WorldWideScience

Sample records for fluctuating water levels

  1. Wii mote as hydrological sensor: observation of water level fluctuations

    Luxemburg, W.; Hut, R.; Weijs, S.; Hegnauer, M.

    2009-12-01

    The input device of the Nintendo Wii, the Wii-mote offers scientist a multitude of cheap, high quality sensors; ideal for proof of concept testing. For a specific application, i.e. the water level fluctuation in a floating evaporation pan the Wii-mote was tested as the observing device. It is shown that the controller can observe movements with high enough temporal and spatial resolution of up to 4 infrared LED’s to describe water level movements. Floating pans positioned in lakes and reservoirs better represent open water evaporation than evaporation pans installed on land. On the other hand performing water level measurements in a floating pan is more complicated due to movement of the pan and wave activities in the pan. The Wii-mote was mounted on the side of a standard class A-pan and a float was placed in the middle of the pan, with 4 LED’s on top moving along a fixed bar. The information that the Wii-mote wirelessly sends by blue tooth was captured on a laptop. With a MATLAB routine this data was converted into movement of the LED’s relatively to the controller. The observations show that wave activities are nicely captured with a typical spatial resolution smaller than 0.1 mm in our set-up and a temporal resolution of maximum 100 Hz. A frequency domain filter was applied to the observed datasets to obtain average water levels. In our laboratory setting the pan was placed in a large basin with a wave generator. A constant, but small, rate of water was added to the evaporation pan. The average pan levels from the filtered datasets showed systematically lower levels compared to the level without any wave activities. This is a typical effect of waves that occur in shallow basins. However, the added water with rates up to 5 mm/hour were clearly recognized in the filtered datasets which indicates that the Wii-mote is very well capable as a sensor for water level observations.

  2. Study on Level Fluctuation of Twin Roll Strip Caster by Water Modeling

    2002-01-01

    According to the principle of similarity theory, a water model of twin roll strip caster was built. The level fluctuation was measured with an ultrasonic level detector. The effect of nozzle design, casting rate, pool depth and nozzles immersion depths on the level fluctuation was studied. And a level fluctuation mathematical model was developed. The experimental results provided a basis to further optimize the nozzle design and technological parameters of twin roll strip caster.

  3. Experimental study on pore pressure in rock-soil slope during reservoir water level fluctuation

    LIU; Yuewu; CHEN; Huixin; LIU; Qingquan; GONG; Xin; ZHANG

    2005-01-01

    A test system was developed for measuring the pore pressure in porous media, and a new model was devised for the pore pressure testing in both saturated and unsaturated rock-soil. Laboratory experiments were carried out to determine the pore pressure during water level fluctuation. The variations of transient pore pressure vs. time at different locations of the simulated rock-soil system were acquired and processed, and meanwhile the deformation and failure of the model are observed. The experiment results show that whether the porous media are saturated or not, the transient pore pressure is mainly dependent on the water level fluctuation, and coupled with the variation of the stress field.

  4. Establishment of earth tides effect on water level fluctuations in an unconfined hard rock aquifer using spectral analysis

    Maréchal, Jean-Christophe; Ahmed, Shakeel; Lachassagne, Patrick

    2010-01-01

    Short-interval water level measurements using automatic water level recorder in a deep well in an unconfined crystalline rock aquifer at the campus of NGRI, near Hyderabad shows a cyclic fluctuation in the water levels. The observed values clearly show the principal trend due to rainfall recharge. Spectral analysis was carried out to evaluate correlation of the cyclic fluctuation to the synthetic earth tides as well as groundwater withdrawal time series in the surrounding. It was found that these fluctuations have considerably high correlation with earth tides whereas groundwater pumping does not show any significant correlation with water table fluctuations. It is concluded that earth tides cause the fluctuation in the water table. These fluctuations were hitherto unobserved during manual observations made over larger time intervals. It indicates that the unconfined aquifer is characterised by a low porosity.

  5. Simulation of Water Level Fluctuations in a Hydraulic System Using a Coupled Liquid-Gas Model

    Chao Wang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A model for simulating vertical water level fluctuations with coupled liquid and gas phases is presented. The Preissmann implicit scheme is used to linearize the governing equations for one-dimensional transient flow for both liquid and gas phases, and the linear system is solved using the chasing method. Some classical cases for single liquid and gas phase transients in pipelines and networks are studied to verify that the proposed methods are accurate and reliable. The implicit scheme is extended using a dynamic mesh to simulate the water level fluctuations in a U-tube and an open surge tank without consideration of the gas phase. Methods of coupling liquid and gas phases are presented and used for studying the transient process and interaction between the phases, for gas phase limited in a chamber and gas phase transported in a pipeline. In particular, two other simplified models, one neglecting the effect of the gas phase on the liquid phase and the other one coupling the liquid and gas phases asynchronously, are proposed. The numerical results indicate that the asynchronous model performs better, and are finally applied to a hydropower station with surge tanks and air shafts to simulate the water level fluctuations and air speed.

  6. Response of littoral macrophytes to water level fluctuations in a storage reservoir

    Krolová, Monika; Čížková, Hana; Hejzlar, Josef; Poláková, S.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 408, May (2013), 07p1-07p21. ISSN 1961-9502 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/09/1764; GA MŠk(CZ) 7E11059 Grant ostatní: EC ENV(CZ) FP7 244121 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60170517 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:67179843 Keywords : littoral macrophytes * eulittoral * water level fluctuation * European Water Framework Directive * ecophases Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 0.622, year: 2013

  7. A hydro-economic model for water level fluctuations: combining limnology with economics for sustainable development of hydropower.

    Hirsch, Philipp Emanuel; Schillinger, Sebastian; Weigt, Hannes; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Water level fluctuations in lakes lead to shoreline displacement. The seasonality of flooding or beaching of the littoral area affects nutrient cycling, redox gradients in sediments, and life cycles of aquatic organisms. Despite the ecological importance of water level fluctuations, we still lack a method that assesses water levels in the context of hydropower operations. Water levels in reservoirs are influenced by the operator of a hydropower plant, who discharges water through the turbines or stores water in the reservoir, in a fashion that maximizes profit. This rationale governs the seasonal operation scheme and hence determines the water levels within the boundaries of the reservoir's water balance. For progress towards a sustainable development of hydropower, the benefits of this form of electricity generation have to be weighed against the possible detrimental effects of the anthropogenic water level fluctuations. We developed a hydro-economic model that combines an economic optimization function with hydrological estimators of the water balance of a reservoir. Applying this model allowed us to accurately predict water level fluctuations in a reservoir. The hydro-economic model also allowed for scenario calculation of how water levels change with climate change scenarios and with a change in operating scheme of the reservoir (increase in turbine capacity). Further model development will enable the consideration of a variety of additional parameters, such as water withdrawal for irrigation, drinking water supply, or altered energy policies. This advances our ability to sustainably manage water resources that must meet both economic and environmental demands. PMID:25526619

  8. Predicting the Water Level Fluctuation in an Alpine Lake Using Physically Based, Artificial Neural Network, and Time Series Forecasting Models

    Chih-Chieh Young

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate prediction of water level fluctuation is important in lake management due to its significant impacts in various aspects. This study utilizes four model approaches to predict water levels in the Yuan-Yang Lake (YYL in Taiwan: a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model, an artificial neural network (ANN model (back propagation neural network, BPNN, a time series forecasting (autoregressive moving average with exogenous inputs, ARMAX model, and a combined hydrodynamic and ANN model. Particularly, the black-box ANN model and physically based hydrodynamic model are coupled to more accurately predict water level fluctuation. Hourly water level data (a total of 7296 observations was collected for model calibration (training and validation. Three statistical indicators (mean absolute error, root mean square error, and coefficient of correlation were adopted to evaluate model performances. Overall, the results demonstrate that the hydrodynamic model can satisfactorily predict hourly water level changes during the calibration stage but not for the validation stage. The ANN and ARMAX models better predict the water level than the hydrodynamic model does. Meanwhile, the results from an ANN model are superior to those by the ARMAX model in both training and validation phases. The novel proposed concept using a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model in conjunction with an ANN model has clearly shown the improved prediction accuracy for the water level fluctuation.

  9. Evaluation and Analysis of Urmia Lake Water Level Fluctuations Bettwen 1998-2006 Using Landsat Images and TOPEX Altimetry Data

    Zahir, N.; Ali, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Lake Urmiah has undergone a drastic shrinkage in size over the past few decades. The initial intention of this paper is to present an approach for determining the so called "salient times" during which the trend of the shrinkage process is accelerated or decelerated. To find these salient times, a quasi_continuous curve was optimally fitted to the Topex altimetry data within the period 1998 to 2006. To find the salient points within this period of time, the points of inflections of the fitted curve is computed using a second derivative approach. The water volume was also computed using 16 cloud free Landsat images of the Lake within the periods of 1998 to 2006. In the first stage of the water volume calculation, the pixels of the Lake were segmented using the Automated Water Extraction Index (AWEI) and the shorelines of the Lake were extracted by a boundary detecting operator using the generated binary image of the Lake surface. The water volume fluctuation rate was then computed under the assumption that the two successive Lake surfaces and their corresponding water level differences demonstrate approximately a truncated pyramid. The analysis of the water level fluctuation rates were further extended by a sinusoidal curve fitted to the Topex altimetry data. This curve was intended to model the seasonal fluctuations of the water level. In the final stage of this article, the correlation between the fluctuation rates and the precipitation and temperature variations were also numerically determined. This paper reports in some details the stages mentioned above.

  10. Seepage flow-stability analysis of the riverbank of Saigon river due to river water level fluctuation

    Oya, A; Hiraoka, N; Fujimoto, M; Fukagawa, R

    2015-01-01

    The Saigon River, which flows through the center of Ho Chi Minh City, is of critical importance for the development of the city as forms as the main water supply and drainage channel for the city. In recent years, riverbank erosion and failures have become more frequent along the Saigon River, causing flooding and damage to infrastructures near the river. A field investigation and numerical study has been undertaken by our research group to identify factors affecting the riverbank failure. In this paper, field investigation results obtained from multiple investigation points on the Saigon River are presented, followed by a comprehensive coupled finite element analysis of riverbank stability when subjected to river water level fluctuations. The river water level fluctuation has been identified as one of the main factors affecting the riverbank failure, i.e. removal of the balancing hydraulic forces acting on the riverbank during water drawdown.

  11. Combining the soilwater balance and water-level fluctuation methods to estimate natural groundwater recharge: Practical aspects

    Sophocleous, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    A relatively simple and practical approach for calculating groundwater recharge in semiarid plain environments with a relatively shallow water table, such as the Kansas Prairies, is outlined. Major uncertainties in the Darcian, water balance, and groundwater fluctuation analysis approaches are outlined, and a combination methodology for reducing some of the uncertainties is proposed. By combining a storm-based soilwater balance (lasting several days) with the resulting water table rise, effective storativity values of the region near the water table are obtained. This combination method is termed the 'hybrid water-fluctuation method'. Using a simple average of several such estimates results in a site-calibrated effective storativity value that can be used to translate each major water-table rise tied to a specific storm period into a corresponding amount of groundwater recharge. Examples of soilwater balance and water-level fluctuation analyses based on field-measured data from Kansas show that the proposed methodology gives better and more reliable results than either of the two well-established approaches used singly. ?? 1991.

  12. Can mercury in fish be reduced by water level management? Evaluating the effects of water level fluctuation on mercury accumulation in yellow perch (Perca flavescens)

    Larson, James H.; Maki, Ryan P.; Knights, Brent C.; Gray, Brian R.

    2014-01-01

    Mercury (Hg) contamination of fisheries is a major concern for resource managers of many temperate lakes. Anthropogenic Hg contamination is largely derived from atmospheric deposition within a lake’s watershed, but its incorporation into the food web is facilitated by bacterial activity in sediments. Temporal variation in Hg content of fish (young-of-year yellow perch) in the regulated lakes of the Rainy–Namakan complex (on the border of the United States and Canada) has been linked to water level (WL) fluctuations, presumably through variation in sediment inundation. As a result, Hg contamination of fish has been linked to international regulations of WL fluctuation. Here we assess the relationship between WL fluctuations and fish Hg content using a 10-year dataset covering six lakes. Within-year WL rise did not appear in strongly supported models of fish Hg, but year-to-year variation in maximum water levels (∆maxWL) was positively associated with fish Hg content. This WL effect varied in magnitude among lakes: In Crane Lake, a 1 m increase in ∆maxWL from the previous year was associated with a 108 ng increase in fish Hg content (per gram wet weight), while the same WL change in Kabetogama was associated with only a 5 ng increase in fish Hg content. In half the lakes sampled here, effect sizes could not be distinguished from zero. Given the persistent and wide-ranging extent of Hg contamination and the large number of regulated waterways, future research is needed to identify the conditions in which WL fluctuations influence fish Hg content.

  13. The Evaluation of Spatial Fluctuations and Temporal Variability in Estimated Levels of THMs in Drinking Water

    Ristoiu, D.; Haiduc, I.; Culea, M.; Mocan, A.; Chira, R.; Vancea, S.

    2007-04-01

    Chlorine, used by municipal water treatment facilities to disinfect water, reacts with naturally occurring organic matter to produce a host of compounds known as disinfection by-products. In addition to chloroform, brominated species such as bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform may also be formed if bromide is present in the source water. Together, these volatile compounds comprise the trihalomethanes (THMs). The results presented in this paper shown that the THM levels were higher in the summer relative to other seasons.

  14. Deep bore well water level fluctuations in the Koyna region, India: the presence of a low order dynamical system in a seismically active environment

    D. V. Ramana

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Water level fluctuations in deep bore wells in the vicinity of seismically active Koyna region in western India provides an opportunity to understand the causative mechanism underlying reservoir-triggered earthquakes. As the crustal porous rocks behave nonlinearly, their characteristics can be obtained by analysing water level fluctuations, which reflect an integrated response of the medium. A Fractal dimension is one such measure of nonlinear characteristics of porous rock as observed in water level data from the Koyna region. It is inferred in our study that a low nonlinear dynamical system with three variables can predict the water level fluctuations in bore wells.

  15. Wetland Ecohydrology: stochastic description of water level fluctuations across the soil surface

    Tamea, S.; Muneepeerakul, R.; Laio, F.; Ridolfi, L.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.

    2009-12-01

    Wetlands provide a suite of social and ecological critical functions such as being habitats of disease-carrying vectors, providing buffer zones against hurricanes, controlling sediment transport, filtering nutrients and contaminants, and a repository of great biological diversity. More recently, wetlands have also been recognized as crucial for carbon storage in the context of global climate change. Despite such importance, quantitative approaches to many aspects of wetlands are far from adequate. Therefore, improving our quantitative understanding of wetlands is necessary to our ability to maintain, manage, and restore these invaluable environments. In wetlands, hydrologic factors and ecosystem processes interplay and generate unique characteristics and a delicate balance between biotic and abiotic elements. The main hydrologic driver of wetland ecosystems is the position of the water level that, being above or below ground, determines the submergence or exposure of soil. When the water level is above the soil surface, soil saturation and lack of oxygen causes hypoxia, anaerobic functioning of microorganisms and anoxic stress in plants, that might lead to the death of non-adapted organisms. When the water level lies below the soil surface, the ecosystem becomes groundwater-dependent, and pedological and physiological aspects play their role in the soil water balance. We propose here a quantitative description of wetland ecohydrology, through a stochastic process-based water balance, driven by a marked compound Poisson noise representing rainfall events. The model includes processes such as rainfall infiltration, evapotranspiration, capillary rise, and the contribution of external water bodies, which are quantified in a simple yet realistic way. The semi-analytical steady-state probability distributions of water level spanning across the soil surface are validated with data from the Everglades (Florida, USA). The model and its results allow for a quantitative

  16. Seepage Analysis of Rock-Fill Dam Subjected to Water Level Fluctuation: A case study on Gotvand-Olya Dam

    Ali Beheshti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The Gotvand-Olya Dam is a rock-fill dam, located at Khuzestan province in southwest of Iran. Since the dam is subjected to the daily water level fluctuation, such as rapid drawdown and refill, thus induce a structural impact on the behavior of dam body, it draws many soil engineering concerns. In this paper, seepage analysis of the rock-fill dam was primarily conducted to evaluate the dam safety against the leakage through the dam body. Traditionally, steady-state analysis was employed to investigate the seepage in the dam body, summing that water level is fixed at two cases: high and low water levels. Consequently, it was not able to properly reflect the time-dependent characteristics of seepage phenomena. In this study, seepage analysis was numerically performed using 2-D FEM transient analysis. As a particular boundary condition for an analysis, the water level fluctuation was incorporated to simulate the daily changes. As a result, various seepage phenomena were quantified such as hydraulic gradient, seepage vector and pore water pressure distribution at the corresponding time of interest as the water level rises and recedes. At steady state analysis, the seepage flux at high water level in downstream area was predicted to be 78 l/s. In additions, the seepage flux measured and estimated were both acceptable considering design criteria. The result of this study proves that there is no sign of hazardous sources contributing to the possibility of piping, internal erosion and excess leakage through the dam body.

  17. Water-Level Responses to Barometric-Pressure Fluctuations in Wells in Semi-Confined Aquifers

    Jin, W.; Butler, J. J.

    2009-12-01

    Hydrologists have long recognized that changes in barometric pressure can produce changes in water levels in wells. The relationship between barometric pressure and water level has traditionally been characterized using the barometric efficiency (BE), the ratio of the change in water level to the change in barometric pressure head. Although BE has proven to be an effective means of characterizing the short-term response of a well to a change in barometric pressure, the barometric response function (BRF) is a more effective means to characterize the longer-term response. The BRF, which can be determined through a regression deconvolution procedure developed by Rasmussen and co-workers (Rasmussen and Crawford, 1997; Toll and Rasmussen, 2007), characterizes the water level response over time to a step change in barometric pressure, essentially BE as a function of the time since the imposed load. We have extended earlier work of Rasmussen and Spane (Rasmussen and Crawford, 1997; Spane, 2002) to show that the BRF can be utilized to glean important insights into semi-confined aquifer systems. The form of the BRF indicates the degree of aquifer confinement, while a comparison of BRFs from different wells provides insight into aquitard continuity. Recently, we have developed a new approach for estimating aquitard K by fitting type curves to experimentally determined BRFs. We will demonstrate the power of the BRF using field data from a long-term monitoring site of the Kansas Geological Survey at which a four-day pumping test has previously been performed. The aquitard K estimates obtained from the BRFs are in good agreement at this site with the estimate determined from the pumping test. We will also show how the BRF for a well in a semi-confined aquifer can be used to gain insights into conditions in the overlying unconfined aquifer and vadose zone. Although the BE is considered an invariant parameter of a well, we will show that the BRF of a well in a semi

  18. Dramatic water-level fluctuations in lakes under intense human impact: modelling the effect of vegetation, climate and hydrogeology

    Vainu, M.

    2012-04-01

    Lakes form a highly important ecosystem in the glacial terrain of northern Europe and America, but their hydrology remains understudied. When the water-level of a lake drops significantly and rises again in a time span of half a century and the widespread explanation of the fluctuations seems insufficient, then it raises a question: how do different anthropogenic and natural processes actually affect the formation of a lakes' water body. The abovementioned scenario applies to three small closed-basin Estonian lakes (L. Ahnejärv, L. Kuradijärv and L. Martiska) analysed in the current study. These lakes suffered a major water-level drop (up to 3.8 m) between 1946 and 1987 and a major rise between 1987 and 2010, from 1 m (L. Ahnejärv) to 2.5 m (L. Kuradijärv). Decreasing and increasing groundwater abstraction near the lakes has been widely considered to be the only reason for the fluctuations. It is true that the most severe drop in the lake levels did occur after 1972 when groundwater abstraction for drinking water started in the vicinity of the lakes. However, the lake levels started to fall before the groundwater abstraction began and for the time being the lake levels have risen to a higher level than in the 1970s when the quantity of annually abstracted groundwater was similar to nowadays. Therefore the processes affecting the formation of the lakes' water body prove to be more complex than purely the hydrogeological change caused by groundwater abstraction. A new deterministic water balance model (where the evaporation from the lake surface was calculated by Penman equation and the catchment runoff by Thornthwaite-Mather soil-moisture model), compiled for the study, coupled with LiDAR-based GIS-modelling of the catchments was used to identify the different factors influencing the lakes' water level. The modelling results reveal that the moderate drop in lake water levels before the beginning of groundwater abstraction was probably caused by the growth of a

  19. Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake, 1984 Annual Report.

    Decker-Hess, Janet; Clancey, Patrick (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Kalispell, MT)

    1984-03-01

    This study was initiated in the fall of 1981 to delineate the extent of successful shoreline spawning of kokanee salmon in Flathead Lake and determine the impacts of the historic and present operations of Kerr and Hungry Horse dams. An investigation of the quantity and quality of groundwater and other factors affecting kokanee reproductive success in Flathead Lake began in the spring of 1982. A total of 719 redds were counted in 17 shoreline areas of Flathead Lake in1983 compared to 592 in 1981 and 1,029 in 1982. Shoreline spawning contributed three percent to the total kokanee spawning in the Flathead drainage in 1983. Fifty-nine percent of the redds were located above 2883 ft, the operational minimum pool. The majority of those redds were constructed between 2885 and 2889 ft. In areas above minimum pool, intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations were adequate for embryo survival and exhibited a decrease with depth. Limited data indicated apparent velocity may be the key in determining redd distribution. Seventy-five percent of the redds located below minimum pool were constructed in a zone between 2869 and 2883 ft. In individual areas, apparent velocity measurements and intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations were related to redd density. The variation in intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations in the Yellow Bay spawning area was partially explained by lake stage fluctuation. As lake stage declined, groundwater apparent velocity increased which increased intergravel dissolved oxygen concentrations. Mean survival to the eyed stage in the three areas below minimum pool was 43 percent. Prior to exposure by lake drawdown, mean survival to the eyed stage in spawning areas above minimum pool was 87 percent. This indicated habitat most conducive to successful embryo survival was in gravels above 2883 ft. prior to significant exposure. Survival in redds exposed to either extended periods of drawdown or to temperatures less than -10% was significantly reduced to

  20. Water-level fluctuations in the Black Sea since the Last Glacial Maximum

    Lericolais, Gilles; Popescu, I; F. Guichard; Popescu, S. M.

    2007-01-01

    Two IFREMER oceanographic surveys carried out in the northwestern Black Sea in 1998 and 2002 complement previous seabed mapping and subsurface sampling by various international expeditions. They show that the lake level rose on the continental shelf to at least the -40 to -30 m isobath based on the landward limit of a Dreissena layer representative of very low salinity conditions (

  1. Assessing spatial fluctuations, temporal variability, and measurement error in estimated levels of disinfection by-products in tap water: implications for exposure assessment

    Symanski, E; Savitz, D; SINGER, P

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To assess spatial fluctuations, temporal variability, and errors due to sampling and analysis in levels of disinfection by-products in routine monitoring tap water samples and in water samples collected in households within the same distribution system for an exposure assessment study.

  2. Environmental assessment for the natural fluctuation of water level in Par Pond and reduced water flow in Steel Creek below L-Lake at the Savannah River Site

    The Savannah River Operations Office Strategic Plan directs Savannah River Site (SRS) to find ways to reduce operating costs, and to determine what site infrastructure must be maintained and what infrastructure is surplus. Because of the mission change, L-Lake, Par Pond, and the river water system are no longer needed to support current missions and therefore provide an opportunity for operating cost reduction. If SRS determines that L-Lake, Par Pond, and the river water system are no longer needed to support future missions and are considered surplus, appropriate NEPA documentation will be prepared. The purpose of the proposed action in this Environmental Assessment is to begin an examination of the need for the Site's river water system by (1) developing data needed to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of further reducing or eliminating the flow demands from the Site's river water system and; (2) evaluating the potential of reducing operating costs by allowing the water level in Par Pond to fluctuate naturally through reduced pumping. This action also includes reducing the current flow rates from L-Lake to Steel Creek to natural stream flows while maintaining full pool. The recently approved Par Pond CERCLA Interim Action Proposed Plan (IAPP) committed to evaluate in a NEPA document the environmental consequences of this proposed action. This document evaluated the remediation of human health and ecological risks associated with the three year drawdown of Par Pond. Should any of the parameters sampled in the reservoir and streams (e.g., water quality, biota, etc.) exceed established threshold levels during the implementation of the proposed action, water would again be pumped into the reservoir to minimize any impacts by bringing the water level back to an appropriate level about 58.2 m (195 ft)

  3. Environmental assessment for the natural fluctuation of water level in Par Pond and reduced water flow in Steel Creek below L-Lake at the Savannah River Site

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Savannah River Operations Office Strategic Plan directs Savannah River Site (SRS) to find ways to reduce operating costs, and to determine what site infrastructure must be maintained and what infrastructure is surplus. Because of the mission change, L-Lake, Par Pond, and the river water system are no longer needed to support current missions and therefore provide an opportunity for operating cost reduction. If SRS determines that L-Lake, Par Pond, and the river water system are no longer needed to support future missions and are considered surplus, appropriate NEPA documentation will be prepared. The purpose of the proposed action in this Environmental Assessment is to begin an examination of the need for the Site`s river water system by (1) developing data needed to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of further reducing or eliminating the flow demands from the Site`s river water system and; (2) evaluating the potential of reducing operating costs by allowing the water level in Par Pond to fluctuate naturally through reduced pumping. This action also includes reducing the current flow rates from L-Lake to Steel Creek to natural stream flows while maintaining full pool. The recently approved Par Pond CERCLA Interim Action Proposed Plan (IAPP) committed to evaluate in a NEPA document the environmental consequences of this proposed action. This document evaluated the remediation of human health and ecological risks associated with the three year drawdown of Par Pond. Should any of the parameters sampled in the reservoir and streams (e.g., water quality, biota, etc.) exceed established threshold levels during the implementation of the proposed action, water would again be pumped into the reservoir to minimize any impacts by bringing the water level back to an appropriate level about 58.2 m (195 ft).

  4. An Original Processing Method of Satellite Altimetry for Estimating Water Levels and Volume Fluctuations in a Series of Small Lakes of the Pantanal Wetland Complex in Brazil

    Henrique Costa, Paulo; Oliveira Pereira, Eric; Maillard, Philippe

    2016-06-01

    Satellite altimetry is becoming a major tool for measuring water levels in rivers and lakes offering accuracies compatible with many hydrological applications, especially in uninhabited regions of difficult access. The Pantanal is considered the largest tropical wetland in the world and the sparsity of in situ gauging station make remote methods of water level measurements an attractive alternative. This article describes how satellites altimetry data from Envisat and Saral was used to determine water level in two small lakes in the Pantanal. By combining the water level with the water surface area extracted from satellite imagery, water volume fluctuations were also estimated for a few periods. The available algorithms (retrackers) that compute a range solution from the raw waveforms do not always produce reliable measurements in small lakes. This is because the return signal gets often "contaminated" by the surrounding land. To try to solve this, we created a "lake" retracker that rejects waveforms that cannot be attributed to "calm water" and convert them to altitude. Elevation data are stored in a database along with the water surface area to compute the volume fluctuations. Satellite water level time series were also produced and compared with the only nearby in situ gauging station. Although the "lake" retracker worked well with calm water, the presence of waves and other factors was such that the standard "ice1" retracker performed better on the overall. We estimate our water level accuracy to be around 75 cm. Although the return time of both satellites is only 35 days, the next few years promise to bring new altimetry satellite missions that will significantly increase this frequency.

  5. Analysis of Water Level Fluctuations and TDS Variations in the Groundwater at Mewat (Nuh District, Haryana (India

    Priyanka1

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater is the major source for fulfilling the water needs of domestic and agricultural sectors in Mewat district, Haryana, India and its continuous use has put an enormous pressure on the groundwater resource, which along with low rainfall and variable geographical conditions lead to the declining water levels. The other problem of this area is high salinity which is reported intruding to the freshwater zone1. Taking into account the twin problem of declining water level and high salinity the study was taken up jointly by National Institute of Hydrology, Roorkee; Sehgal Foundation, Gurgaon and Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee. Groundwater level and TDS (Total dissolved solids data for pre-monsoon and post-monsoon seasons for the time period of 2011–2015 of 40 monitoring wells developed by Sehgal Foundation, Gurgaon was collected and analysed. It has been found that the groundwater level is decreasing in the area while TDS values show inconsistent trends during 2011-15. Further monitoring of the wells is continued to get the more information on water level and TDS which will help in facilitating the researchers in finding out the applicable solutions for the above problems in the Mewat, Haryana.

  6. Influence of water level fluctuation on the mortality and aboveground biomass of the aquatic macrophyte Eleocharis interstincta (VAHL roemer et schults

    Santos Anderson Medeiros dos

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study was to study the biometric alterations of Eleocharis interstincta in response to water level fluctuations in Cabiúnas Lagoon, located on the northern coast of the state of Rio de Janeiro, in the municipality of Macaé. Three quadrats of 0.0625 m² were harvested every two weeks from June/1997 to June/1998; samples were separated into stems, dead stems (detritus and rhizome; lenghted, dried and weighted. The water level fluctuated seasonally in the macrophyte stand with two periods of drawdown. The first period occurred naturally at the end of winter and beginning of spring, when rainfall in the area was normally lowest. The second period of drawdown was the result of an artificial breaching of the sandbar that isolate the lagoon from the sea. The breach was made in the summer, at the time of highest rainfall, when the water level in the lagoon reached the maximum value recorded during the study (1.35 m. There was a strongly positive correlation of the water level with stems mean height and aboveground biomass, indicating that water level played an important role in the determination of these parameters. There was a significant difference between stem height (ANOVA; p < 0.001 and biomass (ANOVA; p < 0.001 in each sampling period, ranging from 143.9 cm and 338.8 g dry wt.m-2, before the sandbar opening, to 16.3 cm and 20.2 g dry wt.m-2 respectively after the sandbar breaching. The drastic variation of the water level, leading mass mortality of the stems, together with the lowest mean biomass/stem (0.057 g dry wt.individual-1, recorded after the sandbar breaching, did not represent a strong disturbance for E. interstincta, since the resilience time estimated for this population was about 30 days.

  7. Submergence Tolerance and Germination Dynamics of Roegneria nutans Seeds in Water-Level Fluctuation Zones with Different Water Rhythms in the Three Gorges Reservoir.

    Feng Lin

    Full Text Available The Three Gorges Dam features two water-level fluctuation zones (WLFZs: the preupland drawdown zone (PU-DZ and the preriparian drawdown zone (PR-DZ. To investigate the vegetation potential of Roegneria nutans in WLFZs, we compared the submergence tolerance and germination dynamics in the natural riparian zone (NRZ, PU-DZ and PR-DZ. We found that the NRZ seeds maintained an 81.3% intactness rate and >91% germination rate. The final seed germination rate and germination dynamics were consistent with those of the controls. Meanwhile, the PU-DZ seeds submerged at 5 m, 10 m, 15 m, and 20 m exhibited intactness rates of 70.5%, 79.95%, 40.75%, and 39.87%, respectively, and >75% germination. Furthermore, the PR-DZ seeds exhibited intactness rates of 22.44%, 61.13%, 81.87%, and 15.36% at 5 m, 10 m, 15 m, and 17 m, respectively, and 80% germination. The germination rates of the intact seeds submerged >10 m were >80%. Finally, the intact seeds germinated quickly in all WLFZs. The high proportion of intact seeds, rapid germination capacity, and high germination rate permit R. nutans seeds to adapt to the complicated water rhythms of the PU-DZ and PR-DZ and indicate the potential for their use in vegetation restoration and recovery. Thus, perennial seeds can be used for vegetation restoration in the WLFZs of large reservoirs and in other regions with water rhythms similar to the Three Gorges Reservoir.

  8. Lake level fluctuations boost toxic cyanobacterial "oligotrophic blooms".

    Cristiana Callieri

    Full Text Available Global warming has been shown to strongly influence inland water systems, producing noticeable increases in water temperatures. Rising temperatures, especially when combined with widespread nutrient pollution, directly favour the growth of toxic cyanobacteria. Climate changes have also altered natural water level fluctuations increasing the probability of extreme events as dry periods followed by heavy rains. The massive appearance of Dolichospermum lemmermannii ( = planktonic Anabaena, a toxic species absent from the pelagic zone of the subalpine oligotrophic Lake Maggiore before 2005, could be a consequence of the unusual fluctuations of lake level in recent years. We hypothesized that these fluctuations may favour the cyanobacterium as result of nutrient pulses from the biofilms formed in the littoral zone when the lake level is high. To help verify this, we exposed artificial substrates in the lake, and evaluated their nutrient enrichment and release after desiccation, together with measurements of fluctuations in lake level, precipitation and D. lemmermannii population. The highest percentage of P release and the lowest C:P molar ratio of released nutrients coincided with the summer appearance of the D. lemmermannii bloom. The P pulse indicates that fluctuations in level counteract nutrient limitation in this lake and it is suggested that this may apply more widely to other oligotrophic lakes. In view of the predicted increase in water level fluctuations due to climate change, it is important to try to minimize such fluctuations in order to mitigate the occurrence of cyanobacterial blooms.

  9. Sliding stones of Racetrack Playa, Death Valley, USA: The roles of rock thermal conductivity and fluctuating water levels

    Kletetschka, Gunther; Hooke, Roger LeB.; Ryan, Andrew; Fercana, George; McKinney, Emerald; Schwebler, Kristopher P.

    2013-08-01

    On occasion, Racetrack playa in Death Valley National Park becomes flooded and temperatures then drop appreciably below freezing. The thermal conductivity of rock is greater than that of water, so heat is conducted from a partially-submerged rock faster than from water. Consequently, a collar of thicker ice forms at the water surface, a layer of ice forms on more deeply-submerged parts of the rock, and playa sediment beneath the rock may even become frozen to it. While this occurs, only a surface layer of ice forms on water away from the rock. Once the ice becomes thick enough, perhaps only 5-10 mm, either the buoyancy of the ice or additions of water to the playa by rain, snow-melt, or groundwater seepage then reduce the normal force between the rock and the playa to the point where wind shear can move the ice sheet with its entrained rocks, making trails (Stanley, 1955; Reid et al., 1995). After the ice melts, rocks are left at the ends of the trails, sometimes atop a pedestal of silt. A renewed increase in water level on the playa before the ice melts may lift a rock completely free of the playa surface and whisk it away, leaving a rockless trail. During a movement event, changes in rock orientation or water depth may result in changes in width along the track. Rock speeds are likely tens to hundreds of millimeters per second.

  10. Habitat Selection by African Buffalo (Syncerus caffer) in Response to Landscape-Level Fluctuations in Water Availability on Two Temporal Scales

    Emily Bennitt; Mpaphi Casper Bonyongo; Stephen Harris

    2014-01-01

    Seasonal fluctuations in water availability cause predictable changes in the profitability of habitats in tropical ecosystems, and animals evolve adaptive behavioural and spatial responses to these fluctuations. However, stochastic changes in the distribution and abundance of surface water between years can alter resource availability at a landscape scale, causing shifts in animal behaviour. In the Okavango Delta, Botswana, a flood-pulsed ecosystem, the volume of water entering the system dou...

  11. Global Warming and Caspian Sea Level Fluctuations

    Ardakanian, Reza; Alemohammad, Seyed Hamed

    2013-01-01

    Coastal regions have a high social, economical and environmental importance. Due to this importance the sea level fluctuations can have many bad consequences. In this research the correlation between the increasing trend of temperature in coastal stations due to Global Warming and the Caspian Sea level has been established. The Caspian Sea level data has been received from the Jason-1 satellite. It was resulted that the monthly correlation between the temperature and sea level is high and als...

  12. Spatial and seasonal CH4 flux in the littoral zone of Miyun Reservoir near Beijing: the effects of water level and its fluctuation.

    Meng Yang

    Full Text Available Wetlands, and especially their littoral zones, are considered to be CH4 emissions hotspots. The recent creation of reservoirs has caused a rapid increase in the area of the world's littoral zones. To investigate the effects of water depth and water level fluctuation on CH4 fluxes, and how these are coupled with vegetation and nutrients, we used static closed chamber and gas chromatography techniques to measure CH4 fluxes in the littoral zone of a large reservoir near Beijing, China, from November 2011 to October 2012. We found that CH4 flux decreased significantly along a transect from open water to dry land, from 3.1 mg m(-2 h(-1 at the deep water site to approximately 1.3 mg m(-2 h(-1 at the shallow water site, and less than 0.01 mg m(-2 h(-1 in the non-flooded area. Water level influenced CH4 flux by affecting soil properties including soil redox potential, soil carbon and nitrogen, and bulk density. The largest emission of all was from the seasonally flooded site after a flooding event (up to 21.1 mg m(-2 h(-1, which may have been caused by vegetation decomposition. Submerged sites had greater emissions, while the driest site had lower emissions. Immediately after the monthly measurements had been made, we removed the aboveground vegetation to enable an assessment of the gas transportation per unit of biomass. Removal of biomass decreased emissions by up to 53%. These results indicated the dominant effect of water depth on CH4 flux through effects of soil conditions, plant species composition and distribution. This study suggests that temporally flooded wetlands, including littoral zones, contribute significantly to the global CH4 burden. However, the current challenge is to capture their spatial extent and temporal variation in the fluxes.

  13. Spatial and seasonal CH4 flux in the littoral zone of Miyun Reservoir near Beijing: the effects of water level and its fluctuation.

    Yang, Meng; Geng, Xuemeng; Grace, John; Lu, Cai; Zhu, Yi; Zhou, Yan; Lei, Guangchun

    2014-01-01

    Wetlands, and especially their littoral zones, are considered to be CH4 emissions hotspots. The recent creation of reservoirs has caused a rapid increase in the area of the world's littoral zones. To investigate the effects of water depth and water level fluctuation on CH4 fluxes, and how these are coupled with vegetation and nutrients, we used static closed chamber and gas chromatography techniques to measure CH4 fluxes in the littoral zone of a large reservoir near Beijing, China, from November 2011 to October 2012. We found that CH4 flux decreased significantly along a transect from open water to dry land, from 3.1 mg m(-2) h(-1) at the deep water site to approximately 1.3 mg m(-2) h(-1) at the shallow water site, and less than 0.01 mg m(-2) h(-1) in the non-flooded area. Water level influenced CH4 flux by affecting soil properties including soil redox potential, soil carbon and nitrogen, and bulk density. The largest emission of all was from the seasonally flooded site after a flooding event (up to 21.1 mg m(-2) h(-1)), which may have been caused by vegetation decomposition. Submerged sites had greater emissions, while the driest site had lower emissions. Immediately after the monthly measurements had been made, we removed the aboveground vegetation to enable an assessment of the gas transportation per unit of biomass. Removal of biomass decreased emissions by up to 53%. These results indicated the dominant effect of water depth on CH4 flux through effects of soil conditions, plant species composition and distribution. This study suggests that temporally flooded wetlands, including littoral zones, contribute significantly to the global CH4 burden. However, the current challenge is to capture their spatial extent and temporal variation in the fluxes. PMID:24710279

  14. Responses of N2O flux to water level fluctuation and other environmental factors at littoral zone of Miyun Reservoir: a comparison with CH4 fluxes

    M. Yang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available There have been only a few studies that allow us to estimate the contribution of newly-created reservoirs to greenhouse gas budgets. In particular, information is limited for understanding the spatiotemporal variation of N2O flux and the underlying mechanisms in the littoral zone where complex biochemical processes are induced by water level fluctuations. A study was carried out at five different water levels (deep water area, shallow water area, seasonally flooded area, control site for seasonally flooded area and non-flooded area at the littoral zone of a temperate reservoir using the static chamber technique. Seasonal and spatial variations of N2O flux and environmental factors were monitored throughout the growing season including a flood event during summer rains. The N2O flux ranged from −2.29 to 182.47 μg m−2 h−1. Non-flooded dry land emitted more N2O than flooded land, no matter whether it was permanently or seasonally flooded. However, no significant difference was observed between seasonally flooded sites and their control sites. Wind speed, air temperature, soil water content, dissolved oxygen in water and soil nitrate influenced N2O flux significantly. In order to know the contrasting characteristics of N2O and CH4 fluxes in the littoral zone of the reservoir, results were compared with a previous study on CH4 emission carried out at the same sites and time with comparable methods. It showed that N2O flux and CH4 flux was influenced by distinct factors and in differing ways. This work highlights the complexity of N2O flux at the littoral zone. The different response ways of N2O and CH4 to environments implies the big challenge of greenhouse gas emission control through ecosystem management.

  15. Influence of Reservoir Water Level Fluctuations on Sediment Methylmercury Concentrations Downstream of the Historical Black Butte Mercury Mine, OR

    Mercury (Hg) is a pollutant of global concern due to its ability to accumulate as methylmercury (MeHg) in biota. Mercury is methylated by anaerobic microorganisms such as sulfate reducing bacteria (SRB) in water and sediment. Throughout North America, reservoirs tend to have e...

  16. Global Warming and Caspian Sea Level Fluctuations

    Ardakanian, Reza

    2013-01-01

    Coastal regions have a high social, economical and environmental importance. Due to this importance the sea level fluctuations can have many bad consequences. In this research the correlation between the increasing trend of temperature in coastal stations due to Global Warming and the Caspian Sea level has been established. The Caspian Sea level data has been received from the Jason-1 satellite. It was resulted that the monthly correlation between the temperature and sea level is high and also positive and almost the same for all the stations. But the yearly correlation was negative. It means that the sea level has decreased by the increase in temperature.

  17. Modeling of groundwater level fluctuations using dendrochronology in alluvial aquifers

    Gholami, V.; Chau, K. W.; Fadaee, F.; Torkaman, J.; Ghaffari, A.

    2015-10-01

    Groundwater is the most important water resource in semi-arid and arid regions such as Iran. It is necessary to study groundwater level fluctuations to manage disasters (such as droughts) and water resources. Dendrochronology, which uses tree-rings to reconstruct past events such as hydrologic and climatologic events, can be used to evaluate groundwater level fluctuations. In this study, groundwater level fluctuations are simulated using dendrochronology (tree-rings) and an artificial neural network (ANN) for the period from 1912 to 2013. The present study was undertaken using the Quercus Castaneifolia species, which is present in an alluvial aquifer of the Caspian southern coasts, Iran. A multilayer percepetron (MLP) network was adopted for the ANN. Tree-ring diameter and precipitation were the input parameters for the study, and groundwater levels were the outputs. After the training process, the model was validated. The validated network and tree-rings were used to simulate groundwater level fluctuations during the past century. The results showed that an integration of dendrochronology and an ANN renders a high degree of accuracy and efficiency in the simulation of groundwater levels. The simulated groundwater levels by dendrochronology can be used for drought evaluation, drought period prediction and water resources management.

  18. Water level fluctuations in a tropical reservoir: the impact of sediment drying, aquatic macrophyte dieback, and oxygen availability on phosphorus mobilization.

    Keitel, Jonas; Zak, Dominik; Hupfer, Michael

    2016-04-01

    Reservoirs in semi-arid areas are subject to water level fluctuations (WLF) that alter biogeochemical processes in the sediment. We hypothesized that wet-dry cycles may cause internal eutrophication in such systems when they affect densely vegetated shallow areas. To assess the impact of WLF on phosphorus (P) mobilization and benthic P cycling of iron-rich sediments, we tested the effects of (i) sediment drying and rewetting, (ii) the impact of organic matter availability in the form of dried Brazilian Waterweed (Egeria densa), and (iii) alternating redox conditions in the surface water. In principle, drying led to increased P release after rewetting both in plant-free and in plant-amended sediments. Highest P mobilization was recorded in plant amendments under oxygen-free conditions. After re-establishment of aerobic conditions, P concentrations in surface water decreased substantially owing to P retention by sediments. In desiccated and re-inundated sediments, P retention decreased by up to 30 % compared to constantly inundated sediments. We showed that WLF may trigger biochemical interactions conducive to anaerobic P release. Thereby, E. densa showed high P release and even P uptake that was redox-controlled and superimposed sedimentary P cycling. Macrophytes play an important role in the uptake of P from the water but may be also a significant source of P in wet-dry cycles. We estimated a potential for the abrupt release of soluble reactive phosphorus (SRP) by E. densa of 0.09-0.13 g SRP per m(2) after each wet-dry cycle. Released SRP may exceed critical P limits for eutrophication, provoking usage restrictions. Our results have implications for management of reservoirs in semi-arid regions affected by WLF. PMID:26670030

  19. [Effects of light irradiation on phosphorous releases from typical submerged soils of water-level fluctuation zones of Three Gorges Reservoirs areas].

    Guo, Nian; Jiang, Tao; Wei, Shi-Qiang; Yan, Jin-Long; Liang, Jian; Lu, Song; Gao, Jie

    2014-12-01

    For understanding the impact of light irradiation on the phosphorus (P) releases from soil-water interface, two types of typical soils sampled from water-level fluctuation zones of Three Gorges Reservoir areas were selected as research objectives, and simulated light irradiation experiment in lab was conducted for unveiling the underlying mechanisms of P releases from submerged soils in the presence of light irradiation. The results showed that light irradiation could inhibit P releases from submerged soils by a certain degree. Under light condition, total P (TP) concentrations in underlying water of submerged purple soil ranged from 0.018 to 0.033 mg x L(-1), as compared to the range of 0.02-0.057 mg x L(-1) in darkness treatment. Additionally, for gray-brown purple soil, TP was in a range of 0.028-0.045 mg x L(-1) when light irradiated, but in the range of 0.04-0. 084 mg x L(-1) under darkness condition. Meanwhile, changes of iron oxides in soils due to light irradiation were possibly to be the important reason to explain the inhabitation of light irradiation on P releases. Moreover, light irradiation resulted in decreasing saturation degree of iron oxides in soils, which further inhibited the iron reduction and production of amorphous iron, further enhanced the underlying mechanisms of decreasing P releases in presence of light irradiation. Further, CO2 and CH4 could reflect decomposition of soil organic carbon (SOC) in submerged condition. Light irradiation significantly decreased SOC transformation into carbon gases. Stimulating consumption of inorganic electron acceptors in submerged soils could also be used to explain the changes of iron oxides under light irradiation condition. Thus, inhabitation of light irradiation on P releases from submerged soils obviously related with iron minerals reduction and decomposition of organic matter in soils. PMID:25826924

  20. [Effects of Citric Acid on Activation and Methylation of Mercury in the Soils of Water-Level-Fluctuating Zone of the Three Gorges.Reservoir].

    Qin, Cai-qing; Liang, Li; You, Rui; Deng, Han; Wang, Ding-yong

    2015-12-01

    To investigate effects of the main component of vegetation root exudates-citric acid on activation and methylation of mercury in the soil of water-level-fluctuating zone (WLFZ) of the Three Gorges Reservoir area, simulation experiments were conducted by extracting and cultivating soil with different concentrations of citric acid. The results showed that after adding citric acid, the total mercury content in leaching solution before reaching peak were higher than that of the control, and increased with the increase of citric acid concentrations. The maximum amount of mercury complexes increased initially and then reached plateaus with the percentage against the total mercury in soil of 1.03%, 1.67%, 1.99%, 2.47%, 2.68%, 2.73% and 2.73% for different citric acid concentrations (0, 1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and 8 mmol · L⁻¹). In addition, concentrations of methylmercury ( MeHg) in soil remained stable in the first 3 hours, and then increased accompanying with the increasing rate rising with the concentration of citric acid ( besides the control group) . This result indicated that citric acid probably could promote the transformation process from inorganic mercury to MeHg in soil. which increased with the concentration of citric acid. PMID:27011985

  1. [Fractions and adsorption characteristics of phosphorus on sediments and soils in water level fluctuating zone of the Pengxi River, a tributary of the Three Gorges Reservoir].

    Sun, Wen-Bin; Du, Bin; Zhao, Xiu-Lan; He, Bing-Hui

    2013-03-01

    content, and significantly related to the content of Ca-P and pH values. According to the phosphorus concentration in the water of Pengxi River, it concludes that sediments and soils in the zone of fluctuating water level of the Pengxi river can be the sink of phosphorus in summer and autumn, while can be the source of phosphorus in the spring and winter. Therefore, the inherent phosphorus present in sediments and soils would be a major threat to the water quality and ecosystem reservation in the watershed of the Pengxi River. PMID:23745421

  2. Mesoscale wind fluctuations over Danish waters

    Vincent, C.L.

    2010-12-15

    Mesoscale wind fluctuations affect the large scale integration of wind power because they undermine the day-ahead predictability of wind speed and power production, and because they can result in large fluctuations in power generation that must be balanced using reserve power. Large fluctuations in generated power are a particular problem for offshore wind farms because the typically high concentration of turbines within a limited geographical area means that fluctuations can be correlated across large numbers of turbines. Furthermore, organised mesoscale structures that often form over water, such as convective rolls and cellular convection, have length scales of tens of kilometers, and can cause large wind fluctuations on a time scale of around an hour. This thesis is an exploration of the predictability of mesoscale wind fluctuations using observations from the world's first two large offshore wind farms - Horns Rev I in the North Sea, and Nysted in the Baltic Sea. The thesis begins with a climatological analysis of wind fluctuations on time scales of 1-10 hours at the two sites. A novel method for calculating conditional climatologies of spectral information is proposed, based on binning and averaging the time axis of the Hilbert spectrum. Results reveal clear patterns between wind fluctuations and locally observed meteorological conditions. The analysis is expanded by classifying wind fluctuations on time scales of 1-3 hours according to synoptic patterns, satellite pictures and wind classes. Results indicate that cold air outbreaks and open cellular convection are a significant contributor to mesoscale wind variability at Horns Rev. The predictability of mesoscale wind fluctuations is tested by implementing standard statistical models that relate local wind variability to parameters based on a large scale weather analysis. The models show some skill, but only achieve a 15% improvement on a persistence forecast. The possibility of explicitly modelling

  3. Spatial patterns of zooplanktivore Chirostoma species (Atherinopsidae during water-level fluctuation in the shallow tropical Lake Chapala, Mexico: seasonal and interannual analysis

    Rodrigo Moncayo-Estrada

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This study addresses the influence of water-level fluctuations on fish distribution at two temporal scales: seasonal (dry and rainy and interannual (low and high volume conditions. The analysis of abundance relationships among three zooplanktivore Chirostoma species at fifteen sites in Lake Chapala, Mexico, revealed the significant influence of contrasting conditions (P=0.0002. Seasonally, segregation was more related to species dominance in the dry season and exclusively related to environmental characteristics in the rainy season. Interanually, biotic influence occurred in the shallowest and the deepest episodes of the lake. Environmental characteristics influenced species distribution when the lake reached 25% of its volume. Site, depth, temperature, and salinity were the leading factors influencing fish distribution. These results emphasize the necessity to implement different management strategies according to lake volume, particularly when a critical threshold is reached.El presente estudio describe la influencia que tiene la fluctuación del nivel del agua en la distribución de los peces a dos diferentes escalas: estacional (estiaje y lluvias e interanual (condiciones de bajo y alto volumen. El análisis de las relaciones de abundancia entre tres especies zooplanctófagas de Chirostoma en quince sitios del Lago de Chapala, México, reveló una influencia estadísticamente significativa en las condiciones contrastantes (P=0.0002. Estacionalmente, la segregación estuvo más relacionada a la dominancia de las especies en la época de estiaje y exclusivamente relacionada a las características ambientales en la época de lluvias. Interanualmente, la influencia biótica se presenta en los episodios más someros y más profundos del lago. Las características ambientales influenciaron la distribución de las especies cuando el lago alcanzó el 25% de su volumen. El sitio geográfico, profundidad, temperatura y salinidad fueron los principales

  4. Hydrological processes and water resources management in a dryland environment IV: Long-term groundwater level fluctuations due to variation in rainfall

    Butterworth, J. A.; R. E. Schulze; Simmonds, L. P.; Moriarty, P.; Mugabe, F.

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of variations in rainfall on groundwater, long-term rainfall records were used to simulate groundwater levels over the period 1953-96 at an experimental catchment in south-east Zimbabwe. Two different modelling methods were adopted. Firstly, a soil water balance model (ACRU) simulated drainage from daily rainfall and evaporative demand; groundwater levels were predicted as a function of drainage, specific yield and water table height. Secondly, the cumulative rainfall ...

  5. 三峡库区消涨带植被恢复策略%Revegetation Strategies for Water-Level Fluctuation Zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region

    卢志军; 江明喜

    2012-01-01

    After the full functioning of the Three Gorges Dam (TGD) , the hydrologic regime will be markedly changed and most of the pre-dam vegetation in the new Water-Level Fluctuation Zone ( WLFZ) may fail to persist. How to revegetate WLFZ of the Three Gorges Reservoir Region (TGRR) has become a hot topic for the scientific community and the governments. Based on review of scientific literature and the findings of our research, we here bring forward a scheme addressing strategies for revegetation of WLFZ of TGRR. Firstly, monitor vegetation dynamics based on permanent plots along the Three Gorges upstream from TGD, potentially providing suitable plants for the future revegetation plans. Secondly, examine the potential of soil seed bank for revegetation of the above-ground vegetation, and evaluate self-regeneration of the post-dam vegetation. Based on these data, select suitable plants for revegetation that integrate desirable physiological and life-history traits. Specifically, wetland vegetation could be constructed with lotus ( Nelumbo nucifera) and aquatic plants. For sites with gentle terrain and fairly hospitable soil conditions, vertical planting of trees, shrubs and grasses/forbs along the elevation gradient could be considered. To attain the sustainable vegetation cover, the newly artificial vegetation should be monitored for at least 5 years.%三峡工程全面运行之后,水文条件发生巨大变化,新形成的消涨带(海拔145~ 175 m)原有植被大部分可能逐渐消亡.如何重建该地段植被成为科研人员和管理部门关注的热点问题.在文献综合分析的基础上,结合在三峡消涨带植被重建方面的前期工作,建议如下:首先对库区消涨带植被进行长期定位监测,了解新的水文条件下原有植被动态及命运,同时为消涨带植被人工重建提供备选物种;其次,评价土壤种子库恢复地上植被的潜力,结合地上植被监测结果,评价消涨带植被的自我恢复(更新)能

  6. Glacier fluctuations, global temperature and sea-level change

    P. W. Leclercq

    2012-01-01

    The current world-wide glacier retreat is a clear sign of global warming. In addition, glaciers contribute to sea-level rise as a consequence of the current retreat. In this thesis we use records of past glacier fluctuations to reconstruct past climate variations and the glacier contribution to sea-level change. Firstly, a coherent data set of world-wide glacier fluctuations over the past centuries is compiled. Most available information of glacier fluctuations concerns glacier length fluctua...

  7. Hydrological processes and water resources management in a dryland environment IV: Long-term groundwater level fluctuations due to variation in rainfall

    J. A. Butterworth

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the effects of variations in rainfall on groundwater, long-term rainfall records were used to simulate groundwater levels over the period 1953-96 at an experimental catchment in south-east Zimbabwe. Two different modelling methods were adopted. Firstly, a soil water balance model (ACRU simulated drainage from daily rainfall and evaporative demand; groundwater levels were predicted as a function of drainage, specific yield and water table height. Secondly, the cumulative rainfall departure method was used to model groundwater levels from monthly rainfall. Both methods simulated observed groundwater levels over the period 1992-96 successfully, and long-term simulated trends in historical levels were comparable. Results suggest that large perturbations in groundwater levels area a normal feature of the response of a shallow aquifer to variations in rainfall. Long-term trends in groundwater levels are apparent and reflect the effect of cycles in rainfall. Average end of dry season water levels were simulated to be almost 3 m higher in the late 1970s compared to those of the early 1990s. The simulated effect of prolonged low rainfall on groundwater levels was particularly severe during the period 1981-92 with a series of low recharge years unprecedented in the earlier record. More recently, above average rainfall has resulted in generally higher groundwater levels. The modelling methods described may be applied in the development of guidelines for groundwater schemes to help ensure safe long-term yields and to predict future stress on groundwater resources in low rainfall periods; they are being developed to evaluate the effects of land use and management change on groundwater resources.

  8. Has sea level fluctuations modulated human settlements in Gulf of Khambhat (Cambay)?

    Nigam, R.; Hashimi, N.H.

    583 HAS SEA LEVEL FLUCTUATIONS MODULATED HUMAN SETTLEMENTS IN GULF OF KHAMBHAT (CAMBAY)? World's major ancient civilizations flourished near river banks and deltaic sea coasts. The reason behind is the easy availability of water, a vital...

  9. Analysis of jitter due to call-level fluctuations

    Mandjes, M.R.H.

    2005-01-01

    In communication networks used by constant bit rate applications, call-level dynamics (i.e., entering and leaving calls) lead to fluctuations in the load, and therefore also fluctuations in the delay (jitter). By intentionally delaying the packets at the destination, one can transform the perturbed

  10. Change of Heavy Metals Content in Soil of Water-Level-Fluctuating Zone in Three Gorges Reservoir Area%三峡库区消落带土壤重金属含量变化特征研究

    王图锦; 杨清伟; 潘瑾; 刘雪莲

    2013-01-01

    采集三峡库区消落带土壤,对干湿交替运行下消落带土壤重金属迁移转化特征进行研究.结果表明:汛期水体重金属含量明显高于汛后,消落带土壤重金属的迁移转化引起的环境风险较低.消落带土壤Cu和Cr主要以残渣态存在,生态风险较低,Pb和Cd可提取态重金属含量较高,潜在生态风险较大.长期周期性干湿交替运行下消落带土壤重金属含量总体呈现增加趋势,土壤中Cu,Pb,Cd,Cr的含量分别提高了17.04%,24.49%,12.99%及13.70%,总体而言,增大幅度排序为Pb >Cu >Cr>Cd.%Taking the soil of water-level-fluctuating zone in Three Gorges Reservoir area as the research object,the features of migration and transportation of the heavy metals in the soil of water-level-fluctuating zone in the condition of alternate drying-wetting are studied.The results indicate that the content of heavy metals in water in flood season is higher than that after the flood season.The environmental risk caused by migration and transportation of the heavy metals in the soil of waterlevel-fluctuating zone is low.Cu and Cr in soil of water-level-fluctuating zone exist in the form of residue and the ecological risk is low.Heavy metals could be extracted from Pb and Cd,whose potential ecological risk is high.Heavy metal concentration inclines to increase generally in a periodical alternate drying-wetting environment for a long time.The average increasing amount of Cu,Pb,Cd and Cr is 17.04%,24.49%,12.99%,13.70% respectively.In general,the increment sequence is Pb > Cu > Cr > Cd.

  11. Impacts of Water Level Fluctuations on Kokanee Reproduction in Flathead Lake; Effects of Operation of Kerr and Hungry Horse Dam on Reproductive Success, 1983 Annual Report.

    Decker-Hess, Janet; McMullin, Steve L.

    1983-11-01

    Koktneesalmon (Oncorhvnchusnerka), the land-locked form of sockeye salmon, were originally introduced to Flathead Lake in 1916. My 1933, kokanee had become established in the lake and provided a popular summer trolling fishery as well as a fall snagging fishery in shoreline areas. Presently, Flathead Lake supports the second highest fishing pressure of any lake or reservoir in Montana (Montana Department of Fish and Game 1976). During 1981-82, the lake provided 168,792 man-days of fishing pressure. Ninety-two percent of the estimated 536,870 fish caught in Flathead Lake in 1981-82 were kokanee salmon. Kokanee also provided forage for bull trout seasonally and year round for lake trout. Kokanee rear to maturity in Flathead Lake, then return to various total grounds to spawn. Spawning occurred in lake outlet streams, springs, larger rivers and lake shoreline areas in suitable but often limited habitat. Shoreline spawning in Flathead Lake was first documented in the mid-1930's. Spawning kokanee were seized from shoreline areas in 1933 and 21,000 cans were processed and packed for distribution to the needy. Stefanich (1953 and 1954) later documented extensive but an unquantified amount of spawning along the shoreline as well as runs in Whitefish River and McDonald Creek in the 1950's. A creel census conducted in 1962-63 determined 11 to 13 percent of the kokanee caught annually were taken during the spawning period (Robbins 1966). During a 1981-82 creel census, less than one percent of the fishermen on Flathead Lake were snagging kokanee (Graham and Fredenberg 1982). The operation of Kerr Dam, located below Flathead Lake on the Flathead River, has altered seasonal fluctuations of Flathead Lake. Lake levels presently remain high during kokanee spawning in November and decline during the incubation and emergence periods. Groundwater plays an important role in embryo and fry survival in redds of shoreline areas exposed by lake drawdown. Stefanich (1954) and

  12. Analysis of jitter due to call-level fluctuations

    Mandjes, Michel

    2005-01-01

    In communication networks used by constant bit rate applications, call-level dynamics (i.e., entering and leaving calls) lead to fluctuations in the load, and therefore also fluctuations in the delay (jitter). By intentionally delaying the packets at the destination, one can transform the perturbed packet stream back into the original periodic stream; in other words: there is a trade off between jitter and delay, in that jitter can be removed at the expense of delay. As a consequence, for str...

  13. Patterns of temporal scaling of groundwater level fluctuation

    Yu, Xue; Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Padilla, Ingrid Y.; Kaeli, David; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2016-05-01

    We studied the fractal scaling behavior of groundwater level fluctuation for various types of aquifers in Puerto Rico using the methods of (1) detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to examine the monofractality and (2) wavelet transform maximum modulus (WTMM) to analyze the multifractality. The DFA results show that fractals exist in groundwater fluctuations of all the aquifers with scaling patterns that are anti-persistent (1 1.5; 1.62 ± 0.07, 4 wells). The multifractal analysis confirmed the need to characterize these highly complex processes with multifractality, which originated from the stochastic distribution of the irregularly-shaped fluctuations. The singularity spectra of the fluctuation processes in each well were site specific. We found a general elevational effect with smaller fractal scaling coefficients in the shallower wells, except for the Northern Karst Aquifer Upper System. High spatial variability of fractal scaling of groundwater level fluctuations in the karst aquifer is due to the coupled effects of anthropogenic perturbations, precipitation, elevation and particularly the high heterogeneous hydrogeological conditions.

  14. Air encapsulation. II. Profile water storage and shallow water table fluctuations

    In a wet soil, volumetric encapsulated air contents can easily approach 0.06 m3 m-3. The objective of this study was to determine, through simulation, the effect of air encapsulation on profile water storage and shallow water table fluctuations and whether air encapsulation should be considered in modeling field events. Using a two-dimensional soil moisture code that included a routine designed to model air encapsulation, the authors simulated profile water storage changes during hypothetical rainfall events and water table responses during actual rainfall events. The simulation results indicated that, following the infiltration of 10 mm of water, profile moisture content differences with and without air encapsulation would be 3 m-3 and thus may not be measurable in the field with a neutron probe. Water table levels, however, rose significantly higher in the profile when air was encapsulated. Depending on the initial depth of the water table and the moisture characteristic, the water table rises were two to five times those when air was not encapsulated. For water tables located within 1.3 m of the surface, application of the model to actual rainfall events improved the fit to the measured water table data. In those situations where water table level predictions are important (e.g., wetlands, stream banks), researchers should consider air encapsulation in their analysis of water table fluctuations

  15. Climate Fluctuations and Record-High Levels of Lake Michigan.

    Changnon, Stanley A., Jr.

    1987-11-01

    Lake Michigan reached record-high levels during 1985 and 1986 just 10 years after attaining its previous record highs of this century. The climate of the basin has become cloudier and cooler over the past 40 years, loading to decreased evaporation and transpiration, but the principal factor for the increased water in the basin is extremely heavy precipitation in the most recent 15 years. Precipitation in this 15-year period averaged 107 percent above the 90-year average, and since 1970 only two years have been dry and 10 have been classified as wet, or much above normal. No other prior period has experienced comparably wet conditions since quality basin-wide records began in 1895. The current record-high levels on Lake Michigan and all other Great Lakes are producing a mixture of impacts including advantages to shipping and hydropower generation and disadvantages to shorelines. Most of the impacts on Lake Michigan have been disastrous with beaches destroyed, shorelines eroded, mid near-shore structures badly damaged. Illinois, with its high-valued 101-km shoreline, is involved in a myriad of vary costly adjustments being performed by individuals, lakeside communities, and state agencies. The federal government is reacting and attempting solutions, such as altered flows between the lakes and increased diversions. However, outlooks call for sustained high levels for at least the next six years and with no major means to sizably reduce levels in sight, damages and costly adjustments will continue into the foreseeable future. The situation illustrates how our complex society has become vulnerable to climate fluctuations. In such a regional case where any extreme has advantages and disadvantages to different economic interests, isolated solutions to ameliorate losses are difficult to achieve and often ineffectual, with resolution most likely needed at the regional policy level.

  16. Glacier fluctuations, global temperature and sea-level change

    Leclercq, P.W.

