WorldWideScience
1

FOSSIL FUEL INDUSTRIES  

Science.gov (United States)

The chapter focuses on methane emissions from the coal and natural gas industries. The petroleum industry is not addressed because of the lack of related quality data. Emission points are identified for each industry, and a discussion of factors affecting emissions is presented. ...

2

Fossil Fuels.  

Science.gov (United States)

This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with fossil fuels. Some topics covered are historic facts, development of fuels, history of oil production, current and future trends of the oil industry, refining fossil fuels, and environmental problems. Material in each unit may…

Crank, Ron

3

ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTROLS: FOSSIL FUEL, STEAM ELECTRIC GENERATING INDUSTRY  

Science.gov (United States)

The report addresses the energy requirements for environmental control in the fossil fuel, steam electric industry. These requirements arise through a number of mechanisms, including: direct fuel or electricity requirements for operating pollution control equipment, including pro...

4

Rethinking Fossil Fuels  

Science.gov (United States)

Climate change and fossil fuel use are connected. It would serve the world well to: begin a moratorium on coal-fired power plants; explore and use renewable energy; insist on immediate action from world governments; and penalize industries putting excess CO2 into the atmosphere.

James Hansen (NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies;)

2008-09-09

5

Taxes on fossil fuels : an incentive for FDI within the biofuel industry  

OpenAIRE

The demand for biofuels has increased over the last 30 years and at the same time period the price of oil has risen. In this thesis we have investigated the impact that taxes on fossil fuels had on the demand for biofuels between 1970 and 2003. We have looked at five different fossil fuels; the chosen fuels are the most frequently used. A large impact would lead to an increase in the biofuel market in Sweden and therefore make Sweden a more attractive alternative for foreign investors. The re...

O?stman, Beata; Jonsson, Bjo?rn

2006-01-01

6

Nuclear Energy R&D Imperative 3: Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuel in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

As described in the Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy’s Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, nuclear energy can play a significant role in supplying energy for a growing economy while reducing both our dependence on foreign energy supplies and emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. The industrial and transportation sectors are responsible for more than half of the greenhouse gas emissions in the U.S., and imported oil supplies 70% of the energy used in the transportation sector. It is therefore important to examine the various ways nuclear energy can facilitate a transition away from fossil fuels to secure environmentally sustainable production and use of energy in the transportation and manufacturing industry sectors. Imperative 3 of the Nuclear Energy R&D Roadmap, entitled “Enable a Transition Away from Fossil Fuels by Producing Process Heat for use in the Transportation and Industrial Sectors”, addresses this need. This document presents an Implementation Plan for R&D efforts related to this imperative. The expanded use of nuclear energy beyond the electrical grid will contribute significantly to overcoming the three inter-linked energy challenges facing U.S. industry: the rising and volatile prices for premium fossil fuels such as oil and natural gas, dependence on foreign sources for these fuels, and the risks of climate change resulting from carbon emissions. Nuclear energy could be used in the industrial and transportation sectors to: • Generate high temperature process heat and electricity to serve industrial needs including the production of chemical feedstocks for use in manufacturing premium fuels and fertilizer products, • Produce hydrogen for industrial processes and transportation fuels, and • Provide clean water for human consumption by desalination and promote wastewater treatment using low-grade nuclear heat as a useful additional benefit. Opening new avenues for nuclear energy will significantly enhance our nation’s energy security through more effective utilization of our country’s resources while simultaneously providing economic stability and growth (through predictable energy prices and high value jobs), in an environmentally sustainable and secure manner (through lower land and water use, and decreased byproduct emissions). The reduction in imported oil will also increase the retention of wealth within the U.S. economy while still supporting economic growth. Nuclear energy is the only non-fossil fuel that has been demonstrated to reliably supply energy for a growing industrial economy.

David Petti; J. Stephen Herring

2010-03-01

7

Fossil Fuels: Capstone  

Science.gov (United States)

This lesson summarizes our dependency upon fossil fuels, pointing out that there are very few aspects of our daily life that are not impacted by their use. The discussion centers around whether these fuels could be replaced and makes the point that there is a significant percentage of them which is used to manufacture products and is not simply burned for energy. The lesson includes an activity in which students use an online calculator to estimate how much of each fossil fuel they are responsible for consuming each year.

Pratte, John

8

Design, quality, and quality assurance of solid recovered fuels for the substitution of fossil feedstock in the cement industry.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper describes the requirements for the production, quality, and quality assurance of solid recovered fuels (SRF) that are increasingly used in the cement industry. Different aspects have to be considered before using SRF as an alternative fuel. Here, a study on the quality of SRF used in the cement industry is presented. This overview is completed by an investigation of type and properties of input materials used at waste splitting and SRF production plants in Austria. As a simplified classification, SRF can be divided into two classes: a fine, high-calorific SRF for the main burner, or coarser SRF material with low calorific value for secondary firing systems, such as precombustion chambers or similar systems. In the present study, SRFs coming from various sources that fall under these two different waste fuel classes are discussed. Both SRFs are actually fired in the grey clinker kiln of the Holcim (Slovensko) plant in Rohožnik (Slovakia). The fine premium-quality material is used in the main burner and the coarse regular-quality material is fed to a FLS Hotdisc combustion device. In general, the alternative fuels are used instead of their substituted fossil fuels. For this, chemical compositions and other properties of SRF were compared to hard coal as one of the most common conventional fuels in Europe. This approach allows to compare the heavy metal input from traditional and alternative fuels and to comment on the legal requirements on SRF that, at the moment, are under development in Europe. PMID:24942836

Sarc, R; Lorber, Ke; Pomberger, R; Rogetzer, M; Sipple, Em

2014-06-18

9

Supply of fossil heating and motor fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This comprehensive study made for the Swiss Federal Office of Energy (SFOE) within the framework of the Energy Economics Fundamentals research programme examines if it can be guaranteed that Swiss industry can be supplied with fossil fuels for heating and transport purposes over the next few decades. The results of a comprehensive survey of literature on the subject are presented, with a major focus being placed on oil. The study examines both pessimistic and optimistic views and also presents an overview of fossil energy carriers and the possibilities of substituting them. Scenarios and prognoses on the availability of fossil fuels and their reserves for the future are presented. Also, new technologies for exploration and the extraction of fossil fuels are discussed, as are international interdependencies that influence supply. Market and price scenarios are presented that take account of a possible increasing scarcity of fossil fuels. The implications for industry and investment planning are examined

10

Crop production without fossil fuel  

OpenAIRE

With diminishing fossil fuel reserves and concerns about global warming, the agricultural sector needs to reduce its use of fossil fuels. The objective of this thesis was to evaluate different systems for biomass-based production of tractor fuel and mineral nitrogen fertilisers, which at present are the two largest fossil energy carriers in Swedish agriculture. The land use, energy input and environmental load of the systems were calculated using life cycle assessment methodology. Two categor...

Ahlgren, Serina

2009-01-01

11

The legacy of fossil fuels.  

Science.gov (United States)

Currently, over 80% of the energy used by mankind comes from fossil fuels. Harnessing coal, oil and gas, the energy resources contained in the store of our spaceship, Earth, has prompted a dramatic expansion in energy use and a substantial improvement in the quality of life of billions of individuals in some regions of the world. Powering our civilization with fossil fuels has been very convenient, but now we know that it entails severe consequences. We treat fossil fuels as a resource that anyone anywhere can extract and use in any fashion, and Earth's atmosphere, soil and oceans as a dump for their waste products, including more than 30?Gt/y of carbon dioxide. At present, environmental legacy rather than consistence of exploitable reserves, is the most dramatic problem posed by the relentless increase of fossil fuel global demand. Harmful effects on the environment and human health, usually not incorporated into the pricing of fossil fuels, include immediate and short-term impacts related to their discovery, extraction, transportation, distribution, and burning as well as climate change that are spread over time to future generations or over space to the entire planet. In this essay, several aspects of the fossil fuel legacy are discussed, such as alteration of the carbon cycle, carbon dioxide rise and its measurement, greenhouse effect, anthropogenic climate change, air pollution and human health, geoengineering proposals, land and water degradation, economic problems, indirect effects on the society, and the urgent need of regulatory efforts and related actions to promote a gradual transition out of the fossil fuel era. While manufacturing sustainable solar fuels appears to be a longer-time perspective, alternatives energy sources already exist that have the potential to replace fossil fuels as feedstocks for electricity production. PMID:21290608

Armaroli, Nicola; Balzani, Vincenzo

2011-03-01

12

News technology utilization fossil fuel  

OpenAIRE

Fossil fuel ? ?alternative energy? is coal, petroleum, natural gas. Petroleum and natural gas are scarce resources, but they are delimited. Reserves petroleum will be depleted after 39 years and reserves natural gas after 60 years.World reserves coal are good for another 240 years. Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel. It is the least expensive energy source for generating electricity. Many environmental problems associated with use of coal:in coal production, mining creates environmental...

Bli?anová Monika; Sciranková Lucia

2004-01-01

13

Fossil fuel usage and the environment  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Greenhouse Effect and global warming, ozone formation in the troposphere, ozone destruction in the stratosphere, and acid rain are important environmental issues. The relationship of fossil fuel usage to some of these issues is discussed. Data on fossil fuel consumption and the sources and sinks of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, methane, nitrogen and sulfur oxides, and ozone indicate that natural gas provides lower emissions of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, and nitrogen and sulfur oxides than other fossil fuels. Global emissions of methane from the gas industry are significantly less than those from other anthropogenic activities and natural sources, and methane plays an important role along with carbon monoxide and nitric oxide in tropospheric ozone formation. Reductions in any or all of these air pollutants would reduce ozone in the lower atmosphere. Several remedial measures have been or are being implemented in certain countries to reduce fossil fuel emissions. These include removal of emissions from the atmosphere by new biomass growth, fuel substitution by use of cleaner burning fuels for stationary and mobile sources, and fossil fuel combustion at higher efficiencies. It is unlikely that concerted environmental action by all governments of the world will occur soon, but much progress has been made to achieve clean air

14

News technology utilization fossil fuel  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Fossil fuel ? ?alternative energy? is coal, petroleum, natural gas. Petroleum and natural gas are scarce resources, but they are delimited. Reserves petroleum will be depleted after 39 years and reserves natural gas after 60 years.World reserves coal are good for another 240 years. Coal is the most abundant fossil fuel. It is the least expensive energy source for generating electricity. Many environmental problems associated with use of coal:in coal production, mining creates environmental problems.On Slovakia representative coal only important internal fuel ? power of source and coal is produced in 5 locality. Nowadays, oneself invest to new technology on utilization coal. Perspective solution onself shows UCG, IGCC.

Bli?anová Monika

2004-09-01

15

Modeling of advanced fossil fuel power plants  

Science.gov (United States)

The first part of this thesis deals with greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from fossil fuel-fired power stations. The GHG emission estimation from fossil fuel power generation industry signifies that emissions from this industry can be significantly reduced by fuel switching and adaption of advanced power generation technologies. In the second part of the thesis, steady-state models of some of the advanced fossil fuel power generation technologies are presented. The impacts of various parameters on the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) overpotentials and outputs are investigated. The detail analyses of operation of the hybrid SOFC-gas turbine (GT) cycle when fuelled with methane and syngas demonstrate that the efficiencies of the cycles with and without anode exhaust recirculation are close, but the specific power of the former is much higher. The parametric analysis of the performance of the hybrid SOFC-GT cycle indicates that increasing the system operating pressure and SOFC operating temperature and fuel utilization factor improves cycle efficiency, but the effects of the increasing SOFC current density and turbine inlet temperature are not favourable. The analysis of the operation of the system when fuelled with a wide range of fuel types demonstrates that the hybrid SOFC-GT cycle efficiency can be between 59% and 75%, depending on the inlet fuel type. Then, the system performance is investigated when methane as a reference fuel is replaced with various species that can be found in the fuel, i.e., H2, CO2, CO, and N 2. The results point out that influence of various species can be significant and different for each case. The experimental and numerical analyses of a biodiesel fuelled micro gas turbine indicate that fuel switching from petrodiesel to biodiesel can influence operational parameters of the system. The modeling results of gas turbine-based power plants signify that relatively simple models can predict plant performance with acceptable accuracy. The unique feature of these models is that they are developed based on similar assumptions and run at similar conditions; therefore, their results can be compared. This work demonstrates that, although utilization of fossil fuels for power generation is inevitable, at least in the short- and mid-term future, it is possible and practical to carry out such utilization more efficiently and in an environmentally friendlier manner.

Zabihian, Farshid

16

Sanitary effects of fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In this compilation are studied the sanitary effects of fossil fuels, behavioral and environmental sanitary risks. The risks in connection with the production, the transport and the distribution(casting) are also approached for the oil(petroleum), the gas and the coal. Accidents in the home are evoked. The risks due to the atmospheric pollution are seen through the components of the atmospheric pollution as well as the sanitary effects of this pollution. (N.C.)

17

NMR for liquid fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The book comprises two parts: the first part elements of relevant NMR phenomenology, including a definition of the most important NMR parameters, an introduction to Fourier transform NMR and a discussion of newer pulse techniques. Sufficient background material is presented to enable the reader to follow such techniques as spin echo, two-dimensional and polarization transfer experiments. These techniques are illustrated by extensive examples derived from fuel chemistry. The second part addresses the interpretation of NMR spectra and is based, to a very large extent, on the work of the authors who have used NMR in a variety of applications in fossil fuels. This part describes in detail the three basic methods for interpreting NMR spectra of liquid fuels: average structural parameter calculations, average molecule construction and functional group analysis. The use of NMR in engineering calculations is also presented and should be particularly useful to those interested in processing of fossil fuels. Extensive examples are drawn from petroleum, shale oils, coal liquids and model systems. Computer programs for performing the characterizations from the spectra are provided. 146 refs.; 64 figs.; 47 tabs

18

On Prediction of Depreciation Time of Fossil Fuel in Malaysia  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Problem statement: The fossil fuels play a crucial role in the world energy markets. Demand for fossil fuels become increasingly high and worrisome, because of fossil fuels will be significantly reduced and ultimately exhausted. This study was conducted to predict the depreciation time of fossil fuels in Malaysia and estimate the time remaining before the fossil fuels will finish. Approach: To predict the depreciation time of fossil fuels, the reserves, consumption and prices of fossil fuel will be used. The prediction of fossil fuel reserves were estimated using ratio of fossil fuel reserve versus consumption, Klass Model and Modified Klass Model. The prediction time will give us the opportunity to prepare for the coming energy crisis and discover new energy sources. The results from the analysis will be concluded alongside with the Olduvai Theory and Hubbert Peak Theory. Both of the theories are highly related to the energy crisis. The Olduvai Theory states that the industrial civilization will last for approximately 100 year: circa 1930-2030. As for Hubbert Peak Theory, it can estimate the total amount of fossil fuels available based on the production rate from time to time. Results: Due to the vast usage of petroleum, it will be depleted faster than natural gas and coal. After 14 years, natural gas and coal will replace petroleum as a fossil fuel and coal would then be the major fossil fuels. Based on the results from Hubbert Peak Theory, the rate of production of petroleum has reached the maximum level in 2004 and started to decline since that time; while in the Olduvai theory, it has explained that the life expectancy of the industrial civilization was found to be ended in 2030. Petroleum will be spent over in 2020, followed by natural gas in 2058 and coal around the year 2066. Conclusion: So far, Malaysia has not facing disconnection of electricity as other developed countries. When this happens, it gives the meaning of the end of the industrial civilization where the electric power grids go down and never come back up. If there is no substance that can replace fossil fuels to continue in the industrial civilization, human civilization will be facing the fate of collapse.

Tey Jin Pin

2012-01-01

19

The cognitive surplus is made of fossil fuels  

OpenAIRE

People in the industrial world have a great deal of free time. Clay Shirky has described this free time, considered as a whole, as a vast “cognitive surplus,” and presents many efforts currently under way to use the cognitive surplus for prosocial ends. However, the cognitive surplus came to exist largely as a result of labor–saving devices that run on fossil fuels. Many problems relating to fossil fuels constrain how people can responsibly use the cognitive surplus to addre...

Tomlinson, Bill University Of California; Silberman, M. Six Bureau Of Economic Interpretation

2012-01-01

20

Fossil fuel support mechanisms in Finland  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Fossil fuel subsidies and other state support for fossil fuels are forbidden by the Kyoto Protocol and other international treaties. However, they are still commonly used. This publication presents and analyses diverse state support mechanisms for fossil fuels in Finland in 2003-2010. Total of 38 support mechanisms are covered in quantitative analysis and some other mechanisms are mentioned qualitatively only. For some mechanisms the study includes a longer historical perspective. This is the case for tax subsidies for crude oil based traffic fuels that have been maintained in Finland since 1965.

Lampinen, Ari

2013-10-15

21

Microalgal and Terrestrial Transport Biofuels to Displace Fossil Fuels  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Terrestrial transport biofuels differ in their ability to replace fossil fuels. When both the conversion of solar energy into biomass and the life cycle inputs of fossil fuels are considered, ethanol from sugarcane and biodiesel from palm oil do relatively well, if compared with ethanol from corn, sugar beet or wheat and biodiesel from rapeseed. When terrestrial biofuels are to replace mineral oil-derived transport fuels, large areas of good agricultural land are needed: about 5x108 ha in the case of biofuels from sugarcane or oil palm, and at least 1.8-3.6x109 ha in the case of ethanol from wheat, corn or sugar beet, as produced in industrialized countries. Biofuels from microalgae which are commercially produced with current technologies do not appear to outperform terrestrial plants such as sugarcane in their ability to displace fossil fuels. Whether they will able to do so on a commercial scale in the future, is uncertain.

Lucas Reijnders

2009-02-01

22

A Statistical Method for Estimating Missing GHG Emissions in Bottom-Up Inventories: The Case of Fossil Fuel Combustion in Industry in the Bogota Region, Colombia  

Science.gov (United States)

The development of environmentally, socially and financially suitable greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation portfolios requires detailed disaggregation of emissions by activity sector, preferably at the regional level. Bottom-up (BU) emission inventories are intrinsically disaggregated, but although detailed, they are frequently incomplete. Missing and erroneous activity data are rather common in emission inventories of GHG, criteria and toxic pollutants, even in developed countries. The fraction of missing and erroneous data can be rather large in developing country inventories. In addition, the cost and time for obtaining or correcting this information can be prohibitive or can delay the inventory development. This is particularly true for regional BU inventories in the developing world. Moreover, a rather common practice is to disregard or to arbitrarily impute low default activity or emission values to missing data, which typically leads to significant underestimation of the total emissions. Our investigation focuses on GHG emissions by fossil fuel combustion in industry in the Bogota Region, composed by Bogota and its adjacent, semi-rural area of influence, the Province of Cundinamarca. We found that the BU inventories for this sub-category substantially underestimate emissions when compared to top-down (TD) estimations based on sub-sector specific national fuel consumption data and regional energy intensities. Although both BU inventories have a substantial number of missing and evidently erroneous entries, i.e. information on fuel consumption per combustion unit per company, the validated energy use and emission data display clear and smooth frequency distributions, which can be adequately fitted to bimodal log-normal distributions. This is not unexpected as industrial plant sizes are typically log-normally distributed. Moreover, our statistical tests suggest that industrial sub-sectors, as classified by the International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC), are also well represented by log-normal distributions. Using the validated data, we tested several missing data estimation procedures, including Montecarlo sampling of the real and fitted distributions, and a per ISIC estimation based on bootstrap-calculated mean values. These results will be presented and discussed in detail. Our results suggest that the accuracy of sub-sector BU emission inventories, particularly in developing regions, could be significantly improved if they are designed and carried out to be representative sub-samples (surveys) of the actual universe of emitters. A large fraction the missing data could be subsequently estimated by robust statistical procedures provided that most of the emitters were accounted by number and ISIC.

Jimenez-Pizarro, R.; Rojas, A. M.; Pulido-Guio, A. D.

2012-12-01

23

Constraints of fossil fuels depletion on global warming projections  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A scientific debate is in progress about the intersection of climate change with the new field of fossil fuels depletion geology. Here, new projections of atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration and global-mean temperature change are presented, should fossil fuels be exploited at a rate limited by geological availability only. The present work starts from the projections of fossil energy use, as obtained from ten independent sources. From such projections an upper bound, a lower bound and an ensemble mean profile for fossil CO{sub 2} emissions until 2200 are derived. Using the coupled gas-cycle/climate model MAGICC, the corresponding climatic projections out to 2200 are obtained. We find that CO{sub 2} concentration might increase up to about 480 ppm (445-540 ppm), while the global-mean temperature increase w.r.t. 2000 might reach 1.2 deg. C (0.9-1.6 deg. C). However, future improvements of fossil fuels recovery and discoveries of new resources might lead to higher emissions; hence our climatic projections are likely to be underestimated. In the absence of actions of emissions reduction, a level of dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system might be already experienced toward the middle of the 21st century, despite the constraints imposed by the exhaustion of fossil fuels. - Highlights: > CO{sub 2} and global temperature are projected under fossil fuels exhaustion scenarios. > Temperature is projected to reach a minimum of 2 deg. C above pre-industrial. > Temperature projections are possibly lower than the IPCC ones. > Fossil fuels exhaustion will not avoid dangerous global warming.

Chiari, Luca, E-mail: chiari@science.unitn.it [Department of Physics, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo (Italy); Zecca, Antonio, E-mail: zecca@science.unitn.it [Department of Physics, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, 38123 Povo (Italy)

2011-09-15

24

Constraints of fossil fuels depletion on global warming projections  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A scientific debate is in progress about the intersection of climate change with the new field of fossil fuels depletion geology. Here, new projections of atmospheric CO2 concentration and global-mean temperature change are presented, should fossil fuels be exploited at a rate limited by geological availability only. The present work starts from the projections of fossil energy use, as obtained from ten independent sources. From such projections an upper bound, a lower bound and an ensemble mean profile for fossil CO2 emissions until 2200 are derived. Using the coupled gas-cycle/climate model MAGICC, the corresponding climatic projections out to 2200 are obtained. We find that CO2 concentration might increase up to about 480 ppm (445-540 ppm), while the global-mean temperature increase w.r.t. 2000 might reach 1.2 deg. C (0.9-1.6 deg. C). However, future improvements of fossil fuels recovery and discoveries of new resources might lead to higher emissions; hence our climatic projections are likely to be underestimated. In the absence of actions of emissions reduction, a level of dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system might be already experienced toward the middle of the 21st century, despite the constraints imposed by the exhaustion of fossil fuels. - Highlights: ? CO2 and global temperature are projected under fossil fuels exhaustion scenarios. ? Temperature is projected to reach a minimum of 2 deg. rojected to reach a minimum of 2 deg. C above pre-industrial. ? Temperature projections are possibly lower than the IPCC ones. ? Fossil fuels exhaustion will not avoid dangerous global warming.

25

Sanitary effects of fossil fuels; Effets sanitaires des combustibles fossiles  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In this compilation are studied the sanitary effects of fossil fuels, behavioral and environmental sanitary risks. The risks in connection with the production, the transport and the distribution(casting) are also approached for the oil(petroleum), the gas and the coal. Accidents in the home are evoked. The risks due to the atmospheric pollution are seen through the components of the atmospheric pollution as well as the sanitary effects of this pollution. (N.C.)

Nifenecker, H. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (IN2P3/CNRS), 38 - Grenoble (France)

2006-07-01

26

When will fossil fuel reserves be diminished?  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Crude oil, coal and gas are the main resources for world energy supply. The size of fossil fuel reserves and the dilemma that 'when non-renewable energy will be diminished' is a fundamental and doubtful question that needs to be answered. This paper presents a new formula for calculating when fossil fuel reserves are likely to be depleted and develops an econometrics model to demonstrate the relationship between fossil fuel reserves and some main variables. The new formula is modified from the Klass model and thus assumes a continuous compound rate and computes fossil fuel reserve depletion times for oil, coal and gas of approximately 35, 107 and 37 years, respectively. This means that coal reserves are available up to 2112, and will be the only fossil fuel remaining after 2042. In the Econometrics model, the main exogenous variables affecting oil, coal and gas reserve trends are their consumption and respective prices between 1980 and 2006. The models for oil and gas reserves unexpectedly show a positive and significant relationship with consumption, while presenting a negative and significant relationship with price. The econometrics model for coal reserves, however, expectedly illustrates a negative and significant relationship with consumption and a positive and significant relationship with price. Consequently, huge reserves of coal and low-level coal prices in comparison to oil and gas make coal one of the main energy substitutions for oil and gas in the future, under the assumption of coal as a clean energy source. (author)

Shafiee, Shahriar; Topal, Erkan [School of Engineering and CRC Mining, The University of Queensland, St. Lucia Qld. 4072 (Australia)

2009-01-15

27

Fructose rich alternative carbon sources for enhanced fossil fuels biodesulfurization  

OpenAIRE

Biodesulfurization allows the removal of recalcitrant sulfur from fossil fuels at mild operating conditions with the aid of microorganisms. However the production of biocatalysts still has elevated costs which hinder its industrial application. So the use of agro-industrial by-products and wastes, as alternative carbon sources could present an opportunity to cheapen the process. In previous works we showed that Gordonia alkanivorans strain 1B has the ability to use materials such as recyc...

Silva, Tiago P.; Paixa?o, Susana M.; Alves, Lui?s Manuel

2013-01-01

28

Steam generation: fossil-fired systems: utility boilers; industrial boilers; boiler auxillaries; nuclear systems: boiling water; pressurized water; in-core fuel management; steam-cycle systems: condensate/feedwater; circulating water; water treatment  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A survey of development in steam generation is presented. First, fossil-fired systems are described. Progress in the design of utility and industrial boilers as well as in boiler auxiliaries is traced. Improvements in coal pulverizers, burners that cut pollution and improve efficiency, fans, air heaters and economisers are noted. Nuclear systems are then described, including the BWR and PWR reactors, in-core fuel management techniques are described. Finally, steam-cycle systems for fossil-fired and nuclear power plants are reviewed. Condensate/feedwater systems, circulating water systems, cooling towers, and water treatment systems are discussed

29

Fossil-fuel constraints on global warming  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In 2008 and 2009 two papers by Kharecha and Hansen and by Nel and Cooper examined possible fossil energy availability and energy consumption scenarios and consequences for future climate. The papers yield somewhat similar results regarding atmospheric CO{sub 2} levels, but they reach substantially different conclusions regarding future climate change. Here, we compare their methods and results. Our work shows that Nel and Cooper's paper significantly underestimates future warming. Nel and Cooper conclude that even if all the available fossil fuels would be burned at the maximum possible rate during this century, the consequent warming would cap at less than 1 C above the 2000 level. We find that - under Nel and Cooper's assumption of an intensive exploitation of fossil fuels - the global temperature in 2100 will likely reach levels which would lead to severely damaging long-term impacts. (author)

Zecca, Antonio; Chiari, Luca [Physics Department, University of Trento, Via Sommarive 14, I-38050 Povo TN (Italy)

2010-01-15

30

Fossil-fuel constraints on global warming  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In 2008 and 2009 two papers by Kharecha and Hansen and by Nel and Cooper examined possible fossil energy availability and energy consumption scenarios and consequences for future climate. The papers yield somewhat similar results regarding atmospheric CO2 levels, but they reach substantially different conclusions regarding future climate change. Here, we compare their methods and results. Our work shows that Nel and Cooper's paper significantly underestimates future warming. Nel and Cooper conclude that even if all the available fossil fuels would be burned at the maximum possible rate during this century, the consequent warming would cap at less than 1 deg. C above the 2000 level. We find that - under Nel and Cooper's assumption of an intensive exploitation of fossil fuels - the global temperature in 2100 will likely reach levels which would lead to severely damaging long-term impacts.

31

The Fascinating Story of Fossil Fuels  

Science.gov (United States)

How this energy source was created, its meaning to mankind, our drastically reduced supply, and why we cannot wait for nature to make more are considered. Today fossil fuels supply 96 percent of the energy used but we must find alternate energy options if we are to combat the energy crisis. (BL)

Asimov, Isaac

1973-01-01

32

Fossil fuels supplies modeling and research  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The fossil fuel supplies modeling and research effort focuses on models for US Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) planning and management. Topics covered included new SPR oil valuation models, updating models for SPR risk analysis, and fill-draw planning. Another task in this program area is the development of advanced computational tools for three-dimensional seismic analysis.

Leiby, P.N.

1996-06-01

33

Clean fuels from fossil sources  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Energy availability is determining to sustain the social development, but energy production involves environmental impacts at regional and global level. The central role of oil, natural gas, coal for energy supply will be kept for decades. The development of the engine-fuel combination to satisfy more stringent emissions limitations, is the challenge for an environmentally clean transportation system

34

When will fossil fuel reserves be diminished?  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Crude oil, coal and gas are the main resources for world energy supply. The size of fossil fuel reserves and the dilemma that 'when non-renewable energy will be diminished' is a fundamental and doubtful question that needs to be answered. This paper presents a new formula for calculating when fossil fuel reserves are likely to be depleted and develops an econometrics model to demonstrate the relationship between fossil fuel reserves and some main variables. The new formula is modified from the Klass model and thus assumes a continuous compound rate and computes fossil fuel reserve depletion times for oil, coal and gas of approximately 35, 107 and 37 years, respectively. This means that coal reserves are available up to 2112, and will be the only fossil fuel remaining after 2042. In the Econometrics model, the main exogenous variables affecting oil, coal and gas reserve trends are their consumption and respective prices between 1980 and 2006. The models for oil and gas reserves unexpectedly show a positive and significant relationship with consumption, while presenting a negative and significant relationship with price. The econometrics model for coal reserves, however, expectedly illustrates a negative and significant relationship with consumption and a positive and significant relationship with price. Consequently, huge reserves of coal and low-level coal prices in comparison to oil and gas make coal one of the main energy substitutions for oil and gas in the future, under the assumption of coal as a clean energy source. 28 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

Shahriar Shafiee; Erkan Topal [University of Queensland, St. Lucia, Qld. (Australia). School of Engineering and CRC Mining

2009-01-15

35

When will fossil fuel reserves be diminished?  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Crude oil, coal and gas are the main resources for world energy supply. The size of fossil fuel reserves and the dilemma that 'when non-renewable energy will be diminished' is a fundamental and doubtful question that needs to be answered. This paper presents a new formula for calculating when fossil fuel reserves are likely to be depleted and develops an econometrics model to demonstrate the relationship between fossil fuel reserves and some main variables. The new formula is modified from the Klass model and thus assumes a continuous compound rate and computes fossil fuel reserve depletion times for oil, coal and gas of approximately 35, 107 and 37 years, respectively. This means that coal reserves are available up to 2112, and will be the only fossil fuel remaining after 2042. In the Econometrics model, the main exogenous variables affecting oil, coal and gas reserve trends are their consumption and respective prices between 1980 and 2006. The models for oil and gas reserves unexpectedly show a positive and significant relationship with consumption, while presenting a negative and significant relationship with price. The econometrics model for coal reserves, however, expectedly illustrates a negative and significant relationship with consumption and a positive and significant relationship with price. Consequently, huge reserves of coal and low-level coal prices in comparison to oil and gas make coal one of the main energy substitutions for oil and gas in the future,bstitutions for oil and gas in the future, under the assumption of coal as a clean energy source. (author)

36

When will fossil fuel reserves be diminished?  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Crude oil, coal and gas are the main resources for world energy supply. The size of fossil fuel reserves and the dilemma that 'when non-renewable energy will be diminished' is a fundamental and doubtful question that needs to be answered. This paper presents a new formula for calculating when fossil fuel reserves are likely to be depleted and develops an econometrics model to demonstrate the relationship between fossil fuel reserves and some main variables. The new formula is modified from the Klass model and thus assumes a continuous compound rate and computes fossil fuel reserve depletion times for oil, coal and gas of approximately 35, 107 and 37 years, respectively. This means that coal reserves are available up to 2112, and will be the only fossil fuel remaining after 2042. In the Econometrics model, the main exogenous variables affecting oil, coal and gas reserve trends are their consumption and respective prices between 1980 and 2006. The models for oil and gas reserves unexpectedly show a positive and significant relationship with consumption, while presenting a negative and significant relationship with price. The econometrics model for coal reserves, however, expectedly illustrates a negative and significant relationship with consumption and a positive and significant relationship with price. Consequently, huge reserves of coal and low-level coal prices in comparison to oil and gas make coal one of the main energy substitutions for oil and gas in the future,bstitutions for oil and gas in the future, under the assumption of coal as a clean energy source

37

Global change: The new challenge for the fossil carbon industries  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Human population growth, at 90 million more per year and at least 10 billion next century, is forcing a re-examination of our values and technologies. Technology concerns are energy, food production, water and air quality, and waste disposal. All of these involve exact knowledge of the outer few km of our planet because this film forms the basis of all our resources. A great new challenge faces people with expertise in the fine structure and dynamics of the porous-cracked outer layers of earth. Much of this expertise is centered in the fossil carbon industries. All must be involved in the problems of water supply, soil conservation, waste disposal, and clean energy production. Perhaps the greatest question facing the fossil fuel industry concerns whether greenhouse gas emissions can be reduced

38

Survey of an evaluation method for CO sub 2 reduction technology in the fossil fuel much-consuming industry field. Kaseki nenryo tashohigata sangyo bun prime ya ni okeru CO sub 2 taisaku gijutsu hyokaho no chosa  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The method similar to inter-industry relations analysis is proposed to establish the method for making a quantitative evaluation of the effects of various technologies for CO{sub 2} emission reduction measures in the fossil fuel much-consuming industry field. In the production process, a new concept, a cumulative CO{sub 2} emission unit requirement ({phi}) is made an evaluation index. In each unit which composes the process, an in/out relationship of materials is expressed linearly, and it is supposed that the connection state between units is already known, and {phi} for raw materials and energy to be used and necessary expenses including equipment and personnel are given as initial conditions. Then, {phi} per product unit quantity can be calculated by the method similar to the inter-industry relations analysis. As basic data, the present situation of CO{sub 2} emission and flow of materials/energy in the following four fossil fuel much-consuming industries are studied: electric power, cement, iron making and nonferrous metal smelting. As a result of trially applying the method of typical plants in the above-mentioned four industries in terms of the present technology and improved technology, validity of this evaluation method is confirmed and {phi} of each product can be calculated. 39 refs. 83 figs., 96 tabs.

1992-03-01

39

Survey of an evaluation method for CO{sub 2} reduction technology in the fossil fuel much-consuming industry field; Kaseki nenryo tashohigata sangyo bun{prime}ya ni okeru CO{sub 2} taisaku gijutsu hyokaho no chosa  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The method similar to inter-industry relations analysis is proposed to establish the method for making a quantitative evaluation of the effects of various technologies for CO{sub 2} emission reduction measures in the fossil fuel much-consuming industry field. In the production process, a new concept, a cumulative CO{sub 2} emission unit requirement ({phi}) is made an evaluation index. In each unit which composes the process, an in/out relationship of materials is expressed linearly, and it is supposed that the connection state between units is already known, and {phi} for raw materials and energy to be used and necessary expenses including equipment and personnel are given as initial conditions. Then, {phi} per product unit quantity can be calculated by the method similar to the inter-industry relations analysis. As basic data, the present situation of CO{sub 2} emission and flow of materials/energy in the following four fossil fuel much-consuming industries are studied: electric power, cement, iron making and nonferrous metal smelting. As a result of trially applying the method of typical plants in the above-mentioned four industries in terms of the present technology and improved technology, validity of this evaluation method is confirmed and {phi} of each product can be calculated. 39 refs. 83 figs., 96 tabs.

1992-03-01

40

IGT calculates world reserves of fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Institute of Gas Technology has published the IGT World Reserves Survey, giving their latest tabulation of world reserves of fossil fuels and uranium. The report contains 120 Tables and 41 Figures. Estimates are provided for proved reserves, resources, current production, and life indexes of the non-renewable energy sources of the US and of the world as a whole. World regional data are also provided in many cases. The data are summarized here. 2 figures, 5 tables

41

Depletion of fossil fuels and anthropogenic climate change : a review  

OpenAIRE

Future scenarios with significant anthropogenic climate change also display large increases in world production of fossil fuels, the principal CO2 emission source. Meanwhile, fossil fuel depletion has also been identified as a future challenge. This chapter reviews the connection between these two issues and concludes that limits to availability of fossil fuels will set a limit for mankind’s ability to affect the climate. However, this limit is unclear as various studies have reached quite ...

Ho?o?k, Mikael; Tang, Xu

2013-01-01

42

Traversing the mountaintop: world fossil fuel production to 2050  

OpenAIRE

During the past century, fossil fuels—petroleum liquids, natural gas and coal—were the dominant source of world energy production. From 1950 to 2005, fossil fuels provided 85–93% of all energy production. All fossil fuels grew substantially during this period, their combined growth exceeding the increase in world population. This growth, however, was irregular, providing for rapidly growing per capita production from 1950 to 1980, stable per capita production from 1980 to 2000 and risin...

Nehring, Richard

2009-01-01

43

The environmental dilemma of fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The increasing atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide poses an environmental dilemma for fossil fuel energy generation that, unlike other related emissions, cannot be resolved by control technologies alone. Although fossil fuels presently provide the most cost-effective global energy source, and model projections suggest that their use is initiating climatic changes which, while quite uncertain, may induce significant, counter-balancing impacts to water resources, coastal resources, ecological systems, and possibly agricultural production. The climate model indicate that the warming should have begun, and there is some evidence for this occurring, but at a less rapid and more uneven rate than projected. In addition, different climate models are not yet in agreement in their latitudinal or regional predictions, and it will likely require a decade or more for such agreement to develop as high performance computers become available for addressing this ''grand challenge'' problem. Thus, in addition to the prospect for climatic change, the uncertainties of the changes and associated impacts contribute to the dilemma of dealing with the issue. Further, the problem is pervasive and international scope, with different countries and peoples having differing perspectives of technology, development, and environmental responsibility. Dealing with this issue will thus require creativity, commitment, and flexibility

44

Fossil-fuels, bio-fuels and food: Raking priorities  

OpenAIRE

This paper deals with the question of the trade-offs between bio-fuels, fossil-fuels, and food. To do so an analysis is conducted taking into consideration the differences in relative prices and in the productive structure among the countries. The results shows that in general food puts a greater stress over the economies than energy does, and mainly in the developing economies. As a consequence of that, the possibilities for the growing use of bio-fuels is limited and restrict to countries w...

Dias, Guilherme Leite Da Silva; Guilhoto, Joaquim Jose? Martins

2010-01-01

45

Hydrogen: A real alternative to fossil fuels and bio fuels in the Spanish vehicle industry; El Hidrogeno: Una alternativa real a los combustible fosiles y a los biocombustible para automoacion en Espana  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

For several years, UE has been trying to increase the use of bio fuels to replace petrol or diesel in the transports with the aim of fulfilling a commitment about climate change, supplying environmentally friendly conditions, promoting renewable energy sources. To achieve this, the 2003/30/EC Directive states that in all the European countries, before 31st December 2010, at least 5.75% of all petrol and diesel fuels used for transport are bio fuels. In previous papers, the authors evaluated this possibility. Analyzing hydrogen as replacement of fossil fuels and bio fuels nowadays in spain and a technical,economic and environmental point of view is the aim of this paper. (Author)

Hernandez-Sobrino, F.; Rodriguez-Monroy, C.; Hernandez-Perez, J. L.

2010-07-01

46

Green trucks: transitioning the freight truck industry to low and zero emission fuel systems  

OpenAIRE

The freight truck industry in Canada is the lifeblood of many communities throughout the country. These communities rely upon overland freight for everything from food to fuel. The continued operation of this industry is fundamentally dependent on the consumption of fossil fuels. This dependence leads to two challenges facing the freight industry: (1) fossil fuels are expensive, finite resources that are prone to dramatic surges in price; and, (2) the consumption and combustion of fossil fuel...

Kalthoff, Jarrett Reid

2012-01-01

47

Global climate change and the need to replace fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

If the Earth had no atmosphere, its average surface temperature would be about -18degC. The Earth is kept at its relatively warm temperature by molecules in the atmosphere, including water molecules and carbon dioxide molecules that absorb some of the infrared radiation emitted by the Earth and prevent its escape from the Earth's environment. This is the natural greenhouse effect.Since the beginning of the industrial era, additional gases have been emitted into the atmosphere-particularly carbon dioxide (CO2)-which adds to this absorption and are believed to further increase the Earth's temperature. This increment is referred to as the anthropogenic greenhouse effect. Warnings about the effects of CO2 emissions date to the 19 century, but they have become a matter of widespread concern only since the 1970. The anticipated consequences are described as global warmingor, more broadly as global climate change.The production of CO2 is the inevitable accompaniment of any combustion of fossil fuels. The amount released per unit energy output varies for the different fuels, due largely to differences in their hydrogen content. Natural gas is primarily methane (CH4) and a considerable fraction of its combustion energy comes from the chemical combination of hydrogen and oxygen. Its ratio of carbon dioxide production to energy production is the lowproduction to energy production is the lowest among the fossil fuels

48

Status of fossil fuel reserves; Etat des reserves des combustibles fossiles  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Reserves represent the sum of past and future productions up to the end of production. In most countries the reserve data of fields are confidential. Therefore, fossil fuel reserves are badly known because the published data are more political than technical and many countries make a confusion between resources and reserves. The cumulated production of fossil fuels represents only between a third and a fifth of the ultimate reserves. The production peak will take place between 2020 and 2050. In the ultimate reserves, which extrapolate the past, the fossil fuels represent three thirds of the overall energy. This document analyses the uncertainties linked with fossil fuel reserves: reliability of published data, modeling of future production, comparison with other energy sources, energy consumption forecasts, reserves/production ratio, exploitation of non-conventional hydrocarbons (tar sands, extra-heavy oils, bituminous shales, coal gas, gas shales, methane in overpressure aquifers, methane hydrates), technology impacts, prices impact, and reserves growth. (J.S.)

Laherrere, J

2005-07-01

49

Development of an atmospheric fossil fuel CO2 monitoring station  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Complete text of publication follows. The aim of the project supported by Hungarian NSF (ref No. F69029) is determination of atmospheric fossil fuel CO2 concentration in major cities or average industrial regions in Hungary using together measurement of CO2 mixing ratio and radiocarbon (14C) content of the air. For this aim we developed a high precision atmospheric CO2 monitoring station in ATOMKI (Figure 1.). The station's measuring system is based on an Ultramat 6F (Siemens) infrared gas analyser. To help continuous, unattended run and autocalibration we built up an automatic gas handling line for the analyzer. For radiocarbon measurements we applied an integrating sampling system. One was installed in Debrecen station and two independent 14CO2 sampling line were installed 400 km far from Debrecen at Hegyhatsal station as background references. During several tests of the measuring and sampling systems we demonstrated that uncertainty of individual CO2 mixing ratio results is less than 0.5 ppm and the applied radiocarbon sampling system developed by ATOMKI works with good reproducibility. In September and October of 2008 we measured the mixing ratio and radiocarbon content of atmospheric CO2 at Debrecen and the far rural reference station (Hegyhatsal) simultaneously. It was concluded that trends in CO2 mixing ratio variations in time are very similar at the three diffen time are very similar at the three different sampling points (2 m above ground in Debrecen, 10 m and 115 m above ground in Hegyhatsal). Air quality in Debrecen during September of 2008 seemed to be relatively clear from the point of view of its CO2 content at least. When winter came in October, with lower outside temperature and less sunshine hours the CO2 content of air was increased in general at all the three sampling points, but this effect was more intensive closer to the ground level. According our radiocarbon observations it was clearly indicated that there was not significant amount of fossil fuel CO2 in the air of Debrecen during September in 2008. But in October of 2008 the ?14C value of atmospheric CO2 of Debrecen decreased with more than 40 h relative to September's results, and according our calculations it was caused by about 20 ppm fossil fuel CO2 which appeared as a surplus amount in the air above the previous months carbon dioxide level. Using the developed mobile and high precision atmospheric CO2 monitoring station we plan to determine the atmospheric fossil fuel CO2 trend in the whole 2008/2009 winter in Debrecen

50

Environmental effects of fossil fuel combustion  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Fossil fuel which include natural gas, petroleum, shale oil and bitumen are the main source of heat and electrical energy. All these fuels contain beside major constituents (carbon, hydrogen, oxygen) other materials as metal, sulfur and nitrogen compounds. During the combustion process different pollutants as fly ash, sulfur oxides (SO2 and SO3), nitrogen oxides (NOx NO + NO2) and volatile organic compounds are emitted. Fly ash contain different trace elements (heavy metals). Gross emission of pollutants is tremendous all over the world. These pollutants are present in the atmosphere in such conditions that they can affect man and his environment. Air pollution caused by the particulate matter and other pollutants not only acts directly on environment but by contamination of water and soil leads to their degradation. Wet and dry deposition of inorganic pollutants leads to acidification of environment. These phenomena affect health of the people, increase corrosion, destroy cultivated soil and forests. Most of the plants, especially coniferous trees are not resistant to sulfur and nitrogen oxides. Following longer exposure leaves wither and fall. Widespread forest damage has been reported in Europe and North America regions. Many cultivated plants are not resistant to these pollutants either especially in the early period vegetation. The mechanisms of pollutants transformation in atmosphere are described by environmental chemistry. An important role in these transformations plays photochemistry. SO2 and NOx are oxidized and sulfuric and nitric acids are formed in presence of water vapours, fog and droplets. Other problem discussed connected with human activities is emission of volatile organic compounds to the atmosphere. These emissions cause stratospheric ozone depletion, ground level photochemical ozone formation, toxic or carcinogenic human health effects, enhancing the global greenhouse effect, accumulation and persistence in environment. Wet flue gas desulfurization (FGD) and selective catalytic reduction (SCR) can be applied for flue gas treatment and SO2 and NOx emission control. (author)

51

Krakow clean fossil fuels and energy efficiency project  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Support for Eastern European Democracy (SEED) Act of 1989 directed the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake an equipment assessment project aimed at developing the capability within Poland to manufacture or modify industrial-scale combustion equipment to utilize fossil fuels cleanly. This project is being implemented in the city of Krakow as the `Krakow Clean Fossil Fuels and Energy Efficiency Project.` Funding is provided through the U.S. Agency for International Development (AID). The project is being conducted in a manner that can be generalized to all of Poland and to the rest of Eastern Europe. The historic city of Krakow has a population of 750,000. Almost half of the heating energy used in Krakow is supplied by low-efficiency boilerhouses and home coal stoves. Within the town, there are more than 1,300 local boilerhouses and 100,000 home stoves. These are collectively referred to as the `low emission sources` and they are the primary sources of particulates and hydrocarbon emissions in the city and major contributors of sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide.

Butcher, T.A.; Pierce, B.L. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-11-01

52

Krakow clean fossil fuels and energy efficiency project  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Support for Eastern European Democracy (SEED) Act of 1989 directed the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to undertake an equipment assessment project aimed at developing the capability within Poland to manufacture or modify industrial-scale combustion equipment to utilize fossil fuels cleanly. This project is being implemented in the city of Krakow as the 'Krakow Clean Fossil Fuels and Energy Efficiency Project.' Funding is provided through the U.S. Agency for International Development (AID). The project is being conducted in a manner that can be generalized to all of Poland and to the rest of Eastern Europe. The historic city of Krakow has a population of 750,000. Almost half of the heating energy used in Krakow is supplied by low-efficiency boilerhouses and home coal stoves. Within the town, there are more than 1,300 local boilerhouses and 100,000 home stoves. These are collectively referred to as the 'low emission sources' and they are the primary sources of particulates and hydrocarbon emissions in the city and major contributors of sulfur dioxide and carbon monoxide

53

ADVANCED FOSSIL FUEL AND THE ENVIRONMENT: AN EXECUTIVE REPORT  

Science.gov (United States)

This executive-level report gives an overview of some of the more advanced fossil fuel technologies, including several Chemical Coal Cleaning and Liquid Fuels Cleaning methods. Synthetic fuels, Chemically Active Fluid Beds, and Oil Shale are also considered as viable advanced pro...

