; Halar, E; Pfeifer, M A; Vukadinovic, C; Bernstein, L; Schneider, M; Liang, K Y; Gabbay, K H; Rubenstein, A H; Porte, D

    1983-01-20

    To assess the potential role of polyol-pathway activity in diabetic neuropathy, we measured the effects of sorbinil--a potent inhibitor of the key polyol-pathway enzyme aldose reductase--on nerve conduction velocity in 39 stable diabetics in a randomized, double-blind, cross-over trial. During nine weeks of treatment with sorbinil (250 mg per day), nerve conduction velocity was greater than during a nine-week placebo period for all three nerves tested: the peroneal motor nerve (mean increase [+/- S.E.M.], 0.70 +/- 0.24 m per second, P less than 0.008), the median motor nerve (mean increase, 0.66 +/- 0.27, P less than 0.005), and the median sensory nerve (mean increase, 1.16 +/- 0.50, P less than 0.035). Conduction velocity for all three nerves declined significantly within three weeks after cessation of the drug. These effects of sorbinil were not related to glycemic control, which was constant during the study. Although the effect of sorbinil in improving nerve conduction velocity in diabetics was small, the findings suggest that polyol-pathway activity contributes to slowed nerve conduction in diabetics. The clinical applicability of these observations remains to be determined, but they encourage further exploration of this approach to the treatment or prevention of diabetic neuropathy. PMID:6401351

  14. Glyoxalase 1 and glutathione reductase 1 regulate anxiety in mice.

    Hovatta, Iiris; Tennant, Richard S; Helton, Robert; Marr, Robert A; Singer, Oded; Redwine, Jeffrey M; Ellison, Julie A; Schadt, Eric E; Verma, Inder M; Lockhart, David J; Barlow, Carrolee

    2005-12-01

    Anxiety and fear are normal emotional responses to threatening situations. In human anxiety disorders--such as panic disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, post-traumatic stress disorder, social phobia, specific phobias and generalized anxiety disorder--these responses are exaggerated. The molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of normal and pathological anxiety are mostly unknown. However, the availability of different inbred strains of mice offers an excellent model system in which to study the genetics of certain behavioural phenotypes. Here we report, using a combination of behavioural analysis of six inbred mouse strains with quantitative gene expression profiling of several brain regions, the identification of 17 genes with expression patterns that correlate with anxiety-like behavioural phenotypes. To determine if two of the genes, glyoxalase 1 and glutathione reductase 1, have a causal role in the genesis of anxiety, we performed genetic manipulation using lentivirus-mediated gene transfer. Local overexpression of these genes in the mouse brain resulted in increased anxiety-like behaviour, while local inhibition of glyoxalase 1 expression by RNA interference decreased the anxiety-like behaviour. Both of these genes are involved in oxidative stress metabolism, linking this pathway with anxiety-related behaviour. PMID:16244648

  15. Phenolics from Garcinia mangostana Inhibit Advanced Glycation Endproducts Formation: Effect on Amadori Products, Cross-Linked Structures and Protein Thiols.

    Abdallah, Hossam M; El-Bassossy, Hany; Mohamed, Gamal A; El-Halawany, Ali M; Alshali, Khalid Z; Banjar, Zainy M