    2012-01-01

    The current world-wide glacier retreat is a clear sign of global warming. In addition, glaciers contribute to sea-level rise as a consequence of the current retreat. In this thesis we use records of past glacier fluctuations to reconstruct past climate variations and the glacier contribution to sea-

  17. 地下水位变化对盾构隧道的影响研究%Study on Influence of Water Level Fluctuation on Shield-bored Tunnel

    李春良; 王勇; 张巍

    2012-01-01

    A finite element model of shield-bored tunnel structure is established, so as to study the influence of water level fluctuation on shield-bored tunnel. The deformation of the tunnel and the ground under different water levels can be predicted and the displacement rules of the shield-bored tunnel under different water levels can be revealed by means of the model. The study results show that : 1 ) Rebound deformation will occur to the shallow soil layers at the ground sur- face when the water level rises. The rebound value of ground under which shield-bored tunnel exists is smaller than that of ground under which no shield-bored tunnel exists. 2) Vertical displacement of the tunnel structure and lateral dis- placement of the sidewall will happen when the ground water level rises from the invert to the crown. The higher the ground water level, the bigger the displacement value.%为研究地下水位变化对盾构隧道结构的影响,利用有限元理论,建立了地下水位变化时盾构隧道结构的有限元模型,该模型可预测出不同地下水位时盾构隧道及地面变形情况,揭示出不同水位时的盾构隧道在土中的位移变化规律。结果表明:地下水位发生变化会对盾构隧道产生一定的影响。地下水位上升会导致地表浅层土体发生回弹变形,并且下方有盾构隧道的地表的回弹值要比下方没有盾构隧道的地表的回弹值小;当地下水位从盾构隧道拱底处逐渐升高到中心处和拱顶处时,盾构隧道结构会出现竖向位移和边壁的侧向位移,并且水位越高,隧道的竖向位移和边壁的侧向位移越大。

  18. Effects of fluctuating glucose levels on neuronal cells in vitro.

    Russo, Vincenzo C; Higgins, Sandra; Werther, George A; Cameron, Fergus J

    2012-08-01

    There is increasing evidence for glucose fluctuation playing a role in the damaging effects of diabetes on various organs, including the brain. We aimed to study the effects of glycaemic variation (GV) upon mitochondrial activity using an in vitro human neuronal model. The metabolic disturbance of GV in neuronal cells, was mimicked via exposure of neuroblastoma cells SH-SY5Y to constant glucose or fluctuating (i.e. 6 h cycles) for 24 and 48 h. Mitochondrial dehydrogenase activity was determined via MTT assay. Cell mitochondrial activity (MTT) was moderately decreased in constant high glucose, but markedly decreased following 24 and 48 h of cyclical glucose fluctuations. Glucose transport determined via 2-deoxy-D-[1-(14)C] glucose uptake was regulated in an exaggerated manner in response to glucose variance, accompanied by modest changes in GLUT 1 mRNA abundance. Osmotic components of these glucose effects were investigated in the presence of the osmotic-mimics mannitol and L: -glucose. Both treatments showed that fluctuating osmolality did not result in a significant change in mitochondrial activity and had no effects on (14)Cglucose uptake, suggesting that adverse effects on mitochondrial function were specifically related to metabolically active glucose fluctuations. Apoptosis gene expression showed that both intrinsic and extrinsic apoptotic pathways were modulated by glucose variance, with two major response clusters corresponding to (i) glucose stress-modulated genes, (ii) glucose mediated osmotic stress-modulated genes. Gene clustering analysis by STRING showed that most of the glucose stress-modulated genes were components of the intrinsic/mitochondrial apoptotic pathway including Bcl-2, Caspases and apoptosis executors. On the other hand the glucose mediated osmotic stress-modulated genes were mostly within the extrinsic apoptotic pathway, including TNF receptor and their ligands and adaptors/activators/initiators of apoptosis. Fluctuating glucose levels

  19. Fluctuating lake levels in humid climates: a suitable proxy of past precipitation?

    Theuerkauf, Martin; Küster, Mathias; Kaiser, Knut

    2016-04-01

    Precipitation is a fundamental climate parameter essentially in arid and semi-arid climates, but changes in precipitation may have influenced Holocene vegetation development and human occupation in humid climates as well. However, past precipitation is notoriously difficult to reconstruct because the proxies available are widely imprecise. For example, peatland proxies such as testate amoebae are suited to reconstruct wet and dry periods of the local environment but they are poorly suited to quantify precipitation. In contrast, lake levels potentially provide a closer link to the past precipitation. In our case study, isolated lakes in the Schorfheide area (NE-Germany), fed by groundwater and rain, show at present prominent water level fluctuations that are closely correlated to annual to decadal changes in precipitation. But are these lakes indeed suitable archives to reconstruct past precipitation? To answer this question we have cored two small lakes in that area (Warnitzsee, Briesensee) with water level fluctuations well above 3 m over the past 40 years. We took seven cores along two transects from the lake shore towards the centre in Lake Warnitzsee and one core near the shore in Lake Briesensee. Core lengths range from 2.5 m to 10 m. Analysis of the cores includes geochemical parameters and pollen analysis. Two cores were dated by radiocarbon ages. All cores show recurrent marked shifts in sediment composition with up to seven peat-gyttia alternations. These sediment shifts indicate that both lakes have strongly fluctuated over the Holocene, partly with a larger magnitude than today. However, whereas the modern fluctuation periods (low and high stands) occurred over years to a few decades, we so far could only detect past fluctuation periods that lasted centuries to millennia. Furthermore, the water level in Lake Warnitzsee possibly followed a long-term trend of high water levels in the early Holocene (10.500-9000 cal. BP), low water levels between 8000 and

  20. On the Fluctuations that Order and Frustrate Liquid Water

    Limmer, David,

    2013-01-01

    At ambient conditions, water sits close to phase coexistence with its crystal. More so than in many other materials, this fact is manifested in the fluctuations that maintain a large degree of local order in the liquid. These fluctuations and how they result in long-ranged order, or its absence, are emergent features of many interacting molecules. Their study therefore requires using the tools of statistical mechanics for their their systematic understanding. In this dissertation we develop s...

  1. Mesoscale wind fluctuations over Danish waters

    Vincent, Claire Louise

    convective rolls and cellular convection, have length scales of tens of kilometers, and can cause large wind uctuations on a time scale of around an hour. This thesis is an exploration of the predictability of mesoscale wind uctuations using observations from the world's rst two large oshore wind farms......Mesoscale wind uctuations aect the large scale integration of wind power because they undermine the day-ahead predictability of wind speed and power production, and because they can result in large uctuations in power generation that must be balanced using reserve power. Large uctuations in...... generated power are a particular problem for oshore wind farms because the typically high concentration of turbines within a limited geographical area means that uctuations can be correlated across large numbers of turbines. Furthermore, organised mesoscale structures that often form over water, such as...

  2. Free product recovery at spill sites with fluctuating water tables

    Spills and leaks of hydrocarbons from underground storage tanks, pipelines and other facilities pose a serious potential for groundwater contamination which can be very costly to remediate. The severity of the impacts and the cost of remediation can be reduced by various means. Lateral spreading of free phase hydrocarbons on the groundwater table can be prevented by pumping water to control the hydraulic gradient. Recovery of floating product may be performed by skimming hydrocarbons from wells, usually in combination with water pumping to increase the gradient. The environmental variables (water table gradient, water table fluctuations due to regional recovery wells, rates of water pumping)

  3. [Effect of Low Molecular Weight Organic Acids on the Chemical Speciation and Activity of Mercury in the Soils of the Water-Level-Fluctuating Zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir].

    You, Rui; Liang, Li; Qin, Cai-qing; Deng, Han; Wang, Ding-yong

    2016-01-15

    To investigate the effect of low molecular weight organic acids ( LMWOA) on the ability of migration and the species of mercury in the soil of the Water-Level-Fluctuating Zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir, citric acid, tartaric acid and oxalic acid were dded into the soil to conduct simulation experiments. The results showed that the percentage of exchangeable mercury increased with the increase of the concentration of citric acid, but the value declined slightly as the concentration of tartaric acid and oxalic acid increased. While all three acids elevated the bioavailability of mercury, which increased with the increase of the concentration of acids. Vhen the concentration of citric acid reached 15 mmol x L(-1), the activation effect was the best. But for oxalic acid and citric acid, 10 mmol x L(-1) was the optimal concentration. In general, the effect of three organic acids on the activation of mercury in the soil followed the trend of citric acid > tartaric acid > oxalic acid. In the soil supplemented with 15 mmol x L(-1) citric acid, the change of mercury pecies was more and more striking with the prolonged incubation, and the conversion did not stop until 14 d, at that time the stomach cid dissolved mercury increased obviously, which was mainly converted from elemental mercury. PMID:27078955

  4. Ground Water Fluctuations In The Kanola Watershed Basin Of Karmala Tahsil, Solapur District, Maharashtra

    Pandurang Y. Patil

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Water level fluctuations and depletion of the groundwater are the major problem in the drought prone area. Just deepening of well with heavy capital investment is not a proper solution. The problem is aggravated especially in the summer season. It has direct bearing on food security and poverty. The present study has attempted to understand fluctuations in the ground water levels in a Kanola watershed basin in the drought affected areas of Maharashtra state. The study concludes that it is necessary to undertake watershed development programmes in the basin taking into account specific site factors to ensure groundwater availability for longer period in a year.

  5. GROUND WATER FLUCTUATIONS IN THE KANOLA WATERSHED BASIN OF KARMALA TAHSIL, SOLAPUR DISTRICT, MAHARASHTRA

    PANDURANG Y. PATIL

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Water level fluctuations and depletion of the groundwater are the major problem in the drought prone area. Just deepening of well with heavy capital investment is not a proper solution. The problem is aggravated especially in the summer season. It has direct bearing on food security and poverty. The present study has attempted to understand fluctuations in the ground water levels in a Kanola watershed basin in the drought affected areas of Maharashtra state. The study concludes that it is necessary to undertake watershed development programmes in the basin taking into account specific site factors to ensure groundwater availability for longer period in a year.

  6. Measuring water storage fluctuations in lake Dongting, China, by Topex/Poseidon satellite altimetry.

    Zhang, Jiqun; Xu, Kaiqin; Yang, Yonghui; Qi, Lianhui; Hayashi, Seiji; Watanabe, Masataka

    2006-04-01

    Although satellite radar altimetry was developed and optimized for open oceans, it has been used to monitor variations in the level of inland water-bodies such as lakes and rivers. Here, for the first time, we have further used the altimetry-derived variation of water level for estimating the fluctuation of water storage as an addition to the present in situ water storage estimation systems to be used in remote areas and in emergency situation such as in the events flooding monitoring and for studying the effect of climate change. Lake Dongting, the second largest lake in China, influenced frequently by flooding, was, therefore, chosen to demonstrate the potential of the technique. By using the concept of an "assumed reference point", we converted Topex/Poseidon satellite altimetry data on water level variations in Lake Dongting to "water level" data. The "water level" time-series data and in situ water storage were used to establish a rating curve. From the rating curve, we converted data on "water level" derived from seven years (1993-1999) of Topex/Poseidon data to actual water storage in Lake Dongting. The result reveals that the seasonal and annual fluctuations of water storage occurred during the 1990s with a more frequent flooding at the late 1990s' especially the flooding in whole catchment level in 1998 and 1999. The study supports the usefulness of satellite altimetry for dense and continuous monitoring of the temporal variations in water dynamic in moderate to large lakes. PMID:16502025

  7. Water level instrumentation simulation

    Through simulation, evaluations of system performance can be made to increase efficiency, reduce costs, enhance safety and provide effective training. A full function simulation for evaluating water level measurement requires modeling the physical process, the process instrumentation response and where appropriate, the human input/response. This paper examines a full function application simulating the primary system water level in a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR). The physical processes associated with BWR vessel level response are modeled with the Modular Accident Analysis Program (MAAP). The MAAP code is used as the basis for providing primary system and containment thermal-hydraulic response to a compendium of expected plant transients. The BWR vessel level instruments is modeled with the FAI developed Instrumentation PACkage (IPAC). With the thermal-hydraulic input from MAAP, the IPAC software models the various phenomena associated with water level measurements including the effects due to: (1) instrument channel calibration, (2) instrument drift and (3) containment (drywell) environmental effects. This paper discusses the IPAC models (instrumentation components) along with the factors which influence the mass balance of water in the downcomer region. A comparison of the BWR vessel water level complete simulation package to data from a simulated BWR plant transient culminates the discussion of this paper. The full function simulation package presented in this paper, enables a software-based representation of the BWR vessel level to be evaluated under various hypothetical plant conditions including normal, accident, and severe accident events. (author)

  8. Water Level Station History

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Images contain station history information for 175 stations in the National Water Level Observation Network (NWLON). The NWLON is a network of long-term,...

  9. Fluctuations in Water and their Relation to the Hydrophobic Effect

    Varilly, Patrick Stephen

    2011-01-01

    The hydrophobic effect, or the tendency for oil and water not to mix, is a fundamental force that strongly influences the shape, behavior and assembly of solutes in solution. Hydrophobicity emerges from the collective behavior of large numbers of solvent molecules, so its accurate treatment is challenging. A decade ago, Lum, Chandler and Weeks (LCW) addressed this challenge indirectly by modeling how solvent density fluctuations couple to external solutes and constraints, and then inferring...

  10. Seasonal fluctuation of bacterial indicators in coastal waters

    Maipa, Vasiliki; Alamanos, Yannis; Bezirtzoglou, Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    The relationships between number of coliforms, fecal coliforms, E. coli, fecal streptococci, location, time and seasonal factors in marine environments of northwest Greece were investigated over a period of 4 years. Research focused on measuring and comparing bacteria in coastal marine waters undergoing heavy bacterial charge during the tourist season. Microbiological pollution was increased during the summer period. Seasonal fluctuation of the fecal indicator bacteria was noted and concerned...

  11. Fluctuation patterns of groundwater levels in Tokyo caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake

    Kawamura, Akira; Ishihara, Shigeyuki; Amaguchi, Hideo; Takasaki, Tadakatsu

    2016-04-01

    . Abrupt rising patterns in unconfined groundwater level were identified as an independent cluster. For the confined groundwater levels, drawdown just after the earthquake occurred about 90% of the wells, which is caused by the pressure release derived from crustal expansion. The most common fluctuation pattern after the drawdown is an increasing tendency of groundwater level, which is mainly caused by decreasing groundwater pumping rate due to the blackout. Groundwater level rising just after the earthquake especially for unconfined groundwater was caused by the phenomenon of liquefaction. In addition, the spatial characteristics and the causes of these patterns were also investigated. It is very important to understand this fluctuation correctly, not only for developing countermeasures for land subsidence and liquefaction, but also for water resource management. ,

  12. Computer simulation study of water using a fluctuating charge model

    M Krishnan; A Verma; S Balasubramanian

    2001-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding in small water clusters is studied through computer simulation methods using a sophisticated, empirical model of interaction developed by Rick et al (S W Rick, S J Stuart and B J Berne 1994 J. Chem. Phys. 101 6141) and others. The model allows for the charges on the interacting sites to fluctuate as a function of time, depending on their local environment. The charge flow is driven by the difference in the electronegativity of the atoms within the water molecule, thus effectively mimicking the effects of polarization of the charge density. The potential model is thus transferable across all phases of water. Using this model, we have obtained the minimum energy structures of water clusters up to a size of ten. The cluster structures agree well with experimental data. In addition, we are able to distinctly identify the hydrogens that form hydrogen bonds based on their charges alone, a feature that is not possible in simulations using fixed charge models. We have also studied the structure of liquid water at ambient conditions using this fluctuating charge model.

  13. Sea Levels Online: Sea Level Variations of the United States Derived from National Water Level Observation Network Stations

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Water level records are a combination of the fluctuations of the ocean and the vertical land motion at the location of the station. Monthly mean sea level (MSL)...

  14. On firm-level, industry-level, and aggregate employment fluctuations

    Casares Polo, Miguel

    2013-01-01

    Employment fluctuations are examined, at different levels of aggregation, in a dynamic model that provides firm-specific hiring decisions due to search frictions and sticky pricing. The results indicate that firm-level employment dispersion rises with higher price stickiness and higher demand elasticity, whereas it falls with more convexity of search costs and with a higher labor supply elasticity. Industry-level employment is more volatile and less procyclical than aggregate employment, and ...

  15. Temporal Hyporheic Zone Response to Water Table Fluctuations.

    Malzone, Jonathan M; Anseeuw, Sierra K; Lowry, Christopher S; Allen-King, Richelle

    2016-03-01

    Expansion and contraction of the hyporheic zone due to temporal hydrologic changes between stream and riparian aquifer influence the biogeochemical cycling capacity of streams. Theoretical studies have quantified the control of groundwater discharge on the depth of the hyporheic zone; however, observations of temporal groundwater controls are limited. In this study, we develop the concept of groundwater-dominated differential hyporheic zone expansion to explain the temporal control of groundwater discharge on the hyporheic zone in a third-order stream reach flowing through glacially derived terrain typical of the Great Lakes region. We define groundwater-dominated differential expansion of the hyporheic zone as: differing rates and magnitudes of hyporheic zone expansion in response to seasonal vs. storm-related water table fluctuation. Specific conductance and vertical hydraulic gradient measurements were used to map changes in the hyporheic zone during seasonal water table decline and storm events. Planar and riffle beds were monitored in order to distinguish the cause of increasing hyporheic zone depth. Planar bed seasonal expansion of the hyporheic zone was of a greater magnitude and longer in duration (weeks to months) than storm event expansion (hours to days). In contrast, the hyporheic zone beneath the riffle bed exhibited minimal expansion in response to seasonal groundwater decline compared to storm related expansion. Results indicated that fluctuation in the riparian water table controlled seasonal expansion of the hyporheic zone along the planar bed. This groundwater induced hyporheic zone expansion could increase the potential for biogeochemical cycling and natural attenuation. PMID:26096382

  16. Climate or vegetation change - what drove Holocene lake level fluctuations in NE-Germany?

    Theuerkauf, Martin; Blume, Theresa; Dreibrodt, Janek; Heidbüchel, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    calculations will nevertheless provide a first test of our hypothesis on the importance of vegetation dynamics as a control on ground- and lake water level fluctuations. This study is a contribution to the Virtual Institute of Integrated Climate and Landscape Evolution (ICLEA; www.iclea.de) of the Helmholtz Association (Grant Number VH-VI-415) and is supported by Helmholtz infrastructure of the Terrestrial Environmental Observatory (TERENO) North-eastern Germany.

  17. Predicting groundwater level fluctuations with meteorological effect implications—A comparative study among soft computing techniques

    Shiri, Jalal; Kisi, Ozgur; Yoon, Heesung; Lee, Kang-Kun; Hossein Nazemi, Amir

    2013-07-01

    The knowledge of groundwater table fluctuations is important in agricultural lands as well as in the studies related to groundwater utilization and management levels. This paper investigates the abilities of Gene Expression Programming (GEP), Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS), Artificial Neural Networks (ANN) and Support Vector Machine (SVM) techniques for groundwater level forecasting in following day up to 7-day prediction intervals. Several input combinations comprising water table level, rainfall and evapotranspiration values from Hongcheon Well station (South Korea), covering a period of eight years (2001-2008) were used to develop and test the applied models. The data from the first six years were used for developing (training) the applied models and the last two years data were reserved for testing. A comparison was also made between the forecasts provided by these models and the Auto-Regressive Moving Average (ARMA) technique. Based on the comparisons, it was found that the GEP models could be employed successfully in forecasting water table level fluctuations up to 7 days beyond data records.

  18. 三峡库区消落带沉积物重金属形态分布特征%Chemical fraction composition characteristics of heavy metals in sediments of water-level-fluctuating zone of Three Gorges Reservoir area

    王图锦; 杨清伟; 潘瑾; 刘雪莲

    2012-01-01

    Objective To investigate the spatial distribution characteristics and chemical fraction composition characteristics of Cu, Pb, Cd and Cr in sediments of water-level-fluctuating zone of Three Gorges Reservoir area. Methods The sediment samples were collected at eleven typical sites in August, 2008. The concentrations and fraction composition characteristics of Cu, Pb, Cd and Cr were determined, and the environment quality evaluation of the sediment was carried out by the methods of geoaccumulation index and risk assessment code. Results The average contents of Cu, Pb, Cd and Cr in sediments were 84.0, S6.2, 0.S6 and 99.2 mg/kg respectively. The geoaccumulation index (Igro) analysis suggested "moderate pollution" of Cu and Cd, and "unpolluted to moderate pollution" of Pb and Cr. Fractionation studies indicated that Cd was predominantly associated with carbonate and Fe-Mn oxide fractions. Cd exhibited the greatest mobility and bioavailability, indicative of anthropogenic sources, while Cr was mainly found in the residual fraction, the average content of residual fraction of Cr reached 93.1%, and could be used as an indicator for the contribution from natural sources. Cu was predominantly associated with organic and residual fractions, and Pb with carbonate, Fe-Mn oxide and residual fractions. Risk assessment code(RAC) analysis indicated that Cd posed a high ecological risk to local environment, Cu was at low to medium risk level,Pb was at low to medium risk level,and Cr showed no to low risk level in sediments. The ecological risk ranked as Cd>Pb>Cu>Cr. Conclusion The pollution level of Cd in sediments from the investigated area is higher and the speciation of Cd exhibits high bioavailability and consequently this element posed a high ecological risk.%目的 了解三峡库区消落带沉积物中Cu、Pb、Cd、Cr四种重金属的形态含量及其分布特征.方法 于2008年8月汛期采集三峡库区消落带11个采样点的沉积物,测定Cu、Pb、Cd、Cr的

  19. A Mathematical View of Water Table Fluctuations in a Shallow Aquifer in Brazil.

    Neto, Dagmar C; Chang, Hung K; van Genuchten, Martinus Th

    2016-01-01

    Detailed monitoring of the groundwater table can provide important data about both short- and long-term aquifer processes, including information useful for estimating recharge and facilitating groundwater modeling and remediation efforts. In this paper, we presents results of 4 years (2002 to 2005) of monitoring groundwater water levels in the Rio Claro Aquifer using observation wells drilled at the Rio Claro campus of São Paulo State University in Brazil. The data were used to follow natural periodic fluctuations in the water table, specifically those resulting from earth tides and seasonal recharge cycles. Statistical analyses included methods of time-series analysis using Fourier analysis, cross-correlation, and R/S analysis. Relationships could be established between rainfall and well recovery, as well as the persistence and degree of autocorrelation of the water table variations. We further used numerical solutions of the Richards equation to obtain estimates of the recharge rate and seasonable groundwater fluctuations. Seasonable soil moisture transit times through the vadose zone obtained with the numerical solution were very close to those obtained with the cross-correlation analysis. We also employed a little-used deep drainage boundary condition to obtain estimates of seasonable water table fluctuations, which were found to be consistent with observed transient groundwater levels during the period of study. PMID:25818697

  20. Carbon and strontium isotope variations and responses tosea-level fluctuations in the Ordovician of the Tarim Basin

    2001-01-01

    Abstract In the Ordovician, a carbonate platform system grading from the platformal interioreastwards to basin was developed in the Tazhong area of the Tarim Basin, and the study column islocated in the place where the paleoslope occurred. The isotope compositions of the carbonatesthere are thus considered as having reflected those of simultaneous sea waters in view of its goodconnection with the open seas. The carbon and strontium isotope compositions of the Ordoviciancarbonates in the Tazhong area are analyzed, and their relationships to the sea-level fluctuationsare discussed as well. Studies have revealed that the carbon isotope composition is related posi-tively with the sea-level fluctuations, whereas an opposing situation occurs to the strontium isotopevariation. Similar responses of carbon and strontium isotope compositions to the sea-level fluctua-tions are reported elsewhere in the world, suggesting that the Ordovician sea-level fluctuations ofthe Tarim Basin were of eustatic implication.

  1. Water levels shape fishing participation in flood-control reservoirs

    Miranda, Leandro E.; Meals, K. O.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the relationship between fishing effort (hours fished) and average March–May water level in 3 flood control reservoirs in Mississippi. Fishing effort increased as water level rose, peaked at intermediate water levels, and decreased at high water levels. We suggest that the observed arched-shaped relationship is driven by the shifting influence of fishability (adequacy of the fishing circumstances from an angler's perspective) and catch rate along a water level continuum. Fishability reduces fishing effort during low water, despite the potential for higher catch rates. Conversely, reduced catch rates and fishability at high water also curtail effort. Thus, both high and low water levels seem to discourage fishing effort, whereas anglers seem to favor intermediate water levels. Our results have implications for water level management in reservoirs with large water level fluctuations.

  2. A possible connection of Caspian Sea level fluctuations with meteorological factors and seismicity

    Ozyavas, Aziz; Khan, Shuhab D.; Casey, John F.

    2010-10-01

    The Caspian Sea has exhibited significant, wide-range fluctuations that have been traditionally attributed to variations in climatic agents. The objective of this research is to estimate the hydrologic budget and sea surface heights of the Caspian Sea from 1998 to 2005 to assess the contribution of meteorological and geological process to the Caspian Sea level variations. The water budget of the Caspian Sea from 1998 to 2005 was calculated using the state-of-the-art remote sensing techniques and ground-truth data. The Sea Surface heights of the Caspian Sea were constructed from the refined Topex/Poseidon altimetry data. The National Centers for Environmental Prediction/Department of Energy Reanalysis 2 meteorological data provided all the variables necessary for the Penman method to estimate evaporation over the Caspian Sea. The data of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission were utilized to estimate precipitation onto the Caspian Sea. A strong agreement between the water budget residuals and Caspian Sea level variations signifies that Caspian Sea level oscillations for this time window are essentially controlled by climate-related factors. On the other hand, the relatively larger gaps between the water balance residuals and Caspian Sea level heights during 2000 and 2001 may indicate an impact of seismicity on Caspian Sea level oscillations as a result of two major earthquakes on November 25, 2000.

  3. Hall Voltage Fluctuations as a Diagnostic of Internal Magnetic Field Fluctuations in High Temperature Superconductors and the Half-filled Landau Level

    Ioffe, L. B.; Lesovik, G. B.; Millis, A.J.

    1996-01-01

    Fluctuations of the Hall voltage reveal information about long wavelength magnetic field fluctuations. If gauge theories of strongly correlated electrons are correct, such fluctuations are particularly large in the half-filled Landau level and in high $T_c$ superconductors. We present estimates for the magnitude, system size and frequency dependence of these fluctuations. The frequency dependence contains information about instantons in the gauge field.

  4. Communication Networks - Analysis of jitter due to call-level fluctuations

    M.R.H. Mandjes

    2007-01-01

    Abstract In communication networks used by constant bit rate applications, call-level dynamics (i.e. entering and leaving calls) lead to fluctuations in the load, and therefore also fluctuations in the delay (jitter). By intentionally delaying the packets at the destination, one can transform the pe

  5. Mechanism of temperature fluctuation phenomena below steam-water interface in a pressurizer spray pipe

    In a PWR plant, a steam-water two-phase flow may exist in the pressurizer spray pipe under a normal operating condition since the flow rate of the spray water is not sufficient to fill the horizontal section of the pipe completely. Initiation of high cycle fatigue cracks is suspected to occur under such thermally stratified two phase flow conditions. Experiments for a steam-water flow have been conducted to investigate the temperature fluctuation phenomena. It has been shown that the wall temperature fluctuations were not caused by the waves on the water surface, but were caused by temperature fluctuations in water layer below the interface. An experiment with visualization test section of rectangular pipe was conducted to investigate the temperature fluctuation mechanism in water layer in this paper. The black stripe pattern was observed below the steam-water interface due to the density change. The water temperature fluctuations had the dominant frequency of about 1Hz. The Richardson number calculated with the measured temperature and velocity gradient was larger than 0.25. The dominant frequency of temperature fluctuations was nearly equal to the Brunt-Väisälä frequency. It was shown that the temperature fluctuations in water layer below the interface were caused by the internal gravity wave in the thermal stratified flow. (author)

  6. Biodegradation of Toluene Under Seasonal and Diurnal Fluctuations of Soil-Water Temperature.

    Yadav, Brijesh K

    2012-05-12

    An increasing interest in bioremediation of hydrocarbon polluted sites raises the question of the influence of seasonal and diurnal changes on soil-water temperature on biodegradation of BTEX, a widespread group of (sub)-surface contaminants. Therefore, we investigated the impact of a wide range of varying soil-water temperature on biodegradation of toluene under aerobic conditions. To see the seasonal impact of temperature, three sets of batch experiments were conducted at three different constant temperatures: 10°C, 21°C, and 30°C. These conditions were considered to represent (1) winter, (2) spring and/or autumn, and (3) summer seasons, respectively, at many polluted sites. Three additional sets of batch experiments were performed under fluctuating soil-water temperature cases (21<>10°C, 30<>21°C, and 10<>30°C) to mimic the day-night temperature patterns expected during the year. The batches were put at two different temperatures alternatively to represent the day (high-temperature) and night (low-temperature) times. The results of constant- and fluctuating-temperature experiments show that toluene degradation is strongly dependent on soil-water temperature level. An almost two-fold increase in toluene degradation time was observed for every 10°C decrease in temperature for constant-temperature cases. Under fluctuating-temperature conditions, toluene degraders were able to overcome the temperature stress and continued thriving during all considered weather scenarios. However, a slightly longer time was taken compared to the corresponding time at daily mean temperature conditions. The findings of this study are directly useful for bioremediation of hydrocarbon-polluted sites having significant diurnal and seasonal variations of soil-water temperature.

  7. Sea-level fluctuations and deep-sea sedimentation rates.

    Worsley, T R; Davies, T A

    1979-02-01

    Sediment accumulation rate curves from 95 drilled cores from the Pacific basin and sea-level curves derived from continental margin seismic stratigraphy show that high biogenous sediment accumulation rates correspond to low eustatic sea levels for at least the last 48 million years. This relationship fits a simple model of high sea levels producing lower land/sea ratios and hence slower chemical erosion of the continents, and vice versa. PMID:17734144

  8. Coherent sea-level fluctuations along the global continental slope

    Chris W. Hughes; Meredith, Michael P

    2006-01-01

    Signals in sea-level or, more properly, sub-surface pressure (SSP; sea-level corrected for the inverse barometer effect) are expected to propagate rapidly along the continental slope due to the effect of sloping topography on wave modes, resulting in strongly correlated SSP over long-distances. Observations of such correlations around the Arctic and Antarctic are briefly reviewed, and then extended using satellite altimetry to the rest of the global continental slope. It is shown that such lo...

  9. Cluster regression model and level fluctuation features of Van Lake, Turkey

    Z. Şen

    Full Text Available Lake water levels change under the influences of natural and/or anthropogenic environmental conditions. Among these influences are the climate change, greenhouse effects and ozone layer depletions which are reflected in the hydrological cycle features over the lake drainage basins. Lake levels are among the most significant hydrological variables that are influenced by different atmospheric and environmental conditions. Consequently, lake level time series in many parts of the world include nonstationarity components such as shifts in the mean value, apparent or hidden periodicities. On the other hand, many lake level modeling techniques have a stationarity assumption. The main purpose of this work is to develop a cluster regression model for dealing with nonstationarity especially in the form of shifting means. The basis of this model is the combination of transition probability and classical regression technique. Both parts of the model are applied to monthly level fluctuations of Lake Van in eastern Turkey. It is observed that the cluster regression procedure does preserve the statistical properties and the transitional probabilities that are indistinguishable from the original data.

    Key words. Hydrology (hydrologic budget; stochastic processes · Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (ocean-atmosphere interactions

  10. Investigation of free level fluctuations in a simulated model of a sodium cooled Fast Breeder Reactor using pulsating conductance monitoring device

    Highlights: ► An innovative approach for measurement of water level fluctuation is presented. ► Measurement was conducted with a PC based pulsating type level sensor. ► Deployed the technique in monitoring level fluctuation in PFBR simulated facility. ► The technique helped in validation of hot pool design of PFBR, India. - Abstract: A high resolution measurement technique for rapid and accurate monitoring of water level using an in-house built pulsating conductance monitoring device is presented. The technique has the capability of online monitoring of any sudden shift in water level in a reservoir which is subjected to rapid fluctuations due to any external factor. We have deployed this novel technique for real time monitoring of water level fluctuations in a specially designed ¼ scale model of the Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) at Kalpakkam, India. The water level measurements in various locations of the simulated test facility were carried out in different experimental campaigns with and without inclusion of thermal baffles to it in specific operating conditions as required by the reactor designers. The amplitudes and the frequencies of fluctuations with required statistical parameters in hot water pool of the simulated model were evaluated from the online time versus water level plot in more convenient way using system software package. From experimental results it is computed that the maximum free level fluctuation in the hot pool of PFBR with baffle plates provided on the inner vessel is 30 mm which is considerably less than the value (∼82 mm) obtained without having any baffle plates. The present work provided useful information for assessment of appropriate design which would be adopted in the PFBR for safe operation of the reactor.

  11. Estimating evapotranspiration and groundwater flow from water-table fluctuations for a general wetland scenario

    Carlson Mazur, Martha L.; Michael J. Wiley; Douglas A. Wilcox

    2015-01-01

    The use of diurnal water-table fluctuation methods to calculate evapotranspiration (ET) and groundwater flow is of increasing interest in ecohydrological studies. Most studies of this type, however, have been located in riparian wetlands of semi-arid regions where groundwater levels are consistently below topographic surface elevations and precipitation events are infrequent. Current methodologies preclude application to a wider variety of wetland systems. In this study, we extended a method for estimating sub-daily ET and groundwater flow rates from water-level fluctuations to fit highly dynamic, non-riparian wetland scenarios. Modifications included (1) varying the specific yield to account for periodic flooded conditions and (2) relating empirically derived ET to estimated potential ET for days when precipitation events masked the diurnal signal. To demonstrate the utility of this method, we estimated ET and groundwater fluxes over two growing seasons (2006–2007) in 15 wetlands within a ridge-and-swale wetland complex of the Laurentian Great Lakes under flooded and non-flooded conditions. Mean daily ET rates for the sites ranged from 4.0 mm d−1 to 6.6 mm d−1. Shallow groundwater discharge rates resulting from evaporative demand ranged from 2.5 mm d−1 to 4.3 mm d−1. This study helps to expand our understanding of the evapotranspirative demand of plants under various hydrologic and climate conditions.

  12. Study on temperature fluctuation phenomena in pressurizer spray pipe of pressurized water reactor

    Gas liquid inter is formed in a pressurizer spray pipe of a pressurized water reactor when flow rate is small at normal reactor operation. Temperature fluctuation may occur it the interface moves periodically. Measurement of inner wall and fluid temperature in the test section simulating the real pressurizer spray pipe was conducted to study mechanism of the temperature fluctuation phenomena. Experiments with and without non-condensable gas, air were conducted. The significant temperature fluctuation was not observed in air-water system and air-vapor-water system. The temperature fluctuation was observed in vapor-water system. Visualization was carried out at the horizontal part of the spray pipe. No interface movement was observed but vortices in the liquid layer near the interface were observed without non-condensable gas. It was estimated that Kelvin-Helmholtz instabilities occurred in the liquid layer near the interface. (author)

  13. Water Density Fluctuations Relevant to Hydrophobic Hydration are Unaltered by Attractions

    Remsing, Richard C

    2014-01-01

    An understanding of density fluctuations in bulk water has made significant contributions to our understanding of the hydration and interactions of idealized, purely repulsive hydrophobic solutes. To similarly inform the hydration of realistic hydrophobic solutes that have dispersive interactions with water, here we characterize water density fluctuations in the presence of attractive fields that correspond to solute-water attractions. We find that when the attractive field acts only in the solute hydration shell, but not in the solute core, it does not significantly alter water density fluctuations in the solute core region. We further find that for a wide range of solute sizes and attraction strengths, the free energetics of turning on the attractive fields in bulk water are accurately captured by linear response theory. Our results also suggest strategies for more efficiently estimating hydration free energies of realistic solutes in bulk water and at interfaces.

  14. 500,000 years of water table fluctuations recorded in Devils Hole 2 cave from southwestern Nevada, USA

    Wendt, Kathleen A.; Moseley, Gina E.; Dublyansky, Yuri V.; Spötl, Christoph; Edwards, R. Lawrence

    2016-04-01

    Evidence for large reoccurring Pleistocene lakes in the Great Basin region of North America suggests that this modern day arid landscape underwent drastic climate fluctuations in the past. We aim to reconstruct the history of water table fluctuations in the discharge area of the Ash Meadow groundwater flow system since 500 ka BP. To do so, we have analyzed a series of carbonate cores drilled at varying elevations above the modern day water table from the walls of Devils Hole 2 cave in southwest Nevada, USA. Petrographic and morphologic differences between calcite precipitated below (mammillary calcite) or at (folia) the water table in this cave record past variations in water table elevation. A total of ten cores were drilled between 0.8 and 15.1 m above the modern day water table. Each core includes alternations between mammillary calcite to folia, with an increasing occurrence of folia in higher elevation cores, suggesting multi-meter variations in past water table elevation. Over 50 high-precision 230Th dates have been measured at the mammillary calcite to folia boundaries of each core. Preliminary results show multi-meter water table fluctuations which appear to follow interglacial-glacial cycles from 500 ka to present day, such that water table high-stands coincide with glacial periods. Observed maxima in water table levels are likely correlated to periods of increased precipitation within the catchment area during glacial (pluvial) periods, which is consistent with paleoclimate records in this region. Preliminary results suggest water table levels peaked (reaching +5.5 m or higher than present day water table) at 461 kyr, between 320 and 250 kyr, between 196 and 137 kyr, and between 67 and 20 kyr BP, largely coinciding with glacial periods. Periods in which water table levels reached the lowest elevation sampled (+0.8 m) occurred at 240 kyr, 116 kyr, and 5.7 kyr BP, largely coinciding with interglacial periods.

  15. 水位变动及降雨入渗联合作用对岩溶地面塌陷的影响分析%Analysis of Joint Action of Water Level Fluctuation and Rainfall on the Influence of Karst Ground Collapse

    周建; 张映钱; 方亿刚; 刘宇

    2016-01-01

    为了预测地区岩溶塌陷的模式及可能性 ,以武汉市陆家街岩溶地面塌陷为研究对象 ,选择多年长江武汉关枯水期和丰水期的平均水位 ,借鉴库伦土压力理论 ,建立类黏性土承压变负压的圆坛型岩溶塌陷预测模型 ,计算其在水位下降与降雨联合作用下的抗塌系数进行初步评价 ,并进一步采用GeoStudio软件的SEEP/W和SIGMA/W模块建立降雨、地下水水位升降-应力应变数值耦合分析模型 ,研究在不同降雨强度和持续时间下土洞的发展过程.结果表明降雨时间越长 ,降雨强度越强 ,土洞位移越大 ;在长江补给联合降雨作用下的位移较大 ,通过不同时间位移和应力分布可以得到其致塌模式为潜蚀 -渗压-重力型 ,成因机制主要为降雨及长江水位变化引起的潜蚀渗压作用.%To analysis the joint action of water level fluctuation and rainfall on the influence of karst ground collapse ,this paper took Lujia street karst ground collapse in Wuhan city as an example ,and proposed a model for the region of karst ground collapse pressure under negative pressure .It also calculated the decline of water level and rainfall under the joint action of collapse resistance coefficient by using GeoStudio software SEEP/W and SIGMA/W module .Different rainfall , water level fluctuation were considered .It chose the mutagenicity and plentiful average water level of Yangtze river water level (Wuhan) ,the results showed that the longer the greater rainfall intensity ,the greater the displacement of the soil holes ,and joint under the action of rainfall in the Yangtze river supplies displacement is larger ,the reason could be that as the increased permeability of rock mass lowered the mechanical property ,displacement and stress distribution in differ-ent time can change it from underground erosion to osmotic pressure and gravity type ,therefore the main reason should be the rainfall and the Yangtze river water level

  16. THE EFFECTS OF WATER TEMPERATURE REGIME FLUCTUATIONS ON THE EMBRYONIC DEVELOPMENT OF SILVER CARP (HYPOPHTHALMICHTHYS MOLITRIX

    А. Vodyanitskyi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine the effect of temperature regime fluctuations on the development of silver carp embryos, as well as the activity of enzymatic reactions in fish eggs. Methodology. The studies were conducted at the experimental station of the Institute of Hydrobiology of Bila Tserkov, Ukrainian National Academy of Sciences, from June to July. The biological materials were silver carp eggs, embryos and larvae. The dissolved oxygen content was determined using the Winkler method at four o’clock in the morning. Alkalinity phosphatase and LDG activity were determined using a set of reagents «Alkalinity phosphatase» and «LDG» (Phyllis diagnosis, Ukraine. SDH activity was determined by Vexy. The activity of Na, K-Mg-dependent-activated ATPase was determined as growth of inorganic phosphorus in the incubation medium by Kindratova M.N. et al. Protease activity was determined using immune enzymatic method of Tyurina et al. The obtained results were processed statistically in Statistica 5.5, Epaprobit analysis was used for calculating LC/EC values (Version 1.5. Findings The results showed that a delay of embryonic stages of development occur, the number of abnormal embryos increases, and the reproduction efficiency of fish reduces with an increase in water temperature and decrease in the dissolved oxygen content in water. The temperature factor had a significant effect on the activity of key enzymes, in particular the energetic metabolism changed from aerobic to anaerobic. Originality. It was found a negative effect of abiotic factors of water medium and drastic fluctuations in water temperature and gas regime of water bodies on the course of embryogenesis of silver carp that is especially important in the conditions of climate change. Practical value. The obtained results showed that the level of optimum and unfavorable environmental factors during the change of embryonic stages in embryonic and larval fish can be established based on the

  17. Using high hydrodynamic fluctuations to obtain water-ethanol mixtures

    Шурчкова, Юлія Олександрівна; Дубовкіна, Ірина Олександрівна

    2016-01-01

    The analysis of the processes that occur in binary systems of water-ethanol: hydration, association, formation of hydrogen bonds. The research of the properties of water systems, namely water-ethanol mixtures processed by discrete-pulsed input of energy are presented. The results of experimental research of the effect of high-frequency oscillations in the hydrodynamic physic-chemical parameters of water systems are obtained. The reductions in the amount of dissolved oxygen in the water-ethano...

  18. Calculation and analysis of thermal–hydraulics fluctuations in pressurized water reactors

    Highlights: • Single-phase thermal–hydraulics noise equations are originally derived in the frequency domain. • The fluctuations of all the coolant parameters are calculated, without any simplifying assumptions. • The radial distribution of the temperature fluctuations in the fuel, gap and cladding are taken into account. • The closed-loop calculations are performed by means of the point kinetics noise theory. • Both the space- and frequency-dependence of the thermal–hydraulics fluctuations are analyzed. - Abstract: Analysis of thermal–hydraulics fluctuations in pressurized water reactors (e.g., local and global temperature or density fluctuations, as well as primary and charging pumps fluctuations) has various applications in calculation or measurement of the core dynamical parameters (temperature or density reactivity coefficients) in addition to thermal–hydraulics surveillance and diagnostics. In this paper, the thermal–hydraulics fluctuations in PWRs are investigated. At first, the single-phase thermal–hydraulics noise equations (in the frequency domain) are originally derived, without any simplifying assumptions. The fluctuations of all the coolant parameters, as well as the radial distribution of the temperature fluctuations in the fuel, gap and cladding are taken into account. Then, the derived governing equations are discretized using the finite volume method (FVM). Based on the discretized equations and the proposed algorithm of solving, a single heated channel noise calculation code (SHC-Noise) is developed, by which the steady-state and fluctuating parameters of PWR fuel assemblies can be calculated. The noise sources include the inlet coolant temperature and velocity fluctuations, in addition to the power density noises. The developed SHC-Noise code is benchmarked in different cases and scenarios. Furthermore, to show the effects of the power feedbacks, the closed-loop calculations are performed by means of the point kinetics noise

  19. Diurnal temperature fluctuations in an artificial small shallow water body

    Jacobs, A. F. G.; Heusinkveld, B.G.; Kraai, S.; K. P. Paaijmans

    2008-01-01

    For aquatic biological processes, diurnal and annual cycles of water temperature are very important to plants as well as to animals and microbes living in the water. An existing one-dimensional model has been extended to simulate the temperature profile within a small water body. A year-round outdoor experiment has been conducted to estimate the model input parameters and to verify the model. Both model simulations and measurements show a strong temperature stratification in the water during ...

  20. Water: Local-level Management

    Brooks, D. B.

    2002-01-01

    This publication summarizes the results of three decades of IDRC-supported research on water supply. It demonstrates that some of the most powerful responses to water scarcities have been mounted at the community or local level — in households, farmers' fields, villages, and city neighbourhoods. With a focus on research findings, and failures, this book presents solidly grounded propositions for decision-makers and for researchers. It goes on to form a series of clear and pointed recommendati...

  1. Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01

    During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural p...

  2. Investigation of temperature fluctuation phenomena in pressurizer spray pipe of pressurized water reactor

    Gas liquid interface is formed in a pressurizer spray pipe of a pressurized water reactor when flow rate is small at normal reactor operation. Temperature fluctuation may occur if the interface moves periodically. Measurement of inner wall and fluid temperature in the test section simulating the real pressurizer spray pipe was conducted to study mechanism of the temperature fluctuation phenomena. The effect of non-condensable gas was investigated by injecting helium gas into test section. When helium gas was injected, the condensation of the vapor was suppressed and the temperature fluctuation was reduced. Richardson number increases with the helium gas injection, which is higher than 0.25 in all conditions of the present experiment. Brunt Vaisala frequency nearly equal to the peak of temperature power spectral density. It seemed that the internal gravity waves caused temperature fluctuations in water layer below the interface. (author)

  3. Ion-Specific Long-Range Correlations on Interfacial Water Driven by Hydrogen Bond Fluctuations

    Enami, Shinichi; Colussi, Agustín J.

    2014-01-01

    Some of the most important processes in nature involve interfacial water. It has long been conjectured that specific ion effects therein are associated with the unique properties of interfacial water. Here we reveal the mechanism of such association by showing that the strength of ion-specific long-range correlations tracks the amplification of fluctuations on the surface of water-alcohol mixtures at the percolation thresholds of their hydrogen-bonded water networks. We used in situ online el...

  4. Lectures on Molecular- and Nano-scale Fluctuations in Water

    Chandler, David; Varilly, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript is the written form of three lectures delivered by David Chandler at the International School of Physics "Enrico Fermi", Course CLXXVI - "Complex materials in physics and biology", in Varenna, Italy in July 2010. It describes the physical properties of water from a molecular perspective and how these properties are reflected in the behaviors of water as a solvent. Theory of hydrophobicity and solvation of ions are topics included in the discussion.

  5. The Fluctuating Political Appeal of Water Engineering in Australia

    Lin R. Crase

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Like many nations, Australia has a mixed history with water engineering. For over a century the engineer was 'king' and water was harnessed as a vehicle for settling the harsh inland, creating wealth and building prosperity. By the 1960s it was becoming increasingly clear that this approach was not without its flaws. Mounting evidence of environmental degradation emerged in the 1970s and the trend towards fiscal responsibility in the 1980s subjected the engineering approach to even greater scrutiny. These events set the context for a series of water policy reforms that commenced in earnest in the early 1990s. Initially, the reforms favoured greater use of economic incentives and focussed attention on the ecological impacts of water management. In this environment, the status of the engineer was transformed from 'king' to 'servant'. However, the engineering profession was not to hold this status for long and the political difficulties of simultaneously dealing with the economics and ecology of water quickly became the rationale for reverting to engineering solutions. This paper traces these historical events and focusses specifically on the politically vexing issues that arise when water reallocation is attempted in a fully allocated basin.

  6. RAPID FLUCTUATIONS OF WATER MASER EMISSION IN VY CMa

    ZhengXingwu; EugenioScaliseJr; HanFu

    1999-01-01

    The monitoring observations of the short- time variation of the water maser to-ward the supergiant star of VY CMa were carried out from August 26 through September 24 1993, using the 13.7 m telescope at the Qinghai station of the Purple

  7. Lake level variability in Silver Lake, Michigan: a response to fluctuations in lake levels of Lake Michigan

    Fisher, Timothy G.; Loope, Walter L.

    2004-01-01

    Sediment from Silver Lake, Michigan, can be used to constrain the timing and elevation of Lake Michigan during the Nipissing transgression. Silver Lake is separated from Lake Michigan by a barrier/dune complex and the Nipissing, Calumet, and Glenwood shorelines of Lake Michigan are expressed landward of this barrier. Two Vibracores were taken from the lake in February 2000 and contain pebbly sand, sand, buried soils, marl, peat, and sandy muck. It is suggested here that fluctuations in the level of Lake Michigan are reflected in Silver Lake since the Chippewa low phase, and possibly at the end of the Algonquin phase. An age of 12,490 B.P. (10,460±50 14C yrs B.P.) on wood from a buried Entisol may record the falling Algonquin phase as the North Bay outlet opened. A local perched water table is indicated by marl deposited before 7,800 B.P. and peat between 7,760-7,000 B.P. when Lake Michigan was at the low elevation Chippewa phase. Continued deepening of the lake is recorded by the transition from peat to sandy muck at 7,000 B.P. in the deeper core, and with the drowning of an Inceptisol nearly 3 m higher at 6,410 B.P. in the shallower core. A rising groundwater table responding to a rising Lake Michigan base level during the Nipissing transgression, rather than a response to mid-Holocene climate change, explains deepening of Silver Lake. Sandy muck was deposited continually in Silver Lake between Nipissing and modern time. Sand lenses within the muck are presumed to be eolian in origin, derived from sand dunes advancing into the lake on the western side of the basin.

  8. Effect of frequency of free level fluctuations and hold time on the thermal ratcheting behavior

    Investigation of cyclic strain accumulation behavior of a thin cylindrical shell (SS 316L) due to thermal ratcheting, in the framework of time independent (Model-1) and dependent formulations (Model-2) is carried out. The effect of frequency of free level fluctuations by varying cycle time (CT) is compared for Model-1 and Model-2. Contribution of strain due to high frequency and low frequency level fluctuations is quantified. Further, the contribution of ratcheting strain with hold time is evaluated to highlight the effect of free level hold on radial deformation of the cylinder. Improvement in predicting ratcheting strain is observed using semi-implicit plasticity integration method. Implicit plastic increment formulation is derived using Newton's method. Validation of code for Model-1 is done by comparing the results with the existing experimental results. Strain controlled cyclic characteristics and uniaxial monotonic loading at different strain rate is analyzed to validate the code for Model-2. - Highlights: • Time independent and dependent ratcheting behavior model is compared. • The relative contribution of viscoplasticity in ratcheting strain is highlighted. • The effect of frequency of free level fluctuations in ratcheting strain is compared. • Implicit plastic integration formulation using Newton's method is discussed. • Contribution of thermal ratcheting strain with hold time is predicted

  9. Changes in climate, catchment vegetation and hydrogeology as the causes of dramatic lake-level fluctuations in the Kurtna Lake District, NE Estonia

    Marko Vainu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Numerous lakes in the world serve as sensitive indicators of climate change. Water levels for lakes Ahnejärv and Martiska, two vulnerable oligotrophic closed-basin lakes on sandy plains in northeastern Estonia, fell more than 3 m in 1946–1987 and rose up to 2 m by 2009. Earlier studies indicated that changes in rates of groundwater abstraction were primarily responsible for the changes, but scientifically sound explanations for water-level fluctuations were still lacking. Despite the inconsistent water-level dataset, we were able to assess the importance of changing climate, catchment vegetation and hydrogeology in water-level fluctuations in these lakes. Our results from water-balance simulations indicate that before the initiation of ground­water abstraction in 1972 a change in the vegetation composition on the catchments triggered the lake-level decrease. The water-level rise in 1990–2009 was caused, in addition to the reduction of groundwater abstraction rates, by increased precipitation and decreased evaporation. The results stress that climate, catchment vegetation and hydrogeology must all be considered while evaluating the causes of modern water-level changes in lakes.

  10. Reactor water level control system

    A BWR type reactor comprises a control valve disposed in a reactor water draining pipelines and undergoing an instruction to control the opening degree, an operation board having a setting device for generating the instruction and a control board for giving the instruction generated by the setting device to the control valve. The instruction is supplied from the setting device to the control valve by way of a control circuit to adjust the opening degree of the control valve thereby controlling the water level in the reactor. In addition, a controller generating an instruction independent of the setting device and a signal transmission channel for signal-transmitting the instruction independent of the control circuit are disposed, to connect the controller electrically to the signal transmission. The signal transmission channel and the control circuit are electrically connected to the control valve switchably with each other. Since instruction can be given to the control valve even at a periodical inspection or modification when the setting device and the control circuit can not be used, the reactor water level can be controlled automatically. Then, operator's working efficiency upon inspection can be improved remarkably. (N.H.)

  11. The effects of climatic fluctuations and extreme events on running water ecosystems

    Woodward, Guy; Bonada, Núria; Brown, Lee E.; Death, Russell G.; Durance, Isabelle; Gray, Clare; Hladyz, Sally; Ledger, Mark E.; Milner, Alexander M.; Ormerod, Steve J.; Thompson, Ross M.

    2016-01-01

    Most research on the effects of environmental change in freshwaters has focused on incremental changes in average conditions, rather than fluctuations or extreme events such as heatwaves, cold snaps, droughts, floods or wildfires, which may have even more profound consequences. Such events are commonly predicted to increase in frequency, intensity and duration with global climate change, with many systems being exposed to conditions with no recent historical precedent. We propose a mechanistic framework for predicting potential impacts of environmental fluctuations on running-water ecosystems by scaling up effects of fluctuations from individuals to entire ecosystems. This framework requires integration of four key components: effects of the environment on individual metabolism, metabolic and biomechanical constraints on fluctuating species interactions, assembly dynamics of local food webs, and mapping the dynamics of the meta-community onto ecosystem function. We illustrate the framework by developing a mathematical model of environmental fluctuations on dynamically assembling food webs. We highlight (currently limited) empirical evidence for emerging insights and theoretical predictions. For example, widely supported predictions about the effects of environmental fluctuations are: high vulnerability of species with high per capita metabolic demands such as large-bodied ones at the top of food webs; simplification of food web network structure and impaired energetic transfer efficiency; and reduced resilience and top-down relative to bottom-up regulation of food web and ecosystem processes. We conclude by identifying key questions and challenges that need to be addressed to develop more accurate and predictive bio-assessments of the effects of fluctuations, and implications of fluctuations for management practices in an increasingly uncertain world. PMID:27114576

  12. The effects of climatic fluctuations and extreme events on running water ecosystems.

    Woodward, Guy; Bonada, Núria; Brown, Lee E; Death, Russell G; Durance, Isabelle; Gray, Clare; Hladyz, Sally; Ledger, Mark E; Milner, Alexander M; Ormerod, Steve J; Thompson, Ross M; Pawar, Samraat

    2016-05-19

    Most research on the effects of environmental change in freshwaters has focused on incremental changes in average conditions, rather than fluctuations or extreme events such as heatwaves, cold snaps, droughts, floods or wildfires, which may have even more profound consequences. Such events are commonly predicted to increase in frequency, intensity and duration with global climate change, with many systems being exposed to conditions with no recent historical precedent. We propose a mechanistic framework for predicting potential impacts of environmental fluctuations on running-water ecosystems by scaling up effects of fluctuations from individuals to entire ecosystems. This framework requires integration of four key components: effects of the environment on individual metabolism, metabolic and biomechanical constraints on fluctuating species interactions, assembly dynamics of local food webs, and mapping the dynamics of the meta-community onto ecosystem function. We illustrate the framework by developing a mathematical model of environmental fluctuations on dynamically assembling food webs. We highlight (currently limited) empirical evidence for emerging insights and theoretical predictions. For example, widely supported predictions about the effects of environmental fluctuations are: high vulnerability of species with high per capita metabolic demands such as large-bodied ones at the top of food webs; simplification of food web network structure and impaired energetic transfer efficiency; and reduced resilience and top-down relative to bottom-up regulation of food web and ecosystem processes. We conclude by identifying key questions and challenges that need to be addressed to develop more accurate and predictive bio-assessments of the effects of fluctuations, and implications of fluctuations for management practices in an increasingly uncertain world. PMID:27114576

  13. Piston slap induced pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage of an internal combustion engine

    Ohta, Kazuhide; Wang, Xiaoyu; Saeki, Atsushi

    2016-02-01

    Liner cavitation is caused by water pressure fluctuation in the water coolant passage (WCP). When the negative pressure falls below the saturated vapor pressure, the impulsive pressure following the implosion of cavitation bubbles causes cavitation erosion of the wet cylinder liner surface. The present work establishes a numerical model for structural-acoustic coupling between the crankcase and the acoustic field in the WCP considering their dynamic characteristics. The coupling effect is evaluated through mutual interaction terms that are calculated from the mode shapes of the acoustic field and of the crankcase vibration on the boundary. Water pressure fluctuations in the WCP under the action of piston slap forces are predicted and the contributions of the uncoupled mode shapes of the crankcase and the acoustic field to the pressure waveform are analyzed. The influence of sound speed variations on the water pressure response is discussed, as well as the pressure on the thrust sides of the four cylinders.

  14. Germination rates of Solanum sisymbriifolium: temperature response models, effects of temperature fluctuations and soil water potential

    Timmermans, B.G.H.; Vos, J.; Nieuwburg, van, J.G.W.; Stomph, T. J.; Putten, van, T.

    2007-01-01

    Four temperature response models were compared describing the emergence rate of Solanum sisymbriifolium (L.) over a broad range of suboptimal temperatures and at different soil water potentials. In the laboratory, the effects were tested on germination rates at constant (9.1-21.8 degrees C) and diurnally fluctuating temperatures at different soil water potentials. Linear, 010, expolinear and quadratic models were fitted to the data on rate of emergence against temperature. For model validatio...

  15. Water Level Measurement in Floodplain using ALOS PALSAR

    Won, Joong-Sun

    2011-01-01

    L-band interferometric SAR (InSAR) has been used to detect a relative water level change in the floodplain of the Tonle Sap, Cambodia. The goal of this research is a pattern and trend analysis of flooding around the Tonle Sap. The flood pattern over the Tonle Sap area during 2007-2011 has been examined using ALOS PALSAR to monitor the flood pattern, water level fluctuation and the area of flood around the Tonle Sap. Previous studies had shown L-band SAR interferometry is a useful method for t...

  16. Statoil`s exposure to oil price fluctuations: An analysis on investment level and stock price

    Nåmdal, Synne Meling; Meling, Kristine

    2015-01-01

    In this thesis an econometric analysis of Statoil’s investment level and stock return has been performed, with purpose of examine the affect that fluctuations in the price of crude oil has on these variables. The results revealed that crude oil prices have a significant impact on Statoil´s stock returns, due to the direct impact the crude oil price has on Statoil’s cash flows. The investment level does not seem to be affected by either of the variables in the analysis, and this could indicate...

  17. 三峡库区消落带不同高程桑树林地土壤抗蚀性及影响因素%Characteristics and soil anti-erodibility effects of mulberry forest lands at different altitudes of water-level fluctuation zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir

    郭天雷; 史东梅; 胡雪琴; 黄先智; 蒋平

    2015-01-01

    消落带是典型的生态脆弱区,研究消落带土壤抗侵蚀特点对三峡库区水土流失防治具有重要意义。为了研究三峡库区消落带桑树林地土壤抗蚀性在不同高程处的差异,本文以典型消落带桑树林地为研究对象,采用土壤理化性质研究法对不同高程桑树林地土壤抗蚀性特征及其影响因素进行了分析。结果表明:1)不同高程桑树林地0~20 cm 土层土壤抗蚀性指数具有较大差异,表现为180 m(38.22%)>170 m(23.09%)>165 m (18.4%)>175 m(10.5%),且未淹没区(高程为180 m)大于淹没区(高程≤175 m);对于同一高程,表层(0~10 cm)土壤抗蚀性优于底层(10~20 cm)。2)土壤15个抗蚀性指标优化为F1、F2、F33个主成分,其土壤抗蚀性综合评价模型为F=0.655F1+0.236F2+0.109F3,评价结果表明不同高程桑树林地土壤抗蚀性大小为180 m>170 m>165 m>175 m。3)相关性分析表明土壤抗蚀性指数与土壤黏粒(0.25 mm水稳性团粒含量呈极显著正相关(P0.25 mm水稳性团粒和有机质是影响三峡库区消落带土壤抗蚀性的重要因子。研究结果可为三峡库区消落带不同区域土壤流失进行针对性防治提供重要科学依据。%Due to periodic wet and dry processes, water-level fluctuation zone of the reservoir area is typically ecologically fragile. It is therefore important for protection of the eco-environments of reservoir areas to control soil and water loss in such specifically fragile zones. Mulberry forest plots were selected in the water-level fluctuation zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir in September 2012 at four altitudes (165 m, 170 m, 175 m and 180 m), with no flooding at the 180 m altitude. Soil physio-chemical characteristics, anti-erodibility and the driving factors of mulberry forest lands at different altitudes were studied. The aim of the study was to explore soil anti-erodibility effect of mulberry forests at different altitudes. The study further provides scientific

  18. Fluctuations in Species-Level Protein Expression Occur during Element and Nutrient Cycling in the Subsurface

    Wilkins, Michael J.; Wrighton, Kelly C.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Williams, Kenneth H.; McCue, Lee Ann; Handley, Kim M.; Miller, C. S.; Giloteaux, L.; Montgomery, A. P.; Lovley, Derek R.; Banfield, Jillian F.; Long, Philip E.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2013-03-05

    While microbial activities in environmental systems play a key role in the utilization and cycling of essential elements and compounds, microbial activity and growth frequently fluctuates in response to environmental stimuli and perturbations. To investigate these fluctuations within a saturated aquifer system, we monitored a carbon-stimulated in situ Geobacter population while iron reduction was occurring, using 16S rRNA abundances and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry proteome measurements. Following carbon amendment, 16S rRNA analysis of temporally separated samples revealed the rapid enrichment of Geobacter-like environmental strains with strong similarity to G. bemidjiensis. Tandem mass spectrometry proteomics measurements suggest high carbon flux through Geobacter respiratory pathways, and the synthesis of anapleurotic four carbon compounds from acetyl-CoA via pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity. Across a 40-day period where Fe(III) reduction was occurring, fluctuations in protein expression reflected changes in anabolic versus catabolic reactions, with increased levels of biosynthesis occurring soon after acetate arrival in the aquifer. In addition, localized shifts in nutrient limitation were inferred based on expression of nitrogenase enzymes and phosphate uptake proteins. These temporal data offer the first example of differing microbial protein expression associated with changing geochemical conditions in a subsurface environment.

  19. Fluctuations in species-level protein expression occur during element and nutrient cycling in the subsurface.

    Michael J Wilkins

    Full Text Available While microbial activities in environmental systems play a key role in the utilization and cycling of essential elements and compounds, microbial activity and growth frequently fluctuates in response to environmental stimuli and perturbations. To investigate these fluctuations within a saturated aquifer system, we monitored a carbon-stimulated in situ Geobacter population while iron reduction was occurring, using 16S rRNA abundances and high-resolution tandem mass spectrometry proteome measurements. Following carbon amendment, 16S rRNA analysis of temporally separated samples revealed the rapid enrichment of Geobacter-like environmental strains with strong similarity to G. bemidjiensis. Tandem mass spectrometry proteomics measurements suggest high carbon flux through Geobacter respiratory pathways, and the synthesis of anapleurotic four carbon compounds from acetyl-CoA via pyruvate ferredoxin oxidoreductase activity. Across a 40-day period where Fe(III reduction was occurring, fluctuations in protein expression reflected changes in anabolic versus catabolic reactions, with increased levels of biosynthesis occurring soon after acetate arrival in the aquifer. In addition, localized shifts in nutrient limitation were inferred based on expression of nitrogenase enzymes and phosphate uptake proteins. These temporal data offer the first example of differing microbial protein expression associated with changing geochemical conditions in a subsurface environment.

  20. Stratigraphic analysis of lake level fluctuations in Lake Ohrid: an integration of high resolution hydro-acoustic data and sediment cores

    Lindhorst, K.; H. Vogel; S. Krastel; Wagner, B.; Hilgers, A.; Zander, A.; Schwenk, T.; Wessels, M.; Daut, G.

    2010-01-01

    Ancient Lake Ohrid is a steep-sided, oligotrophic, karst lake that was tectonically formed most likely within the Pliocene and often referred to as a hotspot of endemic biodiversity. This study aims on tracing significant lake level fluctuations at Lake Ohrid using high-resolution acoustic data in combination with lithological, geochemical, and chronological information from two sediment cores recovered from sub-aquatic terrace levels at ca. 32 and 60 m water depth. According t...

  1. Stratigraphic analysis of lake level fluctuations in Lake Ohrid: an integration of high resolution hydro-acoustic data and sediment cores

    Lindhorst, K.; Vogel, Hendrik; S. Krastel; Wagner, B.; Hilgers, A.; Zander, A.; Schwenk, T.; Wessels, M.; Daut, G.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract. Ancient Lake Ohrid is a steep-sided, oligotrophic, karst lake that was tectonically formed most likely within the Pliocene and often referred to as a hotspot of endemic biodiversity. This study aims on tracing significant lake level fluctuations at Lake Ohrid using high-resolution acoustic data in combination with lithological, geochemical, and chronological information from two sediment cores recovered from sub-aquatic terrace levels at ca. 32 and 60m water dep...

  2. Effect of heat flux on fluctuating pressure in steam-water two-phase flow

    Experiments are carried out to study the feature of pressure fluctuating in helical coil for both adiabatic and boiling steam-water two-phase flows. And the effects of heat flux on the fluctuations are stressed study. It shows that heat flux has great influence on the fluctuation feature. The root mean square (RMS) of the fluctuation process under the condition of low heat flux is similar as that of adiabatic flow, while the RMS of great heat flux differs greatly for that of adiabatic flow. The fractal dimension is close to 1.50 under the condition of great heat flux, which means the pressure fluctuating is approaching stochastic process. The correlation dimension increases with increasing of heat flux. The Kolmogorov entropy on the condition of low heat flux is greater than that of adiabatic flow, while the contrary appears under the condition of great heat flux. It can be concluded that the flow pattern map and transition theories for flow patterns on basis of adiabatic flow just can be extrapolated to boiling flow with low heat flux

  3. Analytic Solutions and Their Errors of Groundwater Phreatic Line in Bank Slope under Reservoir Water Level Fluctuation%库水波动下库岸边坡地下水浸润线解析解及误差分析

    胡庆; 李漪; 李恒; 胡凯锋; 郑德宾

    2013-01-01

    Although analytical method is a practical method in the calculation of phreatic line of groundwater in reservoir bank slope, it is based on certain assumptions and the linearization of the Boussinesq' s equation. Different mathematical models for the seepage of groundwater were established and then solved by analytical method or finite element method. By comparing the solutions to these different models, the errors caused by these assumptions and the linearization were analyzed. Results showed that both the errors caused by the linearization and the neglect of unsaturated seepage were greater than the error caused by assuming the reservoir bank is vertical, and all of them decreased with the increase of permeability coefficient. The error caused by the assumption of uniform water level changes could be ignored in the case of Three Gorges reservoir water scheduling. When calculating the groundwater phreatic line in reservoir bank slope, analytical method only applies to the case when the water level fluctuation amplitude is smaller than 30% of the aquifer thickness, the geotechnical structure is regular, and the soil has good permeability and simple structure.%解析法是库岸边坡地下水浸润线计算中便于实际应用的方法,但该方法须基于若干假定并对潜水运动基本方程线性化后才能求解.针对各假定和线性化过程建立不同的地下水渗流数学模型,用解析法和有限元法解答上述数学模型,分析各误差大小及其规律.结果表明:库岸垂直处理带来的误差要小于方程线性化处理和不考虑非饱和渗流带来的误差,而且它们都随渗透系数变大而减小;在三峡库区库水调度情况下,假定库水位等速变化带来的误差对大多岸坡而言可以忽略;计算库岸边坡地下水浸润线时,解析法只适用于水位变化幅度相比含水层厚度较小,且几何边界规则、岩土结构简单、岩土体渗透性较好时的情况.