54

Fossil fuels. Commercializing clean coal technologies  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Coal, an abundant domestic energy source, provides 25 percent of the nation's energy needs, but its use contributes to various types of pollution, including acid rain. The Department of Energy (DOE) has a Clean Coal Technology (CCT) program whose goal is to expand the use of coal in an environmentally safe manner by contributing to the cost of projects demonstrating the commercial applications of emerging clean coal technologies. Concerned about the implementation of the CCT program, the Chairman, Subcommittee on Energy and Power, House Committee on Energy and Commerce, requested GAO to report on (1) DOE's process of negotiating cooperative agreements with project sponsors, (2) changes DOE has made to the program, (3) the status of funded projects, and (4) the interrelationship between acid rain control proposals and the potential commercialization of clean coal technologies. Under the CCT program, DOE funds up to 50 percent of the cost of financing projects that demonstrate commercial applications of emerging clean coal technologies. DOE has conducted two solicitations for demonstration project proposals and is planning a third solicitation by May 1989. The Congress has appropriated $400 million for the first solicitation, or round one of the program, $575 million for round two, and $575 million for round three, for a total of $1.55 billion. For the round-one solicitation, DOE received 51 proposals from project sponsors. As of December 31, 1988, DOE had funded nine projects and was in the process of negotiating cooperative financial assistance agreements with sponsors of four projects. In September 1988, DOE selected 16 round-two projects from 55 proposals submitted and began the process of negotiating cooperative agreements with the project sponsors. The Congress has debated the need to reduce acid rain-causing emissions associated with fossil fuel combustion. The 100th Congress considered but did not enact about 20 acid rain control bills. On February 9, 1989, President Bush told the Congress that he plans to propose legislation for a new, more effective Clean Air Act, which will include a plan to reduce, by a specific date, the emissions that cause acid rain. DOE experienced difficulties in negotiating cooperative agreements with round-one project sponsors, which delayed completing agreements for five projects and resulted in the termination of negotiations for three projects. One of the main problems was that project sponsors had difficulty in completing financial and other business arrangements to fund their share of project costs. Negotiations were also delayed because of (1) sponsors' reluctance to agree to repay the federal share of project costs should the technology become commercialized and (2) sponsors' and other project participants' reluctance to release proprietary data to DOE. Further, DOE headquarters review and approval process to ensure negotiation consistency added time to the agreement formalization process. Although DOE made changes for round two of the program, federal repayment requirements and proprietary data rights could continue to cause delays in completing agreements with project sponsors. Seven of the nine funded round-one projects are not progressing as planned because of equipment failure, delays in obtaining equipment, project financing problems, and delays in obtaining permits. DOE said it is too early to tell whether the slippage will affect the timing of the commercial availability of the clean coal technologies. The CCT program can play an important role in reducing emissions from fossil fuel-fired power plants. The new administration has indicated its commitment to full funding of the program. Enactment of legislation that prescribes stringent deadlines and/or reduced levels of emissions to control acid rain could affect the program's potential effectiveness by diverting investment from emerging clean coal technologies into available conventional technologies. On the other hand, enactment of legislation that allows for development of emerging technologies while also requiring some

55

Fossil Fuel Emission Verification Modeling at LLNL  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

We have an established project at LLNL to develop the tools needed to constrain fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions using measurements of the carbon-14 isotope in atmospheric samples. In Figure 1 we show the fossil fuel plumes from Los Angeles and San Francisco for two different weather patterns. Obviously, a measurement made at any given location is going to depend on the weather leading up to the measurement. Thus, in order to determine the GHG emissions from some region using in situ measurements of those GHGs, we use state-of-the-art global and regional atmospheric chemistry-transport codes to simulate the plumes: the LLNL-IMPACT model (Rotman et al., 2004) and the WRFCHEM community code (http://www.wrf-model.org/index.php). Both codes can use observed (aka assimilated) meteorology in order to recreate the actual transport that occurred. The measured concentration of each tracer at a particular spatio-temporal location is a linear combination of the plumes from each region at that location (for non-reactive species). The challenge is to calculate the emission strengths for each region that fit the observed concentrations. In general this is difficult because there are errors in the measurements and modeling of the plumes. We solve this inversion problem using the strategy illustrated in Figure 2. The Bayesian Inference step combines the a priori estimates of the emissions, and their uncertainty, for each region with the results of the observations, and their uncertainty, and an ensemble of model predicted plumes for each region, and their uncertainty. The result is the mathematical best estimate of the emissions and their errors. In the case of non-linearities, or if we are using a statistical sampling technique such as a Markov Chain Monte Carlo technique, then the process is iterated until it converges (ie reaches stationarity). For the Bayesian inference we can use both a direct inversion capability, which is fast but requires assumptions of linearity and Gaussianity of errors, or one of several statistical sampling techniques, which are computationally slower but do not require either linearity or Gaussianity (Chow, et al., 2008; Delle Monache, et al., 2008). The emission regions we are using are based on the air-basins defined by the California Air Resources Board (CARB), see Figure 3. The only difference is that we have joined some of the smaller air basins together. The results of a test using 4 days of simulated observations using our ensemble retrieval system are shown in Figure 3 (right). The main source of the variation between the different model configurations arises from the uncertainty in the atmospheric boundary layer parameterization in the WRF model. We are currently developing a capability to constrain the boundary layer height in our carbon-14 work either by weighting the ensemble member results by the accuracy of their boundary layer height (using commercial aircraft observations), or as part of the retrieval process using an ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) capability.

Cameron-Smith, P; Kosovic, B; Guilderson, T; Monache, L D; Bergmann, D

2009-08-06

56

Geological setting of U.S. fossil fuels.  

Science.gov (United States)

The USA has a special position in terms of fossil fuel development. Not only is it one of the most important nations in terms of resources of oil, gas and coal, but it has also been by far the dominant producer and consumer. In this thorough review of the regional geological environments in which fossil fuels formed in the USA, the authors point to a variety of models of resource occurrence of global interest.-Authors

Masters, C.D.; Mast, R.F.

1987-01-01

57

Hydrogen production econometric studies. [hydrogen and fossil fuels  

Science.gov (United States)

The current assessments of fossil fuel resources in the United States were examined, and predictions of the maximum and minimum lifetimes of recoverable resources according to these assessments are presented. In addition, current rates of production in quads/year for the fossil fuels were determined from the literature. Where possible, costs of energy, location of reserves, and remaining time before these reserves are exhausted are given. Limitations that appear to hinder complete development of each energy source are outlined.

Howell, J. R.; Bannerot, R. B.

1975-01-01

58

Alternative fuels in cement industry; Alternativa braenslen i cementindustrin  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In this project the cement industry`s possibilities to replace half of the fossil fuels with waste derived fuels are investigated. Bench-scale experiments, pilot plant tests and full scale tests have been done with used tires and plastics wastes

Nyman, K.E.; Ek, R. [Finnsementti Oy, Parainen (Finland); Maekelae, K. [Finreci Oy (Finland)

1997-10-01

59

Criteria for solid recovered fuels as a substitute for fossil fuels--a review.  

Science.gov (United States)

The waste treatment, particularly the thermal treatment of waste has changed fundamentally in the last 20 years, i.e. from facilities solely dedicated to the thermal treatment of waste to facilities, which in addition to that ensure the safe plant operation and fulfill very ambitious criteria regarding emission reduction, resource recovery and energy efficiency as well. Therefore this contributes to the economic use of raw materials and due to the energy recovered from waste also to the energy provision. The development described had the consequence that waste and solid recovered fuels (SRF) has to be evaluated based on fuel criteria as well. Fossil fuels - coal, crude oil, natural gas etc. have been extensively investigated due to their application in plants for energy conversion and also due to their use in the primary industry. Thereby depending on the respective processes, criteria on fuel technical properties can be derived. The methods for engineering analysis of regular fuels (fossil fuels) can be transferred only partially to SRF. For this reason methods are being developed or adapted to current analytical methods for the characterization of SRF. In this paper the possibilities of the energetic utilization of SRF and the characterization of SRF before and during the energetic utilization will be discussed. PMID:22467662

Beckmann, Michael; Pohl, Martin; Bernhardt, Daniel; Gebauer, Kathrin

2012-04-01

60

Foresight Study on Advanced Conversion Technologies of Fossil Fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Observatorio de Prospectiva Tecnologica Industrial (OPTI) is a Foundation supported by the Ministry of Industry and Energy, (MINER) and has as main objective to provide a basic information and knowledge on technology evolution. This information will be accessible to the Administration and to the Companies and can be taking into account in planning and decision making of technology policies. Ciemat is member of OPTI and is the organism in charge of the actions in the Energy sector. CIEMAT has the responsibility on the realisation of the sector studies to get in three years (1998 to 2001) a foresight vision of the critical technology topics. The OPTI integrated strategic plan undertake the analysis of other seven technology sectors, with the same criteria on methodological aspects. Delphi method was used for the realization of the studies. It consisted of a survey conducted in two rounds using a questionnaire to check the experts opinion. The time frame of the studies was defined from 1999 to 2015. The study presented in this document has been performed by CIEMAT in the second stage of the OPTI activities. The main goal behind this study is to identify the advanced clean and efficient technologies for the conversion of fossil fuels to promote in our country. The questionnaire was addressed to 250 experts and the response rate was about the 37%, ratifying the final results. The spanish position and the barriers for the development of each technology has been determined and also the recommended measures to facilitate their performance in the future. This basic information is consider of main interest, taking in account the actual energetic situation with a foreseeable demand increase and fossil fuels dependence. (Author) 17 refs

61

A long-term view of worldwide fossil fuel prices  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper reviews a long-term trend of worldwide fossil fuel prices in the future by introducing a new method to forecast oil, natural gas and coal prices. The first section of this study analyses the global fossil fuel market and the historical trend of real and nominal fossil fuel prices from 1950 to 2008. Historical fossil fuel price analysis shows that coal prices are decreasing, while natural gas prices are increasing. The second section reviews previously available price modelling techniques and proposes a new comprehensive version of the long-term trend reverting jump and dip diffusion model. The third section uses the new model to forecast fossil fuel prices in nominal and real terms from 2009 to 2018. The new model follows the extrapolation of the historical sinusoidal trend of nominal and real fossil fuel prices. The historical trends show an increase in nominal/real oil and natural gas prices plus nominal coal prices, as well as a decrease in real coal prices. Furthermore, the new model forecasts that oil, natural gas and coal will stay in jump for the next couple of years and after that they will revert back to the long-term trend until 2018. (author)

62

A long-term view of worldwide fossil fuel prices  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper reviews a long-term trend of worldwide fossil fuel prices in the future by introducing a new method to forecast oil, natural gas and coal prices. The first section of this study analyses the global fossil fuel market and the historical trend of real and nominal fossil fuel prices from 1950 to 2008. Historical fossil fuel price analysis shows that coal prices are decreasing, while natural gas prices are increasing. The second section reviews previously available price modelling techniques and proposes a new comprehensive version of the long-term trend reverting jump and dip diffusion model. The third section uses the new model to forecast fossil fuel prices in nominal and real terms from 2009 to 2018. The new model follows the extrapolation of the historical sinusoidal trend of nominal and real fossil fuel prices. The historical trends show an increase in nominal/real oil and natural gas prices plus nominal coal prices, as well as a decrease in real coal prices. Furthermore, the new model forecasts that oil, natural gas and coal will stay in jump for the next couple of years and after that they will revert back to the long-term trend until 2018. (author)

Shafiee, Shahriar [School of Mining Engineering, CRC Mining, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072 (Australia); Topal, Erkan [Mining Engineering Department, Western Australia School of Mines, Curtin University, Kalgoorlie, WA 6433 (Australia)

2010-03-15

63

Fossil fuels in a sustainable energy future  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The coal industry in the United States has become a world leader in safety, productivity, and environmental protection in the mining of coal. The {open_quotes}pick-and-shovel{close_quotes} miner with mangled limbs and black lung disease has been replaced by the highly skilled technicians that lead the world in tons per man-hour. The gob piles, polluted streams, and scared land are a thing of the past. The complementary efforts of the DOE and EPRI-funded programs in coal utilization R&D and the Clean Coal Technology Program commercial demonstrations, have positioned the power generation industry to utilize coal in a way that doesn`t pollute the air or water, keeps electrical power costs low, and avoids the mountains of waste material. This paper reviews the potential for advanced coal utilization technologies in new power generation applications as well as the repowering of existing plants to increase their output, raise their efficiency, and reduce pollution. It demonstrates the potential for these advanced coal-fueled plants to play a complementary role in future planning with the natural gas and oil fired units currently favored in the market place. The status of the US program to demonstrate these technologies at commercial scale is reviewed in some detail.

Bechtel, T.F. [Dept. of Energy, Morgantown, WV (United States)

1995-12-01

64

Preparation and Characterization of Bio Fuel from Industrial Waste  

OpenAIRE

Disposal of biomass becomes often an environmental issue. A novel method has been developed to convert biomass into solid bio-fuel. Experiments were carried out on preparation of solid fuel pellet from industrial biomass wastes. A maximum calorific value of 22,593KJ/kg has been obtained for the bio-fuel prepared in the present investigation and compared with the fossil fuel coal. The bio-fuel pellets were burnt and the emitted green house gases were critically analyzed.

Abinayah Shree, M. N.; Iyappan, K.; Srinivasakannan, C.

2009-01-01

65

Microalgal and Terrestrial Transport Biofuels to Displace Fossil Fuels  

OpenAIRE

Terrestrial transport biofuels differ in their ability to replace fossil fuels. When both the conversion of solar energy into biomass and the life cycle inputs of fossil fuels are considered, ethanol from sugarcane and biodiesel from palm oil do relatively well, if compared with ethanol from corn, sugar beet or wheat and biodiesel from rapeseed. When terrestrial biofuels are to replace mineral oil-derived transport fuels, large areas of good agricultural land are needed: about 5x10(8) ha in t...

Lucas Reijnders

2009-01-01

66

Application of genetic algorithm (GA) technique on demand estimation of fossil fuels in Turkey  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The main objective is to investigate Turkey's fossil fuels demand, projection and supplies by using the structure of the Turkish industry and economic conditions. This study develops scenarios to analyze fossil fuels consumption and makes future projections based on a genetic algorithm (GA). The models developed in the nonlinear form are applied to the coal, oil and natural gas demand of Turkey. Genetic algorithm demand estimation models (GA-DEM) are developed to estimate the future coal, oil and natural gas demand values based on population, gross national product, import and export figures. It may be concluded that the proposed models can be used as alternative solutions and estimation techniques for the future fossil fuel utilization values of any country. In the study, coal, oil and natural gas consumption of Turkey are projected. Turkish fossil fuel demand is increased dramatically. Especially, coal, oil and natural gas consumption values are estimated to increase almost 2.82, 1.73 and 4.83 times between 2000 and 2020. In the figures GA-DEM results are compared with World Energy Council Turkish National Committee (WECTNC) projections. The observed results indicate that WECTNC overestimates the fossil fuel consumptions. (author)

67

Application of genetic algorithm (GA) technique on demand estimation of fossil fuels in Turkey  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The main objective is to investigate Turkey's fossil fuels demand, projection and supplies by using the structure of the Turkish industry and economic conditions. This study develops scenarios to analyze fossil fuels consumption and makes future projections based on a genetic algorithm (GA). The models developed in the nonlinear form are applied to the coal, oil and natural gas demand of Turkey. Genetic algorithm demand estimation models (GA-DEM) are developed to estimate the future coal, oil and natural gas demand values based on population, gross national product, import and export figures. It may be concluded that the proposed models can be used as alternative solutions and estimation techniques for the future fossil fuel utilization values of any country. In the study, coal, oil and natural gas consumption of Turkey are projected. Turkish fossil fuel demand is increased dramatically. Especially, coal, oil and natural gas consumption values are estimated to increase almost 2.82, 1.73 and 4.83 times between 2000 and 2020. In the figures GA-DEM results are compared with World Energy Council Turkish National Committee (WECTNC) projections. The observed results indicate that WECTNC overestimates the fossil fuel consumptions

68

Modeling CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion using the logistic equation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion have been known to contribute to the greenhouse effect. Research on emission trends and further forecasting their further values is important for adjusting energy policies, particularly those relative to low carbon. Except for a few countries, the main figures of CO2 emission from fossil fuel combustion in other countries are S-shaped curves. The logistic function is selected to simulate the S-shaped curve, and to improve the goodness of fit, three algorithms were provided to estimate its parameters. Considering the different emission characteristics of different industries, the three algorithms estimated the parameters of CO2 emission in each industry separately. The most suitable parameters for each industry are selected based on the criterion of Mean Absolute Percentage Error (MAPE). With the combined simulation values of the selected models, the estimate of total CO2 emission from fossil fuel combustion is obtained. The empirical analysis of China shows that our method is better than the linear model in terms of goodness of fit and simulation risk. -- Highlights: ? Figures of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion in most countries are S-shape curves. ? Using the logistic function to model the S-shape curve. ? Three algorithms are offered to estimate the parameters of the logistic function. ? The empirical analysis from China shows that the logistic equation has satisfactory simulation results.

69

Can Geothermal Power Replace Fossil Fuels?  

Science.gov (United States)

Development of geothermal energy in any capacity is a positive step toward a sustainable energy future. The resource is enormous and has the capacity to supply most future demand for electrical power if technology can meet some substantial challenges. Electrical power from geothermal energy has several compelling characteristics: a small footprint, low emissions, continuous availability, and sustainability. However, a common perception of geothermal energy is that it is available only in a few isolated localities and thus cannot contribute significantly to future electrical power needs. This perception neglects the stored thermal energy available everywhere in the upper 10 km of Earth’s crust. We are investigating the potential for power production in oil-producing sedimentary basins where subsurface temperatures are sufficient for intermediate geothermal resources (90 °C -150 °C) at depths greater than 3 km. Existing estimates of geothermal energy stored at depth in sedimentary formations in the U.S. have been based only on a few aquifers and have not included the greater volume of fluids in oil-bearing formations. We reevaluated the accessible geothermal resource base for the north central US and found that including geothermal fluids in oil-producing formations increased the resource estimate by a factor of eight. Preliminary analysis of other basins indicates that the current estimate of thermal energy in the U.S. (100,000 EJ) may be of the order of 400,000 EJ. This is particularly significant due to recent technological advances leading to commercialization of scalable organic Rankine cycle (ORC) engines. Until recently, ORC systems were available only on an at large scale, i.e., 10s of MW, and had efficiencies of about 10 percent. Currently there are at least five manufacturers making scalable ORC systems in the 50 kW to 1 MW range, and at least one system has an efficiency of about 17 percent and is expected to attain an efficiency in the low 20s as it is scaled up to produce power in the MW range. Values needed for these systems are temperatures of 92+ °C and flow rates of 140-1000 gpm. In a detailed analysis of the North Dakota part of the Williston Basin, we used heat flow, bottom-hole temperatures, and measured temperature gradients to calculate the energy contained within specific formations having temperatures in the range of 100 °C to 150 °C. We find that at a 2% recovery factor, approximately 4500 MW/hr can be recovered at depths of 3-4 km. North Dakota currently produces approximately 3100 MW/hr from non-renewable sources such as coal and petroleum. We conclude that the geothermal resource in the Williston Basin could completely replace fossil fuels as an electrical power supply for North Dakota.

Klenner, R.; Gosnold, W. D.

2009-12-01

70

Modelling and CFD simulation of a fluidized bed process for the capture of C02 from fossil fuel combustion sources  

OpenAIRE

Fossil fuels provide the main source of energy for power generation in existing power plants. A mitigation option to reduce carbon dioxide (CO2) emission from existing power plants with fossil fuel combustion is the sequestration of carbon dioxide and storage in geological formations, in the ocean or for use in industrial processes. CO2 capture from combustion exhaust gases by mineral carbonation using a fluidised bed is studied in this project. CFD modelling has been used to study the effici...

Molaei Chalchooghi, Mazaher

2013-01-01

71

Carbon monoxide: A quantitative tracer for fossil fuel CO2?  

OpenAIRE

Carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2), and radiocarbon (14CO2) measurements have been made in Heidelberg from 2001 to 2004 in order to determine the regional fossil fuel CO2 component and to investigate the application of CO as a quantitative tracer for fossil fuel CO2 (CO2(foss)). The observations were compared with model estimates simulated with the regional transport model REMO at 0.5°x0.5° resolution in Europe for 2002. These estimates are based on two available emissions inventori...

Gamnitzer, Ulrike; Karstens, Ute; Kromer, Bernd; Neubert, Rolf; Meijer, Harro; Schroeder, Hartwig; Levin, Ingeborg

2006-01-01

72

Environmental impacts of fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Large power plants burning fossil fuels generate emissions with a high content of sulphur dioxide and a content of noxious aerosols and radioisotopes whose radioactivity exceeds the limits set for nuclear power plants. The main problem of nuclear power plants is to secure radiation safety namely in case of an accident even though the probability of such an event is very small. The most complicated problems are related to the treatment of spent fuel, its transport, processing and storage. (B.H.)

73

New Optical Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Application  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Accomplishments of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants and solid oxide fuel cells are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring.

John Coggin; Tom Flynn; Jonas Ivasauskas; Daniel Kominsky; Carrie Kozikowski; Russell May; Michael Miller; Tony Peng; Gary Pickrell; Raymond Rumpf; Kelly Stinson-Bagby; Dan Thorsen; Rena Wilson

2007-12-31

74

The Formation of Fossil Fuels - Earth: The Operators' Manual  

Science.gov (United States)

This video from Earth: The Operators' Manual describes how fossil fuels are made, and it compares how long it takes to create coal, oil and natural gas (millions of years), with how fast we're using them (hundreds of years). Narrated by Dr. Richard Alley.

Productions, Geoff H.; Manual, Earth: T.

75

Fossil fuels : millions of years in the making  

Science.gov (United States)

What natural processes created oil, coal, and natural gas? This reading, part of a site about the future of energy, describes the conditions under which these fossil fuels were formed. The reading explains that the organisms that went into the making of oil and natural gas are different from the organisms that were converted into coal. Copyright 2005 Eisenhower National Clearinghouse

Project, Iowa P.

2004-01-01

76

CARBON DIOXIDE FROM FOSSIL FUELS: ADAPTING TO UNCERTAINTY  

Science.gov (United States)

The paper discusses the general effect and control of CO2. The world is likely to experience noticeable global warming by the beginning of the next century if high annual growth rates of fossil fuel energy use continue. Only with optimistic assumptions and low growth rates will C...

77

Energy 4: Fossil Fuels and the Greenhouse Gas Effect  

Science.gov (United States)

This video describes in detail the greenhouse effect and how recovery from energy from fossile fuels results in green house gases. This video is part of the Sustainability Learning Suites, made possible in part by a grant from the National Science Foundation. See 'Learn more about this resource' for Learning Objectives and Activities.

Vanasupa, Linda

78

HEAT PUMPS: SUBSTITUTES FOR OUTMODED FOSSIL-FUELED SYSTEMS  

Science.gov (United States)

The report reviews the state-of-the-art relative to development, capacity, and adequacy of the heat pump as a potential replacement for outmoded fossil-fueled heating and cooling systems in the residential and commercial sector. Projections are made of the rate at which heat pump...

79

Modules for estimating solid waste from fossil-fuel technologies  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Solid waste has become a subject of increasing concern to energy industries for several reasons. Increasingly stringent air and water pollution regulations result in a larger fraction of residuals in the form of solid wastes. Control technologies, particularly flue gas desulfurization, can multiply the amount of waste. With the renewed emphasis on coal utilization and the likelihood of oil shale development, increased amounts of solid waste will be produced. In the past, solid waste residuals used for environmental assessment have tended only to include total quantities generated. To look at environmental impacts, however, data on the composition of the solid wastes are required. Computer modules for calculating the quantities and composition of solid waste from major fossil fuel technologies were therefore developed and are described in this report. Six modules have been produced covering physical coal cleaning, conventional coal combustion with flue gas desulfurization, atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion, coal gasification using the Lurgi process, coal liquefaction using the SRC-II process, and oil shale retorting. Total quantities of each solid waste stream are computed together with the major components and a number of trace elements and radionuclides

80

Infrared imaging of fossil fuel power plant boiler interiors  

Science.gov (United States)

Fossil fuel power plant boilers operate continuously for months at a time, typically shutting down only for routine maintenance or to address serious equipment failures. These shutdowns are very costly, and diagnostic tools and techniques which could be used to minimize shutdown duration and frequency are highly desirable. Due to the extremely hostile environment in these boilers, few tools exist to inspect and monitor operating boiler interiors. This paper presents the design of a passively cooled, infrared borescope used to inspect the interior of operating boilers. The borescope operates at 3.9 micrometer, where flame is partially transparent. The primary obstacles overcome in the instrument design were the harsh industrial environment surrounding the boilers and the high temperatures encountered inside the boilers. A portable yet durable lens system and enclosure was developed to work with a scanning radiometer to address these two problems by both shielding the radiometer from the environment and by extending the optical train into a snout designed to be inserted into access ports on the sides of the boiler. In this manner, interior images of the boiler can be made while keeping the radiometer safely outside the boiler. The lens views a 40 degree field of view through any 2.5' or larger opening in a foot thick boiler wall. Three of these borescopes have been built, and high resolution images of boiler interiors have been obtained.

Howard, James W.; Cranton, Brian W.; Armstrong, Karen L.; Hammaker, Robert G.

1997-08-01

81

Modules for estimating solid waste from fossil-fuel technologies  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Solid waste has become a subject of increasing concern to energy industries for several reasons. Increasingly stringent air and water pollution regulations result in a larger fraction of residuals in the form of solid wastes. Control technologies, particularly flue gas desulfurization, can multiply the amount of waste. With the renewed emphasis on coal utilization and the likelihood of oil shale development, increased amounts of solid waste will be produced. In the past, solid waste residuals used for environmental assessment have tended only to include total quantities generated. To look at environmental impacts, however, data on the composition of the solid wastes are required. Computer modules for calculating the quantities and composition of solid waste from major fossil fuel technologies were therefore developed and are described in this report. Six modules have been produced covering physical coal cleaning, conventional coal combustion with flue gas desulfurization, atmospheric fluidized-bed combustion, coal gasification using the Lurgi process, coal liquefaction using the SRC-II process, and oil shale retorting. Total quantities of each solid waste stream are computed together with the major components and a number of trace elements and radionuclides.

Crowther, M.A.; Thode, H.C. Jr.; Morris, S.C.

1980-10-01

82

Ethanol - No Fossils in this Fuel  

Science.gov (United States)

In this short module by General Motors middle school students are introduced to ethanol (E85), ethanol production, flex-fuel technologies, and ethanol emissions. Included in the module are a student activity sheet, experiment (students make ethanol), observation sheet, and vocabulary reference sheet.

2013-04-18

83

CAUSAL RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FOSSIL FUEL CONSUMPTION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN JAPAN: A MULTIVARIATE APPROACH  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper explores whether Japanese economy can continue to grow without extensive dependence on fossil fuels. The paper conducts time series analysis using a multivariate model of fossil fuels, non-fossil energy, labor, stock and GDP to investigate the relationship between fossil fuel consumption and economic growth in Japan. The results of cointegration tests indicate long-run relationships among the variables. Using a vector error-correction model, the study reveals bidirectional causality between fossil fuels and GDP. The results also show that there is no causal relationship between non-fossil energy and GDP. The results of cointegration analysis, Granger causality tests, and variance decomposition analysis imply that non-fossil energy may not necessarily be able to play the role of fossil fuels. Japan cannot seem to realize both continuous economic growth and the departure from dependence on fossil fuels. Hence, growth-oriented macroeconomic policies should be re-examined.

Hazuki Ishida

2013-01-01

84

Fossil-Fuel C02 Emissions Database and Exploration System  

Science.gov (United States)

The Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) quantifies the release of carbon from fossil-fuel use and cement production at global, regional, and national spatial scales. The CDIAC emission time series estimates are based largely on annual energy statistics published at the national level by the United Nations (UN). CDIAC has developed a relational database to house collected data and information and a web-based interface to help users worldwide identify, explore and download desired emission data. The available information is divided in two major group: time series and gridded data. The time series data is offered for global, regional and national scales. Publications containing historical energy statistics make it possible to estimate fossil fuel CO2 emissions back to 1751. Etemad et al. (1991) published a summary compilation that tabulates coal, brown coal, peat, and crude oil production by nation and year. Footnotes in the Etemad et al.(1991) publication extend the energy statistics time series back to 1751. Summary compilations of fossil fuel trade were published by Mitchell (1983, 1992, 1993, 1995). Mitchell's work tabulates solid and liquid fuel imports and exports by nation and year. These pre-1950 production and trade data were digitized and CO2 emission calculations were made following the procedures discussed in Marland and Rotty (1984) and Boden et al. (1995). The gridded data presents annual and monthly estimates. Annual data presents a time series recording 1° latitude by 1° longitude CO2 emissions in units of million metric tons of carbon per year from anthropogenic sources for 1751-2008. The monthly, fossil-fuel CO2 emissions estimates from 1950-2008 provided in this database are derived from time series of global, regional, and national fossil-fuel CO2 emissions (Boden et al. 2011), the references therein, and the methodology described in Andres et al. (2011). The data accessible here take these tabular, national, mass-emissions data and distribute them spatially on a one degree latitude by one degree longitude grid. The within-country spatial distribution is achieved through a fixed population distribution as reported in Andres et al. (1996). This presentation introduces newly build database and web interface, reflects the present state and functionality of the Fossil-Fuel CO2 Emissions Database and Exploration System as well as future plans for expansion.

Krassovski, M.; Boden, T.; Andres, R. J.; Blasing, T. J.

2012-12-01

85

What is the fate of CO2 produced by fossil fuel combustion?  

Science.gov (United States)

Students consider why the observed atmospheric CO2 increase rate is only ~60% of the CO2 loading rate due to fossil fuel combustion. They develop a box-model to simulate the atmospheric CO2 increase during the industrial era and compare it to the historic observations of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. The model is then used to forecast future concentrations of atmospheric CO2 during the next century.

Quay, Paul; University of Washington. This activity is hosted by the Science Education Resource Center (SERC) at Carleton College

86

Geology, fossil fuel potential and environmental concerns of the Caspian Sea  

Science.gov (United States)

The fossil fuel producing areas of the Caspian region consists primarily of two basins, the Precaspian and South Caspian basins, both containing sediments in excess of 20km. The South Caspian Basin, a remnant of Tethys, was formed commencing in the Early-Middle Jurassic as a result of opening of back-arc basins behind volcanic arcs. The PreCaspian Basin extends onshore onto Kazakhstan and Russia and commenced its complicated geological evolution in the Middle Devonian. These basins are presently producing oil and gas in excess of one million barrels per day and two trillion cubic feet per day, respectively. They contain oil and gas reserves that are comparable to those of most other of the world's fossil fuel producing regions, excluding the Middle East. It is anticipated that within a decade these basins will produce over three million barrels of oil and four trillion cubic feet of gas per day. We review the economic, environmental, and geopolitical concerns with respect to exploration and recovery of the region’s fossil fuels. For one, the presence of mud volcanoes, gas hydrates, and earthquakes are a hazard for installation of oil platforms and other facilities. Pollution, attributed in large part to the fossil fuel industry, has created health and other environmental problems such as mass die-off of the Caspian seal, and in part to the large decrease in sturgeon population. Other important environmental concerns include the relatively rapid changes in sea level and desertification of the surrounding regions. There are also important legal questions with respect to ownership of resources beneath the seafloor. In addition, the transportation routes (pipelines) of fossil fuels that are anticipated to be recovered over the next decades have yet to be fully determined. Despite many of the political uncertainties, significant advances have been made in the short time since the breakup of the Soviet Union fueling optimism for the future of the region.

Rabinowitz, P.; Yusifov, M.; Arnoldi, J.

2003-04-01

87

Reduction in fossil fuels by using renewable biomass fuel (rice husk)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The author proposes the use of rice husk as a replacement for fossil fuels. It would save 13 million tons of coal annually together with the costs of mining and transportation and give a reduction in carbon dioxide emissions. (uk)

88

US fossil fuel technologies for Thailand  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The US Department of Energy has been encouraging other countries to consider US coal and coal technologies in meeting their future energy needs. Thailand is one of three developing countries determined to be a potentially favorable market for such exports. This report briefly profiles Thailand with respect to population, employment, energy infrastructure and policies, as well as financial, economic, and trade issues. Thailand is shifting from a traditionally agrarian economy to one based more strongly on light manufacturing and will therefore require increased energy resources that are reliable and flexible in responding to anticipated growth. Thailand has extensive lignite deposits that could fuel a variety of coal-based technologies. Atmospheric fluidized-bed combustors could utilize this resource and still permit Thailand to meet emission standards for sulfur dioxide. This option also lends itself to small-scale applications suitable for private-sector power generation. Slagging combustors and coal-water mixtures also appear to have potential. Both new construction and refurbishment of existing plants are planned. 18 refs., 3 figs., 7 tabs.

Buehring, W.A.; Dials, G.E.; Gillette, J.L.; Szpunar, C.B.; Traczyk, P.A.

1990-10-01

89

The geographical distribution of fossil fuels unused when limiting global warming to 2 °C  

Science.gov (United States)

Policy makers have generally agreed that the average global temperature rise caused by greenhouse gas emissions should not exceed 2 °C above the average global temperature of pre-industrial times. It has been estimated that to have at least a 50 per cent chance of keeping warming below 2 °C throughout the twenty-first century, the cumulative carbon emissions between 2011 and 2050 need to be limited to around 1,100 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide (Gt CO2). However, the greenhouse gas emissions contained in present estimates of global fossil fuel reserves are around three times higher than this, and so the unabated use of all current fossil fuel reserves is incompatible with a warming limit of 2 °C. Here we use a single integrated assessment model that contains estimates of the quantities, locations and nature of the world's oil, gas and coal reserves and resources, and which is shown to be consistent with a wide variety of modelling approaches with different assumptions, to explore the implications of this emissions limit for fossil fuel production in different regions. Our results suggest that, globally, a third of oil reserves, half of gas reserves and over 80 per cent of current coal reserves should remain unused from 2010 to 2050 in order to meet the target of 2 °C. We show that development of resources in the Arctic and any increase in unconventional oil production are incommensurate with efforts to limit average global warming to 2 °C. Our results show that policy makers' instincts to exploit rapidly and completely their territorial fossil fuels are, in aggregate, inconsistent with their commitments to this temperature limit. Implementation of this policy commitment would also render unnecessary continued substantial expenditure on fossil fuel exploration, because any new discoveries could not lead to increased aggregate production.

McGlade, Christophe; Ekins, Paul

2015-01-01

90

The geographical distribution of fossil fuels unused when limiting global warming to 2 °C.  

Science.gov (United States)

Policy makers have generally agreed that the average global temperature rise caused by greenhouse gas emissions should not exceed 2 °C above the average global temperature of pre-industrial times. It has been estimated that to have at least a 50 per cent chance of keeping warming below 2 °C throughout the twenty-first century, the cumulative carbon emissions between 2011 and 2050 need to be limited to around 1,100 gigatonnes of carbon dioxide (Gt CO2). However, the greenhouse gas emissions contained in present estimates of global fossil fuel reserves are around three times higher than this, and so the unabated use of all current fossil fuel reserves is incompatible with a warming limit of 2 °C. Here we use a single integrated assessment model that contains estimates of the quantities, locations and nature of the world's oil, gas and coal reserves and resources, and which is shown to be consistent with a wide variety of modelling approaches with different assumptions, to explore the implications of this emissions limit for fossil fuel production in different regions. Our results suggest that, globally, a third of oil reserves, half of gas reserves and over 80 per cent of current coal reserves should remain unused from 2010 to 2050 in order to meet the target of 2 °C. We show that development of resources in the Arctic and any increase in unconventional oil production are incommensurate with efforts to limit average global warming to 2 °C. Our results show that policy makers' instincts to exploit rapidly and completely their territorial fossil fuels are, in aggregate, inconsistent with their commitments to this temperature limit. Implementation of this policy commitment would also render unnecessary continued substantial expenditure on fossil fuel exploration, because any new discoveries could not lead to increased aggregate production. PMID:25567285

McGlade, Christophe; Ekins, Paul

2015-01-01

91

Renewable hydrogen production for fossil fuel processing  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In the fundamental biological process of photosynthesis, atmospheric carbon dioxide is reduced to carbohydrate using water as the source of electrons with simultaneous evolution of molecular oxygen: H{sub 2}O + CO{sub 2} + light {yields} O{sub 2} + (CH{sub 2}O). It is well established that two light reactions, Photosystems I and II (PSI and PSII) working in series, are required to perform oxygenic photosynthesis. Experimental data supporting the two-light reaction model are based on the quantum requirement for complete photosynthesis, spectroscopy, and direct biochemical analysis. Some algae also have the capability to evolve molecular hydrogen in a reaction energized by the light reactions of photosynthesis. This process, now known as biophotolysis, can use water as the electron donor and lead to simultaneous evolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen. In green algae, hydrogen evolution requires prior incubation under anaerobic conditions. Atmospheric oxygen inhibits hydrogen evolution and also represses the synthesis of hydrogenase enzyme. CO{sub 2} fixation competes with proton reduction for electrons relased from the photosystems. Interest in biophotolysis arises from both the questions that it raises concerning photosynthesis and its potential practical application as a process for converting solar energy to a non-carbon-based fuel. Prior data supported the requirement for both Photosystem I and Photosystem II in spanning the energy gap necessary for biophotolysis of water to oxygen and hydrogen. In this paper we report the at PSII alone is capable of driving sustained simultaneous photoevolution of molecular hydrogen and oxygen in an anaerobically adapted PSI-deficient strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, mutant B4, and that CO{sub 2} competes as an electron acceptor.

Greenbaum, E.; Lee, J.W.; Tevault, C.V. [and others

1995-06-01

92

Approaches and potentials for reducing greenhouse effects from fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

On the basis of energy consumption in 1989, an inventory was made for the original Federal Republic of Germany ('Western Germany') of the carbon dioxide and methane emissions involved in the greenhouse effect for the fossil fuels crude oil, natural gas, coal and lignite. After assessing the various parameters, the report indicates possible approaches to and technical potentials for reducing greenhouse emissions due to use of energy. (orig.) With 70 figs., 144 tabs., 181 refs

93

Say no to fossil fuels and yes to nuclear energy  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Mistaken notion and wrongful fear of nuclear energy based on the horrors of the second world war bombing of Nagasaki and Hiroshima and accidents at Chernobyl and Three mile island and lately the Fukushima nuclear plant meltdown to earthquake and and tsunami have developed antagonism to nuclear energy (NE) and clouded its usefulness as a practical, clean, environment friendly and affordable alternate source of energy. Such antagonism has slowed down research on NE and its adoption on a much wider scale, the crying need of the day. There is a motivated disinformation campaign against nuclear energy in India as witnessed from the ongoing agitation at Kudankulam in Tamil Nadu and Jaitapur in Maharashtra. In fact nuclear energy is the only practical alternative energy source to meet the ever increasing energy needs of the world particularly the developing nations, and to save the world from the greenhouse ill effects of massive carbon dioxide and other emissions from burning fossil fuels like coal, oil and natural gas. Emissions from fossil fuel burning including radioactive emissions are hundreds of times more in weight and volume and far more hazardous than from an equal capacity nuclear plant. In fact there are no greenhouse gases (CO2), acid rain gases (SO2) or carcinogen emissions (NOx) from nuclear plants. The accident rates and severity of accidents owing to nuclear plants is much lower as compared to fossil fuel power generation. Lampared to fossil fuel power generation. Last but not the least NE offers economic freedom from the clutches of the few monopolistic oil producing countries, which charge exorbitant oil prices and cripple the finances of developing nations. (author)

94

CAUSAL RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN FOSSIL FUEL CONSUMPTION AND ECONOMIC GROWTH IN JAPAN: A MULTIVARIATE APPROACH  

OpenAIRE

This paper explores whether Japanese economy can continue to grow without extensive dependence on fossil fuels. The paper conducts time series analysis using a multivariate model of fossil fuels, non-fossil energy, labor, stock and GDP to investigate the relationship between fossil fuel consumption and economic growth in Japan. The results of cointegration tests indicate long-run relationships among the variables. Using a vector error-correction model, the study reveals bidirectional causalit...

Hazuki Ishida

2013-01-01

95

How do the stock prices of new energy and fossil fuel companies correlate? Evidence from China  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This study documents the return and volatility spillover effect between the stock prices of Chinese new energy and fossil fuel companies using the asymmetric BEKK model. Based on daily samples taken from August 30, 2006 to September 11, 2012, the dynamics of new energy/fossil fuel stock spillover are found to be significant and asymmetric. Compared with positive news, negative news about new energy and fossil fuel stock returns leads to larger return changes in their counter assets. News about both new energy and fossil fuel stock returns spills over into variances of their counter assets, and the volatility spillovers depend complexly on the respective signs of the return shocks of each asset. The empirical results demonstrate that new energy and fossil fuel stocks are generally viewed as competing assets, that positive news about new energy stocks could affect the attractiveness of fossil fuel stocks and that new energy stock investment is more speculative and riskier than fossil fuel stock investment. These results have potential implications for asset allocation, financial risk management and energy policymaking. - Highlights: • The dynamics of Chinese new energy/fossil fuel stock spillover are significant and asymmetric. • New energy and fossil fuel stocks are generally viewed as competing assets. • Positive news about new energy stocks affects the attractiveness of fossil fuel stocks. • New energy stock investment is more speculative and riskier than fossil fuel stock investment

96

Power generation by fossil fuels: prospects and problems  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

As fossil fuels are non-renewable energy sources, efficient management of thermal power stations of India is of prime importance in the overall management of available power. The areas which required to be managed are: quality of coal, fuel combustion, heat loss, quality of water and steam, steam consumption, load control, and energy consumption by power station auxiliaries. An energy audit is an essential part of energy management. To reduce period of outages, proper inventory levels of fuel and spares must be maintained. Life of power stations can be extended by renovation and replacement of worn-out parts with high-tech components. Proper management leads to optimum utilization of available resources and this is of economic importance. (M.G.B.). tabs., 7 annexures

97

Strategic backdrop analysis for fossil fuel planning. Task 1. Default Case. Report 468-117-07/02  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report presents data describing a default case analysis performed using the strategic backdrop analytical framework developed to facilitate fossil fuel planning within the DOE. Target years are 1985, 2000, and 2025. Residential, commercial, and industrial energy demands and impacts of energy technology implementation and market penetration are forecast using a set of energy technology assumptions. (DMC)

1980-06-01

98

Strategic backdrop analysis for fossil fuel planning. Task 1. Default Case. Report 468-117-07/03  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report presents data describing a default case analysis performed using the strategic backdrop analytical framework developed to facilitate fossil fuel planning within the DOE. Target years are 1985, 2000, and 2025. Residential, commercial, and industrial energy demands and impacts of energy technology implementation and market penetration are forecast using a set of energy technology assumptions.

1980-06-01

99

Evaluation of conventional power systems. [emphasizing fossil fuels and nuclear energy  

Science.gov (United States)

The technical, economic, and environmental characteristics of (thermal, nonsolar) electric power plants are reviewed. The fuel cycle, from extraction of new fuel to final waste management, is included. Emphasis is placed on the fossil fuel and nuclear technologies.

Smith, K. R.; Weyant, J.; Holdren, J. P.

1975-01-01

100

Large historical changes of fossil-fuel black carbon aerosols  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Anthropogenic emissions of fine black carbon (BC) particles, the principal light-absorbing atmospheric aerosol, have varied during the past century in response to changes of fossil-fuel utilization, technology developments, and emission controls. We estimate historical trends of fossil-fuel BC emissions in six regions that represent about two-thirds of present day emissions and extrapolate these to global emissions from 1875 onward. Qualitative features in these trends show rapid increase in the latter part of the 1800s, the leveling off in the first half of the 1900s, and the re-acceleration in the past 50 years as China and India developed. We find that historical changes of fuel utilization have caused large temporal change in aerosol absorption, and thus substantial change of aerosol single scatter albedo in some regions, which suggests that BC may have contributed to global temperature changes in the past century. This implies that the BC history needs to be represented realistically in climate change assessments.

Novakov, T.; Ramanathan, V.; Hansen, J.E.; Kirchstetter, T.W.; Sato, M.; Sinton, J.E.; Sathaye, J.A.

2002-09-26

101

Energy Efficiency Indicators for Public Electricity Production from Fossil Fuels  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper presents a set of indicators that are used to analyse the energy efficiency of electricity production from fossil fuels on a global level and for a number of key countries and regions. The analysis is based on IEA statistics and includes public electricity plants and public CHP plants. Electricity production by autoproducers is not included and represents less than 6% of global electricity production. However, the share of autoproducers is significant in certain countries, particularly in Europe. Austria, Finland, Luxembourg, the Netherlands and Spain all have a share of electricity production from autoproducers that is more than twice the global average.

NONE

2008-07-01

102

Evaluation of sustainability by a population living near fossil fuel resources in Northwestern Greece  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The emergence of sustainability as a goal in the management of fossil fuel resources is a result of the growing global environmental concern, and highlights some of the issues expected to be significant in coming years. In order to secure social acceptance, the mining industry has to face these challenges by engaging its many different stakeholders and examining their sustainability concerns. For this reason a questionnaire was conducted involving a simple random sampling of inhabitants near an area rich in fossil fuel resources, in order to gather respondents' views on social, economic and environmental benefits. The study discusses new subnational findings on public attitudes to regional sustainability, based on a quantitative research design. The site of the study was the energy-rich Greek region of Kozani, Western Macedonia, one of the country's energy hubs. The paper examines the future perspectives of the area. The conclusions can form a useful framework for energy policy in the wider Balkan area, which contains important fossil fuel resources.

Vatalis, K.I. [Technological Educational Institute of Western Macedonia, Kila (Greece)

2010-12-15

103

Partial replacement of non renewable fossil fuels energy by the use of waste materials as alternative fuels  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper reports recent investigations on the use of biomass like rice husk, palm kernel shell, saw dust and municipal waste to reduce the use of fossil fuels energy in the cement production. Such waste materials have heat values in the range approximately from 2,000 to 4,000 kcal/kg. These are comparable to the average value of 5800 kcal/kg from fossil materials like coals which are widely applied in many industrial processing. Hence, such waste materials could be used as alternative fuels replacing the fossil one. It is shown that replacement of coals with such waste materials has a significant impact on cost effectiveness as well as sustainable development. Variation in moisture content of the waste materials, however should be taken into account because this is one of the parameter that could not be controlled. During fuel combustion, some amount of the total energy is used to evaporate the water content and thus the net effective heat value is less.

Indrawati, V.; Manaf, A.; Purwadi, G.

2009-09-01

104

Health effects of fossil-fuel combustion products: needed research  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An examination is made of the research needed to expand and clarify the understanding of the products of fossil-fuel combustion, chiefly that taking place in stationary sources of power. One of the specific objectives that guided the study on which this report is based was to identify the pollutants potentially hazardous to man that are released into the environment in the course of the combustion of fossil fuels. The hazards of principal concern are those which could cause deleterious, long-term somatic and genetic effects. Another objective was to specify the nature of the research needed to determine the health effects of these pollutants on the general population. Special attention was paid to the interaction of pollutants; the meteorologic and climatic factors that affect the transport, diffusion, and transformation of pollutants; the effects of concentrations of aerosol, particulate, and thermal loads on biologic systems; and the susceptibility of some portions of the population to the effects of pollutants on the skin and cardiovascular, pulmonary, and urinary systems. Other objectives were to evaluate the methods of the proposed research, including analytic and interpretation techniques, to identify fields in which the available scientific information is inadequate for regulatory decision-making and to recommend a research program to meet those deficiencies, and to provide a logical framework within which the necessary information can be developed (the proposed program is presented in terms of subject, methods, and priorities).

1980-01-01

105

Geochemical controls of vanadium accumulation in fossil fuels  

Science.gov (United States)

High vanadium contents in petroleum and other fossil fuels have been attributed to organic-matter type, organisms, volcanic emanations, diffusion of sea water, and epigenetic enrichment. However, these factors are inadequate to account for the high abundance of vanadium in some fossil fuels and the paucity in others. By examining vanadium deposits in sedimentary rocks with sparse organic matter, constraints are placed on processes controlling vanadium accumulation in organic-rich sediments. Vanadium, as vanadate (V(V)), entered some depositional basins in oxidizing waters from dry, subaerial environments. Upon contact with organic matter in anoxic waters, V(V) is reduced to vanadyl (V(IV)), which can be removed from the water column by adsorption. H2S reduces V(IV) to V(III), which hydrolyzes and precipitates. The lack of V(III) in petroleum suggests that reduction of V(IV) to V(III) is inhibited by organic complexes. In the absence of strong complexing agents, V(III) forms and is incorporated in clay minerals.

Breit, G.N.; Wanty, R.B.

1989-01-01

106

Geochemical controls on vanadium accumulation in fossil fuels  

Science.gov (United States)

High vanadium contents in petroleum and other fossil fuels have been attributed to organic-matter type, organisms, volcanic emanations, diffusion of sea water, and epigenetic enrichment. However, these factors are inadequate to account for the high abundance of vanadium in some fossil fuels and the paucity in others. By examining vanadium deposits in sedimentary rocks with sparse organic matter, constraints are placed on processes controlling vanadium accumulation in organic-rich sediments. Vanadium, as vanadate (V(V)), entered some depositional basins in oxidizing waters from dry, subaerial environments. Upon contact with organic matter in anoxic waters, V(V) is reduced to vanadyl (V(IV)), which can be removed from the water column by adsorption. H2S reduces V(IV) to V(III), which hydrolyzes and precipitates. The lack of V(III) in petroleum suggests that reduction of V(IV) to V(III) is inhibited by organic complexes. In the absence of strong complexing agents, V(III) forms and is incorporated in clay minerals.

Breit, G.N.; Wanty, R.B.

1989-01-01

107

Could reducing fossil-fuel emissions cause global warming?  

Science.gov (United States)

WHEN fossil fuel is burned, both carbon dioxide and sulphur dioxide are added to the atmosphere. The former should cause warming of the lower atmosphere by enhancing the greenhouse effect, whereas the latter, by producing sulphate aerosols, may cause a cooling effect. The possibility that these two processes could offset each other was suggested many years ago (see, for example, ref. 1), but during most of the intervening period, attention has focused on the greenhouse effect. Interest in tropospheric aerosols has, however, recently been rekindled by the realization that they may influence climate, not only through clear-sky radiative effects2-5, but also by modifying cloud albedo6-8. Here I examine the sensitivity of the climate system to simultaneous changes in SO2 and CO2 emissions, as might occur if controls were imposed on fossil-fuel use. Over the next 10-30 years, it is conceivable that the increased radiative forcing due to SO2 concentration changes could more than offset reductions in radiative forcing due to reduced CO2 emissions.

Wigley, T. M. L.

1991-02-01

108

Innovative fossil fuel fired vitrification technology for soil remediation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Vortex has successfully completed Phase 1 of the ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation'' program with the Department of Energy (DOE) Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC). The Combustion and Melting System (CMS) has processed 7000 pounds of material representative of contaminated soil that is found at DOE sites. The soil was spiked with Resource Conversation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals surrogates, an organic contaminant, and a surrogate radionuclide. The samples taken during the tests confirmed that virtually all of the radionuclide was retained in the glass and that it did not leach to the environment. The organic contaminant, anthracene, was destroyed during the test with a Destruction and Removal Efficiency (DRE) of at least 99.99%. RCRA metal surrogates, that were in the vitrified product, were retained and will not leach to the environment--as confirmed by the TCLP testing. Semi-volatile RCRA metal surrogates were captured by the Air Pollution Control (APC) system, and data on the amount of metal oxide particulate and the chemical composition of the particulate were established for use in the Phase 2 APC system design. This topical report will present a summary of the activities conducted during Phase 1 of the ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation'' program. The report includes the detail technical data generated during the experimental program and the design and cost data for the preliminary Phase 2 plant

109

An econometrics view of worldwide fossil fuel consumption and the role of US  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Crude oil, coal and gas, known as fossil fuels, play a crucial role in the global economy. This paper proposes new econometrics modelling to demonstrate the trend of fossil fuels consumption. The main variables affecting consumption trends are: world reserves, the price of fossil fuels, US production and US net imports. All variables have been analysed individually for more than half a century. The research found that while the consumption of fossil fuels worldwide has increased trends in the US production and net imports have been dependent on the type of fossil fuels. Most of the US coal and gas production has been for domestic use, which is why it does not have a strong influence on worldwide fossil fuel prices. Moreover, the reserves of fossil fuels have not shown any diminution during the last couple of decades and predictions that they were about to run out are not substantiated. The nominal and real price of fossil fuels was found to change depending on the type. Finally, estimates of three econometric models for the consumption of fossil fuels from 1949 to 2006 are presented which identify the effects of significant variables.

