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Sample records for fiber optic sensing

  1. Optical fiber rotation sensing

    Burns, William K; Kelley, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Optical Fiber Rotation Sensing is the first book devoted to Interferometric Fiber Optic Gyros (IFOG). This book provides a complete overview of IFOGs, beginning with a historical review of IFOG development and including a fundamental exposition of basic principles, a discussion of devices and components, and concluding with industry reports on state-of-the-art activity. With several chapters contributed by principal developers of this solid-state device, the result is an authoritative work which will serve as the resource for researchers, students, and users of IFOGs.* * State-of-t

  2. Specially fibers and relevant technologies for fiber optic sensing

    Fiber optic sensing is one of the most important technologies in phonic sensing. Novel specially fibers and relevant technologies have been developed for various application fields, such as avionics, infrastructures, atomic plants and oil and gas industries. In this paper, recent progress in the fiber optic sensing is reviewed with a focus on the specialty fibers. (author)

  3. Optical Fiber Sensing Using Quantum Dots

    Faramarz Farahi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the application of semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantumdots, as biochemical sensors are reviewed. Quantum dots have unique optical properties thatmake them promising alternatives to traditional dyes in many luminescence basedbioanalytical techniques. An overview of the more relevant progresses in the application ofquantum dots as biochemical probes is addressed. Special focus will be given toconfigurations where the sensing dots are incorporated in solid membranes and immobilizedin optical fibers or planar waveguide platforms.

  4. Distributed sensing employing stimulated Brillouin scattering in optical fibers

    Antman, Yair; Thévenaz, Luc; Zadok, Avinoam

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed are methods and devices for distributed sensing of a measurable parameter employing stimulated Brillouin scattering in an optical fiber. A frequency-modulated or phase-modulated light wave is transmitted into the optical fiber. A scattered light wave in the optical fiber is monitored for sensing a measurable parameter. In some embodiments, the calculating step may include calculating a distance of a sensed location along the optical fiber using the monitored time of arrival.

  5. Bridge SHM system based on fiber optical sensing technology

    Li, Sheng; Fan, Dian; Fu, Jiang-hua; Huang, Xing; Jiang, De-sheng

    2015-09-01

    The latest progress of our lab in recent 10 years on the area of bridge structural health monitoring (SHM) based on optical fiber sensing technology is introduced. Firstly, in the part of sensing technology, optical fiber force test-ring, optical fiber vibration sensor, optical fiber smart cable, optical fiber prestressing loss monitoring method and optical fiber continuous curve mode inspection system are developed, which not only rich the sensor types, but also provides new monitoring means that are needed for the bridge health monitoring system. Secondly, in the optical fiber sensing network and computer system platform, the monitoring system architecture model is designed to effectively meet the integration scale and effect requirement of engineering application, especially the bridge expert system proposed integration of sensing information and informatization manual inspection to realize the mode of multi index intelligence and practical monitoring, diagnosis and evaluation. Finally, the Jingyue bridge monitoring system as the representative, the research on the technology of engineering applications are given.

  6. Radiation distribution sensing with normal optical fiber

    Kawarabayashi, J; Naka, R; Uritani, A; Watanabe, K I; Iguchi, T; Tsujimura, N

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a radiation distribution monitor using a normal plastic optical fiber. The monitor has a long operating length (10m-100m) and can obtain continuous radiation distributions. A principle of the position sensing is based on a time-of-flight technique. The characteristics of this monitor to beta particles, gamma rays and fast neutrons were obtained. The spatial resolutions for beta particles ( sup 9 sup 0 Sr sup - sup 9 sup 0 Y), gamma rays ( sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs) and D-T neutrons were 30 cm, 37 cm and 13 cm, respectively. The detection efficiencies for the beta rays, the gamma rays and D-T neutrons were 0.11%, 1.6x10 sup - sup 5 % and 5.4x10 sup - sup 4 %, respectively. The effective attenuation length of the detection efficiency was 18m. New principle of the position sensing based on spectroscopic analysis was also proposed. A preliminary test showed that the spectrum observed at the end of the fiber depended on the position of the irradiated point. This fact shows that t...

  7. Fiber Optic-Based Refractive Index Sensing at INESC Porto

    Orlando Frazão

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A review of refractive index measurement based on different types of optical fiber sensor configurations and techniques is presented. It addresses the main developments in the area, with particular focus on results obtained at INESC Porto, Portugal. The optical fiber sensing structures studied include those based on Bragg and long period gratings, on micro-interferometers, on plasmonic effects in fibers and on multimode interference in a large spectrum of standard and microstructured optical fibers.

  8. Sensing characteristics of birefringent microstructured polymer optical fiber

    Szczurowski, Marcin K.; Frazao, Orlando; Baptista, J. M.;

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally studied several sensing characteristics of a birefringent microstructured polymer optical fiber. The fiber exhibits a birefringence of the order 2×10-5 at 1.3 μm because of two small holes adjacent to the core. In this fiber, we measured spectral dependence of phase and group mo...

  9. Fiber-Optic Sensing for In-Space Inspection

    Pena, Francisco; Richards, W. Lance; Piazza, Anthony; Parker, Allen R.; Hudson, Larry D.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides examples of fiber optic sensing technology development activities performed at NASA Armstrong. Examples of current and previous work that support in-space inspection techniques and methodologies are highlighted.

  10. Optical Fiber Sensing Based on Reflection Laser Spectroscopy

    Gianluca Gagliardi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An overview on high-resolution and fast interrogation of optical-fiber sensors relying on laser reflection spectroscopy is given. Fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs and FBG resonators built in fibers of different types are used for strain, temperature and acceleration measurements using heterodyne-detection and optical frequency-locking techniques. Silica fiber-ring cavities are used for chemical sensing based on evanescent-wave spectroscopy. Various arrangements for signal recovery and noise reduction, as an extension of most typical spectroscopic techniques, are illustrated and results on detection performances are presented.

  11. Application of Multiscale Fiber Optical Sensing Network Based on Brillouin and Fiber Bragg Grating Sensing Techniques on Concrete Structures

    Xuefeng Zhao; Jie Lu; Ruicong Han; Xianglong Kong; Yanhong Wang; Le Li

    2012-01-01

    The paper reports the application of the distributed optical fiber sensing technology and the FBG sensing technology in bridge strain monitoring; the overall changeable characteristics of the whole structure can be obtained through the distributed optical fiber sensing technology (BOTDA), meanwhile the accurate information of local important parts of the structure can be obtained through the optical fiber Bragg grating sensor (FBG), which can improve the accuracy of the monitoring. FBG sensor...

  12. Radiation resistant optical fiber for FBG based sensing

    Pal, A.; Dhar, A.; Sen, R; Ams, M.; Sun, T.; Grattan, K.T.V.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation-resistant optical fibers have been fabricated through MCVD process. The low radiation-induced-absorption in the fiber and few picometer shifting of Bragg-wavelength of the FBG under γ-exposure indicate its potential application for sensing in radiation environment.

  13. Novel microbend loss fiber optic hydrophones for direction sensing

    Vengsarkar, Ashish Madhukar

    1988-01-01

    Dual purpose fiber optic microbend loss sensors have been developed for measurement of underwater acoustic wave amplitudes and for detection of the direction of wave propagation. Cylindrical sensing elements with external threads have fibers wound around them. Axial slots, cut along the length of the cylinder and deeper than the threads, provide the microbends. Three different construction schemes for cylindrical sensing elements are built. The dual purpose hydrophones are c...

  14. Optical Fiber Sensing Using Quantum Dots

    Faramarz Farahi; José Luís Santos; Tito Trindade; Manuel António Martins; Pedro Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in the application of semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, as biochemical sensors are reviewed. Quantum dots have unique optical properties that make them promising alternatives to traditional dyes in many luminescence based bioanalytical techniques. An overview of the more relevant progresses in the application of quantum dots as biochemical probes is addressed. Special focus will be given to configurations where the sensing dots are incorporated in sol...

  15. Fiber Optic Wing Shape Sensing on NASA's Ikhana UAV

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This document discusses the development of fiber optic wing shape sensing on NASA's Ikhana vehicle. The Dryden Flight Research Center's Aerostructures Branch initiated fiber-optic instrumentation development efforts in the mid-1990s. Motivated by a failure to control wing dihedral resulting in a mishap with the Helios aircraft, new wing displacement techniques were developed. Research objectives for Ikhana included validating fiber optic sensor measurements and real-time wing shape sensing predictions; the validation of fiber optic mathematical models and design tools; assessing technical viability and, if applicable, developing methodology and approaches to incorporate wing shape measurements within the vehicle flight control system; and, developing and flight validating approaches to perform active wing shape control using conventional control surfaces and active material concepts.

  16. Magnetic Sensing with Ferrofluid and Fiber Optic Connectors

    Daniel Homa; Gary Pickrell

    2014-01-01

    A simple, cost effective and sensitive fiber optic magnetic sensor fabricated with ferrofluid and commercially available fiber optic components is described in this paper. The system uses a ferrofluid infiltrated extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) interrogated with an infrared wavelength spectrometer to measure magnetic flux density. The entire sensing system was developed with commercially available components so it can be easily and economically reproduced in large quantities. The ...

  17. Exposed-core chalcogenide microstructured optical fibers for chemical sensing

    Troles, Johann; Toupin, Perrine; Brilland, Laurent; Boussard-Plédel, Catherine; Bureau, Bruno; Cui, Shuo; Mechin, David; Adam, Jean-Luc

    2013-05-01

    Chemical bonds of most of the molecules vibrate at a frequency corresponding to the near or mid infrared field. It is thus of a great interest to develop sensitive and portable devices for the detection of specific chemicals and biomolecules for various applications in health, the environment, national security and so on. Optical fibers define practical sensing tools. Chalcogenide glasses are known for their transparency in the infrared optical range and their ability to be drawn as fibers. They are consequently good candidates to be used in biological/chemical sensing. For that matter, in the past decade, chalcogenide glass fibers have been successfully implemented in evanescent wave spectroscopy experiments, for the detection of bio-chemical species in various fields of applications including microbiology and medicine, water pollution and CO2 detection. Different types of fiber can be used: single index fibers or microstructured fibers. Besides, in recent years a new configuration of microstructured fibers has been developed: microstructured exposed-core fibers. This design consists of an optical fiber with a suspended micron-scale core that is partially exposed to the external environment. This configuration has been chosen to elaborate, using the molding method, a chalcogenide fiber for chemical species detection. The sensitivity of this fiber to detect molecules such as propan-2-ol and acetone has been compared with those of single index fibers. Although evanescent wave absorption is inversely proportional to the fiber diameter, the result shows that an exposed-core fiber is much more sensitive than a single index fiber having a twice smaller external diameter.