  4. Structural and dipolar fluctuations in liquid water: A Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics study

    Skarmoutsos, Ioannis; Masia, Marco; Guardia, Elvira

    2016-03-01

    A Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation was performed to investigate the local tetrahedral order, molecular dipole fluctuations and their interrelation with hydrogen bonding in liquid water. Water molecules were classified in three types, exhibiting low, intermediate and high tetrahedral order. Transitions from low to high tetrahedrally ordered structures take place only through transitions to the intermediate state. The molecular dipole moments depend strongly on the tetrahedral order and hydrogen bonding. The average dipole moment of water molecules with a strong tetrahedral order around them comes in excellent agreement with previous estimations of the dipole moment of ice Ih molecules.

  5. Short-term fluctuations in identity: introducing a micro-level approach to identity formation.

    Klimstra, Theo A; Luyckx, Koen; Hale, William A; Frijns, Tom; van Lier, Pol A C; Meeus, Wim H J

    2010-07-01

    The present study was aimed at examining one relatively neglected part of the identity formation process: the short-term dynamics of identity formation. The short-term dynamics were assessed by examining (a) the day-to-day course of 2 key dimensions of identity formation (i.e., commitment and reconsideration) and (b) the impact of fluctuations in commitment and reconsideration on subsequent levels of these 2 dimensions. Longitudinal data on 580 early adolescents (54.8% boys, 45.2% girls) were used to test these assertions. The authors found evidence for a commitment-reconsideration dynamic that operated on a day-to-day basis. Furthermore, the findings confirmed E. H. Erikson's (1950) assertion that identity reflects a sense of sameness and continuity as a more stable identity (reflected by little day-to-day fluctuations) was predictive of higher levels of commitment and lower levels of reconsideration. Taken together, the present study underscores the importance of the short-term dynamics of identity formation. PMID:20565195

  6. Empirical Research on Household Willingness and Its Caused Factors for Economic Compensation of Eco-fallow in the Water-level Fluctuation Zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir Area%三峡库区消落带农户生态休耕经济补偿意愿及影响因素研究

    尹珂; 肖轶

    2015-01-01

    There is mainly slope land in the Three Gorges Reservoir, accounting for 68.8%of the total cultivated area, in which it has exceeded 25%that the slope is more than 25°. So the fundamental contradiction is intense after the reservoir storage, that is too many people and less land. When the rural resettlement have to make a choice between environmental protection and economic income, most people will choose the latter. Since unrea-sonable land use easily causes soil erosion and non-point source pollution, it will affect the water the reservoir environment security. According to the environmental impact of cultivation in the water-level fluctuation zone of Three Gorges Reservoir area, we established MNL regression to quantitative analyze the impact factors on the demand for an economic compensation of eco-fallow in order to provide recommendations, which is based on spot investigation of 247 households'willingness in Fuling district and Fengdu district, Chongqing city. The results indicate:1) There exists comparatively large differences amongst the household willingness on econom-ic compensation demands which is influenced by household aging, the low comparative profit and the nonfarm income; 2) The obvious influences factors on the economic compensation mechanism of eco-fallow include comparative benefit of eco-fallow, household population, annual household net income per capita, eco-fallow willingness index, expected value of economic compensation. It is conclude:most of surveyed households are relatively strong demand for economic compensation. From the origin, the main reason is that the immigration policy did not consider the future development needs and make compensation according to the market principle in the background of that time. Now many contradictions gradually exposed in practice, the land resource rapid-ly decrease after reservoir storage and the immigrants lose the original income channels which result in some of immigrants become the new poverty

  7. Arrival-time fluctuations of coherent reflections from surface gravity water waves.

    Badiey, Mohsen; Eickmeier, Justin; Song, Aijun

    2014-05-01

    Arrival time fluctuations of coherent reflections from surface gravity waves are examined. A two-dimensional ray model with an evolving rough sea surface is used to explain the mechanism and formation of the deterministic striation patterns due to the surface reflection. Arrival time predictions from the ray model match qualitatively well with the measurements from bidirectional acoustic transmissions in a water depth of 100 m. PMID:24815293

  8. Autocorrelation in ultraviolet radiation measured at ground level using detrended fluctuation analysis

    da Silva Filho, Paulo Cavalcante; da Silva, Francisco Raimundo; Corso, Gilberto

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we analyzed the autocorrelation among four ultraviolet (UV) radiation data sets obtained at 305 nm, 320 nm, 340 nm, and 380 nm. The data were recorded at ground level at the INPE climate station in Natal, RN, Brazil, which is a site close to the equator. The autocorrelations were computed by detrended fluctuation analysis (DFA) to estimate the index α. We found that the ​fluctuations in the UV radiation data were fractal, with scale-free behavior at a DFA index α ≃ 0.7. In addition, we performed a power law spectral analysis, which showed that the power spectrum exhibited a power law behavior with an exponent of β ≃ 0.45. Given that the theoretical result is β = 2 α - 1, these two results are in good agreement. Moreover, the application of the DFA ​method to the UV radiation data required detrending using a polynomial with an order of at least eight, which was related to the complex daily solar radiation curve obtained at ground level in a tropical region. The results indicated that the α exponent of UV radiation is similar to other climatic records such as air temperature, wind, or rain, but not solar activity.

  9. Forecasting monthly groundwater level fluctuations in coastal aquifers using hybrid Wavelet packet–Support vector regression

    N. Sujay Raghavendra

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This research demonstrates the state-of-the-art capability of Wavelet packet analysis in improving the forecasting efficiency of Support vector regression (SVR through the development of a novel hybrid Wavelet packet–Support vector regression (WP–SVR model for forecasting monthly groundwater level fluctuations observed in three shallow unconfined coastal aquifers. The Sequential Minimal Optimization Algorithm-based SVR model is also employed for comparative study with WP–SVR model. The input variables used for modeling were monthly time series of total rainfall, average temperature, mean tide level, and past groundwater level observations recorded during the period 1996–2006 at three observation wells located near Mangalore, India. The Radial Basis function is employed as a kernel function during SVR modeling. Model parameters are calibrated using the first seven years of data, and the remaining three years data are used for model validation using various input combinations. The performance of both the SVR and WP–SVR models is assessed using different statistical indices. From the comparative result analysis of the developed models, it can be seen that WP–SVR model outperforms the classic SVR model in predicting groundwater levels at all the three well locations (e.g. NRMSE(WP–SVR = 7.14, NRMSE(SVR = 12.27; NSE(WP–SVR = 0.91, NSE(SVR = 0.8 during the test phase with respect to well location at Surathkal. Therefore, using the WP–SVR model is highly acceptable for modeling and forecasting of groundwater level fluctuations.

  10. Stratigraphic analysis of lake level fluctuations in Lake Ohrid: an integration of high resolution hydro-acoustic data and sediment cores

    K. Lindhorst

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Ancient Lake Ohrid is a steep-sided, oligotrophic, karst lake that was tectonically formed most likely within the Pliocene and often referred to as a hotspot of endemic biodiversity. This study aims on tracing significant lake level fluctuations at Lake Ohrid using high-resolution acoustic data in combination with lithological, geochemical, and chronological information from two sediment cores recovered from sub-aquatic terrace levels at ca. 32 and 60 m water depth. According to our data, significant lake level fluctuations with prominent lowstands of ca. 60 and 35 m below the present water level occurred during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS 6 and MIS 5, respectively. The effect of these lowstands on biodiversity in most coastal parts of the lake is negligible, due to only small changes in lake surface area, coastline, and habitat. In contrast, biodiversity in shallower areas was more severely affected due to disconnection of today sub-lacustrine springs from the main water body. Multichannel seismic data from deeper parts of the lake clearly image several clinoform structures stacked on top of each other. These stacked clinoforms indicate significantly lower lake levels prior to MIS 6 and a stepwise rise of water level with intermittent stillstands since its existence as water-filled body, which might have caused enhanced expansion of endemic species within Lake Ohrid.

  11. Stratigraphic analysis of lake level fluctuations in Lake Ohrid: an integration of high resolution hydro-acoustic data and sediment cores

    Lindhorst, K.; Vogel, H.; Krastel, S.; Wagner, B.; Hilgers, A.; Zander, A.; Schwenk, T.; Wessels, M.; Daut, G.

    2010-11-01

    Ancient Lake Ohrid is a steep-sided, oligotrophic, karst lake that was tectonically formed most likely within the Pliocene and often referred to as a hotspot of endemic biodiversity. This study aims on tracing significant lake level fluctuations at Lake Ohrid using high-resolution acoustic data in combination with lithological, geochemical, and chronological information from two sediment cores recovered from sub-aquatic terrace levels at ca. 32 and 60 m water depth. According to our data, significant lake level fluctuations with prominent lowstands of ca. 60 and 35 m below the present water level occurred during Marine Isotope Stage (MIS) 6 and MIS 5, respectively. The effect of these lowstands on biodiversity in most coastal parts of the lake is negligible, due to only small changes in lake surface area, coastline, and habitat. In contrast, biodiversity in shallower areas was more severely affected due to disconnection of today sub-lacustrine springs from the main water body. Multichannel seismic data from deeper parts of the lake clearly image several clinoform structures stacked on top of each other. These stacked clinoforms indicate significantly lower lake levels prior to MIS 6 and a stepwise rise of water level with intermittent stillstands since its existence as water-filled body, which might have caused enhanced expansion of endemic species within Lake Ohrid.

  12. Characterization of Water Level Variability of the Main Ethiopian Rift Valley Lakes

    Mulugeta Dadi Belete; Bernd Diekkrüger; Jackson Roehrig

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, the water level fluctuations of eight Ethiopian Rift Valley lakes were analyzed for their hydrological stability in terms of water level dynamics and their controlling factors. Long-term water balances and morphological nature of the lakes were used as bases for the analyses. Pettit’s homogeneity test and Mann–Kendall trend analysis were applied to test temporal variations of the lake levels. It is found that the hydrological stability of most of the Ethiopian Rift Valley lakes...

  13. Development of Mechanical Water Level Controller

    Akonyi Nasiru Sule; Chinedu Cletus Obinwa; Christian Ebele Okekeze; Eyo Ifreke

    2012-01-01

    The automatic water level controller is a device designed to regulate automatically the pumping of water to an overhead tank without allowing the water in the tank to be exhausted. The design of this mechanical device was achieved using the Archimedes principle of floatation; having a float which determines the water level in the tank depending on the choice of the minimum (lower) and maximum (upper) level inscribed in the tank. The fundamental attribute of this device is the ease in design, ...

  14. Understanding and quantifying focused, indirect groundwater recharge from ephemeral streams using water table fluctuations

    Cuthbert, M. O.; Acworth, R. I.; Andersen, M. S.; Larsen, J. R.; McCallum, A. M.; Rau, G. C.; Tellam, J. H.

    2016-02-01

    Understanding and managing groundwater resources in drylands is a challenging task, but one that is globally important. The dominant process for dryland groundwater recharge is thought to be as focused, indirect recharge from ephemeral stream losses. However, there is a global paucity of data for understanding and quantifying this process and transferable techniques for quantifying groundwater recharge in such contexts are lacking. Here we develop a generalized conceptual model for understanding water table and groundwater head fluctuations due to recharge from episodic events within ephemeral streams. By accounting for the recession characteristics of a groundwater hydrograph, we present a simple but powerful new water table fluctuation approach to quantify focused, indirect recharge over both long term and event time scales. The technique is demonstrated using a new, and globally unparalleled, set of groundwater observations from an ephemeral stream catchment located in NSW, Australia. We find that, following episodic streamflow events down a predominantly dry channel system, groundwater head fluctuations are controlled by pressure redistribution operating at three time scales from vertical flow (days to weeks), transverse flow perpendicular to the stream (weeks to months), and longitudinal flow parallel to the stream (years to decades). In relative terms, indirect recharge decreases almost linearly away from the mountain front, both in discrete monitored events as well as in the long-term average. In absolute terms, the estimated indirect recharge varies from 80 to 30 mm/a with the main uncertainty in these values stemming from uncertainty in the catchment-scale hydraulic properties.

  15. Kinetic parameters and intraindividual fluctuations of ochratoxin A plasma levels in humans

    The mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) is a rodent carcinogen produced by species of the ubiquitous fungal genera Aspergillus and Penicillium. OTA is found in a variety of food items and as a consequence is also found in human plasma (average concentrations found in this study: 0.1-1 ng OTA/ml plasma). To improve the scientific basis for cancer risk assessment the toxicokinetic profile of OTA was studied in one human volunteer following ingestion of 395 ng 3H-labeled OTA (3.8 μCi). A two-compartment open model consisting of a central compartment was found to best describe the in vivo data. This two-compartment model consisted of a fast elimination and distribution phase (T1/2 about 20 h) followed by a slow elimination phase (renal clearance about 0.11 ml/min.) and a calculated plasma half-life of 35.55 days. This half-life was approximately eight times longer than that determined previously in rats. In addition, the intraindividual fluctuation of OTA plasma levels was investigated in eight individuals over a period of 2 months. The concentrations determined ranged between 0.2 and 0.9 ng OTA/ml plasma. The plasma levels in some individuals remained nearly constant over time, while others varied considerably (e.g. increase of 0.4 ng/ml within 3 days, decrease of 0.3 ng/ml within 5 days) during the observation period. This intraindividual fluctuation in OTA plasma levels, which may represent differences in OTA exposure and/or metabolism, as well as the large difference in plasma half-life in humans compared to rats must be taken into consideration when the results of rat cancer study data are extrapolated to humans for risk assessment purposes. (orig.)

  16. Random fluctuations of snow accumulation over antarctica and their relation to sea level change

    Remy, F.; Testut, L.; Legresy, B. [LEGOS (CNRS-CNES-UPS), Toulouse (France)

    2002-07-01

    Short-term changes in the volume of ice sheets as analyzed by radar altimetry may not be related to long-term climatic change. Indeed, the large relaxation time of an ice sheet induces a low-frequency response to random fluctuations of snow accumulation. However, the time scale of the response is big compared to the average human lifetime and the effect of these random fluctuations on sea level change may be important even if they are not linked to climatic change. In this study, the relaxation time of an ice sheet is expressed with respect to the ice thickness, surface slope and ice velocity. These parameters are deduced from the precise topography derived from the geodetic cycle of the ERS1 radar altimeter. The variance of the induced effect on ice elevation is found to be around 3 m over a 30-year scale and with a maximum of 10 m in Wilkes Land and in the western part of the West Antarctic ice sheet. Near the coast, this effect can mask a climatic signal and thus be critical for altimetric mass balance surveys. The estimated changes in Antarctica's elevation between the Seasat (1978) and ERS (1993) epochs could be explained at least partially by such processes. In terms of sea level change over the 30-year scale, the standard deviation of the induced effect is 8 {+-} 2.8 cm. Finally, we show that the probability of a present-day, induced sea level rise of between 0.5 and 1 mm/year over a 30-year time scale is estimated at 10% {+-} 10%, with coastal areas accounting for half of this signal. (orig.)

  17. Kinetic parameters and intraindividual fluctuations of ochratoxin A plasma levels in humans

    Studer-Rohr, I. [Inst. of Toxicology, Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech. and Univ. of Zurich, Schwerzenbach (Switzerland); Dept. of Food Science, Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech., Zurich (Switzerland); Schlatter, J. [Toxicology Section, Div. of Food Science, Swiss Federal Office of Public Health, Zurich (Switzerland); Dietrich, D.R. [Dept. of Environmental Toxicology, Univ. of Konstanz, Konstanz (Germany); Inst. of Toxicology, Swiss Federal Inst. of Tech. and Univ. of Zurich, Schwerzenbach (Switzerland)

    2000-11-01

    The mycotoxin ochratoxin A (OTA) is a rodent carcinogen produced by species of the ubiquitous fungal genera Aspergillus and Penicillium. OTA is found in a variety of food items and as a consequence is also found in human plasma (average concentrations found in this study: 0.1-1 ng OTA/ml plasma). To improve the scientific basis for cancer risk assessment the toxicokinetic profile of OTA was studied in one human volunteer following ingestion of 395 ng {sup 3}H-labeled OTA (3.8 {mu}Ci). A two-compartment open model consisting of a central compartment was found to best describe the in vivo data. This two-compartment model consisted of a fast elimination and distribution phase (T{sub 1/2} about 20 h) followed by a slow elimination phase (renal clearance about 0.11 ml/min.) and a calculated plasma half-life of 35.55 days. This half-life was approximately eight times longer than that determined previously in rats. In addition, the intraindividual fluctuation of OTA plasma levels was investigated in eight individuals over a period of 2 months. The concentrations determined ranged between 0.2 and 0.9 ng OTA/ml plasma. The plasma levels in some individuals remained nearly constant over time, while others varied considerably (e.g. increase of 0.4 ng/ml within 3 days, decrease of 0.3 ng/ml within 5 days) during the observation period. This intraindividual fluctuation in OTA plasma levels, which may represent differences in OTA exposure and/or metabolism, as well as the large difference in plasma half-life in humans compared to rats must be taken into consideration when the results of rat cancer study data are extrapolated to humans for risk assessment purposes. (orig.)

  18. Decline in water level boosts cyanobacteria dominance in subtropical reservoirs.

    Yang, Jun; Lv, Hong; Yang, Jun; Liu, Lemian; Yu, Xiaoqing; Chen, Huihuang

    2016-07-01

    Globally aquatic ecosystems are likely to become more vulnerable to extreme water fluctuation rates due to the combined effects of climate change and human activity. However, relatively little is known about the importance of water level fluctuations (WLF) as a predictor of phytoplankton community shifts in subtropical reservoirs. In this study, we used one year of data (2010-2011) from four subtropical reservoirs of southeast China to quantify the effects of WLF and other environmental variables on phytoplankton and cyanobacteria dynamics. The reservoirs showed an apparent switch between a turbid state dominated by cyanobacteria and a clear state dominated by other non-cyanobacterial taxa (e.g., diatoms, green algae). Cyanobacterial dominance decreased, or increased, following marked changes in water level. Multiple regression analysis demonstrated that pH, euphotic depth, WLF, and total phosphorus provided the best model and explained 30.8% of the variance in cyanobacteria biomass. Path analysis showed that positive WLF (i.e. an increase in water level) can reduce the cyanobacteria biomass either directly by a dilution effect or indirectly by modifying the limnological conditions of the reservoirs in complex pathways. To control the risk of cyanobacterial dominance or blooms, WLF should be targeted to be above +2m/month; that is an increase in water level of 2m or more. Given that WLF is likely to be of more frequent occurrence under future predicted conditions of climate variability and human activity, water level management can be widely used in small and medium-sized reservoirs to prevent the toxic cyanobacterial blooms and to protect the ecosystem integrity or functions. PMID:27016690

  19. Investigation of temperature fluctuations caused by steam-water two-phase flow in pressurizer spray piping

    In a PWR plant, a steam-water two-phase flow may possibly exist in the pressurizer spray pipe under a normal operating condition since the flow rate of the spray water is not sufficient to fill the horizontal section of the pipe completely. Initiation of high cycle fatigue cracks is suspected to occur under such thermally stratified two phase flow conditions due to cyclic thermal stress fluctuations caused by oscillations of the water surface. Such oscillations cannot be detected by the measurement of temperature on outer surface of the pipe. In order to clarify the flow and thermal conditions in the pressurizer spray pipe and assess their impact on the pipe structure, an experiment was conducted for a steam-water flow at a low flow rate using a mock-up pressurizer spray pipe. The maximum temperature fluctuation of about 0.2 times of the steam-water temperature difference was observed at the inner wall around water surface in the test section. Visualization tests were conducted to investigate the temperature fluctuation phenomena. It was shown that the fluid temperature fluctuations were not caused by the waves on the water surface, but were caused by liquid temperature fluctuations in water layer below the interface. The influence of small amount of non-condensable gas dissolved in the reactor coolant on the liquid temperature fluctuation phenomena was investigated by injecting air into the experimental loop. The air injection attenuated the liquid temperature fluctuations in the water layer since the condensation was suppressed by the non-condensable gas. It is not expected that wall temperature fluctuation in the actual PWR plant may exceed the temperature equivalent to the fatigue limit stress amplitude when it is assumed to be proportional to the steam-water temperature difference. (author)

  20. Information-based system identification for predicting the groundwater-level fluctuations of hillslopes

    Hong, Yao-Ming; Wan, Shiuan

    2011-09-01

    The analysis of pre-existing landslides and landslide-prone hillslopes requires an estimation of maximum groundwater levels. Rapid increase in groundwater levels may be a dominant factor for evaluating the occurrence of landslides. System identification—use of mathematical tools and algorithms for building dynamic models from measured data—is adopted in this study. The fluid mass-balance equation is used to model groundwater-level fluctuations, and the model is analytically solved using the finite-difference method. Entropy-based classification (EBC) is used as a data-mining technique to identify the appropriate ranges of influencing variables. The landslide area at Wushe Reservoir, Nantou County, Taiwan, is chosen as a field test site for verification. The study generated 65,535 sets of numbers for the groundwater-level variables of the governing equation, which is judged by root mean square errors. By applying cross-validation methods and EBC, limited numbers of validation samples are used to find the range of each parameter. For these ranges, a heuristic method is employed to find the best results of each parameter for the prediction model of groundwater level. The ranges for governing factors are evaluated and the resulting performance is examined.

  1. Stratigraphic analysis of lake level fluctuations in Lake Ohrid: an integration of high resolution hydro-acoustic data and sediment cores

    K. Lindhorst

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Ancient Lake Ohrid is a steep sided, oligotrophic, karst lake of likely Pliocene age and often referred to as a hotspot of endemic biodiversity. This study aims on tracing significant lake level fluctuations at Lake Ohrid using high-resolution acoustic data in combination with lithological, geochemical, and chronological information from two sediment cores recovered from sub-aquatic terrace levels at ca. 32 and 55 m. According to our data, significant lake level fluctuations with prominent lowstands of ca. 60 and 35 m below the present water level occurred during MIS 6 and MIS 5, respectively. The effect of these lowstands on biodiversity in most coastal parts of the lake is negligible, due to only small changes in lake surface area, coastline, and habitat. In contrast, biodiversity in shallower areas was more severely affected due to disconnection of today sub-lacustrine springs from the main water body. Multichannel seismic data from deeper parts of the lake clearly imaged several clinoform structures stacked on top of each other. These stacked clinoforms indicate significantly lower lake levels prior to MIS 6 and a stepwise rise of water level with intermittent stillstands since its existence as water filled body, which might have caused enhanced expansion of endemic species within Lake Ohrid.

  2. Quantum fluctuations and isotope effects in ab initio descriptions of water

    Wang, Lu; Markland, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear quantum effects, such as zero-point energy and tunneling, cause significant changes to the structure and dynamics of hydrogen bonded systems such as liquid water. However, due to the current inability to simulate liquid water using an exact description of its electronic structure, the interplay between nuclear and electronic quantum effects remains unclear. Here we use simulations that incorporate the quantum mechanical nature of both the nuclei and electrons to provide a fully ab initio determination of the particle quantum kinetic energies, free energy change upon exchanging hydrogen for deuterium and the isotope fractionation ratio in water. These properties, which selectively probe the quantum nature of the nuclear degrees of freedom, allow us to make direct comparison to recent experiments and elucidate how electronic exchange and correlation and nuclear quantum fluctuations determine the structure of the hydrogen bond in water.

  3. Optimal control of a qubit coupled to a two-level fluctuator

    Rebentrost, P; Serban, I; Wilhelm, F K

    2006-01-01

    A central challenge for implementing quantum computing in the solid state is decoupling the qubits from the intrinsic noise of the material. We investigate limits of controllability for a paradigmatic model: A single qubit coupled to a two-level fluctuator exposed to a heat bath. We systematically search for optimal pulses using a generalization of the novel open system Gradient Ascent Pulse Engineering (GRAPE) algorithm. We show and explain that next to the known optimal bias point of this model, there are optimal shapes which refocus unwanted terms in the Hamiltonian. We study the limitations of control set by the decoherence properties in the fast flipping regime, which go beyond a simple random telegraph noise model. This can lead to a significant improvement of quantum operations in hostile environments.

  4. Control of mould level fluctuation through the modification of steel composition

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Xiao-huan; Lan, Peng; Zhang, Jia-quan

    2013-02-01

    Periodic mould level fluctuation (MLF) during slab casting is a bottleneck for upgrading the surface quality and casting speed especially for hypoperitectic (HP) or ultralow carbon steels. The uneven growth of the initially solidified shell is verified to be one of the important inducements to MLF due to related unsteady bulging in the secondary cooling zone. It is shown that the solidification mode of steels and the contraction behavior can be modified through chemical composition optimization within given composition limits. For high strength low alloy (HSLA) steels, the actual peritectic points calculated by Thermo-Calc software may change remarkably with the slight variations of alloying element contents. Accordingly, the narrow limit of chemical composition of HP steels through optimization is proven to be one of the effective factors to control the popular MLF phenomenon during slab casting.

  5. Cholesterol-induced suppression of membrane elastic fluctuations at the atomistic level.

    Molugu, Trivikram R; Brown, Michael F

    2016-09-01

    Applications of solid-state NMR spectroscopy for investigating the influences of lipid-cholesterol interactions on membrane fluctuations are reviewed in this paper. Emphasis is placed on understanding the energy landscapes and fluctuations at an emergent atomistic level. Solid-state (2)H NMR spectroscopy directly measures residual quadrupolar couplings (RQCs) due to individual C-(2)H labeled segments of the lipid molecules. Moreover, residual dipolar couplings (RDCs) of (13)C-(1)H bonds are obtained in separated local-field NMR spectroscopy. The distributions of RQC or RDC values give nearly complete profiles of the order parameters as a function of acyl segment position. Measured equilibrium properties of glycerophospholipids and sphingolipids including their binary and tertiary mixtures with cholesterol show unequal mixing associated with liquid-ordered domains. The entropic loss upon addition of cholesterol to sphingolipids is less than for glycerophospholipids and may drive the formation of lipid rafts. In addition relaxation time measurements enable one to study the molecular dynamics over a wide time-scale range. For (2)H NMR the experimental spin-lattice (R1Z) relaxation rates follow a theoretical square-law dependence on segmental order parameters (SCD) due to collective slow dynamics over mesoscopic length scales. The functional dependence for the liquid-crystalline lipid membranes is indicative of viscoelastic properties as they emerge from atomistic-level interactions. A striking decrease in square-law slope upon addition of cholesterol denotes stiffening relative to the pure lipid bilayers that is diminished in the case of lanosterol. Measured equilibrium properties and relaxation rates infer opposite influences of cholesterol and detergents on collective dynamics and elasticity at an atomistic scale that potentially affects lipid raft formation in cellular membranes. PMID:27154600

  6. Measuring water level in a steam generator

    A method is provided for determining and controlling steam water level in a steam generator of a nuclear plant, comprising calibrating the water level sensor in terms of velocity head and also adjusting the high level setpoint in terms of a velocity head bias. The water level differential pressure sensor is calibrated so that maximum water level is indicated as that level corresponding to the upper tap level less velocity head at maximum power plant power. The high level set point is calculated as corresponding to the riser level less a velocity head bias in flow path, the bias being calculated as maximum velocity head at maximum velocity minus rider head percentage of span times velocity head at maximum power. (author)

  7. Anandamide levels fluctuate in the bovine oviduct during the oestrous cycle.

    Maria Gracia Gervasi

    Full Text Available Mammalian oviduct acts as a reservoir for spermatozoa and provides an environment in which they may compete for the opportunity to fertilize the oocyte. Whilst in the oviduct spermatozoa undergo capacitation essential for fertilization. Sperm-oviduct interaction is essential for sperm capacitation and is a tightly regulated process influenced by the local microenvironment. Previously we reported that the endocannabinoid anandamide (AEA regulates sperm release from epithelial oviductal cells by promoting sperm capacitation. The aims of this work were to measure the AEA content and to characterize the main AEA metabolic pathway in the bovine oviduct and determine how these change through the oestrous cycle. In this study, the levels of AEA and two other N-acylethanolamines, N-oleoylethanolamine and N-palmitoylethanolamine, were measured in bovine oviduct collected during different stages of oestrous cycle by ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results indicated that intracellular oviductal epithelial levels of all three N-acylethanolamines fluctuate during oestrous cycle. Anandamide from oviductal fluid also varied during oestrous cycle, with the highest values detected during the periovulatory period. Endocannabinoid levels from ipsilateral oviduct to ovulation were higher than those detected in the contralateral one, suggesting that levels of oviductal AEA may be regulated by ovarian hormones. The expression and localization of N-acylethanolamines metabolizing enzymes in bovine oviduct were also determined by RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry but no change was found during the oestrous cycle. Furthermore, nanomolar levels of AEA were detected in follicular fluids, suggesting that during ovulation the mature follicle may contribute to oviductal AEA levels to create an endocannabinoid gradient conducive to the regulation of sperm function for successful fertilization.

  8. On some consequences resulting in employment of pressurized water reactors operated with fluctuating load

    Load-flexible employment of nuclear power plants may extend to concern in day-night cycle. For vessel-type pressurized water reactors this mode of operation brings essential technological and economic consequences about. As compared with operation on base load, the decrease of load factor and increase of demand for reactivity result in raising of cost. Rise in fuel cost, on the other hand, may be damped by artificially lowering efficiency near the end of campaign. Changes in cost including the influence of efficiency lowering may be calculated starting from the fluctuating load parameters

  9. Energy distribution and local fluctuations in strongly coupled open quantum systems: The extended resonant level model

    Ochoa, Maicol A.; Bruch, Anton; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-07-01

    We study the energy distribution in the extended resonant level model at equilibrium. Previous investigations [Phys. Rev. B 89, 161306 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevB.89.161306; Phys. Rev. B 93, 115318 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevB.93.115318] have found, for a resonant electronic level interacting with a thermal free-electron wide-band bath, that the expectation value for the energy of the interacting subsystem can be correctly calculated by considering a symmetric splitting of the interaction Hamiltonian between the subsystem and the bath. However, the general implications of this approach were questioned [Phys. Rev. B 92, 235440 (2015), 10.1103/PhysRevB.92.235440]. Here, we show that, already at equilibrium, such splitting fails to describe the energy fluctuations, as measured here by the second and third central moments (namely, width and skewness) of the energy distribution. Furthermore, we find that when the wide-band approximation does not hold, no splitting of the system-bath interaction can describe the system thermodynamics. We conclude that in general no proper division subsystem of the Hamiltonian of the composite system can account for the energy distribution of the subsystem. This also implies that the thermodynamic effects due to local changes in the subsystem cannot in general be described by such splitting.

  10. Relationship between fluctuations in glucose levels measured by continuous glucose monitoring and vascular endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    Torimoto Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluctuations in blood glucose level cause endothelial dysfunction and play a critical role in onset and/or progression of atherosclerosis. We hypothesized that fluctuation in blood glucose levels correlate with vascular endothelial dysfunction and that this relationship can be assessed using common bedside medical devices. Methods Fluctuations in blood glucose levels were measured over 24 hours by continuous glucose monitoring (CGM on admission day 2 in 57 patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. The reactive hyperemia index (RHI, an index of vascular endothelial function, was measured using peripheral arterial tonometry (EndoPAT on admission day 3. Results The natural logarithmic-scaled RHI (L_RHI correlated with SD (r=−0.504; PPP=0.001 and percentage of time ≥200 mg/dl (r=−0.292; P=0.028. In 12 patients with hypoglycemia, L_RHI also correlated with the percentage of time at hypoglycemia (r=−0.589; P=0.044. L_RHI did not correlate with HbA1c or fasting plasma glucose levels. Furthermore, L_RHI did not correlate with LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, and triglyceride levels or with systolic and diastolic blood pressures. Finally, multivariate analysis identified MAGE as the only significant determinant of L_RHI. Conclusions Fluctuations in blood glucose levels play a significant role in vascular endothelial dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. Trial registration UMIN000007581

  11. Fluctuations of sea water temperature based on nannofloral changes during the Middle to Late Miocene, Adana Basin, Turkey

    SINACI, Manolya

    2013-01-01

    Some nannoplankton species are sensitive to water temperatures. While Coccolithus pelagicus and Reticulofenestra gelida indicate cooler water conditions, the genera Discoaster and Sphenolithus and Calcidiscus leptoporus are indicative of warmer water environments. This paper focuses on relative fluctuation of sea water temperatures during the Middle and Late Miocene, emphasised by cold and warm nannofossil changes in abundance in 2 wells. At the A-1 well in the Middle Miocene, the total abund...

  12. Impact of a wave farm on its local grid: Voltage limits, flicker level and power fluctuations

    Blavette, Anne; O 'sullivan, Dara; Lewis, Antony; Egan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Significant electrical power fluctuations in the range of seconds may be generated by most oscillating wave energy converters without significant amounts of energy storage capacity. Because of these fluctuations, a wave farm may have a negative impact on the power quality of the local grid to which it is connected. Hence, the impact of these devices on both distribution and transmission networks needs to be well understood, before large scale wave farms can be allowed to connect to the grid. ...

  13. FLUCTUATION EFFECT OF EQUILIBRIUM MOISTURE CONTENT OF LOW SUBGRADE UNDER HIGH GROUNDWATER LEVEL IN HOT AND HUMID CLIMATIC REGIONS

    Que Yun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to reveal the fluctuation effect of equilibrium moisture content of low subgrade in hot and humid climatic regions, the effect of temperature on the fluctuation of the equilibrium moisture content of subgrade was analysed. Taking the typical climate and the subgrade soil in Fujian province as an example, three technological methods - theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and indoor simulation experiment - were adopted in the investigation of the fluctuation effect of equilibrium moisture content of subgrade. The results show that, computing results from the formula of the equilibrium moisture content of subgrade, the numerical simulation results are closer to each other in consideration of the temperature effect. The test results can not reflect the relationship between the equilibrium moisture content and the height of embankment. The maximum fluctuation range of the equilibrium moisture content of the cement concrete pavement is less than 2 percent in Fujian area, and this phenomenon presents the effect of the moist-hot climate on the equilibrium moisture content. Equilibrium moisture content presents a declining trend with the increment of the temperature and the compactness. So, if matric potential considering temperature indirectly reflects the influence of thermal potential, then the equilibrium moisture content of low subgrade under high groundwater level can be estimated approximately. The fluctuation range of equilibrium moisture content in different layers of subgrade can be reduced effectively with the increment of the roadbed compaction degree.

  14. Effect of water-table fluctuations on the degradation of Sphagnum phenols in surficial peats

    Abbott, Geoffrey D.; Swain, Eleanor Y.; Muhammad, Aminu B.; Allton, Kathryn; Belyea, Lisa R.; Laing, Christopher G.; Cowie, Greg L.

    2013-04-01

    A much improved understanding of how water-table fluctuations near the surface affect decomposition and preservation of peat-forming plant litter and surficial peats is needed in order to predict possible feedbacks between the peatland carbon cycle and the global climate system. In this study peatland plants (bryophytes and vascular plants), their litter and peat cores were collected from the Ryggmossen peatland in the boreonemoral zone of central Sweden. The extracted insoluble residues from whole plant tissues were depolymerized using thermally assisted hydrolysis and methylation (THM) in the presence of both unlabelled and 13C-labelled tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) which yielded both vascular plant- and Sphagnum-derived phenols. Methylated 4-isopropenylphenol (IUPAC: 1-methoxy-4-(prop-1-en-2-yl)benzene), methylated cis- and trans-3-(4'-hydroxyphen-1-yl)but-2-enoic acid (IUPAC: (E/Z)-methyl 3-(4-methoxyphenyl)but-2-enoate), and methylated 3-(4'-hydroxyphen-1-yl)but-3-enoic acid (IUPAC: methyl 3-(4-methoxyphenyl)but-3-enoate) (van der Heijden et al., 1997) are confirmed as TMAH thermochemolysis products of "bound" sphagnum acid and also as being specific to Sphagnum mosses. These putative biomarkers were also significant components in the unlabelled TMAH thermochemolysis products from the depolymerization of ultrasonically extracted samples from eight peat cores, one from a hummock and one from a hollow at each of the four stages along the bog plateau-to-swamp forest gradient. We have proposed and measured two parameters namely (i) σ which is defined as the total amount of these four molecules normalised to 100 mg of OC; and (ii) an index (SR%) which is the ratio of σ to the Λ parameter giving a measure of the relative amounts of "bound" sphagnum acid to the "bound" vascular plant phenols in peat moss and the surficial peat layers. Changes in σ and SR% down the bog plateau (BP), bog margin (BM) and fen lagg (FL) cores in the Ryggmossen mire indicates

  15. Geometric and energetic considerations of surface fluctuations during ion transfer across the water-immiscible organic liquid interface

    Karnes, John J.; Benjamin, Ilan

    2016-07-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations and umbrella sampling free energy calculations are used to examine the thermodynamics, energetics, and structural fluctuations that accompany the transfer of a small hydrophilic ion (Cl-) across the water/nitrobenzene interface. By examining several constrained interface structures, we isolate the energetic costs of interfacial deformation and co-transfer of hydration waters during the ion transfer. The process is monitored using both energy-based solvation coordinates and a geometric coordinate recently introduced by Morita and co-workers to describe surface fluctuations. Our simulations show that these coordinates provide a complimentary description of the water surface fluctuations during the transfer and are necessary for elucidating the mechanism of the ion transfer.

  16. Some Examples Of Water Resources Variability In The Context Of Climatic Fluctuations

    Laignel, B.; Massei, N.; Rossi, A.; Mesquita, J.; Slimani, S.

    2008-12-01

    The determination of the impact of climate change on hydrological systems and their water resource constitutes a major stake of the 21st century to which the scientists must answer. First of all, it is necessary to understand how climate are expressed in the hydrosystems. For several years, the M2C laboratory of the University of Rouen has tried to answer this question by working within the framework of many regional, national and international programs as well as PhD works. Those studies involve analyses of hydrological systems located: (1) in various climatic and geomorphological contexts on both sides of the Atlantic Ocean, (2) in various hydrological compartments (surface and ground water), (3) at various spatial scales (watersheds smaller than 1000 km2 and large rivers). The approach consists in studying the long-term changes, oscillations and fluctuations of hydrologic variables by the analysis of time series (precipitation, discharge, piezometry), in particular by means of signal analysis and processing methods. The studied hydrosystems are small watersheds and aquifer in Haute- Normandie, the Seine river (NW France), north-african watersheds (W Morocco and N Algeria), small watersheds and aquifer in Texas, the Colorado river (Texas) and the Mississippi river. Although the identification of structured variations might be uneasy - sometimes just impossible - in raw data, wavelet analysis, for instance, makes it possible to detect localized energetic structures and possible periodicities in all the studied hydrosystems and to quantify them. In many surface hydrosystems we note an intensification of the annual energy band which corresponds to the hydrological cycle. In the NW of France and North Africa, we observe 2-3-year and 5-7-year modes which could be linearly related to fluctuations in the NAO using wavelet coherence. In the USA, we notice similar 2- 3-year and 5-7-year modes that might be possibly related to the characteristic 2-4-year and 4-8-year of

  17. Fluctuating feather asymmetry in relation to corticosterone levels is sex-dependent in Eurasian treecreeper (Certhia familiaris) nestlings

    Helle, Samuli; Suorsa, Petri; Huhta, Esa; Hakkarainen, Harri

    2010-01-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) has been widely used as a stress-related phenotypic marker of developmental instability. However, previous studies relating FA to various stressful conditions have produced inconsistent results and we still lack quantitative individual-level evidence that high FA is related to stress in wild vertebrate species. We studied how baseline plasma levels of corticosterone predicted FA of wing and tail feathers in free-living Eurasian treecreeper (Certhia familiaris) nestl...

  18. Paleoclimatic significance of lake level fluctuations in the Lahontan Basin. [Pyramid Lake, Nevada

    Benson, L.V.

    1980-08-01

    An energy flux balance model has been developed which treats evaporation as a function of air temperature, surface water temperature, precipitable water aloft, the amount, height, and type of sky cover, and the optical air mass. The model has been used to estimate the mean historical evaporation rate for Pyramid Lake, Nevada, using as input climatic data from the Reno area averaged over the period 1950 to 1975. Estimated and measured values of the mean annual evaporation rate were found to be in good agreement. The model was used to simulate changes in the level, the surface area and the volume of paleo Lake Lahontan. In particular, possible climatic states responsible for past high stands (1270 and 1330 m) were investigated. A conservative range of discharge values was used in the calculations. Results of the simulations indicate the fundamental importance of sky cover in the creation and destruction of large lake systems.

  19. Spatiotemporal patterns of water table fluctuations and evapotranspiration induced by riparian vegetation in a semiarid area

    Yue, Weifeng; Wang, Tiejun; Franz, Trenton E.; Chen, Xunhong

    2016-03-01

    Groundwater evapotranspiration (ETg) links various ecohydrological processes and is an important component in regional water budgets. In this study, an extensive monitoring network was established in a semiarid riparian area to investigate various controls on the spatiotemporal pattern of water table fluctuations (WTFs) and ETg induced by riparian vegetation. Along a vegetation gradient (˜1200 m), diurnal WTFs were observed during a growing season in areas covered by woody species (Populus sect. Aigeiros and Juniperus virginiana) and wet slough vegetation (Panicum virgatum and Bromus inermis) with deeper root systems; whereas, no diurnal WTFs were found in the middle section with shallower-rooted grasses (Poa pratensis and Carex sp.). The occurrence of diurnal WTFs was related to temperature-controlled plant phenology at seasonal scales and to radiation at subdaily scales. Daily ETg in the mid-growing season was calculated using the White method. The results revealed that depth to water table (DTWT) was the dominant control on ETg, followed by potential evapotranspiration (ETp). By combining the effects of DTWT and ETp, it was found that at shallower depths, ETg was more responsive to changes in ETp, due to the closer linkage of land surface processes with shallower groundwater. Finally, exponential relationships between ETg/ETp and DTWT were obtained at the study site, although those relationships varied considerably across the sites. This study demonstrates the complex interactions of WTFs and ETg with surrounding environmental variables and provides further insight into modeling ETg over different time scales and riparian vegetation.

  20. Stochastic modelling of intermittent fluctuations in the scrape-off layer: Correlations, distributions, level crossings, and moment estimation

    Garcia, O. E.; Kube, R.; Theodorsen, A.; Pécseli, H. L.

    2016-05-01

    A stochastic model is presented for intermittent fluctuations in the scrape-off layer of magnetically confined plasmas. The fluctuations in the plasma density are modeled by a super-position of uncorrelated pulses with fixed shape and duration, describing radial motion of blob-like structures. In the case of an exponential pulse shape and exponentially distributed pulse amplitudes, predictions are given for the lowest order moments, probability density function, auto-correlation function, level crossings, and average times for periods spent above and below a given threshold level. Also, the mean squared errors on estimators of sample mean and variance for realizations of the process by finite time series are obtained. These results are discussed in the context of single-point measurements of fluctuations in the scrape-off layer, broad density profiles, and implications for plasma-wall interactions due to the transient transport events in fusion grade plasmas. The results may also have wide applications for modelling fluctuations in other magnetized plasmas such as basic laboratory experiments and ionospheric irregularities.

  1. Impact of scaled-down on dissolved oxygen fluctuations at different levels of the lipase synthesis pathway of Yarrowia lipolytica

    Delvigne, F.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The impact of the fluctuations in dissolved oxygen tension (DOT on the lipase production by Yarrowia lipolytica has been investigated in a scale-down reactor (SDR. This bioreactor comprises a 20 l agitated vessel with an automatic valve controlling the opening and closure of the air flow line. This kind of scale-down apparatus is used in order to generate DOT gradients encountered in large-scale, while maintaining the other environmental conditions constant. The impact of DOT fluctuations has been estimated at three levels of the lipase synthesis machinery: lipase gene expression, lipase translation, lipase excretion to the extracellular medium. Among these levels, the performance of lipase production under oscillating DOT was significantly affected at the lipase gene expression level.

  2. Observing plants dealing with soil water stress: Daily soil moisture fluctuations derived from polymer tensiometers

    van der Ploeg, Martine; de Rooij, Gerrit

    2014-05-01

    Periods of soil water deficit often occur within a plant's life cycle, even in temperate deciduous and rain forests (Wilson et al. 2001, Grace 1999). Various experiments have shown that roots are able to sense the distribution of water in the soil, and produce signals that trigger changes in leaf expansion rate and stomatal conductance (Blackman and Davies 1985, Gollan et al. 1986, Gowing et al. 1990 Davies and Zhang 1991, Mansfield and De Silva 1994, Sadras and Milroy 1996). Partitioning of water and air in the soil, solute distribution in soil water, water flow through the soil, and water availability for plants can be determined according to the distribution of the soil water potential (e.g. Schröder et al. 2013, Kool et al. 2014). Understanding plant water uptake under dry conditions has been compromised by hydrological instrumentation with low accuracy in dry soils due to signal attenuation, or a compromised measurement range (Whalley et al. 2013). Development of polymer tensiometers makes it possible to study the soil water potential over a range meaningful for studying plant responses to water stress (Bakker et al. 2007, Van der Ploeg et al. 2008, 2010). Polymer tensiometer data obtained from a lysimeter experiment (Van der Ploeg et al. 2008) were used to analyse day-night fluctuations of soil moisture in the vicinity of maize roots. To do so, three polymer tensiometers placed in the middle of the lysimeter from a control, dry and very dry treatment (one lysimeter per treatment) were used to calculate water content changes over 12 hours. These 12 hours corresponded with the operation of the growing light. Soil water potential measurements in the hour before the growing light was turned on or off were averaged. The averaged value was used as input for the van Genuchten (1980) model. Parameters for the model were obtained from laboratory determination of water retention, with a separate model parameterization for each lysimeter setup. Results show daily

  3. Analysis of Environmental Data and Landscape Characterization on Multiple WetlandTypes Using Water Level Loggers and GIS Techniques in Tampa, FL

    To better characterize the relationships between both adjacent hydrology/ precipitation and nutrient processing with groundwater level fluctuations, continuous water level data are being collected across three dominant wetland types, each with varied landscape characteristics. Th...

  4. Evaluation of the Chemcatcher and DGT passive samplers for monitoring metals with highly fluctuating water concentrations.

    Allan, Ian J; Knutsson, Jesper; Guigues, Nathalie; Mills, Graham A; Fouillac, Anne-Marie; Greenwood, Richard

    2007-07-01

    Passive sampling devices accumulate chemicals continuously from water and can provide time weighted average (TWA) concentrations of pollutants over the exposure period. Hence, they offer a number of advantages over other conventional monitoring techniques such as spot or grab sampling. The diffusive gradient in thin film (DGT) and the Chemcatcher passive samplers can be used to provide TWA concentrations of labile metals, but the approaches to their calibration differ. DGT uses diffusion coefficients of metals in the hydrogel layer, whereas Chemcatcher uses metal specific uptake rates, with both sets of values obtained under controlled laboratory conditions with constant aqueous metal concentrations. However, little is known of how such samplers respond to fluctuating concentrations. We evaluated the responsiveness of these two passive sampling devices to rapidly changing concentrations of Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn in natural freshwater, over a relatively short deployment time. Maximum metal concentrations in water were varied between 70 and 140 microg L(-1). Experiments were carried out in a tank with a rotating carousel system and filled with Meuse river water, allowing a degree of control over experimental conditions while using natural river water. Fluctuating concentrations were obtained by stepwise addition of standard solutions of the metals. The reliability and accuracy of the TWA concentrations measured by the samplers were assessed by comparison with concentrations of the metals in spot samples of water taken regularly over the deployment period. The spot samples of water were either unfiltered (total), filtered (0.45 microm) or ultrafiltered (5 kDa). Predictive speciation modelling using the visual MINTEQ programme was also undertaken. There was reasonable agreement between the TWA concentrations of Cd and Ni obtained with Chemcatcher and DGT and the total Cd and Ni concentrations measured in repeated unfiltered spot samples. For elements (i.e. Cu, Pb, Zn

  5. Advanced methods for modeling water-levels and estimating drawdowns with SeriesSEE, an Excel add-in

    Halford, Keith; Garcia, C. Amanda; Fenelon, Joe; Mirus, Benjamin B.

    2012-01-01

    Water-level modeling is used for multiple-well aquifer tests to reliably differentiate pumping responses from natural water-level changes in wells, or “environmental fluctuations.” Synthetic water levels are created during water-level modeling and represent the summation of multiple component fluctuations, including those caused by environmental forcing and pumping. Pumping signals are modeled by transforming step-wise pumping records into water-level changes by using superimposed Theis functions. Water-levels can be modeled robustly with this Theis-transform approach because environmental fluctuations and pumping signals are simulated simultaneously. Water-level modeling with Theis transforms has been implemented in the program SeriesSEE, which is a Microsoft® Excel add-in. Moving average, Theis, pneumatic-lag, and gamma functions transform time series of measured values into water-level model components in SeriesSEE. Earth tides and step transforms are additional computed water-level model components. Water-level models are calibrated by minimizing a sum-of-squares objective function where singular value decomposition and Tikhonov regularization stabilize results. Drawdown estimates from a water-level model are the summation of all Theis transforms minus residual differences between synthetic and measured water levels. The accuracy of drawdown estimates is limited primarily by noise in the data sets, not the Theis-transform approach. Drawdowns much smaller than environmental fluctuations have been detected across major fault structures, at distances of more than 1 mile from the pumping well, and with limited pre-pumping and recovery data at sites across the United States. In addition to water-level modeling, utilities exist in SeriesSEE for viewing, cleaning, manipulating, and analyzing time-series data.

  6. Mechanism analysis of landslide of a layered slope induced by drawdown of water level

    ZHANG Junfeng; LI Zhengguo; QI Tao

    2005-01-01

    The frequent drawdown of water level of Yangtze River will greatly influence the stability of the widely existing slopes in the Three Gorges reservoir zone, especially those layered ones. Apart from the fluctuating speed of water level, the different geological materials will also play important roles in the failure of slopes. Thus, it must be first to study the mechanism of such a landslide caused by drawdown of water level.A new experimental setup is designed to study the performance of a layered slope under the drawdown of water level. The pattern of landslide of a layered slope induced by drawdown of water level has been explored by means of simulating experiments. The influence of fluctuating speed of water level on the stability of the layered slope is probed,especially the whole process of deformation and development of landslide of the slope versus time. The experimental results show that the slope is stable during the water level rising, and the sliding body occurs in the upper layer of the slope under a certain drawdown speed of water level. In the process of slope failure, some new small sliding body will develop on the main sliding body, and the result is that they speed up the disassembly of the whole slope.Based on the simulating experiment on landslide of a layered slope induced by drawdown of water level, the stress and displacement field of the slope are calculated.The seepage velocity, the pore water pressure, and the gradient of pore water head are also calculated for the whole process of drawdown of water level. The computing results are in good agreement with the experimental results. Accordingly, the mechanism of deformation and landslide of the layered slope induced by drawdown of water level is analyzed. It may provide basis for treating this kind of layered slopes in practical engineering.

  7. Seasonal fluctuations in water repellency and infiltration in a sandy loam soil after a forest fire in Galicia (NW Spain

    M. Rodríguez-Alleres

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to analyze, after a wildfire of moderate severity, the temporal fluctuations in water repellency and infiltration in a sandy loam soil under a mixed plantation of pine and eucalyptus and the comparison with an adjacent area not affected by the fire. In the burnt area and in a neighboring area not affected by the fire were collected during one year (1, 4, 6, 8 and 12 months after the fire 10 soil samples along a transect of 18 m at four depths: 0-2, 2-5, 5-10 and 10-20 cm. Soil water repellency was determined using the water drop penetration time test (WDPT test and the infiltration was measured with a mini-disc infiltrometer (pressure head h0 = -2 cm.The results show a temporal pattern of soil water repellency in the burnt and unburnt areas. Significant correlations between water repellency and soil moisture were observed, with higher correlation coefficients in the unburned area and in the surface soil layer.Soil water infiltration was significantly lower than would be expected by the coarse texture of the soil in both burnt and unburnt areas. Temporal fluctuations in unburnt soil infiltration seem to be clearly related to the transient nature of the soil water repellency, with no infiltration in samples extremely repellent. In the burned area, the soil infiltration showed much more variability and temporal fluctuations appear to be less dependent on the persistence of water repellency and more dependent on environmental conditions.The unburnt area show significant and negative correlations of soil water repellency with hydraulic conductivity and sorptivity and positive of these two parameters with soil moisture. These relationships were not observed in the burnt area. The temporal fluctuations of soil water repellency have an evident impact on soil infiltration and seem to be more influent than the effects of fire.

  8. A two-dimensional analytical model describing groundwater level fluctuations in an anisotropic and bending leaky aquifer system near estuary

    Yeh, Hund-Der; Chuang, Mo-Hsiung

    2014-05-01

    Tide-induced head fluctuation in a two-dimensional estuarine aquifer system is complicated and rather important in dealing with many groundwater management or remediation problems. The conceptual model of the aquifer system we considered is anisotropic, multi-layered with a bending estuarine bank, and subject to the tidal fluctuation effects from both the sea shore and estuarine river. The solution of the model describing the groundwater head distribution in such a coastal aquifer system is developed based on the method of separation of variables and a coordinate transformation applied to the river boundary at the bend with an angle of arbitrary degree to the line perpendicular to the sea shore. The solutions by Sun (Sun H. A two-dimensional analytical solution of groundwater response to tidal loading in an estuary, Water Resour. Res. 1997; 33:1429-35) as well as Tang and Jiao (Tang Z. and J. J. Jiao, A two-dimensional analytical solution for groundwater flow in a leaky confined aquifer system near open tidal water, Hydrological Processes, 2001; 15: 573-585) can be shown to be special cases of the present solution if the degree of the bending angle is zero. On the basis of the analytical solution, the groundwater head distribution in response to estuarine boundary is examined and the influences of anisotropy, leakage, hydraulic parameters, and bending angle on the groundwater head fluctuation are investigated and discussed.

  9. Systems-level modeling the effects of arsenic exposure with sequential pulsed and fluctuating patterns for tilapia and freshwater clam

    The purpose of this paper was to use quantitative systems-level approach employing biotic ligand model based threshold damage model to examine physiological responses of tilapia and freshwater clam to sequential pulsed and fluctuating arsenic concentrations. We tested present model and triggering mechanisms by carrying out a series of modeling experiments where we used periodic pulses and sine-wave as featured exposures. Our results indicate that changes in the dominant frequencies and pulse timing can shift the safe rate distributions for tilapia, but not for that of freshwater clam. We found that tilapia increase bioenergetic costs to maintain the acclimation during pulsed and sine-wave exposures. Our ability to predict the consequences of physiological variation under time-varying exposure patterns has also implications for optimizing species growing, cultivation strategies, and risk assessment in realistic situations. - Systems-level modeling the pulsed and fluctuating arsenic exposures.

  10. Systems-level modeling the effects of arsenic exposure with sequential pulsed and fluctuating patterns for tilapia and freshwater clam

    Chen, W.-Y. [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Tsai, J.-W. [Institute of Ecology and Evolutionary Ecology, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan (China); Ju, Y.-R. [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Liao, C.-M., E-mail: cmliao@ntu.edu.t [Department of Bioenvironmental Systems Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China)

    2010-05-15

    The purpose of this paper was to use quantitative systems-level approach employing biotic ligand model based threshold damage model to examine physiological responses of tilapia and freshwater clam to sequential pulsed and fluctuating arsenic concentrations. We tested present model and triggering mechanisms by carrying out a series of modeling experiments where we used periodic pulses and sine-wave as featured exposures. Our results indicate that changes in the dominant frequencies and pulse timing can shift the safe rate distributions for tilapia, but not for that of freshwater clam. We found that tilapia increase bioenergetic costs to maintain the acclimation during pulsed and sine-wave exposures. Our ability to predict the consequences of physiological variation under time-varying exposure patterns has also implications for optimizing species growing, cultivation strategies, and risk assessment in realistic situations. - Systems-level modeling the pulsed and fluctuating arsenic exposures.

  11. Water Level Detection Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Imagery

    inspection planning), object detection (verification of declared activities, or detection of undeclared activities), and detection of water level fluctuation (which may be linked to a clandestine power generation during a period where optical sensors are not effective, e.g. at night or during adverse weather conditions). Additional analysis of RADARSAT-1 data, supportable by ground truth information and IKONOS imagery, is being carried out and further results are expected to be available soon. Large steep walled or terraced reservoirs, as in the case of JEB Pit TMF would require a different analysis technique. Scoping work indicated that it would be possible to deduce the water level by measuring the wall height using 'radar shadow', in a manner similar to the exploitation of shadows in optical images

  12. Fluctuating micro-heterogeneity in water-tert-butyl alcohol mixtures and lambda-type divergence of the mean cluster size with phase transition-like multiple anomalies.

    Banerjee, Saikat; Furtado, Jonathan; Bagchi, Biman

    2014-05-21

    Water-tert-butyl alcohol (TBA) binary mixture exhibits a large number of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies. These anomalies are observed at surprisingly low TBA mole fraction, with x(TBA) ≈ 0.03-0.07. We demonstrate here that the origin of the anomalies lies in the local structural changes that occur due to self-aggregation of TBA molecules. We observe a percolation transition of the TBA molecules at x(TBA) ≈ 0.05. We note that "islands" of TBA clusters form even below this mole fraction, while a large spanning cluster emerges above that mole fraction. At this percolation threshold, we observe a lambda-type divergence in the fluctuation of the size of the largest TBA cluster, reminiscent of a critical point. Alongside, the structure of water is also perturbed, albeit weakly, by the aggregation of TBA molecules. There is a monotonic decrease in the tetrahedral order parameter of water, while the dipole moment correlation shows a weak nonlinearity. Interestingly, water molecules themselves exhibit a reverse percolation transition at higher TBA concentration, x(TBA) ≈ 0.45, where large spanning water clusters now break-up into small clusters. This is accompanied by significant divergence of the fluctuations in the size of largest water cluster. This second transition gives rise to another set of anomalies around. Both the percolation transitions can be regarded as manifestations of Janus effect at small molecular level. PMID:24852545

  13. Analysis and improvements of module incidental interference faults of water level control system pressurize NPP

    In Daya Bay nuclear power plant, there have been many times that the module used to value the water level outputs a small pulse interference when the pressurizer water level control system is in operation, and the interference exists only in analog storage operation module, which can directly impact the control of the water level of the pressurizer, causing the water level fluctuations and adversely affecting the safe operation of the reactor. This paper analyzes the module incidental interference faults of the water level control system of the NPP pressurizer from the point view of the system control and design of module hardware, and finds out the reasons by the system simulation experiment and power supply circuit test. It is suggested to further improve on the design of hardware loops, add more inductance and capacity to eliminate the interference. (authors)

  14. Individual fluctuations in toxin levels affect breeding site fidelity in a chemically defended amphibian.

    Bucciarelli, Gary M; Green, David B; Shaffer, H Bradley; Kats, Lee B

    2016-05-25

    Behaviours that influence habitat selection strongly determine species movement patterns. One component of animal behaviour that largely influences movement patterns and habitat choice is site fidelity. California newts (family Salamandridae) demonstrate remarkable site fidelity, typically homing to the same pool of a stream each breeding season. Individuals often occupy a specific pool throughout the breeding season, but some males shift among breeding pools, altering their set of potential mates, competitors, and predators. In this study, we measured dermal concentrations of the chemical defence compound tetrodotoxin (TTX) in recaptured male California newts (Taricha torosa) over five breeding seasons to evaluate whether relative TTX concentrations are associated with breeding site fidelity in the field. Our five years of field sampling indicates that TTX concentrations of individuals and group means fluctuate tremendously, implying that TTX is not a stable phenotypic trait. Despite such fluctuations, we found that an individual's relative TTX concentration explains fidelity to a breeding pool and suggests that newts may be able to assess both their own concentrations of TTX and that of conspecifics to make decisions about remaining in or abandoning a breeding pool. These results provide us a novel dimension to chemical defence phenotypes in nature and their ecological consequences, potentially requiring a re-evaluation of the coevolutionary dynamics of predation pressure on toxin-laden organisms. PMID:27194704

  15. Fluctuating feather asymmetry in relation to corticosterone levels is sex-dependent in Eurasian treecreeper (Certhia familiaris) nestlings

    Helle, Samuli; Suorsa, Petri; Huhta, Esa; Hakkarainen, Harri

    2010-01-01

    Fluctuating asymmetry (FA) has been widely used as a stress-related phenotypic marker of developmental instability. However, previous studies relating FA to various stressful conditions have produced inconsistent results and we still lack quantitative individual-level evidence that high FA is related to stress in wild vertebrate species. We studied how baseline plasma levels of corticosterone predicted FA of wing and tail feathers in free-living Eurasian treecreeper (Certhia familiaris) nestlings. We found a sex-specific association between corticosterone levels and FA: high corticosterone levels were related to an increased FA in male but not in female nestlings. These results suggest that in treecreepers, FA may correlate with individual stress hormone levels, male developmental trajectory being potentially more sensitive to stress than that of the female. PMID:20129951

  16. Study on temperature fluctuation phenomena in pressurizer spray pipe of pressurized water reactor

    Damage of a pressurizer spray piping in a PWR plant is potentially considered from a safety point of views. Gas-liquid interface is formed in the pressurizer spray pipe of the PWR under a rated power operating condition. Temperature fluctuation may occur if the interface may move periodically. Measurement of inner wall and fluid temperature in the test section simulating the real pressurizer spray pipe was conducted to study mechanism of the temperature fluctuation phenomena. The temperature fluctuations were observed. Visualization experiment was conducted to understand the flow phenomena. It was estimated that Kelvin-Helmholtz instability occurred in the liquid layer in a horizontal pipe in the spray piping. (author)

  17. Development and evaluation of a water level proportional water sampler

    Schneider, P.; Lange, A.; Doppler, T.

    2013-12-01

    We developed and adapted a new type of sampler for time-integrated, water level proportional water quality sampling (e.g. nutrients, contaminants and stable isotopes). Our samplers are designed for sampling small to mid-size streams based on the law of Hagen-Poiseuille, where a capillary (or a valve) limits the sampling aliquot by reducing the air flux out of a submersed plastic (HDPE) sampling container. They are good alternatives to battery-operated automated water samplers when working in remote areas, or at streams that are characterized by pronounced daily discharge variations such as glacier streams. We evaluated our samplers against standard automated water samplers (ISCO 2900 and ISCO 6712) during the snowmelt in the Black Forest and the Alps and tested them in remote glacial catchments in Iceland, Switzerland and Kyrgyzstan. The results clearly showed that our samplers are an adequate tool for time-integrated, water level proportional water sampling at remote test sites, as they do not need batteries, are relatively inexpensive, lightweight, and compact. They are well suited for headwater streams - especially when sampling for stable isotopes - as the sampled water is perfectly protected against evaporation. Moreover, our samplers have a reduced risk of icing in cold environments, as they are installed submersed in water, whereas automated samplers (typically installed outside the stream) may get clogged due to icing of hoses. Based on this study, we find these samplers to be an adequate replacement for automated samplers when time-integrated sampling or solute load estimates are the main monitoring tasks.

  18. Contribution of climate-driven change in continental water storage to recent sea-level rise

    Milly, P.C.D.; Cazenave, A.; Gennero, C.

    2003-01-01

    Using a global model of continental water balance, forced by interannual variations in precipitation and near-surface atmospheric temperature for the period 1981–1998, we estimate the sea-level changes associated with climate-driven changes in storage of water as snowpack, soil water, and ground water; storage in ice sheets and large lakes is not considered. The 1981–1998 trend is estimated to be 0.12 mm/yr, and substantial interannual fluctuations are inferred; for 1993–1998, the trend is 0....

  19. Fluctuations of Phytoplankton Community in the Coastal Waters of Caspian Sea in 2006

    Siamak Bagheri

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The Caspian Sea ecosystem has been suffered with many problems since 1980s. Aanthropogenic pollution from heavy metals, hydrocarbons, pesticides, changes in the quantity of nutrient inputs by rivers, are significant threats to biodiversity and biological resources such as plankton structure in the Caspian Sea. According to the significant of phytoplankton community in marine system. The state of the fluctuations of phytoplankton communities of the southwestern Caspian Sea was investigated and compared with the findings of before 2006. Approach: Phytoplankton abundance and species composition of the Caspian Sea were evaluated by using samples collected at 12 stations along three transects. Samplings were conducted seasonal in 2006 at 5, 10, 20 and 50 m depth were fixed for each transect in the southwestern Caspian Sea. Results: A total of 39 species phytoplankton species were distinguished during 2006, the annual phytoplankton abundance were calculated as 57, 300±15,550 cells.l-1, which ranged from 89, 250±35, 062 cells.l-1 in September to 16, 200±6,664 cells.l-1 in February. The diatoms formed more than half of the total abundance (61% while cyanophytes were the second important group in view of contribution to total phytoplankton (26% in 2006. The study showed that diatoms Thalassionema nitzschioides, Cyclotella meneghiniana and cyanophyte Osillatoria sp. numerically dominated in this area. Conclusion: The study revealed that diatoms were higher than other groups of phytoplankton in 2006. The hydrology variation, increased fresh water inflow via rivers and a rise in nutrients concentrations have played important roles in blooming of phytoplankton species, e.g., the diatoms in this study, which is also known from other marines. Similar studies on determination of the effects of environmental degradation on phytoplankton and hydrological processes should be taken into account in near future.