Shafiee, Shahriar [School of Engineering, University of Queensland, Qld. 4072 (Australia); CRC Mining, University of Queensland, Qld. 4072 (Australia); Topal, Erkan [School of Engineering, University of Queensland, Qld. 4072 (Australia); CRC Mining, University of Queensland, Qld. 4072 (Australia)], E-mail: e.topal@uq.edu.au

2008-02-15

110

An econometrics view of worldwide fossil fuel consumption and the role of US  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Crude oil, coal and gas, known as fossil fuels, play a crucial role in the global economy. This paper proposes new econometrics modelling to demonstrate the trend of fossil fuels consumption. The main variables affecting consumption trends are: world reserves, the price of fossil fuels, US production and US net imports. All variables have been analysed individually for more than half a century. The research found that while the consumption of fossil fuels worldwide has increased trends in the US production and net imports have been dependent on the type of fossil fuels. Most of the US coal and gas production has been for domestic use, which is why it does not have a strong influence on worldwide fossil fuel prices. Moreover, the reserves of fossil fuels have not shown any diminution during the last couple of decades and predictions that they were about to run out are not substantiated. The nominal and real price of fossil fuels was found to change depending on the type. Finally, estimates of three econometric models for the consumption of fossil fuels from 1949 to 2006 are presented which identify the effects of significant variables

111

Fossils  

Science.gov (United States)

This Topic in Depth begins with a Web site from the Royal Ontario Museum called Fossils!-Behind the Scenes at the Museum (1). It gives a light-hearted but informative introduction to what fossils are and how they're formed, collected, and identified. Next, the University of California Museum of Paleontology offers the Web site Learning From the Fossil Record (2), which contains several learning resources and lesson plans. Topics covered include Determining Age of Rocks and Fossils, Fossilization and Adaptation: Activities in Paleontology, and Microfossils. The third site is a US Geological Survey publication entitled Fossils, Rocks, and Time (3). Visitors can learn about succession, geologic time, and other relevant facts about how fossils are studied. The University of Arizona Department of Geosciences maintains the next site, which is entitled Petrified Wood (4). It provides information on Petrified Forest National Park, an interactive look at the process of petrification, and more. Offered by the Museum Victoria, the fifth site, Dating Rocks and Fossils (5), explains the difference between relative and absolute (radiometric) dating. It also includes a chart that gives the various isotopes used, their half-life, daughter isotope, and geologic application. The next site, provided by the BBC and their Walking With Dinosaurs series, is called Fossil Detectives (6). The site describes why dinosaur fossils are so rare, where the best place to find them is, how their age is estimated, and other interesting information that can be found on this page and the rest of the site. Next, from the Florida Museum of Natural History comes the Fossil Preparation and Conservation (7) Web site. A more in-depth and technical description of fossil preparation is presented, including the use of cosolidants, adhesives, and various tools. The last site is from the University of Kentucky Paleontological Society called Photographs of Fossils Found on KPS Fieldtrips (8). As you would expect, the site contains a large categorized list of fossils, each briefly described and linked to its respective photograph.

2002-01-01

112

GASEOUS EMISSIONS FROM FOSSIL FUELS AND BIOMASS COMBUSTION IN SMALL HEATING APPLIANCES  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The importance of emission control has increased sharply due to the increased need of energy from combustion. However, biomass utilization in energy production is not free from problems because of physical and chemical characteristics which are substantially different from conventional energy sources. In this situation, the quantity and quality of emissions as well as used renewable sources as wood or corn grain are often unknown. To assess this problem the paper addresses the objectives to quantify the amount of greenhouse gases during the combustion of corn as compared to the emissions in fossil combustion (natural gas, LPG and diesel boiler. The test was carried out in Friuli Venezia Giulia in 2006-2008 to determine the air pollution (CO, NO, NO2, NOx, SO2 and CO2 from fuel combustion in family boilers with a power between 20-30 kWt. The flue gas emission was measured with a professional semi-continuous multi-gas analyzer, (Vario plus industrial, MRU air Neckarsulm-Obereisesheim. Data showed a lower emission of fossil fuel compared to corn in family boilers in reference to pollutants in the flue gas (NOx, SO2 and CO. In a particular way the biomass combustion makes a higher concentration of carbon monoxide (for an incomplete combustion because there is not a good mixing between fuel and air and nitrogen oxides (in relation at a higher content of nitrogen in herbaceous biomass in comparison to another fuel.

Gianfranco Pergher

2010-12-01

113

Applying Thermodynamics to Fossil Fuels: Heats of Combustion from Elemental Compositions.  

Science.gov (United States)

Discussed are the calculations of heats of combustions of some selected fossil fuel compounds such as some foreign shale oils and United States coals. Heating values for coal- and petroleum-derived fuel oils are also presented. (HM)

Lloyd, William G.; Davenport, Derek A.

1980-01-01

114

Possible future environmental issues for fossil fuel technologies. Final report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The work reported here was carried out for the Department of Energy's Office of Fossil Energy to identify and assess 15 to 20 major environmental issues likely to affect the implementation of fossil energy technologies between 1985 and 2000. The energy technologies specifically addressed are: oil recovery and processing; gas recovery and processing; coal liquefaction; coal gasification (surface); in situ coal gasification; direct coal combustion; advanced power systems; magnetohydrodynamics; surface oil shale retorting; and true and modified in situ oil shale retorting. Environmental analysis of these technologies included, in addition to the main processing steps, the complete fuel cycle from resource extraction to end use. The 16 environmental issues identified as those most likely for future regulatory actions and the main features of, and the possible regulatory actions associated with, each are as follows: disposal of solid waste from coal conversion and combustion technologies; water consumption by coal and oil shale conversion technologies; siting of coal conversion facilities; the carbon dioxide greenhouse effect; emission of polycyclic organic matter (POM); impacts of outer continental shelf (OCS) oil development; emission of trace elements; groundwater contamination; liquefied natural gas (LNG), safety and environmental factors; underground coal mining - health and safety; fugitive emissions from coal gasification and liquefaction - health and safety; boomtown effects; emission of fine particulates from coal, oil and oil shale technologies; emission of radioactivity from the mining and conversion of coal; emission of nitrogn oxides; and land disturbance from surface mining. (LTN)

Attaway, L.D.

1979-07-01

115

Monthly, global emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuel consumption  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This paper examines available data, develops a strategy and presents a monthly, global time series of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions for the years 1950–2006. This monthly time series was constructed from detailed study of monthly data from the 21 countries that account for approximately 80% of global total emissions. These data were then used in a Monte Carlo approach to proxy for all remaining countries. The proportional-proxy methodology estimates by fuel group the fraction of annual emissions emitted in each country and month. Emissions from solid, liquid and gas fuels are explicitly modelled by the proportional-proxy method. The primary conclusion from this study is the global monthly time series is statistically significantly different from a uniform distribution throughout the year. Uncertainty analysis of the data presented show that the proportional-proxy method used faithfully reproduces monthly patterns in the data and the global monthly pattern of emissions is relatively insensitive to the exact proxy assignments used. The data and results presented here should lead to a better understanding of global and regional carbon cycles, especially when the mass data are combined with the stable carbon isotope data in atmospheric transport models.

Andres, R.J.; Gregg, Jay Sterling

2011-01-01

116

Regulatory taxation of fossil fuels. Theory and policy  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Research on energy taxation is often based on purely theoretical deductions. This paper stays closer to the real world, using empirical data and interpreting results in a political-economic setting of risk and uncertainty. Economic growth in developing countries will boost energy demand, increasing the risk of shortages of oil and natural gas half-way through the next century, and of coal towards the year 2100. Furthermore, there is mounting evidence that emissions of CO2 trigger harmful climate changes. A timely introduction of regulatory taxes will reduce demand for fossil fuels and accelerate the introduction of sustainable technology. The empirical results presented show, moreover, that such taxes may claim a substantial part of the rent on energy extraction for the energy-importing countries. It is argued that optimal control and the avoidance of displacement effects require a tax affecting marginal use, with exceptions to safeguard competitive positions. Exceptions may be scaled down as the jurisdiction is enlarged

117

Intermediate fossil fueled units for variable pressure operation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The intermediate load, fossil-fueled units for variable pressure operation have been highlighted recently as large capacity nuclear power plants play the role of shouldering basic electrical load. The variable pressure operation has the special features of the improvements of thermal efficiency in midnight, follow-up characteristics at load transient and start-up property. The steam turbine is usual one, and the boiler is spiral Benson type being enable to reduce pressure from supercritical region. The features of variable pressure operation, the comparison of the types of variable pressure operation, and the factors contributing to the improvement of thermal efficiency are described, and the variable pressure operation plant with supercritical pressure is explained in this report. (Nakai, Y.)

118

Greenhouse effect and the fuel fossil burning in Brazil  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In Brazil, the global energy consumption per inhabitant is low and the fraction of renewable energy is high, which represents an advantage in terms of gas released. On the other hand the burning in the Amazon Region releases more greenhouse gases than fossil fuel combustion. This article, considering trends in the energy consumption by different economic sectors, discusses the greenhouse effect and its repercussion in energy planning. As known the energy generation process is in great part responsible for the emission of CO2, the main anthropogenic gas which causes the greenhouse effect. A comparison of the brazilian case with other studies from developed countries was made to show the advantages and disadvantages of the adopted energetic solution. Carbon emissions were calculated in different scenarios leading to same interesting conclusions. (B.C.A.)

119

New Optimal Sensor Suite for Ultrahigh Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Accomplishments during Phase II of a program to develop and demonstrate photonic sensor technology for the instrumentation of advanced powerplants are described. The goal of this project is the research and development of advanced, robust photonic sensors based on improved sapphire optical waveguides, and the identification and demonstration of applications of the new sensors in advanced fossil fuel power plants, where the new technology will contribute to improvements in process control and monitoring. During this program work period, major progress has been experienced in the development of the sensor hardware, and the planning of the system installation and operation. The major focus of the next work period will be the installation of sensors in the Hamilton, Ohio power plant, and demonstration of high-temperature strain gages during mechanical testing of SOFC components.

John Coggin; Jonas Ivasauskas; Russell G. May; Michael B. Miller; Rena Wilson

2006-09-30

120

Progress performance report of clean uses of fossil fuels  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A one-year USDOE/EPSCOR Traineeship Grant, entitled ``Clean Uses of Fossil Fuels.`` was awarded to the Kentucky EPSCoR Committee in September 1991 and administered through the the DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee. Ten Traineeships were awarded to doctoral students who are enrolled or accepted into Graduate Programs at either the University of Kentucky or the University of Louisville. The disciplines of these students include Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Geological Sciences, and Physics. The methods used for a statewide proposal solicitation and to award the Traineeships are presented. The review panel and Kentucky DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee involved in awarding the Traineeships are described. A summary of the proposed research to be performed within these awards is presented, along with a description of the qualifications of the faculty and students who proposed projects. Future efforts to increase participation in Traineeship proposals for the succeeding funding period are outlined.

1992-09-01

121

Progress performance report of clean uses of fossil fuels  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A one-year USDOE/EPSCOR Traineeship Grant, entitled Clean Uses of Fossil Fuels.'' was awarded to the Kentucky EPSCoR Committee in September 1991 and administered through the the DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee. Ten Traineeships were awarded to doctoral students who are enrolled or accepted into Graduate Programs at either the University of Kentucky or the University of Louisville. The disciplines of these students include Biology, Chemical Engineering, Chemistry, Geological Sciences, and Physics. The methods used for a statewide proposal solicitation and to award the Traineeships are presented. The review panel and Kentucky DOE/EPSCoR Subcommittee involved in awarding the Traineeships are described. A summary of the proposed research to be performed within these awards is presented, along with a description of the qualifications of the faculty and students who proposed projects. Future efforts to increase participation in Traineeship proposals for the succeeding funding period are outlined.

1992-01-01

122

Ecological consequences of elevated total dissolved solids associated with fossil fuel extraction in the United States  

Science.gov (United States)

Fossil fuel burning is considered a major contributor to global climate change. The outlook for production and consumption of fossil fuels int he US indicates continued growth to support growing energy demands. For example, coal-generated electricity is projected ot increase from...

123

Fossil Fuels. A Supplement to the "Science 100, 101" Curriculum Guide. Curriculum Support Series.  

Science.gov (United States)

When the fossil fuels unit was first designed for Science 101 (the currently approved provincial guide for grade 10 science in Manitoba), Canadian support materials were very limited. Since students are asked to interpret data concerning energy consumption and sources for certain fossil fuels, the need for appropriate Canadian data became obvious.…

Soprovich, William, Comp.

124

Environmental evidence of fossil fuel pollution in Laguna Chica de San Pedro lake sediments (Central Chile)  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper describes lake sediment spheroidal carbonaceous particle (SCP) profiles from Laguna Chica San Pedro, located in the Biobio Region, Chile (36o 51' S, 73o 05' W). The earliest presence of SCPs was found at 16 cm depth, corresponding to the 1915-1937 period, at the very onset of industrial activities in the study area. No SCPs were found at lower depths. SCP concentrations in Laguna Chica San Pedro lake sediments were directly related to local industrial activities. Moreover, no SCPs were found in Galletue lake (38o 41' S, 71o 17.5' W), a pristine high mountain water body used here as a reference site, suggesting that contribution from long distance atmospheric transport could be neglected, unlike published data from remote Northern Hemisphere lakes. These results are the first SCP sediment profiles from Chile, showing a direct relationship with fossil fuel consumption in the region. Cores were dated using the 21Pb technique. - The lake sediment record of SCPs shows the record of fossil-fuel derived pollution in Central Chile

125

Inventory of aerosol and sulphur dioxide emissions from India: I—Fossil fuel combustion  

Science.gov (United States)

A comprehensive, spatially resolved (0.25°×0.25°) fossil fuel consumption database and emissions inventory was constructed, for India, for the first time. Emissions of sulphur dioxide and aerosol chemical constituents were estimated for 1996-1997 and extrapolated to the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) study period (1998-1999). District level consumption of coal/lignite, petroleum and natural gas in power plants, industrial, transportation and domestic sectors was 9411 PJ, with major contributions from coal (54%) followed by diesel (18%). Emission factors for various pollutants were derived using India specific fuel characteristics and information on combustion/air pollution control technologies for the power and industrial sectors. Domestic and transportation emission factors, appropriate for Indian source characteristics, were compiled from literature. SO 2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion for 1996-1997 were 4.0 Tg SO 2 yr -1, with 756 large point sources (e.g. utilities, iron and steel, fertilisers, cement, refineries and petrochemicals and non-ferrous metals), accounting for 62%. PM 2.5 emitted was 0.5 and 2.0 Tg yr -1 for the 100% and the 50% control scenario, respectively, applied to coal burning in the power and industrial sectors. Coal combustion was the major source of PM 2.5 (92%) primarily consisting of fly ash, accounting for 98% of the "inorganic fraction" emissions (difference between PM 2.5 and black carbon+organic matter) of 1.6 Tg yr -1. Black carbon emissions were estimated at 0.1 Tg yr -1, with 58% from diesel transport, and organic matter emissions at 0.3 Tg yr -1, with 48% from brick-kilns. Fossil fuel consumption and emissions peaked at the large point industrial sources and 22 cities, with elevated area fluxes in northern and western India. The spatial resolution of this inventory makes it suitable for regional-scale aerosol-climate studies. These results are compared to previous studies and differences discussed. Measurements of emission factors for Indian sources are needed to further refine these estimates.

Reddy, M. Shekar; Venkataraman, Chandra

126

Inventory of aerosol and sulphur dioxide emissions from India. Part 1 - Fossil fuel combustion  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A comprehensive, spatially resolved (0.25o x 0.25o) fossil fuel consumption database and emissions inventory was constructed, for India, for the first time. Emissions of sulphur dioxide and aerosol chemical constituents were estimated for 1996-1997 and extrapolated to the Indian Ocean Experiment (INDOEX) study period (1998-1999). District level consumption of coal/lignite, petroleum and natural gas in power plants, industrial, transportation and domestic sectors was 9411 PJ, with major contributions from coal (54%) followed by diesel (18%). Emission factors for various pollutants were derived using India specific fuel characteristics and information on combustion/air pollution control technologies for the power and industrial sectors. Domestic and transportation emission factors, appropriate for Indian source characteristics, were compiled from literature. SO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion for 1996-1997 were 4.0Tg SO2yr-1, with 756 large point sources (e.g. utilities, iron and steel, fertilisers, cement, refineries and petrochemicals and non-ferrous metals), accounting for 62%. PM2.5 emitted was 0.5 and 2.0Tgyr-1 for the 100% and the 50% control scenario, respectively, applied to coal burning in the power and industrial sectors. Coal combustion was the major source of PM2.5 (92%) primarily consisting of fly ash, accounting for 98% of the 'inorganic fraction' emissions (difff the 'inorganic fraction' emissions (difference between PM2.5 and black carbon + organic matter) of 1.6Tgyr-1. Black carbon emissions were estimated at 0.1Tgyr-1, with 58% from diesel transport, and organic matter emissions at 0.3Tgyr-1, with 48% from brick-kilns. Fossil fuel consumption and emissions peaked at the large point industrial sources and 22 cities, with elevated area fluxes in northern and western India. The spatial resolution of this inventory makes it suitable for regional-scale aerosol-climate studies. These results are compared to previous studies and differences discussed. Measurements of emission factors for Indian sources are needed to further refine these estimates. (Author)

127

Environmental benchmarking of the largest fossil-fueled electricity generating plants in the U.S  

Science.gov (United States)

Environmental management, to be effective, requires performance evaluation and process improvement. This is especially the case in fossil-fueled electricity generating plants. Although eco-efficient management of these types of organizations are critical to local, national and global environmental issues, few studies have focused on performance measurement and eco-efficiency improvements in this industry. This study evaluates the eco-efficiencies of the top 100 major U.S. fossil-fueled electricity generating plants from 1998 data. Using a multi-criteria non-parametric productivity model (data envelopment analysis) efficiency scores are determined. These efficiency scores are treated by a clustering method in identifying benchmarks for improving poorly performing plants. Efficiency measures are based on three resource input measures including boiler generating capacity, total fuel heat used, and total generator capacity, and four output measures including actual energy generated, SO2, NOx, and CO2 emissions. The purpose of this paper is two-fold, to introduce the methodology"s application to eco-efficiency performance measurement and show some characteristics of the benchmarked plants and groups.

Sarkis, Joseph

2004-02-01

128

Replacing fossil diesel by biodiesel fuel: expected impact on health.  

Science.gov (United States)

Biofuels have become an alternative to fossil fuel, but consequences on human health from changes to emissions compositions are not well understood. By combining information on composition of vehicle exhaust, dispersion models, and relationship between exposure to air contaminants and health, the authors determined expected mortality outcomes in 2 scenarios: a blend of 10% biodiesel and 90% standard diesel (B10) and biodiesel only (B100), for a rural and an urban environment. Vehicle exhaust for both fuel compositions contained lower fine particle mass but higher NO2 levels. Ambient air concentrations in scenario B10 were almost unchanged. In scenario B100, PM2.5 (particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter <2.5 ?m) levels decreased by 4-8% and NO2 levels increased 7-11%. Reduction of PM2.5 is expected to reduce mortality rate by 5 × 10(-6) and 31 × 10(-6) per year, whereas NO2 increase adds 17 × 10(-6) and 30 × 10(-6) to mortality rate for B10 and B100, respectively. Since effects of PM2.5 and NO2 are not independent, a positive net effect is possible. PMID:24965323

Hutter, Hans-Peter; Kundi, Michael; Moshammer, Hanns; Shelton, Janie; Krüger, Bernd; Schicker, Irene; Wallner, Peter

2015-01-01

129

Comparative life cycle assessment of biodiesel and fossil diesel fuel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Biofuels offer clear advantages in terms of greenhouse gas emissions, but do they perform better when we look at all the environmental impacts from a life cycle perspective. In the context of a demonstration project at the Flemish Institute for Technology Research (VITO) on the use of rapeseed methyl ester (RME) or biodiesel as automotive fuel, a life cycle assessment (LCA) of biodiesel and diesel was made. The primary concern was the question as to whether or not the biodiesel chain was comparable to the conventional diesel chain, from an environmental point of view, taking into account all stages of the life cycle of the two products. Additionally, environmental damage costs were calculated, using an impact pathway analysis. This paper presents the results of the two methods for evaluation of environmental impacts of RME and conventional diesel. Both methods are complementary and share the conclusion that although biodiesel has much lower greenhouse gas emissions, it still has significant impacts on other impact categories. The external costs of biodiesel are a bit lower compared to fossil diesel. For both fuels, external costs are significantly higher than the private production cost. (Author)

130

Prevent the risk of climate change by taxing fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Of all the greenhouse gases, it is emissions of CO2 which most urgently require reduction. On the one hand, given the very long lifetime of this gas, its emissions are almost irreversible in character. On the other hand, the measures to be taken concern technological choices, and choices in matters of planning and land use, which are not easily reversible either. It would be very costly, later on, to go back on decisions we make in the coming years without taking into account the risk of climate change. We will only be able to stabilize the concentration of CO2 in the atmosphere if we are able to reduce present emissions by 60 per cent. The challenge to humanity is considerable, since this reduction in emissions has to be achieved despite the forecast doubling of the world's population. We must organize ourselves both to stabilize the world's forests (reforestation in certain regions compensating for the inevitable deforestation elsewhere), and to reduce by 25 per cent the average consumption of fossil fuel per inhabitant. Such a radical reorientation of our habits in the consumption of fossil energy does not seem to me technically unreachable, and it will not cause widespread ruin if we manage to optimize its organization. Preventive work will only be effective if it is made on a planetary scale. It will only be undertaken if we are able to share the burden fairly between the various countries; and it will not be ruinous if we manage to decentrall not be ruinous if we manage to decentralize necessary initiatives, so that the least costly methods are undertaken everywhere from the outset. (author)

131

Fuel cells - an attractive option for use in industry. Brennstoffzellen - eine attraktive Option fuer Anwendungen in der Industrie  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In energy generation, environmental loads caused by fossil fuels are one of the motivations for the development of effective processes, including new technologies. According to a present assessment, fuel cell engineering can reserve some niches in this decade from the point of view of costs. Technically almost mature is especially the phosphoric acid fuel cell. Its use may make sense in the industrial range, if as an industrial by-product hydrogen-rich gases are available, which can be used as fuel for the fuel cell. In the present contribution, an applied case is described and some statements on the engineering and cost-effectiveness are made. (orig.)

Drenckhahn, W. (Siemens AG Bereich Energieerzeugung (KWU), Erlangen (Germany)); Hassmann, K. (Siemens AG Bereich Energieerzeugung (KWU), Erlangen (Germany)); Lezuo, A. (Siemens AG Bereich Energieerzeugung (KWU), Erlangen (Germany))

1994-09-01

132

Tracing fossil fuel CO2 using ?14C in Xi'an City, China  

Science.gov (United States)

Radiocarbon can be used to trace fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) in the atmosphere, because radiocarbon has been depleted in fossil fuels. Here we present our study on the spatial distribution and temporal variations of CO2ff in Xi'an City, China using ?14C of both green foxtail (Setaria viridis, L. Beauv.) leaf samples and urban air samples collected in the recent years. Our results show that the CO2ff indicated by green foxtail ranged from 14.7 ± 1.7 to 52.6 ± 1.7 ppm, reflecting high CO2ff mole fractions in downtown, industrial areas, and at road sites, and low CO2ff mole fractions in public parks. Meanwhile, the monthly CO2ff reflected by air samples showed higher value in winter (57.8 ± 17.1 ppm) than that in summer (20.2 ± 9.8 ppm) due to the enhancement usage of coal burning and the poor dispersion condition of atmosphere. This study displays that the increased fossil fuel emission is associated with the fast development of Xi'an City in China. It is worth mentioning that the green foxtail samples can be used to map out the CO2ff spatial distribution on large scale quickly and conveniently, while the air samples can be used to trace the CO2ff temporal variations with high resolution effectively. Therefore the ?14C of both green foxtail and air samples is a good indicator of CO2ff emission.

Zhou, Weijian; Wu, Shugang; Huo, Wenwen; Xiong, Xiaohu; Cheng, Peng; Lu, Xuefeng; Niu, Zhenchuan

2014-09-01

133

Fossil fuels and clean, plentiful energy in the 21st century: The example of coal  

OpenAIRE

Many people believe we must quickly wean ourselves from fossil fuels to save the planet from environmental catastrophe, wars and economic collapse. However, we have the technological capability to use fossil fuels without emitting climate-threatening greenhouse gases or other pollutants. The natural transition from conventional oil and gas to unconventional oil, unconventional gas and coal for producing electricity, hydrogen and cleaner-burning fuels will decrease energy dependence on politic...

Jaccard, Mark

2007-01-01

134

Innovative fossil fuel fired vitrification technology for soil remediation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Vortec has successfully completed Phase 1 of the ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation'' program. The Combustion and Melting System (CMS) has processed 7000 pounds of material representative of contaminated soil that is found at DOE sites. The soil was spiked with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals surrogates, an organic contaminant, and a surrogate radionuclide. The samples taken during the tests confirmed that virtually all of the radionuclide was retained in the glass and that it did not leach to the environment-as confirmed by both ANS 16.1 and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing. The organic contaminant, anthracene, was destroyed during the test with a Destruction and Removal Efficiency (DRE) of at least 99.99%. RCRA metal surrogates, that were in the vitrified product, were retained and did not leach to the environment as confirmed by the TCLP testing. Semi-volatile RCRA metal surrogates were captured by the Air Pollution Control (APC) system, and data on the amount of metal oxide particulate and the chemical composition of the particulate were established for use in the Phase 2 APC subsystem design

135

Mapping Biomass Availability to Decrease the Dependency on Fossil Fuels  

Science.gov (United States)

To decrease the dependency on fossil fuels, more renewable energy sources need to be explored. Over the last years, the consumption of biomass has risen steadily and it has become a major source for re-growing energy. Besides the most common sources of biomass (forests, agriculture etc.) there are smaller supplies available in mostly unused areas like hedges, vegetation along streets, railways, rivers and field margins. However, these sources are not mapped and in order to obtain their potential for usage as a renewable energy, a method to quickly assess their spatial distribution and their volume is needed. We use a range of data sets including satellite imagery, GIS and elevation data to evaluate these parameters. With the upcoming Sentinel missions, our satellite data is chosen to match the spatial resolution of Sentinel-2 (10-20 m) as well as its spectral characteristics. To obtain sub-pixel information from the satellite data, we use a spectral unmixing approach. Additional GIS data is provided by the German Digital Landscape Model (ATKIS Base-DLM). To estimate the height (and derive the volume) of the vegetation, we use LIDAR data to produce a digital surface model. These data sets allow us to map the extent of previously unused biomass sources. This map can then be used as a starting point for further analyses about the feasibility of the biomass extraction and their usage as a renewable energy source.

Steensen, T.; Müller, S.; Jandewerth, M.; Büscher, O.

2014-09-01

136

Effects of New Fossil Fuel Developments on the Possibilities of Meeting 2C Scenarios  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Recent years have seen an increasing activity in developing new fossil fuel production capacity. This includes unconventional fossil fuels, such as tar sands and shale gas, fossil fuels from remote locations, and fossil fuels with a very large increase in production in the near future. In this report, the impact of such developments on our ability to mitigate climate change is investigated. Our inventory shows that the new fossil fuel developments currently underway consist of 29,400 billion cubic meters of natural gas, 260,000 million barrels of oil and 49,600 million tonnes of coal. The development of these new fossil fuels would result in emissions of 300 billion tonnes of CO2 -equivalent (CO2e) from 2012 until 2050. Until 2050, a 'carbon budget' of 1550 billion tonnes CO2e is still available if we want to of keep global warming below 2C with a 50% probability. For a 75% probability to stay below 2C this budget is only 1050 billion tonnes CO2e. So, the new fossil fuel developments identified in this report consume 20-33% of the remaining carbon budget until 2050. In a scenario where the new fossil fuels are developed, we need to embark on a rapid emission reductions pathway at the latest in 2019 in order to meet the 50% probability carbon budget. Avoiding the development of new fossil fuels will give us until 2025 to start further rapid emission reductions. These calculations are based on the assumption that the maximum emission reduction rate is 4% per year and that the maximum change in emission trend is 0.5 percentage point per year. The starting year for rapid emission reductions depends on the choice of these parameters. A sensitivity analysis shows that, in all cases, refraining from new fossil fuel development allows for a delay of 5 to 8 years before we should embark on a rapid emission reduction pathway. The high investments required for developing new fossil fuels lead to a lock in effect; once developed, these fossil fuels need to be exploited for several decades in order to recuperate investment costs. Since emission reductions need to start soon, i.e. within the next decade, recuperating these costs will be difficult. This will either lead to destruction of capital or not staying within the carbon budget.

Meindertsma, W.; Blok, K.

2012-12-15

137

Emissions from ethanol-blended fossil fuel flames  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A fundamental study to investigate the emission characteristics of ethanol-blended fossil fuels is presented. Employing a heterogeneous experimental setup, emissions are measured from diffusion flames around spherical porous particles. Using an infusion pump, ethanol-fossil fuel blend is transpired into a porous sphere kept in an upward flowing air stream. A typical probe of portable digital exhaust gas analyzer is placed in and around the flame with the help of a multi-direction traversing mechanism to measure emissions such as un-burnt hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide. Since ethanol readily mixes with water, emission characteristics of ethanol-water blends are also studied. For comparison purpose, emissions from pure ethanol diffusion flames are also presented. A simplified theoretical analysis has been carried out to determine equilibrium surface temperature, composition of the fuel components in vapor-phase and heat of reaction of each blend. These theoretical predictions are used in explaining the emission characteristics of flames from ethanol blends. (author) This paper presents the results of an experimental study of flow structure in horizontal equilateral triangular ducts having double rows of half delta-wing type vortex generators mounted on the duct's slant surfaces. The test ducts have the same axial length and hydraulic diameter of 4 m and 58.3 mm, respectively. Each duct consists of double rows of half delta wing pairs arranged either in common flow-up or common flow-down configurations. Flow field measurements were performed using a Particle Image Velocimetry Technique for hydraulic diameter based Reynolds numbers in the range of 1000-8000. The secondary flow field differences generated by two different vortex generator configurations were examined in detail. The secondary flow is found stronger behind the second vortex generator pair than behind the first pair but becomes weaker far from the second pair in the case of Duct1. However, the strength of the secondary flow is found nearly the same behind the first and the second vortex generator pair as well as far from the second vortex generator pair in the case of Duct2. Both ducts are able to create a counter-rotating and a second set of twin foci. Duct2 is able to create the second set of twin foci in an earlier streamwise location than Duct1, as these foci are well-known to their heat transfer augmentation. A larger vortex formation area and a greater induced vorticity field between vortex pairs are observed for Duct2 compared with Duct1. As the induced flow field between the vortex pairs increases the heat transfer, and as the flow field between the vortex cores is found larger in the case of Duct2, therefore, it is expected to obtain better heat transfer characteristics for Duct2 compared with Duct1. (author)

Akcayoglu, Azize [Mersin University, Faculty of Technical Education, Tarsus, Mersin (Turkey)

2011-01-15

138

Impact on food productivity by fossil fuel independence - A case study of a Swedish small-scale integrated organic farm  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The large-scale industrial agriculture that provides the majority of food at present is dependent upon fossil fuels in the form of tractor fuel, mineral fertilizers, pesticides, and irrigation. Yet, the age of cheap and abundant fossil fuels will likely come to an end within the coming decades. In this case study, the productivity of a small-scale farm (8 ha arable land, 5.5 ha meadow, 3.5 ha pasture and 18 ha forest) independent on fossil fuels by using organic methods and draught horse power was investigated. The aim was to quantify its productivity when the animal composition and possible alternatives to tractive power were varied. After an analysis of possible solutions, three scenarios for tractive power were selected: draught horse power, diesel tractor, and combination of draught horse power and rapeseed oil fueled tractor. A model that calculates the amount of food available at the farm in terms of meat, milk egg, and crops, converts it into energy units and calculates how many people can be supplied from the farm was developed. The most reasonable of the scenarios studied was when draught horse power was combined with tractor (and combine harvester) driven on locally produced rapeseed oil. Then the farm will have access to all advantages with the tractor and harvester, e.g., timeliness in harvest and lifting heavy loads, and the renewability and efficiency of draught horse power on smaller fields, and lighter operations. This system was able to support between 66 and 82 persons depending on crop yields, milk yields, meat production, fuel demand for the tractor, and availability of forest grazing. Most likely the production capacity lands on ability to support approximately 68 - 70 persons, and the farm may require fossil fuels to support more than 80 persons. If all farmland globally was to be operated with the same productivity, this would be enough for supplying the global population with food at present.

Johansson, Sheshti [Dept. of Energy and Technology, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Belfrage, Kristina [Centre for Sustainable Agriculture, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden); Olsson, Mats [Dept. of Soil and Environment, Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)

2013-02-15

139

Towards constraints on fossil fuel emissions from total column carbon dioxide  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available We assess the large-scale, top-down constraints on regional fossil fuel emissions provided by observations of atmospheric total column CO2, XCO2. Using an atmospheric general circulation model (GCM with underlying fossil emissions, we determine the influence of regional fossil fuel emissions on global XCO2 fields. We quantify the regional contrasts between source and upwind regions and probe the sensitivity of atmospheric XCO2 to changes in fossil fuel emissions. Regional fossil fuel XCO2 contrasts can exceed 0.7 ppm based on 2007 emission estimates, but have large seasonal variations due to biospheric fluxes. Contamination by clouds reduces the discernible fossil signatures. Nevertheless, our simulations show that atmospheric fossil XCO2 can be tied to its source region and that changes in the regional XCO2 contrasts scale linearly with emissions. We test the GCM results against XCO2 data from the GOSAT satellite. Regional XCO2 contrasts in GOSAT data generally scale with the predictions from the GCM, but the comparison is limited by the moderate precision of and relatively few observations from the satellite. We discuss how this approach may be useful as a policy tool to verify national fossil emissions, as it provides an independent, observational constraint.

G. Keppel-Aleks

2013-04-01

140

Modelling renewable supply chain for electricity generation with forest, fossil, and wood-waste fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In this paper, a multiple objective model to large-scale and long-term industrial energy supply chain scheduling problems is considered. The problems include the allocation of a number of fossil, peat, and wood-waste fuel procurement chains to an energy plant during different periods. This decision environment is further complicated by sequence-dependent procurement chains for forest fuels. A dynamic linear programming model can be efficiently used for modelling energy flows in fuel procurement planning. However, due to the complex nature of the problem, the resulting model cannot be directly used to solve the combined heat and electricity production problem in a manner that is relevant to the energy industry. Therefore, this approach was used with a multiple objective programming model to better describe the combinatorial complexity of the scheduling task. The properties of this methodology are discussed and four examples of how the model works based on real-world data and optional peat fuel tax, feed-in tariff of electricity and energy efficiency constraints are presented. The energy industry as a whole is subject to policy decisions regarding renewable energy production and energy efficiency regulation. These decisions should be made on the basis of comprehensive techno-economic analysis using local energy supply chain models. -- Highlights: ? The energy policy decisions are made using comprehensive techno-economic analysis. ? Peat tax, feed-in tariff and energy efficiency increases renewable energy production. ? The potential of peat procurement deviates from the current assumptions of managers. ? The dynamic MOLP model could easily be adapted to a changing decision environment.

141

Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel use: Recent performance and future prospects  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This publication gives an overview and discusses carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel use worldwide. Main themes discussed in this connection cover recent performance and future prospects. Some proposals on the reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions are given

Jefferson, Michael

1998-12-01

142

Economic growth, CO{sub 2} emissions, and fossil fuels consumption in Iran  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Environmental issues have attracted renewed interest and more attention during recent years due to climatic problems associated with the increased levels of pollution and the deterioration of the environmental quality as a result of increased human activity. This paper investigates the causal relationships between economic growth, carbon emission, and fossil fuels consumption, using the relatively new time series technique known as the Toda-Yamamoto method for Iran during the period 1967-2007. Total fossil fuels, petroleum products, and natural gas consumption are used as three proxies for energy consumption. Empirical results suggest a unidirectional Granger causality running from GDP and two proxies of energy consumption (petroleum products and natural gas consumption) to carbon emissions, and no Granger causality running from total fossil fuels consumption to carbon emissions in the long run. The results also show that carbon emissions, petroleum products, and total fossil fuels consumption do not lead to economic growth, though gas consumption does. (author)

Lotfalipour, Mohammad Reza; Falahi, Mohammad Ali; Ashena, Malihe [Department of Economics, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad, Mashhad (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2010-12-15

143

News from the fuel elements industry  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This article deals successively with: the re-structuring of the PWR fuel industry in France, with the setting up of Fragema and Cogema Framatome Combustible; Fragema products, from standard fuel assembly to the development of a new advanced fuel assembly; Framatome's experience with PWR fuel; fuel performances in the light of requirements imposed by network needs follow-up; devices developed by Fragema for on-site analysis of irradiated fuel

144

INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This Summary Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3, 3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the Material Handling and Conditioning System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem.

J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

2001-07-13

145

INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This Final Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3,3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the MH/C System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem. Because of USEPA policies and regulations that do not require treatment of low level or low-level/PCB contaminated wastes, DOE terminated the project because there is no purported need for this technology.

J. Hnat; L.M. Bartone; M. Pineda

2001-10-31

146

Co-contaminated sites: Biodegradation of fossil fuels in the presence of PCBs  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated sites are often co-contaminated with fossil fuels making biodegradation of the fossil fuel components of two PCB-contaminated sites: (1) a former racing Drag Strip soil contaminated with Aroclor 1242 and (2) a sediment from Silver Lake contaminated with Aroclor 1260. The sandy surface soil at the Drag Strip site contains 1.9% organic carbon and 1.5% fossil fuel component. Analysis of the solvent-extractable organic fraction, by alumina column chromatography, shows the distribution of organics to be 91.2% hydrocarbons, 7.8% polars, and 1.1% asphaltenes. This oil is extremely weathered and contains few readily biodegradable components. Enrichments have yielded undefined mixed cultures of bacteria capable of extensive degradation of components of both the Drag Strip and Silver Lake site materials. One culture, enriched from a creosote-contaminated soil adjacent to a utility pole, transformed approximately 28% and 37% (by weight) of the Drag Strip and Silver Lake oils, respectively. While the presence of fossil fuels has been shown to inhibit aerobic PCB degradation, the studies show that the presence of PCBs negatively impacts fossil fuel biodegradation. Continuing studies will examine the nature of PCB inhibition of fossil fuel biodegradation

147

Material flow analysis of fossil fuels in China during 2000-2010.  

Science.gov (United States)

Since the relationship between the supply and demand of fossil fuels is on edge in the long run, the contradiction between the economic growth and limited resources will hinder the sustainable development of the Chinese society. This paper aims to analyze the input of fossil fuels in China during 2000-2010 via the material flow analysis (MFA) that takes hidden flows into account. With coal, oil, and natural gas quantified by MFA, three indexes, consumption and supply ratio (C/S ratio), resource consumption intensity (RCI), and fossil fuels productivity (FFP), are proposed to reflect the interactions between population, GDP, and fossil fuels. The results indicated that in the past 11 years, China's requirement for fossil fuels has been increasing continuously because of the growing mine productivity in domestic areas, which also leads to a single energy consumption structure as well as excessive dependence on the domestic exploitation. It is advisable to control the fossil fuels consumption by energy recycling and new energy facilities' popularization in order to lead a sustainable access to nonrenewable resources and decrease the soaring carbon emissions. PMID:23365525

Wang, Sheng; Dai, Jing; Su, Meirong

2012-01-01

148

A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This synthesis discusses the emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel combustion and cement production. While much is known about these emissions, there is still much that is unknown about the details surrounding these emissions. This synthesis explores our knowledge of these emissions in terms of why there is concern about them; how they are calculated; the major global efforts on inventorying them; their global, regional, and national totals at different spatial and temporal scales; how they are distributed on global grids (i.e., maps; how they are transported in models; and the uncertainties associated with these different aspects of the emissions. The magnitude of emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels has been almost continuously increasing with time since fossil fuels were first used by humans. Despite events in some nations specifically designed to reduce emissions, or which have had emissions reduction as a byproduct of other events, global total emissions continue their general increase with time. Global total fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions are known to within 10 % uncertainty (95 % confidence interval. Uncertainty on individual national total fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions range from a few percent to more than 50 %. This manuscript concludes that carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion continue to increase with time and that while much is known about the overall characteristics of these emissions, much is still to be learned about the detailed characteristics of these emissions.

R. J. Andres

2012-05-01

149

A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This synthesis discusses the emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel combustion and cement production. While much is known about these emissions, there is still much that is unknown about the details surrounding these emissions. This synthesis explores our knowledge of these emissions in terms of why there is concern about them; how they are calculated; the major global efforts on inventorying them; their global, regional, and national totals at different spatial and temporal scales; how they are distributed on global grids (i.e. maps; how they are transported in models; and the uncertainties associated with these different aspects of the emissions. The magnitude of emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels has been almost continuously increasing with time since fossil fuels were first used by humans. Despite events in some nations specifically designed to reduce emissions, or which have had emissions reduction as a byproduct of other events, global total emissions continue their general increase with time. Global total fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions are known to within 10% uncertainty (95% confidence interval. Uncertainty on individual national total fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions range from a few percent to more than 50%. The information discussed in this manuscript synthesizes global, regional and national fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions, their distributions, their transport, and the associated uncertainties.

R. J. Andres

2012-01-01

150

Comparative evaluation of solar, fission, fusion, and fossil energy resources. Part 4: Energy from fossil fuels  

Science.gov (United States)

The conversion of fossil-fired power plants now burning oil or gas to burn coal is discussed along with the relaxation of air quality standards and the development of coal gasification processes to insure a continued supply of gas from coal. The location of oil fields, refining areas, natural gas fields, and pipelines in the U.S. is shown. The technologies of modern fossil-fired boilers and gas turbines are defined along with the new technologies of fluid-bed boilers and MHD generators.

Williams, J. R.

1974-01-01

151

Cost and performance of fossil fuel power plants with CO2 capture and storage  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

CO2 capture and storage (CCS) is receiving considerable attention as a potential greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation option for fossil fuel power plants. Cost and performance estimates for CCS are critical factors in energy and policy analysis. CCS cost studies necessarily employ a host of technical and economic assumptions that can dramatically affect results. Thus, particular studies often are of limited value to analysts, researchers, and industry personnel seeking results for alternative cases. In this paper, we use a generalized modeling tool to estimate and compare the emissions, efficiency, resource requirements and current costs of fossil fuel power plants with CCS on a systematic basis. This plant-level analysis explores a broader range of key assumptions than found in recent studies we reviewed for three major plant types: pulverized coal (PC) plants, natural gas combined cycle (NGCC) plants, and integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) systems using coal. In particular, we examine the effects of recent increases in capital costs and natural gas prices, as well as effects of differential plant utilization rates, IGCC financing and operating assumptions, variations in plant size, and differences in fuel quality, including bituminous, sub-bituminous and lignite coals. Our results show higher power plant and CCS costs than prior studies as a consequence of recent escalations in capital and operating costs. The broader range of cases also reveals difhe broader range of cases also reveals differences not previously reported in the relative costs of PC, NGCC and IGCC plants with and without CCS. While CCS can significantly reduce power plant emissions of CO2 (typically by 85-90%), the impacts of CCS energy requirements on plant-level resource requirements and multi-media environmental emissions also are found to be significant, with increases of approximately 15-30% for current CCS systems. To characterize such impacts, an alternative definition of the 'energy penalty' is proposed in lieu of the prevailing use of this term

152

Importance of hydrogen fuels as sustainable alternative energy for domestic and industrial applications  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Energy demand is increasing continuously due to rapid growth in population and industrialization development. As a result greenhouse gases especially CO2 produced by the combustion of fossil fuels cause depletion of fossil fuels and deterioration of environmental conditions worldwide. The goal of global energy sustainability implies the replacement of all fossil fuels by renewable energy sources . Hydrogen fuel is one of the sustainable energy sources can be available by conversion of biomass into biological hydrogen gas and ethanol. Rate of biomass generation in domestic wastes in Iranian culture is high. Therefore there is suitable potential for hydrogen generation in rural and urban areas of Iran. On the other hand energy extraction from these fossil fuels causes pollution and diseases. Globally, hydrogen is already produced in significant quantities (around 5 billion cubic metres per annum). It is mainly used to produce ammonia for fertiliser (about 50%), for oil refining (37%), methanol production (8%) and in the chemical and metallurgical industries (4%). On the other hand, increase in emissions rates of greenhouse gases, i.e., CO2 present a threat to the world climate. Also new legislation of Iran has been approved the higher costs of conventional fuels for consuming in vehicles for reduction of greenhouse gases reduction as environmental policies. Demand is rising in all cities of Iran for cleaner fuels such as mixed fuels and natural gas fuels such as mixed fuels and natural gas, but unfortunately they are exporting to foreign countries or the required technologies are not available and economically option. Nuclear industries in Iran are also small and expanding only slowly. So importance of alternative energies as hydrogen powers are increasing daily. Presently both major consumers of domestic and industrial such as plants and manufacturers are using fossil fuels for their process that consequently contribute to the global warming and climate change. This paper reviews these options, with reference not only to greenhouse gases but also to welfare increasing. (author)

153

Biomass gasification--a substitute to fossil fuel for heat application  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The paper addresses case studies of a low temperature and a high temperature industrial heat requirement being met using biomass gasification. The gasification system for these applications consists of an open top down draft reburn reactor lined with ceramic. Necessary cooling and cleaning systems are incorporated in the package to meet the end use requirements. The other elements included are the fuel conveyor, water treatment plant for recirculating the cooling water and adequate automation to start, shut down and control the operations of the gasifier system. Drying of marigold flower, a low temperature application is considered to replace diesel fuel in the range of 125-150 l h-1. Gas from the 500 kg h-1, gasifier system is piped into the producer gas burners fixed in the combustion chamber with the downstream process similar to the diesel burner. The high temperature application is for a heat treatment furnace in the temperature range of 873-1200 K. A 300 kg h-1 of biomass gasifier replaces 2000 l of diesel or LDO per day completely. The novelty of this package is the use of one gasifier to energize 16 burners in the 8 furnaces with different temperature requirements. The system operates over 140 h per week on a nearly nonstop mode and over 4000 h of operation replacing fossil fuel completely. The advantage of bioenergy package towards the economic and environmental considerations is presentednted

154

Fossil and nuclear fuels. Future supply situation; Fossile und Nukleare Brennstoffe. Die kuenftige Versorgungssituation  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The energy watch group is an international network of scientists and politicians providing studies concerning the shortage of fossil and nuclear energy carriers, scenarios for regenerative energy installation and strategies for assuring a long-term stable energy supply for acceptable prices. The study covers the topics crude oil (oil production, potentials for unconventional oil production, future oil supply), natural gas (USA, Europe, Russia, Middle East), coal, uranium and nuclear power.

Zittel, Werner; Zerhausen, Jan; Zerta, Martin [Ludwig-Boelkow-Systemtechnik GmbH, Ottobrunn (Germany); Arnold, Nikolaus [Univ. fuer Bodenkultur, Wien (Austria). Inst. fuer Sicherheits- und Risikowissenschaften

2013-03-15

155

OVERVIEW OF POLLUTION FROM COMBUSTION OF FOSSIL FUELS IN BOILERS OF THE UNITED STATES  

Science.gov (United States)

The report describes the fossil-fuel-fired boiler population of the U.S. It presents data on the number and capacity of boilers for categories most relevant to producing pollution. Information presented includes: type of fuel burned (coal, residual oil, distillate oil, natural ga...

156

Hydrogen production from non-fossil fuel sources: understanding and improving efficiencies  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper describes hydrogen production from non-fossil fuel sources in order to reduce greenhouse gases. It examines energy areas such as hydrogen, nuclear and renewable energy sources and technologies such as thermal storage, hydrogen production, fuel cells, wind system and solar technology

157

BIOMASS AND FOSSIL FUEL TO METHANOL AND CARBON VIA THE HYDROCARB PROCESS  

Science.gov (United States)

The paper discusses the production of methanol and carbon from biomass and fossil fuels, utilizing the Hydrocarbon process. This process has the potential to minimize dependence on imported fuels for the transportation and utility sectors by increasing the yield and reducing the ...

158

The role of nuclear energy in the more efficient exploitation of fossil fuel resources  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The energy theory of value, being a valuable addition to the debate on the rational exploitation of man's energy reserves, is applied in order to clarify the presently confused energy input/output relations for nuclear and solar systems as they interact with fossil fuel. It is shown on the basis of purely energetics considerations that the nuclear route - at present and in future - is a very efficient way to stretch out and finally to substitute for the limited fossil fuel resources. This is particularly true if one considers the transistory phase where the substituting process has to exhibit a rapid exponential growth rate. The energetical effectiveness of the production of a synthetic fuel, as for example hydrogen by water splitting processes, is addressed at the end and serves to give an idea how effectively the energy available in fossil fuels can be amplified by virtue of the coupling of nuclear energy into the process. (Auth.)

159

Risk assessment of atmospheric contamination due to combustion of fossil-fuels in Japan and possible application of fuzzy set  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

For risk assessment of atmospheric contamination due to fossil-fuel combustion in Japan, epidemiological studies have been conducted since 1961. Health effects of sulfur dioxide in industrial areas of Japan where fossil-fuel power stations are located have been investigated. The dose-response relationship between prevalence rates of chronic bronchitis and sulphur dioxide was established. Various efforts have been made to reduce the concentrations of sulfur dioxide in the atmosphere. However, the average concentration of NO2 tended to increase gradually. It was therefore considered important to study the health effects of nitrogen dioxide. In different areas of Japan with varying atmospheric concentrations of nitrogen dioxide, an extensive epidemiological survey was conducted with over 10,000 school-children. The results of the survey indicate that the prevalence rates of asthma and wheezing were higher with the higher degree of air pollution, and that the indoor pollution is important. It is also attempted to compare hazard indices of the air-borne wastes from fossil-fuel power plants and those from nuclear power plants. The conventional pollutants seem to be much more important as compared with the radioactive releases under normal conditions of operation. The survey of stochastic effects with very small chances of occurrence was not attempted because of the great uncertainties and difficulties in identifying a small signal within a large noise. The possibll signal within a large noise. The possible application of the theory of Fuzzy Set for risk analysis is suggested

160

Decision-maker's guide to wood fuel for small industrial energy users. Final report. [Includes glossary  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The technology and economics of various wood energy systems available to the small industrial and commercial energy user are considered. This book is designed to help a plant manager, engineer, or others in a decision-making role to become more familiar with wood fuel systems and make informed decisions about switching to wood as a fuel. The following subjects are discussed: wood combustion, pelletized wood, fuel storage, fuel handling and preparation, combustion equipment, retrofitting fossil-fueled boilers, cogeneration, pollution abatement, and economic considerations of wood fuel use. (MHR)

Levi, M. P.; O& #x27; Grady, M. J.