  18. Multiparameter fiber optic sensing system for monitoring enhanced geothermal systems

    Challener, William A

    2014-12-04

    The goal of this project was to design, fabricate and test an optical fiber cable which supports multiple sensing modalities for measurements in the harsh environment of enhanced geothermal systems. To accomplish this task, optical fiber was tested at both high temperatures and strains for mechanical integrity, and in the presence of hydrogen for resistance to darkening. Both single mode (SM) and multimode (MM) commercially available optical fiber were identified and selected for the cable based on the results of these tests. The cable was designed and fabricated using a tube-within-tube construction containing two MM fibers and one SM fiber, and without supporting gel that is not suitable for high temperature environments. Commercial fiber optic sensing instruments using Raman DTS (distributed temperature sensing), Brillouin DTSS (distributed temperature and strain sensing), and Raleigh COTDR (coherent optical time domain reflectometry) were selected for field testing. A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensor was designed, fabricated, packaged, and calibrated for high pressure measurements at high temperatures and spliced to the cable. A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensor was also spliced to the cable. A geothermal well was selected and its temperature and pressure were logged. The cable was then deployed in the well in two separate field tests and measurements were made on these different sensing modalities. Raman DTS measurements were found to be accurate to ±5°C, even with some residual hydrogen darkening. Brillouin DTSS measurements were in good agreement with the Raman results. The Rayleigh COTDR instrument was able to detect some acoustic signatures, but was generally disappointing. The FBG sensor was used to determine the effects of hydrogen darkening, but drift over time made it unreliable as a temperature or pressure sensor. The MEMS sensor was found to be highly stable and accurate to better than its 0.1% calibration.

  19. Fiber sensing system based on a bragg grating and optical time domain reflectometry

    Chin, Sanghoon; Thévenaz, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Optic fiber sensor characterized in that the sensing fiber is provided with a continuous Bragg grating covering the entire fiber length which is dedicated to sensing and along which spatially resolved measurements are performed.

  20. Experiment Study of Fiber Optic Sensing in Railway Security Monitoring

    Dian Fan; De-Sheng Jiang; Wei-Lai Li

    2008-01-01

    Aiming at some security problems in railway running and the application condition of existing technology, this paper studies some issues of using fiber optic sensing technology in railway security monitoring. Through field experiment measuring the strain of the rail and analyzing the experiment data, the method of diagnosing the health condition of rail and wheel is investigated.

  1. innoFSPEC: fiber optical spectroscopy and sensing

    Roth, Martin M.; Löhmannsröben, Hans-Gerd; Kelz, Andreas; Kumke, Michael

    2008-07-01

    innoFSPEC Potsdam is presently being established as in interdisciplinary innovation center for fiber-optical spectroscopy and sensing, hosted by Astrophysikalisches Institut Potsdam and the Physical Chemistry group of Potsdam University, Germany. The center focuses on fundamental research in the two fields of fiber-coupled multi-channel spectroscopy and optical fiber-based sensing. Thanks to its interdisciplinary approach, the complementary methodologies of astrophysics on the one hand, and physical chemistry on the other hand, are expected to spawn synergies that otherwise would not normally become available in more standard research programmes. innoFSPEC targets future innovations for next generation astrophysical instrumentation, environmental analysis, manufacturing control and process monitoring, medical diagnostics, non-invasive imaging spectroscopy, biopsy, genomics/proteomics, high-throughput screening, and related applications.

  2. Distributed Fiber Optic Gas Sensing for Harsh Environment

    Juntao Wu

    2008-03-14

    This report summarizes work to develop a novel distributed fiber-optic micro-sensor that is capable of detecting common fossil fuel gases in harsh environments. During the 32-month research and development (R&D) program, GE Global Research successfully synthesized sensing materials using two techniques: sol-gel based fiber surface coating and magnetron sputtering based fiber micro-sensor integration. Palladium nanocrystalline embedded silica matrix material (nc-Pd/Silica), nanocrystalline palladium oxides (nc-PdO{sub x}) and palladium alloy (nc-PdAuN{sub 1}), and nanocrystalline tungsten (nc-WO{sub x}) sensing materials were identified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen; while the palladium doped and un-doped nanocrystalline tin oxide (nc-PdSnO{sub 2} and nc-SnO{sub 2}) materials were verified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to carbon monoxide. The fiber micro-sensor comprises an apodized long-period grating in a single-mode fiber, and the fiber grating cladding surface was functionalized by above sensing materials with a typical thickness ranging from a few tens of nanometers to a few hundred nanometers. GE found that the morphologies of such sensing nanomaterials are either nanoparticle film or nanoporous film with a typical size distribution from 5-10 nanometers. nc-PdO{sub x} and alloy sensing materials were found to be highly sensitive to hydrogen gas within the temperature range from ambient to 150 C, while nc-Pd/Silica and nc-WO{sub x} sensing materials were found to be suitable to be operated from 150 C to 500 C for hydrogen gas detection. The palladium doped and un-doped nc-SnO{sub 2} materials also demonstrated sensitivity to carbon monoxide gas at approximately 500 C. The prototyped fiber gas sensing system developed in this R&D program is based on wavelength-division-multiplexing technology in which each fiber sensor is identified according to its transmission spectra features within the guiding mode and cladding modes. The

  3. Monitoring of Thermal Protection Systems using Robust Self-Organizing Optical Fiber Sensing Networks Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Objectives a) Development, evaluation and demonstration of a dynamically reconfigurable optical fiber sensing network that is interrogated using the optical...

  4. Liquid Seal for Temperature Sensing with Fiber-Optic Refractometers

    Ben Xu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Liquid sealing is an effective method to convert a fiber-optic refractometer into a simple and highly sensitive temperature sensor. A refractometer based on the thin-core fiber modal interferometer is sealed in a capillary tube filled with Cargille oil. Due to the thermo-optic effect of the sealing liquid, the high refractive-index sensitivity refractometer is subsequently sensitive to the ambient temperature. It is found that the liquid-sealed sensor produces a highest sensitivity of −2.30 nm/°C, which is over 250 times higher than its intrinsic sensitivity before sealing and significantly higher than that of a grating-based fiber sensors. The sensing mechanisms, including the incidental temperature-induced strain effect, are analyzed in detail both theoretically and experimentally. The liquid sealing technique is easy and low cost, and makes the sensor robust and insensitive to the surrounding refractive index. It can be applied to other fiber-optic refractometers for temperature sensing.

  5. Near-infrared fluorescent dyes for fiber optic sensing

    Patonay, Gabor; Kim, Jun Seok; Medou-Ovono, Martial; Strekowski, Lucjan

    2005-05-01

    Fiber optic sensing requires the use of molecular probes such as fluorescent dyes or indicators that can be induced during analysis to produce a detectable spectral change. Spectroscopic techniques have long been applied to the determination of analytical and bioanalytical measurements using fiber optic sensors; however, relatively few studies have been reported utilizing near-infrared (NIR) absorbing chromophores. This longer wavelength region of the electromagnetic spectrum is more advantageous because of the inherently lower background interference and the high molar absorptivities of NIR absorbing chromophores. Low background interference is especially important in samples containing a complex matrix. The design and operation of an NIR probe are similar to that of conventional UV-visible probes. In principle optical fiber or other optical sensors can be made selective to a particular analyte. The selectivity will be determined primarily by the selectivity of the sensor dye and by the nature of the matrix entrapping the dye if the probe is non-covalently attached. This presentation discusses the development of different NIR dyes for fiber optic sensor applications. Examples are given for determining basic analytical properties, e.g., pH, metal ion concentration, and solvent hydrophobicity. Similarly, NIR dyes are very useful for bioanalytical probes (immunochemistry, etc.) as well.

  6. Optical fiber sensing technology in the pipeline industry

    Braga, A.M.B.; Llerena, R.W.A. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: abraga@mec.puc-rio.br; roberan@mec.puc-rio.br; Valente, L.C.G.; Regazzi, R.D. [Gavea Sensors, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: guedes@gaveasensors.com; regazzi@gaveasensors.com

    2003-07-01

    This paper is concerned with applications of optical fiber sensors to pipeline monitoring. The basic principles of optical fiber sensors are briefly reviewed, with particular attention to fiber Bragg grating technology. Different potential applications in the pipeline industry are discussed, and an example of a pipeline strain monitoring system based on optical fiber Bragg grating sensors is presented. (author)

  7. Frequency-Shifted Interferometry — A Versatile Fiber-Optic Sensing Technique

    Fei Ye; Yiwei Zhang; Bing Qi; Li Qian

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensing is a field that is developing at a fast pace. Novel fiber-optic sensor designs and sensing principles constantly open doors for new opportunities. In this paper, we review a fiber-optic sensing technique developed in our research group called frequency-shifted interferometry (FSI). This technique uses a continuous-wave light source, an optical frequency shifter, and a slow detector. We discuss the operation principles of several FSI implementations and show their applicati...

  8. The study of optical fiber communication technology for space optical remote sensing

    Zheng, Jun; Yu, Sheng-quan; Zhang, Xiao-hong; Zhang, Rong-hui; Ma, Jian-hua

    2012-11-01

    The latest trends of Space Optical Remote Sensing are high-resolution, multispectral, and wide swath detecting. High-speed digital image data transmission will be more important for remote sensing. At present, the data output interface of Space Optical Remote Sensing, after performing the image data compression and formatting, transfers the image data to data storage unit of the Spacecraft through LVDS circuit cables. But this method is not recommended for high-speed digital image data transmission. This type of image data transmission, called source synchronization, has the low performance for high-speed digital signal. Besides, it is difficult for cable installing and system testing in limited space of vehicle. To resolve these issues as above, this paper describes a high-speed interconnection device for Space Optical Remote Sensing with Spacecraft. To meet its objectives, this device is comprised of Virtex-5 FPGA with embedded high-speed series and power-efficient transceiver, fiber-optic transceiver module, the unit of fiber-optic connection and single mode optical fiber. The special communication protocol is performed for image data transferring system. The unit of fiber-optic connection with high reliability and flexibility is provided for transferring high-speed serial data with optical fiber. It is evident that this method provides many advantages for Space Optical Remote Sensing: 1. Improving the speed of image data transferring of Space Optical Remote Sensing; 2. Enhancing the reliability and safety of image data transferring; 3. Space Optical Remote Sensing will be reduced significantly in size and in weight; 4. System installing and system testing for Space Optical Remote Sensing will become easier.