  20. Detecting drawdowns masked by environmental stresses with water-level models

    Garcia, C.A.; Halford, K.J.; Fenelon, J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Detecting and quantifying small drawdown at observation wells distant from the pumping well greatly expands the characterized aquifer volume. However, this detection is often obscured by water level fluctuations such as barometric and tidal effects. A reliable analytical approach for distinguishing drawdown from nonpumping water-level fluctuations is presented and tested here. Drawdown is distinguished by analytically simulating all pumping and nonpumping water-level stresses simultaneously during the period of record. Pumping signals are generated with Theis models, where the pumping schedule is translated into water-level change with the Theis solution. This approach closely matched drawdowns simulated with a complex three-dimensional, hypothetical model and reasonably estimated drawdowns from an aquifer test conducted in a complex hydrogeologic system. Pumping-induced changes generated with a numerical model and analytical Theis model agreed (RMS as low as 0.007 m) in cases where pumping signals traveled more than 1 km across confining units and fault structures. Maximum drawdowns of about 0.05 m were analytically estimated from field investigations where environmental fluctuations approached 0.2 m during the analysis period.

  1. Stratigraphic analysis of lake level fluctuations in Lake Ohrid: an integration of high resolution hydro-acoustic data and sediment cores

    Lindhorst, K.; H. Vogel; S. Krastel; Wagner, B.; Hilgers, A.; Zander, A.; Schwenk, T.; Wessels, M.; Daut, G.

    2010-01-01

    Ancient Lake Ohrid is a steep sided, oligotrophic, karst lake of likely Pliocene age and often referred to as a hotspot of endemic biodiversity. This study aims on tracing significant lake level fluctuations at Lake Ohrid using high-resolution acoustic data in combination with lithological, geochemical, and chronological information from two sediment cores recovered from sub-aquatic terrace levels at ca. 32 and 55 m. According to our data, significant lake level fluctuations with prominent lo...

  2. Performance of broilers submitted to high CO2 levels during incubation combined with temperature fluctuations at late post-hatch

    JIM Fernandes

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Incubation represents around 1/3 of the life cycle of broilers of modern strains; therefore, the appropriate management of this period is crucial to ensure the quality of the neonate. An experiment evaluated the effect of carbon dioxide concentrations during incubation on the live performance, heart morphology, and differential leukocyte count in the blood of broilers submitted to fluctuating temperatures between 35 and 42 days of age. In total, 2,520 fertile eggs were distributed according to a completely randomized design with four CO2 concentrations (4,000; 6,000; 8,000 and 10,000 ppm during the first ten days of incubation, after which all eggs were incubated at the same CO2 level (4,000 ppm. After hatching, male chicks were placed in the experimental broiler houses, and at 35 days of age, 25 birds from each level of CO2 were separated and placed in cages to study the effect of cyclic temperature variations up to 42 days of age on their live performance, heterophil:lymphocyte ratio, and heart morphology. At 42 days of age, blood was collected for hematology and two birds per replicate were sacrificed and evaluated for ascites score and heart and liver relative weights. Heart morphology was assessed by analyzing digital images. In this experiment, hypercapnia during incubation and fluctuating temperatures during the growout did not affect mortality, ascites score, heart and liver relative weights, or heart characteristics (p>0.05. However, heterophill:lymphocyte ratio increased (p<0.05 with increasing carbon dioxide concentrations during incubation. It was concluded that high CO2 levels during incubation did not influence the resistance of broilers to fluctuating temperatures during the last week of age.

  3. GNSS-Reflectometry based water level monitoring

    Beckheinrich, Jamila; Schön, Steffen; Beyerle, Georg; Apel, Heiko; Semmling, Maximilian; Wickert, Jens

    2013-04-01

    Due to climate changing conditions severe changes in the Mekong delta in Vietnam have been recorded in the last years. The goal of the German Vietnamese WISDOM (Water-related Information system for the Sustainable Development Of the Mekong Delta) project is to build an information system to support and assist the decision makers, planners and authorities for an optimized water and land management. One of WISDOM's tasks is the flood monitoring of the Mekong delta. Earth reflected L-band signals from the Global Navigation Satellite System show a high reflectivity on water and ice surfaces or on wet soil so that GNSS-Reflectometry (GNSS-R) could contribute to monitor the water level in the main streams of the Mekong delta complementary to already existing monitoring networks. In principle, two different GNSS-R methods exist: the code- and the phase-based one. As the latter being more accurate, a new generation of GORS (GNSS Occultation, Reflectometry and Scatterometry) JAVAD DELTA GNSS receiver has been developed with the aim to extract precise phase observations. In a two week lasting measurement campaign, the receiver has been tested and several reflection events at the 150-200 m wide Can Tho river in Vietnam have been recorded. To analyze the geometrical impact on the quantity and quality of the reflection traces two different antennas height were tested. To track separately the direct and the reflected signal, two antennas were used. To derive an average height of the water level, for a 15 min observation interval, a phase model has been developed. Combined with the coherent observations, the minimum slope has been calculated based on the Least- Squares method. As cycle slips and outliers will impair the results, a preprocessing of the data has been performed. A cycle slip detection strategy that allows for automatic detection, identification and correction is proposed. To identify outliers, the data snooping method developed by Baarda 1968 is used. In this

  4. Millennial/submillennial-scale sea-level fluctuations in western Mediterranean during the second highstand of MIS 5e

    Dabrio, Cristino J.; Zazo Cardeña, Caridad; Cabero del Río, Ana; Goy Goy, José Luis; Bardají Azcárate, Teresa; Hillaire-Marcel, Claude; González Delgado, José Ángel; Lario Gómez, Javier; Silva Barroso, Pablo Gabriel; Borja, Francisco de; García Blázquez, Ana María

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates a series of small-scale, short-lived fluctuations of sea level registered in a prograding barrier spit that grew during theMIS 5e. This interglacial includes three highstands (Zazo et al., 2003) and we focus on the second highstand, of assumed duration ∼10 2 ka, given that UeTh ages do not provide more accurate data. Geometry and 3D architecture of beach facies, and thin-section petrography were used to investigate eight exposed offlapping subunits separat...

  5. Long-term fluctuations of water resources availability and its implications for a sustainable management of arid agricultural coastal regions

    Grundmann, Jens; Schütze, Niels

    2015-04-01

    Freshwater scarcity and ongoing population growth associated with increasing water demands are major challenges for water management in coastal arid regions. Excessive use of groundwater for irrigation in agriculture puts those regions at risk of saltwater intrusion which limits agricultural opportunities. Additionally, some arid regions are characterised by a cyclic climate in which longer periods of dry years are followed by longer periods of wet years. This results also in long-term fluctuations of groundwater replenishment rates and water resources availability which may reach the same order of magnitude like long-term average values. Therefore, these long-term fluctuations should be considered for water resources management planning and operation. In order to evaluate their impact a simulation-based integrated water management system for coastal arid regions is used. The management system couples a groundwater module, assessing the water resources availability, and an agricultural module, controlling irrigation and cultivation within an optimisation module which allow for multi-objective optimisation of the water management regarding profitable and sustainable water resources and agricultural management on farm and regional scale. To achieve a fast and robust operation of the water management system, surrogate models are used which emulate the behaviour of physically based process models and a hierarchical optimisation scheme is applied. The water management system is driven by different scenarios of the water resources availability which were generated by using time series analyses and modelling of local groundwater replenishment rates. An application is performed for the south Batinah coastal region in the Sultanate of Oman which is affected by saltwater intrusion into a coastal aquifer system due to excessive groundwater withdrawal for irrigated agriculture. Several scenarios of water resources availability are used to compare long-term and adaptive

  6. Enhanced water level model in image classification

    Deng, Shangrong; Qian, Kai; Hung, Chih-Cheng

    2005-05-01

    Water-Level model is an effective method in density-based classification. We use biased sampling, local similarity and popularity as preprocessing, and employ a merging operation in the water-level model for classification. Biased sampling is to get some information about the global structure. Similarity and local density are mainly used to understand the local structure. In biased sampling, images are divided into many l x l patches and a sample pixel is selected from each patch. Similarity at a point p, denoted by sim(p), measures the change of gray level between point p and its neighborhood N(p). Besides using biased sampling to combine spectral and spatial information, we use similarity and local popularity in selecting sample points. A sample point is chosen based on the minimum value of sim(p) + [1-P(p)] after normalization. The selected pixel is a better representative, especially near the border of an object. To make it more effective, one has to deal with small spikes and bumps. To get rid of the small spikes, we establish a threshold |[f(P1)-f(P2)]*(P1-P2)| > c*l*l , where c is a constant, P1 is a local maximum point to be tested and P2 is the nearest local minimum from P1. The condition is only related to the size of the patches l*l. The merging operation we include in the model makes the threshold constant less sensitive in the process. DBScan is combined with the enhanced water level model to reduce noise and to get connected components. Preliminary experiments have been conducted using the proposed methods and the results are promising.

  7. Natural C-14 variations and consequences for sea-level fluctuations and frequency analysis of periods of peat growth

    The rise in sea level during the past 18,000 years has been studied largely by means of radiocarbon dating. The question whether small fluctuations are superimposed on the steadily rising sea level is discussed. Support for this is the observed succession of clastic deposits and peat layers, resulting from alternating periods of transgressive and regressive activity. However, irregularities in the 14C time scale might not only give rise to apparent steps in the relative sea-level rise, but also to clustering of 14C dates of geological finds at certain 14C intervals. Therefore, until there is more evidence the succession of clastic deposits and peat layers is interpreted as caused by local disasters at certain times and random regressive peat growth during quiet periods. (Auth.)

  8. Decreasing residual aluminum level in drinking water

    王志红; 崔福义

    2004-01-01

    The relativity of coagulant dosage, residual turbidity, temperature, pH etc. with residual aluminum concentration were investigated, and several important conclusions were achieved. Firstly, dosage of alum-coagulant or PAC1 influences residual aluminum concentration greatly. There is an optimal-dosage-to-aluminum, a bit less than the optimal-dosage-to-turbidity. Secondly, it proposes that decreasing residual aluminum concentration can be theoretically divided into two methods, either decreasing (even removing) the concentration of particulate aluminum component, or decreasing dissolved aluminum. In these tests there is an optimal value of residual turbidity of postprecipitation at 7.0 NTU. Thirdly, residual aluminum level will increase while water temperature goes higher. At the last, optimal pH value corresponds a minimum dissolved aluminum at a given turbidity. Data shows the optimal pH value decreases with water temperature's increasing.

  9. Ecosystem health evaluation system of the water-fluctuating zone in the Three Gorges Area

    WANG Li-ao; YUAN Hui; ZHANG Yan-hui; HU Gang

    2004-01-01

    This paper discribes the definition of ecosystem health for the water-level flutuation zone of the Three Gorges Region and puts forward an evaluation system involving indicators in three groups: 1) structural indicators comprise slope, biodiversity,environmental capacity, stability, restoration ability and damage situation; 2) functional indicators including probability of geological hazard, erosion rate, habitat rate, land use intension and days of tourist season; 3) environmental indicatiors made up of population quality, potential intension of human, ground water quality, ambient air quality, wastewater treatment rate, pesticide use rate, fertilizer use rate, environmental management and public participation. In the design of the system, the subject zone is regarded as the type similar to wetland and the impacts of human activities on the zone are attached great importance to.

  10. The seismic-stratigraphic record of lake-level fluctuations in Lake Challa: Hydrological stability and change in equatorial East Africa over the last 140 kyr

    Moernaut, J.; D. Verschuren; Charlet, F.; Kristen, I.; Fagot, M.; De Batist, M.;  

    2010-01-01

    Seismic-reflection data from crater lake Challa (Mt. Kilimanjaro, equatorial East Africa) reveal a ∼210-m thick sedimentary infill containing distinct seismic-stratigraphic signatures of late-Quaternary lake-level fluctuations. Extrapolation of a well-constrained age model on the cored upper part of the sequence suggests that these lake-level fluctuations represent a detailed and continuous record of moisture-balance variation in equatorial East Africa over the last 140 kyr. This record indic...

  11. IVF Performance of Women Who Have Fluctuating Early Follicular FSH Levels

    Lass, A.; Gerrard, A.; Abusheikha, N.; Akagbosu, F.; Brinsden, P.

    2000-01-01

    Objectives: The aim was to evaluate whether women who have early follicular follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) levels >12 mIU/ml have reduced response to follicular stimulation for in vitro fertilization (IVF) in a following month, in spite of normal FSH levels.

  12. Investigation of wall temperature fluctuations by visualization tests for steam-water two-phase flow in the pressurizer spray piping

    In a PWR plant, a steam-water two phase flow may possibly exist in the pressurizer spray pipe under a rated power operating condition since the flow rate of the spray water is not sufficient to fill the horizontal section of the pipe completely. Under such thermally stratified two phase flow conditions, the initiation of high cycle fatigue cracks is suspected to occur due to cyclic thermal stress fluctuations caused by oscillations of the water surface, which cannot be detected by the measurement of temperature on outer surface of the pipe. In order to clarify the flow and thermal conditions in the pressurizer spray pipe and assess their impact on the pipe structure, an experiment was conducted for a steam-water flow at a low flow rate using a mock-up pressurizer spray pipe. By measuring inner wall temperature fluctuations, continuous temperature fluctuations, which were around 0.2 times of the steam water temperature difference in the maximum range, were observed at the inclined section where the water surface contacted the pipe wall. Then, we investigated the causes of the fluctuations by visualization tests. As a result of the experiment, it seemed that wall temperature fluctuations were not caused by waves on the water surface, but were caused by liquid temperature fluctuations a layer below the steam-water interface. The influence of a small amount of non-condensable gas dissolved in the reactor coolant on the wall temperature fluctuations was investigated by injecting air into the experimental loop. The liquid temperature fluctuations in the layer which caused wall temperature fluctuations were attenuated after air was injected. (author)

  13. The level of non-thermal velocity fluctuations deduced from Doppler spectroscopy and its role on TJ-II confinement

    Zurro, B

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this investigation is to study, in the line of previous works, the level of velocity fluctuations in different scenarios of the TJ-II stellarator. The method followed consists in measuring the apparent Doppler temperature of C4+ and protons with high spectral resolution techniques with spatial resolution. The level of turbulent velocities in the plasma has been deduced from the difference observed between the apparent temperature of both species, following a method previously presented and borrowed from astrophysics. The study of this difference, as a function of plasma density and injected power, provides a way to explore if this turbulence plays any role in the confinement of the hot TJ-II plasma.

  14. Information Entropy. and Squeezing of Quantum Fluctuations in a Two-Level Atom

    FANG Mao-Fa; ZHOU Peng; S. Swain

    2000-01-01

    We study the atomic squeezing in the language of the quantum information theory. A rigorous entropy uncertainty relation which suits for characterizing the squeezing of a two-level atoms is obtained, and a general definition of information entropy squeezing in the two-level atoms is given. The information entropy squeezing of two-level atoms interacting with a single-mode quantum field is examined. Our results show that the information entropy is a superior measure of the quantum uncertainty of atomic observable, also is a remarkable good precision measure of atomic squeezing. When the population difference of two-level atom is zero, the definition of atomic squeezing based on the Heisenberg uncertainty relation is trivial, while the definition of information entropy squeezing of the atom based on the entropy uncertainty relation is valid and can provide full information on the atomic squeezing in any cases.

  15. Cerebrospinal Fluid Hypocretin-1 (Orexin-A) Level Fluctuates with Season and Correlates with Day Length.

    Boddum, Kim; Hansen, Mathias Hvidtfelt; Jennum, Poul Jørgen; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek

    2016-01-01

    The hypocretin/orexin neuropeptides (hcrt) are key players in the control of sleep and wakefulness evidenced by the fact that lack of hcrt leads to the sleep disorder Narcolepsy Type 1. Sleep disturbances are common in mood disorders, and hcrt has been suggested to be poorly regulated in depressed subjects. To study seasonal variation in hcrt levels, we obtained data on hcrt-1 levels in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from 227 human individuals evaluated for central hypersomnias at a Danish sleep center. The samples were taken over a 4 year timespan, and obtained in the morning hours, thus avoiding impact of the diurnal hcrt variation. Hcrt-1 concentration was determined in a standardized radioimmunoassay. Using biometric data and sleep parameters, a multivariate regression analysis was performed. We found that the average monthly CSF hcrt-1 levels varied significantly across the seasons following a sine wave with its peak in the summer (June-July). The amplitude was 19.9 pg hcrt/mL [12.8-26.9] corresponding to a 10.6% increase in midsummer compared to winter. Factors found to significantly predict the hcrt-1 values were day length, presence of snow, and proximity to the Christmas holiday season. The hcrt-1 values from January were much higher than predicted from the model, suggestive of additional factors influencing the CSF hcrt-1 levels such as social interaction. This study provides evidence that human CSF hcrt-1 levels vary with season, correlating with day length. This finding could have implications for the understanding of winter tiredness, fatigue, and seasonal affective disorder. This is the first time a seasonal variation of hcrt-1 levels has been shown, demonstrating that the hcrt system is, like other neurotransmitter systems, subjected to long term modulation. PMID:27008404

  16. Analysis on the Characteristics of the Coseismic Response of Water Levels Recorded in Three Wells in Hainan,China to the Two Sumatra-Andaman Strong Earthquakes

    Li Zhixiong; Gu Shenyi; Yuan Xiwen; Liu Wei; Ming Suihua; Yang Guang; Guo Nan

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of seismic water level fluctuations of the two Sumatra-Andaman strong earthquakes with magnitude 8.7 and 8.5 on December 26,2004 and March 29,2005 recorded at Jiaji well,Qionghai,Hainan were analyzed,the features of the infrequent"step" changes of well water level after the two earthquakes were also analyzed and the mechanism of the"step change"of well water level was discussed.Then the high-sample-rate digital observation data of seismically-induced water level fluctuations of the Sumatra-Andaman strong earthquakes with magnitude 8.7 and 8.5 recorded at Nanbin well,Sanya and Tanniu well,Wenchang were analyzed.The results suggest that the dominant period of the seismic well water level fluctuation in all three wells was comparatively accordant,the amplitudes of seismic water level fluctuation of the same earthquake in different wells were clearly different,the time duration of seismic water level fluctuations of different earthquakes at the same well was also clearly different.

  17. Hydroxyl radicals cause fluctuation in intracellular ferrous ion levels upon light exposure during photoreceptor cell death.

    Imamura, Tomoyo; Hirayama, Tasuku; Tsuruma, Kazuhiro; Shimazawa, Masamitsu; Nagasawa, Hideko; Hara, Hideaki

    2014-12-01

    Iron accumulation is a potential pathogenic event often seen in age-related macular degeneration (AMD) patients. In this study, we focused on the relationship between AMD pathology and concentrations of ferrous ion, which is a highly reactive oxygen generator in biological systems. Murine cone-cells-derived 661 W cells were exposed to white fluorescence light at 2500 lx for 1, 3, 6, or 12 h. Levels of ferrous ions, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and hydroxyl radicals were detected by RhoNox-1, a novel fluorescent probe for the selective detection of ferrous ion, 5-(and-6)-chloromethyl-2',7'-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate, acetyl ester (CM-H2DCFDA), and 3'-p-(aminophenyl) fluorescein, respectively. Reduced glutathione, total iron levels and photoreceptor cell death were also measured. Two genes related to iron metabolism, transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1) and H ferritin (HFt), were quantified by RT-PCR. The effects of ferrous ion on cell death and hydroxyl radical production were determined by treatment with a ferrous ion chelating agent, 2,2'-bipyridyl. We found that the ferrous ion level decreased with light exposure in the short time frame, whereas it was upregulated during a 6-h light exposure. Total iron, ROS, cell death rate, and expression of TfR and HFt genes were significantly increased in a time-dependent manner in 661 W cells exposed to light. Chelation with 2,2'-bipyridyl reduced the level of hydroxyl radicals and protected against light-induced cell death. These results suggest that light exposure decreases ferrous ion levels and enhances iron uptake in photoreceptor cells. Ferrous ion may be involved in light-induced photoreceptor cell death through production of hydroxyl radicals. PMID:25447561

  18. Potential Effects of Climate Change on the Water Level, Flora and Macro-fauna of a Large Neotropical Wetland

    Úbeda, Bárbara; Di Giacomo, Adrian S.; Neiff, Juan José; Loiselle, Steven A.; Guadalupe Poi, Alicia S.; Gálvez, José Ángel; Casco, Silvina; Cózar, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Possible consequences of climate change in one of the world’s largest wetlands (Ibera, Argentina) were analysed using a multi-scale approach. Climate projections coupled to hydrological models were used to analyse variability in wetland water level throughout the current century. Two potential scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions were explored, both resulting in an increase in the inter-annual fluctuations of the water level. In the scenario with higher emissions, projections also showed a l...

  19. The effects of climatic fluctuations and extreme events on running water ecosystems

    Woodward, Guy; Bonada, Núria; Lee. E. Brown; Russell G. DEATH; Durance, Isabelle; Gray, Clare; Hladyz, Sally; Ledger, Mark E.; Milner, Alexander M.; Ormerod, Steve J.; Thompson, Ross M.; Pawar, Samraat

    2016-01-01

    Most research on the effects of environmental change in freshwaters has focused on incremental changes in average conditions, rather than fluctuations or extreme events such as heatwaves, cold snaps, droughts, floods or wildfires, which may have even more profound consequences. Such events are commonly predicted to increase in frequency, intensity and duration with global climate change, with many systems being exposed to conditions with no recent historical precedent. We propose a mechanisti...

  20. Monitoring of heavy water flow in a 'cannelloni' spallation target through fluctuation analysis of measured temperatures

    A simple and reliable technique of heavy water flow rate monitoring in a 'cannelloni' spallation target is described in this paper. The Swiss Spallation Neutron Source (SINQ) is a large scale facility for matter scattering at Paul Scherrer Institute; neutrons are produced in the spallation target composed of a bundle of zircaloy rods filled with lead. A beam of high speed protons strikes the rods. Neutrons and a large amount of thermal power (up to 800 kW) are produced by spallation reaction. Cooling is essential for safe and proper work of the target. Redundancy of all the monitoring systems is considered beneficial for overall safety of the facility. The paper below introduces an alternative way for coolant (heavy water, D2O) flow monitoring by measurement of propagation of thermal transient fronts in the target. Several data processing methods are analyzed. The heavy water (D2O) circulates between the bundle of rods and a heat exchanger. The proton beam current is not fully stable - as a rule there are at least 4 – 6 beam trips occurring during one hour of the target operation. These proton beam trips lead to a rapid change in heat release in the target spallation zone and corresponding change in the cooling water temperature. Such temperature fluctuation front arise in the water flow from the target's spallation zone towards the heat exchanger. The target cooling loop is equipped with several thermocouples placed along the heavy water flow path; the thermocouples are connected to a data acquisition system, which records the signals. The thermocouples placed at different distances downstream the target spallation zone react one by one to the passage of a temperature fluctuation front. Thus the water flow rate can be calculated based on time difference between the moments this temperature front been detected at different time by sequently placed thermocouples. (author)

  1. Drinking Water Maximum Contaminant Levels (MCLs)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — National Primary Drinking Water Regulations (NPDWRs or primary standards) are legally enforceable standards that apply to public water systems. Primary standards...

  2. Relict faunal testimony for sea-level fluctuations off Myanmar (Burma)

    Panchang, R.; Nigam, R.; Raviprasad, G.V.; Rajagopalan, G.; Ray, D.K.; Hla, U Ko Yi

    in the Indian Ocean, particularly towards its east, with very few studies carried out along the west coast of Myanmar and the Andaman Sea. Thus, the 'India-Myanmar Joint Oceanographic Studies' were initiated by the Ministry of External Affairs, Government... of Myanmar which have been destructed due to sea level rise. ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS This work has been carried out as a part of a collabora- tive project "India-Myanmar Joint Oceanographic Studies in the Andaman Sea" initiated by the Government of India (Min- istry...

  3. The effect of interaural-level-difference fluctuations on the externalization of sound

    Catic, Jasmina; Santurette, Sébastien; Buchholz, Jörg M.;

    2013-01-01

    Real-world sound sources are usually perceived as externalized and thus properly localized in both direction and distance. This is largely due to (1) the acoustic filtering by the head, torso, and pinna, resulting in modifications of the signal spectrum and thereby a frequency-dependent shaping of...... interaural cues and (2) interaural cues provided by the reverberation inside an enclosed space. This study first investigated the effect of room reverberation on the spectro-temporal behavior of interaural level differences (ILDs) by analyzing dummy-head recordings of speech played at different distances in...

  4. Reticulate evolution and sea-level fluctuations together drove species diversification of slipper orchids (Paphiopedilum) in South-East Asia.

    Guo, Yan-Yan; Luo, Yi-Bo; Liu, Zhong-Jian; Wang, Xiao-Quan

    2015-06-01

    South-East Asia covers four of the world's biodiversity hotspots, showing high species diversity and endemism. Owing to the successive expansion and contraction of distribution and the fragmentation by geographical barriers, the tropical flora greatly diversified in this region during the Tertiary, but the evolutionary tempo and mode of species diversity remain poorly investigated. Paphiopedilum, the largest genus of slipper orchids comprising nearly 100 species, is mainly distributed in South-East Asia, providing an ideal system for exploring how plant species diversity was shaped in this region. Here, we investigated the evolutionary history of this genus with eight cpDNA regions and four low-copy nuclear genes. Discordance between gene trees and network analysis indicates that reticulate evolution occurred in the genus. Ancestral area reconstruction suggests that vicariance and long-distance dispersal together led to its current distribution. Diversification rate variation was detected and strongly correlated with the species diversity in subg. Paphiopedilum (~80 species). The shift of speciation rate in subg. Paphiopedilum was coincident with sea-level fluctuations in the late Cenozoic, which could have provided ecological opportunities for speciation and created bridges or barriers for gene flow. Moreover, some other factors (e.g. sympatric distribution, incomplete reproductive barriers and clonal propagation) might also be advantageous for the formation and reproduction of hybrid species. In conclusion, our study suggests that the interplay of reticulate evolution and sea-level fluctuations has promoted the diversification of the genus Paphiopedilum and sheds light into the evolution of Orchidaceae and the historical processes of plant species diversification in South-East Asia. PMID:25847454

  5. Uranium redistribution due to water table fluctuations in sandy wetland mesocosms

    Gilson, Emily R.; Huang, Shan; Koster van Groos, Paul G.; Scheckel, Kirk G.; Qafoku, Odeta; Peacock, Aaron D.; Kaplan, Daniel I.; Jaffe, Peter R.

    2015-10-20

    In order to better understand the fate and stability of immobilized uranium (U) in wetland sediments, and how intermittent dry periods affect U stability, we dosed saturated wetland mesocosms planted with Scirpus acutus with low levels of uranyl acetate for 4 months before imposing a short drying and rewetting period. Concentrations of U in mesocosm effluent increased after drying and rewetting, but the cumulative amount of U released following the dry period constituted less than 1% of the total U immobilized in the soil during the 4 months prior. This low level of remobilization suggests, and XAS analyses confirm, that microbial reduction was not the primary means of U immobilization, as the U immobilized in mesocosms was primarily U(VI) rather than U(IV). Drying followed by re-wetting caused a redistribution of U downward in the soil profile and on to root surfaces. While the U on roots before drying was primarily associated with minerals, the U that relocated to the roots during drying and rewetting was bound diffusely to root surfaces. Results show that short periods of drought conditions in a wetland, which expose reduced sediments to air, may impact U distribution, but these conditions may not cause large releases of soil-bound U from planted wetlands to surface waters.

  6. Determination of heterogeneities in the hydraulic properties of a phreatic aquifer from tidal level fluctuations: a case in Argentina

    Carol, Eleonora S.; Kruse, Eduardo E.; Pousa, Jorge L.; Roig, Alejandro R.

    2009-11-01

    A well-known analytical solution of Jacob (1950) for groundwater flow due to tidal-wave propagation, together with field measurements along a complete tidal cycle and geological data, were used to evaluate the heterogeneities in the hydraulic properties of a phreatic aquifer located next to the River Ajo in the coastal plain environment of the southern sector of the Samborombon Bay wetland, Argentina. From the analysis of water-table fluctuations in a set of monitoring wells located along a riverbank-normal transect, it was possible to quantify the piecewise spatial variations of the hydraulic diffusivity of the phreatic aquifer. The results show the strong lateral variations of the sedimentary environment due to the influence of the different transport and deposition agents that characterize the coastal plain. The known thickness of the phreatic aquifer and the estimated range of the specific yield allowed the hydraulic conductivity to be identified as the most influential factor. [Jacob CE (1950) Flow of ground water. In: Rouse H (ed) Engineering Hydraulics. Wiley, New York

  7. Fluctuations in indoor radon levels in dwellings in a volcanic area of a temperate tropical region

    Mexico City is located in the central section of the Neo-Volcanic Mexican Belt at an altitude of 2240 m. Air pollution is currently a huge environmental problem in the city. With the aim of determining any anomalous behavior patterns in relation to indoor radon, which could possibly have had an effect on patients with lung diseases who are smokers, a study was performed in indoor atmospheres over a period of several months. Radon was measured using both passive and continuous radon monitoring devices. The results of our investigations indicate that the dwellings of patients with lung diseases show no special characteristics as compared to homes included in a control group. However, in both cases, an enhancement in the indoor radon concentration levels during the night and early morning periods was observed, the periods in which most people are at home resting. (orig.)

  8. Dynamics of a Landau–Zener non-dissipative system with fluctuating energy levels

    Fai, L.C. [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang (Cameroon); Diffo, J.T., E-mail: diffojaures@yahoo.com [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang (Cameroon); Department of Physics, Higher Teachers’ Training College, The University of Maroua, Maroua (Cameroon); Ateuafack, M.E.; Tchoffo, M.; Fouokeng, G.C. [Mesoscopic and Multilayer Structures Laboratory, Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Dschang, Dschang (Cameroon)

    2014-12-01

    This paper considers a Landau–Zener (two-level) system influenced by a three-dimensional Gaussian and non-Gaussian coloured noise and finds a general form of the time dependent diabatic quantum bit (qubit) flip transition probabilities in the fast, intermediate and slow noise limits. The qubit flip probability is observed to mimic (for low-frequencies noise) that of the standard LZ problem. The qubit flip probability is also observed to be the measure of quantum coherence of states. The transition probability is observed to be tailored by non-Gaussian low-frequency noise and otherwise by Gaussian low-frequency coloured noise. Intermediate and fast noise limits are observed to alter the memory of the system in time and found to improve and control quantum information processing.

  9. Dynamics of a Landau-Zener non-dissipative system with fluctuating energy levels

    Fai, L. C.; Diffo, J. T.; Ateuafack, M. E.; Tchoffo, M.; Fouokeng, G. C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper considers a Landau-Zener (two-level) system influenced by a three-dimensional Gaussian and non-Gaussian coloured noise and finds a general form of the time dependent diabatic quantum bit (qubit) flip transition probabilities in the fast, intermediate and slow noise limits. The qubit flip probability is observed to mimic (for low-frequencies noise) that of the standard LZ problem. The qubit flip probability is also observed to be the measure of quantum coherence of states. The transition probability is observed to be tailored by non-Gaussian low-frequency noise and otherwise by Gaussian low-frequency coloured noise. Intermediate and fast noise limits are observed to alter the memory of the system in time and found to improve and control quantum information processing.

  10. Dynamics of a Landau–Zener non-dissipative system with fluctuating energy levels

    This paper considers a Landau–Zener (two-level) system influenced by a three-dimensional Gaussian and non-Gaussian coloured noise and finds a general form of the time dependent diabatic quantum bit (qubit) flip transition probabilities in the fast, intermediate and slow noise limits. The qubit flip probability is observed to mimic (for low-frequencies noise) that of the standard LZ problem. The qubit flip probability is also observed to be the measure of quantum coherence of states. The transition probability is observed to be tailored by non-Gaussian low-frequency noise and otherwise by Gaussian low-frequency coloured noise. Intermediate and fast noise limits are observed to alter the memory of the system in time and found to improve and control quantum information processing

  11. Seasonal fluctuations in water repellency and infiltration in a sandy loam soil after a forest fire in Galicia (NW Spain)

    M. Rodríguez-Alleres; M.E. Varela; Benito, E.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyze, after a wildfire of moderate severity, the temporal fluctuations in water repellency and infiltration in a sandy loam soil under a mixed plantation of pine and eucalyptus and the comparison with an adjacent area not affected by the fire. In the burnt area and in a neighboring area not affected by the fire were collected during one year (1, 4, 6, 8 and 12 months after the fire) 10 soil samples along a transect of 18 m at four depths: 0-2, 2-5, 5-10 and 10-2...

  12. Holocene Sea-Level Fluctuations and Paleo-environmental changes in Maputo Bay, Mozambique, using stable isotopes

    Martinez de Lecea, Ander; Green, Andrew; Wiles, Errol; Strachan, Kate; Cooper, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    Mozambique has been classified as a "hot-spot" for potential impacts derived from sea-level rise, yet there is little knowledge on past sea-level fluctuation in this part of the world. Further understanding of sea-level fluctuations in the region would be of great benefit. To this end a high resolution record of paleo-environmental changes in Maputo Bay, Mozambique, are determined. Stable isotope analyses (δ13Corg; δ15N; δ18O) are conducted on the sediment organic matter and foraminifera Elphidium crispum from two cores, a 3.6 m long core collected at 5m below mean sea-level (m.s.l.) (Core V13) and a 6.2 m long core collected at 13.5m below m.s.l. (Core V40). Evolution of the region is informed through a seismic study and dating of cores is under-way using 14C analysis. The two cores analysed in this study showed evidence of catastrophic flooding events, as well as environmental changes. Core V13 represents a higher resolution of environmental changes, while core V40 shows a longer period, with the system changing from terrestrial dominated environment to marine, to terrestrially dominated once again before settling at the present system of marine dominated environment. The deepest layer of Core V13 is of marine origin with evidence of beachrock formation occurring, indicating a beach environment, while the top 190 cm indicate repeated alternation between marine and terrestrial environments, representing a contemporary highstand bay-head delta highly influenced by terrestrial input. This is further supported by the seismic interpretation. Enriched δ15N signatures from the terrestrial layers from the top 190 cm, could suggest the settling of early Europeans in the area (~1,544 AD). Core V40's deepest layer is of terrestrial origin, and terminates abruptly in marine sand, most likely due to the sudden, catastrophic collapse of the dune barrier following sea-level rise. Comparisons of preliminary results with existing studies suggests that this core covers a time

  13. The role of vegetation and bed-level fluctuations in the process of channel narrowing

    Friedman, Jonathan M.; Osterkamp, W. R.; Lewis, William M.

    1996-01-01

    A catastrophic flood ire 1965 on Plum Creek, a perennial sandbed stream in the western Great Plains, removed most of the bottomland vegetation and transformed the single-thalweg stream into a wider, braided channel. Following eight years of further widening associated with minor high flows, a process of channel narrowing began in 1973; narrowing continues today. The history of channel narrowing was reconstructed by counting the annual rings of 129 trees and shrubs along a 5-km reach of Plum Creek near Louviers, Colorado. Sixty-three of these plants were excavated in order to determine the age and elevation of the germination point. The reconstructed record of channel change was verified from historical aerial photographs, and then compared to sediment stratigraphy and records of discharge and bed elevation from a streamflow gaging station in the study reach. Channel narrowing at Plum Creel: occurs in two ways. First, during periods of high flow, sand and fine gravel are delivered to the channel, temporarily raising the general bed-level. Subsequently, several years of uninterrupted low flows incise a narrower channel. Second, during years of low flow, vegetation becomes established on the subaerial part of the present channel bed. In both cases, surfaces stabilize as a result of vegetation growth and vertical accretion of sediment.

  14. A possible role of fluctuating clay-water systems in the production of ordered prebiotic oligomers

    Lahav, N.; White, D. H.

    1980-01-01

    A model is proposed for the intermediate stages of prebiotic evolution, based on the characteristics of the adsorption and condensation of amino acids and nucleotides on the surface area of clay minerals in a fluctuating environment. Template replication and translation of adsorbed oligonucleotides and catalytic effects by peptide products on further condensation are proposed, due to specific properties of hypohydrous clay surfaces as well as the biomolecules themselves. Experimental evidence supports some of the proposed interactions, and all of them can be tested experimentally.

  15. Can the Gulf Stream induce coherent short-term fluctuations in sea level along the US East Coast? A modeling study

    Ezer, Tal

    2016-02-01

    Much attention has been given in recent years to observations and models that show that variations in the transport of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) and in the Gulf Stream (GS) can contribute to interannual, decadal, and multi-decadal variations in coastal sea level (CSL) along the US East Coast. However, less is known about the impact of short-term (time scales of days to weeks) fluctuations in the GS and their impact on CSL anomalies. Some observations suggest that these anomalies can cause unpredictable minor tidal flooding in low-lying areas when the GS suddenly weakens. Can these short-term CSL variations be attributed to changes in the transport of the GS? An idealized numerical model of the GS has been set up to test this proposition. The regional model uses a 1/12° grid with a simplified coastline to eliminate impacts from estuaries and small-scale coastal features and thus isolate the GS impact. The GS in the model is driven by inflows/outflows, representing the Florida Current (FC), the Slope Current (SC), and the Sargasso Sea (SS) flows. Forcing the model with an oscillatory FC transport with a period of 2, 5, and 10 days produced coherent CSL variations from Florida to the Gulf of Maine with similar periods. However, when imposing variations in the transports of the SC or the SS, they induce CSL variations only north of Cape Hatteras. The suggested mechanism is that variations in GS transport produce variations in sea level gradient across the entire GS length and this large-scale signal is then transmitted into the shelf by the generation of coastal-trapped waves (CTW). In this idealized model, the CSL variations induced by variations of ˜10 Sv in the transport of the GS are found to resemble CSL variations induced by ˜5 m s-1 zonal wind fluctuations, though the mechanisms of wind-driven and GS-driven sea level are quite different. Better understanding of the relation between variations in offshore currents and CSL will help

  16. Coseismic response of water level in Changping well, China, to the Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake

    Sun, Xiaolong; Wang, Guangcai; Yang, Xuanhui

    2015-12-01

    A water-level meter installed in Changping well, China, recorded coseismic fluctuations and a step change induced by the Mw 9.0 Tohoku earthquake of 11 March 2011. Here we analyse the correlation between water level in the well and vertical ground motions recorded at a nearby surface site, and we examine the relationship between the characteristics of these two datasets and the well-aquifer system parameters. During the arrival period of P- and S-waves, the water level provides information about the intensification of high-frequency ground motions. During the arrival period of the surface waves, the amplitude of water-level fluctuations was closely related to the velocity of vertical-component surface motions. The fluctuation periods of these two parameters are in the range 15-35 s, and the period of oscillation displays a large-to-small characteristic behaviour. The amplification effect on the water level in Changping well, driven by the pressure fluctuation induced by the surface wave, was relatively small, but a low-to-high characteristic is apparent during the coseismic period, related to the gradual enhancement of aquifer permeability due to the action of seismic waves. The coseismic step increase in water level was related to the enhancement of aquifer permeability under the action of seismic waves, and the results of an inversion of water-level tidal-response characteristics show that permeability increased by ∼6.56 × 10-14 m2 in the vicinity of Changping well in response to the action of seismic waves emanating from the Tohoku earthquake.

  17. Response to an oral calcium load in nephrolithiasis patients with fluctuating parathyroid hormone and ionized calcium levels

    S.A. Gomes

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available the response to an oral calcium load test was assessed in 17 hypercalciuric nephrolithiasis patients who presented elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH irrespective of the ionized calcium (sCa2+ levels. Blood samples were collected at baseline (0 min and at 60 and 180 min after 1 g calcium load for serum PTH, total calcium, sCa2+, and 1.25(OH2D3 determinations. According to the sCa2+ level at baseline, patients were classified as normocalcemic (N = 9 or hypercalcemic (N = 8. Six healthy subjects were also evaluated as controls. Bone mineral density was reduced in 14/17 patients. In the normocalcemic group, mean PTH levels at 0, 60 and 180 min (95 ± 76, 56 ± 40, 57 ± 45 pg/ml, respectively did not differ from the hypercalcemic group (130 ± 75, 68 ± 35, 80 ± 33 pg/ml but were significantly higher compared to healthy subjects despite a similar elevation in sCa2+ after 60 and 180 min vs baseline in all 3 groups. Mean total calcium and 1.25(OH2D3 were similar in the 3 groups. Additionally, we observed that 5 of 9 normocalcemic patients presented a significantly higher concentration-time curve for serum PTH (AUC0',60',180' than the other 4 patients and the healthy subjects, suggesting a primary parathyroid dysfunction. These data suggest that the individual response to an oral calcium load test may be a valuable dynamic tool to disclose a subtle primary hyperparathyroidism in patients with high PTH and fluctuating sCa2+ levels, avoiding repeated measurements of both parameters.

  18. Response to an oral calcium load in nephrolithiasis patients with fluctuating parathyroid hormone and ionized calcium levels

    Gomes S.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available the response to an oral calcium load test was assessed in 17 hypercalciuric nephrolithiasis patients who presented elevated parathyroid hormone (PTH irrespective of the ionized calcium (sCa2+ levels. Blood samples were collected at baseline (0 min and at 60 and 180 min after 1 g calcium load for serum PTH, total calcium, sCa2+, and 1.25(OH2D3 determinations. According to the sCa2+ level at baseline, patients were classified as normocalcemic (N = 9 or hypercalcemic (N = 8. Six healthy subjects were also evaluated as controls. Bone mineral density was reduced in 14/17 patients. In the normocalcemic group, mean PTH levels at 0, 60 and 180 min (95 ± 76, 56 ± 40, 57 ± 45 pg/ml, respectively did not differ from the hypercalcemic group (130 ± 75, 68 ± 35, 80 ± 33 pg/ml but were significantly higher compared to healthy subjects despite a similar elevation in sCa2+ after 60 and 180 min vs baseline in all 3 groups. Mean total calcium and 1.25(OH2D3 were similar in the 3 groups. Additionally, we observed that 5 of 9 normocalcemic patients presented a significantly higher concentration-time curve for serum PTH (AUC0',60',180' than the other 4 patients and the healthy subjects, suggesting a primary parathyroid dysfunction. These data suggest that the individual response to an oral calcium load test may be a valuable dynamic tool to disclose a subtle primary hyperparathyroidism in patients with high PTH and fluctuating sCa2+ levels, avoiding repeated measurements of both parameters.

  19. Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, Final Report.

    Casey, Daniel

    1987-08-01

    The Fish and Wildlife Program of the Northwest Power Planning Council calls for wildlife mitigation at hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River System. Beginning April, 1984, the Bonneville Power Administration funded a study of the effects of the operation of Hungry Horse and Kerr Dams on the western Canada goose (Branta canadensis moffittii) inhabitating the Flathead Valley of northwest Montana. The study was conducted by personnel of the Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MDFWP), to: (1) identify the size and productivity of this population, (2) identify current habitat conditions and losses of nesting and brood-rearing areas, (3) describe the effects of water level fluctuations on nesting and brood-rearing, and (4) identify mitigation alternatives to offset these effects. Annual pair and nest surveys were used to document the location and fate of goose nests. The number of known nesting attempts varied from 44 in 1984 to 108 in 1985, to 136 in 1986 and 134 in 1987. Fifty-four percent of the annual meeting nesting effort took place on elevated sites which were secure from the flooding and dewatering effects of fluctuating water levels. An average of 15 nests were found on stumps in the remnant Flathead River delta, however, an area strongly influenced by the operation of Kerr Dam. Annual nest losses to flooding and predation attributable to fluctuations caused by the dam were recorded. 53 refs., 24 figs., 35 tabs.

  20. The Importance of Water Temperature Fluctuations in Relation to the Hydrological Factor. Case Study – Bistrita River Basin (Romania

    Cojoc Gianina Maria

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The increase in most components of the climate over the past 50 years, including air and water temperature, is a real phenomenon, as attested by the numerous specialized researches according to IPCC (2013. The water temperature is one of the most important climatic components in analyzing the hydrological regime of the Bistrita River (Romania. The thermal regime of the Bistrita River basin and the frost phenomena associated with the risk factor are particularly important and frequently appear in this area. In recent years, under the Siret Water Basin Administration, this parameter was permanently monitored, so we could do an analysis, which shows that the water temperature fluctuations, influenced by air temperature, lead to the emergence of the ice jam phenomenon. The present study aims to analyze the water temperature, as compared to the air temperature, and the effect of these components on the liquid flow regime (the values were recorded at the hydrological stations on the main course of the Bistrita River. The negative effects resulted from the ice jam phenomenon require developing methods of damage prevention and defense. The frost phenomena recorded after the construction of the Bicaz dam are analyzed in this article

  1. Global gray water footprint and water pollution levels related to anthropogenic nitrogen loads to fresh water

    Mesfin M Mekonnen; Hoekstra, Arjen Y

    2015-01-01

    This is the first global assessment of nitrogen-related water pollution in river basins with a specification of the pollution by economic sector, and by crop for the agricultural sector. At a spatial resolution of 5 by 5 arc minute, we estimate anthropogenic nitrogen (N) loads to freshwater, calculate the resultant gray water footprints (GWFs), and relate the GWFs per river basin to runoff to calculate the N-related water pollution level (WPL) per catchment. The accumulated global GWF related...

  2. Effects of water level regulation on littoral zone of lakes Konnivesi and Ruotsalainen

    Measures to develop an ecologically based regulation practice for the lakes Ruotsalainen and Konnivesi which belong to the Kymijoki watercourse, were undertaken in 1995, when the intermunicipal board for the Heinola health care centre and Myllykoski Oy proposed that the regulation licence should re-evaluated. The purpose of this study, which is part of the overall development project, was to assess the ecological impacts of regulation on the littoral zones of these lakes. More specifically, the study focussed on the changes in the ecology of the littoral zone due to the water level fluctuation. The littoral vegetation of lake Konnivesi reflects the improvement of water quality over the past fifteen years. The species indicative of eutrophication have mostly disappeared. The vegetation of the uppermost littoral zone has stabilised, and the effect of wave erosion is small Ice pressure on the bottom has hardly any impact on the plants sensitive to the ice scouring effect, because the ice-covered zone has actually been reduced in size consequent to the regulation. Owing to the small range of water level fluctuation during the open water period, the uppermost littoral zone remains very narrow, which restricts the spreading of especially helophytic vegetation. The narrow littoral zone impairs the development of the normal zonal biotope in many places and simultaneously prevents diverse increase of littoral biota. The aim of the ecological regulation practice proposed for Konnivesi is to ensure a water level favourable for pike spawning It is further proposed that the water level should decline by 25 cm during the open water period following the flood peak. This would help to widen the littoral zone suited to helophytic vegetation and to increase the vegetational diversity of especially gently sloping shores. (orig.) 12 refs

  3. Estimation of nonfluctuating reservoir inflow from water level observations using methods based on flow continuity

    Deng, Chao; Liu, Pan; Guo, Shenglian; Wang, Hao; Wang, Dingbao

    2015-10-01

    The accurate estimation of "true" reservoir inflow is important for hydrological forecasting and efficient operation of reservoirs. However, reservoir inflow estimated using the conventional simple water balance method is not always accurate because the estimation is very sensitive to errors in reservoir water level observations and uncertainty in the stage-storage relationship. An analytical method (AM) and a method using the ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) are proposed to determine nonfluctuating reservoir inflow based on the concept of inflow continuity; that is, that inflow should not change much within a short time period. The AM is developed based on the simultaneous minimization of both the estimated reservoir water level error and the inflow variation. The EnKF, which is built on state equations (inflow continuity and water balance equations) and an observation equation (the reservoir stage-storage relationship), is used to update inflow states by assimilating water level observations. The two proposed methods are evaluated using a synthetic experiment with various conditions including water level observation error, reservoir stage-storage relationship error, and the influence of water surface slope. The AM outperforms the EnKF under all conditions. Case studies of the Gaobazhou and Danjiangkou Reservoirs in China demonstrate that both of the proposed methods can derive an hourly inflow without fluctuations. The results indicate that the AM and the EnKF method can improve reservoir inflow estimation compared with conventional methods.

  4. Drought-trigger ground-water levels and analysis of historical water-level trends in Chester County, Pennsylvania

    Schreffler, Curtis L.

    1996-01-01

    The Chester County observation-well network was established in 1973 through a cooperative agreement between the Chester County Water Resources Authority (CCWRA) and the U.S. Geological Survey. The network was established to monitor local ground-water levels, to determine drought conditions, and to monitor ground-water-level trends. Drought-warning and drought-emergency water-level triggers were determined for 20 of the 23 wells in the Chester County observation-well network. A statistical test to determine either rising or declining water-level trends was performed on data for all wells in the network. Water-level data from both of these wells showed a rising trend. A decrease in ground-water pumping in the area near these wells was probably the reason for the rise in water levels.

  5. Evaluation of statistical properties of free-surface fluctuation on a high-speed water jet using laser refraction technique

    Free-surface fluctuation on a high-speed water jet has been evaluated using a laser beam refraction technique. This technique employs two pulse laser diodes and one high-speed optic detector. By detecting the two dimensional (2D) trajectory of laser beams refracted at free surface, the local streamwise slope-angle fluctuation at two measuring locations 1.27 mm apart on a jet free surface can be evaluated. The experiments are conducted for several locations along the jet center axis within the range of average velocity up to 10 m/s. The wave speed is evaluated from dominant time lag of cross-correlation coefficient for individual wave period, which is divided from time-series slope-angle data according to the zero-up-crossing method. The shape of waves is also calculated by integrating the free-surface slope angle. The wavelength and wave height are evaluated from the individual waveform. The steepness of free surface wave takes a maximum at a certain distance from nozzle exit for U ≤ 8 m/s. This suggests that the initial amplification of wave results in a wave breaking on the jet free surface for these velocity conditions. (author)

  6. Water levels in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, 1993

    Water levels were monitored in 28 wells in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, during 1993. Seventeen wells were monitored periodically, generally on a monthly basis, and 11 wells representing 18 intervals were monitored hourly. All wells monitor water levels in Tertiary volcanic rocks, except one that monitors water levels in Paleozoic carbonate rocks. Water levels were measured using calibrated steel tapes and pressure transducers; steel-tape measurements were corrected for mechanical stretch, thermal expansion, and borehole deviation to obtain precise water-level altitudes. Water-level altitudes in the Tertiary volcanic rocks ranged from about 728 meters above sea level east of Yucca Mountain to about 1,034 meters above sea level north of Yucca Mountain. Water-level altitudes in the well monitoring the Paleozoic carbonate rocks varied between 752 and 753 meters above sea level during 1993. Water levels were an average of about 0.04 meter lower than 1992 water levels. All data were acquired in accordance with a quality-assurance program to support the reliability of the data

  7. Water levels in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, 1993

    Tucci, P.; Goemaat, R.L.; Burkhardt, D.J.

    1996-07-01

    Water levels were monitored in 28 wells in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, during 1993. Seventeen wells were monitored periodically, generally on a monthly basis, and 11 wells representing 18 intervals were monitored hourly. All wells monitor water levels in Tertiary volcanic rocks, except one that monitors water levels in Paleozoic carbonate rocks. Water levels were measured using calibrated steel tapes and pressure transducers; steel-tape measurements were corrected for mechanical stretch, thermal expansion, and borehole deviation to obtain precise water-level altitudes. Water-level altitudes in the Tertiary volcanic rocks ranged from about 728 meters above sea level east of Yucca Mountain to about 1,034 meters above sea level north of Yucca Mountain. Water-level altitudes in the well monitoring the Paleozoic carbonate rocks varied between 752 and 753 meters above sea level during 1993. Water levels were an average of about 0.04 meter lower than 1992 water levels. All data were acquired in accordance with a quality-assurance program to support the reliability of the data.

  8. Biodegradation of Toluene under seasonal and diurnal fluctuations of soil-water temperature

    Yadav, B.K.; Shrestha, S. R.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.

    2012-01-01

    An increasing interest in bioremediation of hydrocarbon polluted sites raises the question of the influence of seasonal and diurnal changes on soil-water temperature on biodegradation of BTEX, a widespread group of (sub)-surface contaminants. Therefore, we investigated the impact of a wide range of varying soil-water temperature on biodegradation of toluene under aerobic conditions. To see the seasonal impact of temperature, three sets of batch experiments were conducted at three different co...

  9. Impact of scaled-down on dissolved oxygen fluctuations at different levels of the lipase synthesis pathway of Yarrowia lipolytica

    Delvigne, F.; Thonart, P.; Destain, J.; Kar, T

    2010-01-01

    The impact of the fluctuations in dissolved oxygen tension (DOT) on the lipase production by Yarrowia lipolytica has been investigated in a scale-down reactor (SDR). This bioreactor comprises a 20 l agitated vessel with an automatic valve controlling the opening and closure of the air flow line. This kind of scale-down apparatus is used in order to generate DOT gradients encountered in large-scale, while maintaining the other environmental conditions constant. The impact of DOT fluctuations h...

  10. Calibration of Nitrate Leaching and Water Table Fluctuation in Paddy Rice Field by DRAINMOD-N Software

    H. Zare Abyaneh

    2011-01-01

    Fertilizers in agriculture are potential sources of environmental pollution, especially in ground water quality and soil resources. Studying factors effective in water and nutrient transport through soil profile is helpful for nutrient management to minimize adverse impacts on environment and nitrate leaching below the root zone. In this study, the ground water level and nitrate leaching transportation below the root zone were measured in a paddy rice field and the data were simulated with th...

  11. Water Level Indicator with Alarms Using PIC Microcontroller

    Ahmed Abdullah

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows a design of a water level indicator with PIC microcontroller. This design is applicable for both reservoir and main tank in home or industries.PIC 18F452 used in this design. There is also buzzer and LCD in this design. LCD used to show the level of water in both reservoir and main tank. Buzzer used to create a siren to stop the pump or water coming channel. There are 10 DIP switches used in this design. These switches indicate water level of both tanks. PIC microcontrollers also controls the motor which pumps the water in the tank from the reservoir. In the auto mode, motor is automatically turned on when water level reaches 20% in the tank and it is turned off when water level reaches 100%. Choose PIC microcontroller for programming flexibility, faster speed of execution since microcontrollers are fully integrated inside the processor

  12. Measurement of Temperature Fluctuations in Plasma JET the Water Stabilized DC Arc Torch

    Sember, Viktor; Hlína, Jan; Kopecký, Vladimír

    Vol. 1. New Jersey: Stevens Institute of Technology, 1995 - (Becker, K.; Carr, E.; Kunhardt, E.) [International Conference on Phenomena in Ionized Gases /22./. New-Jersey (US), 31.07.1995-04.08.1995] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/95/0592 Keywords : water stabilized * plasma

  13. Primary collector wall local temperature fluctuations in the area of water-steam phase boundary

    Matal, O.; Klinga, J.; Simo, T. [Energovyzkum Ltd., Brno (Switzerland)

    1995-12-31

    A limited number of temperature sensors could be installed at the primary collector surface in the area of water - steam phase boundary. The surface temperatures as well WWER 440 steam generator process data were measured and stored for a long time and off-line evaluated. Selected results are presented in the paper. (orig.). 2 refs.

  14. Fluctuating water depths affect American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) body condition in the Everglades, Florida, USA

    Brandt, Laura A.; Beauchamp, Jeffrey S.; Jeffery, Brian M.; Cherkiss, Michael S.; Mazzotti, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Successful restoration of wetland ecosystems requires knowledge of wetland hydrologic patterns and an understanding of how those patterns affect wetland plant and animal populations.Within the Everglades, Florida, USA restoration, an applied science strategy including conceptual ecological models linking drivers to indicators is being used to organize current scientific understanding to support restoration efforts. A key driver of the ecosystem affecting the distribution and abundance of organisms is the timing, distribution, and volume of water flows that result in water depth patterns across the landscape. American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) are one of the ecological indicators being used to assess Everglades restoration because they are a keystone species and integrate biological impacts of hydrological operations through all life stages. Alligator body condition (the relative fatness of an animal) is one of the metrics being used and targets have been set to allow us to track progress. We examined trends in alligator body condition using Fulton’s K over a 15 year period (2000–2014) at seven different wetland areas within the Everglades ecosystem, assessed patterns and trends relative to restoration targets, and related those trends to hydrologic variables. We developed a series of 17 a priori hypotheses that we tested with an information theoretic approach to identify which hydrologic factors affect alligator body condition. Alligator body condition was highest throughout the Everglades during the early 2000s and is approximately 5–10% lower now (2014). Values have varied by year, area, and hydrology. Body condition was positively correlated with range in water depth and fall water depth. Our top model was the “Current” model and included variables that describe current year hydrology (spring depth, fall depth, hydroperiod, range, interaction of range and fall depth, interaction of range and hydroperiod). Across all models, interaction

  15. Effect of Sea Level Variation on Calculation of Design Water Level

    左军成; 于宜法; 鲍献文; 刘德辅

    2001-01-01

    The long-term variation and seasonal variation of sea level have a notable effect on the calculation of engineering water level. Such an effect is first analyzed in this paper. The maximal amplitude of inter-annual anomaly of monthly mean sea level along the China coast is larger than 60 cm. Both the storm surge disaster and cold wave disaster are sea sonal disasters in various regions, so the water level corresponding to the 1% of the cumulative frequency in the cumulative frequency curve of hourly water level data for different seasons in various sea areas is different from design water level, for example, the difference between them reaches maximum in June, July and August for northern sea area, and maxi.mum in September, October and November for Southern China Sea. The hourly water level data of 19 gauge stations along the China coast are analyzed. Firstly, the annual mean sea level for every station is obtained; secondly, linear chan ging rates of annual mean sea level are obtained with the stochastic dynamic method; thirdly, the astronomical tide and storm surge tide are obtained by subtracting the linear fitting part from the original hourly data, finally, two distributions corresponding to the astronomical tide and wind tide are obtained according to whether the astronomical tide and storm tide are correlative or not. So the two check water levels are obtained with the joint probability method. The maximal difference between the two water levels of 100 years' recurrence is more than 30 cm. Both of the two check water levels have disadvantages in the use of observation data, so the mean value is suggested to be taken as the final check water level. A comparison between the two check water levels indicates that the effect of sea level variation upon design water level and check water level is larger than 80 cm at some stations.

  16. Terrestrial waters and sea level variations on interannual time scale

    Llovel, W.; Becker, M.; Cazenave, A.; Jevrejeva, S.; R. Alkama; Decharme, B.; Douville, H.; Ablain, M.; Beckley, B

    2011-01-01

    On decadal to multidecadal time scales, thermal expansion of sea waters and land ice loss are the main contributors to sea level variations. However, modification of the terrestrial water cycle due to climate variability and direct anthropogenic forcing may also affect sea level. For the past decades, variations in land water storage and corresponding effects on sea level cannot be directly estimated from observations because these are almost unexistent at global continental scale. However, g...

  17. Water levels in the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada, 1996

    Water levels were monitored in 24 wells in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, during 1996. Twenty-two wells representing 28 depth intervals were monitored periodically, generally on a monthly basis, and 2 wells representing 3 depth intervals were monitored both hourly and periodically. All wells monitor water levels in Tertiary volcanic rocks except one that monitors water levels in paleozoic carbonate rocks. Water levels were measured using either calibrated steel tapes or a pressure sensor. Mean water-level altitudes in the Tertiary volcanic rocks ranged from about 727.86 to about 1,034.58 meters above sea level during 1996. The mean water-level altitude in the well monitoring the Paleozoic carbonate rocks was about 752.57 meters above sea level during 1996. Mean water-level altitudes for 1996 were an average of about 0.06 meter lower than 1995 mean water-level altitudes and 0.03 meter lower than 1985--95 mean water-level altitudes. During 1996, water levels in the Yucca Mountain area could have been affected by long-term pumping at the C-hole complex that began on May 8, 1996. Through December 31, 1996, approximately 196 million liters were pumped from well UE-25 c number-sign 3 at the C-hole complex. Other ground-water pumpage in the Yucca Mountain area includes annual pumpage from water-supply wells UE-25 J-12 and UE-25 J-13 of approximately 163 and 105 million liters, respectively, and pumpage from well USW G-2 for hydraulic testing during February and April 1996 of approximately 6 million liters

  18. Water levels in the Yucca Mountain Area, Nevada, 1996

    Graves, R.P.

    1998-11-01

    Water levels were monitored in 24 wells in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, during 1996. Twenty-two wells representing 28 depth intervals were monitored periodically, generally on a monthly basis, and 2 wells representing 3 depth intervals were monitored both hourly and periodically. All wells monitor water levels in Tertiary volcanic rocks except one that monitors water levels in paleozoic carbonate rocks. Water levels were measured using either calibrated steel tapes or a pressure sensor. Mean water-level altitudes in the Tertiary volcanic rocks ranged from about 727.86 to about 1,034.58 meters above sea level during 1996. The mean water-level altitude in the well monitoring the Paleozoic carbonate rocks was about 752.57 meters above sea level during 1996. Mean water-level altitudes for 1996 were an average of about 0.06 meter lower than 1995 mean water-level altitudes and 0.03 meter lower than 1985--95 mean water-level altitudes. During 1996, water levels in the Yucca Mountain area could have been affected by long-term pumping at the C-hole complex that began on May 8, 1996. Through December 31, 1996, approximately 196 million liters were pumped from well UE-25 c{number_sign}3 at the C-hole complex. Other ground-water pumpage in the Yucca Mountain area includes annual pumpage from water-supply wells UE-25 J-12 and UE-25 J-13 of approximately 163 and 105 million liters, respectively, and pumpage from well USW G-2 for hydraulic testing during February and April 1996 of approximately 6 million liters.

  19. Tracking water levels in axisymmetric flows

    An interface tracking scheme can radically improve the first-order computational methods for two-phase flow when a problem consists of an interface between liquid phase and steam. On the other hand, the authors studies have shown that failure to implement level tracking fully consistently has degraded the quality of TRAC-BF1 results. In these studies, they have presented an improved version of one-dimensional level tracking with relatively simple and physically sensible corrections. A fully consistent level tracking scheme is also necessary for best results in multidimensional two-phase flows

  20. Determination of Heavy Metal Levels in Various Industrial Waste Waters

    Dündar, Mustafa Şahin; Altundağ, Hüseyin; Kaygaldurak, Sinem; Şar, Volkan; Acar, Aysun

    2012-01-01

    Important part of the environmetal pollution consists of waste water and water pollution. The water polluted by anthropogenical, industrial, and agricultural originated sources are defined as waste waters which are the main pollution sources for reservoirs, rivers, lakes, and seas. In this work, waste waters of leather, textile, automotive side, and metal plating industries were used to determine the levels of Cu, Zn, Cr, Pb and Ni by using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometer. As a result, h...

  1. Estimation of groundwater recharge of shallow aquifer on humid environment in Yaounde, Cameroon using hybrid water-fluctuation and hydrochemistry methods

    Takounjou, A. F.; Ngoupayou, J. R. N.; Riotte, Jean; Takem, G. E.; Mafany, G.; Maréchal, J. C.; Ekodeck, G. E.

    2011-01-01

    A study of environmental chloride and groundwater balance has been carried out in order to estimate their relative value for measuring average groundwater recharge under a humid climatic environment with a relatively shallow water table. The hybrid water fluctuation method allowed the split of the hydrologic year into two seasons of recharge (wet season) and no recharge (dry season) to appraise specific yield during the dry season and, second, to estimate recharge from the water table rise du...

  2. Level densities of 29Si as determined from fluctuations of 28Si(n,p) and 28Si(n,α) cross sections

    Partial cross sections have been measured at LAMPF/WNR for neutron-induced charged particle reactions on 28Si. Data were obtained using a open-quotes whiteclose quotes neutron source for neutrons up to 30 MeV over a 90-meter flight path. The authors have determined excitation functions for proton and alpha emission for the most energetic charged particle groups. Fluctuations in the cross sections were observed in the neutron energy range below 15 MeV. They have undertaken a detailed study of these fluctuations via an Ericson analysis. This analysis has provided them with level width and level density information for the 29Si compound nucleus. Values for level widths and level densities will be compared with previous measurements including those obtained from total cross sections

  3. Numerical Study on the Characteristics of Pressure Fluctuations in an Axial-Flow Water Pump

    Zhi-Jun Shuai; Wan-You Li; Xiang-Yuan Zhang; Chen-Xing Jiang; Feng-Chen Li

    2014-01-01

    Flow induced vibration due to the dynamics of rotor-stator interaction in an axial-flow pump is one of the most damaging vibration sources to the pump components, attached pipelines, and equipment. Three-dimensional unsteady numerical simulations were conducted on the complex turbulent flow field in an axial-flow water pump, in order to investigate the flow induced vibration problem. The shear stress transport (SST) k-ω model was employed in the numerical simulations. The fast Fourier transfo...