1980-02-01

161

Application of the aromatic-based laser-induced fluorescence diagnostic to the quantitative chemical probe of Fossil fuels and Biofuels  

OpenAIRE

The automotive and aviation industries are presently confronted with the twin crises of fossil fuel depletion and environmental degradation. Research for alternative fuels, which promise a harmonious correlation with sustainable development, energy conservation, efficiency and environmental preservation, has become highly pronounced in the present context. However, their influence on pollution, consumption and combustion yield are not clearly defined yet. In particular, their effects on key p...

Ledier, Constantin

2011-01-01

162

Trends in research and development of advanced fossil fuel technologies for electric power generation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Since the end of World War II, electrical generation has increased dramatically worldwide. Fossil fuels account presently for over 70% of the energy input for US electricity generation. Coal provides about three-fourths of the fossil fuel contribution. If no energy policy changes occur, by the year 2010 in the USA over three-fourths of all electricity generation will be fuelled by fossil fuels. As a corrective measure, a National Energy Strategy (NES) has been proposed that will change US energy policies by reducing the expected annual electricity requirements. The NES also forecasts a larger role for nuclear energy and for renewables for power generation needs, with less emphasis on the use of fossil fuels because expected growth in the use of fossil fuels raises concerns about possible health and environmental effects. The switch to new efficient and environmentally superior electricity generating technologies will permit growth while ensuring that the environment is protected. This paper provides an overview of the new advanced technologies for power generation. 10 figs

163

A synthesis of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This synthesis discusses the emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel combustion and cement production. While much is known about these emissions, there is still much that is unknown about the details surrounding these emissions. This synthesis explores our knowledge of these emissions in terms of why there is concern about them; how they are calculated; the major global efforts on inventorying them; their global, regional, and national totals at different spatial and temporal scales; how they are distributed on global grids (i.e., maps); how they are transported in models; and the uncertainties associated with these different aspects of the emissions. The magnitude of emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels has been almost continuously increasing with time since fossil fuels were first used by humans. Despite events in some nations specifically designed to reduce emissions, or which have had emissions reduction as a byproduct of other events, global total emissions continue their general increase with time. Global total fossilfuel carbon dioxide emissions are known to within 10% uncertainty (95% confidence interval). Uncertainty on individual national total fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions range from a few percent to more than 50 %. This manuscript concludes that carbon dioxide emissions from fossil-fuel combustion continue to increase with time and that while much is known about the overall characteristics of these emissions, much is still to be learned about the detailed characteristics of these emissions.

Andres, R.J.; Boden, T.A.

2012-01-01

164

Carry-over of fossil fuel impurities during processes of upgrading and utilization  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Environmental constraints on future fossil fuel utilization, e.g., requirements to minimize solid wastes and fugitive aerosol emissions including acidic components, require that additional information such as the trace element content of fuel stocks and the fate of trace components during processing for fuel extraction, up-grading and combustion, continue to be sought. Among the methods suited for fossil fuel trace analysis, the nuclear-based techniques. INAA, photon activation (IPAA) and PIXE have been adapted in this laboratory. Results obtained by several nuclear methods are compared in accuracy and application to coals and their derivative products and residues, including studies on pilot plant coal hydroliquefaction, and on Canadian coal fired electric generating units and to several Canadian peats. Results obtained for thermal coals and their ashes, synfuel and other heavy oil feedstocks are presented. The results indicate that appreciable fractions of Al, As, Ba, Cr, Ni, Pb, V, and the halogens are carried over into the liquid fuels and some tendency is seen for similar behavior among groups or families of elements which have distinctive associations with mineral components in fossil fuels. The capabilities of radioanalytical techniques to contribute to fossil fuel studies both at the research stage (such as pilot plant coal conversion) and at the full-scale level of thermal station power production are reviewed

165

Towards constraints on fossil fuel emissions from total column carbon dioxide  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available We assess the large-scale, top-down constraints on regional fossil fuel emissions provided by observations of atmospheric total column CO2, XCO2. Using an atmospheric GCM with underlying fossil emissions, we determine the influence of regional fossil fuel emissions on global XCO2 fields. We quantify the regional contrasts between source and upwind regions and probe the sensitivity of atmospheric XCO2 to changes in fossil fuel emissions. Regional fossil fuel XCO2 contrasts can exceed 0.7 ppm based on 2007 emission estimates, but have large seasonal variations due to biospheric fluxes. Contamination by clouds reduces the discernible fossil signatures. Nevertheless, our simulations show that atmospheric fossil XCO2 can be tied to its source region and that changes in the regional XCO2 contrasts scale linearly with emissions. We test the GCM results against XCO2 data from the GOSAT satellite. Regional XCO2 contrasts in GOSAT data generally scale with the predictions from the GCM, but the comparison is limited by the moderate precision of and relatively few observations from the satellite. We discuss how this approach may be useful as a policy tool to verify national fossil emissions, as it provides an independent, observational constraint.

G. Keppel-Aleks

2012-11-01

166

The change from fossil fuel dependence to sustainable energy sources in Nigeria  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Nigeria faces a serious energy crisis due to declining electricity generation from domestic power plants. Although the country is highly dependent on fossil fuel resources, Nigeria has a range of unexploited biomass and hydro power resources, as well as extensive solar energy potential. This paper presented a current energy balance of Nigeria and examined ways of reaching an environmentally sustainable energy balance through the use of a mix of renewable resources. Supply and consumption details of domestic, industrial and transportation sectors as well as electricity production statistics were presented. Total hydropower potential based on the country's river system was estimated to be 10,000 MW. It was estimated that Nigeria has an average of 1.804 x 1015 of incident solar energy annually, which is 27 times the nation's total conventional energy resources in energy units. It was noted that Nigeria also possesses a significant amount of biomass resources from several large forests that may be used to supply domestic cooking and heating needs as well as for ethanol production. It was noted that wind energy may not be a viable alternative for large scale electricity production in Nigeria. Recommendations to promote the use of renewable resources in the national energy mix included encouraging the decentralization of energy supplies; discouraging the use of wood as fuel; promoting efficient methods in the use of biomass energy resources; private sector particss energy resources; private sector participation; and global partnerships. 15 refs., 7 tabs

167

Compound-specific hydrogen isotope composition of n-alkanes in combustion residuals of fossil fuels  

Science.gov (United States)

The hydrogen isotope compositions (?D) of n-alkanes present in the combustion residuals of fossil fuels (coal, gasoline, and diesel) were measured using GC-IRMS to distinguish between coal soot and vehicle exhaust. The n-alkane ?D values of industrial and domestic coal soot ranged from -95.3‰ to -219.6‰ and -128.1‰ to -188.6‰, respectively, exhibiting similar tendencies. The ?D values of the C15-C18n-alkanes in both types of coal soot were nearly consistent, and the ?D values of the C19-C24n-alkanes exhibited a zigzag profile. The ?D values of C16-C22n-alkanes in gasoline exhaust exhibited a saw-tooth distribution, decreased with the carbon number, and were more positive than the ?D values of C16-C22n-alkanes in diesel exhaust, which increased with the carbon number. However, the ?D values of the C23-C29n-alkanes in gasoline and diesel vehicle exhaust were mostly consistent. The weighted average ?D values of the C16-C19n-alkanes in industrial and domestic coal soot were similar to the average ?D values in gasoline and diesel vehicle exhausts; however, the average ?D values of the C21-C29n-alkanes in vehicle exhausts were richer in D than those in coal soot.

Bai, Huiling; Peng, Lin; Li, Zhongping; Liu, Xiaofeng; Song, Chongfang; Mu, Ling

2014-11-01

168

Optimization of the energy system to achieve a national balance without fossil fuels  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This presentation reviewed some of the factors that are driving the transition in Sweden to a fossil free society. It focused on the the range of energy sources that can be used to meet the country's energy needs, aside from hydro power. The paper reviewed the overall balance for Sweden and to some extent EU27 with respect to both power and heat production in relation to how the energy is utilized. The current transportation system was compared with a possible future system with hybrid-electric vehicles, renewable fuels and reductions of total consumption, through both better vehicles and better logistics for transportation of goods. The driving forces and political actions needed to achieve an energy balance within different time frames was also discussed. Energy improvements through more efficient industrial processes were outlined along with energy conservation strategies for households, offices and manufacturing industries through energy efficient buildings and individual behaviour with respect to energy use. The authors noted that new sources for power such as wind and solar power will be less stable than traditional energy sources. Biomass utilization and production was highlighted. It was concluded that Sweden can attain a sustainable society if the political will is present. 28 refs., 6 tabs.

Dahlquist, E.; Vassileva, I.; Wallin, F.; Roots, P.; Yan, J. [Malardalen Univ., Vasteras (Sweden)

2010-07-01

169

Comparative study on systems of residual water treatment in the process industry by evaporation, using fossils fuels or solar energy; Estudio comparativo sobre sistemas de tratamiento de aguas residuales de la industria de procesamiento por evaporacion, utilizando combustibles fosiles o energia solar  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The residual water treatment of the process industry, nowadays is an imminent necessity in our country. In the present study two different forms are considered to concentrate residual waters: multiple effect evaporation and solar evaporation. The use of solar evaporation lagoons is a good possibility to conserving energy by means of the diminution of fossil fuel consumption. The design basis of the evaporation systems via multiple effect, as well as solar evaporation, the results of the respective sizing and the estimation of the corresponding costs are presented. A practical case is described on the cooking of cotton linters (flock) [Spanish] El tratamiento de aguas residuales de la industria de proceso, hoy en dia es una necesidad inminente en nuestro pais. En el presente trabajo se consideran dos formas distintas para concentrar las aguas residuales: evaporacion de multiple efecto y evaporacion solar. El empleo de lagunas de evaporacion solar es una buena posibilidad para conseguir el ahorro de energia mediante disminucion del consumo de combustibles fosiles. Se presentan las bases de diseno de los sistemas de evaporacion via multiple efecto, asi como solar, los resultados del dimensionamiento respectivo y la estimacion de los costos correspondientes. Se describe un caso practico sobre el cocido de linters de algodon (borra)

Landgrave Romero, Julio; Canseco Contreras, Jose [Facultad de Quimica, UNAM (Mexico)

1996-07-01

170

Zooplankton fecal pellets link fossil fuel and phosphate deposits  

Science.gov (United States)

Fossil zooplankton fecal pellets found in thinly bedded marine and lacustrine black shales associated with phosphate, oil, and coal deposits, link the deposition of organic matter and biologically associated minerals with planktonic ecosystems. The black shales were probably formed in the anoxic basins of coastal marine waters, inland seas, and rift valley lakes where high productivity was supported by runoff, upwelling, and outwelling. Copyright ?? 1981 AAAS.

Porter, K.G.; Robbins, E.I.

1981-01-01

171

Industrial Maturity of FR Fuel Cycle Processes and Technologies  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

FR fuel cycle processes and technologies have already been proven industrially for Oxide Fuel, and to a lesser extent for metal fuel. In addition, both used oxide fuel reprocessing and fresh oxide fuel manufacturing benefit from similar industrial experience currently deployed for LWR. Alternative fuel type will have to generate very significant benefit in reactor ( safety, cost, … ) to justify corresponding development and industrialization costs

172

Co-firing experiences of biomass with fossil fuel in the world's largest biofuel power boiler  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The major objective of Alhomens Kraft power plant that started up in early 2002 in Pietarsaari, Finland was to demonstrate a novel technology for multifuel and low emission cogeneration at a new commercial size, and co-firing of biomass with fossil fuel. Plant design was based on maximum exploitation of wood based fuels and peat with bituminous coal. Other objectives included electricity production at a competitive price for sale in the open market, utilization of the process steam and heat in the paper mill and for the city of Pietarsaari, and maximum use of combustible by-products from the paper industry. The utility side required higher steam data and the industrial side required better load flexibility. The boiler design requirements combine both features. The biofuel handling systemposed challenges due to the large plant and the diversity of fuels. The ratio of fuels to be used is varying according to availability, quality and price. The boiler capacity is 550 MWth. The high-pressure and re-heater steam values are 194/179 kg/s at 545/545{sup o}C and 165/40 bar. The large fuel flow and fuel variation make even mixing of the fuel components essential in order to secure optimal combustion, which ensures the lowest emissions for the circulating fluidized bed process. The paper compares operating experiences to objectives of the planning and design phase related to fuel logistics up to boiler plant operation. It describes the experience of using different fuel components in different operational situations. Experiences of auxiliary systems needed for reliable operation in co-combustion as well as experience of the boiler controllability with this heterogeneous fuel combination are described. 7 figs.

Nickull, S.; Petaenen, P. [Oy Alholmens Kraft AB (Finland)

2007-07-01

173

Material Flow Analysis of Fossil Fuels in China during 2000–2010  

OpenAIRE

Since the relationship between the supply and demand of fossil fuels is on edge in the long run, the contradiction between the economic growth and limited resources will hinder the sustainable development of the Chinese society. This paper aims to analyze the input of fossil fuels in China during 2000–2010 via the material flow analysis (MFA) that takes hidden flows into account. With coal, oil, and natural gas quantified by MFA, three indexes, consumption and supply ratio (C/S ratio), reso...

Wang, Sheng; Dai, Jing; Su, Meirong

2012-01-01

174

Beyond Kyoto :CO2 permit prices and the markets for fossil fuels  

OpenAIRE

This paper analyses the markets for fossil fuels given that the limits that the Kyoto Protocol sets on CO2 emissions from Annex B countries extend beyond 2008-2012. To our knowledge we are the first to apply a forward-looking model with endogenous prices for fossil fuels in analysis of specific CO2 emission targets, under different assumptions concerning OPEC behaviour. We calculate both the time-path of the international permit prices needed for the Kyoto targets as well as the implications ...

Lindholt, Lars

1999-01-01

175

Interaction of carbon reduction and green energy promotion in a small fossil-fuel importing economy  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

We study the incidence of carbon-reduction and green-energy promotion policies in an open fossil-fuel importing general equilibrium economy. The focus is on mixed price-based or quantity-based policies. Instruments directed toward promoting green energy are shown to reduce also carbon emissions and vice versa. Their direct effects are stronger than their side effects, the more so, the greater is the elasticity of substitution in consumption between energy and the consumption good. We calculate the effects of variations in individual policy parameters, especially on energy prices and welfare costs, and determine the impact of exogenous fossil-fuel price shocks on the economy. (orig.)

176

Critical analysis on hydrogen as an alternative to fossil fuels and biofuels for vehicles in Europe  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In recent times, the global debate on the environment has been centered on CO2 emissions. This gas is the major cause of the ''greenhouse effect'' and people are more concerned with the idea that the emissions of this gas should be minimized. As a result of this concern, the Kyoto Protocol was enacted and subscribed to by many countries, setting the maximum gas emissions for them. Fossil fuels are a major source of CO2 emissions. For some years now The European Union has been seeking to promote some years now the use of biofuels as substitutes for diesel or petrol for transport purposes. As a result of this policy, in 2003 the European Union (EU) Directive 2003/30/EC was developed with the aim of promoting the use of biofuels as a substitute for diesel or gasoline among European Union countries as well as to contribute to fulfilling the commitments acquired on climate change, security of supply in environmentally friendly conditions and the promotion of renewable energy sources. In order to achieve these goals, the directive forces all EU members to ensure that before December 31 of 2010 at least 5.75% of all gasoline and diesel fuels sold for transport purposes are biofuels. European Union countries have social and economic characteristics unique to themselves. The energy dependence on foreign sources, the features of the agricultural sector or the degree of industrialization varies greatly from one country to another. In this context, it is quetry to another. In this context, it is questionable whether the obligation imposed by this directive is actually achieving in its application uniform and/or identical goals in each of the countries involved and whether the actions of the various governments are also aligned with these goals. All these ideas were developed in a previous report (Sobrino and Monroy (2009)). This report examines the possibility of using hydrogen as an alternative to fossil fuels and biofuels from a technical, economic and environmental point of view in the specific case of a European Union country: Spain. (author)

177

Nondestructive evaluation needs in fossil fuel power plants  

Science.gov (United States)

Fossil power plant operating and maintenance cost reduction efforts coupled with changing plant operating modes have rendered traditional approaches to plant component condition assessment inadequate. New NDE techniques are required to meet utility needs in this changing environment. Key attributes of such new techniques will be improved measurement speed and accuracy, reduced preparation requirements, automated data acquisition, and computer-based analysis support. In addition, tools will be required to assist power plant personnel in making the best decisions on what, when, and how to inspect plant components to achieve overall economic objectives.

Tilley, Richard M.

1995-05-01

178

Energy Analysis of the Danish Food Production System: Food-EROI and Fossil Fuel Dependency  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Modern food production depends on limited natural resources for providing energy and fertilisers. We assess the fossil fuel dependency for the Danish food production system by means of Food Energy Returned on fossil Energy Invested (Food-EROI and by the use of energy intensive nutrients from imported livestock feed and commercial fertilisers. The analysis shows that the system requires 221 PJ of fossil energy per year and that for each joule of fossil energy invested in farming, processing and transportation, 0.25 J of food energy is produced; 0.28 when crediting for produced bioenergy. Furthermore, nutrients in commercial fertiliser and imported feed account for 84%, 90% and 90% of total supply of N, P and K, respectively. We conclude that the system is unsustainable because it is embedded in a highly fossil fuel dependent system based on a non-circular flow of nutrients. As energy and thus nutrient constraints may develop in the coming decades, the current system may need to adapt by reducing use of fossil energy at the farm and for transportation of food and feed. An operational strategy may be to relocalise the supply of energy, nutrients, feed and food.

Hanne Østergård

2013-08-01

179

Market power in the market for greenhouse gas emission permits - the interplay with the fossil fuel markets  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Implementation of the Kyoto Protocol is likely to leave Russia and other Eastern European countries with market power in the market for emission permits. Ceteris paribus, this will raise the permit price above the competitive permit price. However, Russia is also a large exporter of fossil fuels. A high price on emission permits may lower the producer price on fossil fuels. Thus, if Russia co-ordinates its permit market and fossil fuel market policies, market power will not necessarily lead to a higher permit price. Fossil fuel producers may also exert market power in the permit market, provided they conceive the permit price to be influenced by their production volumes. If higher volumes drive up the permit price Russian fuel producers may become more aggressive relative to their competitors in the fuel markets. If the sale of fuels is co-ordinated with the sale of permits. The result is reversed if high fuel production drives the permit price down. (Author)

180

Co-combustion of Fossil Fuels and Waste  

OpenAIRE

The Ph.D. thesis deals with the alternative and high efficiency methods of using waste-derived fuels in heat and power production. The focus is on the following subjects: 1) co-combustion of coal and solid recovered fuel (SRF) under pulverized fuel combustion conditions; 2) dust-firing of straw and the utilization of a waste-derived material as an additive; 3) the combustion of a biomass residue rich in phosphorus. Co-combustion of coal and SRF was conducted in an entrained flow reactor...

Wu, Hao; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-johansen, Kim; Frandsen, Flemming

2011-01-01

181

If Fossil and Fissile Fuels Falter, We've Got. . .  

Science.gov (United States)

Alternative energy sources and the new systems and techniques required for their development are described: fuel cells, magnetohydrodynamics, thermionics, geothermal, wind, tides, waste consersion, biomass, and ocean thermal energy conversion. (MF)

Klaus, Robert L.

1977-01-01

182

Assessment of industrial applications for fuel cell cogeneration systems  

Science.gov (United States)

The fuel cell energy systems are designed with and without a utility connection for emergency back-up power. Sale of electricity to the utility during periods of low plant demand is not considered. For each of the three industrial applications, conceptual designs were also developed for conventional utility systems relying on purchased electric power and fossil-fired boilers for steam/hot water. The capital investment for each energy system is estimated. Annual operating costs are also determined for each system. These cost estimates are converted to levelized annual costs by applying appropriate economic factors. The breakeven electricity price that would make fuel cell systems competitive with the conventional systems is plotted as a function of naphtha price. The sensitivity of the breakeven point to capital investment and coal price is also evaluated.

Stickles, R. P.; Oneill, J. K.; Smith, E. H.

1978-01-01

183

EPA/IFP EUROPEAN WORKSHOP ON THE EMISSION ON NITROUS OXIDE FROM FOSSIL FUEL COMBUSTION  

Science.gov (United States)

The report summarizes the proceedings of an EPA/Institut Francais du Petrole (IFP) cosponsored workshop addressing direct nitrous oxide (N2O) emission from fossil fuel combustion. The third in a series, it was held at the IFP in Rueil-Malmaison, France, on June 1-2, 1988. Increas...

184

A FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR THE COPROCESSING OF FOSSIL FUELS WITH BIOMASS BY THE HYDROCARB PROCESS  

Science.gov (United States)

The report describes and gives results of an assessment of a new process concept for the production of carbon and methanol from fossil fuels. The Hydrocarb Process consists of the hydrogasification of carbonaceous material to produce methane, which is subsequently thermally decom...

185

Workshop on an Assessment of Gas-Side Fouling in Fossil Fuel Exhaust Environments  

Science.gov (United States)

The state of the art of gas side fouling in fossil fuel exhaust environments was assessed. Heat recovery applications were emphasized. The deleterious effects of gas side fouling including increased energy consumption, increased material losses, and loss of production were identified.

Marner, W. J. (editor); Webb, R. L. (editor)

1982-01-01

186

QUANTIFYING HAZARDOUS SPECIES IN PARTICULATE MATTER DERIVED FROM FOSSIL-FUEL COMBUSTION  

Science.gov (United States)

An analysis protocol that combines X-ray absorption near-edge structure spectroscopy with selective leaching has been developed to examine hazardous species in size- segregated particulate matter (PM) samples derived from the combustion of fossil fuels. The protocol has been used...

187

FEASIBILITY STUDY OF COPROCESSING OF FOSSIL FUELS WITH BIOMASS BY THE HYDROCARB PROCESS  

Science.gov (United States)

The report describes and gives results of an assessment of a new process concept for the production of carbon and methanol from fossil fuels. he Hydrocarb Process consists of the hydrogasification of carbonaceous material to produce methane, which is subsequently thermally decomp...

188

Energy 3: Fossil Fuel Use and its Consequences - The Carbon Cycle  

Science.gov (United States)

This video goes through the carbon cycle and describes how using fossil fuels threatens the foundation of the aquatic global food chain. This video is part of the Sustainability Learning Suites, made possible in part by a grant from the National Science Foundation. See 'Learn more about this resource' for Learning Objectives and Activities.

Vanasupa, Linda

189

Impacts of Wind and Solar on Fossil-Fueled Generators: Preprint  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

High penetrations of wind and solar power will impact the operations of the remaining generators on the power system. Regional integration studies have shown that wind and solar may cause fossil-fueled generators to cycle on and off and ramp down to part load more frequently and potentially more rapidly. Increased cycling, deeper load following, and rapid ramping may result in wear-and-tear impacts on fossil-fueled generators that lead to increased capital and maintenance costs, increased equivalent forced outage rates, and degraded performance over time. Heat rates and emissions from fossil-fueled generators may be higher during cycling and ramping than during steady-state operation. Many wind and solar integration studies have not taken these increased cost and emissions impacts into account because data have not been available. This analysis considers the cost and emissions impacts of cycling and ramping of fossil-fueled generation to refine assessments of wind and solar impacts on the power system.

Lew, D.; Brinkman, G.; Kumar, N.; Besuner, P.; Agan, D.; Lefton, S.

2012-08-01

190

Characterization and reactivity of organically bound sulfur and nitrogen fossil fuels  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Advances in X-ray instrumentation over the last decade have allowed the determination and quantification of organically bound sulfur and nitrogen forms in fossil fuels, which led to deeper understanding of their reactivities. This paper reviews recent technical advances in this area, highlights achievements of significant progress in chemical understanding and areas where further advances will likely occur.

Gorbaty, M.L.; Kelemen, S.R. [ExxonMobil Research and Engineering Company, Rt. 22 East, Clinton Twp., 08801 Annandale, NJ (United States)

2001-06-01

191

Liquid fossil-fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, April-June 1982  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report primarily covers in-house oil, gas, and synfuel research and lists the contracted research. The report is broken into the following areas: liquid fossil fuel cycle, extraction, processing, utilization, and project integration and technology transfer. BETC publications are listed. (DLC)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1982-10-01

192

A new evaluation of the uncertainty associated with CDIAC estimates of fossil fuel carbon dioxide emission  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Three uncertainty assessments associated with the global total of carbon dioxide emitted from fossil fuel use and cement production are presented. Each assessment has its own strengths and weaknesses and none give a full uncertainty assessment of the emission estimates. This approach grew out of the lack of independent measurements at the spatial and temporal scales of interest. Issues of dependent and independent data are considered as well as the temporal and spatial relationships of the data. The result is a multifaceted examination of the uncertainty associated with fossil fuel carbon dioxide emission estimates. The three assessments collectively give a range that spans from 1.0 to 13% (2 ?. Greatly simplifying the assessments give a global fossil fuel carbon dioxide uncertainty value of 8.4% (2 ?. In the largest context presented, the determination of fossil fuel emission uncertainty is important for a better understanding of the global carbon cycle and its implications for the physical, economic and political world.

Robert J. Andres

2014-07-01

193

Regional variations in spatial structure of nightlights, population density and fossil-fuel CO2 emissions  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

We evaluate the joint use of satellite-observed intensity of urban nightlights and census-based population density data as constraints on the spatial structure of CO2 emissions from fossil fuels. Findings are: (1) the probability that population density exceeds a given value follows a power-law distribution over two orders of magnitude of population density, encompassing the 40% of the global population at the highest densities. (2) The corresponding probability distribution for nightlights intensity also follows a power-law, departing near instrumental saturation. (3) Assuming that the true nightlights intensity distribution follows the power-law above instrumental saturation, we obtain a correction for saturation errors in the nightlights data. The amplification of nightlights intensity required to correct for saturation errors is estimated to be a factor of 1.15-1.23 globally and much greater in regions with high nightlights intensities. (4) Correcting for saturation, we observe clear empirical relationships between nightlights intensity and areal densities of energy consumption, fossil-fuel emissions and economic activity, holding throughout the development spectrum. (5) We indicate how these relationships underpin a fossil-fuel data assimilation system (FFDAS) for estimating fossil-fuel CO2 emissions.

194

Aluminum-26 in the early solar system - Fossil or fuel  

Science.gov (United States)

The isotopic composition of Mg was measured in different phases of a Ca-Al-rich inclusion in the Allende meteorite. Large excesses of Mg-26 of up to 10% were found. These excesses correlate strictly with the Al-27/Mg-24 ratio for four coexisting phases with distinctive chemical compositions. Models of in situ decay of Al-26 within the solar system and of mixing of interstellar dust grains containing fossil Al-26 with normal solar system material are presented. The observed correlation provides definitive evidence for the presence of Al-26 in the early solar system. This requires either injection of freshly synthesized nucleosynthetic material into the solar system immediately before condensation and planet formation, or local production within the solar system by intense activity of the early sun. Planets promptly produced from material with the inferred Al-26/Al-27 would melt within about 300,000 years.

Lee, T.; Papanastassiou, D. A.; Wasserburg, G. J.

1977-01-01

195

Aluminum-26 in the early solar system: Fossil or fuel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The isotopic composition of Mg was measured in different phases of a Ca-Al rich inclusion in the Allende meteorite. Large excesses of 26Mg of up to 10% were found. These excesses correlate strictly with the 27Al/24Mg for four coexisting phases with distinctive chemical compositions. Models of in situ decay of 26Al within the solar system and of mixing of interstellar dust grains containing fossil 26Al with normal solar system material are presented. The observed correlation provides definitive evidence for the presence of 26Al in the early solar system. This requires either injection of freshly synthesized nucleosynthetic material into the solar system immediately before condensation and planet formation, or local production within the solar system by intense activity of the early Sun. Planets promptly produced from material with the inferred 26Al/27Al would melt within approx.3 x 105 yr

196

The taxation of fossil fuels. An assessment of the Brazilian case; Fiscalite des combustibles fossiles une evaluation du cas Bresilien  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The concept of sustainable development established all around the world has brought a change in the conditions for reciprocal interaction between the various cultures, institutions and organisations. With regard to sustainable energy, proof of these changes can be seen through the presence of a rich diversity of ingenuous proposals and environmental policies. However, the target conditions allowing for the deployment of these policies are not yet defined, with the widespread supposition that growing environmental awareness will create these conditions to a certain extent remaining implicit. The aim of this article is to debate the current fiscal policy of Brazil concerning fossil fuels. Beginning with this framework we aim to demonstrate that the structure or institutional conditions which would allow for the deployment for example of solutions such as the creation of a tax on carbon emissions remain inexistent. (authors)

Hinostroza, M.L.; Sauer, I.L. [Sao Paulo Univ., PIPGE/IEE/, SP (Brazil); Mallet, S.; Guerra, G. [UNICAMP/ PSE/DE/FEM (Brazil)

2003-08-01

197

Alternative fuels mixture in cement industry kilns employing Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm  

OpenAIRE

Most of the works accomplished in the optimization area in the cement industry are addressed to solve problems just considering only one variable, forgetting that it includes too many variables and they act at the same time. Among the main variables it can be mentioned the quality of the final product, the environmental ones, the costs along the process and the reduction of the fossil fuels (primary) employed through the use of alternative fuels (secondary), among others. The present work int...

Carpio, Ricardo C.; Francisco de Sousa Júnior; Leandro dos Santos Coelho; Rogério José da Silva

2008-01-01

198

Cold shock on the wood fuel industry  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The development of the wood fuel industry represents one of the pillars of the European energy plan, and in particular of the French energy policy, as it fulfills both objectives of development of renewable energy sources and CO2 balance. The wood fuel industry supplies 6% of the French energy consumption and has permitted to save more than 9 million tons of petroleum equivalent. However, the conclusions of the European project CARBOSOL stress on the strong health impacts of wood-fueled combustion systems, in particular in the case of domestic individual systems and appliances. The combustion of biomass (fireplaces and agriculture) is responsible for 50 to 70% of the winter carbon pollution in Europe. The situation of collective or industrial wood-fueled facilities is different since pollution control solutions can be more easily implemented. (J.S.)

199

Construction of a 1 degree x 1 degree fossil fuel emission data set for carbonaceous aerosol and implementation and radiative impact in the ECHAM4 model  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Global-scale emissions of carbonaceous aerosol from fossil fuel usage were calculated with a resolution of 1 degree x 1 degree. Emission factors for black and organic carbon were gathered from the literature and applied to domestic, transport and industrial combustion of various fuel types. In addition, allowance was made for the level of development when calculating emissions from a country. Emissions were calculated for 185 countries for the domestic, industrial, and transport sectors using a fuel usage database published by the United Nations. Emissions based on total particulate matter (TPM) and submicron emission factors were calculated. There is at least a factor of 2 uncertainty in the derived emissions due to the lack of exactly appropriate emission data. The emission fields have been introduced into the ECHAM4 atmospheric general circulation model and run for 5 model years. Monthly mean model results were compared to measurements in regions influenced by anthropogenic fossil fuel emissions. The resultant aerosol fields were used to calculate the instantaneous solar radiative forcing at the top of the troposphere due to an external mixture of fossil fuel derived black carbon and organic carbon aerosol.

Cooke, W.F.; Liousse, C.; Cachier, H.; Feichter, J. [Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ (US)

1999-09-27

200

Energy Analysis of the Danish Food Production System: Food-EROI and Fossil Fuel Dependency  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Modern food production depends on limited natural resources for providing energy and fertilisers. We assess the fossil fuel dependency for the Danish food production system by means of Food Energy Returned on fossil Energy Invested (Food-EROI) and by the use of energy intensive nutrients from imported livestock feed and commercial fertilisers. The analysis shows that the system requires 221 PJ of fossil energy per year and that for each joule of fossil energy invested in farming, processing and transportation, 0.25 J of food energy is produced; 0.28 when crediting for produced bioenergy. Furthermore, nutrients in commercial fertiliser and imported feed account for 84%, 90% and 90% of total supply of N, P and K, respectively. We conclude that the system is unsustainable because it is embedded in a highly fossil fuel dependent system based on a non-circular flow of nutrients. As energy and thus nutrient constraints may develop in the coming decades, the current system may need to adapt by reducing use of fossilenergy at the farm and for transportation of food and feed. An operational strategy may be to relocalise the supply of energy, nutrients, feed and food.

Markussen, Mads Ville; Østergård, Hanne

2013-01-01

201

Technical considerations in repowering a nuclear plant for fossil fueled operation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Repowering involves replacement of the reactor by a fossil fuel source of steam. This source can be a conventional fossil fueled boiler or the heat recovery steam generator (HRSG) on a gas turbine exhaust. The existing steam turbine plant is used to the extent possible. Alternative fuels for repowering a nuclear plant are coal, natural gas and oil. In today's world oil is not usually an alternative. Selection of coal or natural gas is largely a matter of availability of the fuel near the location of the plant. Both the fossil boiler and the HRSG produce steam at higher pressures and temperatures than the throttle conditions for a saturated steam nuclear turbine. It is necessary to match the steam conditions from the new source to the existing turbine as closely as possible. Technical approaches to achieve a match range from using a topping turbine at the front end of the cycle to attemperation of the throttle steam with feedwater. The electrical output from the repowered plant is usually greater than that of the original nuclear fueled design. This requires consideration of the ability to use the excess electricity. Interfacing of the new facility with the existing turbine plant requires consideration of facility layout and design. Site factors must also be considered, especially for a coal fired boiler, since rail and coal handling facilities must be added to a site for which these were not considered. Additional site factors that require consideration are ash handling and disposal

202

Reconciling fossil fuel power generation development and climate issues: CCS and CCS-Ready  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper intends to analyse how CCS can contribute to reduce CO2 emissions from fossil-fuel power plants and to describe what is its current overall status. Its potential future development is assessed, in both developed and developing countries, and an economical assessment of different investment options highlight the importance of CCS retrofit. The paper analyses then the challenges of the development of fossil fuelled power plants and details case examples to illustrate some technical challenges related to CCS and what are the technical solutions available today to ease and address them: CCS-Ready power plants.

Paelinck, Philippe; Sonnois, Louis; Leandri, Jean-Francois

2010-09-15

203

Analytic framework for analyzing non-energy uses of fossil fuels as petrochemical feedstocks in the USA  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Carbon dioxide emissions from the non-energy use (NEU) of fossil fuels are a significant source of national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the USA. As one of the emission sources that make the largest contribution to the absolute overall level of national emissions, NEU is a 'key source' in the U.S. GHG Inventory, accounting for 4.6% of USA fossil fuel emissions in 2002. As suggested by IPCC/UNEP/OECD/IEA (Revised 1996 IPCC guidelines for national greenhouse gas inventories. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, United Nations Environment Programme, Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development. Paris, France: International Energy Agency; 1997), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has designed an approach for characterizing emissions and long-term storage of carbon in NEU, tailored to USA conditions and data availability, which yield results that are more accurate than application of the general assumptions supplied by the IPCC guidelines. In the USA, of the various non-energy uses of fossil fuels, petrochemical feedstocks is the largest, followed by asphalt, lubricants, and other categories. The overall storage factor for petrochemical feedstocks in the USA for 2002, calculated as the quotient of carbon stored divided by total carbon in feedstocks, is 67%. In other words, of the net consumption, 67% was destined for long-term storage in products - including products subsequently combusted for waste disposal - while the remaining 33% was emitted to the atmosphere directly as CO{sub 2} (e.g., through combustion of industrial byproducts) or indirectly as CO{sub 2} precursors (e.g., through evaporative product use). The basic framework used in this approach could be applied in other countries, and is similar in several respects to the Non-Energy use Emission Accounting Tables (NEAT) model framework developed independently and described by other authors in this issue.

Freed, Randall; Mintz, Caren; Lanza, Robert [ICF Consulting, 1725 Eye Street, NW, Ste. 1000, Washington, DC 20006 (United States); Hockstad, Leif [US Environmental Protection Agency, US-EPA Headquarters, Ariel Rios Building, Mail Code 6204N, 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

2005-11-01

204

Analytic framework for analyzing non-energy uses of fossil fuels as petrochemical feedstocks in the USA  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Carbon dioxide emissions from the non-energy use (NEU) of fossil fuels are a significant source of national greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the USA. As one of the emission sources that make the largest contribution to the absolute overall level of national emissions, NEU is a 'key source' in the U.S. GHG Inventory, accounting for 4.6% of USA fossil fuel emissions in 2002. As suggested by IPCC/UNEP/OECD/IEA (Revised 1996 IPCC guidelines for national greenhouse gas inventories. Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, United Nations Environment Programme, Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development. Paris, France: International Energy Agency; 1997), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has designed an approach for characterizing emissions and long-term storage of carbon in NEU, tailored to USA conditions and data availability, which yield results that are more accurate than application of the general assumptions supplied by the IPCC guidelines. In the USA, of the various non-energy uses of fossil fuels, petrochemical feedstocks is the largest, followed by asphalt, lubricants, and other categories. The overall storage factor for petrochemical feedstocks in the USA for 2002, calculated as the quotient of carbon stored divided by total carbon in feedstocks, is 67%. In other words, of the net consumption, 67% was destined for long-term storage in products - including products subsequently combusted for waste disposal - while the remaining 33% was emitted sal - while the remaining 33% was emitted to the atmosphere directly as CO2 (e.g., through combustion of industrial byproducts) or indirectly as CO2 precursors (e.g., through evaporative product use). The basic framework used in this approach could be applied in other countries, and is similar in several respects to the Non-Energy use Emission Accounting Tables (NEAT) model framework developed independently and described by other authors in this issue

205

N2O release from agro-biofuel production negates global warming reduction by replacing fossil fuels  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The relationship, on a global basis, between the amount of N fixed by chemical, biological or atmospheric processes entering the terrestrial biosphere, and the total emission of nitrous oxide (N2O, has been re-examined, using known global atmospheric removal rates and concentration growth of N2O as a proxy for overall emissions. The relationship, in both the pre-industrial period and in recent times, after taking into account the large-scale changes in synthetic N fertiliser production and deforestation, is consistent, showing an overall conversion factor of 3–5%. This factor is covered only in part by the ~1% of "direct" emissions from agricultural crop lands estimated by IPCC (2006, or the "indirect" emissions cited therein. This means that the extra N2O entering the atmosphere as a result of using N to produce crops for biofuels will also be correspondingly greater than that estimated just on the basis of IPCC (2006. When the extra N2O emission from biofuel production is calculated in "CO2-equivalent" global warming terms, and compared with the quasi-cooling effect of "saving" emissions of fossil fuel derived CO2, the outcome is that the production of commonly used biofuels, such as biodiesel from rapeseed and bioethanol from corn (maize, can contribute as much or more to global warming by N2O emissions than cooling by fossil fuel savings. Crops with less N demand, such as grasses and woody coppice species have more favourable climate impacts. This analysis only considers the conversion of biomass to biofuel. It does not take into account the use of fossil fuel on the farms and for fertilizer and pesticide production, but it also neglects the production of useful co-products. Both factors partially compensate each other. This needs to be analyzed in a full life cycle assessment.

A. R. Mosier

2007-08-01

206

Electrochemical principles for the mechanism of the spontaneous combustion of solid fossil fuels  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Theoretical and experimental investigations were carried out at the Mendelev Chemistry and Technology Institute on the mechanism in the transient states of the autooxidation, self-heating and spontaneous combustion of solid fossil fuels. The principal stages of oxidation-reduction conversion of the organic and mineral matter in solid fuels during spontaneous combustion were observed. Fuel oxidation reaction under deaerated conditions is viewed as a redox process with hydrogen depolarization. It is theorized that local zones of combustion and semicoke are formed in the low-temperature oxidation-reduction of the organic matter of caustobioliths; this organic matter is in contact with finely-dispersed, electrochemically active mineral matter. 9 references.

Aleksandrov, I.V.

1984-11-01

207

Fossil fuels in a changing climate: how to protect the world's climate by ending the use of coal, oil and gas  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The results of analysis conducted for Greenpeace reported in this document show that contrary to the message from the fossil fuel industries and some governments, that future energy security is dependent on a continuing increase in the use of oil, coal, gas and nuclear energy, it is not only possible to phase out the use of fossil fuels but this is also achievable in a relatively short timescale. The analysis was based on the computer modelling of energy technologies and policies, linked to the related impact on the world's climate. In the analysis, global carbon dioxide emissions from world fossil fuel use fall by more than 50% within 40 years, and 100% by the year 2100. The phase-out of fossil fuels is made possible by the rapid implementation of energy efficiency, together with extensive use of clean renewable energy sources such as solar, wind, biomass, small-scale hydro and geothermal power. Renewable energy currently delivering 14% of global energy supply, could provide more than 60% by 2030, and all the world's energy needs by 2100. Nuclear power could be phased out by 2100. Greenpeace believes that new policies are needed to see the world on the path of a cleaner energy future. Strong protocols are needed to the international climate convention to set targets on energy efficiency and reneable energy for signatory countries as well as providing funding to allow the south to participate effectively

208

Is photovoltaic hydrogen in Italy competitive with traditional fossil fuels?  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

We have performed an evaluation of the end-use price of photovoltaically produced hydrogen. Our evaluation is optimistic as current estimates of photovoltaic energy costs by other authors generally correspond to higher figures, and evaluations of process and transportation costs have usually taken into account only the main components. Hydrogen is considered to be tax-free. A more realistic evaluation should be based on a fractional tax reduction over the short term, followed by full taxation in later years. Under these conditions, photovoltaic hydrogen as a fuel has proved to be non-competitive except in the transport sector. (Author)

209

Vertical profiles of biospheric and fossil fuel-derived CO{sub 2} and fossil fuel CO{sub 2} :CO ratios from airborne measurements of DELTA14C, CO{sub 2} and CO above Colorado, USA  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Measurements of DELTA14C in atmospheric CO{sub 2} are an effective method of separating CO{sub 2} additions from fossil fuel and biospheric sources or sinks of CO{sub 2}. We illustrate this technique with vertical profiles of CO{sub 2} and DELTA14C analysed in whole air flask samples collected above Colorado, USA in May and July 2004. Comparison of lower tropospheric composition to cleaner air at higher altitudes (>5 km) revealed considerable additions from respiration in the morning in both urban and rural locations. Afternoon concentrations were mainly governed by fossil fuel emissions and boundary layer depth, also showing net biospheric CO{sub 2} uptake in some cases. We estimate local industrial CO{sub 2}:CO emission ratios using in situ measurements of CO concentration. Ratios are found to vary by 100% and average 57 mole CO{sub 2}:1 mole CO, higher than expected from emissions inventories. Uncertainty in CO{sub 2} from different sources was +-1.1 to +-4.1 ppm for addition or uptake of -4.6 to 55.8 ppm, limited by DELTA14C measurement precision and uncertainty in background DELTA14C and CO{sub 2} levels

Graven, Heather D.; Keeling, Ralph F. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)); Stephens, Britton B.; Campos, Teresa L. (National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)); Guilderson, Thomas P. (Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)); Schimel, David S. (National Ecological Observatory Network, Boulder, CO (United States); Campbell, J. Elliott (College of Engineering, Univ. of California-Merced, Merced, CA (United States))

2009-07-01

210

The fossil-fuels and the global warming  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The earth is heated by solar radiation. One is the most important questions is the effect of the human industry. A simple model used, this gives a good result of the phenomena than difficult expressions of numerical applications. The calculation assigns a small number of parameters to the atmosphere and the Earth's surface. It is most important parameter which is changing. If decrease the atmospheric CO2 concentration on 500 ppm, the surface temperature would rise less 1 oC. The CO2 concentraton is a sensitive criterion, but not so much then we found by other models.

Remenyi, Karoly

2010-09-15

211

The industrial nuclear fuel cycle in Argentina  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The nuclear power program of Argentina for the period 1976-85 is described, as a basis to indicate fuel requirements and the consequent implementation of a national fuel cycle industry. Fuel cycle activities in Argentina were initiated as soon as 1951-2 in the prospection and mining activities through the country. Following this step, yellow-cake production was initiated in plants of limited capacity. National production of uranium concentrate has met requirements up to the present time, and will continue to do so until the Sierra Pintada Industrial Complex starts operation in 1979. Presently, there is a gap in local production of uranium dioxide and fuel elements for the Atucha power station, which are produced abroad using Argentine uranium concentrate. With its background, the argentine program for the installation of nuclear fuel cycle industries is described, and the techno-economical implications considered. Individual projects are reviewed, as well as the present and planned infrastructure needed to support the industrial effort

212

Sources of variation in ?13C of fossil fuel emissions in Salt Lake City, USA  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The isotopic composition of fossil fuels is an important component of many studies of C sources and sinks based on atmospheric measurements of CO2. In C budget studies, the isotopic composition of crude petroleum and CH4 are often used as a proxy for the isotopic composition of CO2 emissions from combustion. In this study, the C isotope composition (?13C) of exhaust from the major fossil fuel emission sources in Salt Lake City, USA, was characterized with 159 measurements of vehicle exhaust of various types and eight measurements of residential furnace exhaust. These two sources were found to be isotopically distinct, and differed from global-scale estimates based on average values for crude petroleum and CH4. Vehicle-specific factors such as engine load and operation time had no effect on ?13C of vehicle exhaust. A small difference was found between the mean ?13C of vehicle exhaust collected randomly from different vehicles and the mean ?13C of gasoline collected from multiple fueling stations representing major gasoline distributors in Salt Lake City and the surrounding area. However, a paired comparison of ?13C of exhaust and gasoline for six different vehicles did not show any consistent C isotope fractionation during vehicle combustion. The mean ?13C of crude petroleum processed for local distribution differed slightly from refined gasoline collecteghtly from refined gasoline collected at multiple fueling stations, but time lags between processing and transportation cannot be ruled out as an uncontrollable contributing factor. Measured isotope ratios were then combined with fuel consumption statistics to predict the annual cycle of ?13C of fossil fuel emissions for the Salt Lake City metropolitan area. The results showed that the isotopic composition of CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion varied by almost 3 per mille over the course of the 2002 calendar year. This study illustrates that on a regional scale, the isotopic composition of fossil fuel emissions shows a high degree of both spatial and temporal variability that may influence characterization of C sources and sinks with atmospheric measurements

213

Diagnosis of Heat Exchanger Tube Failure in Fossil Fuel Boilers Through Estimation of Steady State Operating Conditions  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Estimation of operating conditions for fossil fuel boiler heat exchangers is often required due to changes in working conditions, design modifications and especially for monitoring performance and failure diagnosis. Regular heat exchangers in fossil fuel boilers are composed of tube banks through which water or steam flow, while hot combustion (flue) gases flow outside the tubes. This work presents a top-down approach to operating conditions estimation based on field measurements. An example for a 350 MW unit superheater is thoroughly discussed. Integral calculations based on measurements for all unit heat exchangers (reheaters, superheaters) were performed first. Based on these calculations a scheme of integral conservation equations (lumped parameter) was then formulated at the single tube level. Steady state temperatures of superheater tube walls were obtained as a main output, and were compared to the maximum allowable operating temperatures of the tubes material. A combined lumped parameter - CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics, FLUENT code) approach constitutes an efficient tool in certain cases. A brief report of such a case is given for another unit superheater. We conclude that steady state evaluations based on both integral and detailed simulations are a valuable monitoring and diagnosis tool for the power generation industry

214

Fossil fuel gasification: Technological developments - processes and materials  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Gasification technology has long played an important role in the process industries and the concept of the environmentally clean Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) power plant has been around for many years. Several coal gasification technologies have been demonstrated at commercial or near-to-commercial scale and there are planned international IGCC power plant projects. The technologies have a few critical areas, particularly, in the field of materials. Research is aiming at a 'simplified' IGCC concept which features two developments which could lead to lower cost plants with efficiencies of 42%: air gasification and hot gas clean-up. New hypotheses of 'hybrid' processes and projects involving heavy oil gasification are being developed. The gasification advanced research activities of ENEL's (Italian National Electricity Board) Research and Development Department are reported in this paper

215

Co-combustion of fossil fuels and waste  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Ph.D. thesis deals with the alternative and high efficiency methods of using waste-derived fuels in heat and power production. The focus is on the following subjects: 1) co-combustion of coal and solid recovered fuel (SRF) under pulverized fuel combustion conditions; 2) dust-firing of straw and the utilization of a waste-derived material as an additive; 3) the combustion of a biomass residue rich in phosphorus. Co-combustion of coal and SRF was conducted in an entrained flow reactor (EFR). The work revealed that when coal was co-fired with up to 25 wt% SRF, the burnout and the emissions of SO{sub 2} and NO were decreased with increasing share of SRF. The Cl content in the fly ash was very low (<0.07 wt%) when coal was co-fired up to 25 wt% SRF, indicating that the majority of the Cl in the SRF were released to gas phase during cocombustion. The formation of fouling deposits on a probe was reduced with increasing share of SRF and the resulting deposits had a very small Cl content (<0.01 wt%). On the other hand, when NaCl or PVC was added to the mixture of coal and SRF, the formation of alkali chlorides was significantly promoted. The partitioning of trace elements (As, Cd, Cr, Pb, Sb and Zn) during co-combustion of coal and SRF was investigated through the experiments in the EFR. They revealed that As, Cd, Pb, Sb and Zn were highly volatile during combustion, while the volatility of Cr was relatively low. The volatility of Cd, Pb and Zn increased significantly with the injection of Cl based additives such as PVC and NaCl, while the addition of ammonium sulphate generally decreased the volatility of trace elements. The addition of kaolinite reduced the volatility of Pb, while the effect on other trace elements was insignificant. Full-scale tests on co-combustion of coal and SRF were carried out in a pulverized coal-fired power plant, and the formation of fine particles was evaluated by applying a low-pressure cascade impactor. Compared to dedicated coal combustion, co-combustion of coal and SRF (up to 10% thermal share) generally promoted the formation of ultrafine particles with a concentration peak around 0.1 {mu}m, while the total concentration of PM{sub 2.5} decreased. Composition analyses showed that the Ca, S and P were significantly enriched in the ultrafine particles, indicating a high volatility of these elements in pulverized coal combustion. Compared to dedicated coal combustion, the content of the Ca, P and K was larger in the fine particles generated from co-combustion, whereas the S content was slightly smaller. During the full-scale tests, the dust emission appeared to be significantly increased during co-combustion of coal and SRF, which was presumably related to a reduction of the collection efficiency of the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Dust-firing of straw was performed in an entrained flow reactor, and the feasibility of utilizing spent bleaching earth (SBE) as an additive was investigated through a comparison with kaolinite. It was found that about 70% of the K in the fly ash from straw-dust firing was water soluble, and the KCl contributed more than 40% of the water soluble K. With the addition of 10-20 wt% of SBE, the Cl retention in ash was decreased, the SO{sub 2} emission was increased, and the formation of water soluble alkali species was reduced. Compared to kaolinite, the inhibiting effect of SBE on the formation of alkali chlorides was slightly smaller when the molar ratio of K/(Al+Si) was similar in the fuel mixture. The addition of SBE significantly reduced the Cl content of the deposits collected on a probe. The release and transformation of inorganic elements during the combustion of a residual bran was studied through experiments and equilibrium modeling. The work revealed that the major inorganic elements released during bran combustion were K, P and S. The S was almost fully vaporized during pyrolysis at temperatures below 700 deg. C, whereas about 60-70 % of the K and P in the bran were released during combustion in a temperature range of 900-1100 deg. C. Additives such

Wu, Hao

2011-05-15

216

More diesel generation could further fossil fuel economy  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Following the introduction last year of their Seahorse medium-speed diesel engine, the manufacturers, Hawthorn Leslie (Engineers) Ltd., of Newcastle upon Tyne, have made an extensive analysis of the resource effectiveness of diesel-driven generating sets. Though directed towards the raising of funds to construct a demonstration power plant in the UK, the analysis is relevant elsewhere. In addition, the firm has now developed an energy recovery package for use with the basic engine to further improve the overall thermal efficiency of the system. Looked at in a British context, the basis of Hawthorn Leslie's case is this. The importance of coal in electicity generation is evidence of its value as a national resource. Now that North Sea oil has emerged as a national energy resource, it must be used to the greatest effect; this means building diesel power stations to take over the mid-load cycle of utility operations. The analysis compares five prime movers: gas turbines, diesel engines, and steam turbines powered by oil- or coal-fired boilers, or thermal reactors. Capital and fixed running costs are shown. The diesel engine is the most efficient prime mover for electricity generation. With this novel energy recovery principle, greater utilization of fuel energy can be realized if direct heating is not required. (MCW)

Jeffs, E.