  9. Calibration and Deployment of a Fiber-Optic Sensing System for Monitoring Debris Flows

    Tsung-Mo Tien; Hsiao-Yuen Yin; Ping-Sen Chen; Ching-Jer Huang; Chung-Ray Chu

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel fiber-optic sensing system, capable of monitoring debris flows or other natural hazards that produce ground vibrations. The proposed sensing system comprises a demodulator (BraggSCOPE, FS5500), which includes a broadband light source and a data logger, a four-port coupler and four Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) accelerometers. Based on field tests, the performance of the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is compared with that of a conventional sensing system that inclu...

  10. Extreme temperature sensing using brillouin scattering in optical fibers

    Fellay, Alexandre

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering in silica-based optical fibers may be considered from two different and complementary standpoints. For a physicist, this interaction of light and pressure wave in a material, or equivalently in quantum theory terms between photons and phonons, gives some glimpses of the atomic structure of the solid and of its vibration modes. For an applied engineer, the same phenomenon may be put to good use as a sensing mechanism for distributed measurements, thanks to the dependence of the scattered light on external parameters such as the temperature, the pressure or the strain applied to the fiber. As far as temperature measurements are concerned, Brillouin-based distributed sensors have progressively gained wide recognition as efficient systems, even if their rather high cost still restricts the number of their applications. Yet they are generally used in a relatively narrow temperature range around the usual ambient temperature; in this domain, the frequency of the scattered light incre...

  11. Mechanically induced long period fiber gratings on single mode tapered optical fiber for structure sensing applications

    Pulido-Navarro, María. G.; Marrujo-García, Sigifredo; Álvarez-Chávez, José A.; Velázquez-González, Jesús S.; Martínez-Piñón, Fernando; Escamilla-Ambrosio, Ponciano J.

    2015-08-01

    The modal characteristics of tapered single mode optical fibers and its strain sensing characteristics by using mechanically induced long period fiber gratings are presented in this work. Both Long Period Fiber Gratings (LPFG) and fiber tapers are fiber devices that couple light from the core fiber into the fiber cladding modes. The mechanical LPFG is made up of two plates, one flat and the other grooved. For this experiment the grooved plate was done on an acrylic slab with the help of a computer numerical control machine. The manufacturing of the tapered fiber is accomplished by applying heat using an oxygen-propane flame burner and stretching the fiber, which protective coating has been removed. Then, a polymer-tube-package is added in order to make the sensor sufficiently stiff for the tests. The mechanical induced LPFG is accomplished by putting the tapered fiber in between the two plates, so the taper acquires the form of the grooved plate slots. Using a laser beam the transmission spectrum showed a large peak transmission attenuation of around -20 dB. The resultant attenuation peak wavelength in the transmission spectrum shifts with changes in tension showing a strain sensitivity of 2pm/μɛ. This reveals an improvement on the sensitivity for structure monitoring applications compared with the use of a standard optical fiber. In addition to the experimental work, the supporting theory and numerical simulation analysis are also included.

  12. Novel Perturbation-Immune All-Fiber Optical Architecture for Current Sensing

    Huang Hung-chia; Yao Shouquan; Guo Qiang

    2003-01-01

    This paper describes a novel all-fiber optical architecture for electric current or magnetic field sensing which is immune against temperature and vibration perturbations in a hazardous environment. The architecture is structured by employing the fiber-optic wave plates (quarter, half or full) of the patented invention of the senior author. Experimental results on prototype fiber-optic specimen and on a variety of optical fiber networks confirm the respective theoretical predictions.

  13. Fiber optic device for sensing the presence of a gas

    Benson, David K.; Bechinger, Clemens S.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1998-01-01

    A fiber-optic device for sensing the presence of a gas in an environment is provided. The device comprises a light source for directing a light beam to a layer system having a first surface and a second surface opposite the first surface. The first surface is exposable to the light beam and the second surface is exposable to the environment. A first light portion encounters and reflects from the first surface at an angle of incidence free from optical wave guide resonance phenomenon and the second light portion encounters and reflects from the first surface at an angle of incidence enabling an optical wave guide resonance phenomenon. The layer system is selected to reversibly react with the gas to be detected. The reaction between the gas and the material changes the material's optical properties and the wavelength at which the optical wave guide resonance occurs. Furthermore, a mechanism for measuring the intensity of the reflected first light portion relative to the reflected second light portion is provided with the ratio of the first and second light portions indicating the concentration of the gas presence in the environment.

  14. Gamma radiation influence on silica optical fibers measured by optical backscatter reflectometry and Brillouin sensing technique

    Wosniok, A.; Sporea, D.; Neguţ, D.; Krebber, K.

    2016-05-01

    We have studied the influence of gamma rays on physical properties of different commercially available silica optical fibers stepwise irradiated up to a total dose of 100 kGy. The detection of radiation-induced changes in silica glass offers the possibility of using selected optical fibers as distributed radiation sensors. The measurements performed by us were based on optical backscatter reflectometry and Brillouin distributed sensing. The measurement methods enable an analysis of radiation-induced modification of the group refractive index and density of the optical fibers. The most distinct physical effect observed by us concerns the increase of the optical attenuation with rising total radiation doses. Quantitative measurement results indicate a crucial impact of fiber dopants on radiation-induced physical and sensory characteristics of silica optical fibers affected by differences in fiber fabrication techniques. Based on the obtained results, the suitability of distributed Brillouin sensing for dosimetry applications seems to be improved by modifying the refractive index profile of the fiber core.

  15. Development of self-sensing BFRP bars with distributed optic fiber sensors

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen; Yang, Caiqian; Shen, Sheng; Wu, Gang; Hong, Wan

    2009-03-01

    In this paper, a new type of self-sensing basalt fiber reinforced polymer (BFRP) bars is developed with using the Brillouin scattering-based distributed optic fiber sensing technique. During the fabrication, optic fiber without buffer and sheath as a core is firstly reinforced through braiding around mechanically dry continuous basalt fiber sheath in order to survive the pulling-shoving process of manufacturing the BFRP bars. The optic fiber with dry basalt fiber sheath as a core embedded further in the BFRP bars will be impregnated well with epoxy resin during the pulling-shoving process. The bond between the optic fiber and the basalt fiber sheath as well as between the basalt fiber sheath and the FRP bar can be controlled and ensured. Therefore, the measuring error due to the slippage between the optic fiber core and the coating can be improved. Moreover, epoxy resin of the segments, where the connection of optic fibers will be performed, is uncured by isolating heat from these parts of the bar during the manufacture. Consequently, the optic fiber in these segments of the bar can be easily taken out, and the connection between optic fibers can be smoothly carried out. Finally, a series of experiments are performed to study the sensing and mechanical properties of the propose BFRP bars. The experimental results show that the self-sensing BFRP bar is characterized by not only excellent accuracy, repeatability and linearity for strain measuring but also good mechanical property.

  16. CO2 laser ablation of bent optical fibers for sensing applications

    A procedure for the fabrication of a fiber optic sensor involving CO2 laser ablation at λ = 10.6 µm is proposed. A basic system to achieve optical fiber bending and material processing on a single mode optical fiber is described and it is demonstrated that an optical fiber can be bent at a very precise angle by focusing a CO2 beam locally near the glass cladding surface until it reaches melting temperature. A method is also described for removing material at the apex of a bent fiber to obtain a smooth and well flattened plane surface that is suitable for optical fiber sensing

  17. Analyzing Fourier Transforms for NASA DFRC's Fiber Optic Strain Sensing System

    Fiechtner, Kaitlyn Leann

    2010-01-01

    This document provides a basic overview of the fiber optic technology used for sensing stress, strain, and temperature. Also, the document summarizes the research concerning speed and accuracy of the possible mathematical algorithms that can be used for NASA DFRC's Fiber Optic Strain Sensing (FOSS) system.

  18. Magnetic sensing with ferrofluid and fiber optic connectors.

    Homa, Daniel; Pickrell, Gary

    2014-01-01

    A simple, cost effective and sensitive fiber optic magnetic sensor fabricated with ferrofluid and commercially available fiber optic components is described in this paper. The system uses a ferrofluid infiltrated extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI) interrogated with an infrared wavelength spectrometer to measure magnetic flux density. The entire sensing system was developed with commercially available components so it can be easily and economically reproduced in large quantities. The device was tested with two different ferrofluid types over a range of magnetic flux densities to verify performance. The sensors readily detected magnetic flux densities in the range of 0.5 mT to 12.0 mT with measurement sensitivities in the range of 0.3 to 2.3 nm/mT depending on ferrofluid type. Assuming a conservative wavelength resolution of 0.1 nm for state of the art EFPI detection abilities, the estimated achievable measurement resolution is on the order 0.04 mT. The inherent small size and basic structure complimented with the fabrication ease make it well-suited for a wide array of research, industrial, educational and military applications. PMID:24573312

  19. Magnetic Sensing with Ferrofluid and Fiber Optic Connectors

    Daniel Homa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple, cost effective and sensitive fiber optic magnetic sensor fabricated with ferrofluid and commercially available fiber optic components is described in this paper. The system uses a ferrofluid infiltrated extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI interrogated with an infrared wavelength spectrometer to measure magnetic flux density. The entire sensing system was developed with commercially available components so it can be easily and economically reproduced in large quantities. The device was tested with two different ferrofluid types over a range of magnetic flux densities to verify performance. The sensors readily detected magnetic flux densities in the range of 0.5 mT to 12.0 mT with measurement sensitivities in the range of 0.3 to 2.3 nm/mT depending on ferrofluid type. Assuming a conservative wavelength resolution of 0.1 nm for state of the art EFPI detection abilities, the estimated achievable measurement resolution is on the order 0.04 mT. The inherent small size and basic structure complimented with the fabrication ease make it well-suited for a wide array of research, industrial, educational and military applications.