  4. Water levels in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, 1994

    Water levels were monitored in 28 wells in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, during 1994. Twelve wells representing 13 intervals were monitored periodically, generally on a monthly basis, 6 wells representing 10 intervals were monitored hourly, and 10 wells representing 13 intervals were monitored both periodically and hourly. All wells monitor water levels in Tertiary volcanic rocks, except one, that monitors water levels in Paleozoic carbonate rocks. Water levels were measured using calibrated steel tapes, a multiconductor cable unit, and pressure transducers. Water-level altitudes in the Tertiary volcanic rocks ranged from about 728 to about 1,034 meters above sea level during 1994. The mean-annual water-level altitude in the well monitoring the Paleozoic carbonate rocks was about 753 meters above sea level during 1994. Water levels were only an average of about 0.01 meters lower than 1993 water levels. All data were acquired in accordance with a quality-assurance program to support the reliability of the data

  5. Water levels in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, 1995

    Water levels were monitored in 28 wells in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, during 1995. Seventeen wells representing 18 depth intervals were monitored periodically, generally on a monthly basis, 2 wells representing 3 depth intervals were monitored hourly, and 9 wells representing 15 depth intervals were monitored both periodically and hourly. All wells monitor water levels in Tertiary volcanic rocks except one that monitors water levels in Paleozoic carbonate rocks. Water levels were measured using calibrated steel tapes, a multiconductor cable unit, and/or pressure transducers. Mean water-level altitudes in the Tertiary volcanic rocks ranged from about 728 to about 1,034 meters above sea level during 1995. The mean water-level altitude in the well monitoring the Paleozoic carbonate rocks was about 753 meters above sea level during 1995. Mean water level altitudes were only an average of about 0.01 meters higher than 1994 mean water level altitudes. A single-well aquifer test was conducted on well UE-25 WT number-sign 12 during August and September 1995. Well USW 0-2 was also pumped during October and November 1995, in preparation for single-well aquifer test at that well. All data were acquired in accordance with a quality-assurance program to support the reliability of the data

  6. Water levels in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, 1994

    Graves, R.P.; Tucci, P.; Goemaat, R.L.

    1996-12-31

    Water levels were monitored in 28 wells in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, during 1994. Twelve wells representing 13 intervals were monitored periodically, generally on a monthly basis, 6 wells representing 10 intervals were monitored hourly, and 10 wells representing 13 intervals were monitored both periodically and hourly. All wells monitor water levels in Tertiary volcanic rocks, except one, that monitors water levels in Paleozoic carbonate rocks. Water levels were measured using calibrated steel tapes, a multiconductor cable unit, and pressure transducers. Water-level altitudes in the Tertiary volcanic rocks ranged from about 728 to about 1,034 meters above sea level during 1994. The mean-annual water-level altitude in the well monitoring the Paleozoic carbonate rocks was about 753 meters above sea level during 1994. Water levels were only an average of about 0.01 meters lower than 1993 water levels. All data were acquired in accordance with a quality-assurance program to support the reliability of the data.

  7. Water levels in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, 1995

    Graves, R.P.; Goemaat, R.L.

    1998-09-01

    Water levels were monitored in 28 wells in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, during 1995. Seventeen wells representing 18 depth intervals were monitored periodically, generally on a monthly basis, 2 wells representing 3 depth intervals were monitored hourly, and 9 wells representing 15 depth intervals were monitored both periodically and hourly. All wells monitor water levels in Tertiary volcanic rocks except one that monitors water levels in Paleozoic carbonate rocks. Water levels were measured using calibrated steel tapes, a multiconductor cable unit, and/or pressure transducers. Mean water-level altitudes in the Tertiary volcanic rocks ranged from about 728 to about 1,034 meters above sea level during 1995. The mean water-level altitude in the well monitoring the Paleozoic carbonate rocks was about 753 meters above sea level during 1995. Mean water level altitudes were only an average of about 0.01 meters higher than 1994 mean water level altitudes. A single-well aquifer test was conducted on well UE-25 WT{number_sign}12 during August and September 1995. Well USW 0-2 was also pumped during October and November 1995, in preparation for single-well aquifer test at that well. All data were acquired in accordance with a quality-assurance program to support the reliability of the data.

  8. Uranium Redistribution Due to Water Table Fluctuations in Sandy Wetland Mesocosms

    To understand better the fate and stability of immobilized uranium (U) in wetland sediments, and how intermittent dry periods affect U stability, we dosed saturated wetland mesocosms planted with Scirpus acutus with low levels of uranyl acetate for 4 months before imposing...

  9. Water table fluctuations within the floodplain of the River Severn, England

    Burt, T. P.; Bates, P. D.; Stewart, M. D.; Claxton, A. J.; Anderson, M. G.; Price, D. A.

    2002-05-01

    In contrast to extensive research on hydrological processes operating in headwater basins, there has been relatively little attention paid to the hydrological processes that occur on the floodplains of lowland rivers. This dearth of information is all the more surprising given current interest in the use of floodplains as buffer zones between farmland and the riverine environment. In the previous paper (Water Resour. Res. 36 (2000) 2517), Bates et al., reported preliminary results from a field site on the floodplain of the River Severn in Shropshire, UK, a large lowland river by British standards. Piezometric data suggested that during out-of-bank conditions a reverse groundwater ridge develops in the floodplain subsurface and results in strong groundwater flux velocities directed towards the base of hillslopes adjoining the floodplain. Bates et al. showed that the impact of such ridges was to switch off hillslope inputs to the riparian zone; they hypothesised that this occurred when surface inundation approached the back of the floodplain. In this paper, we provide a more detailed analysis of the events considered by Bates et al. and extend the analysis to the more common in-bank flood condition. In total, five events are considered (two out-of-bank and three in-bank); these were chosen to represent a wide range of event magnitudes, antecedent conditions and local patterns of rainfall and runoff. The analysis demonstrates that the reverse groundwater ridging process identified by Bates et al. also occurs during in-bank events. Hillslope inputs to the floodplain are also 'switched off' in these events if the flood stage is high. In smaller floods, water continues to move from slope to floodplain, although coupling between slope and channel is only re-established later in the recession. We conclude that, contrary to the conclusions of Bates et al., this process switching is not necessarily dependent on surface inundation approaching the back of the floodplain

  10. Synthesis water level control by fuzzy logic

    P. Berk

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This paper focuses on evolving of two types fuzzy and classical PID liquid level controller and examining whether they are better able to handle modelling uncertainties. A two stage strategy is employed to design the synthesis fuzzy and classical PID controller with the process of the first and second order and implements disorder (quadratic function.Design/methodology/approach: The synthesis of fuzzy and classical PID liquid level controller was realized with the HP laptop 6830s Compaq NA779ES, software Matlab/Simulink 2008b, FIS (Fuzzy Inference System soft logical tool, input-output unit 500 Dragon Rider and ultrasonic sensor. Using the simulation program Matlab/Simulink/FIS we simulate the operation of fuzzy and classical controller in the liquid level regulating cycle and made a comparison between fuzzy and classical controller functioning.Findings: From the responses to step fuzzy and classical controller for first-order process shows that the actual value of the controlled variable takes the value one. Fuzzy and classical PID controller does not allow control derogation, which is also inappropriate for fuzzy and classical control cycle with incorporating disturbance. Classical PID controller in the first-order process provides short-term regulation, such as fuzzy PID controller. In fuzzy control cycle with fuzzy PID controller and incorporating disturbance in the process of second-order the control cycle is stable and at certain predetermined parameters (integral gain a control does not allow deviations.Research limitations/implications: In future research, the robustness of the fuzzy logic controller will be investigated in more details.Practical implications: Using fuzzy liquid level controller can reduce power consumption by 25%. Originality/value: Fuzzy logic controller is useful in applications of nonlinear static characteristic, where classical methods with usually classical PID controllers cannot be a satisfactory outcome

  11. Subtidal water level variation controlled by river flow and tides

    Buschman, F.A.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Vegt, van der M.; Hoekstra, P.

    2009-01-01

    Subtidal water level dynamics in the Berau river, East Kalimantan, Indonesia, feature a pronounced fortnightly variation. The daily mean water levels at a station about 60 km from the sea are 0.2–0.6 m higher during spring tide than during neap tide. To explain the underlying mechanisms, a local sub

  12. Holocene lake level fluctuations of a small alpine lake in the Qilian Mountains, NW China: a comparison of chironomid, ostracod, pollen and geochemistry data.

    Mischke, S.; Herzschuh, U.

    2003-04-01

    A core of 14 m length was drilled in a small alpine lake in the Qilian Mountains, NW China. The lake Luanhaizi has a drainage area of about 30 km2 and is situated at an altitude of 3200 m which represents the altitude of the present regional upper timberline. Due to the small size of the open-basin lake (surface area about 1 km2) and the sharply outlined catchment area the lake is regarded as a very sensitively and rapidly responding ecosystem. Analyses of ostracod shells, head capsules of larval chironomids and pollen and spores were conducted and the organic and carbonate content (LOI), element concentrations and magnetic susceptibility of core samples determined. Ostracod taxa mainly comprise Candona candida, C. neglecta, C. rawsoni, Cyclocypris ovum, Cypridopsis vidua, Fabaeformiscandona caudata, F. danielopoli, F. hyalina, Herpetocypris chevreuxi, Heterocypris salina, Ilyocypris cf. bradyi, I. echinata, I. lacustris and Limnocythere inopinata. They may be used to distinguish periods of low lake levels corresponding to a dense cover of aquatic plants at the lake bottom from stages of higher lake levels and a corresponding decrease in macrophytes at the core site. Chironomid taxa belonging to Chironomus, Cladopelma, Glyptotendipes, Micropsectra, Paratanytarsus, Polypedilum, Psectrocladius and Tanytarsus further provide information on variations in benthic oxygen availability and lake level fluctuations. Several units of the core show high abundances of pollen and spores of higher aquatic and wetland plants and fungi (Cyperaceae, Hippuris, Myriophyllum and Glomus) indicating low lake levels. In contrast, algae such as Botryococcus, Pediastrum and Tetraedron were regarded to reflect higher water levels. Typha angustifolia-type, Typha latifolia, Alisma and Potamogeton were recorded in low abundances as well. The organic content of core samples averages 6 % displaying four alternating stages of distinct minima and maxima. Lowest values of about 1 % occur at the core

  13. Analysis of Ground-Water Levels and Associated Trends in Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, 1951-2003

    J.M. Fenelon

    2005-10-05

    Almost 4,000 water-level measurements in 216 wells in the Yucca Flat area from 1951 to 2003 were quality assured and analyzed. An interpretative database was developed that describes water-level conditions for each water level measured in Yucca Flat. Multiple attributes were assigned to each water-level measurement in the database to describe the hydrologic conditions at the time of measurement. General quality, temporal variability, regional significance, and hydrologic conditions are attributed for each water-level measurement. The database also includes narratives that discuss the water-level history of each well. Water levels in 34 wells were analyzed for variability and for statistically significant trends. An attempt was made to identify the cause of many of the water-level fluctuations or trends. Potential causes include equilibration following well construction or development, pumping in the monitoring well, withdrawals from a nearby supply well, recharge from precipitation, earthquakes, underground nuclear tests, land subsidence, barometric pressure, and Earth tides. Some of the naturally occurring fluctuations in water levels may result from variations in recharge. The magnitude of the overall water-level change for these fluctuations generally is less than 2 feet. Long-term steady-state hydrographs for most of the wells open to carbonate rock have a very similar pattern. Carbonate-rock wells without the characteristic pattern are directly west of the Yucca and Topgallant faults in the southwestern part of Yucca Flat. Long-term steady-state hydrographs from wells open to volcanic tuffs or the Eleana confining unit have a distinctly different pattern from the general water-level pattern of the carbonate-rock aquifers. Anthropogenic water-level fluctuations were caused primarily by water withdrawals and nuclear testing. Nuclear tests affected water levels in many wells. Trends in these wells are attributed to test-cavity infilling or the effects of

  14. The effect of water level fluctuation on tributary spawning migration of reservoir fish

    Hladík, Milan; Kubečka, Jan

    2004-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 4 (2004), s. 449-457. ISSN 1642-3593. [Ecohydrology and physical habitat modifications in lakes. Mondsee, 26.11.2003-28.11.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA206/02/0520; GA AV ČR(CZ) IBS6017004; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA6017201; GA AV ČR(CZ) KSK6005114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6017912 Keywords : freshwater fish spawning migration * tributary * reservoir Subject RIV: GL - Fishing

  15. Lake level fluctuations and catchment dynamics at Lake Ohrid (Macedonia, Albania) during MIS6 and MIS5

    Francke, Alexander; Wagner, Bernd; Just, Janna; Sadori, Laura; Masi, Alessia; Vogel, Hendrik; Lindhorst, Katja; Krastel, Sebastian; Dosseto, Anthony; Rothacker, Leo; Leicher, Niklas; Gromig, Raphael

    2016-04-01

    Lake Ohrid, presumably the oldest lake of Europe located at the border of Macedonia and Albania, is about 30 km long, 15 km wide, and up to 290 m deep. In 2013, an ICDP deep drilling campaign was carried out under the umbrella of the Scientific Collaboration on Past Speciation Conditions in Lake Ohrid (SCOPSCO) project. At the main drill site (DEEP) in the central part of Lake Ohrid, the uppermost 568 m from a total sediment fill of ca. 700 m were recovered. Initial data from core catcher material indicate that the sediment sequence covers more than 1.2 million years. An age model, which is based on 11 tephrostratigragphic tie points and on tuning of biogeochemical proxy data versus orbital parameters reveals that that the upper 247 m of the DEEP site sequence cover the time period between 637 ka (MIS16) and the present. Inhere, we present sedimentological, (bio-)geochemical, environmental magnetic, and pollen data for the time period between MIS6 (191 ka) and MIS5 (71 ka). The data imply that MIS6 was one of the most severe glacial periods, while MIS5 was likely one of the more pronounced interglacial during the past 637 kyrs. The repercussions of these high amplitude climatic and environmental variations during this period are recorded in the sedimentological archive of Lake Ohrid. Previous studies based on hydro-acoustic and sediment core data from the northeastern part of the lake basin have shown that the lake level of Lake Ohrid was likely 60 m lower during MIS6. The ˜60 m lower lake level at Lake Ohrid during MIS6 can at least partly be explained by the ongoing subsidence, which persists in the basin until today. However, in the DEEP site sediments, the MIS6/MIS5 transition occurs at ca. 50 m sediment depth. This implies that climate-induced lake level fluctuation at Lake Ohrid are less severe compared for example to Lake Van (Turkey), were a 260 m lower lake level has been reported for the Younger Dryas. The imprint of the environmental variations between

  16. Prediction of subsurface water level change from satellite data

    Saykawlard, Suphan; Honda, Kiyoshi; Das Gupta, Ashim; Eiumnoh, Apisit; Chen, Xiaoyong

    2005-03-01

    This study explores the potential for predicting the spatial variation in subsurface water level change with crop growth stage from satellite data in Thabua Irrigation Project, situated in the northern central region of Thailand. The relationship between subsurface water level change from pumping water to irrigate rice in the dry season and the age of the rice was analysed. The spatial model of subsurface water level change was developed from the classification using greenness or (normalized difference vegetation index NDVI) derived from Landsat 5 Thematic Mapper data. The NDVI of 52 rice fields was employed to assess its relationship to the age of the rice. It was found that NDVI and rice age have a good correlation (R2 = 0.73). The low NDVI values (-0.059 to 0.082) in these fields were related to the young rice stage (0-30 days). NDVI and subsurface water level change were also correlated in this study and found to have a high correlation (Water level change (m day-1) = 0.3442 × NDVI - 0.0372; R2 = 0.96). From this model, the water level change caused by rice at different growth stages was derived. This was used to show the spatial variation of water level change in the project during the 1998-99 dry-season cropping. This simple method of using NDVI relationships with water level change and crop growth stages proves to be useful in determining the areas prone to excessive lowering of the subsurface water level during the dry season. This could assist in the appropriate planning of the use of subsurface water resources in dry-season cropping.

  17. Study of the influence of temperature and precipitations on the levels of BTEX in natural waters.

    Moliner-Martínez, Y; Herraez-Hernandez, R; Verdú-Andres, J; Campíns-Falcó, P; Garrido-Palanca, C; Molins-Legua, C; Seco, A

    2013-12-15

    Assessment of seasonal changes in surface water quality is an important aspect for evaluating temporal variation of water due to natural or anthropogenic inputs of point and non-point sources. The objective of this paper was to investigate the influence of seasonal temperature fluctuations and precipitations on the levels of BTEX in natural waters. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to evaluate the seasonal correlations of BTEX levels in water and to extract the parameters that are most important in assessing seasonal variations of water quality. This study was carried out as a part of VOCs monitoring program in natural water samples from Mediterranean coast. To carry out this project, a multiresidue analytical method was used. The method was based on headspace solid-phase microextraction (HS-SPME) followed by gas chromatography coupled to flame ionization detector (FID). The limits of detection LODs found for the tested analyte tested were in the 0.001-1 μg/L range. These values were adequate for the analysis of these compounds in water samples according to the regulated values. Water samples from different points of the Mediterranean coast were analyzed during a period of three years, and were taken four times per year. Most of the compounds were below the limit established by the legislation. The results obtained by a chemometric study indicated that temperature and precipitations can be related on the BTEX levels found in water. A regression model between temperature or precipitations and BTEX concentration was obtained, thus these models can be used as predictive model for detection any non-normal concentration level. PMID:23978603

  18. Differential equations governing slip-induced pore-pressure fluctuations in a water-saturated granular medium

    Iverson, R.M.

    1993-01-01

    Macroscopic frictional slip in water-saturated granular media occurs commonly during landsliding, surface faulting, and intense bedload transport. A mathematical model of dynamic pore-pressure fluctuations that accompany and influence such sliding is derived here by both inductive and deductive methods. The inductive derivation shows how the governing differential equations represent the physics of the steadily sliding array of cylindrical fiberglass rods investigated experimentally by Iverson and LaHusen (1989). The deductive derivation shows how the same equations result from a novel application of Biot's (1956) dynamic mixture theory to macroscopic deformation. The model consists of two linear differential equations and five initial and boundary conditions that govern solid displacements and pore-water pressures. Solid displacements and water pressures are strongly coupled, in part through a boundary condition that ensures mass conservation during irreversible pore deformation that occurs along the bumpy slip surface. Feedback between this deformation and the pore-pressure field may yield complex system responses. The dual derivations of the model help explicate key assumptions. For example, the model requires that the dimensionless parameter B, defined here through normalization of Biot's equations, is much larger than one. This indicates that solid-fluid coupling forces are dominated by viscous rather than inertial effects. A tabulation of physical and kinematic variables for the rod-array experiments of Iverson and LaHusen and for various geologic phenomena shows that the model assumptions commonly are satisfied. A subsequent paper will describe model tests against experimental data. ?? 1993 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  19. Study on convective mixing phenomena in parallel triple-jet along wall. Comparison of temperature fluctuation characteristics between sodium and water

    Nobuyuki Kimura; Hiroyuki Miyakoshi; Hiroshi Ogawa; Hideki Kamide [O-arai Engineering Center, Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute, 4002 Narita, O-arai, Ibaraki, 311-1393 (Japan); Yasuhiro Miyake [NDD Corporation, Hope building 8F, 1-7-23, Minato, Tsuchiura, Ibaraki, 300-0034 (Japan); Kazuyoshi Nagasawa [NESI Incorporation, 4002 Narita, O-arai, Ibaraki, 311-1313 (Japan)

    2005-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: When temperature fluctuation due to convective mixing between hot and cold fluids is transferred to structure, there is a possibility of high cycle thermal fatigue. In a fast reactor sodium is used as coolant. Many experiments and calculations using water as working fluid have been carried out for the temperature fluctuations. As regarding sodium there are few experimental data. Sodium has approximately a 100 times larger thermal conductivity than water though dynamic viscosity is the same order. So temperature fluctuation characteristics in sodium will be different from that in water. Especially, decay characteristics of temperature fluctuation near a wall surface are strongly influenced by thermal property of fluid in a boundary layer. This is of importance to evaluate transfer characteristics of temperature fluctuation from fluid to structure. Here, sodium and water experiments were performed using the same geometry of the test sections. These experimental apparatuses have parallel triple jets sandwiched with two partition plates. The triple jets flow vertically along a wall with convective mixing among the jets. The jet in the center is cold, and two jets in both sides are hot. The discharged velocities of the triple jets were 0.5 m/s in both experiments. The temperature data were obtained by movable thermocouple trees, which consisted of 25 to 40 thermocouples. The temperatures were measured at 0.5 mm from the wall surface to the center position between the two partition plates. In addition, a particle image velocimetry was applied to the water experiment. As for the time-averaged temperature field at the furthest position from the wall, the hot jets were inclined toward the cold jet in both experiments. Temperature fluctuation intensity was high in the region where the cold jet met the hot jets. A prominent frequency was observed in temperature fluctuation where the cold jet contacted the hot jets; it was resulted from

  20. Assessment of radon levels in some water resources in Egypt

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that is produced by the radioactive decay of radium. Breathing high concentrations of radon can cause lung cancer. When radon gas migrates through the atmosphere, the solid radon progeny are deposited on the soil and water below, entering into the food chain. Radon generated from rocks containing its parents may escape to the underground or surface running water, which ultimately used as drinking water or for irrigation. In this work radon level was determined in different water resources in Egypt. Water from spring, tap water Nile and some commercially available drinking water were subjected to radon measurements using CR-39 detectors. Radon concentration in different water resources was found the range from 8.94 to 10.00 Bq/m3 while in trapped air above water was 9.3 to 10.38 Bq/m3

  1. Using continuous surface water level and temperature data to characterize hydrological connectivity in riparian wetlands.

    Cabezas, Alvaro; Gonzalez-Sanchís, Maria; Gallardo, Belinda; Comín, Francisco A

    2011-12-01

    Methods to characterize hydrological connectivity at riparian wetlands are necessary for ecosystem management given its importance over ecosystem structure and functioning. In this paper, we aimed to describe hydrological connectivity at one Ebro River reach (NE Spain) and test a method to perform such characterization. Continuous surface water level and temperature data were recorded at five riparian wetlands during the period October 2006-June 2007. Combining water level and temperature, we classified the examined wetlands in three groups, which mainly differed in the dominant water source during different flood stages. Firstly, a comparison of water level fluctuations in riparian wetlands with those in the river channel during events with different characteristics was used to describe hydrological connectivity. Such comparison was also used to extract quantitative hydrological connectivity descriptors as the wetland response initiation time. Secondly, water temperature series were divided in phases with different average, range and daily oscillation, and these parameters were interpreted for each phase to identify dominant flowpaths. By doing so, a more complete description of hydrological connectivity was achieved. Our method provided useful insights to describe hydrological connectivity using a qualitative approach that can be expanded if required to include quantitative parameters for studies of biotic assemblages or ecosystem processes. PMID:21400244

  2. The Influence of a Fluctuating Water Table on Arsenic Mobility in a Western U.S. Aquifer

    Abu-Ramaileh, Allia Maher

    2015-01-01

    Arsenic (As) concentrations in groundwater that exceed the Maximum Contaminant Level (MCL) (10 μg/L) for drinking water have been reported throughout the United States, with higher occurrences in the Southwestern basin-fill aquifers. Levels of As above the MCL were measured in wells throughout the Cache Valley Basin, Utah. The As is naturally occurring in geologic material from the soil surface to depths of groundwater. This study reports on the mechanisms of retention and solubilization of A...

  3. Water level changes of high altitude lakes in Himalaya–Karakoram from ICESat altimetry

    Priyeshu Srivastava; Rakesh Bhambri; Prashant Kawishwar; D P Dobhal

    2013-12-01

    Himalaya–Karakoram (H–K) region hosts large number of high altitude lakes but are poorly gauged by in-situ water level monitoring method due to tough terrain conditions and poor accessibility. After the campaigns of ICESat during 2003–2009, now it is possible to achieve lake levels at decimetre accuracy. Therefore, in present study, high altitude lake levels were observed using ICESat/GLAS altimetry in H–K between 2003 and 2009 to generate baseline information. The study reveals that out of 13 lakes, 10 lakes show increasing trend of water levels at different rate (mean rate 0.173 m/y) whereas three lakes unveiled decreasing trend (mean rate −0.056 m/y). Out of five freshwater lakes, four lakes show an increasing trend of their level (mean rate 0.084 m/y) whereas comparatively six salt lakes (out of seven salt lakes) exhibited ∼3 times higher mean rate of lake level increase (0.233 m/y). These observed lake level rise can be attributed to the increased melt runoffs (i.e., seasonal snow and glacier melts) owing to the enhanced mean annual and seasonal air temperature during past decade in north-western (NW) Himalaya. Further, varied behaviours of lake level rises in inter- and intra-basins suggest that the local climatic fluctuations play prominent role along with regional and global climate in complex geographical system of NW Himalaya.

  4. Regional and State Level Water Scarcity Report: Northeast United States

    Nicoletti, C. K.; Lopez-Morales, C. A.; Hoover, J. H.; Voigt, B. G.; Vorosmarty, C. J.; Mohammed, I. N.

    2010-12-01

    There are an abundance of large-scale, coarse resolution global water scarcity studies, but the existing literature fails to address regional and state specific scarcity measures. Moreover, while environmental water requirements are an integral factor in the development and implementation of sustainable water management practices, only recently has this notion been introduced to water scarcity research. In this paper, we argue that developing a preliminary measure of water scarcity, at the regional and state levels, will allow for more informed policy development. The goal of this study is to generate a more comprehensive understanding of water scarcity in the Northeast, by gathering fine scale data, applying a consistent methodology to the calculation of a scarcity index, and analyzing the results to see relative trends in spatio-temporal water scarcity. Public supply, irrigation, rural, industrial and thermo-power withdrawals have been compiled from USGS state water use publications from 1950 to 1985. Using the WBMplus water model runoff data, state specific in-stream environmental water requirements were calculated using the accepted hydro-ecological methodology. Water scarcity was then calculated as a ratio of water withdrawals to total available water minus environmental flow requirements for the system. In so doing, this study generates a spatially explicit and temporally varying water scarcity indicator (WSI) for the Northeastern United States between 1950 and 2000 at the regional and state levels at a five-year time interval. Calculation of a spatial and temporal water scarcity indicator enabled us to identify regions and specific states that were: slightly exploited (WSI 1.0). The minimum environmental water requirements to maintain in-stream aquatic and riparian ecosystems for the Northeastern states ranged between 27.5 to 36.3 percent of the mean annual runoff within Vermont and Maryland, respectively. The regional WSI values ranged between 0.199 in 1950

  5. Calculating Skempton constant of aquifer from volume strain and water level response to seismic waves at Changping seismic station

    YAN Rui; CHEN Yong; GAO Fu-wang; HUANG Fu-qiong

    2008-01-01

    Based on linear poroelastic theory of ideal poroelastic media, we apply the mathematic expression between pore pressure and volume strain for well-aquifer system to analyzing the observed data of water level and volume strain changes aroused by Sumatra Ms8.7 (determined by China Seismic Networks Center) seismic waves at Changping, Beijing, station on December 26, 2004 from both time and frequency domain. The response coefficients of water level fluctuation to volume strain are also calculated when seismic waves were passing through confined aquifer. A method for estimating Skempton constant B is put forward, which provide an approach for understanding of the characteristics of aquifer.

  6. A multi-source satellite data approach for modelling Lake Turkana water level: Calibration and validation using satellite altimetry data

    Velpuri, N.M.; Senay, G.B.; Asante, K.O.

    2012-01-01

    Lake Turkana is one of the largest desert lakes in the world and is characterized by high degrees of interand intra-annual fluctuations. The hydrology and water balance of this lake have not been well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable ground truth datasets. Managing surface water resources is a great challenge in areas where in-situ data are either limited or unavailable. In this study, multi-source satellite-driven data such as satellite-based rainfall estimates, modelled runoff, evapotranspiration, and a digital elevation dataset were used to model Lake Turkana water levels from 1998 to 2009. Due to the unavailability of reliable lake level data, an approach is presented to calibrate and validate the water balance model of Lake Turkana using a composite lake level product of TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, and ENVISAT satellite altimetry data. Model validation results showed that the satellitedriven water balance model can satisfactorily capture the patterns and seasonal variations of the Lake Turkana water level fluctuations with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.90 and a Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient of Efficiency (NSCE) of 0.80 during the validation period (2004-2009). Model error estimates were within 10% of the natural variability of the lake. Our analysis indicated that fluctuations in Lake Turkana water levels are mainly driven by lake inflows and over-the-lake evaporation. Over-the-lake rainfall contributes only up to 30% of lake evaporative demand. During the modelling time period, Lake Turkana showed seasonal variations of 1-2m. The lake level fluctuated in the range up to 4m between the years 1998-2009. This study demonstrated the usefulness of satellite altimetry data to calibrate and validate the satellite-driven hydrological model for Lake Turkana without using any in-situ data. Furthermore, for Lake Turkana, we identified and outlined opportunities and challenges of using a calibrated satellite-driven water balance

  7. A multi-source satellite data approach for modelling Lake Turkana water level: calibration and validation using satellite altimetry data

    N. M. Velpuri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lake Turkana is one of the largest desert lakes in the world and is characterized by high degrees of inter- and intra-annual fluctuations. The hydrology and water balance of this lake have not been well understood due to its remote location and unavailability of reliable ground truth datasets. Managing surface water resources is a great challenge in areas where in-situ data are either limited or unavailable. In this study, multi-source satellite-driven data such as satellite-based rainfall estimates, modelled runoff, evapotranspiration, and a digital elevation dataset were used to model Lake Turkana water levels from 1998 to 2009. Due to the unavailability of reliable lake level data, an approach is presented to calibrate and validate the water balance model of Lake Turkana using a composite lake level product of TOPEX/Poseidon, Jason-1, and ENVISAT satellite altimetry data. Model validation results showed that the satellite-driven water balance model can satisfactorily capture the patterns and seasonal variations of the Lake Turkana water level fluctuations with a Pearson's correlation coefficient of 0.90 and a Nash-Sutcliffe Coefficient of Efficiency (NSCE of 0.80 during the validation period (2004–2009. Model error estimates were within 10% of the natural variability of the lake. Our analysis indicated that fluctuations in Lake Turkana water levels are mainly driven by lake inflows and over-the-lake evaporation. Over-the-lake rainfall contributes only up to 30% of lake evaporative demand. During the modelling time period, Lake Turkana showed seasonal variations of 1–2 m. The lake level fluctuated in the range up to 4 m between the years 1998–2009. This study demonstrated the usefulness of satellite altimetry data to calibrate and validate the satellite-driven hydrological model for Lake Turkana without using any in-situ data. Furthermore, for Lake Turkana, we identified and outlined opportunities and challenges of using a calibrated

  8. Salmon Migration Patterns Revealed the Temporal and Spatial Fluctuations of the Radiocesium Levels in Terrestrial and Ocean Environments

    Arai, Takaomi

    2014-01-01

    The disabling of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (F1NPP) resulted in the release of radionuclides, including 134Cs and 137Cs, into the air and the ocean. The unpredicted nuclear accident is of global concern for human health and the ecosystem. Although investigations of radionuclides in environments were performed shortly after the accident started, the temporal and spatial impacts and fluctuations on the releasing radionuclides to natural environment remain unclear. I focused on sa...

  9. Stochastic Liouville equations for hydrogen-bonding fluctuations and their signatures in two-dimensional vibrational spectroscopy of water

    Jansen, TL; Hayashi, T; Zhuang, W; Mukamel, S

    2005-01-01

    The effects of hydrogen-bond forming and breaking kinetics on the linear and coherent third-order infrared spectra of the OH stretch of HOD in D2O are described by Markovian, not necessarily Gaussian, fluctuations and simulated using the stochastic Liouville equations. Slow (0.5 ps) fluctuations are

  10. Growth and lipid accumulation of microalgae from fluctuating brackish and sea water locations in South East Queensland – Australia

    Van Thang eDuong

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available One challenge constraining the use of microalgae in the food and biofuels industry is growth and lipid accumulation. Microalgae with high growth characteristics are more likely to originate from the local environment. However, to be commercially effective, in addition to high growth microalgae must also have high lipid productivities and contain the desired fatty acids for their intended use. We isolated microalgae from intertidal locations in South East Queensland, Australia with adverse or fluctuating conditions, as these may harbor more opportunistic strains with high lipid accumulation potential. Screening was based on a standard protocol using growth rate and lipid accumulation as well as prioritizing fatty acid profiles suitable for biodiesel or nutraceuticals. Using these criteria, an initial selection of over 50 local microalgae strains from brackish and sea water was reduced to 16 strains considered suitable for further investigation. Among these 16 strains, the ones most likely to be effective for biodiesel feedstock were Nitzschia sp. CP3a, Tetraselmis sp. M8, Cymbella sp. CP2b and Cylindrotheca closterium SI1c, reaching growth rates of up to 0.53 day-1 and lipid productivities of 5.62 µg mL-1day-1. Omega-3 fatty acids were found in some strains such as Nitzschia sp. CP2a, Nitzschia sp. CP3a and Cylindrotheca closterium SI1c. These strains have potential for further research as commercial food supplements.

  11. Water level changes for Lake Turkana and climate variability during the African Humid Period

    Bloszies, C.; Forman, S. L.; Wright, D. K.

    2013-12-01

    The chronology of East African paleoclimate suggests the transition through the African Humid Period (AHP) at ca. 15 to 5 ka was a binary shift from wet conditions in the Late Pleistocene to current aridity. Previous studies indicate that water levels for Lake Turkana for the AHP were stable at ~88 to 98 m above current level with outflow into the White Nile Basin. This study of relict beaches around Lake Turkana indicates surprisingly >50 m variability in water level between 14 and 4 ka. The elevation of past water level is constrained by barometric and GPS-based altimetry of relict beaches and age control by 14C dating of associated mollusks and OSL dating of quartz grains from surrounding littoral and sublittoral deposits. We also include well provenanced lake level data from prior studies to constrain more fully the timing and height of water level fluctuations in the Late Quaternary. Additionally, previous studies indicate that peak water levels may be regionally amplified by increased precipitation causing overflow into the Lake Turkana Basin from the adjacent Suguta and Chew Bahir basins, particularly during high stands at ca. >8.5 ka and at 6.3 ka. Our analysis of the Lake Turkana strandplain reveals that water level may have varied by × 60 m, potentially reaching the outlet elevation at ca.11.3, 10.3, 9.0, 6.3 and 5.1 ka. There are other possible high stands at ca. 13.0, 8.4, 7.8 and 7.0 ka with limited elevational and age constraints; it is unknown if these lake stands reached the outlet elevation. Evidence from relict strand plains indicate that lake level was probably below 20 m since ca. 4.5 ka, though there were two noticeable high stands up to >12 to 18 m at ca. 830 years ago and source of moisture to sustain these many high stands are based on the isotopic data on leaf wax (δDwax) from lakes Tanganika and Victoria and associated sea surface temperature (SST) records from the Indian and the Atlantic oceans. A brief (sources as well. Similarly, the

  12. Radar Based Flow and Water Level Forecasting in Sewer Systems

    Thorndahl, Søren; Rasmussen, Michael R.; Grum, M.;

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the first radar based forecast of flow and/or water level in sewer systems in Denmark. The rainfall is successfully forecasted with a lead time of 1-2 hours, and flow/levels are forecasted an additional ½-1½ hours using models describing the behaviour of the sewer system. Both...... radar data and flow/water level model are continuously updated using online rain gauges and online in-sewer measurements, in order to make the best possible predictions. The project show very promising results, and show large potentials, exploiting the existing water infrastructure in future climate...

  13. Estimation of Peak Water Level in Pearl River Estuary under the Background of Sea Level Rise

    KONG; Lan; CHEN; Xiao-hong; ZHUANG; Cheng-bin; CHEN; Dong-wei

    2012-01-01

    [Objective] The study aimed to predict the peak water level in Pearl River Estuary under the background of sea level rise. [Method] The changing trends of peak water level at Denglongshan station and Hengmen station were analyzed firstly on the basis of regression models, and then sea level rise in Pearl River Estuary in 2050 was predicted to estimate the 1-in-50-year peak water level in the same year. [Result] Regression analyses showed that the increasing rate of peak water level over past years was 6.3 mm/a at Denglongshan station and 5.8 mm/a at Hengmen station. In addition, if sea level will rise by 20, 30 and 60 cm respectively in 2050, it was predicted that the 1-in-50-year peak water level will reach 3.04, 3.14 and 3.44 m at Denglongshan station, and 3.19, 3.29 and 3.59 m at Hengmen station separately. [Conclusion] The estimation of peak water level in Pearl River Estuary could provide theoretical references for water resources planning.

  14. Potential effects of climate change on the water level, flora and macro-fauna of a large neotropical wetland.

    Úbeda, Bárbara; Di Giacomo, Adrian S; Neiff, Juan José; Loiselle, Steven A; Poi, Alicia S Guadalupe; Gálvez, José Ángel; Casco, Silvina; Cózar, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    Possible consequences of climate change in one of the world's largest wetlands (Ibera, Argentina) were analysed using a multi-scale approach. Climate projections coupled to hydrological models were used to analyse variability in wetland water level throughout the current century. Two potential scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions were explored, both resulting in an increase in the inter-annual fluctuations of the water level. In the scenario with higher emissions, projections also showed a long-term negative trend in water-level. To explore the possible response of biota to such water-level changes, species-area relationships of flora and aerial censuses of macro-fauna were analysed during an extraordinary dry period. Plant species richness at the basin scale was found to be highly resistant to hydrological changes, as the large dimension of the wetland acts to buffer against the water-level variations. However, local diversity decreased significantly with low water levels, leading to the loss of ecosystem resilience to additional stressors. The analysis of macro-fauna populations suggested that wetland provides refuge, in low water periods, for the animals with high dispersal ability (aquatic and migratory birds). On the contrary, the abundance of animals with low dispersal ability (mainly herbivorous species) was negatively impacted in low water periods, probably because they are required to search for alternative resources beyond the wetland borders. This period of resource scarcity was also related to increased mortality of large mammals (e.g. marsh deer) around water bodies with high anthropogenic enrichment and cyanobacteria dominance. The synergy between recurrent climatic fluctuations and additional stressors (i.e. biological invasions, eutrophication) presents an important challenge to the conservation of neotropical wetlands in the coming decades. PMID:23874446

  15. Potential effects of climate change on the water level, flora and macro-fauna of a large neotropical wetland.

    Bárbara Úbeda

    Full Text Available Possible consequences of climate change in one of the world's largest wetlands (Ibera, Argentina were analysed using a multi-scale approach. Climate projections coupled to hydrological models were used to analyse variability in wetland water level throughout the current century. Two potential scenarios of greenhouse gas emissions were explored, both resulting in an increase in the inter-annual fluctuations of the water level. In the scenario with higher emissions, projections also showed a long-term negative trend in water-level. To explore the possible response of biota to such water-level changes, species-area relationships of flora and aerial censuses of macro-fauna were analysed during an extraordinary dry period. Plant species richness at the basin scale was found to be highly resistant to hydrological changes, as the large dimension of the wetland acts to buffer against the water-level variations. However, local diversity decreased significantly with low water levels, leading to the loss of ecosystem resilience to additional stressors. The analysis of macro-fauna populations suggested that wetland provides refuge, in low water periods, for the animals with high dispersal ability (aquatic and migratory birds. On the contrary, the abundance of animals with low dispersal ability (mainly herbivorous species was negatively impacted in low water periods, probably because they are required to search for alternative resources beyond the wetland borders. This period of resource scarcity was also related to increased mortality of large mammals (e.g. marsh deer around water bodies with high anthropogenic enrichment and cyanobacteria dominance. The synergy between recurrent climatic fluctuations and additional stressors (i.e. biological invasions, eutrophication presents an important challenge to the conservation of neotropical wetlands in the coming decades.

  16. Water level influences on body condition of Geophagus brasiliensis (Perciformes: Cichlidae in a Brazilian oligotrophic reservoir

    Alejandra Filippo Gonzalez Neves dos Santos

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available Effects of water level fluctuations on body condition of Geophagus brasiliensis were studied in a 30 km² Brazilian oligotrophic reservoir. Physiological condition (K and gonadosomatic index (GSI were compared according to water level (low and high. Females' best conditions were associated to higher resources availability during high water, since gonad development did not change between low and high water. Males' condition did not change between water levels, while the highest gonad development occurred in low water. Females presented higher reproductive investment than males, which allocated most of energy for somatic development. This strategy could be a mechanism to undergo the stress caused by oligotrophic characteristics of the reservoir enhanced during low water level.Efeitos do nível da água na condição de Geophagus brasiliensis foram analisados em um reservatório oligotrófico. A condição fisiológica (K e o índice gonadossomático (IGS foram comparados entre os níveis da água (baixo e alto. Melhores condições de fêmeas foram associadas a maiores disponibilidades de recursos no nível alto, já que o desenvolvimento gonadal não variou. Não foram registradas diferenças na condição de machos, contudo maiores valores de IGS ocorreram no nível baixo. Fêmeas apresentaram elevado investimento reprodutivo, enquanto machos investiram mais no desenvolvimento somático. Tal estratégia pode ser um mecanismo para suportar o estresse causado pelas características oligotróficas do reservatório, intensificadas durante o período de níveis baixos da água.

  17. Water-level change, High Plains aquifer, 1995 to 2000

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents water-level change in the High Plains aquifer of the United States from 1995 to 2000, in feet. The High Plains aquifer underlies...

  18. Water-level change, High Plains aquifer, 2005 to 2009

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents water-level change in the High Plains aquifer of the United States from 2005 to 2009, in feet. The High Plains aquifer underlies...

  19. Water-level change, High Plains aquifer, 1980 to 1995

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents water-level change in the High Plains aquifer of the United States from 1980 to 1995, in feet. The High Plains aquifer underlies...

  20. Water level monitoring and controlling system in reactor pressure vessel

    Upon controlling of a water level conducted before an operation of removing a head of a reactor pressure vessel performed upon periodical inspection of a power plant, a supersonic displacement sensor capable of conducting measurement on the basis of cm unit is used as a water level indicator. The water level in the reactor pressure vessel can be controlled to a position above a steam dryer accurately by a remote operation while measuring the water level in the pressure vessel at a high accuracy. In addition, a dose equivalent gauge for evaluating the dose equivalent rate of the operation circumstance is previously disposed before the removal of the head of the reactor pressure vessel to reduce the amount of operation and exposure dose of a radiation operation manager. These supersonic displacement sensor and dose equivalent gauge are made detachable so that they can be disposed only when they are required thereby enabling to minimize the deterioration of the device. (N.H.)

  1. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Preliminary, 1-Minute

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has recent, preliminary (not quality-controlled), 1-minute, water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and...

  2. Water-level change, High Plains aquifer, 2000 to 2005

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This raster data set represents water-level change in the High Plains aquifer of the United States from 2000 to 2005, in feet. The High Plains aquifer underlies...

  3. 2012 Water Levels - Mojave River and the Morongo Groundwater Basins

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — During 2012, the U.S. Geological Survey and other agencies made approximately 2,500 water-level measurements in the Mojave River and Morongo groundwater basins....

  4. Water level and vegetation change analysis at Stillwater Wildlife Refuge

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — The aim of the project summarized in this report was to determine the feasibility of detecting change in surface water levels and associated wetland biomass at the...

  5. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Verified, High Low

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has verified (quality-controlled), daily, high low water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services...

  6. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Verified, Hourly

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has verified (quality-controlled), hourly, water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS)....

  7. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Preliminary, 6-Minute

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has recent, preliminary (not quality-controlled), 6-minute, water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and...

  8. NOS CO-OPS Water Level Data, Verified, 6-Minute

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset has verified (quality-controlled), 6-minute, water level (tide) data from NOAA NOS Center for Operational Oceanographic Products and Services (CO-OPS)....

  9. Characterization of Water Level Variability of the Main Ethiopian Rift Valley Lakes

    Mulugeta Dadi Belete

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the water level fluctuations of eight Ethiopian Rift Valley lakes were analyzed for their hydrological stability in terms of water level dynamics and their controlling factors. Long-term water balances and morphological nature of the lakes were used as bases for the analyses. Pettit’s homogeneity test and Mann–Kendall trend analysis were applied to test temporal variations of the lake levels. It is found that the hydrological stability of most of the Ethiopian Rift Valley lakes is sensitive to climate variability. In terms of monotonic trends, Lake Ziway, Hawassa, Abaya and Beseka experienced significant increasing trend, while Ziway, Langano and Chamo do not. In addition, homogeneity test revealed that Lake Hawassa and Abaya showed significant upward shift around 1991/1992, which was likely caused by climate anomalies such as the El Niño / Southern Oscillation (ENSO phenomena. Lake Abiyata is depicted by its significant decreasing monotonic trend and downward regime shift around 1984/1985, which is likely related to the extended water abstraction for industrial consumption.

  10. Contribution of climate-driven change in continental water storage to recent sea-level rise

    Milly, P.C.D.; Cazenave, A.; Gennero, M.C.

    2003-01-01

    Using a global model of continental water balance, forced by interannual variations in precipitation and near-surface atmospheric temperature for the period 1981-1998, we estimate the sea-level changes associated with climate-driven changes in storage of water as snowpack, soil water, and ground water; storage in ice sheets and large lakes is not considered. The 1981-1998 trend is estimated to be 0.12 mm/yr, and substantial interannual fluctuations are inferred; for 1993-1998, the trend is 0.25 mm/yr. At the decadal time scale, the terrestrial contribution to eustatic (i.e., induced by mass exchange) sea-level rise is significantly smaller than the estimated steric (i.e., induced by density changes) trend for the same period, but is not negligibly small. In the model the sea-level rise is driven mainly by a downtrend in continental precipitation during the study period, which we believe was generated by natural variability in the climate system.

  11. Ground-water-level contours for Carson Valley, Nevada

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set contains the ground-water-level contours derived from ground-water monitoring sites in Carson Valley, west-central Nevada. The data set is part of a...

  12. Geomorphological evidence of water level changes in Nepenthes Mensae, Mars

    de Pablo, Miguel Ángel; Pacifici, Andrea

    2008-08-01

    In the western sector of Nepenthes Mensae, Mars, there are some geomorphological features that could be related to a standing water sheet in the area, such as fluvial terraces, deltas and shorelines. A detailed analysis of these features reveals two variations in water level, probably related to tectonic processes, as suggested by the existence of a fissural volcano at this site.

  13. Radium-226 levels in Italian drinking waters and foods

    Levels of 226Ra in Italian waters and foods were measured. Results were similar to those found in other countries, except for some mineral waters with 226Ra concentrations above 1 pCi/liter andup to 19 pCi/liter. No difinite correlation was found between the 226Ra concentrations measured and the high natural background radiation levels determined in central Italy in previous work

  14. Solar Driven Automatic Water Level Controller with Dry Run Protection

    V. Ravikiran,

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents solar driven automatic water level controller with dry run protection (SDWLC. The main purpose of SDWLC is to reduce wastage of water, to stop dry running of motor and to use solar energy effectively by using PV system. Generally water is pumped to overheadtank (OHT from undergroundtank (UGT.People will switch on pump when taps go dry, switch off pump when water over flows and they does not check dry running of motor during this. Also pumping of water to OHT during power cuts is a major problem in most of villages and in some of cities. However these problems can be solved by SDWLC. By using inverter the DC generated from PV system is converted in to AC and given to the motor. The operation of water level controller works upon the fact that water conducts electricity. So water can be used to open or close a circuit. As the water level rises or falls, different circuits in the controller send different signals. These signals are used to switch ON or switch OFF the motor pump as per our requirements.

  15. Response of the Apodi-Mossoró estuary-incised valley system (NE Brazil to sea-level fluctuations

    Helenice Vital

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the Quaternary sea level changes in the Apodi-Mossoró Estuary and adjacent shelf, Northeastern Brazil, based on the analysis of high-resolution seismic profiles, integrated with echosounder, SRTM and satellite image data. We use these data to develop a relative stratigraphy. An incised-valley extending from the Apodi-Mossoró Estuary onto the shelf dominates the investigated area. In very shallow waters (down to 10 m depth the channel lies mainly in a NW-SE direction, changing to NE-SW in waters below10 m, in the form of a J-shaped valley. The southern flank of the shallow channel presents an abrupt morphology, probably determined by a residual scarp due to neotectonic reactivation of a pre-existing fault. This incised-valley can be correlated with a former river valley formed during the late Pleistocene fall in sea-level. The base-level change related to this drop in sea level can be regionally expressed on seismic lines as a laterally-continuous stratigraphic surface named Horizon I, interpreted as representing the sub-aerial exposure of the continental shelf. Many incised valleys were excavated on this exposed shelf, including that of the Apodi-Mossoró Estuary and its incised valley system. This incised valley has lain buried since the Holocene transgression. The Holocene sediments present sub-horizontal layers, or they have filled the incised valley with oblique features.Este estudo utiliza a integração de dados sísmicos de alta resolução, batimétricos, SRTM e imagens de satélite para desenvolvimento da estratigrafia relativa visando entender as variações do nível do mar durante o Quaternário no estuário do rio Apodi-Mossoró e plataforma adjacente, nordeste do Brasil. A principal feição identificada foi um canal submerso, na plataforma interna, parcialmente preenchido, provavelmente relacionado com o sistema de vales incisos formado durante o rebaixamento do nível do mar no Pleistoceno. O canal

  16. Flashing characteristics in pipe downstream from a depressurizing tank and temperature fluctuation characteristics at a mixing tee junction with cold water injection

    The flashing characteristics in a pipe downstream from a depressurizing tank were experimentally and analytically investigated on the basis of the transient test and two-phase flow analysis. The following three conclusions were obtained. (1) When the pressure margin of the pump inlet side and the distance to obtain an isothermal condition were sufficient, flashing phenomena did not occur in spite of the decreasing pressure. (2) When the ratio of the cold water injection flow rate to the hot water flow rate Mc/Mh increased, the peak distance of the water temperature fluctuation moved from L/D=1 to 0, and the maximum water temperature fluctuation ratio was about 40% of the temperature difference between hot and cold water near the mixing tee junction. But no problem occurred regarding the pipe material thermal fatigue, so reliability of the mixing tee junction was assured. (3) Due to suppression of flashing phenomena of the mixing pipe system, the decision diagram on the flashing occurrence was obtained from test and analytical results, taking into consideration three factors : the depressurizing ratio in the tank ; the cold water injection flow rate due to remaining sub-cooling ; and the delay time of thermal mixing. The simplified analytical equation was used to decrease the cold water injection flow rate by the optimized pipe length between the mixing tee junction and drain pump. The cold water injection flow rate was minimized when pipe length was about 15 to 20 times the pipe inner diameter. (author)

  17. Fluctuating water table affects gross ecosystem production and gross radiation use efficiency in a sedge-grass marsh

    Dušek, Jiří; Čížková, Hana; Stellner, Stanislav; Czerný, Radek; Květ, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 692, č. 1 (2012), s. 57-66. ISSN 0018-8158 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0073; GA MŽP(CZ) SP/2D1/93/07; GA MŠk OC08021 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60870520 Keywords : Wetland * fen * carbon * water level * Carex acuta L. * Eddy covariance Subject RIV: DA - Hydrology ; Limnology Impact factor: 1.985, year: 2012

  18. Determination of Heavy Metal Levels in Various Industrial Waste Waters

    Mustafa Şahin Dündar

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Important part of the environmetal pollution consists of waste water and water pollution. The water polluted by anthropogenical, industrial, and agricultural originated sources are defined as waste waters which are the main pollution sources for reservoirs, rivers, lakes, and seas. In this work, waste waters of leather, textile, automotive side, and metal plating industries were used to determine the levels of Cu, Zn, Cr, Pb and Ni by using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometer. As a result, highest mean levels of copper in supernatants of plating and textile industries were observed as 377,18 ng ml-1, respectively 103 ng ml-1 lead and 963,6 ng ml-1 nickel in plating industry, 1068,2 ng ml-1 zinc and 14557,1 ng ml-1 chromium in plating and leather industries were determined.

  19. Image-based Water Level Measurement Method under Stained Ruler

    Jae-do KIM; Young-joon HAN; Hern-soo HAHN

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes the water level measuring method based on the image,while the ruler used to indicate the water level is stained.The contamination of the ruler weakens or eliminates many features which are required for the image processing.However,the feature of the color difference between the ruler and the water surface are firmer on the environmental change compare to the other features.As the color differences are embossed,only the region of the ruler is limited to eliminate the noise,and the average image is produced by using several continuous frames.A histogram is then produced based on the height axis of the produced intensity average image.Local peaks and local valleys are detected,and the section between the peak and valley which have the greatest change is looked for.The valley point at this very moment is used to detect the water level.The detected water level is then converted to the actual water level by using the mapping table.The proposed method is compared to the ultrasonic based method to evaluate its accuracy and efficiency on the various contaminated environments.

  20. Quantification of the response delay of mobile radon-in-air detectors applied for detecting short-term fluctuations of radon-in-water concentrations

    Radon-in-water concentration time-series that are detected by means of radon-in-air detectors usually demonstrate a distinct response delay between radon-in-water concentration and the related radon-in-air records. This response delay results in recorded radon-in-air time-series that are not fully reflecting short-term radon-in-water fluctuations. The response delay is due to (i) the water/air transfer kinetics of radon and (ii) the delayed decay equilibrium between 222Rn and its progeny 218Po, which is actually being measured by most radon-in-air monitors. In the discussed study we designed a laboratory experiment with a defined radon-in-water input function, recorded the radon-in-air response signal and analysed the two time-series. Radon-in-air records showed a delay of about 10 min relative to the radon-in-water concentrations. However, for reconstructing the original radon-in-water signal based on the detected radon-in-air time-series we developed a numerical model considering all delay causing parameters. It was shown that the applied model allows reconstructing the input signal without any time delay and with correct concentrations for all concentration fluctuations lasting longer than about 10 min. In conclusion we can state that the developed numerical model allows a precise determination of radon-in-water concentration time-series based on radon-in-air records even if short-term fluctuations (>10 min) occur. (authors)

  1. Ground-water discharge determined from measurements of evapotranspiration, other available hydrologic components, and shallow water-level changes, Oasis Valley, Nye County, Nevada

    component of 0.5 foot, is estimated to be about 6,000 acre-feet. Annual subsurface outflow from Oasis Valley into the Amargosa Desert is estimated to be between 30 and 130 acre-feet. Estimates of total annual ground-water withdrawal from Oasis Valley by municipal and non-municipal users in 1996 and 1999 are 440 acre-feet and 210 acre-feet, respectively. Based on these values, natural annual ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley is about 6,100 acre-feet. Total annual discharge was 6,500 acre-feet in 1996 and 6,300 acre-feet in 1999. This quantity of natural ground-water discharge from Oasis Valley exceeds the previous estimate made in 1962 by a factor of about 2.5. Water levels were measured in Oasis Valley to gain additional insight into the ET process. In shallow wells, water levels showed annual fluctuations as large as 7 feet and daily fluctuations as large as 0.2 foot. These fluctuations may be attributed to water loss associated with evapotranspiration. In shallow wells affected by E T, annual minimum depths to water generally occurred in winter or early spring shortly after daily ET reached minimum rates. Annual maximum depths to water generally occurred in late summer or fall shortly after daily ET reached maximum rates. The magnitude of daily water-level fluctuations generally increased as ET increased and decreased as depth to water increased

  2. Monitoring of water level inside reactor pressure vessel

    Up to the TMI accident the water level inside the pressurizer was used to monitor the water inventory inside the primary cooling system of pressurized water reactors. The TMI accident showed that this was not a reliable measurement for the reactor coolant inventory inside the reactor pressure vessel. For this reason there was a demand for a measurement of the water level inside the RVP, independent from the existing one inside the pressurizer and with a diverse measuring method. For WWER reactors a new level measurement system was developed to monitor the water level inside the reactor pressure vessel by means of the KNITU, resp. KITU level probe which meet all the mentioned engineered safeguards and geometric and constructive requirements. First backfitting s of the new level measurement system in the WWER s 440 in Bohunice V1 (Slovakia), unit 1 (1998) and unit 2 (2000), Novovoronezh (Russia), unit 4 (1999) and Kola (Russia), unit 1 and unit 2 (1999) show very good operational results. (Authors)

  3. WATER-LEVEL MONITOR FOR BOREWELL AND WATER TANK BASED ON GSM

    R.Ramani

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Now a days, home automation & remote control and monitoring systems have seen a rapid growth in terms of technology. Apparently there is no early warning system to monitor the tank water level and bore well water level when it has reached the critical level. In this paper we have provided water level monitoring in the tank as well as in the bore well. If the water level in a bore well drops below the threshold level for pumping its pump motor may get air locked or more burn out due to dry running. It is awkward for farmers to walk all the way to their fields at night just to switch the pump motor off. Besides, he may never get to identify the problem. This problem can be solved by using this GSM based system that will automatically make a call to the user mobile phone, when the water Level in the bore well drops threshold below or rises to the threshold level for pumping. The user can also remotely switch on or off the pump motor by sending a SMS from his mobile phone. The system is simple, reliable, portable and affordable. We proposed the work in which, Whenever water level in the tankdrops below the required level the system try to fill the tank by switching on the bore well motor to pump the water into the tank It is must to have enough water in the bore well to avoid the formation of air gap or empty running of bore well motor. High precision water level sensor is used to identify the reference water level to activate and deactivate the motor and system properly by interfacing the sensor devices into the well definedembedded system.

  4. A near-uniform fluctuation of ocean bottom pressure and sea level across the deep ocean basins of the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic Seas

    Fukumori, Ichiro; Wang, Ou; Llovel, William; Fenty, Ian; Forget, Gael

    2015-05-01

    Across the Arctic Ocean and the Nordic Seas, a basin-wide mode of ocean bottom pressure and sea level fluctuation is identified using satellite and in situ observations in conjunction with a global ocean circulation model and its adjoint. The variation extends across the interconnected deep ocean basins of these semi-enclosed Arctic seas, collectively called the Arctic Mediterranean, with spatially near-uniform amplitude and phase. The basin-wide fluctuation is barotropic and dominates the region's large-scale variability from sub-monthly to interannual timescales. The fluctuation results from bifurcating coastally trapped waves generated by winds along the continental slopes of the Arctic Mediterranean and its neighboring seas, including the North Atlantic Ocean. The winds drive Ekman transport across the large bathymetric gradients, forcing mass divergence between the shallow coastal area and the deep ocean basins and creating ocean bottom pressure anomalies of opposite signs in the two regions. The anomalies rapidly propagate away as barotropic coastally trapped waves with the coast and continental slope as respective boundaries. The waves subsequently bifurcate at the shallow straits connecting the Arctic Mediterranean with the rest of the globe. The straits transmit the shallow anomalies but not the deep variations, thereby inhibiting the anomalies' mutual cancelation by geographically separating the two. Anomalies that enter the deep Arctic basins equilibrate uniformly across the domain characterized by a homogeneous depth-integrated planetary potential vorticity distribution. The potential vorticity's steep gradient that borders the basins shields the region from neighboring shallow variations, giving rise to the observed spatially confined fluctuation. Compensating anomalies outside the Arctic adjust similarly across the rest of the globe but are comparatively negligible in amplitude because of the global ocean's larger area relative to that of the deep

  5. Water uptake strategies of maize under varying levels of water stress

    van der Ploeg, M.; Gooren, H. P. A.; Bakker, G.; de Rooij, G. H.

    2009-04-01

    More frequent and intense droughts due to global climate change, together with an increasing agricultural water use emphasize the importance of understanding root water uptake under water-stressed conditions. While root water uptake is driven by potential gradients, measurement of soil water potentials was limited by the measurement range of water-filled tensiometers (-0.085 MPa). A recently developed polymer tensiometer (POT) can measure soil water potentials down to -1.6 MPa. Monitoring low soil water potentials in the presence of root water uptake may help gain knowledge of a plant's strategy to cope with water stress, and allows improved determination of local water stress levels in experiments. To investigate plant strategies that cope with water stress, soil water potentials were measured in the vicinity of maize roots in three lysimeters. The lysimeters received different irrigation amounts: an optimal irrigation gift (-0.05 < p < -0.02 MPa) and minimized irrigation to create moderate (minimum p = -0.45 MPa) and severe (minimum p = -0.80 MPa) water stress. Measured soil water potentials showed that the water stressed plants started to take up water from deeper soil layers, and continued to take up water under very dry conditions. This research was funded by the Dutch Technology Foundation (STW).

  6. Relation of drainage problems to high ground-water levels, Coconut Grove area, Oahu, Hawaii

    Swain, L.A.; Huxel, C.J., Jr.

    1971-01-01

    Purpose and Scope In 1969, hydrologic data-collection sites were established in and around the Coconut Grove area for the purpose of measuring directly the relationship between rainfall, runoff, ground-water levels, the level of water in Kawainui Swamp and the canals, and tidal fluctuations. The primary objective was to identify the causes of the occurrence and persistence of flooding and to gain data on which to base recommendations for remedial action. The scope of the study included establishing and operating flow and stage-recording gages on the Swamp, Kawainui Canal, and the inner canal; periodic and repeated measurements of ground-water level in test borings throughout the residential area; collection and analysis of soil and construction borings made for engineering purposes; the assembly and analysis of all available data relating surface and subsurface flow conditions, and the development of conclusions as to the causes and means to alleviate the flooding. This report summarizes the information collected from October 1969 to June 1971, includes analysis of the data, and discusses the probable causes of flooding.

  7. Sea-Level Rise. Implications for Water Resources Management

    Hay, J.E. [International Global Change Institute, University of Waikato, Hamilton (New Zealand); Mimura, N. [Center for Water Environment Studies, Ibaraki University, Hitachi, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2005-10-15

    Globally, sea level has been rising for more than the last one hundred years, and is expected to do so into the foreseeable future, and at an accelerating rate. The direct influences of sea-level rise on water resources come principally from the following: new or accelerated coastal erosion; more extensive coastal inundation and higher levels of sea flooding; increases in the landward reach of sea waves and storm surges; seawater intrusion into surface waters and coastal aquifers; and further encroachment of tidal waters into estuaries and coastal river systems. The impacts of sea-level rise are likely to be felt disproportionately in certain areas, reflecting both natural and socio-economic factors that enhance the levels of risks. The opportunity to learn about the likely nature of, and most appropriate adaptation to, the anticipated impacts of sea-level rise on water resources is arguably best developed in rapidly subsiding coastal areas, and especially in low-lying deltas where subsidence rates are typically much larger than the historic rise in global mean sea level. Significantly, such areas are often major centres of population and of economic activity, thereby highlighting the human dimensions of sea-level rise. Sound management of the risks to water resources associated with sea-level rise requires enhancing adaptive capacity, mainstreaming adaptation, harmonizing responses to extreme events, variability and long-term change and strengthening regional and international cooperation and coordination. In this regard, the policies and initiatives of international organisations are not always entirely consistent with the needs of developing countries.

  8. 随机浅海声传播简正波起伏%Normal mode fluctuation of sound propagating in random shallow water

    彭临慧; 王桂波

    2006-01-01

    Research of fluctuation of sound propagation in a random shallow water environment is of great interest in predicting sound field and environmental parameters for random ocean investigation and monitoring. This paper studies the normal mode fluctuation of sound propagation in random shallow water. Monte Carlo simulation is used to analyze the sound field fluctuation induced by sound speeds random fluctuation with Dozier's statistical coupled mode equations in a random ocean. The random sound speed model is derived based on the statistic analysis of a temperature chain data in shallow sea. The results show that the amplitude fluctuation of normal mode induced by sound speed random fluctuation is larger than the amplitude fluctuation of sound pressure. If the source position is close to the sensitive depth of a normal mode, the scintillation index of this normal mode would be 2~3 order of magnitude larger than the variance of normal mode amplitude fluctuation. As such, the scintillation index of normal mode is an important parameter for detecting sound propagating fluctuation. This article reveals that variance of the sound pressure fluctuation is linear against distance, variance of normal mode amplitude fluctuation, and modal scintillation index.%随机浅海环境中声传播起伏的研究,对于随机海洋环境声场预报及海洋环境参数反演和遥测都有十分重要的意义.文中对随机浅海中声传播的简正波起伏进行了研究,利用L.B.Dozier统计耦合模式方程,通过Monte Carlo数值模拟分析声速场随机变化所产生的声场起伏规律.随机声速场模型由海上温度链测量数据统计规律分析得到.结果表明,声速场随机起伏所导致的简正波幅度起伏远高于声压的起伏;当声源处在某一阶简正波的敏感深度位置时,该阶简正波的闪烁系数会比简正波幅度起伏方差高2~3个量级;在所分析随机声速场模型下,声压起伏方差、简正波幅度起伏

  9. Poster abstract: Water level estimation in urban ultrasonic/passive infrared flash flood sensor networks using supervised learning

    Mousa, Mustafa

    2014-04-01

    This article describes a machine learning approach to water level estimation in a dual ultrasonic/passive infrared urban flood sensor system. We first show that an ultrasonic rangefinder alone is unable to accurately measure the level of water on a road due to thermal effects. Using additional passive infrared sensors, we show that ground temperature and local sensor temperature measurements are sufficient to correct the rangefinder readings and improve the flood detection performance. Since floods occur very rarely, we use a supervised learning approach to estimate the correction to the ultrasonic rangefinder caused by temperature fluctuations. Preliminary data shows that water level can be estimated with an absolute error of less than 2 cm. © 2014 IEEE.