1976-05-01

217

Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2  

Science.gov (United States)

_Science_ has published an article, Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2, discussing a recent experiment conducted by scientists at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and Stanford University. The goal of this radical and ambitious experiment was to directly dispose carbon dioxide (produced due to burning fossil fuels) in the cold and high-pressure environment of the deep sea to prevent it from adding to the greenhouse effect. However, due to unexpected results, this idea seems to be more difficult to implement than imagined. In addition, the effects of deploying liquid carbon dioxide on deep-sea organisms still need to be investigated. The site is for the above-mentioned article that appears in the May 7, 1999 issue of Science; and will be accessible online for a limited time period.

Brewer, Peter G.; Friederich, Gernot.; Orr, F. M. (Franklin Mattes).; Peltzer, Edward T.

1999-01-01

218

Formulating energy policies related to fossil fuel use: Critical uncertainties in the global carbon cycle  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The global carbon cycle is the dynamic interaction among the earth's carbon sources and sinks. Four reservoirs can be identified, including the atmosphere, terrestrial biosphere, oceans, and sediments. Atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration is determined by characteristics of carbon fluxes among major reservoirs of the global carbon cycle. The objective of this paper is to document the knowns, and unknowns and uncertainties associated with key questions that if answered will increase the understanding of the portion of past, present, and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} attributable to fossil fuel burning. Documented atmospheric increases in CO{sub 2} levels are thought to result primarily from fossil fuel use and, perhaps, deforestation. However, the observed atmospheric CO{sub 2} increase is less than expected from current understanding of the global carbon cycle because of poorly understood interactions among the major carbon reservoirs. 87 refs.

Post, W.M.; Dale, V.H.; DeAngelis, D.L.; Mann, L.K.; Mulholland, P.J.; O' Neill, R.V.; Peng, T.-H.; Farrell, M.P.

1990-01-01

219

Applications of biotechnology in the fossil fuel sector  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A review is presented of the effects of micoorganisms on petroleum industry operations and on the potentially significant applications of biotechnology in that sector. Detrimental aspects of microbial activity include the biodegradation of petroleum products and petrochemical products, microbially influenced corrosion, and microbial souring of oil reservoirs by sulfate reducing bacteria. Beneficial aspects include microbially enhanced oil recovery, the mapping of the presence of ethane oxidizing bacteria as an exploration tool, the use of bacterial systems for plugging during hydraulic fracturing, microbially stimulated oil production, microbial dewaxing, use of biopolymers such as xanthan in drilling muds, microbial surfactants and emulsifiers for use in pipelining of viscous oils, microbial upgrading of oil, manufacture of biodegradable products, and bioremediation of contaminated sites. Microbially enhanced oil recovery technologies, well and tank cleaning operations based on microbial formulations, and microbial-based well stimulation and cleaning operations have already reached field trial success, with commercial success in several cases. The hottest area of application in the 1990s will undoubtedly be in the area of biological remediation of hydrocarbon contaminated sites and emissions. 39 refs

220

Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Vision 21 Fossil Fuel Plants  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The objective of this project was to develop an environmentally benign, inexpensive, and efficient method for separating hydrogen from gas mixtures produced during industrial processes, such as coal gasification. A family of hydrogen separation membranes was developed including single phase mixed conducting ceramics, ceramic/ceramic composites, cermet membranes, cermet membranes containing a hydrogen permeable metal, and intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. Each membrane type had different operating parameters, advantages, and disadvantages that were documented over the course of the project. Research on these membranes progressed from ceramics to cermets to intermediate temperature composite layered membranes. During this progression performance was increased from 0.01 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2} up to 423 mL x min{sup -1} x cm{sup -2}. Eltron and team membranes not only developed each membrane type, but also membrane surface catalysis and impurity tolerance, creation of thin film membranes, alternative applications such as membrane promoted alkane dehydrogenation, demonstration of scale-up testing, and complete engineering documentation including process and mechanical considerations necessary for inclusion of Eltron membranes in a full scale integrated gasification combined cycle power plant. The results of this project directly led to a new $15 million program funded by the Department of Energy. This new project will focus exclusively on scale-up of this technology as part of the FutureGen initiative.

Carl R. Evenson; Shane E. Roark

2006-03-31

221

Estimates of carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels combustion in the main sectors of selected countries 1971-1990  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Calculations of sectoral CO2 emissions from fossil fuel burning in the period 1971-1990 were done for the 15 countries at the top of the list of nations ordered by decreasing contribution to global emissions, namely: United States of America, Soviet Union, People's Republic of China, Japan, Federal Republic of Germany, United Kingdom, India, Poland, Canada, France, Italy, German Democratic Republic, South Africa, Mexico and Czechoslovakia. In addition, the CO2 emission of two groups of industrialized countries, namely the OECD and the European Economic Community (EEC) were calculated. The main recommendations of the IPCC/OECD current methodology have been adopted for the calculations, with the principal exception that CO2 emissions from the use of bunker fuels have not been included in the national estimates. The sectors are: 1. Transformations. Total emissions and the part stemming from power plants 2. Industry (excluding Feedstocks) 3. Transportation 4. Agriculture 5. Residential 6. Commerce and Public Services 7. Non-specified Other 8. Non-Energy Use 9. Feedstocks (in Industry). Data are presented in tables and diagrams. (orig./KW)

222

Bio-fuels: the rush to industrialization  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The ambitious goals of the French government fire with enthusiasm the bio-fuel sector which is in the fair way to become an industry at a whole. However, in order to build in time the requested ethanol and bio-diesel units the government will have to speed up the approval procedures and to maintain the financial incentive policy. (J.S.)

223

SOME POSSIBILITIES OF USING BIOGAS AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO FOSSIL FUELS  

OpenAIRE

In present time, the global energy production is mostly dependant on the fossil sources of energy (oil, natural gases and coals). Compared to classic fuels, biogas resulted from anaerobe digestion is permanently renewable, because it is obtained  of biomass. As a result, the biogas produced through anaerobe digestion will not only improve the energetic balance of one country, but it will bring an important contribution on preserving natural resources and improving the environmental co...

Mariana Dumitru; Mirela Stanciu; Marius Bibu

2013-01-01

224

Potential high temperature corrosion problems due to co-firing of biomass and fossil fuels  

OpenAIRE

Over the past few years, considerable high temperature corrosion problems have been encountered when firing biomass in power plants due to the high content of potassium chloride in the deposits. Therefore, to combat chloride corrosion problems cofiring of biomass with a fossil fuel has been undertaken. This results in potassium chloride being converted to potassium sulphate in the combustion chamber and it is sulphate rich deposits that are deposited on the vulnerable metallic surfaces suc...

Montgomery, Melanie; Vilhelmsen, T.; Jensen, S. A.

2008-01-01

225

Optimization of low sulfur carob pulp liquor as carbon source for fossil fuels biodesulfurization  

OpenAIRE

Background:Biodesulfurization (BDS) is a complementary technology to hydrodesulfurization since it allows the removal of recalcitrant sulfur compounds present in fossil fuels. The cost of culture medium to produce the biocatalysts is still one limitation for BDS application. Carob pulp, as an alternative carbon source, can reduce this cost. However, the presence of sulfates is critical, since BDS is inhibited at very low concentrations. Thus, the goal of this work was to optimize the process ...

Silva, Tiago P.; Paixa?o, Susana M.; Teixeira, A. V.; Roseiro, J. Carlos; Alves, Lui?s Manuel

2013-01-01

226

Interaction of carbon reduction and green energy promotion in a small fossil-fuel importing economy  

OpenAIRE

We study the incidence of carbon-reduction and green-energy promotion policies in a general equilibrium small open economy that depends on imports of fossil fuels. The focus is on mixed policies that are either price based (emissions taxes and producer price subsidies for green energy) or quantity based (schemes of trading emissions and green certificates). Policy instruments directed head-on toward promoting green energy are shown to also reduce carbon emissions and vice versa but the direct...

Pethig, Ru?diger; Wittlich, Christian

2009-01-01

227

A multiyear, global gridded fossil fuel CO2 emission data product: Evaluation and analysis of results  

Science.gov (United States)

global quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions is emerging as a critical need in carbon cycle science and climate policy. We build upon a previously developed fossil fuel data assimilation system (FFDAS) for estimating global high-resolution fossil fuel CO2 emissions. We have improved the underlying observationally based data sources, expanded the approach through treatment of separate emitting sectors including a new pointwise database of global power plants, and extended the results to cover a 1997 to 2010 time series at a spatial resolution of 0.1°. Long-term trend analysis of the resulting global emissions shows subnational spatial structure in large active economies such as the United States, China, and India. These three countries, in particular, show different long-term trends and exploration of the trends in nighttime lights, and population reveal a decoupling of population and emissions at the subnational level. Analysis of shorter-term variations reveals the impact of the 2008-2009 global financial crisis with widespread negative emission anomalies across the U.S. and Europe. We have used a center of mass (CM) calculation as a compact metric to express the time evolution of spatial patterns in fossil fuel CO2 emissions. The global emission CM has moved toward the east and somewhat south between 1997 and 2010, driven by the increase in emissions in China and South Asia over this time period. Analysis at the level of individual countries reveals per capita CO2 emission migration in both Russia and India. The per capita emission CM holds potential as a way to succinctly analyze subnational shifts in carbon intensity over time. Uncertainties are generally lower than the previous version of FFDAS due mainly to an improved nightlight data set.

Asefi-Najafabady, S.; Rayner, P. J.; Gurney, K. R.; McRobert, A.; Song, Y.; Coltin, K.; Huang, J.; Elvidge, C.; Baugh, K.

2014-09-01

228

Public money for fossil fuels in the EU and in three EU member states  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This research report aims to provide an overview of all forms of public money spent on the production and primary processing of fossil fuels (oil, gas and coal) in France, the Netherlands, United Kingdom and the European Union since early 2004. Public money includes R and D subsidies, investment and other subsidies; export credits and guarantees; tax rebates and reductions; bilateral development aid and other forms of financial incentives.

Van Gelder, J.W.; Herder, A.; Kroes, H. [Profundo, Castricum (Netherlands)

2009-04-15

229

Public money for fossil fuels in the EU and in three EU member states  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This research report aims to provide an overview of all forms of public money spent on the production and primary processing of fossil fuels (oil, gas and coal) in France, the Netherlands, United Kingdom and the European Union since early 2004. Public money includes R and D subsidies, investment and other subsidies; export credits and guarantees; tax rebates and reductions; bilateral development aid and other forms of financial incentives.

230

The effects of hygroscopicity of fossil fuel combustion aerosols on mixed-phase clouds  

OpenAIRE

Fossil fuel black carbon and organic matter (ffBC/OM) are often emitted together with sulfate, which coats the surface of these particles and changes their hygroscopicity. Observational studies show that the hygroscopicity of soot particles can modulate their ice nucleation ability. To address this, we implemented a scheme that uses 3 levels of soot hygroscopicity (hydrophobic, hydrophilic and hygroscopic) and used laboratory data to specify their ice nuclei abilities. The new scheme r...

Yun, Y.; Penner, J. E.; Popovicheva, O.

2012-01-01

231

Think Globally, Act Locally? Stock vs Flow Regulation of a Fossil Fuel  

OpenAIRE

Regulation of environmental externalities like global warming from the burning of fossil fuels (e.g., coal and oil) is often done by capping both emission flows and stocks. For example, the European Union and states in the Northeastern United States have introduced caps on flows of carbon emissions while the stated goal of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) which provides the science behind the current global climate negotiations is to stabilize the atmospheric stock of carb...

Amigues, Jean-Pierre; Chakravorty, Ujjayant; Moreaux, Michel

2009-01-01

232

Pareto optimality in the extraction of fossil fuels and the greenhouse effect: a note  

OpenAIRE

This note generalizes the Solow-Stiglitz efficiency condition for natural resources to the problem of fossil fuel extraction with a greenhouse effect. The generalized optimality condition suggests that the greenhouse effect implies overextraction in the sense of leaving future generations a wrongly composed wealth portfolio with too few natural resources relative to man-made capital. This judgment is independent of society?s ethical preferences concerning the well-being of future generations.

Sinn, Hans-werner

2007-01-01

233

The Future of Fossil Fuels: A Century of Abundance or a Century of Decline?  

Science.gov (United States)

Horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing, and other advanced technologies have spawned a host of new euphoric forecasts of hydrocarbon abundance. Yet although the world's remaining oil and gas resources are enormous, most of them are destined to stay in the ground due to real-world constraints on price, flow rates, investor appetite, supply chain security, resource quality, and global economic conditions. While laboring under the mistaken belief that it sits atop a 100-year supply of natural gas, the U.S. is contemplating exporting nearly all of its shale gas production even as that production is already flattening due to poor economics. Instead of bringing "energy independence" to the U.S. and making it the top oil exporter, unrestricted drilling for tight oil and in the federal outer continental shelf would cut the lifespan of U.S. oil production in half and make it the world's most desperate oil importer by mid-century. And current forecasts for Canadian tar sands production are as unrealistic as their failed predecessors. Over the past century, world energy production has moved progressively from high quality resources with high production rates and low costs to lower quality resources with lower production rates and higher costs, and that progression is accelerating. Soon we will discover the limits of practical extraction, as production costs exceed consumer price tolerance. Oil and gas from tight formations, shale, bitumen, kerogen, coalbeds, deepwater, and the Arctic are not the stuff of new abundance, but the oil junkie's last dirty fix. This session will highlight the gap between the story the industry tells about our energy future, and the story the data tells about resource size, production rates, costs, and consumer price tolerance. It will show why it's time to put aside unrealistic visions of continued dependence on fossil fuels, face up to a century of decline, and commit ourselves to energy and transportation transition.

Nelder, C.

2012-12-01

234

The influence of constrained fossil fuel emissions scenarios on climate and water resource projections  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Water resources planning requires long-term projections of the impact of climate change on freshwater resources. In addition to intrinsic uncertainty associated with the natural climate, projections of climate change are subject to the combined uncertainties associated with selection of emissions scenarios, GCM ensembles and downscaling techniques. In particular, unknown future greenhouse gas emissions contribute substantially to the overall uncertainty. We contend that a reduction in uncertainty is possible by refining emissions scenarios. We present a comprehensive review of the growing body of literature that challenges the assumptions underlying the high-growth emissions scenarios (widely used in climate change impact studies, and instead points to a peak and decline in fossil fuel production occurring in the 21st century. We find that the IPCC's new RCP 4.5 scenario (low-medium emissions, as well as the B1 and A1T (low emissions marker scenarios from the IPCC's Special Report on Emissions Scenarios are broadly consistent with the majority of recent fossil fuel production forecasts, whereas the medium to high emissions scenarios generally depend upon unrealistic assumptions of future fossil fuel production. We use a simple case study of projected climate change in 2070 for the Scott Creek catchment in South Australia to demonstrate that even with the current suite of climate models, by limiting projections to the B1 scenario, both the median change and the spread of model results are reduced relative to equivalent projections under an unrealistic high emissions scenario (A1FI.

J. D. Ward

2011-03-01

235

The influence of constrained fossil fuel emissions scenarios on climate and water resource projections  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Water resources planning requires long-term projections of the impact of climate change on freshwater resources. In addition to intrinsic uncertainty associated with the natural climate, projections of climate change are subject to the combined uncertainties associated with selection of emissions scenarios, GCM ensembles and downscaling techniques. In particular, unknown future greenhouse gas emissions contribute substantially to the overall uncertainty. We contend that a reduction in uncertainty is possible by refining emissions scenarios. We present a comprehensive review of the growing body of literature that challenges the assumptions underlying the high-growth emissions scenarios (widely used in climate change impact studies, and instead points to a peak and decline in fossil fuel production occurring in the 21st century. We find that the IPCC's new RCP 4.5 scenario (low-medium emissions, as well as the B1 and A1T (low emissions marker scenarios from the IPCC's Special Report on Emissions Scenarios are broadly consistent with the majority of recent fossil fuel production forecasts, whereas the medium to high emissions scenarios generally depend upon unrealistic assumptions of future fossil fuel production. We use a simple case study of projected climate change in 2070 for the Scott Creek catchment in South Australia to demonstrate that even with the current suite of climate models, by limiting projections to the B1 scenario, both the median change and the spread of model results are reduced relative to equivalent projections under an unrealistic high emissions scenario (A1FI.

J. D. Ward

2011-06-01

236

Low energy buildings – the basis for realizing the strategy for independency of fossil fuels in 2050  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The paper introduces how low energy buildings can be developed, designed, optimized, constructed and operated in the future and thereby make a significant contribution to the realization of aim of the energy policy of EU: to become independent of fossil fuels in 2050. The paper describes how low energy buildings can become independent of fossil fuels in 2020 based on the following activities. Innovation of building components and systems with improved energy performance. Heating of low energy building with low temperature district heating based on renewable heat. Integrated design and optimization of low energy buildings. Continuous commissioning of low energy buildings with respect to energy use, indoor environment and durability. The very big and quick change of the energy performance of buildings is a challenge for the building sector but it can be solved by improving the methods of product developments as well as the methods of designing, constructing and operating buildings by including simulation based analysis and optimisation of solutions with respect to energy use and indoor environment as well as durability. The paper concludes that the development of low energy buildings without use of fossil fuels can be accomplished by the building sector by 2020. The building sector may in the process be transformed from an experience based sector to knowledge and research based sector with high quality sustainable products and very good business.

Svendsen, Svend Technical University of Denmark,

2011-01-01

237

A fast method for updating global fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

We provide a fast and efficient method for calculating global annual mean carbon dioxide emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels by combining data from an established data set with BP annual statistics. Using this method it is possible to retrieve an updated estimate of global CO2 emissions six months after the actual emissions occurred. Using this data set we find that atmospheric carbon dioxide emissions have increased by over 40% from 1990 to 2008 with an annual average increase of 3.7% over the five-year period 2003-2007. In 2008 the growth rate in the fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions was smaller than in the preceding five years, but it was still over 2%. Global mean carbon dioxide emissions in 2008 were 8.8 GtC yr-1. For the latter part of the last century emissions of carbon dioxide have been greater from oil than from coal. However during the last few years this situation has changed. The recent strong increase in fossil fuel CO2 emissions is mainly driven by an increase in emissions from coal, whereas emissions from oil and gas to a large degree follow the trend from the 1990s.

238

Climate change adaptation, damages and fossil fuel dependence. An RETD position paper on the costs of inaction  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Renewable Energy Technology Deployment (RETD) agreement initiated this project to advance the understanding of the ''Costs of Inaction'', i.e. the costs of climate change adaptation, damages and fossil fuel dependence. A quantitative estimate was developed as well as a better understanding of the knowledge gaps and research needs. The project also included some conceptual work on how to better integrate the analyses of mitigation, adaptation, damages and fossil fuel dependence in energy scenario modelling.

Katofsky, Ryan; Stanberry, Matt; Hagenstad, Marca; Frantzis, Lisa

2011-07-15

239

A novel approach for independent budgeting of fossil fuel CO2 over Europe by 14CO2 observations  

OpenAIRE

Long-term atmospheric 14CO2 observations are deployed to quantify fossil fuel derived CO2 concentrations at a regional polluted site, and at a continental mountain station in south-west Germany. Fossil fuel CO2 emission rates for the relevant catchment areas are obtained by applying the Radon-Tracer-Method. They are shown to compare well with statistical emissions inventories but reveal a larger seasonality than assumed earlier, thus contributing significantly to the observed CO2 seasonal cyc...

Levin, Ingeborg; Kromer, Bernd; Schmidt, Martina; Sartorius, Hartmut

2003-01-01

240

Comparison of electricity production from fossil fuels. Consistent and realistic simulation models for modern power plant processes with coal and gas; Fossile Stromproduktion im Vergleich. Einheitliche und realitaetsnahe Simulationsmodelle fuer moderne Kraftwerksprozesse mit Kohle und Gas  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

If industrial production requires electricity on a windless winter morning, solar energy systems and wind turbines reach their limits. Then, power plants which can convert fossil fuels into electricity no matter what the time, provide the electricity quantities required. Power plant technologies are under development for coal and gas, which can generate electricity more efficient and with lower emissions than previously. A realistic comparison of the efficiencies of modern power plant processes helps in decisions on the role of coal and gas in the future energy mix. (orig.)

Horenburg, Peter

2011-07-01

241

Radiocarbon in urban atmosphere: assessing fossil fuel CO2 fluxes using combined measurements of CO2, CO, and 14CO2/12CO2 mixing ratios  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: Emissions of carbon dioxide related to burning of fossil fuels (coal, oil and natural gas) constitute an important component of the carbon budget, both on global and regional scales. For heavily industrialized and populated areas such as western and central Europe, a large proportion of the total CO2 flux entering the atmosphere is attributed to this source. Global and regional models of carbon cycle rely so far exclusively on emission statistics to quantify the magnitude and variability of the fossil CO2 flux into the atmosphere. The combined measurements of CO and CO2 mixing ratios on a given area, when calibrated using independent measurements of 14CO2/12CO2 ratios in atmospheric CO2 may provide an independent way of assessing local and regional fossil CO2 fluxes and their temporal variability. Krakow (50o04'N, 19o55'E, 220 m a.s.l.) is a large urban agglomeration located in the southern Poland, with about 1 million inhabitants, rapidly growing car traffic and significant industrial activities. Consumption of coal, gas and oil for communal and transport purposes generates major fluxes of anthropogenic carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide within the region. In addition, due to prevailing westerly air circulation, the Krakow region is under substantial influence of a large coal mining and industrial centre (Upper Silesia) located approximal centre (Upper Silesia) located approximately 60 km west of the city. The 14CO2/12CO2 ratios measured in Krakow since 1983 testify major changes in economy of the region which have occurred since 1989. The 14C signature of atmospheric CO2 reflects significant changes in anthropogenic CO2 fluxes released into the atmosphere both on local and regional scales. The contribution of fossil-fuel derived CO2 in the total CO2 load of the lower atmosphere in Krakow decreased from approximately 21 ppm in 1989 to around 10-12 ppm in the last few years. This change is linked with major reduction in coal consumption in Poland, from ca. 160 Mt in 1985 to 84 Mt in 2004. The measurements of CO concentrations in urban atmosphere can serve as a substitute for costly determinations of 14CO2/12CO2 mixing ratios, provided that the ratio CO/CO2 (fossil) is determined for the given area and its variability is adequately characterized. The average value of CO/CO2(fossil) ratio derived for the period April 2003 - April 2006 for Krakow region is equal 27.6 ± 4.2 ppb CO per ppm of fossil CO2. No distinct seasonal changes of this ratio were detected so far. Occasionally, very high (above 70 ppb/ppm) and very low (below 10 ppb/ppm) values of the CO/CO2 (fossil) ratio have been observed. The emission-based CO/CO2 ratios reported for the period 1998-2005 for major industrial sources in the Krakow region are in the range between 7.3 and 10.8 ppb CO per ppm of fossil CO2. However, they do not comprise emissions related to car traffic which is an important source of fossil fuel CO2. Also other trace substances of anthropogenic origin (PAHs, CHCl3, CH3CCl3, CCl4, SF6, F11, F12, F113) have been tested as potential proxies of fossil fuel CO2 emissions in the urban environment. The results of these trials are presented and discussed. (author)

242

Fuel Cells in the Coal Energy Industry  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In march 1998 at the conference ?Coal Utilization & Fuel Systems? in Clearwater, USA representatives of U.S. Department of Energy presented the vision 21 focused on the electricity generation from coal for 21st century. The goal is a powerplant with the ability to produce the electricity from coal with the efficiency approaching 60% (higher heating value and emission levels of one-tenth of today´s technologies, The CO2 capture and permanent sequestration at the cost of $15/ton of CO2, and a cost of electricity of 3 cents per kilowatt-hour. The goal is believed to be achievable by the first quarter of the next century. The vision 21 is presented with several possible concepts. One of them is based on coal gasification with following hydrogen separation. The obtained hydrogen is used as a fuel for the cogeneration unit with fuel cells. The remaining gas can be liquefied and utilised as a fuel in the automotive industry or further chemically processed. The concept has several important features. Firstly, a very clean low cost electricity production. Secondly, it is comprised of fuel processing section and power processing section. The two sections need not to be co-located. In the world of the deregulated electricity generation this offers a major advantage. The technologies of fuel processing section ? coal gasification and hydrogen separation have been successfully developed in the last two decades. A specificity of the fuel processing section of this concept is to obtain hydrogen rich gas with very low concentrations of substances, as CO, which cause a poisoning of electrodes of fuel cells leading to the decreasing fuel cells efficiency. Fuel cells, specially highly efficient coal-gas SOFC and MCFC, are expected to be commercially available by 2020. The natural-gas MCFC and SOFC plants should enter the commercial marketplace by the year 2002.

Kolat Peter

1998-09-01

243

Fossil fuel consumption and heavy metal emissions into the atmosphere in Russia  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In recent decades more and more attention has been paid to the problem of ecosystem pollution by heavy metals. Many trace elements are registered now as a global pollutant due to their toxic nature. Their negative influence on the environment is caused by accumulation in different ecosystem components and increased involvement in biochemical cycles. The atmosphere is the main medium through which pollutants transported from emission sources to background territories where heavy metals are deposited into water and on plants. Heavy metal emissions into the atmosphere cause certain global environmental problems due to their long lifetime and the long-term transport of these elements in the atmosphere, as well as the increasing rate of their accumulation in the environment even at most remote territories. Moreover, heavy metals have evidently entered human food chains. The influence of global ecosystem pollution by heavy metals on human health is not well known as yet. Most trace elements comes into the atmosphere with natural and man-made aerosols. The main sources of natural aerosols in the atmosphere are soil erosion and weathering of mountain rocks, volcanic and space dust, forest firing smoke, and others. Major anthropogenic sources of toxic elements are fossil fuel combustion, mining, industrial processes, and waste incineration. The anthropogenic flow of heavy metals to the atmosphere is about 94-97 per cent of the total. An inventory of emission sources should be n inventory of emission sources should be the first step in developing a control strategy and modelling global and regional cycles of trace elements. In this article the situation with lead, cadmium and mercury emissions from coal combustion of power plants and gasoline combustion by road transport is discussed. Pollutant amounts released into the atmosphere in industrial regions induce not only local deterioration of air, but they also affect on remote areas, and areas sensitive to contamination, such as the Arctic region. Problems on the uncertainty of emission inventory and, as a consequence, long range transport and deposition of air pollution into ecosystems of remote lands are also discussed

244

Reforming options for hydrogen production from fossil fuels for PEM fuel cells  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

PEM fuel cell systems are considered as a sustainable option for the future transport sector in the future. There is great interest in converting current hydrocarbon based transportation fuels into hydrogen rich gases acceptable by PEM fuel cells on-board of vehicles. In this paper, we compare the results of our simulation studies for 100kW PEM fuel cell systems utilizing three different major reforming technologies, namely steam reforming (SREF), partial oxidation (POX) and autothermal reforming (ATR). Natural gas, gasoline and diesel are the selected hydrocarbon fuels. It is desired to investigate the effect of the selected fuel reforming options on the overall fuel cell system efficiency, which depends on the fuel processing, PEM fuel cell and auxiliary system efficiencies. The Aspen-HYSYS 3.1 code has been used for simulation purposes. Process parameters of fuel preparation steps have been determined considering the limitations set by the catalysts and hydrocarbons involved. Results indicate that fuel properties, fuel processing system and its operation parameters, and PEM fuel cell characteristics all affect the overall system efficiencies. Steam reforming appears as the most efficient fuel preparation option for all investigated fuels. Natural gas with steam reforming shows the highest fuel cell system efficiency. Good heat integration within the fuel cell system is absolutely necessary to achieve acceptable overall system efficiencies. (author)

Ersoz, Atilla; Olgun, Hayati [TUBITAK Marmara Research Center, Institute of Energy, Gebze, 41470 Kocaeli (Turkey); Ozdogan, Sibel [Marmara University Faculty of Engineering, Goztepe, 81040 Istanbul (Turkey)

2006-03-09

245

Reforming options for hydrogen production from fossil fuels for PEM fuel cells  

Science.gov (United States)

PEM fuel cell systems are considered as a sustainable option for the future transport sector in the future. There is great interest in converting current hydrocarbon based transportation fuels into hydrogen rich gases acceptable by PEM fuel cells on-board of vehicles. In this paper, we compare the results of our simulation studies for 100 kW PEM fuel cell systems utilizing three different major reforming technologies, namely steam reforming (SREF), partial oxidation (POX) and autothermal reforming (ATR). Natural gas, gasoline and diesel are the selected hydrocarbon fuels. It is desired to investigate the effect of the selected fuel reforming options on the overall fuel cell system efficiency, which depends on the fuel processing, PEM fuel cell and auxiliary system efficiencies. The Aspen-HYSYS 3.1 code has been used for simulation purposes. Process parameters of fuel preparation steps have been determined considering the limitations set by the catalysts and hydrocarbons involved. Results indicate that fuel properties, fuel processing system and its operation parameters, and PEM fuel cell characteristics all affect the overall system efficiencies. Steam reforming appears as the most efficient fuel preparation option for all investigated fuels. Natural gas with steam reforming shows the highest fuel cell system efficiency. Good heat integration within the fuel cell system is absolutely necessary to achieve acceptable overall system efficiencies.

Ersoz, Atilla; Olgun, Hayati; Ozdogan, Sibel

246

Cleaner fossil fuel technologies for Africa's sustainable development. Status of World Energy Council Cleaner Fossil Fuels Systems Committee Action Plan  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

We know that access to electricity would improve the quality of life of most Africans. The people of sub-Saharan Africa need clean, affordable energy to help free them from abject poverty. And we know we can't necessarily try to resolve one societal problem without simultaneously attending to others. Providing electricity to the many underdeveloped regions is good for Africa because it is good for Africans. The poorest people need it most. What can electricity do for the people? Electricity, giving light and power, begets industry and agriculture, which beget jobs, which in turn enhance purchasing power, all of which improves the quality of life. Clean and cost-effective energy must be made available at the grassroots level. The more assess to clean energy that African nations have, the more they can sustain themselves and their sovereignty. African nations can benefit from more advanced nations who have already got past the learning curve and incurred the research and development costs. The technologies and insight are available now. It is vital for world stability that 'globalisation' does not leave the poorest behind. We must take the necessary steps to eliminate the 'digital divide,' so Africans have access to the world of information available on the internet. But concrete actions must be taken to activate plans after we lay out what needs to be done at conferences like this. This conference gives us the space and time to talk freely and make some serious decisions on how to move forward in Africa. But we need to think outside the box, so to speak. We need to be creative. We need some new approaches. Questions still remain unanswered. That's why we're here today. What is the most costeffective method for improving accessibility to electricity for the masses of Africans still deprived of this essential service? How can we ensure a win-win result? Work will be needed to answer this question, which must be addressed, to ensure sustainable development. Among other viable technologies, cleaner fossil fuel technologies have a place in the solutions to improve sustainable development in Africa. Again, we need to focus not just on 'action plants' but also on really taking action. We must see that the actions needed are interconnected. We all have a role. And giant steps need to be taken by all of us. I know we can start a few initiatives that will further problem resolution after this meeting. Let us be ready to face the challenges of the coming millennium, however great they may be. I hope our actions here can help lift the shroud of poverty and the yoke of conflict in much of Africa. And we can measure our success by how much the quality of life has improved for the people of the African continent. (au)

McKee, B.N. [US Department of Energy (United States)

2001-07-01

247

Long-term tradeoffs between nuclear- and fossil-fuel burning  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A global energy/economics/environmental (E{sup 3}) model has been adapted with a nuclear energy/materials model to understand better {open_quotes}top-level{close_quotes}, long-term trade offs between civilian nuclear power, nuclear-weapons proliferation, fossil-fuel burning, and global economic welfare. Using a {open_quotes}business-as-usual{close_quotes} (BAU) point-of-departure case, economic, resource, proliferation-risk implications of plutonium recycle in LAIRs, greenhouse-gas-mitigating carbon taxes, and a range of nuclear energy costs (capital and fuel) considerations have been examined. After describing the essential elements of the analysis approach being developed to support the Los Alamos Nuclear Vision Project, preliminary examples of parametric variations about the BAU base-case scenario are presented. The results described herein represent a sampling from more extensive results collected in a separate report. The primary motivation here is: (a) to compare the BAU basecase with results from other studies; (b) to model on a regionally resolved global basis long-term (to year {approximately}2100) evolution of plutonium accumulation in a variety of forms under a limited range of fuel-cycle scenarios; and (c) to illustrate a preliminary connectivity between risks associated with nuclear proliferation and fossil-fuel burning (e.g., greenhouse-gas accumulations).

Krakowski, R.A.

1996-12-31

248

Long-term tradeoffs between nuclear- and fossil-fuel burning  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A global energy/economics/environmental (E3) model has been adapted with a nuclear energy/materials model to understand better open-quotes top-levelclose quotes, long-term trade offs between civilian nuclear power, nuclear-weapons proliferation, fossil-fuel burning, and global economic welfare. Using a open-quotes business-as-usualclose quotes (BAU) point-of-departure case, economic, resource, proliferation-risk implications of plutonium recycle in LAIRs, greenhouse-gas-mitigating carbon taxes, and a range of nuclear energy costs (capital and fuel) considerations have been examined. After describing the essential elements of the analysis approach being developed to support the Los Alamos Nuclear Vision Project, preliminary examples of parametric variations about the BAU base-case scenario are presented. The results described herein represent a sampling from more extensive results collected in a separate report. The primary motivation here is: (a) to compare the BAU basecase with results from other studies; (b) to model on a regionally resolved global basis long-term (to year ?2100) evolution of plutonium accumulation in a variety of forms under a limited range of fuel-cycle scenarios; and (c) to illustrate a preliminary connectivity between risks associated with nuclear proliferation and fossil-fuel burning (e.g., greenhouse-gas accumulations)

249

Comparative life cycle assessment (LCA) of biodiesel and fossil diesel fuel  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Complementary to VlTO's demonstration project on the use of biodiesel as engine fuel (including on the road emission measurements) in Flanders, Belgium, a comparative life cycle assessment (LCA) has been carried out for rapeseed methyl ester (RME) and fossil diesel fuel. The primary concern of this study is the question as to whether or not the production of biodiesel is comparable to the production of fossil diesel fuel from an environmental point of view, taking into account all stages of the life cycle of these two products. The study covers: (1) a description of the LCA methodology used; (2) a definition of the goal and scope of the study: (3) an inventory of the consumption of energy and materials and the discharges to the environment, from the cradle to the grave, for both alternative fuels: (4) a comparative impact assessment; and (5) the interpretation of the results. The results of this comparative LCA can be used in the final decision making process next to the results of a social and economical assessment. 6 refs

250

Potential high temperature corrosion problems due to co-firing of biomass and fossil fuels  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Over the past few years, considerable high temperature corrosion problems have been encountered when firing biomass in power plants due to the high content of potassium chloride in the deposits. Therefore, to combat chloride corrosion problems cofiring of biomass with a fossil fuel has been undertaken. This results in potassium chloride being converted to potassium sulphate in the combustion chamber and it is sulphate rich deposits that are deposited on the vulnerable metallic surfaces such as high temperature superheaters. Although this removes the problem of chloride corrosion, other corrosion mechanisms appear such as sulphidation and hot corrosion due to sulphate deposits. At Studstrup power plant Unit 4, based on trials with exposure times of 3000 h using 0–20% straw co-firing with coal, the plant now runs with a fuel mix of 10% strawþcoal. Based on results from a 3 years exposure in this environment, the internal sulphidation is much more significant than that revealed in the demonstration project. Avedøre 2 main boiler is fuelled with wood pelletsþheavy fuel oilþgas. Some reaction products resulting from the presence of vanadium compounds in the heavy oil were detected, i.e. iron vanadates. However, the most significant corrosion attack was sulphidation attack at the grain boundaries of 18-8 steel after 3 years exposure. The corrosion mechanisms and corrosion rates are compared with biomass firing and coal firing. Potential corrosion problems due to co-firing biomass and fossil fuels are discussed.

Montgomery, Melanie; Vilhelmsen, T.

2008-01-01

251

Industrial experience of irradiated nuclear fuel reprocessing  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

At the moment and during the next following years, France and La Hague plant particularly, own the greatest amount of industrial experience in the field of reprocessing, since this experience is referred to three types of reactors, either broadly spread all through the world (GCR and LWR) or ready to be greatly developed in the next future (FBR). Then, the description of processes and technologies used now in France, and the examination of the results obtained, on the production or on the security points of view, are a good approach of the actual industrial experience in the field of spent fuel reprocessing. (author)

252

Problems of attracting nuclear energy resources in order to provide economical and rational consumption of fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Depletion of fossil fuel resources and the gradual increase in cost of their extraction and transportation to the places of their consumption put forward into a line of the most urgent tasks the problem of rational and economical utilization of fuel and energy resources, as well as introduction of new energy sources into various sectors of the national economy. The nuclear energy sources which are widely spread in power engineering have not yet been used to a proper extent in the sectors of industrial technologies and residential space heating, which are the most energy consuming sectors in the national economy. The most effective way of solving this problem can be the development and commercialization of high temperature nuclear reactors, as the majority of power consuming industrial processes and those involved in chemico-thermal systems of distant heat transmission demand the temperature of a heat carrier generated by nuclear reactors and assimilated by the above processes to be in the range from 9000 to 10000C. (author)

253

Fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Support for East European Democracy (SEED) Act of 1989 required the Secretary of Energy to cooperate with Polish officials to retrofit a coal-fired powerplant in Poland with advanced clean coal technology that has been successfully demonstrated in the United States. The project's goal is to demonstrate a cost-effective technique to control sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions that can be used at other powerplants in Poland. The act required that the retrofit be carried out by United States companies using United States technology and equipment manufactured in the United States. Questions were raised about changes the Department of Energy (DOE) made to its original definition of a United States firm, and about reductions DOE made to its original SO2 emission requirements for the project. Such changes might result in foreign-owned rather than American-owned firms providing the technology and that the technology might not be the best this country could offer to the Polish people. This paper reviews the reasons for these changes

254

Life cycle inventories for bioenergy and fossil-fuel fired cogeneration plants  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Life-cycle inventories for heat production from forest fuel, Salix, coal and oil are presented. Data from the Oerebro cogeneration plant are used for the bioenergy and coal cycles, whereas the oil-fired cycle is based on a fictive plant producing 53 MW electricity and 106 MW heat, also located in the town of Oerebro. This life cycle analysis only covers the inventory stage. A complete life cycle analysis also includes an environmental impact assessment. The methods for assessing environmental impact are still being developed and thus this phase has been omitted here. The intention is, instead, to provide an overall perspective of where in the chain the greatest environmental load for each fuel can be found. Production and energy conversion of fuel requires energy, which is often obtained from fossil fuel. This input energy corresponds to about 11% of the extracted amount of energy for oil, 9% for coal, 6% for Salix, whereas it is about 4% for forest fuel. Utilization of fossil fuel in the coal cycle amounts to production of electricity using coal condensation intended for train transports within Poland. In a life cycle perspective, biofuels show 20-30 times lower emissions of greenhouse gases in comparison with fossil fuels. The chains for biofuels also give considerably lower SO2 emissions than the chains for coal and oil. The coal chain shows about 50% higher NOx emission than the other fuels. Finally, the study illustrates that emission of parthe study illustrates that emission of particles are similar for all sources of energy. The biofuel cycle is assessed to be generally applicable to plants of similar type and size and with similar transport distances. The oil cycle is probably applicable to small-scale cogeneration plants. However, at present there are no cogeneration plants in Sweden that are solely fired with oil. In the case of the coal cycle, deep mining and a relatively long transport distance within Poland have been assumed. If the coal mining had been from open-cast mines, and if the subsequent transports had been from port to port, some of the results would have been affected markedly, including the input energy 17 refs, 17 figs, 7 tabs, appendices

255

Problems of attracting nuclear energy resources in order to provide economical and rational consumption of fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The solution of problems related to increasing costs of fossil fuels and application of nuclear energy in the industrial sector could be the development and commercialization of high temperature nuclear reactors, as the majority of power consuming industrial processes demand that the temperature of heat carrier generated to be in the range from 900-1000 deg. C. In the Soviet Union the strategy adopted for solving energy supply problems was named 'nuclear-hydrogen power engineering and technologies'. Based on analytic research and taking into account the present state of the art, the new alternative energy sources, e.g. nuclear ones, should be introduced into the industry by the following steps: development and mastering of stable operation of high-temperature nuclear reactors; search of rational technical solutions for heat discharge from nuclear reactors; utilisation of meet the power demand of existing production plants; complete substitution of organic raw materials burned now with nuclear energy; review the conditions and development of organizational and engineering solutions acceptable for implementing the nuclear energy in commercial processes

256

Ongoing studies on the evaluation of the impact of fossil fuels power plants in Italy  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In Italy studies are in progress to evaluate the impact of oil and coal fired power plants on the environment and on the population health. In this paper the preliminar results obtained for toxic trace elements are reported. It is, in fact, not clearly assessed the relative importance of the various groups of pollutants emitted into the atmosphere by fossil fueled power plants (i.e. Sulphur Oxides, Carbon Oxide, Nitrogen Oxides, Toxic Trace Elements, Organic Compounds). Joint epidemiological and statistical works have not clearly indicated significant correlation between health effects and environmental pollutant levels, while some significant results have been gathered when two or more pollutants have been considered. Therefore it has been deviced to include toxic trace metals in the impact evaluation of the coal fuel cycle. Coal and ash samples have been analyzed for their content of about 30 elements, by means of different analytical procedures (Instrumental Neutron Activation Analaysis, Atomic Absorption Spectrometry, Gamma Spectrometry and Fluorimetry). On the basis of estimated releases and of the site characteristics, the potential impact has to be estimated and compared with that attributable to the other pollutants (SOx, NOx, TSP etc.). Fossil fuel power plants impact is also being studied in order to evaluate potential advantage of long range health transport for urban heating in terms of urban air pollution abatement and of consequent population risk reductt and of consequent population risk reduction

257

The annual cycle of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions in the United States  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Time-series of estimated monthly carbon dioxide emissions from consumption of coal, petroleum and natural gas in the United States from 1981 to 2002 have been derived from energy consumption data. The data series for coal and natural gas each reveal a consistent seasonal pattern, with a winter peak for gas and two peaks (summer and winter) for coal. The annual cycle of total emissions has an amplitude of about 20 Tg-C, and is dominated by CO2 released from consumption of natural gas. Summation of the monthly estimates to obtain annual values reveals good agreement with other estimates of CO2 emissions. The varying proportions of CO2 emitted from each fuel type over the course of a year lead to an annual cycle in the carbon isotope ratio (13C), with a range of about 2 . These monthly carbon emissions estimates should be helpful in understanding the carbon cycle by providing (1) monthly/seasonal input for carbon cycle models, (2) estimates of the annual cycle of the 13C isotope ratio in fossil-fuel CO2 emissions and (3) data at fine enough time intervals to investigate effects of seasonal climate variations and changes in seasonally dependent use patterns of certain appliances (e.g. air conditioners) on fossil-fuel carbon emissions

258

Fuel-cycle fossil energy use and greenhouse gas emissions of corn and cellulosic ethanol  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The use of corn-based ethanol as an automotive fuel to displace petroleum-based gasoline in an effort to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions was discussed. Some past studies have shown increased GHG emissions from corn ethanol when energy use and emissions by up-stream production activities for corn ethanol were taken into account. Other studies have shown that the use of ethanol reduces GHG emissions. In this study, a thorough analysis of fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emissions of corn ethanol was conducted. The major issues under study were: (1) energy and chemical use intensity of corn farming, (2) N2O emissions from nitrogen fertilizer in corn fields, (3) energy use intensity at ethanol plants, and (4) energy and emission credits of co-products of corn ethanol. Results showed that the use of E85 from corn reduces fossil energy use by 35 to 40 per cent compared to gasoline and GHG are reduced by 16 to 28 per cent. Fuel-cycle energy and GHG emission impacts of cellulosic ethanol was also examined. It was shown that the use of E85 produced from biomass reduces fossil energy use by 80 per cent and eliminates GHG emissions of petroleum-based gasoline. 1 tab., 11 figs

259

The investigation of grinding kinetics of power plant solid fossil fuel in ball mill  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The kinetics of batch dry grinding of power plant solid fossil fuel, from the feeds of sieve sizes -3.350 + 2.360, -2.360 + 1.700, -1.180 + 0.850, -0.425 + 0.300 and -0.212 + 0.150 mm have been determined using a Bond ball mill with a mixture of five ball sizes. The mill used has a diameter of 30.5 cm, length of 30.5 cm, providing a total mill volume of 22.272 cm{sup 3} with a total mass of 20.125 g steel ball mixtures of 38.10, 31.75, 25.40, 19.05 and 12.70 mm diameters. The balls occupied 22% of mill volume. The speed of rotation of the mill was chosen as 70 rpm. The specific rates of breakage (Si) and primary breakage distribution (B{sub i,j}) values, called as grinding breakage parameters, were determined for those feed size fractions to simulate the product size distributions for comparison to the experimentally obtained data. As the feed sizes increase, the Si values also increase, that is, faster breakage values from higher to lower values were in the order of solid fossil fuel by comparing to its {alpha} values. Breakage distribution functions were found non-normalizable. It is dependent upon the initial feed particle sizes. In other words, the simulations of product size distributions for fossil fuels were in good agreement with the experimental data using a ball mill simulation program, called JKSimMet. 17 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

S. Samanli; D. Cuhadaroglu; H. Ipek; Y. Ucbas [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Zonguldak (Turkey). Mining Engineering Department

2010-03-15

260

Differentiation of primary, secondary and tertiary aromatic amines in fossil fuels using trifluoroacylation. 1, Analytical methodology  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An analytical method which distinguishes between primary, secondary and tertiary amines has been developed. Trifluoroacetic anhydride, with 4-pyrrolidinopyridine as a catalyst, is used to form di- and mono-trifluoroacylated derivatives of primary and secondary aromatic amines, respectively. Tertiary aromatic amines such as quinoline do not react. GC/MS is then used to analyze the derivatized samples. Retention indices and response factors (relative to 4-fluoroaniline) are reported for >50 pure compounds known or expected to be present in fossil fuel base fractions. Also, results from the analysis of base fractions from mildly hydrotreated SRC II coal liquids and petroleum-derived light cycle oils will be reported.

Thomson, J.S.; Green, J.B.; Yu, S.K.T.; Vrana, R.P.

1991-12-01

261

Differentiation of primary, secondary and tertiary aromatic amines in fossil fuels using trifluoroacylation  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

An analytical method which distinguishes between primary, secondary and tertiary amines has been developed. Trifluoroacetic anhydride, with 4-pyrrolidinopyridine as a catalyst, is used to form di- and mono-trifluoroacylated derivatives of primary and secondary aromatic amines, respectively. Tertiary aromatic amines such as quinoline do not react. GC/MS is then used to analyze the derivatized samples. Retention indices and response factors (relative to 4-fluoroaniline) are reported for >50 pure compounds known or expected to be present in fossil fuel base fractions. Also, results from the analysis of base fractions from mildly hydrotreated SRC II coal liquids and petroleum-derived light cycle oils will be reported.

Thomson, J.S.; Green, J.B.; Yu, S.K.T.; Vrana, R.P.

1991-12-01

262

Carbon sequestration from fossil fuels and biomass - long-term potentials  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Carbon sequestration and disposal from fossil fuels combustion is gaining attraction as a means to deal with climate change. However, CO2 emissions from biomass combustion can also be sequestered. If that is done, biomass energy with carbon sequestration (BECS) would become a net negative carbon sink that would at the same time deliver carbon free energy (heat, electricity or hydrogen) to society. Here we estimate some global technoeconomical potentials for BECS, and we also present some rough economics of electricity generation with carbon sequestration

263

Climate Policy and the Optimal Extraction of High- and Low-Carbon Fossil Fuels  

OpenAIRE

We study how restricting CO2 emissions affcts resource prices and depletion over time.We use a Hotelling-style model with two nonrenewable fossil fuels that differ in their carbon content (e.g. coal and natural gas) and that are imperfect substitutes in final good production.We study both an unexpected constraint and an anticipated constraint.Both shocks induce intertemporal substitution of resource use.When emissions are unexpectedly restricted, it is cost-effective to use high-carbon resour...