  20. Corrosion monitoring along infrastructures using distributed fiber optic sensing

    Alhandawi, Khalil B.; Vahdati, Nader; Shiryayev, Oleg; Lawand, Lydia

    2016-04-01

    Pipeline Inspection Gauges (PIGs) are used for internal corrosion inspection of oil pipelines every 3-5 years. However, between inspection intervals, rapid corrosion may occur, potentially resulting in major accidents. The motivation behind this research project was to develop a safe distributed corrosion sensor placed inside oil pipelines continuously monitoring corrosion. The intrinsically safe nature of light provided motivation for researching fiber optic sensors as a solution. The sensing fiber's cladding features polymer plastic that is chemically sensitive to hydrocarbons within crude oil mixtures. A layer of metal, used in the oil pipeline's construction, is deposited on the polymer cladding, which upon corrosion, exposes the cladding to surrounding hydrocarbons. The hydrocarbon's interaction with the cladding locally increases the cladding's refractive index in the radial direction. Light intensity of a traveling pulse is reduced due to local reduction in the modal capacity which is interrogated by Optical Time Domain Reflectometery. Backscattered light is captured in real-time while using time delay to resolve location, allowing real-time spatial monitoring of environmental internal corrosion within pipelines spanning large distances. Step index theoretical solutions were used to calculate the power loss due changes in the intensity profile. The power loss is translated into an attenuation coefficient characterizing the expected OTDR trace which was verified against similar experimental results from the literature. A laboratory scale experiment is being developed to assess the validity of the model and the practicality of the solution.

  1. Dynamic Response of Tapered Optical Multimode Fiber Coated with Carbon Nanotubes for Ethanol Sensing Application

    Arafat Shabaneh; Saad Girei; Punitha Arasu; Mohd Mahdi; Suraya Rashid; Suriati Paiman; Mohd Yaacob

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a highly combustible chemical universally designed for biomedical applications. In this paper, optical sensing performance of tapered multimode fiber tip coated with carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film towards aqueous ethanol with different concentrations is investigated. The tapered optical multimode fiber tip is coated with CNT using drop-casting technique and is annealed at 70 °C to enhance the binding of the nanomaterial to the silica fiber tip. The optical fiber tip and the CNT se...

  2. Molecular alignment relaxation in polymer optical fibers for sensing applications

    Stajanca, Pavol; Cetinkaya, Onur; Schukar, Marcus; Mergo, Pawel; Webb, David J.; Krebber, Katerina

    2016-03-01

    A systematic study of annealing behavior of drawn PMMA fibers was performed. Annealing dynamics were investigated under different environmental conditions by fiber longitudinal shrinkage monitoring. The shrinkage process was found to follow a stretched exponential decay function revealing the heterogeneous nature of the underlying molecular dynamics. The complex dependence of the fiber shrinkage on initial degree of molecular alignment in the fiber, annealing time and temperature was investigated and interpreted. Moreover, humidity was shown to have a profound effect on the annealing process, which was not recognized previously. Annealing was also shown to have considerable effect on the fiber mechanical properties associated with the relaxation of molecular alignment in the fiber. The consequences of fiber annealing for the climatic stability of certain polymer optical fiber-based sensors are discussed, emphasizing the importance of fiber controlled pre-annealing with respect to the foreseeable operating conditions.

  3. Biochemical sensing application based on optical fiber evanescent wave sensor

    Lv, Xiaoyi; Mo, Jiaqing; Xu, Liang; Jia, Zhenhong

    2015-08-01

    We have designed a novel evanescent field fiber optic biosensors with porous silicon dioxide cladding. The pore size of porous silicon dioxide cladding is about 100 nm in diameter. Biological molecules were immobilized to the porous silicon dioxide cladding used APTES and glutaraldehyde. Refractive index of cladding used Bruggemann's effective medium theory. We carried out simulations of changing in light intensity in optical fiber before and after chemical coupling of biomolecules. This novel optical fiber evanescent wave biosensor has a great potential in clinical chemistry for rapid and convenient determination of biological molecule.

  4. Frequency-Shifted Interferometry — A Versatile Fiber-Optic Sensing Technique

    Fei Ye

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-optic sensing is a field that is developing at a fast pace. Novel fiber-optic sensor designs and sensing principles constantly open doors for new opportunities. In this paper, we review a fiber-optic sensing technique developed in our research group called frequency-shifted interferometry (FSI. This technique uses a continuous-wave light source, an optical frequency shifter, and a slow detector. We discuss the operation principles of several FSI implementations and show their applications in fiber length and dispersion measurement, locating weak reflections along a fiber link, fiber-optic sensor multiplexing, and high-sensitivity cavity ring-down measurement. Detailed analysis of FSI system parameters is also presented.

  5. Single-ring hollow core optical fibers made by glass billet extrusion for Raman sensing.

    Tsiminis, G; Rowland, K J; Schartner, E P; Spooner, N A; Monro, T M; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, H

    2016-03-21

    We report the fabrication of the first extruded hollow core optical fiber with a single ring of cladding holes, and its use in a chemical sensing application. These single suspended ring structures show antiresonance reflection optical waveguiding (ARROW) features in the visible part of the spectrum. The impact of preform pressurization on the geometry of these fibers is determined by the size of the different hole types in the preform. The fibers are used to perform Raman sensing of methanol, demonstrating their potential for future fiber sensing applications. PMID:27136787

  6. Spatially continuous distributed fiber optic sensing using optical carrier based microwave interferometry.

    Huang, Jie; Lan, Xinwei; Luo, Ming; Xiao, Hai

    2014-07-28

    This paper reports a spatially continuous distributed fiber optic sensing technique using optical carrier based microwave interferometry (OCMI), in which many optical interferometers with the same or different optical path differences are interrogated in the microwave domain and their locations can be unambiguously determined. The concept is demonstrated using cascaded weak optical reflectors along a single optical fiber, where any two arbitrary reflectors are paired to define a low-finesse Fabry-Perot interferometer. While spatially continuous (i.e., no dark zone), fully distributed strain measurement was used as an example to demonstrate the capability, the proposed concept may also be implemented on other types of waveguide or free-space interferometers and used for distributed measurement of various physical, chemical and biological quantities. PMID:25089493

  7. Application of Distributed Optical Fiber Sensing Technology in the Anomaly Detection of Shaft Lining in Grouting

    Chunde Piao; Jun Yuan; Bin Shi; Haijun Lu; Guangqing Wei; Chunsheng Gu

    2015-01-01

    The rupture of the shaft lining caused by grouting has seriously undermined the safety in coal mining. Based on BOTDR distributed optical fiber sensing technology, this paper studied the layout method of optical fiber sensors and the anomaly detection method of the deformation and obtained the evolution law of shaft deformation triggered by grouting. The research results showed that the bonding problem of optical fiber sensors in damp environment could be effectively solved, by applying the b...

  8. Fiber-optic-coupled dosemeter for remote optical sensing of radiation

    Remote sensing technologies for the detection and measurement of ionizing radiation exposure are of current interest for applications such as patient dose verification during radiotherapy and the monitoring of environmental contaminants. Fiberoptic-based sensing is attractive due to the advantages of small size, low cost, long life and freedom from electromagnetic interference. Several fiberoptic-based radiation sensing systems have been described that utilize radiation induced changes in the optical characteristics of the fiber such as reduced transmission as a result of darkening of the glass, optical phase shifts due to heating, or changes in the birefringence of a polarization-maintaining fiber. The measurement of radiation induced darkening is limited in both sensitivity and dynamic range and requires long fiber lengths. Phase shift measurements require the use of single-mode lasers, phase sensitive interferometric detection, long fiber lengths and complex signal processing techniques. Alternatively, thermoluminescent (TL) phosphor powders have been coated onto fiberoptic cables and remote dosimetry measurements performed using traditional laser heating techniques. The sensitivity is limited by the requirement for a very thin layer of phosphor material, due to problems associated with light scattering and efficient heating by thermal diffusion. In this paper we report the development of an all-optical, fiber-optic-coupled, thermoluminescence dosemeter for remote radiation sensing that offers significant advantages compared to previous technologies. We recently reported the development of an optically transparent, TL glass material having exceptionally good characteristics for traditional dosimetry applications. We also reported a modified TL glass incorporating a rare earth ion dopant in order to absorb light from a semiconductor laser and utilize the absorbed light energy to internally heat the glass and release the trapped electrons. (author)

  9. Structural Health Monitoring of Civil Infrastructure Using Optical Fiber Sensing Technology: A Comprehensive Review

    X. W. Ye

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last two decades, a significant number of innovative sensing systems based on optical fiber sensors have been exploited in the engineering community due to their inherent distinctive advantages such as small size, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI and corrosion, and embedding capability. A lot of optical fiber sensor-based monitoring systems have been developed for continuous measurement and real-time assessment of diversified engineering structures such as bridges, buildings, tunnels, pipelines, wind turbines, railway infrastructure, and geotechnical structures. The purpose of this review article is devoted to presenting a summary of the basic principles of various optical fiber sensors, innovation in sensing and computational methodologies, development of novel optical fiber sensors, and the practical application status of the optical fiber sensing technology in structural health monitoring (SHM of civil infrastructure.

  10. Structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure using optical fiber sensing technology: a comprehensive review.