  10. Perchlorate levels in soil and waters from the Atacama Desert.

    Calderón, R; Palma, P; Parker, D; Molina, M; Godoy, F A; Escudey, M

    2014-02-01

    Perchlorate is an anion that originates as a contaminant in ground and surface waters. The presence of perchlorate in soil and water samples from northern Chile (Atacama Desert) was investigated by ion chromatography-electrospray mass spectrometry. Results indicated that perchlorate was found in five of seven soils (cultivated and uncultivated) ranging from 290 ± 1 to 2,565 ± 2 μg/kg. The greatest concentration of perchlorate was detected in Humberstone soil (2,565 ± 2 μg/kg) associated with nitrate deposits. Perchlorate levels in Chilean soils are greater than those reported for uncultivated soils in the United States. Perchlorate was also found in superficial running water ranging from 744 ± 0.01 to 1,480 ± 0.02 μg/L. Perchlorate water concentration is 30-60 times greater than levels established by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (24.5 μg/L) for drinking. PMID:24165784

  11. Environmental Kuznets Curve for Water Quality Parameters at Global Level

    Paudel, Krishna P.; Lin, C.-Y. Cynthia; Pandit, Mahesh

    2014-01-01

    We examine the relationship between income and water pollutants using country-level global water quality data over the period 1980 to 2012. We include civil liberties and political rights in addition to income as explanatory variables. We use recent advances in econometric techniques to address the inclusion of continuous and discrete variables in nonparametric instrumental variable regression models. Results indicate an inverted U-shape relationship between income and pollution for one pollu...

  12. RETRAN02 analysis of reactor water level controller failure

    This study provides a detailed examination of a feedwater flow excursion caused by a Reactor Water Level Controller Failure at the Perry Nuclear Power Plant (3579 Mwth, GE BWR 6). The feedwater flow excursion led to a plant scram due to high reactor water level. Plant conditions were as follows: power 63.5%, coreflow 50.4% and steamflow 60.5%. Both one-dimensional kinetics and point kinetics RETRAN neutronic models for the actual point conditions are implemented. Confidence in the model and modeling techniques was achieved by comparing the analytical transient response with the actual plant data. Measured parameters consisted of recorded data from the Emergency Response Information System, the plant process computer, and other available data acquisition systems. RETRAN observables consist of major and minor edit variables, Trip Summary table, and other printed RETRAN output. Good agreement was found with the parameters monitored: core power, reactor steam dome pressure, core flow, steamflow, and reactor water level

  13. Experimental detection of radiative energy signal from a supercharged marine boiler and simulation on its application in control of drum water level

    This paper describes a study on the application of a flame detecting system installed in a marine supercharged boiler. Flame images captured from experiments show that fluctuation of the flame in the supercharged boiler is intensive than that in stationary power plant boilers. Radiative Energy Signal (RES) is obtained from experiments by the flame detecting system, and it is shown that RES varies approximately linearly with the oil consumption rate and the heat absorption rate in the riser. Then, an instantaneous heat absorption rate is deduced from the real time RES by a linear equation, and a control strategy for the water level in drum by RES is proposed, in which the real time RES is used to control the flow rate of feed water in advance. Simulation results show that the fluctuating amplitude of the water level can be reduced significantly by introducing RES, and this control strategy has a great potential to improve the control quality of drum water level in the supercharged boiler. - Highlights: → We install a flame detecting system on a marine boiler to monitor furnace combustion. → We use flame image processing technology to analyze the boiler combustion behavior. → A control strategy is proposed as introducing RES into the feed water control system. → Simulation shows the drum water level overcome fluctuations by inducing RES. → Experiments state this strategy and detecting method for improving combustion efficiency.

  14. Fluctuating sea levels off Bombay (India) between 14,500 and 10,000 years before present

    Nigam, R.; Hashimi, N.H.; Menezes, E.T.; Wagh, A.B.

    of deposition shows that sea level had transgressed considerably prior to 10,000 years before present (super(14) C age of the surface sediment). By comparison with global events, we infer that the sea level was at 101.5 m below the present level at about 14...

  15. Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, 1984 Annual Report.

    Casey, Daniel

    1985-02-01

    Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River causes sporadic level fluctuations along the main stem Flathead River. Seasonal water level fluctuations and substantial habitat losses have occurred as a result of construction and operation of Kerr Dam, which regulates Flathead Lake. These fluctuations may impact goose populations through flooding or erosion of nesting and brood-rearing habitats, and increased susceptibility of nests and young to predation. The number, location, and success of goose nests were determined through pair surveys and nest searches. Counts of indicated pairs suggest there were 73-125 occupied nests in the study area; 44 were located in 1984. Twenty were island ground nests, 19 were tree nests, and 5 were on man-made structures. Hatching success was 76 percent. Sixty-one percent of all nests were in deciduous forest habitat; 87 percent were on riparian bench or island landforms. Seventy-four percent of all nests were within 5 m of the seasonal high water mark (HWM) and 85 percent of ground nests were 1 m or less above the HWM. Production, habitat use, and distribution of broods were documented through aerial, boat, ground, and observation tower surveys. 28 refs., 10 figs., 4 tabs.

  16. AUTOMATED WATER LEVEL MEASUREMENTS IN SMALL-DIAMETER AQUIFER TUBES

    PETERSEN SW; EDRINGTON RS; MAHOOD RO; VANMIDDLESWORTH PE

    2011-01-14

    Groundwater contaminated with hexavalent chromium, strontium-90, and uranium discharges into the Columbia River along approximately 16 km (10 mi) of the shoreline. Various treatment systems have and will continue to be implemented to eliminate the impact of Hanford Site contamination to the river. To optimize the various remediation strategies, it is important to understand interactions between groundwater and the surface water of the Columbia River. An automated system to record water levels in aquifer sampling tubes installed in the hyporheic zone was designed and tested to (1) gain a more complete understanding of groundwater/river water interactions based on gaining and losing conditions ofthe Columbia River, (2) record and interpret data for consistent and defensible groundwater/surface water conceptual models that may be used to better predict subsurface contaminant fate and transport, and (3) evaluate the hydrodynamic influence of extraction wells in an expanded pump-and-treat system to optimize the treatment system. A system to measure water levels in small-diameter aquifer tubes was designed and tested in the laboratory and field. The system was configured to allow manual measurements to periodically calibrate the instrument and to permit aquifer tube sampling without removing the transducer tube. Manual measurements were collected with an e-tape designed and fabricated especially for this test. Results indicate that the transducer system accurately records groundwater levels in aquifer tubes. These data are being used to refine the conceptual and numeric models to better understand interactions in the hyporheic zone of the Columbia River and the adjacent river water and groundwater, and changes in hydrochemistry relative to groundwater flux as river water recharges the aquifer and then drains back out in response to changes in the river level.

  17. Politics of innovation in multi-level water governance systems

    Daniell, Katherine A.; Coombes, Peter J.; White, Ian

    2014-11-01

    Innovations are being proposed in many countries in order to support change towards more sustainable and water secure futures. However, the extent to which they can be implemented is subject to complex politics and powerful coalitions across multi-level governance systems and scales of interest. Exactly how innovation uptake can be best facilitated or blocked in these complex systems is thus a matter of important practical and research interest in water cycle management. From intervention research studies in Australia, China and Bulgaria, this paper seeks to describe and analyse the behind-the-scenes struggles and coalition-building that occurs between water utility providers, private companies, experts, communities and all levels of government in an effort to support or block specific innovations. The research findings suggest that in order to ensure successful passage of the proposed innovations, champions for it are required from at least two administrative levels, including one with innovation implementation capacity, as part of a larger supportive coalition. Higher governance levels can play an important enabling role in facilitating the passage of certain types of innovations that may be in competition with currently entrenched systems of water management. Due to a range of natural biases, experts on certain innovations and disciplines may form part of supporting or blocking coalitions but their evaluations of worth for water system sustainability and security are likely to be subject to competing claims based on different values and expertise, so may not necessarily be of use in resolving questions of "best courses of action". This remains a political values-based decision to be negotiated through the receiving multi-level water governance system.

  18. Influence of nutrient level on methylmercury content in water spinach.

    Greger, Maria; Dabrowska, Beata

    2010-08-01

    Widely consumed vegetables are often cultivated in sewage waters with high nutrient levels. They can contain high levels of methylmercury (MeHg), because they can form MeHg from inorganic Hg in their young shoots. We determined whether the MeHg uptake and the MeHg formation in the shoots of water spinach (Ipomoea aquatica) were affected by the presence of a high nutrient level in the growth medium. Water spinach shoots were rooted and pretreated in growth medium containing 7% (low) or 70% (high) Hoagland nutrient solution; thereafter, the plants were treated with either 0.02 microM MeHg or 0.2 microM HgCl2 for 3 d. Half the plants were then analyzed for total Hg and MeHg. The remaining plants were transferred to mercury-free medium with low or high nutrient levels and posttreated for 3 days before analysis of total Hg and MeHg in order to measure MeHg formation in the absence of external Hg. The results indicate that nutrient level did not influence MeHg uptake, but that a high nutrient level reduced the distribution of MeHg to the shoots 2.7-fold versus low nutrient level. After treatment with HgCl2, MeHg was found in roots and new shoots but not in old shoots. The MeHg:total-Hg ratio was higher in new shoots than in roots, being 13 times higher at high versus low nutrient levels. Thus, MeHg formation was the same in new shoots independent of inorganic Hg concentration, since the total Hg level decreased at a high nutrient level. PMID:20821626

  19. Low-level measurements of tritium in water

    Using a liquid scintillation counter, an experimental procedure for measuring low-level activity concentrations of tritium in environmental water has been developed by our laboratory, using the electrolytic tritium enrichment. Additionally, some quality tests were applied in order to assure the goodness of the method. Well-known water samples collected in the Tagus River (West of Spain) and the Danube River (Bulgaria), both affected by nuclear plant releases, were analysed and results were compared to previous data. The analytical procedure was applied to drinking water samples from the public water supply of Seville and mineral waters from different springs in Spain in order to characterize its origin. Due to the very low levels of tritium in the analysed samples, some results were reported as lower than the minimum detectable activity concentration (MDA). However, the count rate of these measurements was over the background count rate of LS counter in all the cases. For that reason, an exhaustive discussion about the meaning of the MDA, using an experimental essay, was made in order to establish a rigorous criterion that leads to a reliable value in the case of low-level measurements

  20. Paleocommunity Replacements of Benthic Brachiopod in the Middle-Upper Devonian in the Longmenshan Area, Southwestern China: Responses to Sea Level Fluctuations

    CHEN Yuanren; LI Xianghui

    2005-01-01

    Twelve paleocommunities dominated by benthic brachiopod are recognized in the Givetian-Frasnian stages of the Devonian in the Longmenshan area, southwestern China, in which two kinds of brachiopod community replacement are classified. One is the abrupt replacement, represented by abrupt alternation between the Leiorhynchus community and Zhonghuacoelia-Striatopugnax community in the Frasnian Tuqiaozi Formation. The other is the gradual one, developed in the Givetian Guanwushan Formation, which had been completed by the shift of the Independatrypa lemma-Uncinulus heterocostellis-Emanuella takwanensis community via the Sinospongophyllum irregulare-Pseudomicroplasma fongi community to the Clathrocoilona spissa-Hexagonaria composite reef community. According to analyses of the paleocommunities, either the abrupt or gradual paleocommunity replacement of the Middle-Upper Devonian in the Longmenshan area is suggested as a response to the 5th-order sea level fluctuation due to the replacements of the paleocommunities in a tracts-system of depositional sequence. It is supposed that changes of paleocommunity diversity,one of the results of paleocommunity replacement, are depended on the range and magnitude of sea level fluctuation, but there is not a linear relationship between them. Furthermore, a suggestion is proposed that the concept of paleocommunity succession seem to be abandoned in the paleocommunity analysis because it almost never be practiced to recover the information of community succession in the geological record at present.

  1. Carbon and strontium isotope variations and responses tosea-level fluctuations in the Ordovician of the Tarim Basin

    JIANG; Maosheng

    2001-01-01

    [1]Arthur, M. A., The carbon cycle-controls of atmospheric CO2 and climate in the geologic past, in Climate in Earth History (eds., Berger, W. M., Crowell, J. C), Washington D C: U. S. National Academy Press, 1982, 55-67.[2]Kroopnick, P. M., Margolis, M. V., Wong, C. S., δ18C variations in marine carbonate sediments as indicators of the CO2 balance between atmosphere and ocean, in The Fate of Fossil Fuel CO2 in the Ocean (eds., Anderson, N. R., Malahoff. A.),New York: Plenum Press, 1977, 295-321.[3]Veizer, J., Fritz, P., Jones, B., Geochemistry of brachiopods: Oxygen and carbon isotopic records of Paleozoic oceans,Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1986, 50: 1679- 1696.[4]Wadleigh, M. A., Veizer, J., 18O/16O and 13C/12C in Lower Paleozoic articulate brachiopods: Implications for the isotopic composition seawater, Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta, 1992, 56:431-443.[5]Goldberg, E. D., Minor elements in sea water, in Chemical Oceanography (eds., Riley, J. P., Skirrow, G.), Vol. l, New York: Academic Press, 1986.[6]Fanre, G., Principles ofIsotope Geology, New York: Wiley, 1986, 1 -589.[7]Ebneth, S., Diener, A., Buhl, D. et al., Strontium isotope systematics of conodonts: Middle Devonian, Eifel Mts. Germany,Paleogeogr. Paleoclimatol. Paleoecol, 1996, 119:201 - 214.[8]Martin, E. E., Macdougall, J. D., Sr and Nd isotopes at Permian / Triassic boundary: A record of climate change, Chem.Geol.. 1995. 125: 73-79.[9]Jones. C. E.. Jenkyns, H. C., Hesselbo, S. P., Strotium isotopic variations in Jurassic and Cretaceous seawater, Geochemica et Cosmochemica Acta. 1994, 58:3061 - 3074.[10]McArthur. J. M., Kennedy, W. J., Chen, M. et al., Staontium isotope stratigraphy for Late Cretaceous time: Drect numerical clibration of the Sr curve based on the U.S. western interior, Paleogeogr. Paleoclimatol. Paleoecol., 1994, 108:95-119.[11]McArthur, J. M., Thirlwall, M. F., Gale, A. S. et al., Strotium isotope stratigraphy for the Late Cretaceous: A new curve

  2. Stationary flow solution for water levels in open channels

    Opheusden, van J.H.J.; Molenaar, J.; Beltman, W.H.J.; Adriaanse, P.I.

    2010-01-01

    We study stationary flow in open discharge channels. A model is derived from basic principles, which is solved numerically for the water level and discharge as a function of position along the channel. The model describes the effect of external inflow from fields adjacent to the channel. Several sce

  3. CAN FLUORIDATION AFFECT WATER LEAD LEVELS AND LEAD NEUROTOXICITY?

    Recent reports have attempted to show that certain approaches to fluoridating potable water is linked to increased levels of lead(II) in the blood. We examine these claims in light of the established science and critically evaluate their significance. The completeness of nexafluo...

  4. Mold Simulator Study of the Initial Solidification of Molten Steel in Continuous Casting Mold: Part II. Effects of Mold Oscillation and Mold Level Fluctuation

    Zhang, Haihui; Wang, Wanlin

    2016-04-01

    The surface quality of the continuous casting strands is closely related to the initial solidification of liquid steel in the vicinity of the mold meniscus, and thus the clear understanding of the behavior of molten steel initial solidification would be of great importance for the control of the quality of final slab. With the development of the mold simulator techniques, the complex interrelationship between the solidified shell surface profile, heat flux, shell thickness, mold level fluctuation, and the infiltrated slag film was well illustrated in our previous study. As the second part, this article investigated the effect of the mold oscillation frequency, stroke, and mold level fluctuation on the initial solidification of the molten steel through the conduction of five different experiments. Results suggested that in the case of the stable mold level, the oscillation marks (OMs) exhibit equally spaced horizon depressions on the shell surface, where the heat flux at the meniscus area raises rapidly during negative strip time (NST) period and the presence of each OMs on the shell surface is corresponding to a peak value of the heat flux variation rate. Otherwise, the shell surface is poorly defined by the existence of wave-type defects, such as ripples or deep depressions, and the heat flux variation is irregular during NST period. The rising of the mold level leads to the longer-pitch and deeper OMs formation; conversely, the falling of mold level introduces shorter-pitch and shallower OMs. With the increase of the mold oscillation frequency, the average value of the low-frequency heat flux at the meniscus increases; however, it decreases when the mold oscillation stroke increases. Additionally, the variation amplitude of the high-frequency temperature and the high-frequency heat flux decreases with the increase of the oscillation frequency and the reduction of the oscillation stroke.

  5. Fluctuation phenomena

    Fluctuation phenomena are the ''tip of the iceberg'' revealing the existence, behind even the most quiescent appearing macroscopic states, of an underlying world of agitated, ever-changing microscopic processes. While the presence of these fluctuations can be ignored in some cases, e.g. if one is satisfied with purely thermostatic description of systems in equilibrium, they are central to the understanding of other phenomena, e.g. the nucleation of a new phase following the quenching of a system into the co-existence region. This volume contains a collection of review articles, written by experts in the field, on the subject of fluctuation phenomena. Some of the articles are of a very general nature discussing the modern mathematical formulation of the problems involved, while other articles deal with specific topics such as kinetics of phase transitions and conductivity in solids. The juxtaposition of the variety of physical situations in which fluctuation phenomena play an important role is novel and should give the reader an insight into this subject

  6. A high resolution water level forecast for the German Bight

    Niehüser, Sebastian; Dangendorf, Sönke; Arns, Arne; Jensen, Jürgen

    2016-04-01

    Many coastal regions worldwide are potentially endangered by storm surges which can cause disastrous damages and loss of life. Due to climate change induced sea level rise, an accumulation of such events is expected by the end of the 21th century. Therefore, advanced storm surge warnings are needed to be prepared when another storm surge hits the coast. In the shallow southeastern North Sea these storm surge warnings are nowadays routinely provided for selected tide gauge locations along a coastline through state-of-the-art forecast systems, which are based on a coupled system of empirical tidal predictions and numerical storm surge forecasts. Along the German North Sea coastline, the Federal Maritime and Hydrographic Agency in cooperation with the German Weather Service is responsible for the storm surge warnings. They provide accurate, high frequency and real-time water level forecasts for up to six days ahead at selected tide gauge sites via internet, telephone and broadcast. Since water levels along the German North Sea coastline are dominated by shallow water effects and a very complex bathymetric structure of the seabed, the pointwise forecast is not necessarily transferable to un-gauged areas between the tide gauges. Here we aim to close this existing gap and develop water level forecasts with a high spatial (continuously with a resolution of at least 1 kilometer) as well as a high temporal (at least 15-minute values) resolution along the entire German North Sea coastline. We introduce a new methodology for water level forecasts which combines empirical or statistical and numerical models. While the tidal forecast is performed by non-parametric interpolation techniques between un-gauged and gauged sites, storm surges are estimated on the basis of statistical/empirical storm surge formulas taken from a numerical model hindcast. The procedure will be implemented in the operational mode forced with numerical weather forecasts.

  7. Radioactivity levels in waters and sediments from Van Lake / Turkey

    It is well known that natural radionuclides can be effective as tracers for the different processes controlling the distribution of elements dissolved and particulate phases in aquatic systems. Significant radiation doses to man can potentially occur following radioactive contamination of water bodies such as rivers, lakes and reservoirs. In the long term, radioactivity in the water body can remain at significant levels as a result of secondary contamination processes. The Van Lake is located at Eastern part of Turkey and it is largest Lake of Turkey. The purpose of this study is to measure natural radioactivity in the waters and sediments taken from along to shore of Van Lake. Total of 19 surface coast lake waters and 18 sediments samples were collected from Van Lake in dry season in 2005, in the first part of this Project. In surface lake water samples, pH, mV and conductivity values were measured and alkalinity content was determined titrimetrically. The uranium concentrations in the lake water samples were measured using uranium analyzer. Radioactivities related to gross radium isotopes, gross-α and gross-β radioactivity levels in the surface water were determined. Gross radium isotopes were separated using the barium sulphate co-precipitation method and then the radioactivity of gross radium isotopes was measured by ZnS(Ag) alpha scintillation counter. The correlation among measured parameters for water samples and concentrations of uranium and gross radium isotopes are also discussed. Natural radioactivity in the sediments was also determined by gamma spectrometer. The field and laboratory studies on this project are carried out

  8. Mountain Pine Beetle Impact on Stand-level Water Balance

    Reilly, J. A.; Woods, S.

    2012-12-01

    The recent mountain pine beetle (MPB) epidemic has disturbed millions of hectares throughout the Rocky Mountain West. The most persistent effects of MPB infestation on the stand-level water balance are likely concomitant with the grey stage of the disturbance cycle. The grey stage occurs within 3 to 5 years of the initial infestation after the needles of an infected tree have turned red and fallen off due to tree death. Large numbers of grey-stage trees in a stand may remain on the landscape for up to 20 years, until windthrow or another disturbance sends them to the forest floor. The greater temporal persistence of the grey stage over antecedent stages suggested that an examination of the grey stage would best capture long-term effects of MPB disturbance on the forest water balance. In this study we hypothesized that changes to the forest canopy associated with MPB disturbance may affect the stand-level water balance. The needle loss and windthrow that follows MPB disturbance is expected to increase the amount of precipitation reaching the forest floor. Additionally, overstory evapotranspiration (ET) demand is expected to decrease as MPB-induced tree mortality increases within disturbed stands. The expected cumulative effect of MPB disturbance on the stand-level water balance is an increase in soil moisture due to increased precipitation inputs and reduced overstory ET. This study was conducted in Lubrecht Experimental Forest and adjacent Bureau of Land Management areas near Missoula, Montana. Sub-canopy measurements of soil moisture, precipitation (rain and snow water equivalent), overstory transpiration and micro-meteorological data (net radiation, temperature, wind speed, etc.) were collected in three 50 x 50 meter plots. The plots consisted of a uniform stand of grey-stage lodgepole pine, a uniform stand of non-infested lodgepole pine, and a recent clear-cut stand, which served as a control unit. Water balances for each stand were constructed using a mass

  9. Effects of Water Levels on Productivity of Canada Geese in the Northern Flathead Valley, 1985 Annual Report.

    Casey, Daniel

    1986-04-01

    Operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork Flathead River causes sporadic water level fluctuations along the main stem Flathead River. Changes in chronology of seasonal water level fluctuations and substantial habitat losses have occurred as a result of construction and operation of Kerr Dam, which regulates Flathead Lake. These fluctuations may impact goose populations through flooding and erosion of nesting and brood-rearing habitats, and increased susceptibility of nests and young to predation. The number, location, and success of goose nests were determined through pair surveys and nest searches. Our 1985 pair count data indicated that 95 to 143 nests may have been present. Hatching success for 1985 nests (55%) was low compared to long-term averages for the region. Predation was the predominant cause of ground nest failure (25 nests); we documented 2 nest failures due to flooding. The maximum gosling count in the study area for 1985 was 197. Six key brood-rearing areas were identified. Most (80%) sites were located in the herbaceous or pasture cover type and the riparian bench landform. Analysis of aerial photographs taken prior to construction of Kerr Dam documented the loss of 1859 acres of habitat along the north shore of Flathead Lake. Losses were attributed to inundation and to continuing erosion due to operation of Kerr Dam. Lake and river water level regimes were compared with the chronology of important periods in the nesting cycle. Low lake levels in May and early June coincide with the breed-rearing period. Mudflats are heavily used by broods, but their effect on survival must still be documented. Preliminary recommendations to protect and enhance Canada goose habitat and production are being developed.

  10. Fuzzy Neural Networks for water level and discharge forecasting

    Alvisi, Stefano; Franchini, Marco

    2010-05-01

    A new procedure for water level (or discharge) forecasting under uncertainty using artificial neural networks is proposed: uncertainty is expressed in the form of a fuzzy number. For this purpose, the parameters of the neural network, namely, the weights and biases, are represented by fuzzy numbers rather than crisp numbers. Through the application of the extension principle, the fuzzy number representative of the output variable (water level or discharge) is then calculated at each time step on the basis of a set of crisp inputs and fuzzy parameters of the neural network. The proposed neural network thus allows uncertainty to be taken into account at the forecasting stage not providing only deterministic or crisp predictions, but rather predictions in terms of 'the discharge (or level) will fall between two values, indicated according to the level of credibility considered, whereas it will take on a certain value when the level of credibility is maximum'. The fuzzy parameters of the neural network are estimated using a calibration procedure that imposes a constraint whereby for an assigned h-level the envelope of the corresponding intervals representing the outputs (forecasted levels or discharges, calculated at different points in time) must include a prefixed percentage of observed values. The proposed model is applied to two different case studies. Specifically, the data related to the first case study are used to develop and test a flood event-based water level forecasting model, whereas the data related to the latter are used for continuous discharge forecasting. The results obtained are compared with those provided by other data-driven models - Bayesian neural networks (Neal, R.M. 1992, Bayesian training of backpropagation networks by the hybrid Monte Carlo method. Tech. Rep. CRG-TR-92-1, Dep. of Comput. Sci., Univ. of Toronto, Toronto, Ont., Canada.) and the Local Uncertainty Estimation Model (Shrestha D.L. and Solomatine D.P. 2006, Machine learning

  11. Quadratic controller syntheses for the steam generator water level

    The steam generator water level, (SGWL), control problem in the pressurized water reactor of a nuclear power plant is considered from robust control techniques point of view. The plant is a time-varying system with a non minimum phase behavior and an unstable open-loop response. The time-varying nature of the plant due to change in operating power is taken into account by including slowly time-varying uncertainty in the model. A linear Time-Invariant, (LTI) guaranteed cost quadratic stabilizing controller is designed in order to address some of the particular issues arising for such a control problem. (author)

  12. Interlaboratory comparison of low-level tritium measurements in water

    The paper presents and discusses results submitted by 41 laboratories who participated in the third inter-laboratory comparison of low-level tritium measurements in waters organized by the Isotope Hydrology Section of IAEA. Four waters of different concentration were prepared by diluting NBS 4926 standard. A high proportion of unsatisfactory results were received for all four samples, revealing problems in control and assessment of measurement errors, and also a generally unsatisfactory situation regarding standardization. Recommendations are made for the adoption of a single parent standard and a fixed half-life for decay corrections. (author)

  13. Multivariate statistical analysis of water chemistry conditions in three wastewater stabilization ponds with algae blooms and pH fluctuations.

    Wallace, Jack; Champagne, Pascale; Hall, Geof

    2016-06-01

    The wastewater stabilization ponds (WSPs) at a wastewater treatment facility in eastern Ontario, Canada, have experienced excessive algae growth and high pH levels in the summer months. A full range of parameters were sampled from the system and the chemical dynamics in the three WSPs were assessed through multivariate statistical analysis. The study presents a novel approach for exploratory analysis of a comprehensive water chemistry dataset, incorporating principal components analysis (PCA) and principal components (PC) and partial least squares (PLS) regressions. The analyses showed strong correlations between chl-a and sunlight, temperature, organic matter, and nutrients, and weak and negative correlations between chl-a and pH and chl-a and DO. PCA reduced the data from 19 to 8 variables, with a good fit to the original data matrix (similarity measure of 0.73). Multivariate regressions to model system pH in terms of these key parameters were performed on the reduced variable set and the PCs generated, for which strong fits (R(2) > 0.79 with all data) were observed. The methodologies presented in this study are applicable to a wide range of natural and engineered systems where a large number of water chemistry parameters are monitored resulting in the generation of large data sets. PMID:27038585

  14. Mesoscopic fluctuations, two-parameter scaling and concommitant unusual level spacing distributions in finite 1D disordered systems

    We study level spacing distributions of finite-sized one-dimensional disordered systems. As the system evolves from a quasi-ballistic to a strongly localized regime, the system crosses over from a strongly non-Wigner-Dyson type level spacing distribution to a universal Poisson distribution in the thermodynamic (L→∞) limit. In between it goes through regimes where the distribution seems to be a mixture of Wigner-Dyson type and Poisson type distributions, thus indicating existence of pre-localized states before the thermodynamic limit sets in. (author)

  15. Cambro-ordovician sea-level fluctuations and sequence boundaries: The missing record and the evolution of new taxa

    Lehnert, O.; Miller, J.F.; Leslie, Stephen A.; Repetski, J.E.; Ethington, Raymond L.

    2005-01-01

    The evolution of early Palaeozoic conodont faunas shows a clear connection to sea-level changes. One way that this connection manifests itself is that thick successions of carbonates are missing beneath major sequence boundaries due to karstification and erosion. From this observation arises the question of how many taxa have been lost from different conodont lineages in these incomplete successions. Although many taxa suffered extinction due to the environmental stresses associated with falling sea-levels, some must have survived in these extreme conditions. The number of taxa missing in the early Palaeozoic tropics always will be unclear, but it will be even more difficult to evaluate the missing record in detrital successions of higher latitudes. A common pattern in the evolution of Cambrian-Ordovician conodont lineages is appearances of new species at sea-level rises and disappearances at sea-level drops. This simple picture can be complicated by intervals that consistently have no representatives of a particular lineage, even after extensive sampling of the most complete sections. Presumably the lineages survived in undocumented refugia. In this paper, we give examples of evolution in Cambrian-Ordovician shallowmarine conodont faunas and highlight problems of undiscovered or truly missing segments of lineages. ?? The Palaeontological Association.

  16. Predicting the residual aluminum level in water treatment process

    J. Tomperi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available In water treatment processes, aluminum salts are widely used as coagulation chemical. High dose of aluminum has been proved to be at least a minor health risk and some evidence points out that aluminum could increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease thus it is important to minimize the amount of residual aluminum in drinking water and water used at food industry. In this study, the data of a water treatment plant (WTP was analyzed and the residual aluminum in drinking water was predicted using Multiple Linear Regression (MLR and Artificial Neural Network (ANN models. The purpose was to find out which variables affect the amount of residual aluminum and create simple and reliable prediction models which can be used in an early warning system (EWS. Accuracy of ANN and MLR models were compared. The new nonlinear scaling method based on generalized norms and skewness was used to scale all measurement variables to range [−2...+2] before data-analysis and modeling. The effect of data pre-processing was studied by comparing prediction results to ones achieved in an earlier study. Results showed that it is possible to predict the baseline level of residual aluminum in drinking water with a simple model. Variables that affected the most the amount of residual aluminum were among others: raw water temperature, raw water KMnO4 and PAC / KMnO4-ratio. The accuracies of MLR and ANN models were found to be almost equal. Study also showed that data pre-processing affects to the final prediction result.

  17. Predicting the residual aluminum level in water treatment process

    J. Tomperi

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In water treatment processes, aluminum salts are widely used as coagulation chemical. High dose of aluminum has been proved to be at least a minor health risk and some evidence points out that aluminum could increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease. Thus it is important to minimize the amount of residual aluminum in drinking water and water used at food industry. In this study, the data of a water treatment plant (WTP was analyzed and the residual aluminum in drinking water was predicted using Multiple Linear Regression (MLR and Artificial Neural Network (ANN models. The purpose was to find out which variables affect the amount of residual aluminum and create simple and reliable prediction models which can be used in an early warning system (EWS. Accuracy of ANN and MLR models were compared. The new nonlinear scaling method based on generalized norms and skewness was used to scale all measurement variables to range [−2...+2] before data-analysis and modeling. The effect of data pre-processing was studied by comparing prediction results to ones achieved in an earlier study. Results showed that it is possible to predict the baseline level of residual aluminum in drinking water with a simple model. Variables that affected the most the amount of residual aluminum were among others: raw water temperature, raw water KMnO4 and PAC/KMnO4 (Poly-Aluminum Chloride/Potassium permanganate-ratio. The accuracies of MLR and ANN models were found to be almost the same. Study also showed that data pre-processing affects to the final prediction result.

  18. Effect of water level lfuctuations on temporal-spatial patterns of foraging activities by the wintering Hooded Crane (Grus monacha)

    Dongmei Zhang; Lizhi Zhou; Yunwei Song

    2015-01-01

    Background: The Yangtze River lfoodplain provides important wintering habitats for Hooded Cranes (Grus monacha) in China. Fluctuations in the water level change foraging habitat and food availability, affecting their temporal-spatial patterns of foraging activities. It is of considerable importance to investigate the effect of these lfuctuations on food availability for wintering Hooded Cranes and their foraging response to these changes. Understanding their behavior patterns is beneifcial in protecting the wintering crane population and restoring their wintering habitats. Methods: A ifeld survey of the winter behavior of cranes was carried out at Shengjin Lake from November in 2013 to April in 2014. Habitat variables, as well as the spatial distribution and behavior patterns of wintering cranes at their foraging sites during ifve stages of water level lfuctuation were collected. Based on this data we analyzed the relation-ship of foraging behavior relative to water level lfuctuations and habitat types. Results: The foraging habitats used by Hooded Cranes varied at the different water level stages. As the water level decreased, the use of meadows and mudlfats increased. When the water dropped to its lowest level, the use by the Hooded Crane in the mudlfats reached a peak. There were statistically signiifcant differences in time budget in the three types of habitats over the ifve stages of the water level. In the mudlfats, the foraging behavior and maintenance behavior varied signiifcantly with the water level, while the alert behavior showed little variation. Analysis of a general-ized linear model showed that the ifve water level stages and three habitat types had a signiifcant effect on forag- ing behavior, while the combined effect of these two variables was signiifcant on the foraging time budget and the length of foraging activity of the Hooded Crane. Conclusions: With the decrease in the water level, the use of mudlfats by Hooded Cranes increased

  19. Water level and pressure control device upon isolation of reactors

    Purpose: To enable automatic control for the pressure and reactor water level upon isolation of nuclear reactor and significantly decrease the thermal stresses on the reactor materials due to the supply of low temperature water. Constitution: In a case where a main steam isolation valve of BWR type reactor is colsed to isolate the reactor, a flow control valve is controlled by a flow detector that detects the steam flow rate in a main steam relief pipe to thereby release a portion of the main steams to a pressure suppression chamber thereby maintain the reactor pressure to a predetermined value. While on the other hand, feedwater corresponding to the released amount of steams is injected into the reactor core by a pump driven from an auxiliary turbine depending on the detection signal from the flow rate detector and the level detector to thereby attain the intended purpose. (Nakamoto, H.)

  20. Investigation of natural radioactivity levels in water around Kadugli, Sudan

    Surface water from Miri Lake and groundwater from around Kadugli (West-Central Sudan) obtained by means of hand-pumps was analysed for 238U, 226Ra, 222Rn, and 232Th activity concentrations. The surface water showed very low levels of radionuclide concentrations: -1 for 238U, 226Ra, 222Rn, and 232Th, respectively. Groundwater revealed a significant amount of natural radioactivity (16.1-1720, 7.7-14.3, 3000-139,000, -1) respectively. The overall annual effective dose was below the WHO reference dose level of 0.1 mSv yr-1 except in one groundwater sample with an associated dose of 0.7 mSv yr-1

  1. Analytical approach for predicting fresh water discharge in an estuary based on tidal water level observations

    H. Cai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available As the tidal wave propagates into an estuary, the tidally averaged water level tends to rise in landward direction due to the density difference between saline and fresh water and the asymmetry of the friction. The effect of friction on the residual slope is even more remarkable when accounting for fresh water discharge. In this study, we investigate the influence of river discharge on tidal wave propagation in the Yangtze estuary with specific attention to residual water level slope. This is done by using a one-dimensional analytical model for tidal hydrodynamics accounting for the residual water level. We demonstrate the importance of the residual slope on tidal dynamics and use it to improve the prediction of the tidal propagation in estuaries (i.e., tidal damping, velocity amplitude, wave celerity and phase lag, especially when the influence of river discharge is significant. Finally, we develop a new inverse analytical approach for estimating fresh water discharge on the basis of tidal water level observations along the estuary, which can be used as a tool to obtain information on the river discharge that is otherwise difficult to measure in the tidal region.

  2. The Water Level Fall of Lake Megali Prespa (N Greece): an Indicator of Regional Water Stress Driven by Climate Change and Amplified by Water Extraction?

    van der Schriek, Tim; Giannakopoulos, Christos

    2014-05-01

    The Mediterranean stands out globally due to its sensitivity to (future) climate change, with future projections predicting an increase in excessive drought events and declining rainfall. Regional freshwater ecosystems are particularly threatened: precipitation decreases, while extreme droughts increase and human impacts intensify (e.g. water extraction, drainage, pollution and dam-building). Many Mediterranean lake-wetland systems have shrunk or disappeared over the past two decades. Protecting the remaining systems is extremely important for supporting global biodiversity and for ensuring sustainable water availability. This protection should be based on a clear understanding of lake-wetland hydrological responses to natural and human-induced changes, which is currently lacking in many parts of the Mediterranean. The interconnected Prespa-Ohrid Lake system is a global hotspot of biodiversity and endemism. The unprecedented fall in water level (~8m) of Lake Megali Prespa threatens this system, but causes remain debated. Modelling suggests that the S Balkan will experience rainfall and runoff decreases of ~30% by 2050. However, projections revealing the potential impact of these changes on future lake level are unavailable as lake regime is not understood. A further drop in lake level may have serious consequences. The Prespa Lakes contribute ~25% of the total inflow into Lake Ohrid through underground karst channels; falling lake levels decrease this discharge. Lake Ohrid, in turn, feeds the Drim River. This entire catchment may therefore be affected by falling lake levels; its water resources are of great importance for Greece, Albania, FYROM and Montenegro (e.g. tourism, agriculture, hydro-energy, urban & industrial use). This new work proves that annual water level fluctuations of Lake Megali Prespa are predominantly related to precipitation during the first 7 months (Oct-Apr) of the hydrological year (Oct-Sep). Lake level is very sensitive to regional and

  3. Classical and quantal descriptions of small amplitude fluctuations around equilibriums in the two-level pairing model

    Various classical counterparts to the two-level pairing model in a many-fermion system are presented in the Schwinger boson representation. It is shown that one of the key ingredients giving the classical descriptions for quantal systems is the use of various trial states in addition to the su(2) x su(2)-coherent state, which may be a natural selection for the two-level pairing model governed by the su(2) x su(2)-algebra. It is pointed out that a spurious behavior such as a sharp phase transition can be avoided by using the other states including the su(2) x su(1, 1)- and su(1, 1) x su(1, 1)-coherent states. This contrasts with the situation regarding the usual Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and quasi-particle random phase approximations applied to the original fermion system, which yield a sharp phase transition. (author)

  4. Classical and Quantal Descriptions of Small Amplitude Fluctuations Around Equilibriums in the Two-Level Pairing Model

    Tsue, Y; Providência, J; Yamamura, M

    2006-01-01

    Various classical counterparts for the two-level pairing model in a many-fermion system are presented in the Schwinger boson representation. It is shown that one of the key ingredients giving the classical descriptions for quantal system is the use of the various trial states besides the $su(2)\\otimes su(2)$-coherent state, which may be natural selection for the two-level pairing model governed by the $su(2)\\otimes su(2)$-algebra. It is pointed out that the fictitious behavior like the sharp phase transition can be avoided by using the other states such as the $su(2)\\otimes su(1,1)$- and the $su(1,1)\\otimes su(1,1)$-coherent states, while the sharp phase transition appears in the usual Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov and the quasi-particle random phase approximations in the original fermion system.

  5. The link between unemployment and crime rate fluctuations: An analysis at the county, state, and national levels.

    Phillips, Julie; Land, Kenneth C

    2012-05-01

    Cantor and Land (1985) developed a theoretical model that proposed two pathways through which economic activity - as indexed by the aggregate unemployment rate - could affect the rate of criminal activity. The first is by increasing levels of criminal motivation within the population as deteriorating economic conditions affect social strain and social control; the second is by influencing the availability and vulnerability of criminal targets and thus the number of criminal opportunities. Although much empirical research has applied this theoretical model, few analyses have done so at disaggregated units of analysis. We present the most comprehensive analysis to date by empirically evaluating this model with data on 400 of the largest US counties - and examine the effects of aggregation on results as these county data are combined to the state and national levels - for the years 1978-2005. For seven Index crimes at each of the three levels of analysis, and with or without controls for structural covariates at each level, the directional effects hypothesized by Cantor and Land are found for 78 out of 84 estimated relationships. Even after taking into account the lack of statistical independence of these estimates by drawing on recently developed statistical theory, this is a very unlikely outcome. In accordance with expectations based on theory and prior research, (a) some of these relationships are weak and not statistically significant, and (b) the strongest and most consistent patterns of relationships for both the crime opportunity and crime motivation effects are found for three property crimes: burglary, larceny, and motor vehicle theft. Suggestions for further research on this topic are given. PMID:23017802

  6. A multiresidue method to evaluate emerging micropollutants levels in waters

    Lionard, E.; Serveto, F.; Desbiolles, F.; Daval, A.; Coquery, M.; Miège, C.

    2015-01-01

    During the last decade, the interest on the fate of emerging organic micropollutants, including pharmaceuticals and pesticides, in rivers and waste waters has constantly grown. Analysis of these pollutants at trace level in complex matrices is an analytical challenge that requires the development of reliable analytical methods. Based on the conclusions of national research programs on wastewater and sludge treatments and on expert opinions, indicative compounds typical of urban domestic pollu...

  7. Hydrology and water quality of Shell Lake, Washburn County, Wisconsin, with special emphasis on the effects of diversion and changes in water level on the water quality of a shallow terminal lake

    Juckem, Paul F.; Robertson, Dale M.

    2013-01-01

    Shell Lake is a relatively shallow terminal lake (tributaries but no outlets) in northwestern Wisconsin that has experienced approximately 10 feet (ft) of water-level fluctuation over more than 70 years of record and extensive flooding of nearshore areas starting in the early 2000s. The City of Shell Lake (City) received a permit from the Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources in 2002 to divert water from the lake to a nearby river in order to lower water levels and reduce flooding. Previous studies suggested that water-level fluctuations were driven by long-term cycles in precipitation, evaporation, and runoff, although questions about the lake’s connection with the groundwater system remained. The permit required that the City evaluate assumptions about lake/groundwater interactions made in previous studies and evaluate the effects of the water diversion on water levels in Shell Lake and other nearby lakes. Therefore, a cooperative study between the City and U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) was initiated to improve the understanding of the hydrogeology of the area and evaluate potential effects of the diversion on water levels in Shell Lake, the surrounding groundwater system, and nearby lakes. Concerns over deteriorating water quality in the lake, possibly associated with changes in water level, prompted an additional cooperative project between the City and the USGS to evaluate efeffects of changes in nutrient loading associated with changes in water levels on the water quality of Shell Lake. Numerical models were used to evaluate how the hydrology and water quality responded to diversion of water from the lake and historical changes in the watershed. The groundwater-flow model MODFLOW was used to simulate groundwater movement in the area around Shell Lake, including groundwater/surface-water interactions. Simulated results from the MODFLOW model indicate that groundwater flows generally northward in the area around Shell Lake, with flow locally converging

  8. Reservoir Computing approach to Great Lakes water level forecasting

    Coulibaly, Paulin

    2010-02-01

    SummaryThe use of echo state network (ESN) for dynamical system modeling is known as Reservoir Computing and has been shown to be effective for a number of applications, including signal processing, learning grammatical structure, time series prediction and motor/system control. However, the performance of Reservoir Computing approach on hydrological time series remains largely unexplored. This study investigates the potential of ESN or Reservoir Computing for long-term prediction of lake water levels. Great Lakes water levels from 1918 to 2005 are used to develop and evaluate the ESN models. The forecast performance of the ESN-based models is compared with the results obtained from two benchmark models, the conventional recurrent neural network (RNN) and the Bayesian neural network (BNN). The test results indicate a strong ability of ESN models to provide improved lake level forecasts up to 10-month ahead - suggesting that the inherent structure and innovative learning approach of the ESN is suitable for hydrological time series modeling. Another particular advantage of ESN learning approach is that it simplifies the network training complexity and avoids the limitations inherent to the gradient descent optimization method. Overall, it is shown that the ESN can be a good alternative method for improved lake level forecasting, performing better than both the RNN and the BNN on the four selected Great Lakes time series, namely, the Lakes Erie, Huron-Michigan, Ontario, and Superior.

  9. The Application of a Grey Markov Model to Forecasting Annual Maximum Water Levels at Hydrological Stations

    DONG Sheng; CHI Kun; ZHANG Qiyi; ZHANG Xiangdong

    2012-01-01

    Compared with traditional real-time forecasting,this paper proposes a Grey Markov Model (GMM) to forecast the maximum water levels at hydrological stations in the estuary area.The GMM combines the Grey System and Markov theory into a higher precision model.The GMM takes advantage of the Grey System to predict the trend values and uses the Markov theory to forecast fluctuation values,and thus gives forecast results involving two aspects of information.The procedure for forecasting annul maximum water levels with the GMM contains five main steps:1) establish the GM (1,1) model based on the data series; 2) estimate the trend values; 3) establish a Markov Model based on relative error series; 4) modify the relative errors caused in step 2,and then obtain the relative errors of the second order estimation; 5) compare the results with measured data and estimate the accuracy.The historical water level records (from 1960 to 1992) at Yuqiao Hydrological Station in the estuary area of the Haihe River near Tianjin,China are utilized to calibrate and verify the proposed model according to the above steps.Every 25 years' data are regarded as a hydro-sequence.Eight groups of simulated results show reasonable agreement between the predicted values and the measured data.The GMM is also applied to the 10 other hydrological stations in the same estuary.The forecast results for all of the hydrological stations are good or acceptable.The feasibility and effectiveness of this new forecasting model have been proved in this paper.

  10. Plio-Pleistocene sea level and temperature fluctuations in the northwestern Pacific promoted speciation in the globally-distributed flathead mullet Mugil cephalus

    Durand Jean-Dominique

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The study of speciation in the marine realm is challenging because of the apparent absence of physical barriers to dispersal, which are one of the main drivers of genetic diversity. Although phylogeographic studies using mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA information often reveal significant genetic heterogeneity within marine species, the evolutionary significance of such diversity is difficult to interpret with these markers. In the northwestern (NW Pacific, several studies have emphasised the potential importance of sea-level regression during the most recent glaciations as a driver of genetic diversity in marine species. These studies have failed, however, to determine whether the period of isolation was long enough for divergence to attain speciation. Among these marine species, the cosmopolitan estuarine-dependent fish Mugil cephalus represents an interesting case study. Several divergent allopatric mtDNA lineages have been described in this species worldwide, and three occur in sympatry in the NW Pacific. Results Ten nuclear microsatellites were surveyed to estimate the level of genetic isolation of these lineages and determine the role of sea-level fluctuation in the evolution of NW Pacific M. cephalus. Three cryptic species of M. cephalus were identified within this region (NWP1, 2 and 3 using an assignment test on the microsatellite data. Each species corresponds with one of the three mtDNA lineages in the COI phylogenetic tree. NWP3 is the most divergent species, with a distribution range that suggests tropical affinities, while NWP1, with a northward distribution from Taiwan to Russia, is a temperate species. NWP2 is distributed along the warm Kuroshio Current. The divergence of NWP1 from NWP2 dates back to the Pleistocene epoch and probably corresponds to the separation of the Japan and China Seas when sea levels dropped. Despite their subsequent range expansion since this period of glaciation, no gene flow was observed

  11. Sedimentary archaeal amoA gene abundance reflects historic nutrient level and salinity fluctuations in Qinghai Lake, Tibetan Plateau

    Yang, Jian; Jiang, Hongchen; Dong, Hailiang; Hou, Weiguo; Li, Gaoyuan; Wu, Geng

    2015-12-01

    Integration of DNA derived from ancient phototrophs with their characteristic lipid biomarkers has been successfully employed to reconstruct paleoenvironmental conditions. However, it is poorly known that whether the DNA and lipids of microbial functional aerobes (such as ammonia-oxidizing archaea: AOA) can be used for reconstructing past environmental conditions. Here we identify and quantify the AOA amoA genes (encoding the alpha subunit of ammonia monooxygenases) preserved in a 5.8-m sediment core (spanning the last 18,500 years) from Qinghai Lake. Parallel analyses revealed that low amoA gene abundance corresponded to high total organic carbon (TOC) and salinity, while high amoA gene abundance corresponded to low TOC and salinity. In the Qinghai Lake region, TOC can serve as an indicator of paleo-productivity and paleo-precipitation, which is related to historic nutrient input and salinity. So our data suggest that temporal variation of AOA amoA gene abundance preserved in Qinghai Lake sediment may reflect the variations of nutrient level and salinity throughout the late Pleistocene and Holocene in the Qinghai Lake region.

  12. Concentrating Low-Level Tritiated Water Through Isotope Exchange

    Trapping of tritium on polymers with specific functional groups was investigated as a means of treating waste streams containing low levels of tritium. Chemical exchange of tritium with hydrogen on the functional group was used as the mechanism for trapping. The polymers tested include Aurorez polybenzimidazole resin beads, Chelex 100 resin beads, Duolite GT-73, microcrystalline cellulose, and polyethylenimine. The tests were performed under simulated operating conditions on water obtained from the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Tritiated water from the Tritium Systems Test Assembly is discharged to this plant. Polyethylenimine is a water-soluble polymer that was tested using a stirred membrane cell with an ultrafiltration membrane. All of the polymers except polyethylenimine took up tritium from the water. Polybenzimidazole demonstrated the highest tritium uptake. The results are explained on the basis of the type of functional group, hydrogen bonding, and rigidity of the molecular structure of the polymer. The theoretical calculations indicate that significant isotope discrimination requires high-frequency modes with hydrogen bonding contribution and support the experimental findings. Modeling suggested trends that may lead to structures that are more efficient in trapping tritium

  13. Concentrating low-level tritiated water through isotope exchange

    Trapping of tritium on polymers with specific functional groups was investigated as a means of treating waste streams containing low levels of tritium. Chemical exchange of tritium with hydrogen on the functional group was used as the mechanism for trapping. The polymers tested include Aurorez polybenzimidazole resin beads, Chelex 100 resin beads, Duolite GT-73, microcrystalline cellulose, and polyethylenimine. The tests were performed under simulated operating conditions on water obtained from the Radioactive Liquid Waste Treatment Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, Tritiated water from the Tritium Systems Test Assembly is discharged to this plant. Polyethylenimine is a water-soluble polymer that was tested using a stirred membrane cell with an ultrafiltration membrane. All of the polymers except polyethylenimine took up tritium from the water. Polybenzimidazole demonstrated the highest tritium uptake. The results are explained on the basis of the type of functional group, hydrogen bonding, and rigidity of the molecular structure of the polymer. The theoretical calculations indicate that significant isotope discrimination requires high-frequency modes with hydrogen bonding contribution and support the experimental findings. Modeling suggested trends that may lead to structures that are more efficient in trapping tritium

  14. Long term fluctuations of groundwater mine pollution in a sulfide mining district with dry Mediterranean climate: Implications for water resources management and remediation.

    Caraballo, Manuel A; Macías, Francisco; Nieto, José Miguel; Ayora, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Water resources management and restoration strategies, and subsequently ecological and human life quality, are highly influenced by the presence of short and long term cycles affecting the intensity of a targeted pollution. On this respect, a typical acid mine drainage (AMD) groundwater from a sulfide mining district with dry Mediterranean climate (Iberian Pyrite Belt, SW Spain) was studied to unravel the effect of long term weather changes in water flow rate and metal pollutants concentration. Three well differentiated polluting stages were observed and the specific geochemical, mineralogical and hydrological processes involved (pyrite and enclosing rocks dissolution, evaporitic salts precipitation-redisolution and pluviometric long term fluctuations) were discussed. Evidencing the importance of including longer background monitoring stage in AMD management and restoration strategies, the present study strongly advise a minimum 5-years period of AMD continuous monitoring previous to the design of any AMD remediation system in regions with dry Mediterranean climate. PMID:26379258

  15. Optimum Water Level for Spent Fuel Pool using MCNP Code

    TRIGA reactor (RTP) has been operated for more than 30 years. Some of the part of the reactor become degraded by the time. Sooner or later, all these part either will be changed with a new part and proceed with upgrading plan or the reactor itself will be decommissioned. By that time, spent fuel pool (SFP) need to be ready to keep all the fuel from the core. The conceptual design of the SFP has been established. This paper will determine optimum water level to avoid any radiation hazard expose to the workers during managing the fuel later. This determination will use MCNP computer code. (author)

  16. Records of ground-water levels and effects of pumping in the Ardmore well-field area, Carter County, Oklahoma

    Wood, P.R.

    1965-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to outline the results of work done by the U.S. Geological Survey in the Ardmore well-field area, near Newport, Carter County. The work, completed in two periods between April 1964 and June 1965, was done as part of the ground-water program carried out by the Geological Survey in cooperation with the Oklahoma Water Resources Board. The study in the report area included: (1) a physical inventory of wells in the vicinity of the Ardmore well field (fig. 1); (2) information on depths, perforated intervals, ground-water levels, and water use (table 1); (3) records of water-level fluctuations in deep and shallow wells (table 2) to determine if there is a hydraulic connection between the deep zones tapped by Ardmore's wells and the shallow and intermediate zones tapped by domestic and stock wells in the surrounding area; and (4) general information on the geologic and hydrologic features that may be of use in evaluating the ground-water potential of the Wichita Formation, the principal aquifer in the area. (available as photostat copy only)

  17. Establishing solar water disinfection as a water treatment method at household level

    Regula Meierhofer

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available 1.1 billion People worldwide do not have access to safe drinking water and therefore are exposed to a high risk for diarrhoeal diseases. As a consequence, about 6,000 children die each day of dehydration due to diarrhoea. Adequate water treatment methods and safe storage of drinking water, combined with hygiene promotion, are required to prevent the population without access to safe drinking water from illness and death. Solar water disinfection (SODIS is a new water treatment to be applied at household level with a great potential to reduce diarrhoea incidence of users. The method is very simple and the only resources required for its application are transparent PET plastic bottles (or glass bottles and sufficient sunlight: microbiologically contaminated water is filled into the bottles and exposed to the full sunlight for 6 hours. During solar exposure, the diarrhoea causing pathogens are killed by the UV-A radiation of the sunlight. At present, SODIS is used by about 2 Million users in more than 20 countries of the South. Diarrhoea incidence of users significantly has been reduced by 30 to 70 %. A careful and long-term community education process that involves creating awareness on the importance of treating drinking water and initiates behaviour change is required to establish the sustainable practice of SODIS at community level. In Madagascar, more than 160 children younger than 5 years die each day from malaria, diarrhoea and acute respiratory illnesses. The application of household water treatment methods such as SODIS significantly could contribute to improve their health.

  18. Ion Chromatographic Determination of low level Perchlorate in Natural Waters

    Perchlorate (ClO4-) is a persistent contaminant of drinking-, surface-, and ground-water, and of soils. Possible contributions of ClO4- contamination are the military, the space program, and supporting industries and fertilizers. Perchlorate has long been known to have a negative effect on the thyroid gland. It has been added to the United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Contaminant candidate List (CCL) in 1998, so that ClO4 can be regulated at a concentration safe to humans. This paper describes the determination of trace level ClO4- in various matrices utilizing ion chromatographic method. The method utilizes a Dionex IonPac AS11 column with suppressed conductivity detection, 1500ul sample loop, and a 100 mN NaOH eluent at a flow rate of 1.0ml/min. These parameters allow a method detection limit (MDL) of 0.277ug/1 and a short retention time of 8 minutes. A quality control, proficiency testing samples from the EPA and a number of environmental samples from New York State (ground water) and California (ground and surface waters) were analyzed by this technique. Concentrations measured were in the range of 1.9-217 ug/1. No evidence of ClO4- was found in various commonly used fertilizers. (author)

  19. Impact assessment of climate change and human activities on annual highest water level of Taihu Lake

    Qing-fang HU; Yin-tang WANG

    2009-01-01

    The annual highest water level of Taihu Lake (Zm) is very significant for flood management in the Taihu Basin. This paper first describes the inter-annual and intra-annual traits of Zm from 1956 to 2000. Then, using the Mann-Kenall (MK) and Spearman (SP) nonparametric tests, the long-term change trends of area precipitation and pan evaporation in the Taihu Basin are determined. Meanwhile, using the Morlet wavelet transformation, the fluctuation patterns and change points of precipitation and pan evaporation are analyzed. Also, human activities in the Taihu Basin are described, including land use change and hydraulic project construction. Finally, the relationship between Zm, the water level of Taihu Lake 30 days prior to the day of Zm (Z0), and the 30-day total precipitation and pan evaporation prior to the day of Zm (P and E0, respectively) is described based on multi-linear regression equations. The relative influence of climate change and human activities on the change of Zm is quantitatively ascertained. The results demonstrate that: (1) Zm was distinctly higher during the 1980-2000 period than during the 1956-1979 period, and the 30 days prior to the day of Zm are the key phase influencing Zm every year; (2) P increased significantly at a confidence level of 95% during the 1956-2000 period, while the reverse was true for E0; (3) The relationship between Zm, P and E0 distinctly changed after 1980; (4) Climate change and human activities together caused frequent occurrences of high Zm after 1980; (5) Climate change caused a substantially greater Zm difference between the 1956-1979 and 1980-2000 periods than human activities. Climate change, as represented by P and E0, was the dominant factor raising Zm, with a relative influence ratio of 83.6%, while human activities had a smaller influence ratio of 16.4%.

  20. Investigation of natural radioactivity levels in water around Kadugli, Sudan

    Osman, Alfatih A.A. [Sudan Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 3001, Khartoum (Sudan)], E-mail: alfatih_123@yahoo.com; Salih, Isam; Shaddad, Ibrahim A.; El Din, Saif; Siddeeg, M.B.; Eltayeb, Hatem; Idriss, Hajo; Hamza, Walid; Yousif, E.H. [Sudan Atomic Energy Commission, P.O. Box 3001, Khartoum (Sudan)

    2008-11-15

    Surface water from Miri Lake and groundwater from around Kadugli (West-Central Sudan) obtained by means of hand-pumps was analysed for {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 222}Rn, and {sup 232}Th activity concentrations. The surface water showed very low levels of radionuclide concentrations: <1.0-7.5, 8.5-16.5, <1.6, and <0.1-0.39 mBq L{sup -1} for {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 222}Rn, and {sup 232}Th, respectively. Groundwater revealed a significant amount of natural radioactivity (16.1-1720, 7.7-14.3, 3000-139,000, <0.1-39 mBq L{sup -1}) respectively. The overall annual effective dose was below the WHO reference dose level of 0.1 mSv yr{sup -1} except in one groundwater sample with an associated dose of 0.7 mSv yr{sup -1}.

  1. FLUCTUATION CHARACTERISTICS OF HOLOCENE SEA-LEVEL CHANGE AND ITS ENVIRONMENTAL IMPLICATIONS%略论全新世海面变化的波动性及其环境意义

    谢志仁; 袁林旺

    2012-01-01

    Sea-level change and climate change are interrelated multiscale natural processes with profound spatial and temporal span connotation. Historical fact and event recognition of millennium to centennial scale sea level fluctuations and their relation to climate fluctuations are not only the foundation and theoretical issues of sea level change studies, but also very important for in-depth understanding of historical and future trends of coastal environment in both reality and conceptual issues. Based on land-sea level system,this paper integrates statistical analysis, simulation based on models and virtual environment test, and research on a variety of sea level change proxy data. The eastern China and global mean sea level series during the last 20ka are reconstructed based on 67 series selected from 130 global studies on regional sea level series and 12 Holocene series of China coast as well as 667 proxy data of historical sea level with different space-time scales. The fluctuations of different temporal scales are analyzed in details. The division of the millennial fluctuations in Holocene of eastern China and global average sea level is proposed as well as the division of centennial sea level fluctuations over the past 2ka. Then the correspondence between sea-level fluctuations and the global and China temperature fluctuations of the corresponding period are discussed. Based on the land-sea level system virtual simulation and experimental platform,the evolution of the sea-land relationship in the Yangtze River Delta is simulated, which suggests that the land-sea system evolution in Yangtze River Delta can be divided into early,middle and late stages. The early stage, spanning 10.0 ~ 7.0ka, is a period when sea level raised very quickly and the sea area expanded rapidly. In the middle stages, spanning 7. 0 ~ 2. 5 ka, the sea level raised a little and sea area oscillated a.t a high level; In the late stage,spanning 2. 5 ~0ka,the sea level decrease slightly and the

  2. [Effect of external condition on the static migration and release of dibutylphthalate in the soil of the fluctuating zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir to the overlying water].

    Song, Jiao-yan; Mu, Zhi-jian; Wang, Qiang; Yang, Zhi-dan; Wang, Fa

    2015-01-01

    In order to understand the environmental behavior of the organic pollutants Dibutyl-phthalate (DBP) in fluctuating zone soil, the migration and release processes of DBP in the fluctuating zone of the Three Gorges Reservoir to the overlying water and the impacts of temperature, light, coexistence phthalate-bis (2-ethylhexyl)-ester (DEHP), microbial activity on the process were studied using static flooding method. The results showed that DBP migrated from the soil to the overlying water in the early days after flooding, and the release process of DBP was divided into two phases: one was the quick release with a relatively short releasing time and a rapid releasing rate; the other was the slow release with a relatively long releasing time and a slow releasing rate. The slow release was a major speed control step, which could be well fitted by two-compartment first-order kinetics. In the interim (12 d) after flooding, the capacity of release reached a maximum, the DBP released from the soil into the water migrated from the water to the soil again after continued flooding, and eventually the content of DBP in soil and water reached equilibrium in the later period after flooding. The intensity of DBP releasing into the overlying water and the rapid releasing rate increased, while the slow releasing rate decreased when the temperature increased. The concentrations of DBP released into the water were different with different light sources. The concentration of DBP in the overlying water with treatment of natural light was higher than those with treatment of ultraviolet light UVB, UVA. After the amount of DBP in the overlying water reached the maximum, the content of DBP in the overlying water decreased relatively faster under the ultraviolet light than under the natural light. The largest release content of DBP and the time reached the largest release content were different with different oxygen content in the overlying water. Overall, the higher oxygen content in the

  3. Pore pressure fluctuations of overlying aquifer during residual coal mining and water-soil stress coupling analysis

    DONG Qing-hong; SUI Wang-hua; ZHANG Xiao-cui; MAO Zeng-min

    2009-01-01

    Three test models and a simulation model were constructed based on the prevailing conditions of the Taiping coalmine in order to analyze pore pressure fluctuations of an overlying aquifer during residual coal mining. As well, the relation between pore pressure and soil stress was evaluated. The model tests show the vibrations of pore pressure and soil stress as a result of mining activities. The simulation model tells of the response characteristics of pore pressure after mining and its distribution in the sand aquifer. The comparative analysis reveals that pore pressure and soil stress vibration are activated by unexpected events occurring in mines, such as collapsing roofs. An increased pore pressure zone always lies above the wall in front or behind the working face of a mine. Both pore pressure and vertical stress result in increasing and decreasing processes during movements of the working face of a mine. The vibration of pore pressure always precedes soil stress in the same area and ends with a sharp decline. Changes in pore pressure of sand aquifer are limited to the area of stress changes. Obvious changes are largely located in a very small frame over the mining face.

  4. Evapotranspiration Partitioning and Response to Abnormally Low Water Levels in a Floodplain Wetland in China

    Xiaosong Zhao; Yuanbo Liu

    2016-01-01

    Evapotranspiration (ET) is an important component of the wetland water budget. Water level declines in Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China, have caused concerns, especially during low water levels. However, how wetland ET and its partitioning respond to abnormally low water levels is unclear. In this study, wetland ET was estimated with MODIS data and meteorological data. The wetland ET partitioning and its relationship with abnormally low water levels were analyzed for 2000–201...

  5. Water Requirements for Food Assessed at Different Levels of Scale

    Ruiter de, Henri

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Fresh water scarcity is a major and increasing problem. Increasing water scarcity will have consequences for food security; thus strategies are needed to reduce the appropriation of water. Since agriculture uses 70% of all freshwater withdrawals,

  6. Radioactive levels in Taihu and water bodies of Suzhou

    The radioactive levels in Taihu and water bidies of Suzhou, southern China, were investigated in 1983. The results of the investigation were compared with that of 1973. In addition, the authors investigated a suspectable radioactive pollutant-ash of coal powder from Wongting coal-fired power plant and its affect on the water in Taihu and Suzhou section of the Grand Canal. These results show: the average radioactive levels in Taihu are 41.4 mBq/L for total α, 91.9 mBq/L for total β, 3.4 x 10-7 g/L for uranium, 3.5 x 10-7 g/L for thorium; in Suzhou section of the Grand Canal 37.6 mBq/L for total α, 101.9 mBq/L for total β, 3.6 x 10-7 g/L for uranium, 4.9 x 10-7 g/L for thorium; in shallow well of Suzhou 61.4 mBq/L for total α, 857.7 mBq/L for total β, 1.6 x 10-7 g/L for uranium, 3.9 x 10-7 g/L for thorium. The radioactive levels in dry season are higher than that in rainy season, and each of them is lower than that in 1973. The average radioactive levels in Taihu and in Suzhou section of the Grand Canal caused by ash of coal powder from Wongting coal-fired power plant are: 87.3 and 140.6 mBq/L for total α respectively; 146.3 and 162.8 mBq/L for total β; 162.0 and 130.2 mBq/L for 40K; 6.7 x 10-7 and 5.3 x 10-7 g/L for uranium and 4.1 x 10-7 and 4.6 x 10-7 g/L for thorium

  7. Emergency action levels for light water reactors. Draft report

    United States nuclear power plants are currently preparing revised radiological emergency response plans. As part of these plans, each licensee is establishing plant-specific instrumentation readings, called emergency action levels (EALs), that indicate the presence of a problem and the need to declare one of four classes of emergency as designated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. In this report, the EALs prepared for a pressurized water reactor and a boiling water reactor are assessed to determine whether they meet the requirements of NUREG-0654, Rev. 1 Appendix 1. In addition, five recent nuclear incidents are studied to determine how their outcomes might have been affected by the new emergency response plans. Most of the EALs reviewed were judged adequate. In some cases, alternate EALs or sets of generic EALs are proposed to meet the intent of NUREG-0654 Rev 1 Appendix 1, and the wording of some of the initiating conditions for the four emergency classes is clarified. For three of the five incidents reviewed, the new emergency response plans probably would not have affected the outcome; in one case, the plans would probably have prevented core damage; and any effect on the outcome of the last incident is uncertain

  8. Mixing height over water and its role on the correlation between temperature and humidity fluctuations in the unstable surface layer

    Sempreviva, A.M.; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2000-01-01

    Results from an experimental investigation of the mixing height over inner Danish waters carried out from September 1990 to October 1992, are discussed. The statistical analysis of the mixed-layer height (z(i)) over the sea does not exhibit the daily variation that is characteristic of the mixed ...