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of Advanced Glycation Endproducts (AGEs) in body tissues plays a major role in the development of diabetic complications. Here, the inhibitory effect of bioactive metabolites isolated from fruit hulls of Garcinia mangostana on AGE formation was investigated through bio-guided approach using aminoguanidine (AG) as a positive control. Including G. mangostana total methanol extract (GMT) in the reaction mixture of bovine serum albumin (BSA) and glucose or ribose inhibited the fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs formation in a dose dependent manner. The bioassay guided fractionation of GMT revealed isolation of four bioactive constituents from the bioactive fraction; which were identified as: garcimangosone D (1), aromadendrin-8-C-glucopyranoside (2), epicatechin (3), and 2,3',4,5',6-pentahydroxybenzophenone (4). All the tested compounds significantly inhibited fluorescent and non-fluorescent AGEs formation in a dose dependent manner whereas compound 3 (epicatechin) was found to be the most potent. In search for the level of action, addition of GMT, and compounds 2-4 inhibited fructosamine (Amadori product) and protein aggregation formation in both glucose and ribose. To explore the mechanism of action, it was found that addition of GMT and only compound (3) to reaction mixture increased protein thiol in both glucose and ribose while compounds 1, 2 and 4 only increased thiol in case of ribose. In conclusion, phenolic compounds 1-4 inhibited AGEs formation at the levels of Amadori product and protein aggregation formation through saving protein thiol. PMID:26907243

  16. Synthesis of antibacterial amphiphilic elastomer based on polystyrene-block-polyisoprene-block-polystyrene via thiol-ene addition

    A new type of amphiphilic antibacterial elastomer has been described. Thermoplastic elastomer, polystyrene–block-polyisoprene–block-polystyrene (PS–b-PI–b-PS) triblock copolymer was functionalized in toluene solution by free radical mercaptan addition in order to obtain an amphiphilic antibacterial elastomer. Thiol terminated PEG was grafted through the double bonds of PS–b-PI–b-PS via free radical thiol-ene coupling reaction. The antibacterial properties of the amphiphilic graft copolymers were observed. The original and the modified polymers were used to create microfibers in an electro-spinning process. Topology of the electrospun micro/nanofibers were studied by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The chemical structures of the amphiphilic comb type graft copolymers were elucidated by the combination of elemental analysis, 1H NMR, 13C NMR, GPC and FTIR. - Graphical abstract: Double bonds of polyisoprene units in polystyrene–block-polyisoprene–block-polystyrene triblock copolymer were partially capped with PEG containing mercapto end group via thiol-ene addition in order to obtain antibacterial amphiphilic elastomer. Nano fibers from amphiphilic graft polymers solution were produced by electrospinning. The PEG grafted copolymer inhibits very effectively bacterial growth. Highlights: ► A commercial synthetic elastomer was grafted with PEG to obtain amphiphilic elastomer. ► Amphiphilic elastomer shows antibacterial properties. ► Electrospun micro fibers of the amphiphilic elastomer tend to globular formation

  17. Prevention of benznidazole-induced prolonging effect on the pentobarbital sleeping time of rats using different thiol-containing compounds.

    Montalto de Mecca, M; Bernacchi, A S; Castro, J A

    2000-01-01

    Benznidazole (BZ) is a nitroimidazolic chemotherapeutic agent employed against the acute and indeterminate phase of Chagas' disease, a tropical sickness afflicting more than twenty million people in Latin America. BZ has serious toxic side effects forcing people to stop treatment. These effects were attributed to the nitroreductive metabolic activation of BZ to a hydronitroxide radical or the hydroxylamine, which would covalently bind to cellular components. One of these deleterious effects is the prolongation on the pentobarbital sleeping time of rats. This results from the covalent binding of BZ reactive metabolites, arisen during its nitroreductive metabolism, to the phospholipid component of the mixed function oxidase which biotransform the barbiturate. In this study, the potential ability of different thiol containing drugs to trap BZ reactive metabolites and to prevent BZ effect on the pentobarbital sleeping time was tested. Our HPLC studies evidenced that cysteine, N-acetylcysteine, penicillamine and glutathione were able to trap BZ reactive metabolites in vitro to produce one or two adducts. Reduced lipoic acid instead, decreased the intensity of the nitroreductive process without leading to detectable adducts. The in vivo administration of the thiol drugs, at dosage regimes available in literature, was able to markedly prevent the BZ prolongation effect on the sleeping time. Whether these thiols might prevent other BZ toxic effects without harming its chemotherapeutic actions remains to be established. PMID:11758973

  18. Nitrogen catabolite repression modulates the production of aromatic thiols characteristic of Sauvignon Blanc at the level of precursor transport.