    Ye, X W; Su, Y H; Han, J P

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, a significant number of innovative sensing systems based on optical fiber sensors have been exploited in the engineering community due to their inherent distinctive advantages such as small size, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and corrosion, and embedding capability. A lot of optical fiber sensor-based monitoring systems have been developed for continuous measurement and real-time assessment of diversified engineering structures such as bridges, buildings, tunnels, pipelines, wind turbines, railway infrastructure, and geotechnical structures. The purpose of this review article is devoted to presenting a summary of the basic principles of various optical fiber sensors, innovation in sensing and computational methodologies, development of novel optical fiber sensors, and the practical application status of the optical fiber sensing technology in structural health monitoring (SHM) of civil infrastructure. PMID:25133250

  11. Measuring artificial recharge with fiber optic distributed temperature sensing.

    Becker, Matthew W; Bauer, Brian; Hutchinson, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Heat was used as a tracer to measure infiltration rates from a recharge basin. The propagation of diurnal oscillation of surface water temperature into the basin bed was monitored along a transect using Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (FODTS). The propagation rate was related to downward specific discharge using standard theory of heat advection and dispersion in saturated porous media. An estimate of the temporal variation of heat propagation was achieved using a wavelet transform to find the phase lag between the surface temperature diurnal oscillation and the correlated oscillation at 0.33 and 0.98 m below the bed surface. The wavelet results compared well to a constant velocity model of thermal advection and dispersion during periods of relatively constant discharge rates. The apparent dispersion of heat was found to be due primarily to hydrodynamic mechanisms rather than thermal diffusion. Specific discharge estimates using the FODTS technique also compared well to water balance estimates over a four month period, although there were occasional deviations that have yet to be adequately explained. The FODTS technique is superior to water balance in that it produces estimates of infiltration rate every meter along the cable transect, every half hour. These high resolution measurements highlighted areas of low infiltration and demonstrated the degradation of basin efficiency due to source waters of high suspended solids. FODTS monitoring promises to be a useful tool for diagnosing basin performance in an era of increasing groundwater demand. PMID:23110559

  12. NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) Fiber Optic Sensing System (FOSS) Technology

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick; Hamory, Phil; Pena, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Attached is a power point presentation created to assist the Tech Transfer Office and the FOSS project team members in responding to inquiries from the public about the capabilities of the Fiber Optic Sensing System.

  13. Liquid Seal for Temperature Sensing with Fiber-Optic Refractometers

    Ben Xu; Jianqing Li; Yi Li; Jianglei Xie; Xinyong Dong

    2014-01-01

    Liquid sealing is an effective method to convert a fiber-optic refractometer into a simple and highly sensitive temperature sensor. A refractometer based on the thin-core fiber modal interferometer is sealed in a capillary tube filled with Cargille oil. Due to the thermo-optic effect of the sealing liquid, the high refractive-index sensitivity refractometer is subsequently sensitive to the ambient temperature. It is found that the liquid-sealed sensor produces a highest sensitivity of −2.30 n...

  14. Distributed optical fiber perturbation sensing system based on Mach-Zehnder interferometer

    Wengang WANG; Deming LIU; Hairong LIU; Qizhen SUN; Zhifeng SUN; Xu ZHANG; Ziheng XU

    2009-01-01

    A novel distributed optical fiber vibration-sensing system based on Mach-Zehnder interferometer has been designed and experimentally demonstrated. Firstly, the principle of Mach-Zehnder optical path interferometer technique is clarified. The output of the Mach-Zehnder interferometer is proportional to the phase shift induced by the perturbation. Secondly, the system consists of the laser diode (LD) as the light source, fiber, Mach-Zehnder optical interferometers as the sensing units, a 1×N star fiber-optic coupler, an N×1 fiber-optic coupler, a photodiode (PD) detector, and a computer used in signal processing. The entire monitoring region of this system is divided into several small zones, and each small monitoring zone is independent from each other. All of the small monitoring zones have their own sensing unit, which is defined by Mach-Zehnder optical interferometer. A series of sensing units are connected by the star fiber-optic couplers to form a whole sensing net. Thirdly, signal-processing techniques are subsequently used to calculate the phase shift to estimate whether intruders appear. The sensing system is able to locate the vibration signal simultaneously, includ-ing multiple vibrations at different positions, by employing the time-division multiplexed (TDM) technique. Finally, the operation performance of the proposed system is tested in the experiment lab with the conditions as follows: the number of the sensing units is 3, the length of the sensing fiber is 50 m, and the wavelength of the light diode is 1550nm. Based on these investigations, the fiber surrounding alert system is achieved. We have experimen-tally demonstrated that the sensing system can measure both the frequency and position of the vibration in real time, with a spatial positional resolution better than 50 m in an area of 1 km2.

  15. Downhole fiber optic sensing: the oilfield service provider's perspective: from the cradle to the grave

    Skinner, Neal G.; Maida, John L.

    2014-06-01

    For almost three decades, interest has continued to increase with respect to the application of fiber-optic sensing techniques for the upstream oil and gas industry. This paper reviews optical sensing technologies that have been and are being adopted downhole, as well as their drivers. A brief description of the life of a well, from the cradle to the grave, and the roles fiber-optic sensing can play in optimizing production, safety, and protection of the environment are also presented. The performance expectations (accuracy, resolution, stability, and operational lifetime) that oil companies and oil service companies have for fiber-optic sensing systems is described. Additionally, the environmental conditions (high hydrostatic pressures, high temperatures, shock, vibration, crush, and chemical exposure) that these systems must tolerate to provide reliable and economically attractive oilfield monitoring solutions are described.

  16. Preliminary study of distributed optical fiber sensing technology in radiation monitoring

    A decline of optical performance and corresponding loss originated when the optical fiber has been exposed in the radiation environment due to radiation-induced defects and the formation of color centers. According that, a conception of radiation monitoring system, based on distributed optical fiber single-end sensing technique,was introduced. It can be used to retrieve the dose of radiation by comparing light intensity of the output with the input. And space division multiplexing technology and many fiber-optic sensors are adopted to make multipoint supervision of nuclear power plants and nuclear arsenals and so on, where radioactive materials are concentrated, over large area. (authors)

  17. Applicability study of optical fiber distribution sensing to nuclear facilities

    Optical fibers have advantages like flexible configuration, intrinsic immunity for electromagnetic fields etc., and they have been used for signal transmission and as optical fiber sensors (OFSs). By some of these sensor techniques, continuous or discrete distribution of physical parameters can be measured. Here, in order to discuss the applicability of these OFSs to nuclear facilities, irradiation experiments to optical fibers were carried out using the fast neutron source reactor 'YAYOI' and a 60Co γ source. It has been shown that, under irradiation with fast neutrons, the radiation induced loss increase almost linearly with the neutron fluence. On the other hand, when irradiated with 60Co γ rays, the loss shows a saturation tendency. As an example of the OFSs, applicability of the Raman distributed temperature sensor (RDTS) to the monitoring of nuclear facilities has been examined. Two correction techniques for radiation induced errors have been developed and for the demonstration of their feasibility, measurements were carried out along the primary piping system of the experimental fast reactor: JOYO. During the continuous measurements with the total dose of more than 107[R], the radiation induced errors showed a saturating tendency and the feasibility of the loss correction technique was demonstrated. Although the time response of the system should be improved, the RDTS can be expected as a noble temperature monitor in nuclear facilities. (author)

  18. Distributed Long-Gauge Optical Fiber Sensors Based Self-Sensing FRP Bar for Concrete Structure

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin scattering-based distributed optical fiber (OF) sensing technique presents advantages for concrete structure monitoring. However, the existence of spatial resolution greatly decreases strain measurement accuracy especially around cracks. Meanwhile, the brittle feature of OF also hinders its further application. In this paper, the distributed OF sensor was firstly proposed as long-gauge sensor to improve strain measurement accuracy. Then, a new type of self-sensing fiber reinforced p...

  19. Sapphire optical fiber sensors

    Feth, Shari

    1991-01-01

    Fiber optic sensors offer many advantages over conventional sensors, including; small size, low weight, high strength and durability. Standard silica optical fibers are limited by the material properties of silica. Temperatures above 700°C and other harsh environments are incompatible with standard optical fiber sensors. Sapphire fiber sensors offer another option for fiber optic sensing. Sapphire fibers are limited by the material properties of sapphire, which include high...

  20. Temperature sensing up to 1300°C using suspended-core microstructured optical fibers.

    Warren-Smith, Stephen C; Nguyen, Linh Viet; Lang, Catherine; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Monro, Tanya M

    2016-02-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to high temperature sensing using femtosecond laser ablation gratings within silica suspended-core microstructured optical fibers. The simple geometry of the suspended-core fiber allows for femtosecond laser processing directly through the fiber cladding. Pure silica glass is used, allowing the sensor to be used up to temperatures as high as 1300°C while still allowing the fibre to be spliced to conventional fiber. The sensor can also be wavelength division multiplexed, with three sensors in a single fiber demonstrated. PMID:26907027

  1. Development of fiber-optic current sensing technique and its applications in electric power systems

    Kurosawa, Kiyoshi

    2014-03-01

    This paper describes the development and applications of a fiber-optic electric current sensing technique with the stable properties and compact, simple, and flexible structure of the sensing device. The special characteristics of the sensors were achieved by use of the special low birefringence fiber as the Faraday-effect sensing element and were also achieved with creation of sensing schemes which matched with the features of the fiber. Making use of the excellent features of the sensing technique, various current monitoring devices and systems were developed and applied practically for the control and maintenance in the electric power facility. In this paper, the design and performance of the sensing devices are introduced first. After that, examples of the application systems practically applied are also introduced, including fault section/point location systems for power transmission cable lines.

  2. Structural Health Monitoring of Civil Infrastructure Using Optical Fiber Sensing Technology: A Comprehensive Review

    Ye, X. W.; Su, Y. H.; Han, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    In the last two decades, a significant number of innovative sensing systems based on optical fiber sensors have been exploited in the engineering community due to their inherent distinctive advantages such as small size, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI) and corrosion, and embedding capability. A lot of optical fiber sensor-based monitoring systems have been developed for continuous measurement and real-time assessment of diversified engineering structures such as b...

  3. Fiber-Optic Sensing System: Overview, Development and Deployment in Flight at NASA

    Chan, Hon Man; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Richards, W. Lance

    2015-01-01

    An overview of the research and technological development of the fiber-optic sensing system (FOSS) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (NASA AFRC) is presented. Theory behind fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, as well as interrogation technique based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) is discussed. Assessment and validation of FOSS as an accurate measurement tool for structural health monitoring is realized in the laboratory environment as well as large-scale flight deployment.