  9. Lake-level fluctuations since the Last Glaciation in Selin Co (lake), Central Tibet, investigated using optically stimulated luminescence dating of beach ridges

    This paper presents a preliminary study on lake-level fluctuations since the Last Glaciation in Selin Co (lake), Central Tibet, by dating four groups of beach ridges using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). The highest/oldest beach ridge group (>100 m higher than the current lake level) is dated back to 67.9 ± 2.4 ka BP, corresponding to the early stage of the Last Glaciation (marine isotope stage (MIS) 4). This date further supports that no plateau-scale ice sheet covered the Tibetan Plateau during the Last Glaciation. The other three groups produce OSL ages of 30.4 ± 2.9 to 18.6 ± 1.7, 12.5 ± 1.6 to 9.2 ± 0.5, and 6.9 ± 0.2 ka BP respectively, most likely corresponding to cold or wet climate periods of the late stage of the Last Glaciation (MIS 2), deglaciation, and Holocene Hypsithermal. On the plateau scale, these four beach ridge groups are almost synchronous with advances or standstills of Himalayan glaciers, indicating similar climate controls across the central and southern Tibetan Plateau, and being consistent with the conclusion, obtained from nearby ice core records, that this area is affected by the South Asia monsoon. Furthermore, beach ridges are also synchronous with fluvial terraces in the northern Tibetan Plateau, implying common driving forces during their formation. Therefore, some terraces may be formed as a result of climate events rather than being of tectonic origin.

  10. Lake Fluctuation Effectively Regulates Wetland Evapotranspiration: A Case Study of the Largest Freshwater Lake in China

    Xiaosong Zhao

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Lakes and wetlands provide valuable water resources. Wetland evapotranspiration (ET is a key hydrologic component; however, the effects of lake fluctuation on wetland ET remain unclear. The Poyang Lake is the largest freshwater lake in China and experiences a dramatic fluctuation in water level and inundated area. This study used remote sensing data to estimate the wetland ET for Poyang Lake and to illustrate the distribution of wetland ET and its response to lake fluctuations. Our results showed that wetland ET was related to lake fluctuation both spatially and temporally. Within the same year, the difference between annual water evaporation (Ewater and wetland ET (ETwetland was primarily attributed to lake fluctuation through its effects on inundated area and exposure days. A 1% increase in inundated area would result in a 7.87 ± 1.13 mm a−1 reduction in annual Ewater-to-ETwetland differences, and a 10-day elongation of exposure could lead to an 11.1 ± 1.6 mm a−1 increase in annual Ewater-to-ETwetland differences, on average. Inter-annually, the Ewater-to-ETwetland differences were attributed to the combined effects of atmospheric and environmental variables and lake fluctuation. The lake fluctuation contributed 73% to the inter-annual ET difference, followed by relative humidity (19%, net radiation (5%, and wind speed (4%. Overall, lake fluctuation effectively regulates wetland ET, and its effect should receive careful consideration in hydrological and water resources studies under the current changing climate.

  11. GPS water level measurements for Indonesia's Tsunami Early Warning System

    Schöne, T.; Pandoe, W.; Mudita, I.; Roemer, S.; Illigner, J.; Zech, C.; Galas, R.

    2011-03-01

    On Boxing Day 2004, a severe tsunami was generated by a strong earthquake in Northern Sumatra causing a large number of casualties. At this time, neither an offshore buoy network was in place to measure tsunami waves, nor a system to disseminate tsunami warnings to local governmental entities. Since then, buoys have been developed by Indonesia and Germany, complemented by NOAA's Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART) buoys, and have been moored offshore Sumatra and Java. The suite of sensors for offshore tsunami detection in Indonesia has been advanced by adding GPS technology for water level measurements. The usage of GPS buoys in tsunami warning systems is a relatively new approach. The concept of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS) (Rudloff et al., 2009) combines GPS technology and ocean bottom pressure (OBP) measurements. Especially for near-field installations where the seismic noise may deteriorate the OBP data, GPS-derived sea level heights provide additional information. The GPS buoy technology is precise enough to detect medium to large tsunamis of amplitudes larger than 10 cm. The analysis presented here suggests that for about 68% of the time, tsunamis larger than 5 cm may be detectable.

  12. Normal operating radiation levels in pressurized water reactor plants

    Operating plant radiation level measurements are important in optimizing the operation of nuclear plant systems and in confirming methods and assumptions used by shield designers and must be evaluated to aid in improving future plant designs. In addition, the anticipated long-term radiation fields to which reactor components are subjected are an important consideration in materials selection and/or placement. Radiation level measurements obtained from various pressurized water reactor plants show a wide range of measured dose rates, both in certain areas of the plant (e.g., containment operating deck) and near various components. In some cases, the differences can be explained based on variations in plant layout and shielding configuration, extent of fuel cladding failures, etc., but in many cases, the reported values lack sufficient detail and appropriate explanatory information to correctly interpret the data. The measurements that have been accumulated and correlated thus far are being used to confirm the assumptions and models currently being employed by the shield designers and have led to system and equipment design improvements

  13. GPS water level measurements for Indonesia's Tsunami Early Warning System

    T. Schöne

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available On Boxing Day 2004, a severe tsunami was generated by a strong earthquake in Northern Sumatra causing a large number of casualties. At this time, neither an offshore buoy network was in place to measure tsunami waves, nor a system to disseminate tsunami warnings to local governmental entities. Since then, buoys have been developed by Indonesia and Germany, complemented by NOAA's Deep-ocean Assessment and Reporting of Tsunamis (DART buoys, and have been moored offshore Sumatra and Java. The suite of sensors for offshore tsunami detection in Indonesia has been advanced by adding GPS technology for water level measurements.

    The usage of GPS buoys in tsunami warning systems is a relatively new approach. The concept of the German Indonesian Tsunami Early Warning System (GITEWS (Rudloff et al., 2009 combines GPS technology and ocean bottom pressure (OBP measurements. Especially for near-field installations where the seismic noise may deteriorate the OBP data, GPS-derived sea level heights provide additional information.

    The GPS buoy technology is precise enough to detect medium to large tsunamis of amplitudes larger than 10 cm. The analysis presented here suggests that for about 68% of the time, tsunamis larger than 5 cm may be detectable.

  14. Non Invasive Water Level Monitoring on Boiling Water Reactors Using Internal Gamma Radiation: Application of Soft Computing Methods

    To provide best knowledge about safety-related water level values in boiling water reactors (BWR) is essentially for operational regime. For the water level determination hydrostatic level measurement systems are almost exclusively applied, because they stand the test over many decades in conventional and nuclear power plants (NPP). Due to the steam generation especially in BWR a specific phenomenon occurs which leads to a water-steam mixture level in the reactor annular space and reactor plenum. The mixture level is a high transient non-measurable value concerning the hydrostatic water level measuring system and it significantly differs from the measured collapsed water level. In particular, during operational and accidental transient processes like fast negative pressure transients, the monitoring of these water levels is very important. In addition to the hydrostatic water level measurement system a diverse water level measurement system for BWR should be used. A real physical diversity is given by gamma radiation distribution inside and outside the reactor pressure vessel correlating with the water level. The vertical gamma radiation distribution depends on the water level, but it is also a function of the neutron flux and the coolant recirculation pump speed. For the water level monitoring, special algorithms are required. An analytical determination of the gamma radiation distribution outside the reactor pressure vessel is impossible due to the multitude of radiation of physical processes, complicated non-stationary radiation source distribution and complex geometry of fixtures. For creating suited algorithms Soft Computing methods (Fuzzy Sets Theory, Artificial Neural Networks, etc.) will be used. Therefore, a database containing input values (gamma radiation distribution) and output values (water levels) had to be built. Here, the database was established by experiments (data from BWR and from a test setup) and simulation with the authorised thermo

  15. Effects of sea-level rise on ground water flow in a coastal aquifer system

    Masterson, J.P.; Garabedian, S.P.

    2007-01-01

    The effects of sea-level rise on the depth to the fresh water/salt water interface were simulated by using a density-dependent, three-dimensional numerical ground water flow model for a simplified hypothetical fresh water lens that is similar to shallow, coastal aquifers found along the Atlantic coast of the United States. Simulations of sea-level rise of 2.65 mm/year from 1929 to 2050 resulted in an increase in water levels relative to a fixed datum, yet a net decrease in water levels relative to the increased sea-level position. The net decrease in water levels was much greater near a gaining stream than farther from the stream. The difference in the change in water levels is attributed to the dampening effect of the stream on water level changes in response to sea-level rise. In response to the decreased water level altitudes relative to local sea level, the depth to the fresh water/salt water interface decreased. This reduction in the thickness of the fresh water lens varied throughout the aquifer and was greatly affected by proximity to a ground water fed stream and whether the stream was tidally influenced. Away from the stream, the thickness of the fresh water lens decreased by about 2% from 1929 to 2050, whereas the fresh water lens thickness decreased by about 22% to 31% for the same period near the stream, depending on whether the stream was tidally influenced. The difference in the change in the fresh water/salt water interface position is controlled by the difference in the net decline in water levels relative to local sea level. ?? 2007 National Ground Water Association.

  16. Holocene hydrological changes in south-western Mediterranean as recorded by lake-level fluctuations at Lago Preola, a coastal lake in southern Sicily, Italy

    Magny, Michel; Vannière, Boris; Calo, Camilla; Millet, Laurent; Leroux, Aurélie; Peyron, Odile; Zanchetta, Gianni; La Mantia, Tommaso; Tinner, Willy

    2011-09-01

    This paper presents a high-resolution lake-level record for the Holocene at Lago Preola (Sicily, southern Italy) based on a specific sedimentological approach, with a chronology derived from AMS radiocarbon dates. It gives evidence of three major successive palaeohydrological periods, with (1) a pronounced dryness during the early Holocene until ca 10300 cal BP, (2) a highstand from ca 10300 to 4500 cal BP, and (3) a marked lowstand from 4500 cal BP to present. Large amplitude lake-level fluctuations characterise two transition phases at ca 10300-9000 and 6400-4500 cal BP. Period 2 was interrupted between 8300 and 7000 cal BP by a dry phase that was punctuated to ca 7300 cal BP by the deposition of a tephra from neighbouring Pantelleria Island. Comparisons of the Preola record with other palaeohydrological records along north-south and west-east transects in the Mediterranean show contrasting patterns of hydrological changes: north (south) of around 40°N latitude, the records highlight a mid-Holocene period characterised by lake-level minima (maxima). Humid mid-Holocene conditions over the Mediterranean south of 40°N were probably linked to a strong weakening of the Hadley cell circulation and of monsoon winds. We suggest that the maximum of humidity in the Mediterranean during the mid-Holocene was characterised by humid winters to the north of 40°N and humid summers to the south. On a multi-centennial scale, the high-resolution palaeohydrological reconstructions in the central Mediterranean area reveal a strong climate reversal around 4500-4000 cal BP, with contrasting changes in the hydrological cycle. In addition to seasonal and inter-hemispherical changes related to orbital forcing, this major oscillation might be related to non-linear responses of the climatic system to the gradual decrease in summer insolation at northern latitudes. Another major climate oscillation around 7500-7000 cal BP may have resulted from the combined effects of (1) a strong rate of

  17. Evapotranspiration Partitioning and Response to Abnormally Low Water Levels in a Floodplain Wetland in China

    Xiaosong Zhao

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Evapotranspiration (ET is an important component of the wetland water budget. Water level declines in Poyang Lake, the largest freshwater lake in China, have caused concerns, especially during low water levels. However, how wetland ET and its partitioning respond to abnormally low water levels is unclear. In this study, wetland ET was estimated with MODIS data and meteorological data. The wetland ET partitioning and its relationship with abnormally low water levels were analyzed for 2000–2013. The results showed that the water evaporation rate (Ewater was larger than the land ET rate (ETland; the ETland/Ewater ranged from 0.77 to 0.99. When the water level was below 12.8 m, the ET partition ratio was larger than 1, which indicates that wetland ET comes from land surface ET more than water evaporation. The negative standardized water level index (SWI was used to represent an abnormally low water level in the wetland. Although the monthly wetland ET decreased as the negative SWI decreased, ETland was higher than the average under negative SWI conditions from September to December, when the water level decreased. The abnormally low water level induced more water loss from the land surface, especially when the water level decreased, which reduced the available water resources along the wetland shore.

  18. A data set of worldwide glacier fluctuations

    P. W. Leclercq; Oerlemans, J.; H. J. Basagic; I. Bushueva; Cook, A. J.; Le Bris, R.

    2014-01-01

    Glacier fluctuations contribute to variations in sea level and historical glacier length fluctuations are natural indicators of past climate change. To study these subjects, longterm information of glacier change is needed. In this paper we present a data set of global long-term glacier length fluctuations. The data set is a compilation of available information on changes in glacier length worldwide, including both measured and reconstructed glacier length fluctuations. All 471 length series ...

  19. Seasonal, sub-seasonal and spatial fluctuations in oxygen-depleted bottom waters in an embayment of an eastern boundary upwelling system: St Helena Bay

    Pitcher, G. C.; Probyn, T. A.

    2015-08-01

    The considerable impact of oxygen deficient waters on marine resources in St Helena Bay has generated interest in exploring the vulnerability of South Africa's largest and most productive bay to further deoxygenation in response to climate change. Seasonal, sub-seasonal and spatial fluctuations in bottom dissolved oxygen (DO) are examined in St Helena Bay to facilitate better interpretation of historical data. DO measurements in relation to physical, chemical and biological variables were made between November 2013 and November 2014. Alongshore bay characteristics were assessed through comparison of variables along the 50 m depth contour. A mean coefficient of variation of 0.35 provided a measure of the relative variability of near-bottom DO concentrations along this contour. Across-shelf transects captured the seasonal development of hypoxia in relation to the distribution of phytoplankton biomass. DO was lowest in autumn in the south of the bay prior to winter ventilation of the bottom waters. Exceptional dinoflagellate blooms forming extensive subsurface thin layers preceded the autumn DO minima. The development of hypoxia at inner and central stations prior to expansion beyond the boundaries of the bay provided evidence of local drawdown. Coincident with the seasonal decline of DO within the bay was an increase in macronutrient concentrations which tended to mirror DO concentrations. Indication of denitrification in the suboxic waters in the south of the bay was provided through evidence of a nitrate deficit in autumn supported by elevated nitrite concentrations. Superimposed on the seasonal decline of DO concentrations in the bottom waters were sub-seasonal events of hypoxia and anoxia linked to episodic deposition of organic matter as indicated by increases in bottom Chl a concentrations.

  20. Wave transformation and shoreline water level on Funafuti Atoll, Tuvalu

    Beetham, Edward; Kench, Paul S.; O'Callaghan, Joanne; Popinet, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    The influence of sea swell (SS) waves, infragravity (IG) waves, and wave setup on maximum runup (Rmax) is investigated across different tidal stages on Fatato Island, Funafuti Atoll, Tuvalu. Field results illustrate that SS waves are tidally modulated at the shoreline, with comparatively greater wave attenuation and setup occurring at low tide versus high tide. A shoreward increase in IG wave height is observed across the 100 m wide reef flat at all tidal elevations, with no tidal modulation of IG wave height at the reef flat or island shoreline. A 1-D shock-capturing Green-Naghdi solver is used to replicate the field deployment and analyze Rmax. Model outputs for SS wave height, IG wave height and setup at the shoreline match field results with model skill >0.96. Model outputs for Rmax are used to identify the temporal window when geomorphic activity can occur on the beach face. During periods of moderate swell energy, waves can impact the beach face at spring low tide, due to a combination of wave setup and strong IG wave activity. Under mean wave conditions, the combined influence of setup, IG waves and SS waves results in interaction with island sediment at midtide. At high tide, SS and IG waves directly impact the beach face. Overall, wave activity is present on the beach face for 71% of the study period, a significantly longer duration than is calculated using mean water level and topographic data.

  1. ERPWS: An Energy Efficient Routing Protocol for Conductive Sensor based Water Level Monitoring and Control System using Zigbee and 74HC14 Inverter

    Saima Maqbool

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we have shown how to use conductive sensor, Zigbee and 74HC14 Inverter to monitor the water level and to control the working of pump. This project is designed to automatically fill the over head tank when it gets empty and monitor the water level in it. The motor is switched ON when the water level in the overhead tank drops below a pre fixed low level (on point and puts off the motor when water level rises up to pre fixed high level (off point.The motor is also switched off during the following conditions: when the sump water is exhausted before filling overhead tank, pump running dry, mains voltage fluctuations. We also introduce an energy efficient routing protocol for Wireless Sensor Networks (ERPWS for Conductive Sensor based Water Level Monitoring and Control System using Zigbee (XBEE 802.15.4 in terms of energy consumptions, the packet loss ratio, network lifetime and the average delivery delay. The XBEE used here is XBEE Pro Series 1(XBP24-AWI-001 and IC used is 74HC14 Hex Inverting Schmitt trigger. Simulation results have been obtained by using NS2 simulator. The evaluation results show that the energy consumption of routing using ERPWS is significantly lower than LEACH and traditional routing protocols.

  2. Fuzzy logic control of steam generator water level in pressurized water reactors

    In this paper a fuzzy logic controller is applied to control the steam generator water level in a pressurized water reactor. The method does not require a detailed mathematical mode of the object to be controlled. The design is based on a set of linguistic rules that were adopted from the human operator's experience. After off-line fuzzy computation, the controller is a lookup table, and thus, real-time control is achieved. Shrink-and-swell phenomena are considered in the linguistic rules, and the simulation results show that their effect is dramatically reduced. The performance of the control system can also be improved by changing the input and output scaling factors, which is convenient for on-line tuning

  3. The Fluctuation Niche in Plants

    Classical approaches to niche in coexisting plants have undervalued temporal fluctuations. We propose that fluctuation niche is an important dimension of the total niche and interacts with habitat and life-history niches to provide a better understanding of the multidimensional niche space where ecological interactions occur. To scale a fluctuation niche, it is necessary to relate environmental constrictions or species performance not only to the absolute values of the usual environmental and eco physiological variables but also to their variances or other measures of variability. We use Mediterranean plant communities as examples, because they present characteristic large seasonal and inter annual fluctuations in water and nutrient availabilities, along an episodic-constant gradient, and because the plant responses include a number of syndromes coupled to this gradient.

  4. Measurement of water level, electrical conductivity, and sediment surface level using time domain reflectometry

    Time domain reflectometry (TDR) has been drawing a lot more attention as a way to identify the interfaces in between different dielectric media. To monitor water level (hsub(w)) with electrical conductivity (omegasub(w)) and sediment surface level (hsub(sed)) in river by applying TDR, we developed a mathematical model to evaluate these properties and verified its effectiveness by measuring the dielectric constant of conductive fluid media and a soil material (sand) using TDR probes with different lengths. Although the determination of (hsub(w)) in extremely high-conductive media was technically incompleted, we could successfully determine (hsub(w)), (omegasub(w)), and hsub(sed) with a probe in moderate-conductive media. Judging from the relatively good agreement between properties evaluated from the model and observed data, we concluded the TDR measurement could be useful to evaluate hsub(w), omegasub(w), and hsub(sed) with sufficient accuracy for practical use within an appropriate conductive range. In actual application of TDR to a river monitoring, the calibration of the probe used must be required to conduct accurate measurement based of the model

  5. Dual-Level Material and Psychological Assessment of Urban Water Security in a Water-Stressed Coastal City

    Yajing Huang; Linyu Xu; Hao Yin; YanpengCai; ZhifengYang

    2015-01-01

    The acceleration of urbanization and industrialization has been gradually aggravating water security issues, such as water shortages, water pollution, and flooding or drought disasters and so on. Water security issues have become a great challenge to urban sustainable development. In this context, we proposed a dual-level material and psychological assessment method to assess urban water security. Psychological security coefficients were introduced in this method to combine material security ...

  6. DOC and CO2-C Releases from Pristine and Drained Peat Soils in Response to Water Table Fluctuations: A Mesocosm Experiment

    Merjo P. P. Laine

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydrological conditions are considered to be among the main drivers influencing the export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC from terrestrial to aquatic ecosystems, and hydrology is likely to alter due to climate change. We built a mesocosm experiment by using peat profiles from a pristine and from a drained (drained in 1978 peatland. A several-week-long low water table period followed by a high water table period, that is, a setting mimicking drought followed by flood, released relatively more DOC from pristine peat than from drained peat. From pristine peat profiles DOC was released into soil water in such quantities that the concentration of DOC remained stable despite dilution caused by added spring water to the mesocosms. In drained peat the DOC concentrations decreased during the high water table period indicating stronger dilution effect in comparison to pristine peat. At the landscape level DOC load from a drained peatland to the recipient water body may, however, increase during flooding because of high water runoff out of the peatland containing high DOC concentrations relative to the forest and agricultural areas. During the high water table period neither peat type nor water table had any clear impact on carbon dioxide (CO2-C fluxes.

  7. Comparison Of Vented And Absolute Pressure Transducers For Water-Level Monitoring In Hanford Site Central Plateau Wells

    Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The

  8. COMPARISON OF VENTED AND ABSOLUTE PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS FOR WATER-LEVEL MONITORING IN HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU WELLS

    MCDONALD JP

    2011-09-08

    Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The

  9. Material Weakening of Slip Zone Soils Induced by Water Level Fluctuation in the Ancient Landslides of Three Gorges Reservoir

    Yu-Yong Jiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This experimental study investigated the effect of repeated wetting and drying on the reduction of slip zone soils taken from the Huangtupo landslide in the Three Gorges Reservoir, China. The variation process of the physical property and substance composition of the slip zone soils under the wetting-drying cycles was studied through liquid and plastic limit test and X-ray diffraction test. The results indicate that (1 the shearing strength of the slip zone soil dramatically decreased after one wetting-drying cycle and then gradually decreased until reaching a relatively stable state at the fourth cycle; (2 the plasticity index of the slip zone soil varied with increasing number of cycles and a variation process opposite to that of the strength value was observed; and (3 the clay mineral content in the slip zone soil increased and the calcite and quartz contents relatively decreased with increasing number of cycles. The variations in the plasticity index of the slip zone soil, as well as the increase in its clay mineral content, play important roles in the strength reduction. The results of this study provide a foundation for revealing the deformation and damage mechanism of landslides in reservoir banks.

  10. Depth distribution of epilithic cyanobacteria and pigments in a mountain lake characterized by marked water-level fluctuations

    Cantonati, M.; Guella, G.; Komárek, Jiří; Spitale, D.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 33, č. 2 (2014), 537-547. ISSN 2161-9549 Institutional support: RVO:67985939 Keywords : epilithon * cyanobacteria * depth distribution Subject RIV: EF - Botanics Impact factor: 1.941, year: 2014

  11. Sliding stones of Racetrack Playa, Death Valley, USA: The roles of rock thermal conductivity and fluctuating water levels

    Kletetschka, Günther; Hooke, R. L.; Ryan, A.; Fercana, G.; McKinney, E.; Schwebler, K. P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 195, 1 August (2013), s. 110-117. ISSN 0169-555X Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Endorheic * Finite element modeling * hydrogeology * Racetrack playa * sliding stones Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 2.577, year: 2013

  12. Effect of water level drawdown on decomposition in boreal peatlands

    Straková, Petra; Penttilä, Timo; Laiho, Raija

    2010-05-01

    Plant litter production and decomposition are key processes in element cycling in most ecosystems. In peatlands, there has been a long-term imbalance between litter production and decay caused by high water levels (WL) and consequent anoxia. This has resulted in peatlands being a significant sink of carbon (C) from the atmosphere. However, peatlands are experiencing both "natural" (global climate change) and anthropogenic (ditching) changes that threaten their ability to retain this ecosystem identity and function. Many of these alterations can be traced back to WL drawdown, which can cause increased aeration, higher acidity, falling temperatures, and a greater probability of drought. Such changes are also associated with an increasing decomposition rate, and therefore a greater amount of C released back to the atmosphere. Yet studies about how the overall C balance of peatlands will be affected have come up with conflicting conclusions, demonstrating that the C store could increase, decrease, or remain static. A factor that has been largely overlooked is the change in litter type composition following persistent WL drawdown. It is the aim of our study, then, to help to resolve this issue. We studied the effects of short-term (ca. 4 years) and long-term (ca. 40 years) persistent WL drawdown on the decomposition of numerous types of above-ground and below-ground plant litters at three boreal peatland sites: bog, oligotrophic fen and mesotrophic fen. We thus believe that enough permutations have been created to obtain a good assessment of how each factor, site nutrient level, WL regime, and litter type composition, influences decomposition. We used the litter bag method to measure the decomposition rates: placed measured amounts of plant litter, or cellulose strips as a control, into closed mesh bags, and installed the bags in the natural environment for decomposition for each litter type for varying amounts of time. Following litter bag recovery, the litter was

  13. The issue of excessive uranium levels in drinking water

    The following topics are described: Hygienic requirements for drinking water; Requirements placed by the Czech State Office for Nuclear Safety on the operation of systems separating uranium from drinking water and on the saturated ion exchanger handling patterns; Uranium speciation in groundwater; and Technologies for uranium removal from drinking water. Special attention is devoted to ionexes saturated by the process, which are not regenerated in the Czech Republic. (orig.)

  14. Behaviors of extreme water level in the Pearl River Delta and possible impacts from human activities

    Y. D. Chen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Trends and variations of the extreme water levels defined as exceeding/falling below certain thresholds (mean ± std across the Pearl River Delta (PRD are systematically explored using the linear regression method. Research results indicate that: 1 The upper PRD is dominated by the significant decreasing low water level, and significant increasing low water level can be identified in the lower PRD. The variations of the relative frequency of the high water level are characterized by the decreasing variability in the middle PRD. However more stations show significant changes of the relative frequency of the low water level across the PRD. No confirmative changing patterns of the relative frequency of the low water level can be detected in the middle PRD; 2 When it comes to the seasonal variations of the high/low water level in JJA (high flow periods in the PRD, stations located closer to the estuary tend to exhibit increasing high/low water level. However stations located closer to the upper PRD tend to show decreasing high/low water level. Similar patterns can be identified in the high/low water level in DJF (low flow periods in the PRD; 3 The changes of the water level in the PRD are heavily affected by human interferences, e.g. in-channel dredging, sand mining and the construction of levees. The stations dominated by decreasing water level are mostly located along the river channels featured by highly-intensive dredging. The stations along the coastal regions show significant increasing extreme high/low water level. The coastal regions are not influenced by in-channel dredging, and furthermore, sediment loads from upper and middle PRD are deposited in the river mouths and which will tend to raise the water level in the estuary of the PRD. The findings of this paper may be helpful for local water resource management.

  15. Modelling Lake Kivu water level variations over the last seven decades

    Muvundja, Fabrice A.; Wüest, Alfred; Isumbisho, Mwapu; Kaningini, Mwenyemali B.; Pasche, Natacha; Rinta, Päivi Johanna; Schmid, Martin

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed at analysing the hydrological changes in the Lake Kivu Basin over the last seven decades with focus on the response of the lake water level to meteorological factors and hydropower dam construction. Historical precipitation and lake water levels were acquired from literature, local agencies and from global databases in order to compile a coherent dataset. The net lake inflow was modelled using a soil water balance model and the water levels were reconstructed using a parsimon...

  16. Core level spectroscopy of neon- and water-clusters

    We present high resolution K-shell absorption spectra of neon and water clusters from the monomer to the solid. Shifts in the pre edge absorption are discussed and first EXAFS data presented. For water clusters a photoelectron study supplements the results. (author)

  17. Lowered tritium levels in river water indicate significant storage of water in a large catchment

    Tritium in the runoff of the Tugela river, in Kwazulu-Natal province on the east coast of South Africa, was monitored for a three year period from 1970 to 1972. The catchment above the runoff sampling site (Mandini) is 29089 km2 in extent; the altitude ranges from sea level to 3000 masl, the mean annual rainfall ranges from 700 to 1500 mm and the mean annual runoff ranges between 6 to 49% of the rainfall (that is 46 to 724 mm). Rainfall was monitored at three sites representing a range of altitudes and distance from the coast. Tritium in the river water was considerably lower than that of rainfall of the inland stations. A model for tritium in rainfall was used describing the increasing tritium content inland. Using the data of a rainfall-runoff model that describes 74 sub-catchments (200 to 1200 km2 in size) by their characteristic rainfall and runoff, it is possible to calculate the contribution of each sub-catchment to the total runoff at the sampling station. Labelling the runoff of each sub-catchment with the tritium level of its rainfall, enables the calculation of a weighted mean tritium content of annual input for the entire catchment. For the hydrological years (Oct-Sept) 1971/2 and 1972/3 these are 38 and 30 TU respectively. The weighted (by monthly flow) mean tritium level of the river is 26.6 and 26.3 TU for the same years. This suggest a large source of low-tritium water contributing to the Tugela runoff for both these seasons. This is all the more remarkable since the sampling period was six years after the bomb peak of tritium in the southern hemisphere (e.g. Pretoria station 6826200). Any carry-over water in the river from a previous year should actually increase the tritium content in the river. The sparseness of available data (two seasons) does not allow a detailed analysis of the residence times of water in the system and more recent measurements are just not available. Interpretation models that can be used are: a binary model indicating 74% of

  18. BWR [boiling water reactor] core criticality versus water level during an ATWS [anticipated transient without scram] event

    The BWR [boiling water reactor] emergency procedures guidelines recommend management of core water level to reduce the power generated during an anticipated transient without scram (ATWS) event. BWR power level variation has traditionally been calculated in the system codes using a 1-D [one-dimensional] 2-group neutron kinetics model to determine criticality. This methodology used also for calculating criticality of the partially covered BWR cores has, however, never been validated against data. In this paper, the power level versus water level issues in an ATWS severe accident are introduced and the accuracy of the traditional methodology is investigated by comparing with measured data. It is found that the 1-D 2-group treatment is not adequate for accurate predictions of criticality and therefore the system power level for the water level variations that may be encountered in a prototypical ATWS severe accident. It is believed that the current predictions for power level may be too high

  19. Options for water-level control in developed wetlands

    Kelley, J. R., Jr.; Laubhan, M. K.; Reid, F. A.; Wortham, J. S.; Fredrickson, L. H.

    1993-01-01

    Wetland habitats in the United States currently are lost at a rate of 260,000 acres/year (105,218 ha/year). Consequently, water birds concentrate in fewer and smaller areas. Such concentrations may deplete food supplies and influence behavior, physiology, and survival. Continued losses increase the importance of sound management of the remaining wetlands because water birds depend on them. Human activities modified the natural hydrology of most remaining wetlands in the conterminous United States, and such hydrologic alterations frequently reduce wetland productivity. The restoration of original wetland functions and productivity often requires the development of water distribution and discharge systems to emulate natural hydrologic regimes. Construction of levees and correct placement of control structures and water-delivery and water-discharge systems are necessary to (1) create soil and water conditions for the germination of desirable plants, (2) control nuisance vegetation, (3) promote the production of invertebrates, and (4) make foods available for wildlife that depends of wetlands (Leaflets 13.2.1 and 13.4.6). This paper provides basic guidelines for the design of wetlands that benefit wildlife. If biological considerations are not incorporated into such designs, the capability of managing wetlands for water birds is reduced and costs often are greater. Although we address the development of palustrine wetlands in migration and wintering areas, many of the discussed principles are applicable to the development of other wetland types and in other locations.

  20. Options for future effective water management in Lombok: A multi-level nested framework

    Sjah, Taslim; Baldwin, Claudia

    2014-11-01

    Previous research on water use in Lombok identified reduced water available in springs and limits on seasonal water availability. It foreshadowed increasing competition for water resources in critical areas of Lombok. This study examines preliminary information on local social-institutional arrangements for water allocation in the context of Ostrom's rules for self-governing institutions. We identify robust customary mechanisms for decision-making about water sharing and rules at a local level and suggest areas of further investigation for strengthening multi-level networked and nested frameworks, in collaboration with higher levels of government.

  1. Comparison of Regression Methods to Compute Atmospheric Pressure and Earth Tidal Coefficients in Water Level Associated with Wenchuan Earthquake of 12 May 2008

    He, Anhua; Singh, Ramesh P.; Sun, Zhaohua; Ye, Qing; Zhao, Gang

    2016-07-01

    The earth tide, atmospheric pressure, precipitation and earthquake fluctuations, especially earthquake greatly impacts water well levels, thus anomalous co-seismic changes in ground water levels have been observed. In this paper, we have used four different models, simple linear regression (SLR), multiple linear regression (MLR), principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) to compute the atmospheric pressure and earth tidal effects on water level. Furthermore, we have used the Akaike information criterion (AIC) to study the performance of various models. Based on the lowest AIC and sum of squares for error values, the best estimate of the effects of atmospheric pressure and earth tide on water level is found using the MLR model. However, MLR model does not provide multicollinearity between inputs, as a result the atmospheric pressure and earth tidal response coefficients fail to reflect the mechanisms associated with the groundwater level fluctuations. On the premise of solving serious multicollinearity of inputs, PLS model shows the minimum AIC value. The atmospheric pressure and earth tidal response coefficients show close response with the observation using PLS model. The atmospheric pressure and the earth tidal response coefficients are found to be sensitive to the stress-strain state using the observed data for the period 1 April-8 June 2008 of Chuan 03# well. The transient enhancement of porosity of rock mass around Chuan 03# well associated with the Wenchuan earthquake (Mw = 7.9 of 12 May 2008) that has taken its original pre-seismic level after 13 days indicates that the co-seismic sharp rise of water well could be induced by static stress change, rather than development of new fractures.

  2. Comparison of Regression Methods to Compute Atmospheric Pressure and Earth Tidal Coefficients in Water Level Associated with Wenchuan Earthquake of 12 May 2008

    He, Anhua; Singh, Ramesh P.; Sun, Zhaohua; Ye, Qing; Zhao, Gang

    2016-05-01

    The earth tide, atmospheric pressure, precipitation and earthquake fluctuations, especially earthquake greatly impacts water well levels, thus anomalous co-seismic changes in ground water levels have been observed. In this paper, we have used four different models, simple linear regression (SLR), multiple linear regression (MLR), principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least squares (PLS) to compute the atmospheric pressure and earth tidal effects on water level. Furthermore, we have used the Akaike information criterion (AIC) to study the performance of various models. Based on the lowest AIC and sum of squares for error values, the best estimate of the effects of atmospheric pressure and earth tide on water level is found using the MLR model. However, MLR model does not provide multicollinearity between inputs, as a result the atmospheric pressure and earth tidal response coefficients fail to reflect the mechanisms associated with the groundwater level fluctuations. On the premise of solving serious multicollinearity of inputs, PLS model shows the minimum AIC value. The atmospheric pressure and earth tidal response coefficients show close response with the observation using PLS model. The atmospheric pressure and the earth tidal response coefficients are found to be sensitive to the stress-strain state using the observed data for the period 1 April-8 June 2008 of Chuan 03# well. The transient enhancement of porosity of rock mass around Chuan 03# well associated with the Wenchuan earthquake (Mw = 7.9 of 12 May 2008) that has taken its original pre-seismic level after 13 days indicates that the co-seismic sharp rise of water well could be induced by static stress change, rather than development of new fractures.

  3. Investigation of natural radioactivity level of the waters in Guangdong province

    This paper reports the investigation results of natural radioactivity level in river, lake, reservoir, spring, tap water and offshore water in Guangdong Province and Hainan Province. There were totally 220 samples collected from 144 measuring points. The results show that the radioactivity level of varied water bodies of the province was within normal natural background

  4. Challenge to high-activity-level water treatment by adsorbents

    There are over 280,000 tonnes of contaminated water in the damaged Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Plant site in various tanks and barges and a large amount of contaminated water is now producing at the rate of several tonnes/day owing to inevitable cooling of the reactor cores. SARRY (Simplified Active Water Retrieve and Recovery System) and ALPS (Advanced Liquid Processing System) are installed to remove Cs and multi-elements respectively utilizing ion exchangers (zeolite, crystalline silicon titanate, and metal ferrocyanides) from contaminated water. The author continues efforts to find effective and selective adsorbents for Cs and Sr by measuring partition data, adsorption isotherms and adsorption rate referring with chemical structure elucidated from X-ray diffraction and SEM techniques. The obtained data are presented. (S. Ohno)

  5. Investigation of spatio-temporal water level and mass oscillations by using satellite gravimetry, altimetry and thermal data in Caspian Sea

    Moradi, A.; de Viron, O.; Metivier, L.

    2012-12-01

    As Caspian Sea does not communicate with the world oceans, its dynamics are very different from the global water. Although -as for the world ocean- its level presents regular annual oscillations, estimations from last century and new more precise measurements shows large interannual fluctuations. Changes in the Caspian Sea water volume are investigated using space altimetry, whereas the GRACE satellite gravimetry mission allows monitoring the change of the surface mass distribution. Under the hypothesis that the change in water mass is the only cause of gravity change, it is possible to convert the mass distribution change into volume change, using a steric equation for the sea water. Combinations of multi-mission gridded altimetry data from AVISO with mono mission time series were used in order to analyze the local fluctuations of the lake, revealing a significant tilt between north and south. Large differences in the surface mass distribution rate of change in the basin and in the lake are evidenced in the GRACE data, as well as small differences in phase, which are due to delayed snow melting. Ignoring the short-term changes in water level due to winds, the main reason to cause periodic spatial water level disuniformity is spatial disuniformity in water density. Steric effect was calculated by interfering 2 factors of temperature and salinity. Steric anomaly maps show that it is able to change water level up to 17 cm. As the northern part of the lake has the least salinity in summers the largest effect would be expected to occur in the northern part, but the opposite is observed, probably due to the fact that this part is the shallowest. For the steric anomaly the lake presents spatially variations of 3 cm in winter but 7 cm in the summers. Generally, the largest steric induced fluctuations are observed in the middle of the lake, mostly in the north and east parts of the lake center. We used altimetry and space gravity data jointly, in order to build an improved

  6. Coastal hazards projections on the U.S. West Coast using a dynamic water level modeling approach

    Barnard, P.; Erikson, L. H.; Foxgrover, A. C.; O'Neill, A.

    2014-12-01

    Many studies of future coastal flooding vulnerability consider sea level rise and tides only, typically applying a bath-tub type approach that omits key physical-forcing factors that elevate flood levels during storm events such as waves, surge and fluvial discharge. Here we present a new modeling approach that considers all the relevant factors that contribute to elevated water levels for open coast and embayment settings along the U.S. West Coast during projected 21stcentury storms. The Coastal Storm Modeling System (CoSMoS) is a numerical modeling system developed to predict coastal flooding due to both SLR and plausible 21st century storms for active-margin settings like the U.S. West Coast. CoSMoS applies a predominantly deterministic framework that encompasses large geographic scales (100s to 1000s of kilometers) yet models flood extents to a local resolution (2 m) so that storm related changes in water levels at the shore can be resolved. In the latest iteration of CoSMoS applied to San Francisco Bay, efforts were made to incorporate water level fluctuations in response to trapped coastal waves, low pressure systems, ocean swell energy penetrating through the Golden Gate, locally wind-generated waves, and backflow induced by river discharge. The end product is a web-based tool (www.prbo.org/ocof) where users can assess variations in flood extent, maximum flood depth, maximum current velocities and wave heights in response to a number of potential SLR and storm combinations, providing direct support for adaptation and management decisions. Future efforts in Southern California will feature a dynamic coastal DEM that evolves over decadal time scales to provide updated boundary conditions for future storm simulations.

  7. A novel encoding water level monitor system during and after LOCAs in a nuclear heating reactor

    The water level in a nuclear reactor vessel is an important parameter during and after LOCAs. Nuclear safety specifications can not be carried out when the water level is measured using a pressurizer which does show the level in the vessel. It is difficult to monitor the water level in the vessel of a Daqing 200MW nuclear heating reactor (NHR-200) using the present differential pressure transducers. Based on the heat transfer differences between water (or liquid) and steam (or gas), a novel level detector, which includes encoding heating shell thermocouples, has been developed and verified for use experimentally under pressures of 0.15-3.0 MPa. A novel encoding water level monitoring system was designed, made up of an assembly that contains several detectors, a signal encoder and an intelligent processor. Analysis and experiments have shown that the new system is correct in principle, reliable and feasible in structure for monitoring the water level in the NHR-200 reactor. (orig.)

  8. A new water level monitor system for nuclear reactor vessel during and after LOCAs

    The water level in nuclear reactor vessel is an important parameter during and after LOCAs. It can not meet the nuclear safety specification to use the water level measured in the pressurizer to show the level in the vessel. It is difficult to monitor the water level in the vessel of NHR-200 nuclear heating reactor with present differential pressure transducers. A new level detector based on the heat transfer difference between water (or liquid) and steam (or gas) is developed and proven for use by experiments under the pressure 0.15-3.0 MPa. A new water level monitor system including a detector assembly that contains several detectors, a signal encoder and an intellectual processor, is designed. The analysis and experiments show that the new system is correct in principle, reliable in working properties and feasible in structure for monitoring the water level in the NHR-200 reactor

  9. Water Hardness Level and ItAND#8217;s Health Effects

    Necmettin Kocak

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Water hardness is a term used to define the number of ions contained in the water, especially quantity sulphate, carbonate salts of calcium and magnesium. This characteristis of water is a important quality in it’s use as drinking water, industrial water and service water. The temporary hardness level of water cames from bicarbonate salts of calcium and magnesium whereas chloride, sulphate, nitrate, phosphate, silicate salts of calcium and magnesium. In order to indicate the hardness level of water samples French Hardness Level is used in our country. There is a larger amounth of calcium and magnesium salts in hard water samples. These minerals have very important functions in the human body. In this study, the importance of hard water in terms of human health has been assessed under light of current information. The studies about the preventive role of hard water in cardiovascular diseases, cerebrovascular diseases, stroke and many types of cancer areviewed. These studies Express that higher levels of calcium and magnesium hard water provide a higher reduction in these disease. Water, which must be consumed as 2 liters per dayis very important for human life. Hard water contains a lot of the minerals that must be taker daily, especially calcium and magnesium. It’s advised that water for consumption to have medium hardness. The hardness level of water is an aesthetic quality. Thus, in populations having a taste for soft water, the effort of individuals to softer the network water provided by municipalities using different equipments, in addition to their preference of soft water in plastic or glass bottles for consumption could imply lack of benefit of hard water for population health and also bring out some risks in terms of water hygiene. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2011; 10(2.000: 187-192

  10. Characterisation of Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae larval habitats at ground level and temporal fluctuations of larval abundance in Córdoba, Argentina

    Marta Grech

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The aims of this study were to characterise the ground-level larval habitats of the mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus, to determine the relationships between habitat characteristics and larval abundance and to examine seasonal larval-stage variations in Córdoba city. Every two weeks for two years, 15 larval habitats (natural and artificial water bodies, including shallow wells, drains, retention ponds, canals and ditches were visited and sampled for larval mosquitoes. Data regarding the water depth, temperature and pH, permanence, the presence of aquatic vegetation and the density of collected mosquito larvae were recorded. Data on the average air temperatures and accumulated precipitation during the 15 days prior to each sampling date were also obtained. Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae were collected throughout the study period and were generally most abundant in the summer season. Generalised linear mixed models indicated the average air temperature and presence of dicotyledonous aquatic vegetation as variables that served as important predictors of larval densities. Additionally, permanent breeding sites supported high larval densities. In Córdoba city and possibly in other highly populated cities at the same latitude with the same environmental conditions, control programs should focus on permanent larval habitats with aquatic vegetation during the early spring, when the Cx. quinquefasciatus population begins to increase.

  11. 90Sr levels in water samples of Adriatic sea

    The Institute of Nuclear Physics, Tirana, performs systematic measurements of the radioactivity in different samples for the national network. Hundreds of samples of air, fallout, surface water food and vegetation collected in various regions of the country were measured. Water samples of the Adriatic Sea are measured for the determination of 90Sr, 137Cs, since 1992 as presented in this paper. The radiochemical separation of 90Sr from Barium and Calcium are described in this paper. The oxalic acid C2H2O4*2H20 (as oxalate, carbonate and oxide) method for the determination of the chemical separation ratio was used. The activity concentration of 90Sr in water sea is evaluated by its daughter 90Y in equilibrium with it. The collective dose assessment by 90Sr is done

  12. Investigation of pond water levels during the 1972 waterfowl brooding season

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Water level management in the ponds of Malheur National Wildlife Refuge is important in providing food and habitat for migrating waterfowl. Water flow measurements...

  13. Barometric response functions from borehole water level records and quantification of aquifer vulnerability

    Odling, N. E.; Serrano, R. P.; Hussein, M.; Guadagnini, A.; Riva, M.

    2013-12-01

    In confined and semi-confined aquifers, borehole water levels respond to fluctuations in barometric pressure and this response can be used to estimate the properties of aquifer confining layers. We use this response as indicator of groundwater vulnerability for the semi-confined Chalk aquifer in East Yorkshire, UK. Time series data of borehole water levels are corrected for Earth tides and recharge, and barometric response functions (BRFs) estimated using cross-spectral deconvolution-averaging techniques. The resulting BRFs are fitted using a theoretical model of the BRF gain and phase for a semi-confined aquifer (Rojstaczer, 1988) to obtain confining layer properties. For all of the boreholes, non-zero hydraulic diffusivities for the confining layer were found indicating that the aquifer is semi-confined. A ';characteristic time scale' based on the hydraulic and pneumatic diffusivities of the confining layer is introduced as a measure of the degree of aquifer confinement and therefore groundwater vulnerability. The analytical model assumes that the confining layer and aquifer are homogeneous. However, in nature, confining layers are heterogeneous and groundwater vulnerability dominated by the presence of high diffusivity, high flow pathways through the confining layer to the aquifer. A transient numerical model (MODFLOW) was constructed to test the impact of such heterogeneities on the BRF. In the model, an observed barometric pressure time series is used as a boundary condition applied to the upper surface of the top unit of the model (representing the confining layer) and BRFs determined from the time series of model heads in the bottom unit (representing the aquifer). The results from a numerical model with a homogeneous confining layer were found to accurately reproduce the BRFs from a modified version of the analytical model. The introduction of a localized, high diffusive block in the confining layer was found to modify the BRF, reducing the gain amplitude

  14. Stochastic modeling of Lake Van water level time series with jumps and multiple trends

    Aksoy, H.; Unal, N. E.; Eris, E.; Yuce, M. I.

    2013-06-01

    In the 1990s, water level in the closed-basin Lake Van located in the Eastern Anatolia, Turkey, has risen up about 2 m. Analysis of the hydrometeorological data shows that change in the water level is related to the water budget of the lake. In this study, stochastic models are proposed for simulating monthly water level data. Two models considering mono- and multiple-trend time series are developed. The models are derived after removal of trend and periodicity in the dataset. Trend observed in the lake water level time series is fitted by mono- and multiple-trend lines. In the so-called mono-trend model, the time series is treated as a whole under the hypothesis that the lake water level has an increasing trend. In the second model (so-called multiple-trend), the time series is divided into a number of segments to each a linear trend can be fitted separately. Application on the lake water level data shows that four segments, each fitted with a trend line, are meaningful. Both the mono- and multiple-trend models are used for simulation of synthetic lake water level time series under the hypothesis that the observed mono- and multiple-trend structure of the lake water level persist during the simulation period. The multiple-trend model is found better for planning the future infrastructural projects in surrounding areas of the lake as it generates higher maxima for the simulated lake water level.

  15. Raising the level: orangutans use water as a tool.

    Mendes, Natacha; Hanus, Daniel; Call, Josep

    2007-10-22

    We investigated the use of water as a tool by presenting five orangutans (Pongo abelii) with an out-of-reach peanut floating inside a vertical transparent tube. All orangutans collected water from a drinker and spat it inside the tube to get access to the peanut. Subjects required an average of three mouthfuls of water to get the peanut. This solution occurred in the first trial and all subjects continued using this successful strategy in subsequent trials. The latency to retrieve the reward drastically decreased after the first trial. Moreover, the latency between mouthfuls also decreased dramatically from the first mouthful in the first trial to any subsequent ones in the same trial or subsequent trials. Additional control conditions suggested that this response was not due to the mere presence of the tube, to the existence of water inside, or frustration at not getting the reward. The sudden acquisition of the behaviour, the timing of the actions and the differences with the control conditions make this behaviour a likely candidate for insightful problem solving. PMID:17609175

  16. Environmental factors responsible for fluctuation phenomena. Difficulties in accepting these facts by scientific community

    Our physico-chemical approach started already in early sixties by Piccardi is based on the sensitivity of water to low level of energy of physical factors excising and fluctuating in the environment. This approach could be at the origin of many unexplained solar-terrestrial relationships or fluctuating phenomena in biology, medicine, psychology and social sciences. Methodology and causality are still the major problems raised in the scientific community by the Piccardi effect. These problems can be solved only by the organization of interdisciplinary cooperation in the research and scientific investigation of environmental factors responsible for fluctuating phenomena in exact, natural and human sciences on an international scale. 9 refs

  17. Theory and Method for Identifying Well Water Level Anomalies in a Groundwater Overdraft Area

    Zhang Suxin; Zhang Ziguang; Ren Xiaoxia; Wang Xiang

    2007-01-01

    The overexploitation of underground water leads to the continuous drawdown of groundwater levels, change of water quality and dry-up in dynamic water level observation wells. Due to land subsidence, the well pipes uplift and the observation piping systems are damaged. These environmental geology problems can present serious difficulties for the identification of earthquake anomalies by groundwater level observation. Basied on hydrogeological theories and methods, the paper analyzes the relations of the water balance state of aquifers with stressstrain conditions and the water level regime, and then discusses preliminarily the theory and method for identifying well water level anomalies in a groundwater overdraft area. The result shows that we can accurately judge the nature of the anomaly according to the diffusion character of the drawdown funnel in the well area in combination with the aforementioned theory and method and multi-year variation patterns obtained from existing data. The results of the research are helpful for distinguishing the influence of single centralized water pumping from the long-term overdraft of water on the water level, correctly recognizing water level anomalies in the groundwater overdraft area and increasing the level of earthquake analysis and prediction.

  18. Fluctuations of sea-water chemistry during Gargasian (Middle Aptian time. Data from trace-element content (Mg, Sr, Mn, Fe in hemipelagic carbonates from La Marcouline Quarry (Cassis, SE France

    TRONCHETTI Guy

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available In the Lower Aptian historical stratotype area (Cassis-La Bédoule, SE France, a geochemical study of the Gargasian (Middle Aptian marl-limestone alternations of the La Marcouline quarry complements data already obtained from Bedoulian (Early Aptian sediments there. Nannoconids are the main carbonate producers in both limestones and marls. Although diagenetic minerals, such as ankerite (2.5% are present in small amounts, the trace-element content of bulk carbonate is very close to that of Nannoconus spp. so geochemical sequences can be defined. The long-term evolution of trace-element content was not affected by diagenetic processes, variations in carbonate mineralogy, or a change of carbonate producers. An increase of around 500 ppm in the strontium content of bulk carbonate occurs between the base of the Cabri zone (late Bedoulian and the Algerianus zone (late Gargasian. This evolution is linked to fluctuations in seawater Sr/Ca ratios caused by variability in the influx of hydrothermal and river waters, by changes in the ratio of aragonite/calcite production and by shifts in sea level. The eustatic sequence Aptian 4, its parasequences and its key surfaces (sequence boundaries, maximum flooding surface are clearly reflected in the evolution of the bulk-carbonate contents of manganese.

  19. Identification and simulation for steam generator water level based on Kalman Filter

    In order to effectively control the water level of the steam generator (SG), this paper has set about the state-observer theory in modern control and put forward a method to detect the 'false water level' based on Kalman Filter. Kalman Filter is a efficient tool to estimate state-variable by measured value including noise. For heavy measurement noise of steam flow, constructing a 'false water level' observer by Kalman Filter could availably obtain state variable of 'false water level'. The simulation computing for the dynamics characteristic of nuclear SG water level process under several typically running power was implemented by employing the simulation model. The result shows that the simulation model accurately identifies the 'false water level' produced in the reverse thermal-dynamic effects of nuclear SG water level process. The simulation model can realize the precise analysis of dynamics characteristic for the nuclear SG water level process. It can provide a kind of new ideas for the 'false water level' detecting of SG. (authors)

  20. Study on Volume Strain Inversion from Water Level Change of Well-aquifer Systems

    Yan Rui; Gao Fuwang; Chen Yong

    2008-01-01

    Based on linear poroelastic and hydrogcology theory, a mathematical expression describing the relationship between water level change and aquifer volume strain is put forward. Combined with earth tidal theory, we analyze the response characteristics from well-aquifer water level change to earth tide of volume strain and present a method of volume strain inversion from water level change. Comparing the results of inversion with real observed data, we found that there is a good consistency. This suggcsts that the method of volume strain inversion from water level change is proper. It will offer a reference for learning about hydrogeology characteristics, volume strain and searching for precursor anomalies.

  1. Digitization and simulation realization of full range control system for steam generator water level

    In this paper, a full range digital control system for the steam generator water level is designed by a control scheme of single element control and three-element cascade feed-forward control, and the method to use the software module configuration is proposed to realize the water level control strategy. This control strategy is then applied in the operation of the nuclear power simulation machine. The simulation result curves indicate that the steam generator water level maintains constant at the stable operation condition, and when the load changes, the water level changes but finally maintains the constant. (authors)

  2. Estimating water demand at irrigation scheme scale using various levels of Knowledge: application in Northern Tunisia

    Hanafi, S; Mailhol, J.C.; Poussin, J.C.; Zairi, A.

    2012-01-01

    The precise estimation of water demand at the scale of the irrigation perimeter scale is a key requirement for water management. Most methods for estimating water demand use biophysical models and cropping patterns but do not account for the wide range of farmers' real practices. These methods thus only allow estimation of a theoretical water demand'. The objective of this study was to analyze different methods for evaluating irrigation water demand using several levels of knowledge about the...

  3. Dual-Level Material and Psychological Assessment of Urban Water Security in a Water-Stressed Coastal City

    Yajing Huang

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The acceleration of urbanization and industrialization has been gradually aggravating water security issues, such as water shortages, water pollution, and flooding or drought disasters and so on. Water security issues have become a great challenge to urban sustainable development. In this context, we proposed a dual-level material and psychological assessment method to assess urban water security. Psychological security coefficients were introduced in this method to combine material security and residents’ security feelings. A typical water-stressed coastal city in China (Dalian was chosen as a case study. The water security status of Dalian from 2010 to 2012 was analysed dynamically. The results indicated that the Dalian water security statuses from 2010 to 2012 were basically secure, but solutions to improve water security status and solve water resource problems are still required. This dual-level material and psychological assessment for urban water security has improved conventional material assessment through the introduction of psychological security coefficients, which can benefit decision-making for urban water planning, management and protection.

  4. Is China's fifth-largest inland lake to dry-up? Incorporated hydrological and satellite-based methods for forecasting Hulun lake water levels

    Cai, Zuansi; Jin, Taoyong; Li, Changyou; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Zhang, Sheng; Ding, Aizhong; Li, Jiancheng

    2016-08-01

    Hulun Lake, China's fifth-largest inland lake, experienced severe declines in water level in the period of 2000-2010. This has prompted concerns whether the lake is drying up gradually. A multi-million US dollar engineering project to construct a water channel to transfer part of the river flow from a nearby river to maintain the water level was completed in August 2010. This study aimed to advance the understanding of the key processes controlling the lake water level variation over the last five decades, as well as investigate the impact of the river transfer engineering project on the water level. A water balance model was developed to investigate the lake water level variations over the last five decades, using hydrological and climatic data as well as satellite-based measurements and results from land surface modelling. The investigation reveals that the severe reduction of river discharge (-364 ± 64 mm/yr, ∼70% of the five-decade average) into the lake was the key factor behind the decline of the lake water level between 2000 and 2010. The decline of river discharge was due to the reduction of total runoff from the lake watershed. This was a result of the reduction of soil moisture due to the decrease of precipitation (-49 ± 45 mm/yr) over this period. The water budget calculation suggests that the groundwater component from the surrounding lake area as well as surface run off from the un-gauged area surrounding the lake contributed ∼ net 210 Mm3/yr (equivalent to ∼ 100 mm/yr) water inflows into the lake. The results also show that the water diversion project did prevent a further water level decline of over 0.5 m by the end of 2012. Overall, the monthly water balance model gave an excellent prediction of the lake water level fluctuation over the last five decades and can be a useful tool to manage lake water resources in the future.

  5. Entanglement and quantum fluctuations

    Klyachko, Alexander A.; Shumovsky, Alexander S.

    2003-01-01

    We discuss maximum entangled states of quantum systems in terms of quantum fluctuations of all essential measurements responsible for manifestation of entanglement. Namely, we consider maximum entanglement as a property of states, for which quantum fluctuations come to their extreme.

  6. Design and Implementation of a Water Level Controller using Fuzzy Logic

    Namrata Dey

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes the effectiveness of water level control using fuzzy logic. The water level in the tank is sensed using transistor switching principle. The level sensed is fed to the PIC16 microcontroller. The user provides the set point to the microcontroller through serial communication using the COM development port software, Terminal. It computes the error as the difference between the set point and the process variable. The fuzzy logic programmed in the microcontroller is applied which controls the water level in the tank using the drain and the feed pumps. Once the set point has been reached, the message along with the present level is sent back through serial communication to the user interface on a PC. Thus, the water level in the tank is controlled according to the set point given by the user. The implementation of a fuzzy level controller has many applications such as boiler drum level control, reverse osmosis plant, demineralisation plant etc.

  7. Towards risk-based drought management in the Netherlands: making water supply levels transparent to water users

    Maat Judith, Ter; Marjolein, Mens; Vuren Saskia, Van; der Vat Marnix, Van

    2016-04-01

    To prepare the Dutch Delta for future droughts and water scarcity, a nation-wide 4-year project, called Delta Programme, assessed the impact of climate change and socio-economic development, and explored strategies to deal with these impacts. The Programme initiated a joint approach to water supply management with stakeholders and developed a national adaptation plan that is able to adapt to future uncertain conditions. The adaptation plan consists of a set of preferred policy pathways - sequences of possible actions and measures through time - to achieve targets while responding in a flexible manner to uncertain developments over time, allowing room to respond to new opportunities and insights. With regard to fresh water allocation, the Delta Programme stated that supplying water of sufficient quality is a shared responsibility that requires cohesive efforts among users in the main and regional water system. The national and local authorities and water users involved agreed that the water availability and, where relevant, the water quality should be as transparent and predictable as possible under normal, dry and extremely dry conditions. They therefore introduced the concept of "water supply service levels", which should describe water availability and quality that can be delivered with a certain return period, for all regions and all relevant water users in the Netherlands. The service levels form an addition to the present policy and should be decided on by 2021. At present water allocation during periods of (expected) water shortage occurs according to a prearranged ranking system (a water hierarchy scheme based on a list of priorities), if water availability drops below a critical low level. The aim is to have supply levels available that are based on the probability of occurrence and economic impact of water shortage, and that are transparent for all water users in the regional water systems and the main water system. As part of the European project

  8. Influence of water fluctuations on the limnological characteristics of two floodplain lagoons (Ribeira do Iguape Valley, state of São Paulo, Brazil

    Rogério Herlon Furtado Freire

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim: Current study assessed the influence of hydrometric levels on the limnological characteristics of two river floodplain systems in the Ribeira do Iguape Basin (state of São Paulo, Brazil. Methods: Rainfall data were collected dailyfrom an automatic weather station in Jacupiranga SP Brazil and daily hydrometric level records were obtained from automatic linigraphs installed on the two adjacent rivers. Moreover, pH, electrical conductivity and dissolved oxygen were measured by a multiparametric probe. Water samples were collected to analyze nitrate, ammoniac nitrogen, total nitrogen and phosphorus, total alkalinity and suspended material. The samplings were carried out in April and July, representative months for low and high water periods, respectively. Results and Conclusions: Statistical analysis highlighted the “effect of homogenization”, attributed to the hydrological pulses in several studies carried out in river-floodplain systems. This effect in current study was more underscored at Lagoon 2, which remained connected for a longer period with the adjacent river, when compared to Lagoon 1- River Jacupiranguinha system. Higher dissolved oxygen concentrations at Lagoon 2, in contrast with the Lagoon 1 featuring anoxia during the whole period under analysis, were also attributed to the above-mentioned greater hydrological connectivity. Current study highlights that the water-mediated transferences during the high water period may contribute not only towards the fertilization of marginal lagoons (inputs of nutrients and organic matter but also to significant pollutant loads, according to land use along the watersheds. In the case of Lagoon 1- River Jacupiranguinha system, even though further studies are needed and strongly recommended, it is reasonable to assume that the discharges of mining effluents into the river may result in ecological damage not only to the receiving water body but also to the connected ecosystems.

  9. Fuzzy logic control of water level in advanced boiling water reactor

    The feedwater control system in the Advanced Boiling Water Reactor (ABWR) is more challenging to design compared to other control systems in the plant, due to the possible change in level from void collapses and swells during transient events. A basic fuzzy logic controller is developed using a simplified ABWR mathematical model to demonstrate and compare the performance of this controller with a simplified conventional controller. To reduce the design effort, methods are developed to automatically tune the scaling factors and control rules. As a first step in developing the fuzzy controller, a fuzzy controller with a limited number of rules is developed to respond to normal plant transients such as setpoint changes of plant parameters and load demand changes. Various simulations for setpoint and load demand changes of plant performances were conducted to evaluate the modeled fuzzy logic design against the simplified ABWR model control system. The simulation results show that the performance of the fuzzy logic controller is comparable to that of the Proportional-Integral (PI) controller, However, the fuzzy logic controller produced shorter settling time for step setpoint changes compared to the simplified conventional controller

  10. 76 FR 64810 - Beverages: Bottled Water Quality Standard; Establishing an Allowable Level for di(2-ethylhexyl...

    2011-10-19

    ... adopting the allowable level for DEHP in the bottled water quality standard as proposed (58 FR 41612... FR 41612), FDA published a proposal (``the 1993 proposed rule'') to revise the bottled water quality... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 165 Beverages: Bottled Water Quality...

  11. DOWNSTREAM-WATER-LEVEL CONTROL TEST RESULTS ON THE WM LATERAL CANAL

    On steep canals, distant downstream water-level control can be challenging. SacMan (Software for Automated Canal Management) was developed, in part, to test various distant downstream water level controllers. It was implemented on the WM canal of the Maricopa Stanfield Irrigation and Drainage Distri...

  12. The economics of leaf-gas exchange in a fluctuating environment and their upscaling to the canopy-level using turbulent transport theories

    Katul, G. G.; Palmroth, S.; Manzoni, S.; Oren, R.

    2012-12-01

    Global climate models predict decreases in leaf stomatal conductance (gs) and transpiration due to increases in atmospheric CO2. The consequences of these reductions are increases in soil moisture availability and continental scale run-off at decadal time-scales. Thus, a theory explaining the differential sensitivity of stomata to changing atmospheric CO2 and other environmental conditions such as soil moisture at the ecosystem scale must be identified. Here, these responses are investigated using an optimality theory applied to stomatal conductance. An analytical model for gs is first proposed based on (a) Fickian mass transfer of CO2 and H2O through stomata; (b) a biochemical photosynthesis model that relates intercellular CO2 to net photosynthesis; and (c) a stomatal model based on optimization for maximizing carbon gains when water losses represent a cost. The optimization theory produced three gas exchange responses that are consistent with observations across a wide-range of species: (1) the sensitivity of gs to vapour pressure deficit (D) is similar to that obtained from a previous synthesis of more than 40 species, (2) the theory is consistent with the onset of an apparent 'feed-forward' mechanism in gs, and (3) the emergent non-linear relationship between the ratio of intercellular to atmospheric CO2 (ci/ca) and D agrees with the results available on this response. A simplified version of this leaf-scale approach recovers the linear relationship between stomatal conductance and leaf-photosynthesis employed in numerous climate models that currently use a variant on the 'Ball-Berry' or the 'Leuning' approaches provided the marginal water use efficiency increases linearly with atmospheric CO2. The model is then up-scaled to the canopy-level using novel theories about the structure of turbulence inside vegetation. This up-scaling proved to be effective in resolving the complex (and two-way) interactions between leaves and their immediate micro

  13. Natural circulation steam generator model for optimal steam generator water level control

    Several authors have cited the control of steam generator water level as an important problem in the operation of pressurized water reactor plants. In this paper problems associated with steam generator water level control are identified, and advantages of modern estimation and control theory in dealing with these problems are discussed. A new state variable steam generator model and preliminary verification results using data from the loss of fluid test (LOFT) plant are also presented

  14. Anomalies in Water Level Records in Yunnan Caused by the Great Indonesian Earthquakes and Their Significance

    Fu Hong; Wu Chengdong; Liu Qiang; Wang Shiqin; Chen Yan

    2008-01-01

    Two great earthquakes occurred in the sea northwest of Sumatra,Indonesia,on December 26,2004 and March 29,2005.The observation of water levels in Yunnan yielded abundant information about the two earthquakes.This paper presents the water level response to the two earthquakes in Yunnan and makes a preliminary analysis.It is observed that the large earthquake-induced abnormal water level change could be better recorded by analog recording than by digital recording.The large earthquake-caused water level rise or decline may be attributed to the effect of seismic waves that change the stress in tectonic units,and is correlated with the geological structure where the well is located.The water level response mode in a well is totally the same for earthquakes occurring on the same fault and with the same fracture mode.The only difference is that the response amplitude increases with the growth of the earthquake magnitude.