Werf, Edwin; Smulders, Sjak

2005-01-01

264

Radioactivity in the atmospheric effluents of power plants that use fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Ra and Th concentrations in flyash from a coal-fired power plant and solid residues from an oil-fired plant were compared with data on the radioactive discharge from nuclear-powered plants of comparable size. Samples were analyzed radiochemically for Ra 226, Ra 228, and Th 228. Radioisotopes in the coal ash were formed from traces of U 238 and Th 232. Pulverized coal-fired power plants not equipped with dust collectors discharged much higher levels of Ra than plants having effective flyash control equipment. Conventional fossil-fueled power plants discharged greater amounts of radioactive substances then a majority of nuclear-powered plants

265

Challenges of efficient and clean use of fossil fuels for power production  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Constantly increasing resource efficiency together with the broad introduction of CCS technologies is fundamental for a continuous use of fossil fuels in power generation against the background of up-coming requirements for CO2 emission reduction. In principle, CCS means up-grading conventional power plant technology with proven CO2 removal processes. However, this leads to additional losses, auxiliary power demand and cost. System integration, development or at least adaption of components and processes are the main requirements in this context. Different technology solutions and recent developments will be addressed as well as challenges when implementing in demonstration projects.

Vortmeyer, Nicolas; Zimmermann, Gerhard

2010-09-15

266

Liquid fossil-fuel technology. Quarterly technical progress report, January-March 1983  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Accomplishments for the quarter ending March 1983 are presented under the following headings: liquid fossil fuel cycle, processing, utilization, and project integration and technology transfer. Feature articles for this quarter are: (1) abandoned oil field reports issued; (2) oilfield water data bank report published; (3) microbial enhanced recovery report issued; (4) polymer-augmented project could be economic today; (5) carbon dioxide EOR estimates given; (6) BETC passes 65th milestone; and (7) fifty achievements for fifty years (1918-1968). BETC publications are also listed. (ATT)

Linville, B. (ed.)

1983-07-01

267

Importance of fossil fuel emission uncertainties over Europe for CO2 modeling. Model intercomparison  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Inverse modeling techniques used to quantify surface carbon fluxes commonly assume that the uncertainty of fossil fuel CO2 (FFCO2) emissions is negligible and that intraannual variations can be neglected. To investigate these assumptions, we analyzed the differences between four fossil fuel emission maps with spatial and temporal differences over Europe and their impact on the model simulated CO2 concentration. Large temporal flux variations characterize the hourly fields (40% and 80% for the seasonal and diurnal cycles, peak-to-peak) and annual country totals differ by 10% on average and up to 40% for some countries (i.e., The Netherlands). These emissions have been prescribed to seven different transport models, resulting in 28 different FFCO2 concentrations fields. The modeled FFCO2 concentration time series at surface sites using time-varying emissions show larger seasonal cycles (+2 ppm at the Hungarian tall tower (HUN)) and smaller diurnal cycles in summer (-1 ppm at HUN) than when using constant emissions. The concentration range spanned by all simulations varies between stations, and is generally larger in winter (up to 10 ppm peak-to-peak at HUN) than in summer (5 ppm). The contribution of transport model differences to the simulated concentration std-dev is 2-3 times larger than the contribution of emission differences only, at typical European sites used in global inversions. These contributions to the hourly (monns. These contributions to the hourly (monthly) std-dev's amount to 1.2 (0.8) ppm and 0.4 (0.3) ppm for transport and emissions, respectively. First comparisons of the modeled concentrations with 14C-based fossil fuel CO2 observations show that the large transport differences still hamper a quantitative evaluation/validation of the emission inventories. Changes in the estimated monthly biosphere flux (Fbio) over Europe, using two inverse modeling approaches, are relatively small (less that 5%) while changes in annual Fbio (up to 0.15 Gt C/yr) are only slightly smaller than the differences in annual emission totals and around 30% of the mean European ecosystem carbon sink. These results point to an urgent need to improve not only the transport models but also the assumed spatial and temporal distribution of fossil fuel emission maps

268

Sensitivity of simulated CO2 concentration to regridding of global fossil fuel CO2 emissions  

Science.gov (United States)

Errors in the specification or utilization of fossil fuel CO2 emissions within carbon budget or atmospheric CO2 inverse studies can alias the estimation of biospheric and oceanic carbon exchange. A key component in the simulation of CO2 concentrations arising from fossil fuel emissions is the spatial distribution of the emission near coastlines. Regridding of fossil fuel CO2 emissions (FFCO2) from fine to coarse grids to enable atmospheric transport simulations can give rise to mismatches between the emissions and simulated atmospheric dynamics which differ over land or water. For example, emissions originally emanating from the land are emitted from a grid cell for which the vertical mixing reflects the roughness and/or surface energy exchange of an ocean surface. We test this potential "dynamical inconsistency" by examining simulated global atmospheric CO2 concentration driven by two different approaches to regridding fossil fuel CO2 emissions. The two approaches are as follows: (1) a commonly used method that allocates emissions to grid cells with no attempt to ensure dynamical consistency with atmospheric transport and (2) an improved method that reallocates emissions to grid cells to ensure dynamically consistent results. Results show large spatial and temporal differences in the simulated CO2 concentration when comparing these two approaches. The emissions difference ranges from -30.3 TgC grid cell-1 yr-1 (-3.39 kgC m-2 yr-1) to +30.0 TgC grid cell-1 yr-1 (+2.6 kgC m-2 yr-1) along coastal margins. Maximum simulated annual mean CO2 concentration differences at the surface exceed ±6 ppm at various locations and times. Examination of the current CO2 monitoring locations during the local afternoon, consistent with inversion modeling system sampling and measurement protocols, finds maximum hourly differences at 38 stations exceed ±0.10 ppm with individual station differences exceeding -32 ppm. The differences implied by not accounting for this dynamical consistency problem are largest at monitoring sites proximal to large coastal urban areas and point sources. These results suggest that studies comparing simulated to observed atmospheric CO2 concentration, such as atmospheric CO2 inversions, must take measures to correct for this potential problem and ensure flux and dynamical consistency.

Zhang, X.; Gurney, K. R.; Rayner, P.; Liu, Y.; Asefi-Najafabady, S.

2014-12-01

269

Reducing global warming through the provision of hydrogen from non-fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Concern has increased in recent years regarding the rising atmospheric concentration of carbon dioxide and its potential effect on future global climate. One element of strategies for the reduction of CO2 emissions would be to increase the proportion of energy derived from non-fossil energy sources. This option has led to renewed interest in the use of hydrogen as an energy vector which could facilitate the transfer of non-fossil energy into a wider range of end-use sectors. To assess, in this context, the potential role of non-fossil-fuel hydrogen (NFFH), published information on the costs and performance of technologies for the production, storage, distribution and utilisation of hydrogen has been reviewed in this study. These data have been used in a model of the UK energy system to investigate the potential contributions of the various hydrogen technologies, over a 50 year timeframe, and with different levels of constraint imposed on the rate of CO2 release. Finally, to set these reduced CO2 release rates in the context of the resultant reduction in global warming commitment, a further modelling study has been made to estimate the residual transient warming to 2050, assuming the world as a whole follows the same CO2 emission profiles as modelled for the UK. This 259 page report of the study contains extensive tables of data and references, and a glossary of terms, units and conversion factors. (author)

270

High-resolution simulations of the ?14CO2 gradients from fossil fuels and nuclear power plants over Europe  

Science.gov (United States)

Radiocarbon (14CO2) can be used to quantify fossil fuel CO2 addition to the atmosphere, since fossil CO2 is void of 14C. However, the current observational network is not dense enough to constrain regional emissions in most parts of the world. Furthermore, most sampling sites are not as informative for the regional anthropogenic emissions because they are located outside polluted regions. High resolution modeling of regional fossil fuel CO2 dispersion can help to define sampling locations at which ?14CO2 gradients will be strong enough to estimate regional fossil fuel emissions. However, an important consideration should be the 14CO2 enrichment due to nuclear power plant 14CO2 production. These point sources contribute little to the global radiocarbon budget, but on a regional scale their importance for the atmospheric ?14CO2 signature can be considerable. We therefore simulate the fossil fuel CO2 and nuclear 14CO2 transport for Western Europe using the Weather Research and Forecast model (WRF-Chem) and evaluate the gradients and resulting ?14CO2. We verify our modeling framework with integrated 14CO2, CO2, and meteorological observations. We find that the gradients in daytime fossil fuel CO2 addition can be as high as 10 ppm. Additionally, the effects of the nuclear 14CO2 emitted from the strongest source in the region can be traced to sites more than 500 km away, and their impact on the atmospheric ?14CO2 signature can sometimes be of the same magnitude as the regional fossil fuel CO2 addition. We will present our findings and possible implications for sampling campaigns and observational sites.lt;img border=0 src="images/A33P-06_B.jpg">

Bozhinova, D.; van der Molen, M. K.; Palstra, S. W.; Meijer, H. A.; Krol, M. C.; Peters, W.

2012-12-01

271

Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, 1751-1991; and an estimate of their isotopic composition and latitudinal distribution  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This work briefly discusses four of the current research emphases at Oak Ridge National Laboratory regarding the emission of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from fossil fuel consumption, natural gas flaring and cement manufacture. These emphases include: (1) updating the 1950 to present time series of CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement manufacture, (2) extending this time series back to 1751, (3) gridding the data at 1{sup 0} by 1{sup 0} resolution, and (4) estimating the isotopic signature of these emissions. In 1991, global emissions of CO{sub 2} from fossil fuel and cement increased 1.5% over 1990 levels to 6188 {times} 10{sup 6} metric tonnes C. The Kuwaiti oil fires can account for all of the increase. Recently published energy data (Etemad et al., 1991) allow extension of the CO emissions time series back to 1751. Preliminary examination shows good agreement with two other, but shorter, energy time series. A latitudinal distribution of carbon emissions is being completed. A southward shift in the major mass of CO{sub 2} emissions is occurring from European-North American latitudes towards central-southeast Asian latitudes, reflecting the growth of population and industrialization at these lower latitudes. The carbon isotopic signature of these emissions has been re-examined. The emissions of the last two decades are approximately 1{per_thousand} lighter than previously reported (Tans, 1981). This lightening of the emissions signature is due to fossil fuel gases and liquids, including a revision of their {delta}{sup 13}C isotopic signature and an increased production rate.

Andres, R.J.; Marland, G.; Boden, T.; Bischof, S.

1994-10-01

272

Household consumption, associated fossil fuel demand and carbon dioxide emissions. The case of Greece between 1990 and 2006  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper explores how Greece's household consumption has changed between 1990 and 2006 and its environmental implications in terms of fossil fuel demand and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. The results show that the 44% increase in Greece's household expenditure between 1990 and 2006 was accompanied by a 67% increase in fossil fuel demand. Of this total, indirect demand accounted for approximately 60% throughout the 16-year period, increasing by 56% overall, whereas direct fossil fuel demand grew by 80%. The results also show that associated CO{sub 2} emissions increased by 60%, resulting in a relative decoupling from energy demand. This relative decoupling is shown to be due to fossil fuel mix changes from the supply side rather than action from consumers. These insights highlight the opportunities for demand-side policies to further reduce fossil fuel demand and CO{sub 2} emissions, allowing Greece to set more proactive and ambitious post-Kyoto targets. (author)

Papathanasopoulou, Eleni [Sustainable Solutions Greece, P.O. Box 77174, Paleo Faliro, 17510 Athens (Greece)

2010-08-15

273

Household consumption, associated fossil fuel demand and carbon dioxide emissions: The case of Greece between 1990 and 2006  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper explores how Greece's household consumption has changed between 1990 and 2006 and its environmental implications in terms of fossil fuel demand and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions. The results show that the 44% increase in Greece's household expenditure between 1990 and 2006 was accompanied by a 67% increase in fossil fuel demand. Of this total, indirect demand accounted for approximately 60% throughout the 16-year period, increasing by 56% overall, whereas direct fossil fuel demand grew by 80%. The results also show that associated CO{sub 2} emissions increased by 60%, resulting in a 'relative decoupling' from energy demand. This relative decoupling is shown to be due to fossil fuel mix changes from the supply side rather than action from consumers. These insights highlight the opportunities for demand-side policies to further reduce fossil fuel demand and CO{sub 2} emissions, allowing Greece to set more proactive and ambitious post-Kyoto targets.

Papathanasopoulou, Eleni, E-mail: epapathanasopoulou@sustainablesolutions.g [Sustainable Solutions Greece, P.O. Box 77174, Paleo Faliro, 17510 Athens (Greece)

2010-08-15

274

Decarbonization of fossil fuels as a strategy to control global warming  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

With the world reaching near-total consensus on the seriousness of the global warming impacts, and on the urgency to halt further warming, R & D efforts have intensified many-fold to find ways and means of global warming control. One of the avenues being explored is 'decarbonization' of fossil fuel use by either decarbonizing the fuels before they are burnt or by capturing the CO{sub 2} they emit on combustion. In this paper the various available options are reviewed in the context of their economic and environmental viability. It emerges that even as the goal is very enchanting, the possibility of it's realization appears remote. It also follows that the only sure method of reducing greenhouse gas emissions presently available to humankind is by reducing consumption of energy and other resources.

Abbasi, T.; Abbasi, S.A. [Pondicherry Central University, Pondicherry (India)

2011-05-15

275

Fossil fuels: technical, economical and political challenges for 2030-2050  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This panorama takes stock on the international energy actuality in 2003 and discusses the instability of the geo-political context of the energy and the part of the fossil fuels for the future years 2030-2050. The following topics were presented: activities and market for the exploration-production, refining and petrochemistry, the world gas trade situation, the petroleum supply and demand, the Iraq, the diesel in the USA, the investments and the depletion, long-dated evolutions of motors and fuels, implementing of the european directive concerning the market of tradable permits of CO2, the carbon sequestration, hydrogen the energy of the future and the biofuels in Europe. (A.L.B.)

276

Cost and prices of electricity. Fossil fuels, nuclear power and renewable energy sources in comparison  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Consumers of electricity pay for production, transport and distribution as well as for taxes and dues. Electricity rates depend on various influencing factors, e.g. different fuel and capital cost of the power plants and the ratio of supply and demand in the electricity stock markets. End user electricity rats also include taxes and dues as well as the cost of power transmission. The publication presents background information on the formation of electricity rates in Germany. In a second step, the different cost factors of fossil fuels, nuclear power and renewable energy sources are compared. In particular, the external cost is gone into which often tends to be neglected in the electricity markets.

277

Survey of population health in towns with nuclear and fossil fuel power plants  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Comparative assessment of population health in Sosnovy Bor with nuclear power plant and Kirovsk with fossil fuel power station was made for public and administration information. Both towns are located in Leningrad administrative region at 150 km distance from each other. In nuclear power town radiological situation was assessed as normal and in Kirovsk up to 1995 yr. with coal fuel, maximum permissible levels of suspended particle of sulfur oxide in atmosphere were exceeded in 6-9% of samples. After 1995 yr. the natural gas was used as fuel. Demographic data for 1991-2000 yrs indicate that mortality including infants mortality and stillborns was lower in Sosnovy Bor (NOS) then in Kirovsk (fossil fuel) and on average Leningrad administrative region. Birth rate and population growth was higher in Sosnovy Bor at the same time surprisingly the recorded morbidity was higher in Sosnovy Bor which might be explained by extensive medical supervision and improved diagnostics. However, cancer and tuberculosis morbidity was lower in Sosnovy Bor. In Kirovsk in 1997-2000 yrs. oncological morbidity was higher on average comparing to Leningrad administrative region. Oncological mortality in Sosnovy Bor in 1997-2000 yrs. was lower than in Kirovsk and Leningrad region Standardized annual mortality in Sosnovy Bor, Kirovsk and Leningrad administrative region was 128.3, 209.6 and 211.7 on 100 000 respectively. Health state of pregnant women, deliveries, new-born condition were all in normal range in Sosnovy Bor, contrary to higher increased abortion rate and pregnancy complications in Kirovsk. These findings need further studies. (Author)

Ivanov, E.; Shubik, V. M.

2004-07-01

278

Building-specific quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions in an urban domain: the case of Indianapolis, US  

Science.gov (United States)

Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions from the bottom-up perspective is a critical element in interpreting atmospheric CO2 measurements in addition to providing critical emissions mitigation information. Recent research and decision-support has placed emphasis on quantification of emissions for urban domes with sector specificity. Here we present results of the Hestia Project, an effort aimed at quantifying fossil fuel CO2 emissions at the building and road segment scale for the city of Indianapolis as part of the INFLUX experiment. To calculate CO2 emissions for buildings, we use a combination of county-level estimation from the Vulcan Project and distribute those emissions via an allocation method that utilizes a building energy simulation tool - eQuest (DOE). eQUEST is based on a series of building typologies and has a large number of input variables in order to quantify energy consumption. The simulation process uses default values when the actual data are inaccessible or non-existent. Our method is based on the construction of 22 commercial, 18 industrial, and 8 residential building types. This classification requires specification of building vintages and sizes. To calculate the total floor area of buildings from building heights, remote sensing data are used. The DOEs regional energy surveys, CBECS, RECS and MECS data for the East North Central Census Division, are used to calibrate hourly profiles for different building types. Previous published results for Indianapolis have been substantially updated by using additional data on natural gas pipelines. A more accurate, statistically-based building height assessment has been made using improved lidar data. The reclassification procedure converting Assessor's parcel types into Hestia prototypes, has been revised and improved. More accurate statistics have been calculated and corresponding diagrams and thematic maps have been prepared. Development of a powerful user-friendly information system for decision-makers is in process. That system will allow city environmental managers and regional planning agencies to make analyses of CO2 emissions for inquired sector and period. Of the townships in Indianapolis, Central Township has the largest emissions through the whole year while Wayne is the largest Industrial emitter. The commercial sector building emissions peak during at 7:30 am and 5 pm while the residential sector has peaks at 6 am and 6 pm. The Industrial sector has one peak at 1:30 pm. The relative proportions of those peaks vary with seasons of year. In contrast, their positions in monthly and diurnal profiles appear stable.

Razlivanov, I.; Gurney, K. R.; Zhou, Y.; Turnbull, J. C.; Sweeney, C.; Guenther, D.; Karion, A.; Davis, K. J.; Miles, N. L.; Richardson, S.; Lauvaux, T.; Shepson, P. B.; Cambaliza, M. L.; Lehman, S. J.; Tans, P. P.

2011-12-01

279

The potential of wind energy to largely displace existing Canadian fossil fuel and nuclear electricity generation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The potential of wind-generated electricity to displace existing fossil fuel and nuclear generation in Canada is assessed by combining wind turbine power curves with data from the Canadian Wind Energy Atlas. There are many widely-scattered regions with capacity factors (average power output as a fraction of the rated output) greater than 0.4, and some greater than 0.5, that could supply many times the current electricity production from fossil fuel and nuclear powerplants in Canada. By linking multiple high-wind regions to the major demand centres with high voltage direct current transmission lines, the variation in the aggregate electricity output at time scales of one week or less would be greatly reduced, while variations at longer time scales can be largely offset through anti-phase operation of hydro-electric reservoirs. Assuming onshore and offshore wind farm capital costs of about $2000/kW and $3000/kW, respectively, onshore and offshore transmission line costs of $0.5/kW/km and $0.75/kW/km, respectively, and terminal costs of $250/kW, the cost of electricity (financed at a real interest rate of 3%/yr) is 5–7 cents/kWh, which is less than the likely cost of electricity from new coal powerplants equipped to capture CO2 (at least 9 cents/kWh) or from new nuclear powerplants (10–23 cents/kWh). - Highlights: ? Regions of strong wind are widely distributed across Canada. ? Wind combined with hydropower could displace fossil and nuclear. ? Costs including HVDC transmission would be 5–7 cents/kWh at 3% financing

280

The effect of retrofitting Portuguese fossil fuel power plants with CCS  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Highlights: ? A map of mainland Portugal with potential CO2 source-sink matching was created. ? Four existing Portuguese power plants were simulated with and without CCS. ? Effect of CCS retrofit on performance and costs at each power plant was studied. ? The incremental COE was estimated at around 46 $/MW h for NGCC plants. ? The incremental COE was estimated at around 61 $/MW h for PC plants. -- Abstract: This work assesses the retrofit potential of existing Portuguese fossil fuel power plants with post-combustion CO2 capture and storage (CCS) technology. The Integrated Environmental Control Model (IECM) was used to provide a systematic techno-economic analysis of the cost of emission control equipment, the reduction in greenhouse gas emissions, and other key parameters which may change when CCS is implemented at a fossil fuel power plant. The results indicate that CCS requires a large capital investment and significantly increases the levelized cost of electricity. However, the economic viability of CCS increases with higher CO2 prices. The breakeven CO2 price for plants with and without CCS was estimated at $85–$140/t of CO2 depending on the technical parameters of the individual plants.

281

Long-term ocean oxygen depletion in response to carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Ongoing global warming could persist far into the future, because natural processes require decades to hundreds of thousands of years to remove carbon dioxide from fossil-fuel burning from the atmosphere(1-3). Future warming may have large global impacts including ocean oxygen depletion and associated adverse effects on marine life, such as more frequent mortality events(4-8), but long, comprehensive simulations of these impacts are currently not available. Here we project global change over the next 100,000 years using a low-resolution Earth system model(9), and find severe, long-term ocean oxygen depletion, as well as a great expansion of ocean oxygen-minimum zones for scenarios with high emissions or high climate sensitivity. We find that climate feedbacks within the Earth system amplify the strength and duration of global warming, ocean heating and oxygen depletion. Decreased oxygen solubility from surface-layer warming accounts for most of the enhanced oxygen depletion in the upper 500 m of the ocean. Possible weakening of ocean overturning and convection lead to further oxygen depletion, also in the deep ocean. We conclude that substantial reductions in fossil-fuel use over the next few generations are needed if extensive ocean oxygen depletion for thousands of years is to be avoided.

Shaffer, G.; Olsen, S.M.

2009-01-01

282

Radiocarbon-based assessment of fossil fuel-derived contaminant associations in sediments.  

Science.gov (United States)

Hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) are associated with natural organic matter (OM) in the environment via mechanisms such as sorption or chemical binding. The latter interactions are difficult to quantitatively constrain, as HOCs can reside in different OM pools outside of conventional analytical windows. Here, we exploited natural abundance variations in radiocarbon (14C) to trace various fossil fuel-derived HOCs (14C-free) within chemically defined fractions of contemporary OM (modern 14C content) in 13 samples including marine and freshwater sediments and one dust and one soil sample. Samples were sequentially treated by solvent extraction followed by saponification. Radiocarbon analysis of the bulk sample and resulting residues was then performed. Fossil fuel-derived HOCs released by these treatments were quantified from an isotope mass balance approach as well as by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. For the majority of samples (n = 13), 98-100% of the total HOC pool was solvent extractable. Nonextracted HOCs are only significant (29% of total HOC pool)in one sample containing p,p-2,2-bis(chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane and its metabolites. The infrequency of significant incorporation of HOCs into nonextracted OM residues suggests that most HOCs are mobile and bioavailable in the environment and, as such, have a greater potential to exert adverse effects. PMID:18754456

White, Helen K; Reddy, Christopher M; Eglinton, Timothy I

2008-08-01

283

Implications of fossil fuel constraints on economic growth and global warming  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Energy Security and Global Warming are analysed as 21st century sustainability threats. Best estimates of future energy availability are derived as an Energy Reference Case (ERC). An explicit economic growth model is used to interpret the impact of the ERC on economic growth. The model predicts a divergence from 20th century equilibrium conditions in economic growth and socio-economic welfare is only stabilised under optimistic assumptions that demands a paradigm shift in contemporary economic thought and focused attention from policy makers. Fossil fuel depletion also constrains the maximum extent of Global Warming. Carbon emissions from the ERC comply nominally with the B1 scenario, which is the lowest emissions case considered by the IPCC. The IPCC predicts a temperature response within acceptance limits of the Global Warming debate for the B1 scenario. The carbon feedback cycle, used in the IPCC models, is shown as invalid for low-emissions scenarios and an alternative carbon cycle reduces the temperature response for the ERC considerably compared to the IPCC predictions. Our analysis proposes that the extent of Global Warming may be acceptable and preferable compared to the socio-economic consequences of not exploiting fossil fuel reserves to their full technical potential. (author)

Nel, Willem P.; Cooper, Christopher J. [Department of Geography, Environmental Management and Energy Studies, Institute for Energy Studies, University of Johannesburg, PO Box 524, Auckland Park 2006, Johannesburg (South Africa)

2009-01-15

284

Detecting the influence of fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon aerosols on near surface temperature changes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Past research has shown that the dominant influence on recent global climate changes is from anthropogenic greenhouse gas increases with implications for future increases in global temperatures. One mitigation proposal is to reduce black carbon aerosol emissions. How much warming can be offset by the aerosol's control is unclear, especially as its influence on past climate has not been previously unambiguously detected. In this study observations of near-surface warming over the last century are compared with simulations using a climate model, HadGEM1. In the simulations black carbon, from fossil fuel and bio-fuel sources (fBC, produces a positive radiative forcing of about + 0.25 Wm?2 over the 20th century, compared with a little under + 2.5 Wm?2 for well mixed greenhouse gases. A simulated warming of global mean near-surface temperatures over the twentieth century from fBC of 0.14 ± 0.1 K compares with 1.06 ± 0.07 K from greenhouse gases, -0.58 ± 0.10 K from anthropogenic aerosols, ozone and land use changes and 0.09 ± 0.09 K from natural influences. Using a detection and attribution methodology, the observed warming since 1900 has detectable influences from anthropogenic and natural factors. Fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon is found to have a detectable contribution to the warming over the last 50 years of the 20th century, although the results are sensitive to a number of analysis choices, and fBC is not detected for the later fifty year period ending in 2006. The attributed warming of fBC was found to be consistent with the warming from the unscaled simulation. This study suggests that there is a possible significant influence from fBC on global temperatures, but its influence is small compared to that from greenhouse gas emissions.

G. S. Jones

2010-09-01

285

Detecting the influence of fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon aerosols on near surface temperature changes  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Past research has shown that the dominant influence on recent global climate changes is from anthropogenic greenhouse gas increases with implications for future increases in global temperatures. One mitigation proposal is to reduce black carbon aerosol emissions. How much warming can be offset by controlling black carbon is unclear, especially as its influence on past climate has not been previously unambiguously detected. In this study observations of near-surface warming over the last century are compared with simulations using a climate model, HadGEM1. In the simulations black carbon, from fossil fuel and bio-fuel sources (fBC, produces a positive radiative forcing of about +0.25 Wm?2 over the 20th century, compared with +2.52 Wm?2 for well mixed greenhouse gases. A simulated warming of global mean near-surface temperatures over the twentieth century from fBC of 0.14 ± 0.1 K compares with 1.06 ± 0.07 K from greenhouse gases, ?0.58 ± 0.10 K from anthropogenic aerosols, ozone and land use changes and 0.09 ± 0.09 K from natural influences. Using a detection and attribution methodology, the observed warming since 1900 has detectable influences from anthropogenic and natural factors. Fossil fuel and bio-fuel black carbon is found to have a detectable contribution to the warming over the last 50 yr of the 20th century, although the results are sensitive to the period being examined as fBC is not detected for the later fifty year period ending in 2006. The attributed warming of fBC was found to be consistent with the warming from fBC unscaled by the detection analysis. This study suggests that there is a possible significant influence from fBC on global temperatures, but its influence is small compared to that from greenhouse gas emissions.

G. S. Jones

2011-01-01

286

Modern approach to the problem of fossil gas fuels replacement by alternative fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

New scientific and engineering fundamentals of fuels substitution have been developed instead of obsolete methodology “Interchangeability of Fuel Gases” developed in USA and existing from the middle of XXth century. To perform the complex prediction of total or partial substitution of given flow rate of natural gas NG for alternative gases AG the following parameters are to be predicted: plant utilization efficiencies – regarding fuel and energy utilization, the last in form of heat ?H and exergy ?eff efficiencies, saving or overexpenditure of the NG flow rate in the gas mixture with AG, specific fuel consumption b f and specific issue of harmful substances Ct – pollutants in the combustion products (CNOx ) and greenhouse gases (C CO2 ). Certification of alternative gas fuels and fuel mixtures as a commodity products is carried out in frame of our approach with necessary set of characteristics, similar to those accepted in the world practice. Key words: alternative fuel, fuel replacement (substitution), natural gas, process gases, theoretical combustion temperature, thermodynamic equilibrium computations, total enthalpy

287

Options for the Swedish steel industry - Energy efficiency measures and fuel conversion  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The processes of iron and steel making are energy intensive and consume large quantities of electricity and fossil fuels. In order to meet future climate targets and energy prices, the iron and steel industry has to improve its energy and resource efficiency. For the iron and steel industry to utilize its energy resources more efficiently and at the same time reduce its CO2 emissions a number of options are available. In this paper, opportunities for both integrated and scrap-based steel plants are presented and some of the options are electricity production, fuel conversion, methane reforming of coke oven gas and partnership in industrial symbiosis. The options are evaluated from a system perspective and more specific measures are reported for two Swedish case companies: SSAB Strip Products and Sandvik AB. The survey shows that both case companies have great potentials to reduce their CO2 emissions. -- Research highlights: ? Steel plants have several opportunities to utilize excess energy flows. ? Industrial symbiosis and TES can enhance the utilization of excess energy. ? Options to produce electricity from low-grade heat and heat radiation. ? Options to substitute fossil fuels with biomass. ? The case companies have great potentials to reduce their CO2 emissions.

288

Health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants. Volume 6 of health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. [In California  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report reviews health effects and related standards for fossil-fuel and geothermal power plants, emphasizing impacts which may occur through emissions into the atmosphere, and treating other impacts briefly. Federal regulations as well as California state and local regulations are reviewed. Emissions are characterized by power plant type, including: coal-fired, oil-fired, gas-fired, combined cycle and advanced fossil-fuel plants; and liquid and vapor geothermal systems. Dispersion and transformation of emissions are treated. The state of knowledge of health effects, based on epidemiological, physiological, and biomedical studies, is reviewed.

Case, G.D.; Bertolli, T.A.; Bodington, J.C.; Choy, T.A.; Nero, A.V.

1977-01-01

289

Industrial aspects of spent fuel storage  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

As part of its programme for expanding the reprocessing facilities at the La Hague plant, Cogema has entrusted the Societe generale pour les techniques nouvelles with the task of constructing the new installations required for the storage and reprocessing of spent fuel from French and foreign PWR and BWR plants. The main industrial aspects of the design and operation of the following reception and storage facilities are described: the NPH facility (Nouvelles Piscines de La Hague) which has been in operation since February 1981, the T0 facility (dry unloading) and the storage ponds C,D and E. Also described are the techniques used for reprocessing spent fuel transport casks in the NPH facility (reception, preparation for unloading, decontamination after removal from the pond), the auxiliary functions of the facility (water treatment, control of the installations), and some of the special devices that have been installed. The T0 facility now under construction is described; each facility will be used for the dry unloading of transport casks as of 1985. Finally, the salient characteristics are given of the four storage ponds, each of which can accommodate 2000 t of spent initial uranium fuel. A number of prototypes are used in the installations making up the reception and storage facilities. The most important of these are described: spent fuel transfer equipment, heat exchangers, handling equipment, etc. Facility construction costs are then compared. In conclusion, the sts are then compared. In conclusion, the experience gained at La Hague in the reception and treatment of LWR spent fuel transport casks is described and an explanation is given of how this experience is reflected in the design of the facilities for future UP2-800 and UP3 plants. (author)

290

Comparative analysis of structural concrete Quality Assurance practices on nine nuclear and three fossil fuel power plant construction projects. Final summary report  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A summary of two reports, COO/4120-1 and COO/4120-2, is given. A comparative analysis was made of the Quality Assurance practices related to the structural concrete phase on nine nuclear and three fossil fuel power plant projects which are (or have been) under construction in the United States in the past ten years. For the nuclear projects the analysis identified the response of each Quality Assurance program to the applicable criteria of 10 CFR Part 50, Appendix B as well as to the pertinent regulatory requirements and industry standards. For the fossil projects the analysis identified the response of each Quality Assurance program to criteria similar to those which were applicable in the nuclear situation. The major emphasis was placed on the construction aspects of the structural concrete phase of each project. The engineering and design aspects were examined whenever they interfaced with the construction aspects

291

?14C level of annual plants and fossil fuel derived CO2 distribution across different regions of China  

Science.gov (United States)

The 14C level in annual plants is a sensitive tracer for monitoring fossil fuel derived CO2 in the atmosphere. Corn leave samples were selected from different regions of China, including high mountains in the Tibetan Plateau, grassland in Inner Mongolia, and inland and coastal cities during the summer of 2010. The 14C/12C ratio of the samples was measured with the NEC compact AMS system at the Institute of Heavy Ion Physics, Peking University. The fossil fuel derived CO2 was estimated by comparing the measured ?14C values of corn leave samples to background atmospheric ?14C level. The influences of topography, meteorological conditions and carbon cycling processes on the fossil fuel derived CO2 concentration are considered when interpreting the data. Our results show a clear association of the low ?14C values with regions where human activities are intensive.

Xi, X. T.; Ding, X. F.; Fu, D. P.; Zhou, L. P.; Liu, K. X.

2013-01-01

292

Contributions of fossil fuel, biomass-burning, and biogenic emissions to carbonaceous aerosols in Zurich as traced by 14C  

Science.gov (United States)

Many open questions exist about the importance of different sources of carbonaceous aerosol, which is a substantial contributor to the global aerosol budget and, therefore, to climate change and human mortality. In this work, 14C was determined in elemental carbon (EC) and different organic carbon (OC) fractions from ambient urban aerosols with aerodynamic diameter attribution of the carbonaceous aerosol mass than is possible with other currently available methods. The three major sources, fossil fuel, wood combustion (both anthropogenic emissions), and biogenic emissions, were quantified, making specific regulatory air quality management measures possible. EC originates nearly exclusively from fossil fuel usage during summer, whereas biomass-burning emissions become substantial during winter with ˜25%, even though this source contributes only marginally to the local energy consumption. For OC, biogenic sources are dominant in summer with ˜60%, where secondary organic aerosol prevails. Wood combustion accounts for up to ˜41% of OC in winter. Fossil fuels represent ˜30% of OC throughout the year.

Szidat, SöNke; Jenk, Theo M.; Synal, Hans-Arno; Kalberer, Markus; Wacker, Lukas; Hajdas, Irka; Kasper-Giebl, Anne; Baltensperger, Urs

2006-04-01

293

Costs and CO{sub 2} benefits of recovering, refining and transporting logging residues for fossil fuel replacement  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

There are many possible systems for recovering, refining, and transporting logging residues for use as fuel. Here we analyse costs, primary energy and CO{sub 2} benefits of various systems for using logging residues locally, nationally or internationally. The recovery systems we consider are a bundle system and a traditional chip system in a Nordic context. We also consider various transport modes and distances, refining the residues into pellets, and replacing different fossil fuels. Compressing of bundles entails costs, but the cost of chipping is greatly reduced if chipping is done on a large scale, providing an overall cost-effective system. The bundle system entails greater primary energy use, but its lower dry-matter losses mean that more biomass per hectare can be extracted from the harvest site. Thus, the potential replacement of fossil fuels per hectare of harvest area is greater with the bundle system than with the chip system. The fuel-cycle reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions per harvest area when logging residues replace fossil fuels depends more on the type of fossil fuel replaced, the logging residues recovery system used and the refining of the residues, than on whether the residues are transported to local, national or international end-users. The mode and distance of the transport system has a minor impact on the CO{sub 2} emission balance. (author)

Gustavsson, Leif [Ecotechnology, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Mid Sweden University, 83125 Oestersund (Sweden); Linnaeus University, 35195 Vaexjoe (Sweden); Eriksson, Lisa; Sathre, Roger [Ecotechnology, Department of Engineering and Sustainable Development, Mid Sweden University, 83125 Oestersund (Sweden)

2011-01-15

294

Determination of heating value of industrial waste for the formulation of alternative fuels  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The use of alternative fuels has become increasingly widespread. They are basically designed based on industrial waste so that they can substitute fossil fuels which start to become scarce. Alternative fuels must meet some criteria, namely an important calorific content, minimum humidity and ash content. When it comes to combustion, the most interesting parameter is the calorific value which represents the thermal energy released during combustion. The experiments that were conducted showed that the calorific value is influenced by other parameters namely moisture and ash content. It was therefore necessary to study the behavior of the heating value in terms of these two parameters in order to establish a relationship that is used to describe the behavior. This is expected to allow a simulation of the calorific value of a mixture of various industrial waste.

Bouabid G.

2013-09-01

295

A comparative study among fossil fuel power plants in PJM and California ISO by DEA environmental assessment  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This study compares among fossil fuel power plants in PJM and California ISO by their unified (operational and environmental) performance. DEA (Data Envelopment Analysis) is used as a methodology. For comparative analysis, DEA incorporates strategic concepts such as natural and managerial disposability into the computational process. This study explores both how to measure Returns to Scale (RTS) under natural disposability and how to measure Damages to Scale (DTS) under managerial disposability. This empirical study obtains two implications on US energy policy. One of the two policy implications is that California ISO outperforms PJM in terms of the three unified efficiency measures. The result implies that strict regulation on undesirable outputs, as found in California, is important in enhancing the performance of US fossil fuel power plants. Thus, it is necessary for federal and local governments to regulate the fossil fuel power plants under the strict implementation of environmental protection. Under such a policy direction, it is possible for US fossil fuel power plants to attain economic prosperity (by enhancing their operational efficiencies) and to satisfy environmental regulation (by enhancing their environmental efficiencies). The other policy implication is that coal-fired and gas-fired power plants in PJM and California ISO need to reduce their operational sizes or introduce technology innovation on desirable and undesirable outputs and/or new management for environmental protection within their operations. Meanwhile, oil-fired power plants may increase their operational sizes if they can introduce technology innovation and new management on undesirable outputs. - Highlights: • This study compares fossil fuel power plants in PJM and California ISO. • California ISO outperforms PJM in terms of their unified efficiency measures. • Regulation by Clean Air Act is important for environmental protection. • Fossil fuel power plants need technology innovation for environmental protection

296

Fossil fuel use and CO2 emissions in Korea. NEAT approach  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Carbon accounting is a key issue in the discussions on global warming/CO2 mitigation. This paper applies both the intergovernmental panel on climate change-reference approach (IPCC-RA) and the non-energy use emission accounting tables (NEAT) model, a material flow analysis, to estimate the carbon storage originating from the non-energy use as to assess the carbon release from the use of fossil fuels in Korea for the years 1999 and 2000. The current Korean carbon accounting seems to overestimate the carbon storage and to concomitantly underestimate CO2 emissions. This is because the gross naphtha deliveries are currently considered as feedstock use. The estimation after correction of the non-energy use statistics shows, however, that the carbon storage calculated according to the IPCC-RA are lower than those calculated using the NEAT model. This is because the IPCC default storage fraction for naphtha used in Korea seems to be too low for the Korean petrochemical production structure. A by-product of this study is the identification of a double counting of naphtha consumption in the amount of the backflows to refineries in the Korean energy balance which led to a four-year project to revise the energy balances back to 1990. This paper shows that a material flow analysis like the NEAT model can provide a better basis for estimation of CO2 emissions of the non-energy use and with it that of the fossil fuel use than the current IPCC-RA. Thssil fuel use than the current IPCC-RA. The NEAT model can be used as an independent emission calculation tool to verify the IPCC-RA and IPCC-SA as well as to replace them

297

Toxic and hazardous air pollutants from co-firing biomass fuels, fossil fuels, MSW and RDF  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Toxic and hazardous pollutants are defined and then are considered from the perspective of pollutants which enter the combustion process with the fuel (principally the metals and metallic compounds) and pollutants which are formed as products of incomplete combustion. Control strategies are reviewed through the entire process including fuel preparation and storage, combustion control and the application of air pollution control devices. Measurement techniques for specific toxic and hazardous air pollutants are discussed

298

Options for the Swedish steel industry - Energy efficiency measures and fuel conversion  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The processes of iron and steel making are energy intensive and consume large quantities of electricity and fossil fuels. In order to meet future climate targets and energy prices, the iron and steel industry has to improve its energy and resource efficiency. For the iron and steel industry to utilize its energy resources more efficiently and at the same time reduce its CO{sub 2} emissions a number of options are available. In this paper, opportunities for both integrated and scrap-based steel plants are presented and some of the options are electricity production, fuel conversion, methane reforming of coke oven gas and partnership in industrial symbiosis. The options are evaluated from a system perspective and more specific measures are reported for two Swedish case companies: SSAB Strip Products and Sandvik AB. The survey shows that both case companies have great potentials to reduce their CO{sub 2} emissions.

Johansson, M.T.; Soderstrom, M. [Linkoping University, Linkoping (Sweden). Dept. of Management & Engineering

2011-01-15

299

Securing the resources needed for mobility in the age after fossil fuels; Ressourcensicherung fuer die postfossile Mobilitaet  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

To date, the climate debate has concentrated only on the effects of burning fossil fuels. The implications of our mobility being 100% dependent on crude oil make it necessary to analyze the oil-supply situation. There are more and more signs that supply bottlenecks are going to accelerate a paradigm shift for mobility. That is going to have consequences for new and upgraded transport routes. As a system, 'rail' presents the greatest advantages for the post-fossil-fuel age. (orig.)

Kuhla, E. [Mobilitaetsinitiative (moin), Syke (Germany)

2007-12-15

300

Are forestation, bio-char and landfilled biomass adequate offsets for the climate effects of burning fossil fuels?  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Forestation and landfilling purpose-grown biomass are not adequate offsets for the CO2 emission from burning fossil fuels. Their permanence is insufficiently guaranteed and landfilling purpose-grown biomass may even be counterproductive. As to permanence, bio-char may do better than forests or landfilled biomass, but there are major uncertainties about net greenhouse gas emissions linked to the bio-char life cycle, which necessitate suspension of judgement about the adequacy of bio-char addition to soils as an offset for CO2 emissions from burning fossil fuels.

301

Atmospheric fossil fuel CO2 record in Debrecen city during the winter of 2008  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Complete text of publication follows. Fossil fuel CO2 content in the air of a major Hungarian city (Debrecen) was determined using together measurement of CO2 mixing ratio and radiocarbon (14C) content of air. In this project we developed a high precision atmospheric CO2 monitoring station in Debrecen. An integrating sampling system (developed by ATOMKI) was applied for radiocarbon measurements. One sampler was installed in Debrecen station and two independent 14CO2 sampling line were installed 300 km far from Debrecen at Hegyhatsal station as independent background references, where high precision atmospheric CO2 mixing ratio measurement is also running since 1997. During the winter of 2008/09 we measured the mixing ratio and radiocarbon content of atmospheric CO2 at Debrecen and the reference station simultaneously. It was concluded that trends in CO2 mixing ratio variations in time are very similar at the three different sampling points (3 m above ground in Debrecen, 10 m and 115 m above ground in Hegyhatsal). Air quality in Debrecen during September of 2008 seemed to be relatively clear from the point of view of its CO2 content at least When winter came closer in October, with lover outside temperature and less sunshine hours the CO2 content of air was increased in general at all the three sampling points, but this effect was more intensive closs, but this effect was more intensive closer to the ground level. According our radiocarbon observations it was clearly indicated that there was not significant amount of fossil fuel CO2 in the air of Debrecen during September in 2008. But during the winter of 2008/09 the ?14C value of atmospheric CO2 of Debrecen decreased with more than 40 per mill relative to September's results, and according our calculations it was caused by about 20 ppm fossil fuel CO2 which appeared as a surplus amount in the air above the September level (Figure 1.). Acknowledgements This research project was supported by Hungarian NSF (Ref No. OTKA-F69029) and Isotoptech Zrt.

302

Technological research and development of fossil fuels; Ricerca e sviluppo tecnologico per lo sfruttamento ottimale dei combustibili fossili  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The aim of the present document is to supply general information concerning fossil fuels that represent, today and for the near future, the main energy source of our planet. New fossil fuel technologies are in continual development with two principal goals: to decrease environmental impact and increase transformation process efficiency. Examples of this effort are: (1) gas-steam combined cycles integrated with coal gasification plants, or with pressurized-fluidized-bed combustors; (2) new cycles with humid air or coal direct fired turbine, now under development. In the first part of this document the international and national energy situations and trends are shown. After some brief notes on environment problems and alternative fuels, such as biomasses and municipal wastes, technological aspects, mainly relevant to increasing fossil-fueled power plant performances, are examined in greater depth. Finally the research and technological development activities of ENEA (National Agency for New technologies, Energy and the Environment) Engineering Branch in order to improve fossil fuels energy and environmental use are presented.

Minghetti, E.; Palazzi, G. [ENEA, Centro Ricerche Casaccia, Rome (Italy). Dip. Energia

1995-05-01

303

Fossil fuel-fired power generation. Case studies of recently constructed coal- and gas-fired plants  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

To meet future energy demand growth and replace older or inefficient units, a large number of fossil fuel-fired plants will be required to be built worldwide in the next decade. Yet CO{sub 2} emissions from fossil-fired power generation are a major contributor to climate change. As a result, new plants must be designed and operated at highest efficiency both to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions and to facilitate deployment of CO{sub 2} capture and storage in the future. The series of case studies in this report, which respond to a request to the IEA from the G8 Summit in July 2005, were conducted to illustrate what efficiency is achieved now in modern plants in different parts of the world using different grades of fossil fuels. The plants were selected from different geographical areas, because local factors influence attainable efficiency. The case studies include pulverized coal combustion (PCC) with both subcritical and supercritical (very high pressure and temperature) steam turbine cycles, a review of current and future applications of coal-fuelled integrated gasification combined cycle plants (IGCC), and a case study of a natural gas fired combined cycle plant to facilitate comparisons. The results of these analyses show that the technologies for high efficiency (low CO{sub 2} emission) and very low conventional pollutant emissions (particulates, SO{sub 2}, NOx) from fossil fuel-fired power generation are available now through PCC, IGCC or NGCC at commercially acceptable cost. This report contains comprehensive technical and indicative cost information for modern fossil fuel-fired plants that was previously unavailable. It serves as a valuable sourcebook for policy makers and technical decision makers contemplating decisions to build new fossil fuel-fired power generation plants.

Henderson, C. [IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)

2007-10-23

304

Small Scale SOFC Demonstration Using Bio-Based and Fossil Fuels  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Technology Management, Inc. (TMI) of Cleveland, Ohio, has completed the project entitled â??Small Scale SOFC Demonstration using Bio-based and Fossil Fuels.â? Under this program, two 1-kW systems were engineered as technology demonstrators of an advanced technology that can operate on either traditional hydrocarbon fuels or renewable biofuels. The systems were demonstrated at Patterson's Fruit Farm of Chesterland, OH and were open to the public during the first quarter of 2012. As a result of the demonstration, TMI received quantitative feedback on operation of the systems as well as qualitative assessments from customers. Based on the test results, TMI believes that > 30% net electrical efficiency at 1 kW on both traditional and renewable fuels with a reasonable entry price is obtainable. The demonstration and analysis provide the confidence that a 1 kW entry-level system offers a viable value proposition, but additional modifications are warranted to reduce sound and increase reliability before full commercial acceptance.

Michael Petrik; Robert Ruhl

2012-03-31

305

Fossil fuel subsidy removal and inadequate public power supply: Implications for businesses  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

We briefly consider the impact of fossil fuel subsidy removal policies in the context of inadequate power supply, with a focus on the implications for businesses. In doing so, we utilize the case of the early 2012 fuel subsidy removal in Nigeria. The rationale for such subsidy-removal policies is typically informed by analysis showing that they lead to an economically inefficient allocation of resources and market distortions, while often failing to meet intended objectives. However, often the realities of infrastructural and institutional deficiencies are not appropriately factored into the decision-making process. Businesses in many developing countries, already impaired by the high cost of power supply deficiencies, become even less competitive on an unsubsidized basis. We find that justifications for removal often do not adequately reflect the specific environments of developing country economies, resulting in poor recommendations – or ineffective policy. - Highlights: ? We consider the impact of fuel subsidy removal in the context of energy poverty. ? Calls for subsidy removal often do not reflect the developing country realities. ? Businesses impaired by power supply deficiencies, become even less competitive.

306

Effects of aqueous effluents from in situ fossil-fuel processing technologies on aquatic systems  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Progress is reported for the second year of this project to evaluate the effects of aqueous effluents from in-situ fossil fuel processing technologies on aquatic biota. The project objectives for Year 2 were pursued through five tasks: literature reviews on process water constituents, possible environmental impacts and potential control technologies; toxicity bioassays on the effects of coal gasification and oil shale retorting process waters and six process water constituents on aquatic biota; biodegradation studies on process water constituents; bioaccumulation factor estimation for the compounds tested in the toxicity bioassays; and recommendations on maximum exposure concentrations for process water constituents based on data from the project and from the literature. Results in each of the five areas of research are reported.

Bergman, H.L.

1978-12-01

307

Chromosome aberrations in employees from fossil-fueled and nuclear-power plants  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Chromosome aberrations were scored in 59 persons from fossil-fueled plants, in 89 persons from nuclear-power plants and in 23 controls. A significant increase in acentric chromosome fragments and dicentric chromosomes compared to the control group was observed in both types of workers. Moreover, the number of abnormal cells was significantly greater in workers of conventional plants than in those of nuclear-power plants. When adjusted for loss of lymphocytes according to a half-life of 3 years, this difference was also significant for the number of dicentric chromosomes observed. A significant effect of length of exposure or of frequency of radiological examinations could be discerned only in the group of workers from conventional plants. (orig.)

308

Integrated capture of fossil fuel gas pollutants including CO.sub.2 with energy recovery  

Science.gov (United States)

A method of reducing pollutants exhausted into the atmosphere from the combustion of fossil fuels. The disclosed process removes nitrogen from air for combustion, separates the solid combustion products from the gases and vapors and can capture the entire vapor/gas stream for sequestration leaving near-zero emissions. The invention produces up to three captured material streams. The first stream is contaminant-laden water containing SO.sub.x, residual NO.sub.x particulates and particulate-bound Hg and other trace contaminants. The second stream can be a low-volume flue gas stream containing N.sub.2 and O.sub.2 if CO2 purification is needed. The final product stream is a mixture comprising predominantly CO.sub.2 with smaller amounts of H.sub.2O, Ar, N.sub.2, O.sub.2, SO.sub.X, NO.sub.X, Hg, and other trace gases.

Ochs, Thomas L. (Albany, OR); Summers, Cathy A. (Albany, OR); Gerdemann, Steve (Albany, OR); Oryshchyn, Danylo B. (Philomath, OR); Turner, Paul (Independence, OR); Patrick, Brian R. (Chicago, IL)

2011-10-18

309

Device for separating CO2 from fossil-fueled power plant emissions  

Science.gov (United States)

A gas separation device includes an inner conduit, and a concentric outer conduit. An electrically conductive filter media, preferably a carbon fiber composite molecular sieve, is provided in the annular space between the inner conduit and the outer conduit. Gas flows through the inner conduit and the annular space between the inner conduit and the outer conduit, so as to contact the filter media. The filter media preferentially adsorbs at least one constituent of the gas stream. The filter media is regenerated by causing an electric current to flow through the filter media. The inner conduit and outer conduit are preferably electrically conductive whereby the regeneration of the filter media can be electrically stimulated. The invention is particularly useful for the removal of CO.sub.2 from the exhaust gases of fossil-fueled power plants.