  4. Application research on hydraulic coke cutting monitoring system based on optical fiber sensing technology

    Zhong, Dong; Tong, Xinglin

    2014-06-01

    With the development of the optical fiber sensing technology, the acoustic emission sensor has become one of the focal research topics. On the basis of studying the traditional hydraulic coke cutting monitoring system, the optical fiber acoustic emission sensor has been applied in the hydraulic coke cutting monitoring system for the first time, researching the monitoring signal of the optical fiber acoustic emission sensor in the system. The actual test results show that using the acoustic emission sensor in the hydraulic coke cutting monitoring system can get the real-time and accurate hydraulic coke cutting state and the effective realization of hydraulic coke cutting automatic monitoring in the Wuhan Branch of Sinopec.

  5. Fiber Strain Measurement for Wide Region Quasidistributed Sensing by Optical Correlation Sensor with Region Separation Techniques

    Xunjian Xu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The useful application of optical pulse correlation sensor for wide region quasidistributed fiber strain measurement is investigated. Using region separation techniques of wavelength multiplexing with FBGs and time multiplexing with intensity partial reflectors, the sensor measures the correlations between reference pulses and monitoring pulses from several cascadable selected sensing regions. This novel sensing system can select the regions and obtain the distributed strain information in any desired sensing region.

  6. An optical fiber sensing technique for temperature distribution measurements in microwave heating

    We introduce an optical fiber sensing technique that can measure the temperature distributions along a fiber during microwave heating. We used a long-length fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as an electromagnetic-immune sensor and interrogated temperature distributions along the FBG by an optical frequency domain reflectometry. Water in a glass tube with a length of 820 mm was heated in a microwave oven, and its temperature distribution along the glass tube was measured using the sensing system. The temperature distribution was obtained in 5 mm intervals. Infrared radiometry was also used to compare the temperature measurement results. Time and spatial variations of the temperature distribution profiles were monitored for several microwave input powers. The results clearly depict inhomogeneous temperature profiles. The applicability and effectiveness of the optical fiber distributed measurement technique in microwave heating are demonstrated. (paper)

  7. An optical fiber sensing technique for temperature distribution measurements in microwave heating

    Wada, Daichi; Sugiyama, Jun-ichi; Zushi, Hiroaki; Murayama, Hideaki

    2015-08-01

    We introduce an optical fiber sensing technique that can measure the temperature distributions along a fiber during microwave heating. We used a long-length fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as an electromagnetic-immune sensor and interrogated temperature distributions along the FBG by an optical frequency domain reflectometry. Water in a glass tube with a length of 820 mm was heated in a microwave oven, and its temperature distribution along the glass tube was measured using the sensing system. The temperature distribution was obtained in 5 mm intervals. Infrared radiometry was also used to compare the temperature measurement results. Time and spatial variations of the temperature distribution profiles were monitored for several microwave input powers. The results clearly depict inhomogeneous temperature profiles. The applicability and effectiveness of the optical fiber distributed measurement technique in microwave heating are demonstrated.

  8. Dynamic Response of Tapered Optical Multimode Fiber Coated with Carbon Nanotubes for Ethanol Sensing Application

    Arafat Shabaneh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is a highly combustible chemical universally designed for biomedical applications. In this paper, optical sensing performance of tapered multimode fiber tip coated with carbon nanotube (CNT thin film towards aqueous ethanol with different concentrations is investigated. The tapered optical multimode fiber tip is coated with CNT using drop-casting technique and is annealed at 70 °C to enhance the binding of the nanomaterial to the silica fiber tip. The optical fiber tip and the CNT sensing layer are micro-characterized using FESEM and Raman spectroscopy techniques. When the developed sensor was exposed to different concentrations of ethanol (5% to 80%, the sensor reflectance reduced proportionally. The developed sensors showed high sensitivity, repeatability and fast responses (<55 s towards ethanol.

  9. Highly Sensitive Temperature Sensors Based on Fiber-Optic PWM and Capacitance Variation Using Thermochromic Sensing Membrane

    Md. Rajibur Rahaman Khan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a temperature/thermal sensor that contains a Rhodamine-B sensing membrane. We applied two different sensing methods, namely, fiber-optic pulse width modulation (PWM and an interdigitated capacitor (IDC-based temperature sensor to measure the temperature from 5 °C to 100 °C. To the best of our knowledge, the fiber-optic PWM-based temperature sensor is reported for the first time in this study. The proposed fiber-optic PWM temperature sensor has good sensing ability; its sensitivity is ~3.733 mV/°C. The designed temperature-sensing system offers stable sensing responses over a wide dynamic range, good reproducibility properties with a relative standard deviation (RSD of ~0.021, and the capacity for a linear sensing response with a correlation coefficient of R2 ≈ 0.992 over a wide sensing range. In our study, we also developed an IDC temperature sensor that is based on the capacitance variation principle as the IDC sensing element is heated. We compared the performance of the proposed temperature-sensing systems with different fiber-optic temperature sensors (which are based on the fiber-optic wavelength shift method, the long grating fiber-optic Sagnac loop, and probe type fiber-optics in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity. We observed that the proposed sensing systems have better sensing performance than the above-mentioned sensing system.

  10. Highly Sensitive Temperature Sensors Based on Fiber-Optic PWM and Capacitance Variation Using Thermochromic Sensing Membrane

    Khan, Md. Rajibur Rahaman; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a temperature/thermal sensor that contains a Rhodamine-B sensing membrane. We applied two different sensing methods, namely, fiber-optic pulse width modulation (PWM) and an interdigitated capacitor (IDC)-based temperature sensor to measure the temperature from 5 °C to 100 °C. To the best of our knowledge, the fiber-optic PWM-based temperature sensor is reported for the first time in this study. The proposed fiber-optic PWM temperature sensor has good sensing ability; its sensitivity is ~3.733 mV/°C. The designed temperature-sensing system offers stable sensing responses over a wide dynamic range, good reproducibility properties with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of ~0.021, and the capacity for a linear sensing response with a correlation coefficient of R2 ≈ 0.992 over a wide sensing range. In our study, we also developed an IDC temperature sensor that is based on the capacitance variation principle as the IDC sensing element is heated. We compared the performance of the proposed temperature-sensing systems with different fiber-optic temperature sensors (which are based on the fiber-optic wavelength shift method, the long grating fiber-optic Sagnac loop, and probe type fiber-optics) in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity. We observed that the proposed sensing systems have better sensing performance than the above-mentioned sensing system. PMID:27409620

  11. Highly Sensitive Temperature Sensors Based on Fiber-Optic PWM and Capacitance Variation Using Thermochromic Sensing Membrane.

    Khan, Md Rajibur Rahaman; Kang, Shin-Won

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a temperature/thermal sensor that contains a Rhodamine-B sensing membrane. We applied two different sensing methods, namely, fiber-optic pulse width modulation (PWM) and an interdigitated capacitor (IDC)-based temperature sensor to measure the temperature from 5 °C to 100 °C. To the best of our knowledge, the fiber-optic PWM-based temperature sensor is reported for the first time in this study. The proposed fiber-optic PWM temperature sensor has good sensing ability; its sensitivity is ~3.733 mV/°C. The designed temperature-sensing system offers stable sensing responses over a wide dynamic range, good reproducibility properties with a relative standard deviation (RSD) of ~0.021, and the capacity for a linear sensing response with a correlation coefficient of R² ≈ 0.992 over a wide sensing range. In our study, we also developed an IDC temperature sensor that is based on the capacitance variation principle as the IDC sensing element is heated. We compared the performance of the proposed temperature-sensing systems with different fiber-optic temperature sensors (which are based on the fiber-optic wavelength shift method, the long grating fiber-optic Sagnac loop, and probe type fiber-optics) in terms of sensitivity, dynamic range, and linearity. We observed that the proposed sensing systems have better sensing performance than the above-mentioned sensing system. PMID:27409620

  12. Fire Source Localization Based on Distributed Temperature Sensing by a Dual-Line Optical Fiber System.

    Sun, Miao; Tang, Yuquan; Yang, Shuang; Li, Jun; Sigrist, Markus W; Dong, Fengzhong

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for localizing a fire source using an optical fiber distributed temperature sensor system. A section of two parallel optical fibers employed as the sensing element is installed near the ceiling of a closed room in which the fire source is located. By measuring the temperature of hot air flows, the problem of three-dimensional fire source localization is transformed to two dimensions. The method of the source location is verified with experiments using burning alcohol as fire source, and it is demonstrated that the method represents a robust and reliable technique for localizing a fire source also for long sensing ranges. PMID:27275822

  13. Chalcogenide glass fibers: Optical window tailoring and suitability for bio-chemical sensing

    Lucas, Pierre; Coleman, Garrett J.; Jiang, Shibin; Luo, Tao; Yang, Zhiyong

    2015-09-01

    Glassy materials based on chalcogen elements are becoming increasingly prominent in the development of advanced infrared sensors. In particular, infrared fibers constitute a desirable sensing platform due to their high sensitivity and versatile remote collection capabilities for in-situ detection. Tailoring the transparency window of an optical material to the vibrational signature of a target molecule is important for the design of infrared sensor, and particularly for fiber evanescent wave spectroscopy. Here we review the basic principles and recent developments in the fabrication of chalcogenide glass infrared fibers for application as bio-chemical sensors. We emphasize the challenges in designing materials that combine good rheological properties with chemical stability and sufficiently wide optical windows for bio-chemical sensing. The limitation in optical transparency due to higher order overtones of the amorphous network vibrations is established for this family of glasses. It is shown that glasses with wide optical window suffer from higher order overtone absorptions. Compositional engineering with heavy elements such as iodine is shown to widen the optical window but at the cost of lower chemical stability. The optical attenuations of various families of chalcogenide glass fibers are presented and weighed for their applications as chemical sensors. It is then shown that long-wave infrared fibers can be designed to optimize the collection of selective signal from bio-molecules such as cells and tissues. Issues of toxicity and mechanical resistance in the context of bio-sensing are also discussed.