  15. Reactor vessel water level estimation during severe accidents using cascaded fuzzy neural networks

    Kim, Dong Yeong; Yoo, Kwae Hwan; Choi, Geon Pil; Back, Ju Hyun; Na, Man Gyun [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Global concern and interest in the safety of nuclear power plants have increased considerably since the Fukushima accident. In the event of a severe accident, the reactor vessel water level cannot be measured. The reactor vessel water level has a direct impact on confirming the safety of reactor core cooling. However, in the event of a severe accident, it may be possible to estimate the reactor vessel water level by employing other information. The cascaded fuzzy neural network (CFNN) model can be used to estimate the reactor vessel water level through the process of repeatedly adding fuzzy neural networks. The developed CFNN model was found to be sufficiently accurate for estimating the reactor vessel water level when the sensor performance had deteriorated. Therefore, the developed CFNN model can help provide effective information to operators in the event of a severe accident.

  16. Effect of Pressure, Water Depth and Water Flow Rate on Oxygen Saturation Level in Activated Sludge Process

    Nabil N. Atta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The role of aeration in activated sludge process is to provide oxygen to microorganisms as they assimilate the organic carbon compounds and digest a portion of them to carbon dioxide and water, sulfate and nitrate compounds. The water aeration equipment used in this process consumes as much as 60-80% of total power requirements in modern wastewater treatment plants. Approach: The objective of this study is to enhance the oxygen transfer in aeration tank in activated sludge process by increasing pressure inside the part of aeration tank to increase the saturation level of dissolved oxygen in wastewater. The diffuser cap model is the experimental model which was used to show the effect of increasing pressure on oxygen transfer level. Three cases were considered, the first used without diffuser cap, the second with diffuser cap and the third with diffuser cap and plastic strips. Results: Obtained results show that in case of using the model with diffuser cap enhanced the oxygen level by about 5% than in case of without diffuser cap while that of adding plastic strips enhanced the oxygen level by about 7%. The variation of water flow showed that increasing water flow rate from 1-2 L min-1 decreased the oxygen saturation level by about 6%. Furthermore, increasing water depth from 15-60 cm increased the oxygen level by about 40%. Conclusion: The diffuser cap model showed that the increase of pressure and water depth increased the dissolved oxygen level while increasing water flow rate decreased the dissolved oxygen level.

  17. Changes in Water Levels and Storage in the High Plains Aquifer, Predevelopment to 2007

    McGuire, V.L.

    2009-01-01

    The High Plains aquifer underlies 111.6 million acres (174,000 square miles) in parts of eight States - Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The area overlying the High Plains aquifer is one of the primary agricultural regions in the Nation. Water-level declines began in parts of the High Plains aquifer soon after the beginning of substantial irrigation with ground water in the aquifer area. By 1980, water levels in the High Plains aquifer in parts of Texas, Oklahoma, and southwestern Kansas had declined more than 100 feet (Luckey and others, 1981). In response to these water-level declines, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with numerous Federal, State, and local water-resources agencies, began monitoring more than 7,000 wells in 1988 to assess annual water-level changes in the aquifer. This fact sheet summarizes changes in water levels and drainable water in storage in the High Plains aquifer from predevelopment (before about 1950) to 2007 and serves as a companion product to a USGS report that presents more detailed and technical information about water-level and storage changes in the High Plains aquifer during this period (McGuire, 2009).

  18. Effects of water level on three wetlands soil seed banks on the Tibetan Plateau.

    Miaojun Ma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although the effect of water level on germination in soil seed banks has been documented in many ecosystems, the mechanism is not fully understood, and to date no empirical studies on this subject exist. Further, no work has been done on the effect of water level on seed banks of drying and saline-alkaline wetlands in alpine areas on the Tibetan Plateau. METHODOLOGY: We examined the effects of water level (0 cm, 5 cm and 10 cm on seed germination and seedling establishment from soil seed banks at 0-5 cm and 5-10 cm depths in typical, drying, and saline-alkaline wetlands. We also explore the potential role of soil seed bank in restoration of drying and saline-alkaline wetlands. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Species richness decreased with increase in water level, but there almost no change in seed density. A huge difference exists in species composition of the seed bank among different water levels in all three wetlands, especially between 0 cm and 5 cm and 0 cm and 10 cm. Similarity of species composition between seed bank and plant community was higher in 0 cm water level in drying wetland than in the other two wetlands. The similarity was much higher in 0 cm water level than in 5 cm and 10 cm water levels in all three wetlands. Species composition of the alpine wetland plant community changed significantly after drying and salinization, however, species composition of the seed bank was unchanged regardless of the environment change. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Water level greatly affects seed bank recruitment and plant community establishment. Further, different water levels in restored habitats are likely to determine its species composition of the plant community. The seed bank is important in restoration of degraded wetlands. Successful restoration of drying and salinization wetlands could depend on the seed bank.

  19. Seven years of external control of fluoride levels in the public water supply in Bauru, Sao Paulo, Brazil

    Marilia Afonso Rabelo BUZALAF

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Fluoridation of the public water supplies is recognized as among the top ten public health achievements of the twentieth century. However, the positive aspects of this measure depend on the maintenance of fluoride concentrations within adequate levels. Objective To report the results of seven years of external control of the fluoride (F concentrations in the public water supply in Bauru, SP, Brazil in an attempt to verify, on the basis of risk/benefit balance, whether the levels are appropriate. Material and Methods From March 2004 to February 2011, 60 samples were collected every month from the 19 supply sectors of the city, totaling 4,641 samples. F concentrations in water samples were determined in duplicate, using an ion-specific electrode (Orion 9609 coupled to a potentiometer after buffering with TISAB II. After the analysis, the samples were classified according to the best risk-benefit adjustment. Results Means (±standard deviation of F concentrations ranged between 0.73±0.06 and 0.81±0.10 mg/L for the different sectors during the seven years. The individual values ranged between 0.03 and 2.63 mg/L. The percentages of the samples considered “low risk” for dental fluorosis development and of “maximum benefit” for dental caries prevention (0.55-0.84 mg F/L in the first, second, third, fourth, fifth, sixth, and seventh years of the study were 82.0, 58.5, 37.4, 61.0, 89.9, 77.3, and 72.4%, respectively, and 69.0% for the entire period. Conclusions Fluctuations of F levels were found in the public water supply in Bauru during the seven years of evaluation. These results suggest that external monitoring of water fluoridation by an independent assessor should be implemented in cities where there is adjusted fluoridation. This measure should be continued in order to verify that fluoride levels are suitable and, if not, to provide support for the appropriate adjustments.

  20. Understanding consumption and residential uses of water at the household level in Quito, Ecuador

    Oscar Zapata

    2011-01-01

    Climate change, water scarcity, costly infrastructure projects, and inadequate pricing schemes and inefficient subsidies, are just a few reasons of concern for the current and future provision of potable water in many cities of the world. The understanding of consumer behavior may inform policy makers about cost-effective measures to achieve sustainable levels of water consumption. From an economic perspective, water pricing policies might be very effective to modify consumption patterns and ...

  1. Relationship of drinking water disinfectants to plasma cholesterol and thyroid hormone levels in experimental studies.

    Revis, N W; McCauley, P; Bull, R.; Holdsworth, G

    1986-01-01

    The effects of drinking water containing 2 or 15 ppm chlorine (pH 6.5 and 8.5), chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine on thyroid function and plasma cholesterol were studied because previous investigators have reported cardiovascular abnormalities in experimental animals exposed to chlorinated water. Plasma thyroxine (T4) levels, as compared to controls, were significantly decreased in pigeons fed a normal or high-cholesterol diet and drinking water containing these drinking water disinfectant...

  2. An electrical impedance sensor for water level measurements in air–water two-phase stratified flows

    We report a design of an optimized ring-type impedance sensor for water level measurements in air–water stratified flows through horizontal pipes. The ring-type sensor is optimized in view of the sensor linearity. In order to determine an optimal electrode and gap size of a ring-type sensor which generates a linear relationship between the impedance (resistance and/or reactance) and the water level, systematic numerical calculations are performed, and a ring-type impedance sensor of electrode width-to-diameter ratio 0.25 and gap-to-diameter ratio 0.2 has been selected as optimal. Lab-scale static experiments have been conducted to verify the sensor performance in terms of the linearity. Finally, this proposed sensor is installed in a horizontal loop 40 mm in diameter and roughly 5200 mm in length and measures water levels for various stratified flow conditions. The comparisons of water level measurements between the proposed sensor and the high-speed camera images post-processed by the edge detection scheme show that the maximum deviation in dimensionless water level is roughly 0.037, which corresponds to 1.5 mm over the range 40 mm. (paper)

  3. Water deprivation increases maternal corticosterone levels and enhances offspring growth in the snake Vipera aspis.

    Dupoué, Andréaz; Angelier, Frédéric; Brischoux, François; DeNardo, Dale F; Trouvé, Colette; Parenteau, Charline; Lourdais, Olivier

    2016-03-01

    Circulating glucocorticoid (GC) levels may increase as a result of reproductive effort or in response to unpredictable events. However, GC secretion can vary with the availability of vital trophic resources such as energy. While water represents another critical resource, the impact of water deprivation on GC secretion during reproduction has not yet been thoroughly investigated. Here, we examined the effects of water deprivation on plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentrations of female aspic vipers (Vipera aspis), and determined the impacts of water deprivation on offspring traits. We exposed both pregnant and non-reproductive females to a 20-day water deprivation and compared their pre- and post-deprivation CORT levels with those of control females. At the end of the treatment, only water-deprived pregnant females showed a significant increase in CORT levels. In pregnant females, changes in baseline CORT level were correlated with changes in female hydration state. Changes in baseline CORT levels were also negatively influenced by maternal reproductive effort in pregnant control females, while such a relationship was not apparent in pregnant water-deprived females. Finally, we found that offspring from water-deprived females had higher growth rates than offspring from control females. Offspring growth was also positively correlated with changes in both maternal osmolality and baseline CORT levels. Together, our results suggest that dehydration increases maternal CORT levels, which may subsequently influence offspring development. Further long-term field studies are therefore required to assess whether there is an adaptive significance of this response. PMID:26747902

  4. Water levels in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, 1990--91

    Water levels were monitored in 27 wells in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada during 1990--91. Twelve wells were monitored periodically, generally on a monthly basis, and 15 wells representing 24 intervals were monitored hourly. All wells monitor water levels in Tertiary volcanic rocks, except one that monitors levels in paleozoic carbonate rocks. Water levels were measured using calibrated steel tapes and pressure transducers; steel-tape measurements were corrected for mechanical stretch, thermal expansion, and borehole deviation to obtain precise water-level altitudes. Water-level altitudes in the Tertiary volcanic rocks ranged from about 728 meters above sea level east of Yucca Mountain to about 1,035 meters above sea level north of Yucca Mountain. Water-level altitudes in the well monitoring the Paleozoic carbonate rocks varied between 752 and 753 meters above sea level during 1990--91. All data were acquired in accordance with a quality-assurance program to support the reliability of the data

  5. Water levels in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada, 1990--91

    Tucci, P.; O`Brien, G.M.; Burkhardt, D.J.

    1996-07-01

    Water levels were monitored in 27 wells in the Yucca Mountain area, Nevada during 1990--91. Twelve wells were monitored periodically, generally on a monthly basis, and 15 wells representing 24 intervals were monitored hourly. All wells monitor water levels in Tertiary volcanic rocks, except one that monitors levels in paleozoic carbonate rocks. Water levels were measured using calibrated steel tapes and pressure transducers; steel-tape measurements were corrected for mechanical stretch, thermal expansion, and borehole deviation to obtain precise water-level altitudes. Water-level altitudes in the Tertiary volcanic rocks ranged from about 728 meters above sea level east of Yucca Mountain to about 1,035 meters above sea level north of Yucca Mountain. Water-level altitudes in the well monitoring the Paleozoic carbonate rocks varied between 752 and 753 meters above sea level during 1990--91. All data were acquired in accordance with a quality-assurance program to support the reliability of the data.

  6. The Water Footprint as an indicator of environmental sustainability in water use at the river basin level.

    Pellicer-Martínez, Francisco; Martínez-Paz, José Miguel

    2016-11-15

    One of the main challenges in water management is to determine how the current water use can condition its availability to future generations and hence its sustainability. This study proposes the use of the Water Footprint (WF) indicator to assess the environmental sustainability in water resources management at the river basin level. The current study presents the methodology developed and applies it to a case study. The WF is a relatively new indicator that measures the total volume of freshwater that is used as a production factor. Its application is ever growing in the evaluation of water use in production processes. The calculation of the WF involves water resources (blue), precipitation stored in the soil (green) and pollution (grey). It provides a comprehensive assessment of the environmental sustainability of water use in a river basin. The methodology is based upon the simulation of the anthropised water cycle, which is conducted by combining a hydrological model and a decision support system. The methodology allows the assessment of the environmental sustainability of water management at different levels, and/or ex-ante analysis of how the decisions made in water planning process affect sustainability. The sustainability study was carried out in the Segura River Basin (SRB) in South-eastern Spain. The SRB is among the most complex basins in Europe, given its special peculiarities: competition for the use, overexploitation of aquifers, pollution, alternative sources, among others. The results indicate that blue water use is not sustainable due to the generalised overexploitation of aquifers. They also reveal that surface water pollution, which is not sustainable, is mainly caused by phosphate concentrations. The assessment of future scenarios reveals that these problems will worsen if no additional measures are implemented, and therefore the water management in the SRB is environmentally unsustainable in both the short- and medium-term. PMID:27405519

  7. Study of emergency-action levels for light water reactors

    An emergency action level (EAL) is an observation or judgment that forms the basis for declaring an emergency status at a nuclear generating facility. There are four graded emergency category classifications which indicate an increasing potential for offsite radiological impact. Each emergency category is normally associated with an implementation procedure that outlines the preplanned actions that the emergency director will undertake. Thus a transient which causes a system or parameter to reach an EAL will also cause a transition of the normal station organization to an emergency organization. This transition will include an augmentation of the basic shift staff in order to support the corrective and mitigative actions of the nuclear reactor operators. In this regard, the major purpose of EALs is to provide an early indication of potential problems. Ideally, the ensuing response of the emergency organization will prevent a propagation of errors or failures that could result in serious consequences

  8. Changes in water levels and storage in the High Plains Aquifer, predevelopment to 2009

    McGuire, V.L.

    2011-01-01

    The High Plains aquifer underlies 111.8 million acres (175,000 square miles) in parts of eight States - Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The area overlying the High Plains aquifer is one of the primary agricultural regions in the Nation. Water-level declines began in parts of the High Plains aquifer soon after the onset of substantial irrigation with groundwater from the aquifer (about 1950 and termed "predevelopment" in this fact sheet). By 1980, water levels in the High Plains aquifer in parts of Texas, Oklahoma, and southwestern Kansas had declined more than 100 feet (ft) (Luckey and others, 1981). In 1987, in response to declining water levels, Congress directed the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in collaboration with numerous Federal, State, and local water-resources entities, to assess and track water-level changes in the aquifer. This fact sheet summarizes changes in water levels and drainable water in storage in the High Plains aquifer from predevelopment to 2009. Drainable water in storage is the fraction of water in the aquifer that will drain by gravity and can be withdrawn by wells. The remaining water in the aquifer is held to the aquifer material by capillary forces and generally cannot be withdrawn by wells. Drainable water in storage is termed "water in storage" in this report. A companion USGS report presents more detailed and technical information about water-level and storage changes in the High Plains aquifer during this period (McGuire, 2011).

  9. Characterizing price index behavior through fluctuation dynamics

    Panigrahi, Prasanta K; Banerjee, Arjun; Bahadur, Jainendra; Manimaran, P

    2012-01-01

    We study the nature of fluctuations in variety of price indices involving companies listed on the New York Stock Exchange. The fluctuations at multiple scales are extracted through the use of wavelets belonging to Daubechies basis. The fact that these basis sets satisfy vanishing moments conditions makes them ideal to extract local polynomial trends, through the low pass or `average coefficients'. Subtracting the trends from the original time series yields the fluctuations, at different scales, depending on the level of low-pass coefficients used for finding the `average behavior'. The fluctuations are then studied using wavelet based multifractal detrended fluctuation analysis to analyze their self-similar and non-statistical properties. Due to the multifractality of such time series, they deviate from Gaussian behavior in different frequency regimes. Their departure from random matrix theory predictions in such regimes is also analyzed. These deviations and non-statistical properties of the fluctuations can...

  10. Fluorescence fluctuation immunoassay.

    Elings, V B; Nicoli, D F; Briggs, J

    1983-01-01

    The homogeneous fluorescent immunoassay described above allows one to measure the brightness of fluorescently tagged carrier particles that are suspended in a background of free, unbound fluorescent sources. We have demonstrated the feasibility of our technique using a gentamicin competitive assay as well as idealized model systems. We have seen that the fluctuation-correlation method is able to discriminate against free background sources because each fluorescing particle in solution contributes to the correlation peak [Eq. (4)] with a weighting equal to the square of its respective intensity. Hence, a few very bright sources contribute disproportionately to the "signal" relative to many weak ones. To take advantage of this property, one would therefore design an assay that uses relatively larger carrier particles, each of which is capable of binding on the order of 10(3) to 10(4) tagged antibodies or antigens. Unfortunately, the nonlinear dependence of the correlation peak on the brightness of the fluorescing species causes the technique to be perturbed by carrier particle aggregation; the apparent bound fluorescence intensity increases with the extent of aggregation. The latter may be an unavoidable consequence of performing assays using raw blood serum, for example. The ultimate usefulness of this method will depend on its sensitivity and speed when applied to "real" assays of clinical significance. These characteristics will be influenced by a number of technical details. Given our limited experience with the method thus far, it would appear that its principal drawback is its relatively slow speed. In order to decrease the time needed for a reliable measurement, one must average the random fluctuations in the fluorescent intensity to zero more quickly. In principle, this can be accomplished by decreasing the shot noise by collecting a larger fraction of the fluorescent light, and increasing the sampling rate. The method requires rather complicated

  11. A data set of worldwide glacier fluctuations

    Leclercq, P.W.; Oerlemans, J.; Basagic, H.J.; Bushueva, I.; Cook, A.J.; Le Bris, R.

    2014-01-01

    Glacier fluctuations contribute to variations in sea level and historical glacier length fluctuations are natural indicators of past climate change. To study these subjects, longterm information of glacier change is needed. In this paper we present a data set of global long-term glacier length fluct

  12. Dissipative Dynamics of Quantum Fluctuations

    Benatti, F; Floreanini, R

    2015-01-01

    One way to look for complex behaviours in many-body quantum systems is to let the number $N$ of degrees of freedom become large and focus upon collective observables. Mean-field quantities scaling as $1/N$ tend to commute, whence complexity at the quantum level can only be inherited from complexity at the classical level. Instead, fluctuations of microscopic observables scale as $1/\\sqrt{N}$ and exhibit collective Bosonic features, typical of a mesoscopic regime half-way between the quantum one at the microscopic level and the classical one at the level of macroscopic averages. Here, we consider the mesoscopic behaviour emerging from an infinite quantum spin chain undergoing a microscopic dissipative, irreversible dynamics and from global states without long-range correlations and invariant under lattice translations and dynamics. We show that, from the fluctuations of one site spin observables whose linear span is mapped into itself by the dynamics, there emerge bosonic operators obeying a mesoscopic dissipa...

  13. 46 CFR 52.01-110 - Water-level indicators, water columns, gauge-glass connections, gauge cocks, and pressure gauges...

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR 52.01-1) except as noted otherwise in this section. (b) Water level indicators. (Modifies PG-60.1... water columns is generally limited to firetube boilers. Water column installations shall be close hauled to minimize the effect of ship motion on water level indication. When water columns are provided...

  14. Analytical approach for determining the mean water level profile in an estuary with substantial fresh water discharge

    Cai, Huayang; Savenije, Hubert H. G.; Jiang, Chenjuan; Zhao, Lili; Yang, Qingshu

    2016-03-01

    The mean water level in estuaries rises in the landward direction due to a combination of the density gradient, the tidal asymmetry, and the backwater effect. This phenomenon is more prominent under an increase of the fresh water discharge, which strongly intensifies both the tidal asymmetry and the backwater effect. However, the interactions between tide and river flow and their individual contributions to the rise of the mean water level along the estuary are not yet completely understood. In this study, we adopt an analytical approach to describe the tidal wave propagation under the influence of substantial fresh water discharge, where the analytical solutions are obtained by solving a set of four implicit equations for the tidal damping, the velocity amplitude, the wave celerity, and the phase lag. The analytical model is used to quantify the contributions made by tide, river, and tide-river interaction to the water level slope along the estuary, which sheds new light on the generation of backwater due to tide-river interaction. Subsequently, the method is applied to the Yangtze estuary under a wide range of river discharge conditions where the influence of both tidal amplitude and fresh water discharge on the longitudinal variation of the mean tidal water level is explored. Analytical model results show that in the tide-dominated region the mean water level is mainly controlled by the tide-river interaction, while it is primarily determined by the river flow in the river-dominated region, which is in agreement with previous studies. Interestingly, we demonstrate that the effect of the tide alone is most important in the transitional zone, where the ratio of velocity amplitude to river flow velocity approaches unity. This has to do with the fact that the contribution of tidal flow, river flow, and tide-river interaction to the residual water level slope are all proportional to the square of the velocity scale. Finally, we show that, in combination with extreme

  15. Monitoring Everglades freshwater marsh water level using L-band synthetic aperture radar backscatter

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Lu, Zhong; Jones, John W.; Shum, C.K.; Lee, Hyongki; Jia, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    The Florida Everglades plays a significant role in controlling floods, improving water quality, supporting ecosystems, and maintaining biodiversity in south Florida. Adaptive restoration and management of the Everglades requires the best information possible regarding wetland hydrology. We developed a new and innovative approach to quantify spatial and temporal variations in wetland water levels within the Everglades, Florida. We observed high correlations between water level measured at in situ gages and L-band SAR backscatter coefficients in the freshwater marsh, though C-band SAR backscatter has no close relationship with water level. Here we illustrate the complementarity of SAR backscatter coefficient differencing and interferometry (InSAR) for improved estimation of high spatial resolution water level variations in the Everglades. This technique has a certain limitation in applying to swamp forests with dense vegetation cover, but we conclude that this new method is promising in future applications to wetland hydrology research.

  16. Sensitivity and uncertainty analysis for crop water footprint accounting at a basin level

    Zhuo, L.; Mekonnen, M. M.; Hoekstra, A. Y.

    2013-12-01

    Water footprint has been recognized as a comprehensive indicator in water management to evaluate the human pressure on water resources from either production or consumption perspectives. The agricultural sector in particular crop production takes the largest share of the global water footprint. Water footprint of producing unit mass of a crop (m3/ ton) is normally expressed by single volumetric numbers referring to an average value for certain areas and periods. However, the divergence in crop water footprint accounts from different studies, primarily due to the input data quality, may confuse water users and managers. The study investigates the output sensitivity and uncertainty of the green (rainfall) and blue (irrigation water) crop water footprint to key input variables (reference evapotranspiration (ETo), precipitation (PR), crop coefficient (Kc) and crop calendar (D)) at a basin level. A grid-based daily water balance model was applied to compute water footprints of four major crops - maize, rice, soybean and wheat - in the Yellow River basin for 1996-2005 at a 5 by 5 arc minute resolution. Sensitivities of the yearly crop water footprints to individual input variability were assessed by the one-at-a-time (';sensitivity curve') method. Uncertainty in crop water footprint to input uncertainties were quantified through Monte Carlo simulations for selected years 1996 (wet), 2000 (dry) and 2005 (average). Results show that the crop water footprint is most sensitive to ETo and Kc, followed by D and PR. Blue water footprints were more sensitive than green water footprints to input variability. Interestingly, the smaller the annual blue water footprint, the higher its sensitivity to PR, ETo and Kc variability. The uncertainties in total crop water footprints to combined uncertainties in four key input variables was less than × 30% for total water footprints at 95% confidence level. The sensitivity and uncertainty level of crop water footprints also differs with

  17. Potential of ENVISAT Radar Altimetry for Water Level Monitoring in the Pantanal Wetland

    Denise Dettmering

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Wetlands are important ecosystems playing an essential role for continental water regulation and the hydrologic cycle. Moreover, they are sensitive to climate changes as well as anthropogenic influences, such as land-use or dams. However, the monitoring of these regions is challenging as they are normally located in remote areas without in situ measurement stations. Radar altimetry provides important measurements for monitoring and analyzing water level variations in wetlands and flooded areas. Using the example of the Pantanal region in South America, this study demonstrates the capability and limitations of ENVISAT radar altimeter for monitoring water levels in inundation areas. By applying an innovative processing method consisting of a rigorous data screening by means of radar echo classification as well as an optimized waveform retracking, water level time series with respect to a global reference and with a temporal resolution of about one month are derived. A comparison between altimetry-derived height variations and six in situ time series reveals accuracies of 30 to 50 cm RMS. The derived water level time series document seasonal height variations of up to 1.5 m amplitude with maximum water levels between January and June. Large scale geographical pattern of water heights are visible within the wetland. However, some regions of the Pantanal show water level variations less than a few decimeter, which is below the accuracies of the method. These areas cannot be reliably monitored by ENVISAT.

  18. Human impacts on tides overwhelm the effect of sea level rise on extreme water levels in the Rhine-Meuse delta

    Vellinga, N. E.; Hoitink, A. J F; van der Vegt, M.; Zhang, W.; Hoekstra, P.

    2014-01-01

    With the aim to link tidal and subtidal water level changes to human interventions, 70. years of water level data for the Rhine-Meuse tidal river network is analysed using a variety of statistical methods. Using a novel parameterization of probability density functions, mean high and low water level

  19. Predicted impacts of future water level decline on monitoring wells using a ground-water model of the Hanford Site

    A ground-water flow model was used to predict water level decline in selected wells in the operating areas (100, 200, 300, and 400 Areas) and the 600 Area. To predict future water levels, the unconfined aquifer system was stimulated with the two-dimensional version of a ground-water model of the Hanford Site, which is based on the Coupled Fluid, Energy, and Solute Transport (CFEST) Code in conjunction with the Geographic Information Systems (GIS) software package. The model was developed using the assumption that artificial recharge to the unconfined aquifer system from Site operations was much greater than any natural recharge from precipitation or from the basalt aquifers below. However, artificial recharge is presently decreasing and projected to decrease even more in the future. Wells currently used for monitoring at the Hanford Site are beginning to go dry or are difficult to sample, and as the water table declines over the next 5 to 10 years, a larger number of wells is expected to be impacted. The water levels predicted by the ground-water model were compared with monitoring well completion intervals to determine which wells will become dry in the future. Predictions of wells that will go dry within the next 5 years have less uncertainty than predictions for wells that will become dry within 5 to 10 years. Each prediction is an estimate based on assumed future Hanford Site operating conditions and model assumptions

  20. A Screening-Level Hydroeconomic Model of South Florida Water Resources System

    Mirchi, A.; Watkins, D. W., Jr.; Flaxman, M.; Wiesmann, D.

    2014-12-01

    South Florida's water resources management is characterized by system-wide tradeoffs associated with maintaining the ecological integrity of natural environments such as the Everglades while meeting the water demands of the agricultural sector and growing urban areas. As these tradeoffs become more pronounced due to pressures from climate change, sea level rise, and population growth, it will be increasingly challenging for policy makers and stakeholders to reach consensus on water resources management objectives and planning horizons. A hydroeconomic optimization model of south Florida's water resources system is developed to incorporate the value of water for preserving ecosystem services alongside water supplies to the Everglades Agricultural Area and urban areas. Results of this screening-level network flow model facilitate quantitative analysis and provide insights for long-term adaptive management strategies for the region's water resources.

  1. X-ray radiographic experimental investigation of the reference level in hydrostatic level measurement systems for boiling water reactors

    Hydrostatic level control is of high priority for normal operation safety of BWR-type reactors. For the prevention of undershooting the limiting values precise and secure measuring techniques are indispensable. Actually the filling level is determined form the hydrostatic pressure difference to a reference column. For the secure non-invasive detection of the phase boundary water/steam in inclined tubes the X-ray radiography has been chosen. The experiments were aimed to study possible geometric influences on the water/steam phase boundary. It was shown that the reference filling level is not significantly changed in spite of permanent phase transitions, provided an ideal mechanical construction of the system is given. Future experiments shall be focused on the analysis of interface behavior in case of non-ideal geometries (welds).

  2. Artificial regulation of water level and its effect on aquatic macrophyte distribution in Taihu Lake.

    Dehua Zhao

    Full Text Available Management of water levels for flood control, water quality, and water safety purposes has become a priority for many lakes worldwide. However, the effects of water level management on the distribution and composition of aquatic vegetation has received little attention. Relevant studies have used either limited short-term or discrete long-term data and thus are either narrowly applicable or easily confounded by the effects of other environmental factors. We developed classification tree models using ground surveys combined with 52 remotely sensed images (15-30 m resolution to map the distributions of two groups of aquatic vegetation in Taihu Lake, China from 1989-2010. Type 1 vegetation included emergent, floating, and floating-leaf plants, whereas Type 2 consisted of submerged vegetation. We sought to identify both inter- and intra-annual dynamics of water level and corresponding dynamics in the aquatic vegetation. Water levels in the ten-year period from 2000-2010 were 0.06-0.21 m lower from July to September (wet season and 0.22-0.27 m higher from December to March (dry season than in the 1989-1999 period. Average intra-annual variation (CV(a decreased from 10.21% in 1989-1999 to 5.41% in 2000-2010. The areas of both Type 1 and Type 2 vegetation increased substantially in 2000-2010 relative to 1989-1999. Neither annual average water level nor CV(a influenced aquatic vegetation area, but water level from January to March had significant positive and negative correlations, respectively, with areas of Type 1 and Type 2 vegetation. Our findings revealed problems with the current management of water levels in Taihu Lake. To restore Taihu Lake to its original state of submerged vegetation dominance, water levels in the dry season should be lowered to better approximate natural conditions and reinstate the high variability (i.e., greater extremes that was present historically.

  3. Development of simple evaluation tool for water temperature and water level of spent fuel pit. Pit Calculator

    Before the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, we had already started to develop a method to predict the water temperature increase in the Spent Fuel Pit (SFP) adequately and simply during the shutdown of cooling systems. In these serial studies, we have carried out prediction of decay heat, calculation of evaporation heat flux from the water surface to the air and three dimensional (3D) thermal hydraulic computations of the SFP water using the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) software. After the accident, we extended the method capability to predict the water level decrease in the SFP during loss of all AC power supplies. 3D computations require a long computing time and its computed results showed that water temperatures were almost uniform outside the rack. This result indicated that a prediction system using one region (1R) calculation model might be able to obtain an average water temperature accurately. From these results, we had developed a simple evaluation tool for water temperature and water level of SFP named 'Pit Calculator'. (author)

  4. DATA QUALIFICATION REPORT: WATER-LEVEL DATA FROM THE NYE COUNTY EARLY WARNING DRILLING PROGRAM

    The objective of this work is to evaluate unqualified, water-level data gathered under the Nye County Early Warning Drilling Program (EWDP) and to determine whether the status of the data should be changed to ''qualified'' data in accordance with AP-SIII.2Q (Qualification of Unqualified Data and the Documentation of Rationale for Accepted Data). The corroboration method (as defined in Attachment 2 of AP-SIII.2Q) was implemented to qualify water-level data from Nye County measurements obtained directly from the Nye County Nuclear Waste Repository Program Office (NWRPO). Comparison of United States Geological Survey (USGS) measurements contained in DTN GS990608312312.003 with the Nye County water-level data has shown that the differences in water-level altitudes for the same wells are significantly less than 1 meter. This is an acceptable finding. Evaluation and recommendation criteria have been strictly applied to qualify Nye County measurements of water levels in selected wells measured by the USGS. However, the process of qualifying measured results by corroboration also builds confidence that the Nye County method for measurement of water levels is adequate for the intended use of the data (which is regional modeling). Therefore, it is reasonable to extend the term of ''qualified'' to water-level measurements in the remaining Nye County Phase I wells on the basis that the method has been shown to produce adequate results for the intended purpose of supporting large-scale modeling activities for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). The Data Qualification Team recommends the Nye County, water-level data contained in Appendix D of this report be designated as ''qualified''. These data document manual measurements of water-levels in eight (8) EWDP Phase I drillholes that were obtained prior to the field installation of continuous monitoring equipment

  5. Performance assessment for the water level control system in steam generator of the nuclear power plant

    Highlights: ► We consider the two PI controller steam generator water level control systems. ► We develop performance assessment methods for plants with stable and unstable zeros. ► The examples show the effectiveness of the proposed method. - Abstract: The steam generator water level control system is the most important components of a nuclear power plant. The operating steam generator water level control system is increasingly recognized as a capital asset that should be routinely maintained and monitored. However, the control loop performance assessment is still an open problem; thus, the performance assessment technology will be brought into the steam generator water level control system in nuclear power plants. Performance assessment methods for the plant with stable and unstable zeros of two PI controller systems are developed at all specific power levels. The numerical examples will demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  6. Urban water : harvesting rainwater at household level to improve the current water metabolism in Cuenca, Ecuador

    Godoy Gacha, Juan Diego

    2015-01-01

    With a global population about 7 billion people and their continued growth are pressuring global natural resources, in freshwater matter this pressure is altering both the river flows; timing season of water flows; and spatial patterns in order to meet human demands both in urban as rural areas. However, water stress in urban areas are increasing and expectations by 2050 are grim with a global urban development by 70 percent moreover urbanization rate expected by 2030 in Latin America is 80 p...

  7. Recent reduction in the water level of Lake Victoria has created more habitats for Anopheles funestus

    Futami Kyoko

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The water level of Lake Victoria has fallen more than 1.5 m since 1998, revealing a narrow strip of land along the shore. This study determined whether the recent drop in the water level has created additional breeding grounds for malaria vectors. Methods The recent and past shorelines were estimated using landmarks and a satellite image. The locations of breeding habitats were recorded using a GPS unit during the high and low lake water periods. GIS was used to determine whether the breeding habitats were located on newly emerged land between the new and old shorelines. Results Over half of the breeding habitats existed on newly emerged land. Fewer habitats for the Anopheles gambiae complex were found during the low water level period compared to the high water period. However, more habitats for Anopheles funestus were found during the high water level period, and they were all located on the newly emerged land. Conclusion The recent reduction in water level of Lake Victoria has increased the amount of available habitat for A. funestus. The results suggest that the water drop has substantially affected the population of this malaria vector in the Lake Victoria basin, particularly because the lake has a long shoreline that may harbour many new breeding habitats.

  8. Structured singular value synthesis based steam generator water level controller design

    An uncertainty kinetic model for valve position of feed water to steam generator water level plant was built which can express parameter perturbation and unmodeled dynamic due to operation condition change of steam generator and feed water pump. Robust controller was designed based on structured singular value synthesis method. Robust stability of the water control system can be guaranteed under parameter perturbation and unmodeled dynamic, and robust performance can be acquired via suitable performance weight function. Simulation results show that good control performances are obtained under all combinations of steam generator operation condition and feed water pump operation condition. (authors)

  9. GRACE-Based Analysis of Total Water Storage Trends and Groundwater Fluctuations in the North-Western Sahara Aquifer System (NWSAS) and Tindouf Aquifer in Northwest Africa

    Lezzaik, K. A.; Milewski, A.

    2013-12-01

    Optimal water management practices and strategies, in arid and semi-arid environments, are often hindered by a lack of quantitative and qualitative understanding of hydrological processes. Moreover, progressive overexploitation of groundwater resources to meet agricultural, industrial, and domestic requirements is drawing concern over the sustainability of such exhaustive abstraction levels, especially in environments where groundwater is a major source of water. NASA's GRACE (gravity recovery and climate change experiment) mission, since March 2002, has advanced the understanding of hydrological events, especially groundwater depletion, through integrated measurements and modeling of terrestrial water mass. In this study, GLDAS variables (rainfall rate, evapotranspiration rate, average soil moisture), and TRMM 3B42.V7A precipitation satellite data, were used in combination with 95 GRACE-generated gravitational anomalies maps, to quantify total water storage change (TWSC) and groundwater storage change (GWSC) from January 2003 to December 2010 (excluding June 2003), in the North-Western Sahara Aquifer System (NWSAS) and Tindouf Aquifer System in northwestern Africa. Separately processed and computed GRACE products by JPL (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA), CSR (Center of Space Research, UT Austin), and GFZ (German Research Centre for Geoscience, Potsdam), were used to determine which GRACE dataset(s) best reflect total water storage and ground water changes in northwest Africa. First-order estimates of annual TWSC for NWSAS (JPL: +5.297 BCM; CSR: -5.33 BCM; GFZ: -9.96 BCM) and Tindouf Aquifer System (JPL: +1.217 BCM; CSR: +0.203 BCM; GFZ: +1.019 BCM), were computed using zonal averaging over a span of eight years. Preliminary findings of annual GWSC for NWSAS (JPL: +2.45 BCM; CSR: -2.278 BCM; GFZ: -6.913 BCM) and Tindouf Aquifer System (JPL: +1.108 BCM; CSR: +0.094 BCM; GFZ: +0.910 BCM), were calculating using a water budget approach, parameterized by GLDAS

  10. Fluoride level in drinking water resources of gorgan rural regions, 1385

    H Rahimzadeh

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Fluoride is one of the anions existed in water and soil. Its amount is not the same in different kind of water. Since the most of body's need to fluoride should be provided by drinking water, this study was aimed at determining the fluoride level in water supply of Gorgan rural regions. Materials and Methods: In this Cross-Sectional study, the subjects were all 67 water sources of the region. Every season, a one litter Sample was taken in a plastic Container and tested by SPADS Method. After Collecting and encoding the data, ANOVA was used to analyze. Results: The Findings shows that there are 4 springs and 63 wells which are Located in the mountainous (N=16 and flat (N= 47 regions. In every season, the average fluoride Level was lower than Standard Level (1.5 mg/L. The difference between fluoride Level of wells (0.39±0.15mg/L and springs (0.16± 0.13mg/L is Significant (p<0.05 the fluoride Level of mountainous wells is higher than wells located in flat regions (0.13mg/L. This deference was Significant (p<0.05. Conclusion: Based on The results revealing the fluoride Level of drinking water in Gorgan Rural region is less than international Standard, we recommend adding of Supplementary fluoride in foodstuffs of The people Living in This region. Key words: fluoride, drinking water resources, Gorgan, spring

  11. The water level simulation for crane habitat optimization in Xianghai Nature Reserve

    ZHANGYanhong; LIUZhaoli; DENGWei; ZHANGSHuwen; ZHAIJinliang

    2003-01-01

    The probaility of crane living in reedy wetlands can reach 100%, at the same time,the area of reed ,the water level and adjacent water area are main factors which control the crane''''''''s habitat selection.We all know that all these factors are spatially heterogeneous.For the Xianghai wetland safety and to protect the Xianghai wetland habitat of crane,this paper has mainly identified a solution to these problems.The wetland in formation is extracted from the TM images,which reflect the whole wetland landscape and are very important for both quantitative analysis of remote sensing observation of the earth system and positioning analysis in GIS database that is automatically extracted from DEM.The DEM for Xianghai characteristics of topography is created.On the basis of the GRID SUBMODULE,applying the GIS spatial overlay analysis,the relationship between the water level and the reed area below the water level and the rating distribution maps of reed area above water level is established ,When the water level reaches the altitude of 165 n ,the reed area,981.2 ha is maximum,i.e., the water level of 165 m is the optimal.

  12. Estimation method of water level behavior in the case of large pressure change in a BWR

    In a BWR, coolant of core and upper plenum involves so much void volume that free surface level change at downcomer is conspicuous owing to increase and decrease of void volume influenced by pressure change. When mass balance in a reactor vessel becomes non-equilibrium due to steam valve stuck open or feedwater pump trip, difference between liquid level and mixture level becomes very large because of void increased due to depressurization. Therefore, it is very difficult to estimate changes in water level after void exclusion by isolation valve closure etc. So a new parameter ''effective increased void volume'' was contrived to estimate water level in the occurrance of above mentioned phenomena, as a result of consideration about relation between discharged mass and reactor pressure. Degree of water level change under initial operating conditions and reactor pressure change can be estimated by using this parameter. (author)

  13. DAHITI - an innovative approach for estimating water level time series over inland waters using multi-mission satellite altimetry

    Schwatke, C.; Dettmering, D.; Bosch, W.; Seitz, F.

    2015-10-01

    Satellite altimetry has been designed for sea level monitoring over open ocean areas. However, for some years, this technology has also been used to retrieve water levels from reservoirs, wetlands and in general any inland water body, although the radar altimetry technique has been especially applied to rivers and lakes. In this paper, a new approach for the estimation of inland water level time series is described. It is used for the computation of time series of rivers and lakes available through the web service "Database for Hydrological Time Series over Inland Waters" (DAHITI). The new method is based on an extended outlier rejection and a Kalman filter approach incorporating cross-calibrated multi-mission altimeter data from Envisat, ERS-2, Jason-1, Jason-2, TOPEX/Poseidon, and SARAL/AltiKa, including their uncertainties. The paper presents water level time series for a variety of lakes and rivers in North and South America featuring different characteristics such as shape, lake extent, river width, and data coverage. A comprehensive validation is performed by comparisons with in situ gauge data and results from external inland altimeter databases. The new approach yields rms differences with respect to in situ data between 4 and 36 cm for lakes and 8 and 114 cm for rivers. For most study cases, more accurate height information than from other available altimeter databases can be achieved.

  14. DAHITI - An Innovative Approach for Estimating Water Level Time Series over Inland Water using Multi-Mission Satellite Altimetry

    Schwatke, Christian; Dettmering, Denise

    2016-04-01

    Satellite altimetry has been designed for sea level monitoring over open ocean areas. However, for some years, this technology has also been used to retrieve water levels from lakes, reservoirs, rivers, wetlands and in general any inland water body. In this contribution, a new approach for the estimation of inland water level time series is presented. The method is the basis for the computation of time series of rivers and lakes available through the web service 'Database for Hydrological Time Series over Inland Water' (DAHITI). It is based on an extended outlier rejection and a Kalman filter approach incorporating cross-calibrated multi-mission altimeter data from Envisat, ERS-2, Jason-1, Jason-2, Topex/Poseidon, and SARAL/AltiKa, including their uncertainties. The new approach yields RMS differences with respect to in situ data between 4 cm and 36 cm for lakes and 8 cm and 114 cm for rivers, respectively. Within this presentation, the new approach will be introduced and examples for water level time series for a variety of lakes and rivers will be shown featuring different characteristics such as shape, lake extent, river width, and data coverage. A comprehensive validation is performed by comparisons with in situ gauge data and results from external inland altimeter databases.

  15. Fluctuations in anti-nRNP levels in patients with mixed connective tissue disease are related to disease activity as part of a polyclonal B cell response.

    Houtman, P M; Kallenberg, C. G.; Limburg, P C; Leeuwen, M.A. van; van Rijswijk, M H; The, T H

    1986-01-01

    In a follow up study of 11 patients with mixed connective tissue disease the levels of antibodies to nuclear ribonucleoprotein (nRNP) as measured by an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were related to clinical activity of disease. To assess the relation between anti-nRNP levels and disease activity the levels of total immunoglobulin G, IgM rheumatoid factor (IgM RF), and antibodies to an unrelated antigen (tetanus toxoid) were determined simultaneously. No significant changes in anti...

  16. Land use water level fluctuation and water quality in two reservoirs subjected to semi-arid climate (Trás-os-Montes, Portugal)

    Geraldes, Ana Maria; Maria José BOAVIDA

    2002-01-01

    Serra Serrada and Azibo reservoirs are located in River Douro watershed. The cLimate is continental, with warm, dry summers and long, cold winters. Precipitation occurs mainly in Autumn and Winter, although in a very irregular regime with wet winters to followed by drought ones.

  17. Trends in Water Level and Flooding in Dhaka, Bangladesh and Their Impact on Mortality

    Insa Thiele-Eich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Climate change is expected to impact flooding in many highly populated coastal regions, including Dhaka (Bangladesh, which is currently among the fastest growing cities in the world. In the past, high mortality counts have been associated with extreme flood events. We first analyzed daily water levels of the past 100 years in order to detect potential shifts in extremes. A distributed lag non-linear model was then used to examine the connection between water levels and mortality. Results indicate that for the period of 2003–2007, which entails two major flood events in 2004 and 2007, high water levels do not lead to a significant increase in relative mortality, which indicates a good level of adaptation and capacity to cope with flooding. However, following low water levels, an increase in mortality could be found. As our trend analysis of past water levels shows that minimum water levels have decreased during the past 100 years, action should be taken to ensure that the exposed population is also well-adapted to drought.

  18. Changes in Water Levels and Storage in the High Plains Aquifer, Predevelopment to 2005

    McGuire, V.L.

    2007-01-01

    The High Plains aquifer underlies 111.4 million acres (174,000 square miles) in parts of eight States-Colorado, Kansas, Nebraska, New Mexico, Oklahoma, South Dakota, Texas, and Wyoming. The area overlying the High Plains aquifer is one of the major agricultural regions in the world. Water-level declines began in parts of the High Plains aquifer soon after the beginning of extensive ground-water irrigation. By 1980, water levels in the High Plains aquifer in parts of Texas, Oklahoma, and southwestern Kansas had declined more than 100 feet (Luckey and others, 1981). In response to these water-level declines, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with numerous Federal, State, and local water-resources agencies, began monitoring more than 7,000 wells in 1988 to assess annual water-level change in the aquifer. A report by the USGS, 'Water-Level Changes in the High Plains Aquifer, Predevelopment to 2005 and 2003 to 2005' (McGuire, 2007), shows the areas of substantial water-level changes in the aquifer from the time prior to substantial ground-water irrigation development (predevelopment or about 1950) to 2005 (fig. 1). In parts of the area, farmers began using ground water for irrigation extensively in the 1930s and 1940s. Estimated irrigated acreage in the area overlying the High Plains aquifer increased rapidly from 1940 to 1980 and changed slightly from 1980 to 2002: 1949-2.1 million acres, 1980-13.7 million acres, 1997-13.9 million acres, 2002-12.7 million acres. Irrigated acres in 2002 were 12 percent of the aquifer area, not including the areas with little or no saturated thickness (McGuire, 2007). Ground-water withdrawals for irrigation and other uses are compiled and reported by the USGS and agencies in each State about every 5 years. Ground-water withdrawals from the High Plains aquifer for irrigation increased from 4 to 19 million acre-feet from 1949 to 1974. Ground-water withdrawals for irrigation in 1980, 1985, 1990, and 1995 were from 4 to 18

  19. [Wastewater Quantity and Quality Fluctuation Characteristics of Typical Area of Hybrid Sewage System].

    Cheng, Xun; Zhang, Ming-kai; Liu, Yan-chen; Shi, Han-chang

    2016-05-15

    The inflow and infiltration problems cause large fluctuation in wastewater quantity and quality in hybrid sewage system. This seriously challenges the operation and management of sewage system. A multi-point on-line simultaneous monitoring system was established in a typical hybrid sewage system. The key characteristic parameters and their variation features under different circumstances were studied. The result indicated that the daily variation rule was obvious and appeared synchronous among multiple points at normal water level under dry weather flow, but there was no synchronization in conductivity variation among multiple points at high water level under dry weather flow. The statistical distribution range of water level and conductivity was significantly impacted by the seasonal rainfall change under dry weather. The statistical distribution ranges of water level variation rate and conductivity variation rate in specific time were significantly impacted by the rainfall. The response features of water level and conductivity to rainfall intensity and pattern were significantly different under different circumstances. The response sensitivity of conductivity was higher than water level at normal water level and lower at high water level. The database which could support the optimization of operation and management in the hybrid sewage system was proposed based on the distribution law of wastewater quality and quantity fluctuation under dry and wet weather, as well as the variation rate features of wastewater quality and quantity during rainfall obtained using the multi-point on-line simultaneous monitoring system. PMID:27506039

  20. Quantitative Assay and Evaluation of Uranium Levels in Water Resources of Egypt

    Quality of water resources are one of the vital components for industrial, agricultural and economical development as well as for security issue. The aim of this study is to evaluate the levels of uranium in the Egyptian water resources used for drinking purposes. Fifty-seven water samples representing Egyptian water resources for drinking water (unpurified, purified, tap and ground) were collected. Sensitive and rapid destructive laser fluorimetry technique was used for uranium determination. The results showed that the level of uranium in most of the collected samples was below than the safe limit recommended by the international organizations. The average annual equivalent dose due to the consumption of water ranged from 0.1 μSv/y to 2.0 μSv/y which is lower than the international recommendation

  1. Numerical Simulation of Elimination of Pressure Fluctuation in Francis Turbine Draft Tube Using Water Jet%射水减弱混流式水轮机尾水管内压力脉动的数值模拟

    李章超; 常近时; 辛喆

    2013-01-01

    3-D unsteady turbulent flow simulation with RNG k - e turbulence model of complete flow passage on Francis turbine at partial load condition was performed. The simulation results were compared with the test data. The simulation predicted the pressure fluctuation magnitude and frequency characteristic in the draft tube successfully. A method injecting water from the crown tip to the turbine draft tube to weaken the pressure fluctuation was introduced. Simulation of the flow with water jet was performed, showing that the water jet weakened the pressure fluctuation in the turbine draft tube effectively. With the increase of the jet flow rate, a greater reduction of pressure fluctuation magnitude was detected, but a decrease of efficiency was found. To keep a balance between pressure fluctuation mitigation and efficiency requirement, 0. 03 ~ 0. 05 times of flow rate at the calculated operating condition was suggested.%选用RNGk-ε湍流模型,对一台混流式模型水轮机在部分负荷工况下的流动进行了全流道三维瞬态湍流数值模拟.数值计算结果与模型试验结果进行了比较,成功预测了水轮机尾水管内压力脉动的幅值与频率特性.从混流式水轮机泄水锥处向尾水管内射水可减弱尾水管内低频压力脉动,对射水后水轮机内的流动进行了数值模拟.计算结果表明,通过射水可以有效减弱尾水管内的压力脉动,减小压力脉动幅值.随着射水量的增加,压力脉动幅值减小更加明显,但是同时会导致水轮机效率的下降.为了尽可能大的减小压力脉动幅值,并兼顾水轮机效率,建议选择0.03~0.05倍该工况流量的射水量.此时,水轮机压力脉动幅值降低明显,而水轮机效率下降不大.

  2. HIRDLS/Aura Level 3 Water Vapor (H2O) Zonal Fourier Coefficients V007

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The "HIRDLS/Aura Level 3 Water Vapor (H2O) Zonal Fourier Coefficients" version 7 data product (H3ZFCH2O) contains the entire mission (~3 years) of HIRDLS data...

  3. Back-Analyses of Landfill Instability Induced by High Water Level: Case Study of Shenzhen Landfill

    Peng, Ren; Hou, Yujing; Zhan, Liangtong; Yao, Yangping

    2016-01-01

    In June 2008, the Shenzhen landfill slope failed. This case is used as an example to study the deformation characteristics and failure mode of a slope induced by high water levels. An integrated monitoring system, including water level gauges, electronic total stations, and inclinometers, was used to monitor the slope failure process. The field measurements suggest that the landfill landslide was caused by a deep slip along the weak interface of the composite liner system at the base of the landfill. The high water level is considered to be the main factor that caused this failure. To calculate the relative interface shear displacements in the geosynthetic multilayer liner system, a series of numerical direct shear tests were carried out. Based on the numerical results, the composite lining system simplified and the centrifuge modeling technique was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of water levels on landfill instability. PMID:26771627

  4. Anatomic adaptation of seedlings of woody plants to various levels of soil water supply

    I. P. Grigoryuk; V. I. Tkachov; P. P. Yavorivskyi

    2005-01-01

    Tree seedlings anatomical parameters adaptation to different soil water supply levels were studied. Differences in stomata number and shape and fiber length for leaf-bearing species and central cylinder area for coniferous species have been determined.

  5. Great Lakes Daily Ice Observations at NOAA Water Level Gauge Sites

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains daily visual ice observations taken yearly from 1 November to 30 April at NOAA/National Ocean Service water level gauge sites in the Great...

  6. Back-Analyses of Landfill Instability Induced by High Water Level: Case Study of Shenzhen Landfill

    Ren Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In June 2008, the Shenzhen landfill slope failed. This case is used as an example to study the deformation characteristics and failure mode of a slope induced by high water levels. An integrated monitoring system, including water level gauges, electronic total stations, and inclinometers, was used to monitor the slope failure process. The field measurements suggest that the landfill landslide was caused by a deep slip along the weak interface of the composite liner system at the base of the landfill. The high water level is considered to be the main factor that caused this failure. To calculate the relative interface shear displacements in the geosynthetic multilayer liner system, a series of numerical direct shear tests were carried out. Based on the numerical results, the composite lining system simplified and the centrifuge modeling technique was used to quantitatively evaluate the effect of water levels on landfill instability.

  7. Early Water Stress Detection Using Leaf-Level Measurements of Chlorophyll Fluorescence and Temperature Data

    Zhuoya Ni; Zhigang Liu; Hongyuan Huo; Zhao-Liang Li; Françoise Nerry; Qingshan Wang; Xiaowen Li

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper was to investigate the early water stress in maize using leaf-level measurements of chlorophyll fluorescence and temperature. In this study, a series of diurnal measurements, such as leaf chlorophyll fluorescence (Fs), leaf spectrum, temperature and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR), were conducted for maize during gradient watering and filled watering experiments. Fraunhofer Line Discriminator methods (FLD and 3FLD) were used to obtain fluorescence from leav...

  8. Hydrological forecast of maximal water level in Lepenica river basin and flood control measures

    Milanović Ana

    2006-01-01

    Lepenica river basin territory has became axis of economic and urban development of Šumadija district. However, considering Lepenica River with its tributaries, and their disordered river regime, there is insufficient of water for water supply and irrigation, while on the other hand, this area is suffering big flood and torrent damages (especially Kragujevac basin). The paper presents flood problems in the river basin, maximum water level forecasts, and flood control measures carried out unti...

  9. Status of Water Levels and Selected Water-Quality Conditions in the Sparta-Memphis Aquifer in Arkansas and the Status of Water Levels in the Sparta Aquifer in Louisiana, Spring 2005

    Schrader, T.P.; Jones, J.S.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Arkansas Natural Resources Commission, the Arkansas Geological Commission, and the Louisiana Department of Transportation and Development has monitored water levels in the Sparta Sand of Claiborne Group and Memphis Sand of Claiborne Group since the 1920's. Ground-water withdrawals have increased while water levels have declined since monitoring was initiated. This report has been produced to describe ground-water levels in the aquifers in the Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand and provide information for the management of this valuable resource. The 2005 potentiometric-surface map of the aquifers in the Sparta Sand and Memphis Sand was constructed using water-level data collected in 333 wells in Arkansas and 120 wells in Louisiana during the spring of 2005. The highest water-level altitude measured in Arkansas was 327 feet above National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 located in Grant County in the outcrop at the western boundary of the study area; the lowest water-level altitude was 189 feet below National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 in Union County. The highest water-level altitude measured in Louisiana was 246 feet above National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 located in Bossier Parish in the outcrop area near the western boundary of the study area; the lowest water-level altitude was 226 feet below National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929 in central Ouachita Parish. Three large depressions centered in Columbia, Jefferson, and Union Counties in Arkansas are the result of large withdrawals for industrial and public supplies. In Louisiana, three major pumping centers are in Ouachita, Jackson, and Lincoln Parishes. Water withdrawals from these major pumping centers primarily is used for industrial and public-supply purposes. Withdrawals from Ouachita and Lincoln Parishes and Union County, Arkansas, primarily for industrial purposes, have caused the resulting cones of depression to coalesce so that the -40 foot

  10. 1:750,000-scale static ground-water levels of Nevada

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This data set consists of static ground-water levels for the State of Nevada based on a 1974 ground-water map (Rush, 1974) published by the Nevada Department of...

  11. Effects of radiation heat transfer for prediction of water temperature and level in spent fuel pit

    In order to predict water temperature of the spent fuel pit (SFP) of nuclear power plants after shutdown of its cooling systems, a prediction system with a one-region model was developed based on three-dimensional (3D) thermal-hydraulic behavior calculated by using the CFD software, FLUENT 6.3.26. In the prediction system, decay heat calculated by using the burn-up calculation software, ORIGEN 2.2, and the previously proposed correlation for evaporation heat fluxes from the water surface to air were used. The prediction system was extended to calculate water temperature and level during loss of all AC power supplies under natural convection of air flow and the calculated results were verified using measured values from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station. This prediction system was introduced a conservative heat transfer model which ignored radiation heat fluxes that contained uncertain emissivity. Therefore, in this, study, we used a non-conservative heat transfer model including radiation heat fluxes with relatively large emissivity and we calculated effects of radiation heat fluxes on the water temperature and level to investigate uncertainties of the prediction system. As a result, we found radiation heat fluxes affected the decreasing rate of the water level but did not directly affect the water temperature. Then we did sensitivity calculations to obtain decay heat and evaporation heat flux which gave good agreement with the measured decreasing rate of the water level and water temperature, respectively. (author)

  12. An Environmental Chemistry Experiment: The Determination of Radon Levels in Water.

    Welch, Lawrence E.; Mossman, Daniel M.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a radiation experiment developed to complement a new environmental chemistry laboratory curriculum. A scintillation counter is used to measure radon in water. The procedure relies on the fact that toluene will preferentially extract radon from water. Sample preparation is complete in less than 90 minutes. Because the level of…

  13. Implementation of E.U. Water Framework Directive: source assessment of metallic substances at catchment levels.

    Chon, Ho-Sik; Ohandja, Dieudonne-Guy; Voulvoulis, Nikolaos

    2010-01-01

    The E.U. Water Framework Directive (WFD) aims to prevent deterioration of water quality and to phase out or reduce the concentrations of priority substances at catchment levels. It requires changes in water management from a local scale to a river basin scale, and establishes Environmental Quality Standards (EQS) as a guideline for the chemical status of receiving waters. According to the Directive, the standard and the scope of the investigation for water management are more stringent and expanded than in the past, and this change also needs to be applied to restoring the level of metals in water bodies. The aim of this study was to identify anthropogenic emission sources of metallic substances at catchment levels. Potential sources providing substantial amounts of such substances in receiving waters included stormwater, industrial effluents, treated effluents, agricultural drainage, sediments, mining drainage and landfill leachates. Metallic substances have more emission sources than other dangerous substances at catchment levels. Therefore, source assessment for these substances is required to be considered more significantly to restore their chemical status in the context of the WFD. To improve source assessment quality, research on the role of societal and environmental parameters and contribution of each source to the chemical distribution in receiving waters need to be carried out. PMID:20081997

  14. Data quality assurance in pressure transducer-based automatic water level monitoring

    Submersible pressure transducers integrated with data loggers have become relatively common water-level measuring devices used in flow or well water elevation measurements. However, drift, linearity, hysteresis and other problems can lead to erroneous data. Researchers at the USDA-ARS in Watkinsvill...

  15. Efficient local personal cooling with fluctuating airflows

    Bakker, L.G.; Hoes-van Oeffelen, E.C.M.; Hordijk, G.J.; Ham, E.R. van de

    2015-01-01

    Overheating in buildings is an increasingly important issue. Various studies show that local personalized cooling can substantially improve comfort levels while saving energy. Airflows are an efficient approach for local cooling. Fluctuating airflows seem more effective and are potentially perceived

  16. Prediction of Flow Rate in a Passive Residual Heat Removal System with Various Water Levels

    A passive residual heat removal system (PRHRS) is one of passive safety systems that have been adopted in SMART. In the case of an emergency such as an unavailability of the secondary side feedwater supply or a station blackout, the PRHRS passively removes the core decay heat and sensible heat through a two-phase natural circulation, and thus maintains the reactor in a stable condition without any AC power or operator actions. The PRHRS consists of an emergency cool-down tank (ECT), a condensing heat exchanger (HX), a makeup tank (MT), valves, pipes, and monitoring instruments. Its conceptual diagram is given in Fig. 1. If the passive residual heat removal actuation signal is generated, the PRHRS starts running. Subcooled water in the HX flows into the secondary side of the SG due to the difference in the water level. The feedwater is evaporated by residual heat, and exits the SG cassette nozzle header at a two-phase flow or superheated steam condition. Then, as it flows into the HX submerged in the ECT, the steam is condensed into subcooled water by emitting the residual heat into the cool-down water. Thus, continuous coolant circulation occurs in the PRHRS. Such a natural circulation becomes weakened, however, as the water level and density differences between the HX and the secondary side of the SG dwindle due to the decrease of residual heat. In this study, therefore, the effects of water level in the PRHRS on the flow rate are theoretically examined. To obtain the flow rate variation, the natural circulation in PRHRS is modeled with basic hydraulic theory. The effect of the water level of the SG, HX and MT on the natural circulation in the PRHRS has been investigated. The HX flow rate also increases with the decrease in the SG water level. It is noted that a natural circulation in PRHRS mainly occurs through the flow path of the HX because the flow path configuration through the MT gives an inherently high hydraulic resistance. Thus, the total flow rate has a

  17. A molecular level study of liquid water with a flexible water model

    Liu Chang-Song; Liang Yun-Feng; Zhu Zhen-Gang; Li Guang-Xu

    2005-01-01

    The structural properties of water at different temperatures and pressures have been investigated by using a flexible water model and the inherent structure mechanism. The presence of 60° peak in the O-O-O angle distribution function and the behaviours of the hydrogen bonds in the first shell indicate that some water molecules in the second shell move toward the central molecules through the bending (not breaking) of hydrogen bonds and even become first-shell molecules of the central molecule on the basis of the O-O cutoff distance but not first-shell molecules by means of the hydrogen-bond criterion. The inherent-structure analysis of the O-O radial distribution functions at different pressures shows that the first peak is almost independent of the pressure; the position of second peak moves from 0.45 to 0.32nm as the pressure increases from 1 × 105Pa to 1 × 109Pa. This particularly evident pressure effect, i.e. the constant nearest-neighbours and the transformation of outer-neighbours on the basis of O-O distance, together with the results at different temperatures, gives a positive evidence for the two-state outer-neighbour mixture model: liquid water is a mixture of Ice-Ih-type-bonding and Ice-Ⅱ-type bonding structures.

  18. Fluctuations and NA49

    A brief history of the study of fluctuations in high energy nuclear collisions at the CERN SPS by NA49 is presented. The ideas and the corresponding experimental data on fluctuations are discussed from the point of view of their sensitivity to the onset of deconfinement

  19. Particle density fluctuations

    Aggarwal, M.M.; Ahammed, Z.; Angelis, A.L.S.; Antonenko, V.; Arefiev, V.; Astakhov, V.; Avdeitchikov, V.; Awes, T.C.; Baba, P.V.K.S.; Badyal, S.K.; Bathe, S.; Batiounia, B.; Bernier, T.; Bhalla, K.B.; Bhatia, V.S.; Blume, C.; Bucher, D.; Buesching, H.; Carlen, L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Das, A.C.; Decowski, M.P.; Donni, P.; Dubey, A.K.; Dutta Majumdar, M.R.; Enosawa, K.; Fokin, S.; Frolov, V.; Ganti, M.S.; Garpman, S.; Gavrishcuk, O.; Geurts, F.J.M.; Glasow, R.; Guskov, B.; Gustafsson, H.A.; Gutbrod, H.H.; Hrivnacova, I.; Ippolitov, M.; Kalechofsky, H.; Kamermans, R.; Karadjev, K.; Karpio, K.; Kolb, B.W.; Kosarev, I.; Koutcheryaev, I.; Kugler, A.; Kulinich, P.; Kurata, M.; Lebedev, A.; Loehner, H.; Mahapatra, D.P.; Manko, V.; Martin, M.; Miake, Y.; Mishra, G.C.; Mohanty, B.; Morrison, D.; Mukhopadhayay, D.S.; Naef, H.; Nandi, B.K.; Nayak, S.K.; Nayak, T.K.; Nianine, A.; Nikitine, V.; Nikolaev, S.; Nishimura, S.; Nomokov, P.; Petracek, V.; Plasil, F.; Purschke, M.L.; Rak, J.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rao, N.K.; Retiere, F.; Reygers, K.; Roland, G.; Rosselet, L.; Roufanov, I.; Rubio, J.M.; Sambyal, S.S.; Santo, R.; Sato, S.; Schlagheck, H.; Schmidt, H.-R.; Schutz, Y.; Shabratova, G.; Sibiriak, I.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sinha, B.C.; Slavine, N.; Soederstroem, K.; Sood, G.; Soerensen, S.P.; Stankus, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stenlund, E.; Sumbera, M.; Svensson, T.; Trivedi, M.D.; Tsvetkov, A.; Tykarski, L.; Urbahn, J.; Eijinhoven, N. van; Niewenhuizen, G.J. van; Vinogradov, A.; Viyogi, Y.P.; Vodopianov, A.; Voeroes, S.; Wyslouch, B.; Young, G.R

    2003-03-10

    Event-by-event fluctuations in the multiplicities of charged particles and photons at SPS energies are discussed. Fluctuations are studied by controlling the centrality of the reaction and rapidity acceptance of the detectors. Results are also presented on the event-by-event study of correlations between the multiplicity of charged particles and photons to search for DCC-like signals.

  20. Particle density fluctuations

    Event-by-event fluctuations in the multiplicities of charged particles and photons at SPS energies are discussed. Fluctuations are studied by controlling the centrality of the reaction and rapidity acceptance of the detectors. Results are also presented on the event-by-event study of correlations between the multiplicity of charged particles and photons to search for DCC-like signals