Burchell, Timothy D. (Oak Ridge, TN); Judkins, Roddie R. (Knoxville, TN); Wilson, Kirk A. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-04-23

310

Air/gas system dynamics of fossil-fuel power plants, volume 5. System excitation sources  

Science.gov (United States)

Combustion air/flue gas system dynamic problems in fossil fuel power plants involving significant pressure and flow dynamic variations are addressed. A computer based mathematical model was used to study system stability, surging and transient response to changes in damper settings and disturbances generated by fans and other equipment. Low frequency periodic oscillations resulting from air preheater rotation and higher frequency disturbances resulting from forced draft induced draft and recirculation fans were identified. Significant disturbances were found at frequencies corresponding to fan rotation speed and its harmonics, including blade passage frequency. The fan was operated at flows corresponding to and less than the peak efficiency point, and a disturbance ssociated with rotating stall at a frequency of approximately two thirds of rotation frequency was produced.

Goldschmied, F. R.; Wormly, D. N.; Rowell, D.

1981-10-01

311

Climate policy and the optimal extraction of high- and low-carbon fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

We study how restricting CO2 emissions affects resource prices and depletion over time. We use a Hotelling-style model with two non- renewable fossil fuels that differ in their carbon content (e.g. coal and natural gas) and that are imperfect substitutes in final good production. We study both an unexpected constraint and an anticipated constraint. Both shocks induce intertemporal substitution of resource use. When emissions are unexpectedly restricted, it is cost-effective to use high-carbon resources relatively more (less) intensively on impact if this resource is relatively scarce (abundant). If the emission constraint is anticipated, it is cost-effective to use relatively more (less) of the low-carbon input before the constraint becomes binding, in order to conserve relatively more (less) of the high-carbon input for the period when climate policy is active in case the high-carbon resource is relatively scarce (abundant)

312

DEVELOPMENT OF SAMPLING AND ANALYTICAL METHODS FOR THE MEASUREMENT OF NITROUS OXIDE FROM FOSSIL FUEL COMBUSTION SOURCES  

Science.gov (United States)

The report documents the technical approach and results achieved while developing a grab sampling method and an automated, on-line gas chromatography method suitable to characterize nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions from fossil fuel combustion sources. he two methods developed have b...

313

Contextualizing avian mortality: A preliminary appraisal of bird and bat fatalities from wind, fossil-fuel, and nuclear electricity  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This article explores the threats that wind farms pose to birds and bats before briefly surveying the recent literature on avian mortality and summarizing some of the problems with it. Based on operating performance in the United States and Europe, this study offers an approximate calculation for the number of birds killed per kWh generated for wind electricity, fossil-fuel, and nuclear power systems. The study estimates that wind farms and nuclear power stations are responsible each for between 0.3 and 0.4 fatalities per gigawatt-hour (GWh) of electricity while fossil-fueled power stations are responsible for about 5.2 fatalities per GWh. While this paper should be respected as a preliminary assessment, the estimate means that wind farms killed approximately seven thousand birds in the United States in 2006 but nuclear plants killed about 327,000 and fossil-fueled power plants 14.5 million. The paper concludes that further study is needed, but also that fossil-fueled power stations appear to pose a much greater threat to avian wildlife than wind and nuclear power technologies.

314

The implication for climate change and peak fossil fuel of the continuation of the current trend in wind and solar energy production  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Climate change, and more recently, the risk of fossil fuel production being unable to keep pace with demand (peak fossil fuel) are both considered as risks to civilisation, or global risks. In an initial empirical analysis, this paper attempts to answer the following questions, which have often been posed but have not, to our knowledge, been answered empirically at global level. At which date, if unaddressed, will the risks become critical? Given that the substitution of fossil fuels by wind and solar energy is often proposed as a solution to these problems, what is its current aggregate growth rate and is there a plausible future growth rate which would substitute it for fossil fuels before the risks become critical? The study finds that the peak fossil fuel risk will start to be critical by 2020. If however the future growth rate of wind and solar energy production follows that already achieved for the world mobile phone system or the Chinese National Expressway Network the peak fossil fuel risk can be prevented completely. For global warming, the same growth rate provides significant mitigation by reducing carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels to zero by the early 2030s. - Highlights: ? Converging studies show the peak fossil fuel risk likely to be critical by 2020. ? We model the future growth rate of wind and solar energy based on analogous precedents. ? These are the growth rates already achieved by the world mobile phone system and the Chinese Nation phone system and the Chinese National Expressway Network. ? We show that wind and solar energy growth at these rates averts the peak fossil fuel risk. ? For global warming, the scenarios make fossil-fuel CO2 emissions zero by 2030.

315

A numerical analysis of worldwide CO{sub 2} emissions based on fossil fuels and effects on atmospheric warming in Turkey  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The climate system of the earth, globally and locally, obviously has been changed from pre-industrial period to present. Some of the changes are due to human activities where the vital role has been played by the emission. Fossil fuels (coal, natural gas, oil), the raw materials for energy, play an effective and determining role in the development and sustenance of industrial development, as well as in the energy planning in all major countries. When global and regional geographies are evaluated from the geo-strategic and geo-political points of view, it is clearly seen that among all fossil fuels, coal is distributed more 'equally' in ratio than oil and natural gas reserves. Coal is gradually gaining importance for countries that do not have energy resources, have limited ones, or have resources on the verge of exhaustion. With the latest environmentally-friendly technological innovations in the field of burning-storing CO2 emissions in thermal power plants and given today's emphasis on the principle of 'sustainable development,' it is an undeniable fact that coal will continue to be a significant primary energy resource in the future, both in Turkey and around the world. In this study, in order to numerically calculate the impact of CO2 from fossil fuel consumption on global warming and the process of climate change, a global scale numerical evaluation has been constructed. The evaluation utilizes the 'total primary energy supply (TPES) - CO2 emission' from 136 countries in 2004 together with such basic indicators as 'TPES/capita' and 'ton CO2/capita'. The potential CO2 emission for the year 2030 has also been estimated. Moreover, to maintain the integrity of the subject under study, the distribution of thermal power plants utilizing fossil fuels among the differing geographical regions of Turkey, the relationship between forests (F) in these regions, and the average annual increase in temperature ({delta}T) between 1975-92 and 1993-2006 have also been examined. Data was taken from 133 macro-climatic meteorological stations within the scope of this study.

Tokgoz, Nuray

2007-07-01

316

Fossil fuels: technical, economical and political challenges for 2030-2050; Combustibles fossiles: enjeux techniques, economiques et politiques a l'horizon 2030-2050  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This panorama takes stock on the international energy actuality in 2003 and discusses the instability of the geo-political context of the energy and the part of the fossil fuels for the future years 2030-2050. The following topics were presented: activities and market for the exploration-production, refining and petrochemistry, the world gas trade situation, the petroleum supply and demand, the Iraq, the diesel in the USA, the investments and the depletion, long-dated evolutions of motors and fuels, implementing of the european directive concerning the market of tradable permits of CO{sub 2}, the carbon sequestration, hydrogen the energy of the future and the biofuels in Europe. (A.L.B.)

NONE

2004-07-01

317

An assessment of econometric models applied to fossil fuel power generation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The main purpose of this report is to provide a general view of those studies, in which the econometric approach is applied to the selection of fuel in fossil fired power generation, focusing the attention to the key role played by the fuel prices. The report consists of a methodological analysis and a survey of the studies available in literature. The methodological analysis allows to assess the adequateness of the econometric approach, in the electrical power utilities policy. With this purpose, the fundamentals of microeconomics, which are the basis of the econometric models, are pointed out and discussed, and then the hypotheses, which are needed to be assumed for complying the economic theory, are verified in their actual implementation in the power generation sector. The survey of the available studies provides a detailed description of the Translog and Logit models, and the results achieved with their application. From these results, the estimated models show to fit the data with good approximation, a certain degree of interfuel substitution and a meaningful reaction to prices on demand side

318

Photodegradation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in fossil fuels catalysed by supported TiO{sub 2}  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper describes the photodegradation behavior of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in different types of fossil fuels (commercial diesel, Arabian light crude, heavy fuel oil from the Prestige oil spill and coal from an abandoned coal dump) suspended in artificial seawater or ultrapure water, under irradiation in a stirred photochemical reactor for 14 days. The reactor was continuously fed with air from a compressor at a constant rate of 6NLh{sup -1}, and thin films of TiO{sub 2} (anatase) supported on pyrex glass raschig rings were used as catalyst. Dark control samples were carried out simultaneously for all the experiments, and both phases, aqueous and organic, were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry in the experimental and dark control samples, allowing to calculate a photodegradation ratio. The polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons reached a high degree of photodegradation in the water-soluble fraction of the samples, but the organic fractions remained almost unaffected in most of the experiments. Some photodegradation products have been also identified in the aqueous and organic fractions of the samples. (author)

Garcia-Martinez, Maria J.; Da Riva, Ignacio; Canoira, Laureano; Llamas, Juan F.; Alcantara, Ramon [Department of Chemical Engineering and Fuels, School of Mines, Technical University of Madrid, Rios Rosas 21, 28003-Madrid (Spain); Gallego, Jose Luis R. [Department of Exploitation and Prospecting for Mines, Campus of Mieres, University of Oviedo, Gonzalo Gutierrez S/N-33600 Mieres, Asturias (Spain)

2006-10-05

319

The Estonian national program for sustainable resource development and its connection with teaching about fossil fuels in chemistry courses  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The conception of sustainable resource development worked out under the initiative of the United Nations (UN) actualizes ideas for improving the health of people and the environment. The needs of people are to he addressed and, simultaneously, natural resources preserved. That is ,why ecological and economic expenses are to he integrated and flow sheets of industrial plants are to be reorganized in order to utilize natural resources in a rational way. The association of Estonia with the resolution of the UN Conference on Environmental Development held in Rio de Janeiro and the resolution of the Estonian Parliament concerning The National Program of Sustainable Development require changes in our lifestyle. Chemical education in schools has to support a change in the way of thinking and many concrete subjects can be connected with the problems of sustainable development. Metallic elements get into the environment mostly with fuel combustion ashes. According to various prognoses, fossil fuel resources will last for a thousand years. This means that more and more metallic compounds are thrown into the environment. Dispersion of metals in the air, water bodies and soil is continuously increasing. Finally, they reach the food chain and to the human body. As a result, toxicosis, illnesses, and inadvisable dislocations in organic life may occur. The trend to use ash as a raw material for metal production is considered to have some prospective economically attractive applicatispective economically attractive application. This would be one possible way of sustainable resource development to avoid the increase of environmental pollution and increase production of the corresponding metals

320

Impacts of proposed RCRA regulations and other related federal environmental regulations on Fossil Fuel-Fired Facilities: Final report, Volume 1  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In order to fulfill its responsibilities, DOE contracted with Engineering-Science to perform a multi-phase engineering and economics study to evaluate the impact of the proposed RCRA regulations and other related federal environmental regulations on coal-fired utilities. This Interim Phase I report presents the findings of the impacts of proposed RCRA and related federal regulations on the utility sector fossil fuel-fired facilities. Subsequent phases involve parallel engineering studies on the industrial sector as well as economic evaluations. The framework of this study was based on the development and analysis (engineering and economic) of four regulatory scenarios for the disposal of fly ash, bottom ash and FGD sludge from the utility industry.

1987-03-01

321

Transforming fossil fuel energy to electricity using MHD with a rare-gas working fluid  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The combination of a source of combustion products and a closed cycle containing a rare gas is a very attractive idea since, to the extent that the problem of the heat transfer from the combustion products to the rare gas is solved, it is possible to enjoy the particular advantages of the open or the closed cycle while avoiding their disadvantages. It is not difficult to produce thermal energy at high temperatures in an open cycle. On the other hand, the design of ducts for operation over long periods of time and the treatment of the combustion products in the medium-temperature heat exchangers and at the seed removal stage pose difficult technological problems for which it may not be possible to find economic solutions. In the closed cycle, on the other hand, the technological problems do not seem to be crucial since the operating temperatures are lower and the gases are far less corrosive. Problems arise when one attempts to link a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor to an MHD system as system pressures are incompatible. However, the existence of a heat exchanger capable of transferring to a rare gas, at about 2000°C, thermal energy obtained by the combustion at atmospheric pressure of fossil fuels with air would: (a) Solve the problem of increasing the efficiency with which the energy released by the combustion of the fossil substances is converted into electricity, a problem which research workers are trying to tackle using Open-cycle systems; (b) Permit the study of closed-cycle problems at full scale before a series of high- temperature converters is launched. In the first part of the paper the authors examine a heat exchanger design that meets these requirements. In the second part they consider the general characteristics of power plants built around such heat exchangers and assess their conversion efficiency. In the third part they study in detail a specific commercial power station project. (author)

322

Industry  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of industrial mitigation for sustainable development is discussed in Section 7.7. Section 7.8 discusses the sector's vulnerability to climate change and options for adaptation. A number of policies have been designed either to encourage voluntary GHG emission reductions from the industrial sector or to mandate such reductions. Section 7.9 describes these policies and the experience gained to date. Co-benefits of reducing GHG emissions from the industrial sector are discussed in Section 7.10. Development of new technology is key to the cost-effective control of industrial GHG emissions. Section 7.11 discusses research, development, deployment and diffusion in the industrial sector and Section 7.12, the long-term (post-2030) technologies for GHG emissions reduction from the industrial sector. Section 7.13 summarizes gaps in knowledge.

Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

2007-12-01

323

Effective utilization of fossil fuels for low carbon world -- IGCC and high performance gas turbine  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The reduction of greenhouse-gas emissions is required to minimize the effect of hydrocarbon based power generation on global warming. In pursue of this objective, Mitsubishi Heavy Industries is dedicating considerable efforts on two different ways to reduce the environmental impact. The first one involves gas turbine performance improvement by raising firing temperature for Natural-gas and LNG applications. In this regard, the latest J class gas turbine was designed to operate at 1600 deg C and expected combined cycle efficiency in excess of 60%. The other approach involves the use of Integrated Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) plants to burn solid fuel like coal.

Ishii, Hiromi; Hashimoto, Takao; Sakamoto, Koichi; Komori, Toyoaki; Kishine, Takashi; Shiozaki, Shigehiro

2010-09-15

324

Industrial Fuel Gas Demonstration Plant Program: plan for use and disposition of industrial fuel gas  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The IFG plant will convert 3160 tons per day of high-sulfur coal to produce 175 million cubic feet of medium-Btu gas daily, which is the equivalent of 50 billion Btu's per day of natural gas. The plant will provide an assurance of supply and reliability of IFG to potential customers by using a credit generating unit that methanates and injects a small portion of gas into the natural gas pipeline. The gas is credited to the IFG customers and is supplied to them during periods when the IFG plant is shut down. We have identified 25 prospective customers, which include existing industrial customers and Tennessee Valley Authority's (TVA's) Allen Generating Station who provide a large market potential for IFG. Industrial fuel gas has a heating value of approximately 300 Btu's per standard cubic foot, which is one-third that of natural gas; therefore, it is transported to the industrial customers through a separate distribution pipeline. Combustion trials with IFG were conducted in equipment similar to the identified customers' boilers to provide information on its utilization. The study also considered the cost of converting existing equipment to use IFG and concluded that most of the customers' equipment does not require major changes. Several conclusions may be drawn from the market survey and the plan contained in this report. The IFG is viewed as a crucial step toward providing supplemental energy for MLGW's industrial customers. A large immediate market exists for the total output of IFG. Letters of intent to negotiate to purchase about 100% of the plant output have been obtained, thus meeting the contractual requirements. Combustion tests show the feasibility of using IFG in the customers' existing equipment. The IFG distribution system, including the credit system and underground gas storage, will provide a 365-day/yr assured and reliable fuel supply to the customers.

1979-01-01

325

Modelling African aerosol using updated fossil fuel and biofuel emission inventories for 2005 and 2030  

Science.gov (United States)

A regional fossil fuel and biofuel emission inventory for particulates has been developed for Africa at a resolution of 0.25° x 0.25° for the year 2005. The original database of Junker and Liousse (2008) was used after modification for updated regional fuel consumption and emission factors. Consumption data were corrected after direct inquiries conducted in Africa, including a new emitter category (i.e. two-wheel vehicles including “zemidjans”) and a new activity sector (i.e. power plants) since both were not considered in the previous emission inventory. Emission factors were measured during the 2005 AMMA campaign (Assamoi and Liousse, 2010) and combustion chamber experiments. Two prospective inventories for 2030 are derived based on this new regional inventory and two energy consumption forecasts by the Prospective Outlook on Long-term Energy Systems (POLES) model (Criqui, 2001). The first is a reference scenario, where no emission controls beyond those achieved in 2003 are taken into account, and the second is for a "clean" scenario where possible and planned policies for emission control are assumed to be effective. BC and OCp emission budgets for these new inventories will be discussed and compared to the previous global dataset. These new inventories along with the most recent open biomass burning inventory (Liousse et al., 2010) have been tested in the ORISAM-TM5 global chemistry-climate model with a focus over Africa at a 1° x 1° resolution. Global simulations for BC and primary OC for the years 2005 and 2030 are carried out and the modelled particulate concentrations for 2005 are compared to available measurements in Africa. Finally, BC and OC radiative properties (aerosol optical depths and single scattering albedo) are calculated and the direct radiative forcing is estimated using an off line model (Wang and Penner, 2009). Results of sensitivity tests driven with different emission scenarios will be presented.

Liousse, C.; Penner, J. E.; Assamoi, E.; Xu, L.; Criqui, P.; Mima, S.; Guillaume, B.; Rosset, R.

2010-12-01

326

Contamination of seafood by radioactivity produced from burning of coal and other fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The environmental impact of radioactivity produced from fossil fuel combustion is investigated. A brief review is given of previous work. The latest calculation of the Oak Ridge group shows that a power plant using coal, which contains 1 ppm of U and 2 ppm of Th, gives a radioactive dose comparable to, or greater than that of a nuclear reactor, even if the dust is removed by up to 99%. A review of the experimental data is given. It is emphasized that 210Pb and 210Po, because of their volatility, are expected to be released at much higher rates than other radioactivities and that they are strongly concentrated in marine organisms so that their effect on the Japanese living on seafood may be considerable. An estimate is made for the hazard of 210Po through the foodchain of marine organisms. Although the uncertainties are still very large, the effect of 210Po on the Japanese is found to be significant. The collective dose of a 1,000 MW coal-fired power plant in Japan is estimated to be 320 - 16,000 man-rem/year, which should be compared with 20 man-rem/year in the results of the Oak Ridge group, which do not include this foodchain. Comparison with nuclear energy is made. Although the absolute value of the coal-fired power plant is still much smaller than the natural background, its maximum value is three times as large as the total fuel cycle of the full-scale nuclear electricity generation, so its social implications cannot betion, so its social implications cannot be overlooked. (author)

327

Accumulation of fossil fuels and metallic minerals in active and ancient rift lakes  

Science.gov (United States)

A study of active and ancient rift systems around the world suggests that accumulations of fossil fuels and metallic minerals are related to the interactions of processes that form rift valleys with those that take place in and around rift lakes. The deposition of the precursors of petroleum, gas, oil shale, coal, phosphate, barite, Cu-Pb-Zn sulfides, and uranium begins with erosion of uplifted areas, and the consequent input of abundant nutrients and solute loads into swamps and tectonic lakes. Hot springs and volcanism add other nutrients and solutes. The resulting high biological productivity creates oxidized/reduced interfaces, and anoxic and H2S-rich bottom waters which preserves metal-bearing organic tissues and horizons. In the depositional phases, the fine-grained lake deposits are in contact with coarse-grained beach, delta, river, talus, and alluvial fan deposits. Earthquake-induced turbidites also are common coarse-grained deposits of rift lakes. Postdepositional processes in rifts include high heat flow and a resulting concentration of the organic and metallic components that were dispersed throughout the lakebeds. Postdepositional faulting brings organic- and metal-rich sourcebeds in contact with coarse-grained host and reservoir rocks. A suite of potentially economic deposits is therefore a characteristic of rift valleys. ?? 1983.

Robbins, E.I.

1983-01-01

328

Response of the global climate to changes in atmospheric chemical composition due to fossil fuel burning  

Science.gov (United States)

Recent modeling of atmospheric chemical processes (Logan et al, 1978; Hameed et al, 1979) suggests that tropospheric ozone and methane might significantly increase in the future as the result of increasing anthropogenic emissions of CO, NO(x), and CH4 due to fossil fuel burning. Since O3 and CH4 are both greenhouse gases, increases in their concentrations could augment global warming due to larger future amounts of atmospheric CO2. To test the possible climatic impact of changes in tropospheric chemical composition, a zonal energy-balance climate model has been combined with a vertically averaged tropospheric chemical model. The latter model includes all relevant chemical reactions which affect species derived from H2O, O2, CH4, and NO(x). The climate model correspondingly incorporates changes in the infrared heating of the surface-troposphere system resulting from chemically induced changes in tropospheric ozone and methane. This coupled climate-chemical model indicates that global climate is sensitive to changes in emissions of CO, NO(x) and CH4, and that future increases in these emissions could augment global warming due to increasing atmospheric CO2.

Hameed, S.; Cess, R. D.; Hogan, J. S.

1980-01-01

329

Electrical discharge phenomena application for solid fossil fuels in-situ conversion  

Science.gov (United States)

The application of high voltage to oil shale initiates partial discharges (PDs) with the following treeing like in insulating dielectrics. Critical PDs and treeing with a high propagation rate occur under the low electrical intensity ~102 V/cm due to oil shale's high porosity, heterogeneity and anisotropy. The completed discharge occurs as a result of these phenomena. Carbonization is initiated around a plasma channel at the treeing stage and extended during electromagnetic action time. Carbonized rock electrical resistance decreases by 8÷10 degrees to 10 ohm·cm, and shale and coal could be heated by Joule heat in carbonized volume and discharge plasma. A high-current supply is necessary for this heating stage. Also, a high- voltage supply with steep-grade characteristics can be used for PDs and treeing initiating and heating the carbonized rock with low resistance. Thus, these phenomena allow in-situ processing in order to produce a flammable gas and synthetic oil from inferior solid fossil fuels by pyrolytic conversion. Computations show that the ratio between energy derived from gas flaming and energy for shale conversion is more than fifty. Therefore, oil shale conversion with the help of electrical discharge phenomena application can be very efficient, as it needs little energy.

Bukharkin, A. A.; Lopatin, V. V.; Martemyanov, S. M.; Koryashov, I. A.

2014-11-01

330

On-line elemental analysis of fossil fuel process streams by inductively coupled plasma spectrometry  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

METC is continuing development of a real-time, multi-element plasma based spectrometer system for application to high temperature and high pressure fossil fuel process streams. Two versions are under consideration for development. One is an Inductively Coupled Plasma system that has been described previously, and the other is a high power microwave system. The ICP torch operates on a mixture of argon and helium with a conventional annular swirl flow plasma gas, no auxiliary gas, and a conventional sample stream injection through the base of the plasma plume. A new, demountable torch design comprising three ceramic sections allows bolts passing the length of the torch to compress a double O-ring seal. This improves the reliability of the torch. The microwave system will use the same data acquisition and reduction components as the ICP system; only the plasma source itself is different. It will operate with a 750-Watt, 2.45 gigahertz microwave generator. The plasma discharge will be contained within a narrow quartz tube one quarter wavelength from a shorted waveguide termination. The plasma source will be observed via fiber optics and a battery of computer controlled monochromators. To extract more information from the raw spectral data, a neural net computer program is being developed. This program will calculate analyte concentrations from data that includes analyte and interferant spectral emission intensity. Matrix effects and spectral overlaps can be treated more effectively by this method than by conventional spectral analysis.

Chisholm, W.P.

1995-06-01

331

Improving the Carbon Dioxide Emission Estimates from the Combustion of Fossil Fuels in California  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Central to any study of climate change is the development of an emission inventory that identifies and quantifies the State's primary anthropogenic sources and sinks of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion accounted for 80 percent of California GHG emissions (CARB, 2007a). Even though these CO2 emissions are well characterized in the existing state inventory, there still exist significant sources of uncertainties regarding their accuracy. This report evaluates the CO2 emissions accounting based on the California Energy Balance database (CALEB) developed by Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in terms of what improvements are needed and where uncertainties lie. The estimated uncertainty for total CO2 emissions ranges between -21 and +37 million metric tons (Mt), or -6percent and +11percent of total CO2 emissions. The report also identifies where improvements are needed for the upcoming updates of CALEB. However, it is worth noting that the California Air Resources Board (CARB) GHG inventory did not use CALEB data for all combustion estimates. Therefore the range in uncertainty estimated in this report does not apply to the CARB's GHG inventory. As much as possible, additional data sources used by CARB in the development of its GHG inventory are summarized in this report for consideration in future updates to CALEB.

de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Wenzel, Tom; Price, Lynn

2008-08-13

332

Integral power evaluation in fossil fuel power plants; Evaluacion energetica integral en unidades de centrales termoelectricas  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In this occasion, a methodology is presented that carries out an integral energy evaluation of fossil fuel power plants units (FFPPU) with the purpose of determining the root of the significant decrements of power produced soon after the annual maintenance service. This proposal, besides identifying the origin of the energy efficiency problems, offers information about the contributions of each one of the involved equipment in the total decrement of the unit. With this methodology, the maintenance focuses in the equipment that contributes to the greater energy loss. This document presents such methodology along with its application in a real case, results and necessary remedial actions, demonstrating that its application offers bases for the investment in corrective measures. [Spanish] En esta ocasion se presenta una metodologia que efectua una evaluacion energetica integral de las unidades de centrales termoelectricas (UCT) con el fin de determinar la raiz de los decrementos de potencia significativos producidos luego del servicio anual de mantenimiento. Dicha propuesta, ademas de identificar el origen de los problemas de eficiencia energetica, brinda informacion acerca de las aportaciones de cada uno de los equipos involucrados al decremento total de la unidad. Con esta metodologia, el mantenimiento se enfoca a los equipos que contribuyen a la mayor perdida de potencia. Este documento exhibe tal metodologia junto con su aplicacion en un caso real, resultados y las acciones correctivas necesarias, demostrando que su aplicacion ofrece bases para una inversion futura en medidas correctivas.

Figueroa I, Luis R; Sanchez H, Laura E; Rodriguez M, Jose H [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca, Morelos (Mexico); Nebradt G, Jesus [Unidad de Investigacion y Desarrollo de la Subdireccion de Generacion de la Comision Federal de Electricidad, (Mexico)

2006-07-01

333

INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION. SUMMARY REPORT  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This Summary Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3, 3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the Material Handling and Conditioning System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem

334

Innovative fossil fuel fired vitrification technology for soil remediation. Phase 1  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Vortec has successfully completed Phase 1 of the ``Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation`` program. The Combustion and Melting System (CMS) has processed 7000 pounds of material representative of contaminated soil that is found at DOE sites. The soil was spiked with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals surrogates, an organic contaminant, and a surrogate radionuclide. The samples taken during the tests confirmed that virtually all of the radionuclide was retained in the glass and that it did not leach to the environment-as confirmed by both ANS 16.1 and Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) testing. The organic contaminant, anthracene, was destroyed during the test with a Destruction and Removal Efficiency (DRE) of at least 99.99%. RCRA metal surrogates, that were in the vitrified product, were retained and did not leach to the environment as confirmed by the TCLP testing. Semi-volatile RCRA metal surrogates were captured by the Air Pollution Control (APC) system, and data on the amount of metal oxide particulate and the chemical composition of the particulate were established for use in the Phase 2 APC subsystem design.

1994-01-01

335

Comparison of radiative forcing impacts of the use of wood, peat, and fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The present study investigates the greenhouse impacts and the relevant time factors of the use of peat and wood for energy production and compares them with those of fossil fuels. Emissions and sinks of the whole energy production chain and subsequent use of the wood or peat production site are taken into account. The radiative forcing caused by energy production is used as a measure for the greenhouse impact. Economical considerations are not included. Radiative forcing is calculated for carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4) and nitrous oxide (N2O) emissions. The real emissions of energy production are calculated by subtracting the emissions of non-use from the emissions of energy production. All the emissions are given as a function of time, i.e. their evolution over time is taken into account. At this point the estimates for some emission developments are quite crude and should be considered exemplary. The studied energy production chains can be divided roughly into three groups, if the greenhouse impact caused by continuous energy production of hundred years is considered. In this case forest residues, planted stands and unused merchantable wood cause the least radiative forcing per unit of primary energy generated. Natural gas and peat from cultivated peatland form the middle group. According to the calculations coal and conventional peat cause the greatest greenhouse impact

336

Efficiency-improving fossil fuel technologies for electricity generation: Data selection and trends  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper studies patenting dynamics in efficiency improving electricity generation technologies as an important indicator of innovation activity. We build a novel database of worldwide patent applications in efficiency-improving fossil fuel technologies for electricity generation and then analyse patenting trends over time and across countries. We find that patenting has mostly been stable over time, with a recent decreasing trend. OECD countries represent the top innovators and the top markets for technology. Some non-OECD countries, and particularly China, are also very active in terms of patenting activity in this sector. The majority of patents are first filed in OECD countries and only then in BRIC and other non-OECD countries. BRIC and other non-OECD countries apply for patents that are mostly marketed domestically, but BRIC countries represent important markets for patent duplication of OECD inventions. These results are indicative of significant technology transfer in the field of efficiency-improving technologies for electricity production. - Highlights: ? We study innovation in efficiency-improving electricity generation technologies. ? Relevant patents are identified and used as an indicator of innovation. ? We show that there is significant technology transfer in this field. ? Most patents are first filed in OECD countries and then in non-OECD countries. ? Patents in non-OECD countries are mostly marketed domestically.cally.

337

On-line monitoring of the thermal power plant using fossil fuel by personal computer  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Increasing demand for electric power in combination with the environmental concern, requires better utilisation of the thermal power plants using fossil fuel. In this respect, to improve the utilisation it is no longer sufficient to rely on conventional technique. Improved utilisation requires more information that is reliable, structured and available to the user. This can be achieved with on-line monitoring as a part of a complex automation dedicated to control the plant. On-line monitoring improves better overview of the process and functionality of the obtained information. For the complete list of monitored variables it is necessary to develop software functions with an efficient and user- friendly tools, running on a standard PC. However, such a task is a challenge for a thermal power plants in use for 15-20 years. where the compromise between the equipment and required monitoring functions has to be considered. In this paper a practical approach in monitoring of the most important process variables in TPP Negotino (Macedonia) is proposed. The object oriented presentation (apparatus) in Windows environment enables multi-media process presentation by PC. Trends and reports are also defined by a simple selection of the values to be included. Since, the software enables analysis for a severe contingency, it can be also used for a training. (Author)

338

Enhancement of carburization/oxidation resistance in fossil fuel environments through alloy compositional optimization  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Carburization resistance of numerous heat resistant alloys has been evaluated in equilibrated atmospheres having a wide range of oxygen potentials. This paper attempts to characterize and explain alloy performance in these simulated fossil fuel environments on the basis of alloy content and scale characteristics and discusses means of further improvements in performance. A survey of current information regarding scale characteristics of wrought nickel-base alloys is also presented. Typical carburizing service environments contain at least some level of oxygen. Such applications include heat treating, ethylene pyrolysis, coal conversion, activated carbon production and steam hydrocarbon reforming. Carburization usually plays some role in the ultimate failure of an alloy; it often compromises creep and fatigue life and/or ductility. Conversely, creep, fatigue and thermal cycling can cause protective scales to crack and spall, thereby compromising carburization resistance. To maximize carburization resistance in future alloys, attention must be paid not only to corrosion performance in static environments but also to scale-alloy compatibility, growth stresses, creep and thermal gradient stresses, and inward and outward diffusion coefficients, and scale repairability.

Baker, B.A.; Smith, G.D.; Tassen, C.S. [INCO Alloys International, Inc., Huntington, WV (United States)

1996-08-01

339

Alternative fuels mixture in cement industry kilns employing Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Most of the works accomplished in the optimization area in the cement industry are addressed to solve problems just considering only one variable, forgetting that it includes too many variables and they act at the same time. Among the main variables it can be mentioned the quality of the final product, the environmental ones, the costs along the process and the reduction of the fossil fuels (primary employed through the use of alternative fuels (secondary, among others. The present work intends to build a mathematical model using optimization tools seeking to improve the cement production process foreseeing what can happen with the clinker and the emissions when the industrial residues co-processing technology is used as alternative or secondary fuel. In the optimization process a new approach called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO is employed, which is based on the Cauchy and Gauss distribution considering several process restrictions such as the specific fuel consumption, the cement quality and the environmental impact. The results obtained with PSO were precise and promising and they were compared with the classical Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP. It was also possible to evaluate the levels of primary fuels substitution through the alternative or secondary ones.

Ricardo C. Carpio

2008-12-01

340

Alternative fuels mixture in cement industry kilns employing Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english Most of the works accomplished in the optimization area in the cement industry are addressed to solve problems just considering only one variable, forgetting that it includes too many variables and they act at the same time. Among the main variables it can be mentioned the quality of the final produ [...] ct, the environmental ones, the costs along the process and the reduction of the fossil fuels (primary) employed through the use of alternative fuels (secondary), among others. The present work intends to build a mathematical model using optimization tools seeking to improve the cement production process foreseeing what can happen with the clinker and the emissions when the industrial residues co-processing technology is used as alternative or secondary fuel. In the optimization process a new approach called Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is employed, which is based on the Cauchy and Gauss distribution considering several process restrictions such as the specific fuel consumption, the cement quality and the environmental impact. The results obtained with PSO were precise and promising and they were compared with the classical Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP). It was also possible to evaluate the levels of primary fuels substitution through the alternative or secondary ones.

Ricardo C., Carpio; Francisco de, Sousa Júnior; Leandro dos Santos, Coelho; Rogério José da, Silva.

2008-12-01

341

Survey of United States and total world production, proved reserves, and remaining recoverable resources of fossil fuels and uranium  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Estimates of US and world conventional fossil fuel and uranium proved reserves and remaining recoverable resources are updated. The survey provides data on current and cumulative production of these nonrenewable energy sources and their life expectancies at selected annual consumption growth rates. Conservation would help to preserve fossil fuel resources, although some complex problems must be solved to avoid a simultaneous reduction in the rate of growth of the economy. The continual increase in world oil prices should encourage commercialization of the vast oil shale and tar sands resources if environmental problems can be solved. Efforts must be made to improve safety, efficiency, and public acceptance of nuclear power and to minimize storage problems of radioactive materials. 115 references, 18 figures, 62 tables

342

Comparative evaluation of radiation hazard to the population from fossil-fuel and nuclear power plant discharges into the atmosphere  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The paper presents a comparative evaluation of radiation hazard from fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants on the basis of the most comparable indicator - the cancerogenic effect due to radiation exposure of the population to natural and artificial radionucleides discharged by the plants. The situation is considered for the population living in the vicinity of a power station and for the population of the country as a whole. On the basis of calculated doses to various organs and tissues and the corresponding estimates of the number of deaths from malignant neoplasms, it is shown that for a 20-year period of operation of stations the effect per unit power from a fossil-fuel plant is several tens of times greater than from a nuclear station

343

A multiresolution spatial parameterization for the estimation of fossil-fuel carbon dioxide emissions via atmospheric inversions  

Science.gov (United States)

The characterization of fossil-fuel CO2 (ffCO2) emissions is paramount to carbon cycle studies, but the use of atmospheric inverse modeling approaches for this purpose has been limited by the highly heterogeneous and non-Gaussian spatiotemporal variability of emissions. Here we explore the feasibility of capturing this variability using a low-dimensional parameterization that can be implemented within the context of atmospheric CO2 inverse problems aimed at constraining regional-scale emissions. We construct a multiresolution (i.e., wavelet-based) spatial parameterization for ffCO2 emissions using the Vulcan inventory, and examine whether such a~parameterization can capture a realistic representation of the expected spatial variability of actual emissions. We then explore whether sub-selecting wavelets using two easily available proxies of human activity (images of lights at night and maps of built-up areas) yields a low-dimensional alternative. We finally implement this low-dimensional parameterization within an idealized inversion, where a sparse reconstruction algorithm, an extension of stagewise orthogonal matching pursuit (StOMP), is used to identify the wavelet coefficients. We find that (i) the spatial variability of fossil-fuel emission can indeed be represented using a low-dimensional wavelet-based parameterization, (ii) that images of lights at night can be used as a proxy for sub-selecting wavelets for such analysis, and (iii) that implementing this parameterization within the described inversion framework makes it possible to quantify fossil-fuel emissions at regional scales if fossil-fuel-only CO2 observations are available.

Ray, J.; Yadav, V.; Michalak, A. M.; van Bloemen Waanders, B.; McKenna, S. A.

2014-09-01

344

DETERMINING THE COMPOSITION OF HIGH TEMPERATURE COMBUSTION PRODUCTS OF FOSSIL FUEL BASED ON VARIATIONAL PRINCIPLES AND GEOMETRIC PROGRAMMING  

OpenAIRE

This paper presents the algorithm and results of a computer program for calculation of complex equilibrium composition for the high temperature fossil fuel combustion products. The method of determining the composition of high temperatures combustion products at the temperatures appearing in the open cycle MHD power generation is given. The determination of combustion product composition is based on minimization of the Gibbs free energy. The number of equations to be solved is reduced by usin...

Vujovic?, Velibor V.

2011-01-01

345

Documented international enquiry on solid sedimentary fossil fuels; Coal: definitions, classifications, reserves-resources and energy potential  

OpenAIRE

This paper deals with all solid sedimentary fossil fuels, i.e. coal, the main one for geological reserves and resources, peat, and oil shales. Definitions of coal ( < 50% ash) and coal seam (thickness and depth limits) are examined in view of an international agreement regarding new concepts for a common reserves and resources evaluation using the same nomenclature. The 50% ash limit, already adopted by UN-ECE for coal definition, allows the creation of a new category—the organic ...

Alpern, B.; Lemos Sousa, M. J.

2002-01-01

346

The effects of hygroscopicity on ice nucleation of fossil fuel combustion aerosols in mixed-phase clouds  

OpenAIRE

Fossil fuel black carbon and organic matter (ffBC/OM) are often emitted together with sulfate, which coats the surface of these particles and changes their hygroscopicity. Observational studies at cirrus temperatures (??40 °C) show that the hygroscopicity of soot particles can modulate their ice nucleation ability. Here, we implement a scheme for 3 categories of soot (hydrophobic, hydrophilic and hygroscopic) on the basis of laboratory data and specify their ability to act as ice nuclei ...

Yun, Y.; Penner, J. E.; Popovicheva, O.

2013-01-01

347

Atmospheric observations of carbon monoxide and fossil fuel carbon dioxide emissions from East Asia  

Science.gov (United States)

Flask samples from two sites in East Asia, Tae-Ahn Peninsula, Republic of Korea (TAP), and Shangdianzi, People's Republic of China (SDZ), were measured for a suite of trace gases and isotopes, including CO2, CO and ?14CO2. We use the ?14CO2 measurements to quantify the contribution of recently added fossil fuel CO2 (CO2ff) in each sample. Our five-year record from TAP, on the western edge of Korea, shows high pollution events when local air comes from the Korean Peninsula. Most samples at this site, however, reflect air masses from further afield in Northeastern China and typically have lower CO2ff values. SDZ is about 100km northeast of Beijing, and our small set of samples from winter 2009/2010 have strongly elevated CO2ff. Biospheric CO2 also contributes substantially to variability in total CO2 at both sites, even in winter when non-fossil CO2 sources (including photosynthesis, respiration, biomass burning and biofuel use) contribute 20-30% of the total CO2 enhancement over background. Carbon monoxide (CO) is also elevated, and correlates strongly with CO2ff. The SDZ samples, and the TAP far-field (China influenced) samples have CO to CO2ff emission ratios (RCO:CO2ff) of 47±2 and 44±3 ppb/ppm respectively, in agreement with recent bottom-up inventory estimates and consistent with other observational studies. Locally influenced TAP samples fall into two distinct datasets, ascribed to air sourced from either South Korea or North Korea. The South Korea samples are characterized by high CO2ff values and low RCO:CO2ff of 13±3 ppb/ppm, slightly higher than two available bottom-up inventory estimates, but quite consistent with emission ratios for other developed nations. We also compare our CO2ff observations with modeled CO2ff using the FLEXPART Lagrangian particle dispersion model, convolved with a bottom-up CO2ff emission inventory which includes the reported increase in Chinese emissions of 63% from 2004 to 2010. At SDZ, the model replicates the observations quite well. At TAP, the model performs well on an annual basis, although it is unable to capture the variability on individual days. The modeled time trend is consistent with our observations, whereas a model version which holds Chinese emissions flat at 2004 levels is unable to replicate the observed CO2ff.

Turnbull, J. C.; Tans, P. P.; Lehman, S. J.; Baker, D. F.; Conway, T. J.; Chung, Y. S.; Gregg, J.; Miller, J. B.; Southon, J. R.; Zhou, L.

2011-12-01

348

Plasma Technologies for Effective and Ecological Incineration of Fossil Fuels and Their Mixtures  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

An outlook on plasma technologies and their mixtures utilization is examined, these technologies are based on use of electro arc plasma and include oil-free firing up of boilers, stabilization of combustion (lighting) of low-grade coals and their mixtures, stabilizing of liquid slag yield in slag-tap furnaces, plasma gasification and complex processing of solid fuels, utilization of heavy wastes of deep processing of oil and other industrial wastes. Plasma technologies are not sensible to the quality of initial fuels and their mixtures and provide their effective burning with concurrent decrease in CO2, NOx, SOx, V2O5 emissions into environment and decrease of unburned carbon. Plasma technologies of oil-free firing up and flame stabilization have been already realized in 26 coal-fired boilers of 75-670 ton/h steam output at 15 Thermal Power Stations (TPS) in Russia, Ukraine, Kazakhstan, China, Korea, Slovakia and Mongolia. Amounts of unburned carbon were reduced 1,5-2 times, emissions of nitrogen and sulphur oxides were reduced 1.5 times. When utilizing plasma technologies of solid fuel burning at TPS CO2 emissions may be reduced by 10-15 gr. Per 1 kWh of produced electric power at the cost of decrease in amounts of unburned carbon by 40-50%. Plasma technologies utilization in power engineering allows to reduce a severe impact on environment at conservation of high technical and economical indexes on TPigh technical and economical indexes on TPS. (author)

349

ELECTRICITY SUPPLY, FOSSIL FUEL CONSUMPTION, CO2 EMISSIONS AND ECONOMIC GROWTH: IMPLICATIONS AND POLICY OPTIONS FOR SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT IN NIGERIA  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper investigates the causal relationship among electricity supply, fossil fuel consumption, CO2 emissions and economic growth in Nigeria for the period 1971-2009, in a multivariate framework.Using the bound test approach to cointegration, we found a short-run as well as a long-run relationship among the variables with a positive and statistically significant relationship between CO2 emissions and fossil fuel consumption. The findings also indicate that economic growth is associated with increased CO2 emissions while a positive relationship exists between electricity supply and CO2 emissions revealing the poor nature of electricity supply in Nigeria. Further, the Granger causality test results indicate that electricity supply has not impacted significantly on economic growth in Nigeria. The results also strongly imply that policies aimed at reducing carbon emissions in Nigeria will not impede economic growth. The paper therefore concludes that a holistic energy planning and investment in energy infrastructure is needed to drive economic growth. In the long-run however, it is possible to meet the energy needs of the country, ensure sustainable development and at the same time reduce CO2 emissions by developing alternatives to fossil fuel consumption, the main source of CO2 emissions.

Chibueze Eze Nnaji

2013-01-01

350

Industrial integration of the fuel cycle in Argentina  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The power-reactor construction program in Argentina for the period 1976-1985 is described on the basis of which the nuclear-fuel requirements have been determined. Activities connected with the fuel cycle commenced in 1950 in Argentina with the prospection and working of uranium deposits. On the basis of the nuclear power program described, plans have been drawn up for the establishment of the industrial plants that will be needed to ensure the domestic supply of fuel. The demand for fuel is correlated with the availability of uranium resoures and it is shown to be desirable from the technical, economic and industrial point of view to integrate the front end of the fuel cycle, keeping the irradiation aspects and the tail end at the development level. Progress made in this field and current programs covering exploration, concentrate production, nuclear purification, conversion to uranium dioxide, production of special alloys and fuel element fabrication are described

351

Risk and investment in the fuel cell industry  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The energy industry is one of the building blocks of the new economy. Currently, the global energy industry is going through a transformation from high carbon content fuels like crude oil to less carbon content fuels like natural gas and hydrogen. Fuel cells are the backbone of the hydrogen economy. Advances in fuel cell technology have the potential to improve the living standards of people in all countries. New sources of financial capital, however, remain a problem. In the fuel cell industry, the future of a firm often depends upon the success or failure of a few key products. This tends to make these firms very risky to invest in and, as a result, makes it difficult for these firms to secure financial investment capital. Oil price movements remain one very important source of risk to fuel cell companies. Conventional wisdom suggests that higher oil prices stimulate interest in alternative energy sources like fuel cells and the stock prices of publicly traded fuel cell companies tend to perform well when oil prices are high. Lower oil prices, however, have the opposite effect. Consequently, oil price movements may affect the rates of return of the companies currently in the fuel cell industry. In this paper, we empirically analyze the stock price sensitivity of a sample of fuel cell companies to oil price risk. In particular, we look at both the impact and magnitude of oil price changes on fuel cell stock prices. Both symmetric and asymmetric oil price changes are tric and asymmetric oil price changes are considered. Our results indicate that oil price risk is not an important source of risk that impacts the equity returns of fuel cell companies. We find that market risk factors are much more important. We then offer suggestions on how to manage this risk. These results are useful for managers, investors, policy makers, and others who are interested in the strategic management, financing and risk management of firms building the hydrogen economy. (author)

352

Brazil dominates global fuel ethanol industry  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Brazil is on its way to become oil self-sufficient this year and will meet its demand for fuel by increasing production from petroleum and ethanol. Flex-fuel cars that run on both gasoline and ethanol make up three-fourths of new car sales in Brazil. Brazilian companies are aiming to double their exports of ethanol by 2010

353

Krakow clean fossil fuels and energy efficiency program. Phase 1 report  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Krakow is one of the largest and oldest cities in Poland. It is situated in the south of the country on the banks of the Vistula River. From the 11th until the 17th centuries, it was the capital of Poland. Today, Krakow is a city of 750,000 residents, one of the largest centers of higher education, an important industrial center, and is of particular importance because of the number and kinds of historic buildings and sites. For this reason, Krakow was included by the UNESCO in the list of the world`s cultural heritages. For about three decades, significant air pollution has been one of Krakow`s most serious problems. Because the city is situated in the Vistula River valley, it is poorly ventilated and experiences a high concentration of air pollutants. The quality of air in Krakow is affected mainly by industry (Sendzimir Steelworks, energy industry, chemical plants), influx from the Silesian industrial region (power plants, metallurgy), transboundary pollution (Ostrava - Czech Republic), and local sources of low pollution, i.e. more than 1,000 boiler houses using solid fuels and more than 100,000 coal-fired home stoves. These local sources, with low stacks and almost no pollution-control equipment, are responsible for about 35-40% of the air pollution. This report presents phase I results of a program to reduce pollution in krakow. Phase I was to gather information on emissions and costs, and to verify assumptions on existing heating methods and alternatives.

Butcher, T.; Pierce, B. [eds.

1995-06-01

354

Prices of agricultural commodities, biofuels and fossil fuels in long-run relationships: a comparative study for the USA and Europe  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Time-series data for the USA and Europe representing prices of agricultural commodities, biofuels and fossil fuels are used for a comparative analysis of long-run price relationships. There is some evidence for cointegration between ethanol and gasoline, especially for the USA, and in the case of biodiesel, stronger evidence of cointegration between biodiesel, diesel and soya oil for both the USA and Europe. Finally, biofuel prices do not seem to influence agricultural commodity prices or fossil fuel prices.

Groth, Tanja; Bentzen, Jan

2013-01-01

355

Carbon storage versus fossil fuel substitution: a climate change mitigation option for two different land use categories based on short and long rotation forestry in India  

OpenAIRE

Short rotation bioenergy crops for energy production are considered an effective means to mitigate the greenhouse effect, mainly due to their ability to substitute fossil fuels. Alternatively, carbon can be sequestered and stored in the living biomass. This paper compares the two land use categories (forest land and non-forest land) for two management practices (short rotation vs. long rotation) to study mitigation potential of afforestation and fossil fuel substitution as compared to carbon ...

Kaul, M.; Mohren, G. M. J.; Dadhwal, V. K.