  14. Characterization of Flexible Copolymer Optical Fibers for Force Sensing Applications

    Lukas J. Scherer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, different polymer optical fibres for applications in force sensing systems in textile fabrics are reported. The proposed method is based on the deflection of the light in fibre waveguides. Applying a force on the fibre changes the geometry and affects the wave guiding properties and hence induces light loss in the optical fibre. Fibres out of three different elastic and transparent copolymer materials were successfully produced and tested. Moreover, the influence of the diameter on the sensing properties was studied. The detectable force ranges from 0.05 N to 40 N (applied on 3 cm of fibre length, which can be regulated with the material and the diameter of the fibre. The detected signal loss varied from 0.6% to 78.3%. The fibres have attenuation parameters between 0.16–0.25 dB/cm at 652 nm. We show that the cross-sensitivies to temperature, strain and bends are low. Moreover, the high yield strength (0.0039–0.0054 GPa and flexibility make these fibres very attractive candidates for integration into textiles to form wearable sensors, medical textiles or even computing systems.

  15. Current sensing in magnetic fusion experiments by faraday rotation in single-mode optical fibers

    Interest in measurement devices which use optical fibers as the sensing element has increased rapidly in the last few years. Fibers interact with their environments in a number of useful ways. Most sensors developed so far have coupled the fiber mechanically to a transducer element which strains the fiber in response to an external field; the strain is measured interferometrically. Applications of this method include acoustic and field sensors. A second important class of sensors exploits the elasto-, electro-, and magnetooptic properties of the fiber material to directly sense the relevant fields. The sensors we report here are of this type. Essentially all of the sensor work uses single-mode fiber; in the beginning fiber intended for telecommunications applications was used but several companies now supply single-mode fiber optimized in various ways for sensors. Exploitation of the Faraday effect in glass fibers for the measurement of current was reported by Smith, Papp and Harms, and others. The authors became interested in using this technique on CTR magnetic fusion experiments because the unique dielectric properties of optical fibers hold promise for making possible the measurement of magnetic fields and currents where present techniques could not, and for avoiding some of the problems associated with the Rogowski coil-integrator system widely used now. Some experiments, the difficulties encountered, and the prospect for continued development of this diagnostic technique are reported

  16. Assessment of fiber optic sensors and other advanced sensing technologies for nuclear power plants

    Hashemian, H.M. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-03-01

    As a result of problems such as calibration drift in nuclear plant pressure sensors and the recent oil loss syndrome in some models of Rosemount pressure transmitters, the nuclear industry has become interested in fiber optic pressure sensors. Fiber optic sensing technologies have been considered for the development of advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) systems for the next generation of reactors and in older plants which are retrofitted with new I&C systems. This paper presents the results of a six-month Phase I study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. This initial Phase I study has recently been granted a two-year extension by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The next phase will evaluate fiber optic pressure sensors in specific nuclear plant applications in addition to other advanced methods for monitoring critical nuclear plant equipment.

  17. Advanced end-to-end fiber optic sensing systems for demanding environments

    Black, Richard J.; Moslehi, Behzad

    2010-09-01

    Optical fibers are small-in-diameter, light-in-weight, electromagnetic-interference immune, electrically passive, chemically inert, flexible, embeddable into different materials, and distributed-sensing enabling, and can be temperature and radiation tolerant. With appropriate processing and/or packaging, they can be very robust and well suited to demanding environments. In this paper, we review a range of complete end-to-end fiber optic sensor systems that IFOS has developed comprising not only (1) packaged sensors and mechanisms for integration with demanding environments, but (2) ruggedized sensor interrogators, and (3) intelligent decision aid algorithms software systems. We examine the following examples: " Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) optical sensors systems supporting arrays of environmentally conditioned multiplexed FBG point sensors on single or multiple optical fibers: In conjunction with advanced signal processing, decision aid algorithms and reasoners, FBG sensor based structural health monitoring (SHM) systems are expected to play an increasing role in extending the life and reducing costs of new generations of aerospace systems. Further, FBG based structural state sensing systems have the potential to considerably enhance the performance of dynamic structures interacting with their environment (including jet aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), and medical or extravehicular space robots). " Raman based distributed temperature sensing systems: The complete length of optical fiber acts as a very long distributed sensor which may be placed down an oil well or wrapped around a cryogenic tank.

  18. Polarization effects in optical fiber communication and distributed vibration sensing systems

    Zhang, Ziyi

    This thesis includes studies of polarization effects in two main research areas of optical fiber technology: optical fiber communication systems and optical fiber sensors. Polarization of light in optical fiber is sensitive to environmental disturbances. On the negative side, this results in complex measurement processes and errors in communication systems caused by dynamic polarization mode dispersion (PMD) and polarization dependent loss (PDL). On the positive side though, it also results in the possibility of developing a distributed optical fiber vibration sensor. For the purpose of fast polarization measurement for high bit-rate communication systems, a new PDL vector method was proposed based on the equation of motion in Stokes space. It is capable of providing accurate PDL measurements while requiring less measurement steps compared with other available techniques. We had performed a PMD field test, and found the fastest PMD change in submarine fibers under the Caribbean Sea. With long measurement duration (>24h) on one pair of fiber, correlations between polarization effects and tides were reported for the first time. A histogram of the differential group delay (DGD) data and an auto-correlation function of state of polarization (SOP) and DGD were validated by theoretical fittings. The average and fastest drift time for both SOP and DGD was found to be ˜3min and less than 15s, respectively. Polarization effects were then utilized as a sensing parameter to detect and locate external disturbances along the optical fiber. A system based on polarization optical time domain reflectometry (Polarization-OTDR) technique was developed in order to pinpoint the disturbances as well as to give events' frequency information. For the first time, a fully distributed optical fiber vibration sensor has been demonstrated in a 1km fiber link with 10m spatial resolution and 5kHz maximum detectable frequency. Moreover, by our proposed spectrum analysis, multiple simultaneous

  19. A plastic optical fiber sensor for the dual sensing of temperature and oxygen

    Lo, Yu-Lung; Chu, Chen-Shane

    2008-04-01

    This study presents a low-cost plastic optical fiber sensor for the dual sensing of temperature and oxygen. The sensor features a commercially available epoxy glue coated on the side-polished fiber surface for temperature sensing and a fluorinated xerogel doped with platinum tetrakis pentrafluoropheny porphine (PtTFPP) coated on the fiber end for oxygen sensing. The temperature and oxygen indicators are both excited using a UV LED light source with a wavelength of 380 nm. The luminescence emission spectra of the two indicators are well resolved and exhibit no cross-talk effects. Overall, the results indicate that the dual sensor presented in this study provides an ideal solution for the non-contact, simultaneous sensing of temperature and oxygen in general biological and medical applications.

  20. Fiber-optic Raman sensing of cell proliferation probes and molecular vibrations: Brain-imaging perspective

    Doronina-Amitonova, Lyubov V.; Fedotov, Il'ya V.; Ivashkina, Olga I.; Zots, Marina A.; Fedotov, Andrei B.; Anokhin, Konstantin V.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2012-09-01

    Optical fibers are employed to sense fingerprint molecular vibrations in ex vivo experiments on the whole brain and detect cell proliferation probes in a model study on a quantitatively controlled solution. A specifically adapted spectral filtering procedure is shown to allow the Raman signal from molecular vibrations of interest to be discriminated against the background from the fiber, allowing a highly sensitive Raman detection of the recently demonstrated EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) labels of DNA synthesis in cells.

  1. Advanced Fiber Optic-Based Sensing Technology for Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Ko, William L.; Chan, Patrick; Bakalyar, John

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of fiber optic sensing technology development activities performed at NASA Dryden in support of Unmanned Aircraft Systems. Examples of current and previous work are presented in the following categories: algorithm development, system development, instrumentation installation, ground R&D, and flight testing. Examples of current research and development activities are provided.

  2. Fiber Strain Measurement for Wide Region Quasidistributed Sensing by Optical Correlation Sensor with Region Separation Techniques

    Xunjian Xu; Antonio Bueno; Koji Nonaka; Salvador Sales

    2010-01-01

    The useful application of optical pulse correlation sensor for wide region quasidistributed fiber strain measurement is investigated. Using region separation techniques of wavelength multiplexing with FBGs and time multiplexing with intensity partial reflectors, the sensor measures the correlations between reference pulses and monitoring pulses from several cascadable selected sensing regions. This novel sensing system can select the regions and obtain the distributed strain information in an...

  3. Towards mid-infrared fiber-optic devices and systems for sensing, mapping and imaging

    Jayasuriya, D.; Wilson, B.; Furniss, D.; Tang, Z.; Barney, E.; Benson, T. M.; Seddon, A. B.

    2016-03-01

    Novel chalcogenide glass-based fiber opens up the mid-infrared (MIR) range for real-time monitoring and control in medical diagnostics and chemical processing. Fibers with long wavelength cut-off are of interest here. Sulfide, selenide and telluride based chalcogenide glass are candidates, but there are differences in their glass forming region, thermal stability and in the short and long wavelength cut-off positions. In general sulfide and selenide glasses have greater glass stability, but shorter long-wavelength cut-off edge, compared to telluride glasses; selenide-telluride glasses are a good compromise. Low optical loss selenide-telluride based long wavelength fibers could play a substantial role in improving medical diagnostic systems, chemical sensing, and processing, and in security and agriculture. For biological tissue, the molecular finger print lies between ~3-15 μm wavelengths in the MIR region. Using MIR spectral mapping, information about diseased tissue may be obtained with improved accuracy and in vivo using bright broadband MIR super-continuum generation (SCG) fiber sources and low optical loss fiber for routing. The Ge-As-Se-Te chalcogenide glass system is a potential candidate for both MIR SCG and passive-routing fiber, with good thermal stability, wide intrinsic transparency from ~1.5 to 20 μm and low phonon energy. This paper investigates Ge-As-Se-Te glass system pairs for developing high numerical aperture (NA) small-core, step-index optical fiber for MIR SCG and low NA passive step-index optical fiber for an in vivo fiber probe. Control of fiber geometry of small-core optical fiber and methods of producing the glass material are also included in this paper.