    Subileau, Maeva; Schneider, Rémy; Salmon, Jean-Michel; Degryse, Eric

    2008-08-01

    The free thiols 3-mercapto-hexanol (3MH) and its acetate, practically absent from musts, are liberated by yeast during fermentation from a cysteinylated precursor [S-3-(hexan-1-ol)-l-cysteine (Cys-3MH)] present in the grape must and contribute favorably to the flavor of Sauvignon white wines. Production of 3MH is increased when urea is substituted for diammonium phosphate (DAP) as the sole nitrogen source on a synthetic medium. On grape must, complementation with DAP induces a decrease of 3MH production. This observation is reminiscent of nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). The production of 3MH is significantly lower for a gap1Delta mutant compared with the wild type, during fermentation of a synthetic medium containing Cys-3MH as the precursor and urea as the sole nitrogen source. Mutants isolated from an enological strain with a relief of NCR on GAP1 produce significantly higher amounts of 3MH on synthetic medium than the parental strain. These phenotypes were not confirmed on grape must. It is concluded that on synthetic medium, Cys-3MH enters the cell through at least one identified transporter, GAP1p, whose activity is limiting the release of volatile thiols. On grape must, the uptake of the precursor through GAP1p is not confirmed, but the effect of addition of DAP, eventually prolonging NCR, is shown to decrease thiol production. PMID:18549408

  19. An orthogonal, one-pot, simultaneous UV-mediated route to thiol-ene/sol-gel film

    A. Chemtob

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available We describe a novel combination of orthogonal reactions based on UV-driven thiol–ene and alkoxysilyl condensation reactions to form a single-step route toward thioether-bridged silsesquioxane films. Our chemical strategy consists of using two bifunctional (methacrylate (E and propanethiol (T trimethoxysilyl precursors containing two complementary functional moieties for thiol-ene coupling and sol-gel process. The reaction kinetics revealed that c.a. 85% of thiol and ene conversions were consumed concomitantly. Meanwhile, a complete hydrolysis was accomplished, affording ultimately a high degree of condensation (81%. Emphasis was placed on differences of mechanical properties between sol-gel hybrids resulting from thiol-ene reaction (E-T mixture and ene homopolymerization (E only using scratch test measurements. For the methacrylate system, the formation of thioether linkages within a vitreous silica network emerged as a useful strategy for the formation of a uniform, low-stress and flexible crosslinked hybrid structure. Enhanced mechanical properties were manifested by an expanded elastic domain, and better resistance to cracking. Moreover, there are clear indications that mechanical properties can be easily tuned upon varying the ratio of the two hybrid precursors.

  20. Influence of oxygen on the repair of direct radiation damage to DNA by thiols in model systems

    Here the reactions of thiols with DNA primary radical intermediates formed after γ-irradiation of frozen (77K) anoxic and oxic solutions of DNA/thiol mixtures are investigated. Through analysis of the experimental composite spectra at each annealing temperature, the relative concentrations of individual radicals present are estimated and reaction sequences inferred. In all samples the primary DNA radical anions and cations (DNA·+ and DNA·-) are suggested to be the predominant radicals at low temperatures. In anoxic samples, TH· (5,6-dihydrothym-5-yl radical), RSSR·- and, in glutathione samples, ·GSH [γ-glu-NHC(CH2SH) CO-gly] radicals are observed as the temperature is increased. The presence of oxygen efficiently suppresses the formation of RSSR·- and ·GSH; instead, in oxic samples, O2·-, DNAOO· , RSOO· and RSO· are observed at higher temperatures. The photolytic conversion of RSOO· to RSO2· is used to verify the presence of RSOO· in γ-irradiated DNA/thiol systems and confirm that the computer analysis employed yields reasonable estimates of the relative DNAOO· and RSOO· concentrations. (Author)