2010-01-01

356

INNOVATIVE FOSSIL FUEL FIRED VITRIFICATION TECHNOLOGY FOR SOIL REMEDIATION. FINAL REPORT  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This Final Report summarizes the progress of Phases 3,3A and 4 of a waste technology Demonstration Project sponsored under a DOE Environmental Management Research and Development Program and administered by the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory-Morgantown (DOE-NETL) for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation''. The Summary Reports for Phases 1 and 2 of the Program were previously submitted to DOE. The total scope of Phase 3 was to have included the design, construction and demonstration of Vortec's integrated waste pretreatment and vitrification process for the treatment of low level waste (LLW), TSCA/LLW and mixed low-level waste (MLLW). Due to funding limitations and delays in the project resulting from a law suit filed by an environmental activist and the extended time for DOE to complete an Environmental Assessment for the project, the scope of the project was reduced to completing the design, construction and testing of the front end of the process which consists of the Material Handling and Waste Conditioning (MH/C) Subsystem of the vitrification plant. Activities completed under Phases 3A and 4 addressed completion of the engineering, design and documentation of the MH/C System such that final procurement of the remaining process assemblies can be completed and construction of a Limited Demonstration Project be initiated in the event DOE elects to proceed with the construction and demonstration testing of the MH/C Subsystem. Because of USEPA policies and regulations that do not require treatment of low level or low-level/PCB contaminated wastes, DOE terminated the project because there is no purported need for this technology

357

Comparison of AB2588 multipathway risk factors for California fossil-fuel power stations  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Substances released from power plants may travel through various exposure pathways resulting in human health and environmental risks. The stack air emission's primary pathway is inhalation from the ambient air. Multipathway factors (adjustment factors to the inhalation risk) are used to evaluate the importance of non-inhalation pathways (such as ingestion and dermal contact). The multipathway factor for a specific substance is the health risk by all pathways divided by the inhalation health risk for that substance. These factors are compared for fossil fuel power stations that submitted regulatory risk assessments in compliance with California Toxic Hot Spots Act (AB2588). Substances representing the largest contributions to the cancer risk are of primary concern: arsenic, beryllium, cadmium, chromium (+6), formaldehyde, nickel, lead, selenium, and PAHs. Comparisons of the chemical-specific multipathway factors show the impacts of regulatory policy decisions on the estimated health risk for trace substances. As an example, point estimates of the soil mixing depth, varying from 1 cm to 15 cm, relate to the relative importance of the pathway. For the deeper mixing depths, the root-zone uptake by homegrown tomato plants (for assumed consumption rate of 15% for San Diego) may result in high multipathway factors for several trace metals. For shallower mixing depths, soil ingestion may become the dominant non-inhalation pathway. These differences may lead to significantly dse differences may lead to significantly different risk estimates for similar facilities located at different California locations such as to be under local regulatory authorities. The overall multipathway factor for the total cancer risk is about 2, much smaller than some of the chemical-specific factors. Science-based multipathway analysis should reduce much of the concern that may be due to policy-based decisions on pathway selection and high-value point-estimates of the parameters

358

Distributions of fossil fuel originated CO2 in five metropolitan areas of Korea (Seoul, Busan, Daegu, Daejeon, and Gwangju) according to the ?14C in ginkgo leaves  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

We collected a batch of ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba Linnaeus) leaf samples at five metropolitan areas of Korea (Seoul, Busan, Daegu, Daejeon, and Gwangju) in 2009 to obtain the regional distribution of fossil fuel originated CO2 (fossil fuel CO2) in the atmosphere. Regions assumed to be free of fossil fuel CO2 were also selected, namely Mt. Chiak, Mt. Kyeryong, Mt. Jiri, Anmyeon Island, and Jeju Island and ginkgo leaf samples were collected in those areas during the same period. The ?14C values of the samples were measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and the fossil fuel CO2 ratios in the atmosphere were obtained in the five metropolitan areas. The average ratio of fossil fuel CO2 in Seoul was higher than that in the other four cities. The leaves from the Sajik Tunnel in Seoul recorded the highest FFCTC (fossil fuel CO2 over total CO2 in atmosphere), 13.9 ± 0.5%, as the air flow of the surrounding neighborhood of the Sajik Tunnel was blocked.

359

Distributions of fossil fuel originated CO2 in five metropolitan areas of Korea (Seoul, Busan, Daegu, Daejeon, and Gwangju) according to the ?14C in ginkgo leaves  

Science.gov (United States)

We collected a batch of ginkgo (Ginkgo biloba Linnaeus) leaf samples at five metropolitan areas of Korea (Seoul, Busan, Daegu, Daejeon, and Gwangju) in 2009 to obtain the regional distribution of fossil fuel originated CO2 (fossil fuel CO2) in the atmosphere. Regions assumed to be free of fossil fuel CO2 were also selected, namely Mt. Chiak, Mt. Kyeryong, Mt. Jiri, Anmyeon Island, and Jeju Island and ginkgo leaf samples were collected in those areas during the same period. The ?14C values of the samples were measured using Accelerator Mass Spectrometry (AMS) and the fossil fuel CO2 ratios in the atmosphere were obtained in the five metropolitan areas. The average ratio of fossil fuel CO2 in Seoul was higher than that in the other four cities. The leaves from the Sajik Tunnel in Seoul recorded the highest FFCTC (fossil fuel CO2 over total CO2 in atmosphere), 13.9 ± 0.5%, as the air flow of the surrounding neighborhood of the Sajik Tunnel was blocked.

Park, J. H.; Hong, W.; Park, G.; Sung, K. S.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, Y. E.; Kim, J. K.; Choi, H. W.; Kim, G. D.; Woo, H. J.

2013-01-01

360

Environment, automotive fuels and petroleum industry  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

After several years of delays, the italian environmental regulation concerning the oil industry has taken a leading role in Europe, especially starting from 1995, for benzene limits in gasoline. This article tries to estimate what are the anticipates costs for the italian industry due to a stricter legislation on gasoline compared to the rest of Europe

361

Partial replacement of fossil fuel in a cement plant: risk assessment for the population living in the neighborhood.  

Science.gov (United States)

In cement plants, the substitution of traditional fossil fuels not only allows a reduction of CO(2), but it also means to check-out residual materials, such as sewage sludge or municipal solid wastes (MSW), which should otherwise be disposed somehow/somewhere. In recent months, a cement plant placed in Alcanar (Catalonia, Spain) has been conducting tests to replace fossil fuel by refuse-derived fuel (RDF) from MSW. In July 2009, an operational test was progressively initiated by reaching a maximum of partial substitution of 20% of the required energy. In order to study the influence of the new process, environmental monitoring surveys were performed before and after the RDF implementation. Metals and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) were analyzed in soil, herbage, and air samples collected around the facility. In soils, significant decreases of PCDD/F levels, as well as in some metal concentrations were found, while no significant increases in the concentrations of these pollutants were observed. In turn, PM(10) levels remained constant, with a value of 16?gm(-3). In both surveys, the carcinogenic and non-carcinogenic risks derived from exposure to metals and PCDD/Fs for the population living in the vicinity of the facility were within the ranges considered as acceptable according to national and international standards. This means that RDF may be a successful choice in front of classical fossil fuels, being in accordance with the new EU environmental policies, which entail the reduction of CO(2) emissions and the energetic valorization of MSW. However, further long-term environmental studies are necessary to corroborate the harmlessness of RDF, in terms of human health risks. PMID:20709362

Rovira, Joaquim; Mari, Montse; Nadal, Martí; Schuhmacher, Marta; Domingo, José L

2010-10-15

362

Isotope- and tracer-based measurements of fossil fuel and biospheric carbon dioxide in Paris during winter 2010  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Measurements of the mole fraction of the CO2 and its isotopes were performed in Paris during the MEGAPOLI winter campaign (January–February 2010. Radiocarbon (14CO2 measurements were used to identify the relative contributions of 77% CO2 from fossil fuel consumption (CO2ff from liquid and gas combustion and 23% from biospheric CO2 (CO2 from the use of biofuels and from human and plant respiration: CO2bio. These percentages correspond to average mole fractions of 26.4 ppm and 8.2 ppm for CO2ff and CO2bio, respectively. The 13CO2 analysis indicated that gas and liquid fuel contributed 70% and 30%, respectively, of the CO2 emission from fossil fuel use. Continuous measurements of CO and NOx and the ratios CO/CO2ff and NOx/CO2ff derived from radiocarbon measurements during four days make it possible to estimate the fossil fuel CO2 contribution over the entire campaign. The ratios CO/CO2ff and NOx/CO2ff are functions of air mass origin and exhibited daily ranges of 7.9 to 14.5 ppb ppm?1 and 1.1 to 4.3 ppb ppm?1, respectively. These ratios are sufficiently consistent with different emission inventories given the uncertainties of the different approaches.

M. Lopez

2013-01-01

363

Fossil fuel CO2 estimation by atmospheric 14C measurement and CO2 mixing ratios in the city of Debrecen, Hungary  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A field unit was installed in the city of Debrecen (East Hungary) during the summer of 2008 to monitor urban atmospheric fossil fuel CO2. To establish a reference level simultaneous CO2 sampling has been carried out at a rural site (Hegyhatsal) in Western Hungary. Using the Hungarian background 14CO2 observations from the rural site atmospheric fossil fuel CO2 component for the city of Debrecen was reported in a regional 'Hungarian' scale. A well visible fossil fuel CO2 peak (10-15 ppm) with a maximum in the middle of winter 2008 (January) was observed in Debrecen air. Significant local maximum (?20 ppm) in fossil fuel CO2 during Octobers of 2008 and 2009 was also detected. Stable isotope results are in agreement with the 14C based fossil fuel CO2 observations as the winter of 2008 and 2009 was different in atmospheric ?13C variations too. The more negative ?13C of atmospheric CO2 in the winter of 2008 means more fossil carbon in the atmosphere than during the winter of 2009. (author)

364

Future directions of fuel efficiency in aviation industry  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A major goal for the aviation community is reducing fuel consumption. Nowadays we can see so much effort to design a modern aircrafts that offer weight and low fuel burn savings. This study could help to understand the long way during the production of the efficient engine such as PurePower and it shows us many advantages in fuel economy. In the second part of this study the author describes technological enhancements and inevitable measures for the improvement of fuel economy. Current fuel efficient engines and future innovations in aircraft designs are introduced in the third part of the thesis. It also shows a great vision in improving aircraft performance and reducing fuel consumption. Anyway, it is too early to say which of many researching ways will lead to viable solutions, but the air transport industry is committed to support advanced technological innovations. Also, technologies are constantly being deployed and researched by the aviation industry to continuously increase performance. But we cannot forget that our effort to achieve an increased efficiency in terms of fuel consumption is still pushing the industry further.

Maria MRAZOVA

2013-12-01

365

Overall intelligent hybrid control system for a fossil-fuel power unit  

Science.gov (United States)

In response to the multiple and tighter operation requirements already placed on power plants, and anticipating everyday variations on their quantity and relevance due to competition on deregulated energy markets, this dissertation contributes the Intelligent Coordinated Control System (ICCS) paradigm that establishes a reference framework for the design of overall control systems for fossil-fuel power units, and develops a minimum prototype (ICCS-MP) to show its feasibility. The ICCS consists of a multiagent system organization structured as an open set of functionally grouped agent clusters in a two-level hierarchy. The upper level performs the supervisory functions needed to produce self-governing system behavior, while the lower level performs the fast reactive functions necessary for real-time control and protection. The ICCS-MP greatly extends the concept of current coordinated control schemes and embraces a minimum set of ICCS functions for the power unit to participate in load-frequency control in deregulated power systems; provides the means to achieve optimal wide-range load-tracking in multiobjective operating scenarios. The ICCS-MP preserves the ICCS structure. Supervisory functions include optimization and command generation, learning and control tuning, and performance and state monitoring. Direct level control functions realize a nonlinear multivariable feedforward-feedback scheme. These functions are implemented in three modules: reference governor, feedforward control processor (FFCP), and feedback control processor (FBCP). The reference governor provides set-point trajectories for the control loops by solving a multiobjective optimization problem that accommodates the operating scenario at hand. The FFCP facilitates achievement of wide-range operation; it is implemented as a fuzzy system that emulates the inverse static behavior of the power unit, and it is designed using neural networks. The FBCP provides disturbance and uncertainty compensation along the set-point trajectories; it includes fuzzy-PID controllers in a multiloop configuration and a multivariable feedforward interaction compensator, both scheduled in two-dimensions. Controllers are tuned using a genetic algorithm based procedure, and the compensator is designed using the relative gain array method. Simulation results show that the proposed ICCS paradigm provides a suitable conceptual framework to manage the complexity and to integrate either algorithmic or heuristic techniques into a control system that provides high maneuverability and optimized unit operation.

Garduno-Ramirez, Raul

2000-10-01

366

Analysis of possible future atmospheric retention of fossil fuel CO/sub 2/  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report investigates the likely rates and the potential range of future CO/sub 2/ emissions, combined with knowledge of the global cycle of carbon, to estimate a possible range of future atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations through the year 2075. Historic fossil fuel usage to the present, growing at a rate of 4.5% per year until 1973 and at a slower rate of 1.9% after 1973, was combined with three scenarios of projected emissions growth ranging from approximately 0.2 to 2.8% per year to provide annual CO/sub 2/ emissions data for two different carbon cycle models. The emissions scenarios were constructed using an energy-economic model and by varying key parameters within the bounds of currently expected future values. The extreme values for CO/sub 2/ emissions in the year 2075 are 6.8 x 10/sup 15/ and 91 x 10/sup 15/ g C year/sup -1/. Carbon cycle model simulations used a range of year - 1800 preindustrial atmospheric concentrations of 245 to 292 ppM CO/sub 2/ and three scenarios of bioshere conversion as additional atmospheric CO/sub 2/ source terms. These simulations yield a range of possible atmospheric CO/sub 2/ concentrations in year 2075 of approximately 500 to 1500 ppM, with a median of about 700 ppM. The time at which atmospheric CO/sub 2/ would potentially double from the preindustrial level ranges from year 2025 to >2075. The practical, programmatic value of this forecast exercise is that it forces quantitative definition of the assumptions, and the uncertainties therein, which form the basis of our understanding of the natural biogeochemical cycle of carbon and both historic and future human influences on the dynamics of the global cycle. Assumptions about the possible range of future atmospheric CO/sub 2/ levels provide a basis on which to evaluate the implications of these changes on climate and the biosphere. 44 references, 17 figures, 21 tables.

Edmonds, J.A.; Reilly, J.; Trabalka, J.R.; Reichle, D.E.

1984-09-01

367

Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 at the building/street level for the LA Megacity  

Science.gov (United States)

Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions from the bottom-up perspective is a critical element in emerging plans on a global, integrated, carbon monitoring system (CMS). A space/time explicit emissions data product can act as both verification and guidance to emissions mitigation. We have progress on applying our Hestia approach to the entire LA Basin. Here, we present these initial results focusing on a few points of progress worthy of dissemination. Geocoding of the original point sources are inaccurate, placing point sources in the wrong physical position. Sometimes these errors are many kilometers. We have corrected the majority of these point through a variety of techniques. The LAX airport and the LA Port pose large unique sources in the Basin and we have taken novel approaches to characterizing the space/time distribution of these emission sources. We have used AADT and hourly traffic data to best distribute emissions in the onroad sector. This has required both extrapolation and interpolation techniques to fully cover all road types other than local roads. Finally, we have updated the emission product to the year 2012 using a variety of scaling arguments. Work on greenhouse gas emissions has been accomplished by others, though these efforts typically go down to only the county spatial scale. However, these offer numerous opportunities to potentially calibrate or explore alternative methods and results. We will review these efforts and what benefit they are provided thus far. Finally, we will review our attempts to quantify uncertainty at the space/time scales attempted here. Uncertainty quantification remains challenging due to a variety of reasons. First, bottom-up source data is often produced by a regulatory agency, which has strict legal limits to the amount and type of information available. Even in cases where legal limitations are not at work, there is no standard for uncertainty reporting and hence, little reliable uncertainty estimation is made. In the course of this work, we have attempted to quantify uncertainty. In some cases, this is driven by parameter sensitivity, in other cases through the comparison of independent datasets reporting on the same entity. Expert judgment is also deployed where no alternative exists. Here, we will provide a review of some of these techniques with examples from our urban case studies.

Gurney, K. R.; Razlivanov, I. N.; Patarasuk, R.; Song, Y.; O'Keeffe, D.; Duren, R. M.; Eldering, A.

2013-12-01

368

Risk and investment in the fuel cell industry  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The transformation of the global energy industry from high carbon content fuels to less carbon content fuels like natural gas and hydrogen, and the implications of that transformation to risk and investment are discussed. The conventional view that high oil prices stimulate interest in alternative energy sources such as hydrogen fuel cells, and that oil price fluctuations affect the rates of return of companies in the fuel cell industry is examined, using the multi-factor Arbitrage Pricing Theory model that allows for unconditional and conditional risk factors. Results indicate that oil price risk is negligible as a source of risk impacting on the equity returns of fuel cell companies. Market risk factors have been found to be much more significant, suggesting that over the time period studied (the last 10 years) the fortunes of fuel cell companies tended to follow the boom and bust cycle of the technology bubble, and investors have come to view the fuel cell companies as being similar to other high technology companies. Accordingly, the authors recommend that investors use a portfolio approach to diversify risk when investing in fuel cell companies, i.e. allocate only a small proportion of investment funds to fuel cell companies. With respect to managers, investors and policy makers who are interested in the strategic management, financing and risk management of firms building the hydrogen economy, the authors advise the use of 'real options', an investment tool that is very pertinent to firms in the hydrogen fuel cell sector. Greater cooperation between governments, industry and the universities, along the lines of Michigan's NextEnergy Center, a research facility for developing and demonstrating alternative energy technologies, is also recommended. 14 refs., 3 tabs., 1 fig.

Henriques, I.; Sadorsky, P. [York University, Schulich School of Business, Toronto, ON (Canada)

2004-07-01

369

A Description of the Global, Monthly, Fossil-Fuel Carbon Dioxide Time Series Based on National Estimates  

Science.gov (United States)

Increased analysis has led to the realization that a detailed, mechanistic understanding of the global carbon cycle needs more detailed description in multiple dimensions (e.g., finer spatial scales, finer temporal scales, more accurate and precise mass fluxes, isotopic descriptions, ...). Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels are central to the increased interest in the carbon cycle and are critical toward a more detailed understanding of other fluxes in the carbon cycle. This presentation describes recent efforts that have produced a more detailed description of fossil-fuel-derived carbon dioxide emissions at finer spatial and temporal scales. The efforts describe, explicitly, a majority of the total fossil-fuel-derived carbon dioxide emission flux and, via extrapolation, the entire fossil-fuel-derived carbon dioxide emission flux. The extrapolation is based on selecting representative monthly descriptions from among the 21 countries studied in detail to represent the monthly distribution of emissions for the remaining countries of the world. These selections are based on similarities in economy and climate. Emission fluxes will be characterized in both mass and stable carbon isotope space. These results, when combined with global carbon cycle models, should lead to a better understanding of the global carbon cycle. Monte Carlo simulations will be applied to the individual, national, monthly time series to generate possible, future, monthly time series. The domain of inputs to the Monte Carlo simulation will be the actual monthly time series generated for each of the 21 countries examined in detail. For most of these countries, monthly time series that span multiple years were constructed, although some of the data series are quite short. In addition, each of these 21 countries has individual time series for gas, liquid and solid fuels; each of which will be subjected to Monte Carlo analysis. The national results will then be aggregated into a global, monthly time series. The resultant global time series of emissions estimates will cover an extended time period even though the individual, national data sets are of varying length and not necessarily synchronous. The results of the Monte Carlo analysis should be useful to the larger community for representing the historic or estimating the future patterns of fossil-fuel use and their resulting carbon dioxide emissions. Past analyses of the monthly time series for individual countries have shown significant differences in the month-to-month emissions as opposed to a 1/12 distribution (a typical default distribution pattern obtained by dividing annual emissions equally among the 12 months). The global monthly time series shows statistically significant differences from the 1/12 distribution. Past analyses of the stable carbon isotope signature (del 13C) of the monthly time series for individual countries have shown significant changes in the month to month signatures. This is due to the distinct isotopic signatures of solid, liquid and gaseous fuels and the monthly variations in the mass of each fuel consumed. These signatures will now be applied to the global, monthly time series and similar, significant changes are expected to be revealed in the month to month signatures.

Andres, R. J.; Boden, T. A.; Gregg, J. S.; Losey, L.; Marland, G.

2008-12-01

370

Evaluation of long range transport of fossil fuel originated organic aerosol at a background site in Northeast Asia  

Science.gov (United States)

Northeast Asia is heavy air pollution region due to usage of large amounts of fossil fuel. In addition, meteorological conditions represented as prevailing westerlies in Northeast Asia region causes long range transport of anthropogenic pollutants emitted from China to Korea and Japan and even the United States across the Pacific Ocean (Bey et al., 2001). The Baengnyeong Island of Korea is located at the northwestern part of the Korean peninsula and close by North Korea and China, thus this site is regarded as an ideal place for background air measurements in Northeast Asia. Also, it has low local anthropogenic emissions and is frequently influenced by various air masses from China and North Korea in the Island. In this study, we performed intensive sampling during summer and winter in the Baengnyeong Island and analyzed various organic compounds including fossil fuel originated organic markers such as hopanes and PAHs using thermal desorption two dimensional gas chromatography with time of flight mass spectrometry (TD-GC×GC-TOFMS). We also analyzed ~20 urban aerosol samples collected at Seoul, a representative urban site in Northeast Asia region to compare organic compounds distributions of aerosol samples at the Baengnyeong Island. By applying air mass back trajectory analysis and comparing organic compounds distributions in aerosol samples of the Baengnyeong Island and Seoul, the impact of long-range transport of fossil fuel originated organic pollutants at a background site in Northeast Asia were evaluated. (References) Bey, I., Jacob, D.J., Logan, J.A., Yantosca, R.M., 2001. Asian chemical outflow to the Pacific in spring: origins, pathways, and budgets. Journal of Geophysical Research-Atmosphere 106, 23097-23113.

Hwang, Eun Jin; Lee, Ji Yi; Park, Jin Soo; Lee, Seok Jo; Kim, Hyun Jae; Jeon, Ha Eun; Sung, Min Young

2013-04-01

371

The flexfuel tractor. Invesigations on the combustion behaviour of vegetable oil fuels and on the discernability of fossil and biogenic fuels; Der Flexfuel Traktor. Untersuchungen zum Verbrennungsverhalten von Pflanzenoelkraftstoffen und zur Unterscheidbarkeit fossiler und biogener Kraftstoffe  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Increasing energy prices, especially for fossil fuels, as well as the necessity to reduce CO{sub 2} emissions are emphasizing the advantages of self-produced vegetable oil fuels in agriculture. Monetary advantages are depending on basic conditions like farm size or tax legislation, which can be changing locally as well as temporarily. Due to the differing properties of diesel and vegetable oil fuel, engines have to be adapted to each fuel to fulfil performance requirements as well as emission limits and reliability. Knowing that there are advantages of vegetable oil compared to diesel fuel, though not always and everywhere present, it becomes obvious that the well known flexible fuel concept of passenger cars should be adapted for diesel engines of agricultural machines. So called flexfuel engines imply the detection of the fuel type and an automated adjustment of the engine control parameters without any manual action of an operator. Therefore, the first step consists of the evaluation of the combustion properties of rapeseed, sunflower, jatropha and false flax oil compared to diesel fuel. The tested vegetable oils showed very similar behaviour in the tested common rail diesel engine. Especially the limited emissions were met with the same engine control software with all vegetable oils. In consequence it is possible to realize a flexfuel engine using the two engine control maps available at the moment, one for diesel and the other one for vegetable oil fuels. For further investigations one oil type, namely rapeseed oil was selected to test the combustion behaviour of fuel blends made of diesel and vegetable oil. The goal was to determine the blend ratio of vegetable oil and diesel fuel at which the engine control software has to be changed from the diesel to the vegetable oil map automatically. If the fuel consists of 40% or more vegetable oil, the vegetable oil engine control map has to be selected in order to fulfil legal emission limits. Finally the feasibility to detect different fuel types, especially vegetable oils and diesel, but also blends of those fuels and additionally biodiesel, was evaluated. A fluid property sensor was utilized to measure the viscosity, the permittivity constant, the density and the temperature of different fuels and blends. At a fuel temperature of 40 C diesel, vegetable oil and biodiesel can be detected using only two of the sensor's three values. The accuracy of the sensor decreases with increasing viscosity of the fluid, thus two or all three measured values have to be used to determine the fuel type reliably. This is even more important, if not only straight fuels, but also unknown blends of different fuel types need to be detected, which is very likely in the daily use of a flexfuel vehicle. Having determined the reliability of this fluid property sensor in a temperature range of 25 to 60 C, an accuracy of 10 to 20% can be observed, which leads to a total detection accuracy of about 10 to 20% fuel blend differences. This is sufficient for engine operation with the two engine maps strategy. It was verified that a current stage 3A common rail for valve technology engine can be transferred into a flexfuel engine using only two engine control maps and selecting those based on a sensor based fuel detection. Once the interpolation between those engine control maps is enabled, the results of the combustion analysis of diesel-vegetable oil fuel blends can be utilized again. (orig.)

Dieringer, Stefanie

2012-07-01

372

Cleaner fuels for the future: an oil industry perspective  

OpenAIRE

South Africa is lagging major developed countries, such as Europe and the USA, in introducing fuel specifications that meet more stringent standards. There are increasing pressures locally, from inter alia the government and the motor industry, to make certain changes to current fuel specifications that enable alterations in vehicle technology which will lead to a reduction in harmful vehicle exhaust emissions. The complete phase-out of lead in petrol in South Africa by 2006 was the result of...

Stead, M.; Moldan, A.

2009-01-01

373

How polygeneration schemes may develop under an advanced clean fossil fuel strategy under a joint sino-European initiative  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In this article the prospect of emerging co-production and polygeneration schemes based on pre-combustion decarbonisation and options for geological storage of the CO2 are discussed in a European and Chinese setting. Reference is made to European and Chinese undertakings - especially the COACH project that is being conducted under the auspices of the European Commission. COACH is based on principles lined up by the EU-based DYNAMIS project with reference to options for decarbonising fossil fuels within a more sustainable framework. (author)

374

Use of Chia Plant to Monitor Urban Fossil Fuel CO2 Emission: An Example From Irvine, CA in 2010  

Science.gov (United States)

?14CO2 is a unique tracer for quantifying anthropogenic CO2 emissions. However, monitoring 14CO2 change and distribution in an urban environment is challenging because of its large spatial and temporal variations. We have tested the potential use of a chia plant (Salvia hispanica) as an alternative way to collect a time-integrated CO2 sample for radiocarbon analysis. The results show that ?14C of the new growth of chia sprouts and chia leaves are consistent with the ?14C of air samples collected during the growing period, indicating the new growth has no inherited C from seeds and thus records atmospheric 14CO2. Time-integrated air samples and chia leaf samples significantly reduced the noises of ?14CO2 in an urban environment. We report here an example of monitoring 14CO2 change in Irvine, CA from Mar 2010 to Mar 2011 utilizing such a method. The results showed a clear seasonal cycle with high (close to remote air background level) ?14C in summer and low ?14C in winter months in this urban area. Excess (above remote air background) fossil fuel CO2 was calculated to be closed to 0 ppm in June to about 16 ppm from November 2010 to February 2011. Monthly mean ?14CO2 was anti-correlated with monthly mean CO mixing ratio, indicating ?14CO2 is mainly controlled by fossil fuel CO2 mixing with clean on-shore marine air. In summary, this study has shown encouraging result that chia plant can be potentially used as a convenient and inexpensive sampling method for time-integrated atmospheric 14CO2. Combined with other annual plants this provides the opportunity to map out time-integrated fossil fuel-derived CO2 in major cities at low cost. This in turn can be used to: 1) establish a baseline for fossil fuel emissions reductions in cities in the future; 2) provide invaluable information for validating emission models.

Xu, X.; Stills, A.; Trumbore, S.; Randerson, J. T.; Yi, J.

2011-12-01

375

Bioaccumulation of fossil fuel components during single-compound and complex-mixture exposures of Daphnia magna  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The authors conducted tests with the water flea (Daphnia magna) to compare the bioaccumulation of compounds presented alone with the bioaccumulation of these same compounds when they were presented within a complex coal liquid, water-soluble fraction. Phenol and aniline were used as representative compounds because they are highly soluble, moderately toxic, and common to many fossil fuel liquid products and corresponding wastes. The tests were primarily designed to aid in development of predictive models relating to the transport and fate of components from complex mixtures in aquatic biota

376

Proceedings of the US Department of Energy environmental control symposium. Volume 1. Plenary session and fossil fuels  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Volume one of the proceedings (Plenary Session and Fossil Fuels) contains papers on environmental pollution control which resulted mainly from US DOE's research programs in coal (preparation, desulfurization, gasification, liquefaction, combustion, fluidized-bed combustion, and pollution control methods with respect to SO/sub 2/, NO/sub x/, and CO/sub 2/ (global effects and feasibility studies); a few papers deal with oil shale operations and the enhanced recovery of petroleum. Papers have been entered individually into EDB and ERA, with 3 also into EAPA; six papers had been entered previously from other sources. (LTN)

None

1979-09-01

377

The future for fuel cells in the automotive industry  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

'Full text:' This paper presents the view that the automotive industry, seen as a vital potential market for hydrogen fuel cell applications, is one that will be characterised in the future by an unprecedented combination of technological and economic diversity. This highly volatile and uncertain future has profound implications for those involved in government policy related to energy use and transportation, as well as those involved in the fuel cell industry. Most significantly, it is argued that the industry that applies hydrogen fuel cells twenty to thirty years from now will have a quite different structure and economic logic to that which currently prevails. Suppliers of hydrogen fuel cell solutions and systems need to have considerable flexibility in their business models. The themes of diversity and co-existence are developed from extensive research into the contemporary automotive industry, as well as an active involvement in the government policy arena at national, EU and international levels. The continued search for sustainability will not just entail the insertion of technology into otherwise familiar products by otherwise familiar manufacturing processes. It will enable and require the transformation of industry. This paper seeks to outline some of the ways in which the changes could unfold. (author)

378

The Hestia Project: High Spatial Resolution Fossil Fuel Carbon Dioxide Emissions Quantification at Hourly Scale in Indianapolis, USA  

Science.gov (United States)

In order to advance the scientific understanding of carbon exchange with the land surface and contribute to sound, quantitatively-based U.S. climate change policy interests, quantification of greenhouse gases emissions drivers at fine spatial and temporal scales is essential. Quantification of fossil fuel CO2 emissions, the primary greenhouse gases, has become a key component to cost-effective CO2 emissions mitigation options and a carbon trading system. Called the ‘Hestia Project’, this pilot study generated CO2 emissions down to high spatial resolution and hourly scale for the greater Indianapolis region in the USA through the use of air quality and traffic monitoring data, remote sensing, GIS, and building energy modeling. The CO2 emissions were constructed from three data source categories: area, point, and mobile. For the area source emissions, we developed an energy consumption model using DOE/EIA survey data on building characteristics and energy consumption. With the Vulcan Project’s county-level CO2 emissions and simulated building energy consumption, we quantified the CO2 emissions for each individual building by allocating Vulcan emissions to roughly 50,000 structures in Indianapolis. The temporal pattern of CO2 emissions in each individual building was developed based on temporal patterns of energy consumption. The point sources emissions were derived from the EPA National Emissions Inventory data and effluent monitoring of electricity producing facilities. The mobile source CO2 emissions were estimated at the month/county scale using the Mobile6 combustion model and the National Mobile Inventory Model database. The month/county scale mobile source CO2 emissions were downscaled to the “native” spatial resolution of road segments every hour using a GIS road atlas and traffic monitoring data. The result is shown in Figure 1. The resulting urban-scale inventory can serve as a baseline of current CO2 emissions and should be of immediate use to city environmental managers and regional industry as they plan emission mitigation options and project future emission trends. The results obtained here will also be a useful comparison to atmospheric CO2 monitoring efforts from the top-down. Figure 1. Location of the study area, the building level and mobile CO2 emissions, and an enlarged example neighborhood

Zhou, Y.; Gurney, K. R.

2009-12-01

379

Fuel quality issues in the oil heat industry  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The quality of fuel oil plays an essential role in combustion performance and efficient operation of residential heating equipment. With the present concerns by the oil-heat industry of declining fuel-oil quality, a study was initiated to identify the factors that have brought about changes in the quality of distillate fuel. A background of information will be provided to the industry, which is necessary to deal with the problems relating to the fuel. The high needs for servicing heating equipment are usually the result of the poor handling characteristics of the fuel during cold weather, the buildup of dirt and water in storage tanks, and microbial growth. A discussion of how to deal with these problems is presented in this paper. The effectiveness of fuel additives to control these problems of quality is also covered to help users better understand the functions and limitations of chemical treatment. Test data have been collected which measure and compare changes in the properties of fuel using selected additives.

Litzke, Wai-Lin.

1992-12-01

380

Fuel Cells in the Coal Energy Industry  

OpenAIRE

In march 1998 at the conference ?Coal Utilization & Fuel Systems? in Clearwater, USA representatives of U.S. Department of Energy presented the vision 21 focused on the electricity generation from coal for 21st century. The goal is a powerplant with the ability to produce the electricity from coal with the efficiency approaching 60% (higher heating value) and emission levels of one-tenth of today´s technologies, The CO2 capture and permanent sequestration at the cost of $15/ton of CO2, and...

Kolat Peter; Hermann Peter; Noskieviè Pavel

1998-01-01

381

Tactical techno-economic analysis of electricity generation from forest, fossil, and wood waste fuels in a heating plant  

OpenAIRE

The Finnish energy industry is subject to policy decisions regarding renewable energy production and energy efficiency regulation. Conventional electricity generation has environmental side-effects that may cause global warming. Renewable fuels are superior because they offer near-zero net emissions. In this study, we investigated a heating mill's ability to generate electricity from forest fuels in southern Finland on a 1-year strategic decision-making horizon. The electricity-generati...

Palander Teijo; Vesa Lauri

2012-01-01

382

Future climate trends from a first-difference atmospheric carbon dioxide regression model involving emissions scenarios for business as usual and for peak fossil fuel  

CERN Document Server

This paper investigates the implications of the future continuation of the demonstrated past (1960-2012) strong correlation between first-difference atmospheric CO2 and global surface temperature. It does this, for the period from the present to 2050, for a comprehensive range of future global fossil fuel energy use scenarios. The results show that even for a business-as-usual (the mid-level IPCC) fossil fuel use estimate, global surface temperature will rise at a slower rate than for the recent period 1960-2000. Concerning peak fossil fuel, for the most common scenario the currently observed (1998-2013)temperature plateau will turn into a decrease. The observed trend to date for temperature is compared with that for global climate disasters: these peaked in 2005 and are notably decreasing. The temperature and disaster results taken together are consistent with either a reduced business-as-usual fossil fuel use scenario into the future, or a peak fossil fuel scenario, but not with the standard business-as-usu...

Leggett, L M W

2014-01-01

383

The substitutive effect of biofuels on fossil fuels in the lower and higher crude oil price periods  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Various biofuels, including bioethanol and biodiesel are technologically being considered replacements for fossil fuels, such as the conventional gasoline and diesel. This paper aims to measure whether economic substitutability can be generated during periods of higher and/or lower prices of crude oil. The empirical results of the bivariate EGARCH model prove that this substitutive effect was occurred during the higher crude oil price period due to the significant price spillover effects from crude oil futures to corn and soybean futures, indicating that the increase in food prices can be attributed to more consumption of biofuels. We suggest more extensive research in the search for fuel alternatives from inedible feedstock such as pongamia, jojoba, jatropha, especially the 2nd generation biofuel technologies such as algae-based biofuels. (author)

384

The substitutive effect of biofuels on fossil fuels in the lower and higher crude oil price periods  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Various biofuels, including bioethanol and biodiesel are technologically being considered replacements for fossil fuels, such as the conventional gasoline and diesel. This paper aims to measure whether economic substitutability can be generated during periods of higher and/or lower prices of crude oil. The empirical results of the bivariate EGARCH model prove that this substitutive effect was occurred during the higher crude oil price period due to the significant price spillover effects from crude oil futures to corn and soybean futures, indicating that the increase in food prices can be attributed to more consumption of biofuels. We suggest more extensive research in the search for fuel alternatives from inedible feedstock such as pongamia, jojoba, jatropha, especially the 2nd generation biofuel technologies such as algae-based biofuels. (author)

Chang, Ting-Huan [Energy and Environment Research Laboratories, Industrial Technology Research Institute, Hsinchu County 310 (China); Department of Banking and Finance, Tamkang University, No.151, Ying-Chuan Road, Taipei County 251 (China); Su, Hsin-Mei [Department of Banking and Finance, Tamkang University, No.151, Ying-Chuan Road, Taipei County 251 (China)

2010-07-15

385

MEETING REPORT: ADVANCED FOSSIL FUELS SECTOR GROUP, LAS VEGAS, 25 AUGUST 1976  

Science.gov (United States)

The general areas of concern were: Advanced oil processing; Chemical coal cleaning; Synthetic fuels environmental assessment; Synthetic fuels control technology development; High temperature/high pressure particulate treatment; Environmental processes and effects....

386

75 FR 63404 - Fossil Fuel-Generated Energy Consumption Reduction for New Federal Buildings and Major...  

Science.gov (United States)

...fuel-generated energy consumption reduction level...the specified functional needs for that...fuel-generated energy consumption reduction requirements...agency's specified functional needs for that...of food and beverages for consumption. For...

2010-10-15

387

Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Funding from DoE grant # FG0204-ER63721, Direct Experiments on the Ocean Disposal of Fossil Fuel CO2, supposed several postdoctoral fellows and research activities at MBARI related to ocean CO2 disposal and the biological consequences of high ocean CO2 levels on marine organisms. Postdocs supported on the project included Brad Seibel, now an associate professor at the University of Rhode Island, Jeff Drazen, now an associate professor at the University of Hawaii, and Eric Pane, who continues as a research associate at MBARI. Thus, the project contributed significantly to the professional development of young scientists. In addition, we made significant progress in several research areas. We continued several deep-sea CO2 release experiments using support from DoE and MBARI, along with several collaborators. These CO2 release studies had the goal of broadening our understanding of the effects of high ocean CO2 levels on deep sea animals in the vicinity of potential release sites for direct deep-ocean carbon dioxide sequestration. Using MBARI ships and ROVs, we performed these experiments at depths of 3000 to 3600 m, where liquid CO2 is heavier than seawater. CO2 was released into small pools (sections of PVC pipe) on the seabed, where it dissolved and drifted downstream, bathing any caged animals and sediments in a CO2-rich, low-pH plume. We assessed the survival of organisms nearby. Several publications arose from these studies (Barry et al. 2004, 2005; Carman et al. 2004; Thistle et al. 2005, 2006, 2007; Fleeger et al. 2006, 2010; Barry and Drazen 2007; Bernhard et al. 2009; Sedlacek et al. 2009; Ricketts et al. in press; Barry et al, in revision) concerning the sensitivity of animals to low pH waters. Using funds from DoE and MBARI, we designed and fabricated a hyperbaric trap-respirometer to study metabolic rates of deep-sea fishes under high CO2 conditions (Drazen et al, 2005), as well as a gas-control aquarium system to support laboratory studies of the effects of high CO2 waters on marine animals (Barry et al. 2008). This system is capable of controlling oxygen, pH, and temperature of seawater for use in studies of the physiological responses of animals under acidified conditions. We have investigated the tolerance of deep- and shallow-living crabs to high CO2 levels (Pane and Barry 2007; Pane et al. 2008), and are now working on brachiopods (Barry et al. in prep.) and a comparison of deep and shallow living sea urchins. This research program, supported in part by DoE has contributed to a number of other publications authored or co-authored by Barry (Caldeira et al. 2005; Brewer and Barry 2008; Barry et al. 2006, 2010a,b,c; National Research Council, in press; Hoffman et al. in press) as well as over 40 invited talks since 2004, including Congressional briefings and testimony at U.S. Senate Hearings on Ocean Acidification. Through the grant period, the research emphasis shifted from studies of the effects of direct deep-sea carbon dioxide sequestration on deep-sea animals, to a broader conceptual framework of the effects of ocean acidification (whether purposeful or passive) on the physiology and survival of deep and shallow living marine animals. We feel that this has been a very productive program and are grateful to DoE for its support.

Barry, James, P.

2010-05-26

388

Intense atmospheric pollution modifies weather: a case of mixed biomass burning with fossil fuel combustion pollution in eastern China  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The influence of air pollutants, especially aerosols, on regional and global climate has been widely investigated, but only a very limited number of studies report their impacts on everyday weather. In this work, we present for the first time direct (observational evidence of a clear effect of how a mixed atmospheric pollution changes the weather with a substantial modification in the air temperature and rainfall. By using comprehensive measurements in Nanjing, China, we found that mixed agricultural burning plumes with fossil fuel combustion pollution resulted in a decrease in the solar radiation intensity by more than 70%, a decrease in the sensible heat by more than 85%, a temperature drop by almost 10 K, and a change in rainfall during both daytime and nighttime. Our results show clear air pollution–weather interactions, and quantify how air pollution affects weather via air pollution–boundary layer dynamics and aerosol–radiation–cloud feedbacks. This study highlights cross-disciplinary needs to investigate the environmental, weather and climate impacts of the mixed biomass burning and fossil fuel combustion sources in East China.

A. J. Ding

2013-10-01

389

Public support for reducing US reliance on fossil fuels. Investigating household willingness-to-pay for energy research and development  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In order to reduce future dependence on foreign oil and emissions of CO{sub 2}, how much would US households be willing to pay annually to support increased energy research and development (R and D) activities designed to replace fossil fuels? Does it matter whether the R and D includes nuclear energy options? We explore these questions using data from a unique set of national telephone and Internet surveys. Using a national advisory referendum format, the contingent valuation method is applied to estimate annual household willingness-to-pay (WTP) for US household support of a national Energy Research and Development Fund (ERDF) for investments in energy sources not reliant on fossil fuels. While accounting for the level of (un)certainty in voting responses, the WTP modeling includes a comparison of both classic maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) and Bayesian analysis. Evidence indicates that MLE and Bayesian analysis achieve similar statistical inference, while the Bayesian analysis provides a narrower confidence interval around estimated WTP. (author)

Li, Hui [Department of Economics, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, IL (United States); Jenkins-Smith, Hank C.; Silva, Carol L.; Herron, Kerry G. [Center for Applied Social Research and Department of Political Science, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Berrens, Robert P. [Department of Economics, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

2009-01-15

390

Directing Technical Change from Fossil-Fuel to Renewable Energy Innovation. An Empirical Application Using Firm-Level Patent Data  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This paper investigates the determinants of directed technical change in the electricity generation sector. We use firm-level data on patents filed in renewable (REN) and fossil fuel (FF) technologies by about 7,000 European firms over the period 1978-2006. We separately study specialized firms, that innovate in only one type of technology during the sample period, and mixed firms, that innovate in both technologies. We find that for specialized firms the main drivers of innovation are fossil-fuel prices, market size, and firms' past knowledge stocks. Also, prices and market size drive the entry of new REN firms into innovation. By contrast, we find that innovation by mixed firms is mainly driven by strong path-dependencies since for these firms past knowledge stock is the major driver of the direction of innovation. These results imply that generic environmental policies that affect prices and energy demand are mainly effective in directing innovation by small specialized firms. In order to direct innovation efforts of large mixed corporations with a long history of FF innovation, targeted R and D policies are likely to be more effective.

Noailly, J. [CIES, Graduate Institute of International and Development Studies, Geneva (Switzerland); Smeets, R. [Rutgers Business School, Newark (United States)

2012-12-15

391

Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development; Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Clean Energy Systems, Inc. (CES) partnered with the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory in 2005 to study and develop a competing technology for use in future fossil-fueled power generation facilities that could operate with near zero emissions. CES’s background in oxy-fuel (O-F) rocket technology lead to the award of Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-05NT42645, “Coal-Based Oxy-Fuel System Evaluation and Combustor Development,” where CES was to first evaluate the potential of these O-F power cycles, then develop the detailed design of a commercial-scale O-F combustor for use in these clean burning fossil-fueled plants. Throughout the studies, CES found that in order to operate at competitive cycle efficiencies a high-temperature intermediate pressure turbine was required. This led to an extension of the Agreement for, “Oxy-Fuel Turbomachinery Development for Energy Intensive Industrial Applications” where CES was to also develop an intermediate-pressure O-F turbine (OFT) that could be deployed in O-F industrial plants that capture and sequester >99% of produced CO2, at competitive cycle efficiencies using diverse fuels. The following report details CES’ activities from October 2005 through March 2013, to evaluate O-F power cycles, develop and validate detailed designs of O-F combustors (main and reheat), and to design, manufacture, and test a commercial-scale OFT, under the three-phase Cooperative Agreement.

Hollis, Rebecca

2013-03-31

392

Carbon isotopes and sulphur content as indicators of atmospheric pollution from burning fossil fuels  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper summarizes the study carried out in Krakow, Poland in 1975-76 on the estimated local air pollution as measured by carbon isotopes and total sulphur measurement in plants. Good correlation was found between ?14C value and total sulpher (measured by radionuclide excited X-ray fluorescence) in beech leaves collected in late summer, indicating the common source of both pollutants. Sampling and measurement of delta13C in atmospheric CO2 has shown that delta13C can be used as a pollution indicator only in the winter period when no fluctuations exist due to plant respiration. A method of CO2 sampling using molecular sieve proved to be feasible for instantaneous sampling with no isotope fractionation. The highest pollution by fossil CO2 was measured in winter (12.8% excess). During spring and summer the average contribution of fossil CO2 was 4.5 to 5.6%. (author)

393

Confining and abating CO2 from fossil fuel combustion in the European Communities: a feasible option?  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A multidisciplinary policy development study undertaken on behalf of the European Communities (EC) shows that some 60% of the CO2 emissions could be avoided by simultaneously implementing confining, abating and preventive measures. Such an implementation would cost approximately 110 x 109ECU/y gross or, taking the benefits of avoided fossil energy production and use into account, 55 x 109 ECU/y net. 1 ref., 1 fig

394

Greenhouse gas reduction from fossil fuel power stations the effect of surface condenser and cooling tower performance  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Surface condenser and cooling tower performance impact directly on the efficiency of power generation, and therefore greenhouse gas emission, from fossil fuel power stations. If performance can be maintained at close to design or original levels, both power generation costs and greenhouse gases will be minimized. The cooling water management and cooling tower operation required to achieve peak performance are not high capital items, and in fact are normally an existing operating cost. Algorithms were used to generate a mathematical model for greenhouse gas emission reduction as a function of fuel type and the surface condenser and cooling tower performance indicators, namely, cleanliness factor and inlet cooling water temperature, respectively. The model was run under typical power station conditions with brown coal, back coal and natural gas to generate two reduction factors, one for an increase in cleanliness factor from 70% to 95%, the other for a 12{sup o}C drop in cooling water temperature due to improved cooling tower performance. The combined impact of operating surface condensers and their associated cooling towers at the improved performance levels is close to 1% reduction in CO{sub 2} equivalent emissions for all three of the fossil fuels considered. While not a large reduction per se, it is large relative to a power station's viable greenhouse gas reduction options. Tables and graphs are presented to allow greenhouse gas emission reductions to be estimated for any selection of surface condenser or cooling tower performance improvement. The impact and cost benefit of other greenhouse gas reduction strategies and technologies are discussed. 12 refs., 3 figs., 9 tabs.

NONE

2006-07-01

395

Non-energy use of fossil fuels and resulting carbon dioxide emissions: bottom-up estimates for the world as a whole and for major developing countries  

OpenAIRE

We present and apply a simple bottom–up model for estimating non-energy use of fossil fuels and resulting CO2 (carbon dioxide) emissions.We apply this model for the year 2000: (1) to the world as a whole, (2) to the aggregate of Annex I countries and non-Annex I countries, and (3) to the ten non-Annex I countries with the highest consumption of fossil fuels for non-energy purposes. We find that worldwide non-energy use is equivalent to 1,670 ± 120 Mt (megatonnes) CO2 and ...

Weiss, M.; Neelis, M. L.; Blok, K.; Patel, M. K.

2009-01-01

396

Nuclear fuel cycle bringing about opportunity for industrial structure conversion  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Three facilities of nuclear fuel cycle, that is, uranium enrichment, fuel reprocessing and low level radioactive waste storage and burying, are being constructed by electric power industry in Rokkasho Village, Kamikita County, Aomori Prefecture. These are the large scale project of the total investment of 1.2 trillion yen. It is expected that the promotion of this project exerts not a little effect to the social economy of the surrounding districts. Agency of Natural Resources and Energy, Ministry of International Trade and Industry, carried out the social environment survey on the location of nuclear fuel cycle facilities. In this report, the outline of the economical pervasive effect due to the construction and operation of the three facilities in the report of this survey is described. The method of survey and the organization, the outline of three nuclear fuel cycle facilities, the economical pervasive effect, the effect to the local social structure, and the direction of arranging occupation, residence and leisure accompanying the location of three nuclear fuel cycle facilities are reported. (K.I.)

397

COPROCESSING OF FOSSIL FUELS AND BIOMASS FOR CO2 EMISSION REDUCTION IN THE TRANSPORTATION SECTOR  

Science.gov (United States)

The paper discusses an evaluation of the Hydrocarb process for conversion of carbonaceous raw material to clean carbon and methanol products. hese products are valuable in the market either as fuel or as chemical commodities. s fuel, methanol and carbon can be used economically, ...

398

Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 9. Methodologies for review of the health and safety aspects of proposed nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel sites and facilities  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This report sets forth methodologies for review of the health and safety aspects of proposed nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel sites and facilities for electric power generation. The review is divided into a Notice of Intention process and an Application for Certification process, in accordance with the structure to be used by the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, the first emphasizing site-specific considerations, the second examining the detailed facility design as well. The Notice of Intention review is divided into three possible stages: an examination of emissions and site characteristics, a basic impact analysis, and an assessment of public impacts. The Application for Certification review is divided into five possible stages: a review of the Notice of Intention treatment, review of the emission control equipment, review of the safety design, review of the general facility design, and an overall assessment of site and facility acceptability

399

Health and safety impacts of nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel electric generation in California. Volume 9. Methodologies for review of the health and safety aspects of proposed nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel sites and facilities  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This report sets forth methodologies for review of the health and safety aspects of proposed nuclear, geothermal, and fossil-fuel sites and facilities for electric power generation. The review is divided into a Notice of Intention process and an Application for Certification process, in accordance with the structure to be used by the California Energy Resources Conservation and Development Commission, the first emphasizing site-specific considerations, the second examining the detailed facility design as well. The Notice of Intention review is divided into three possible stages: an examination of emissions and site characteristics, a basic impact analysis, and an assessment of public impacts. The Application for Certification review is divided into five possible stages: a review of the Notice of Intention treatment, review of the emission control equipment, review of the safety design, review of the general facility design, and an overall assessment of site and facility acceptability.

Nero, A.V.; Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

1977-01-01

400

Suitability of thin-layer chromatography-flame ionization detection with regard to quantitative characterization of different fossil fuel products. 1. FID performances and response of pure compounds related to fossil fuel products  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The performance of a modern TLC-FID system (which includes the newest detector configuration) was tested on polycyclic aromatic compound standards and related compounds as a preliminary step to evaluate its suitability for quantitative hydrocarbon group type analysis of different coal and petroleum products. FID linearity was evaluated as a function of sample load and scan speed for high-molecular-weight and semi-volatile standards. TLC-FID response factors for compounds of several homologous series were studied in order to differentiate effects of volatility from those exclusively due to the chemical nature concerning FID response. Criteria are developed for the accurate application of TLC-FID to fossil fuel samples. Measurements of chromarod temperatures were carried out in order to evaluate whether an evaporation of compounds outside the H{sub 2} flame might take place. 10 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

Cebolla, V.L.; Vela, J.; Membrado, L.; Ferrando, A.C. [CSIC, Zaragoza (Spain). Inst. de Carboquimica, Dept. de Procesos Quimicos

1998-10-01