  4. Fiber Optic Sensing Monitors Strain and Reduces Costs

    2008-01-01

    In applications where stress on a structure may vary widely and have an unknown impact on integrity, a common engineering strategy has been overbuilding to ensure a sufficiently robust design. While this may be appropriate in applications where weight concerns are not paramount, space applications demand a bare minimum of mass, given astronomical per-pound launch costs. For decades, the preferred solution was the tactic of disassembly and investigation between flights. Knowing there must be a better way, Dr. Mark Froggatt, of Langley Research Center, explored alternate means of monitoring stresses and damage to the space shuttle. While a tear-it-apart-and-have-a-look strategy was effective, it was also a costly and time consuming process that risked further stresses through the very act of disassembly and reassembly. An alternate way of monitoring the condition of parts under the enormous stresses of space flight was needed. Froggatt and his colleagues at Langley built an early-warning device to provide detailed information about even minuscule cracks and deformations by etching a group of tiny lines, or grating, on a fiber optic cable five-thousandths of an inch thick with ultraviolet light. By then gluing the fiber to the side of a part, such as a fuel tank, and shining a laser beam down its length, reflected light indicated which gratings were under stress. Inferring this data from measurements in light rather than in bonded gauges saved additional weight. Various shuttle components now employ the ultrasonic dynamic vector stress sensor (UDVSS), allowing stress detection by measuring light beamed from a built-in mini-laser. By measuring changes in dynamic directional stress occurring in a material or structure, and including phase-locked loop, synchronous amplifier, and contact probe, the UDVSS proved especially useful among manufacturers of aerospace and automotive structures for stress testing and design evaluation. Engineers could ensure safety in airplanes

  5. Distributed Long-Gauge Optical Fiber Sensors Based Self-Sensing FRP Bar for Concrete Structure

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin scattering-based distributed optical fiber (OF) sensing technique presents advantages for concrete structure monitoring. However, the existence of spatial resolution greatly decreases strain measurement accuracy especially around cracks. Meanwhile, the brittle feature of OF also hinders its further application. In this paper, the distributed OF sensor was firstly proposed as long-gauge sensor to improve strain measurement accuracy. Then, a new type of self-sensing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bar was developed by embedding the packaged long-gauge OF sensors into FRP bar, followed by experimental studies on strain sensing, temperature sensing and basic mechanical properties. The results confirmed the superior strain sensing properties, namely satisfied accuracy, repeatability and linearity, as well as excellent mechanical performance. At the same time, the temperature sensing property was not influenced by the long-gauge package, making temperature compensation easy. Furthermore, the bonding performance between self-sensing FRP bar and concrete was investigated to study its influence on the sensing. Lastly, the sensing performance was further verified with static experiments of concrete beam reinforced with the proposed self-sensing FRP bar. Therefore, the self-sensing FRP bar has potential applications for long-term structural health monitoring (SHM) as embedded sensors as well as reinforcing materials for concrete structures. PMID:26927110

  6. Distributed Long-Gauge Optical Fiber Sensors Based Self-Sensing FRP Bar for Concrete Structure.

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin scattering-based distributed optical fiber (OF) sensing technique presents advantages for concrete structure monitoring. However, the existence of spatial resolution greatly decreases strain measurement accuracy especially around cracks. Meanwhile, the brittle feature of OF also hinders its further application. In this paper, the distributed OF sensor was firstly proposed as long-gauge sensor to improve strain measurement accuracy. Then, a new type of self-sensing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bar was developed by embedding the packaged long-gauge OF sensors into FRP bar, followed by experimental studies on strain sensing, temperature sensing and basic mechanical properties. The results confirmed the superior strain sensing properties, namely satisfied accuracy, repeatability and linearity, as well as excellent mechanical performance. At the same time, the temperature sensing property was not influenced by the long-gauge package, making temperature compensation easy. Furthermore, the bonding performance between self-sensing FRP bar and concrete was investigated to study its influence on the sensing. Lastly, the sensing performance was further verified with static experiments of concrete beam reinforced with the proposed self-sensing FRP bar. Therefore, the self-sensing FRP bar has potential applications for long-term structural health monitoring (SHM) as embedded sensors as well as reinforcing materials for concrete structures. PMID:26927110

  7. Shear stress sensing with Bragg grating-based sensors in microstructured optical fibers.

    Sulejmani, Sanne; Sonnenfeld, Camille; Geernaert, Thomas; Luyckx, Geert; Van Hemelrijck, Danny; Mergo, Pawel; Urbanczyk, Waclaw; Chah, Karima; Caucheteur, Christophe; Mégret, Patrice; Thienpont, Hugo; Berghmans, Francis

    2013-08-26

    We demonstrate shear stress sensing with a Bragg grating-based microstructured optical fiber sensor embedded in a single lap adhesive joint. We achieved an unprecedented shear stress sensitivity of 59.8 pm/MPa when the joint is loaded in tension. This corresponds to a shear strain sensitivity of 0.01 pm/µε. We verified these results with 2D and 3D finite element modeling. A comparative FEM study with conventional highly birefringent side-hole and bow-tie fibers shows that our dedicated fiber design yields a fourfold sensitivity improvement. PMID:24105585

  8. Electrically Insulated Sensing of Respiratory Rate and Heartbeat Using Optical Fibers

    Ernesto Suaste-Gómez; Daniel Hernández-Rivera; Anabel S. Sánchez-Sánchez; Elsy Villarreal-Calva

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and heart rates are among the most important physiological parameters used to monitor patients’ health. It is important to design devices that can measure these parameters without risking or altering the subject’s health. In this context, a novel sensing method to monitor simultaneously the heartbeat and respiratory rate signals of patients within an electrically safety environment was developed and tested. An optical fiber-based sensor was used in order to detect two optical phen...

  9. A hydrostatic leak test for water pipeline by using distributed optical fiber vibration sensing system

    Wu, Huijuan; Sun, Zhenshi; Qian, Ya; Zhang, Tao; Rao, Yunjiang

    2015-07-01

    A hydrostatic leak test for water pipeline with a distributed optical fiber vibration sensing (DOVS) system based on the phase-sensitive OTDR technology is studied in this paper. By monitoring one end of a common communication optical fiber cable, which is laid in the inner wall of the pipe, we can detect and locate the water leakages easily. Different apertures under different pressures are tested and it shows that the DOVS has good responses when the aperture is equal or larger than 4 mm and the inner pressure reaches 0.2 Mpa for a steel pipe with DN 91cm×EN 2cm.

  10. Fiber Optic Shape Sensing for Tethered Marsupial Rovers Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated is proposing to design, build, and test a shape, length, and tension sensing tether for robotic exploration and sample-gathering...

  11. Fiber Optic Shape Sensing for Tethered Marsupial Rovers Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Building upon the successful proof of concept work in Phase I, Luna Innovations Incorporated is proposing to design, build, and test a sensing tether for marsupial...

  12. Surface Plasmon Scattering in Exposed Core Optical Fiber for Enhanced Resolution Refractive Index Sensing.

    Klantsataya, Elizaveta; François, Alexandre; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Hoffmann, Peter; Monro, Tanya M

    2015-01-01

    Refractometric sensors based on optical excitation of surface plasmons on the side of an optical fiber is an established sensing architecture that has enabled laboratory demonstrations of cost effective portable devices for biological and chemical applications. Here we report a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) configuration realized in an Exposed Core Microstructured Optical Fiber (ECF) capable of optimizing both sensitivity and resolution. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of fabrication of a rough metal coating suitable for spectral interrogation of scattered plasmonic wave using chemical electroless plating technique on a 10 μm diameter exposed core of the ECF. Performance of the sensor in terms of its refractive index sensitivity and full width at half maximum (FWHM) of SPR response is compared to that achieved with an unstructured bare core fiber with 140 μm core diameter. The experimental improvement in FWHM, and therefore the detection limit, is found to be a factor of two (75 nm for ECF in comparison to 150 nm for the large core fiber). Refractive index sensitivity of 1800 nm/RIU was achieved for both fibers in the sensing range of aqueous environment (1.33-1.37) suitable for biosensing applications. PMID:26426022

  13. Surface Plasmon Scattering in Exposed Core Optical Fiber for Enhanced Resolution Refractive Index Sensing

    Elizaveta Klantsataya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Refractometric sensors based on optical excitation of surface plasmons on the side of an optical fiber is an established sensing architecture that has enabled laboratory demonstrations of cost effective portable devices for biological and chemical applications. Here we report a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR configuration realized in an Exposed Core Microstructured Optical Fiber (ECF capable of optimizing both sensitivity and resolution. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of fabrication of a rough metal coating suitable for spectral interrogation of scattered plasmonic wave using chemical electroless plating technique on a 10 μm diameter exposed core of the ECF. Performance of the sensor in terms of its refractive index sensitivity and full width at half maximum (FWHM of SPR response is compared to that achieved with an unstructured bare core fiber with 140 μm core diameter. The experimental improvement in FWHM, and therefore the detection limit, is found to be a factor of two (75 nm for ECF in comparison to 150 nm for the large core fiber. Refractive index sensitivity of 1800 nm/RIU was achieved for both fibers in the sensing range of aqueous environment (1.33–1.37 suitable for biosensing applications.

  14. Comprehensive long distance and real-time pipeline monitoring system based on fiber optic sensing

    Nikles, Marc; Ravet, Fabien; Briffod, Fabien [Omnisens S.A., Morges (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    An increasing number of pipelines are constructed in remote regions affected by harsh environmental conditions. These pipeline routes often cross mountain areas which are characterized by unstable grounds and where soil texture changes between winter and summer increase the probability of hazards. Due to the long distances to be monitored and the linear nature of pipelines, distributed fiber optic sensing techniques offer significant advantages and the capability to detect and localize pipeline disturbance with great precision. Furthermore pipeline owner/operators lay fiber optic cable parallel to transmission pipelines for telecommunication purposes and at minimum additional cost monitoring capabilities can be added to the communication system. The Brillouin-based Omnisens DITEST monitoring system has been used in several long distance pipeline projects. The technique is capable of measuring strain and temperature over 100's kilometers with meter spatial resolution. Dedicated fiber optic cables have been developed for continuous strain and temperature monitoring and their deployment along the pipeline has enabled permanent and continuous pipeline ground movement, intrusion and leak detection. This paper presents a description of the fiber optic Brillouin-based DITEST sensing technique, its measurement performance and limits, while addressing future perspectives for pipeline monitoring. (author)

  15. Fiber Loop Ringdown — a Time-Domain Sensing Technique for Multi-Function Fiber Optic Sensor Platforms: Current Status and Design Perspectives

    Chuji Wang

    2009-01-01

    Fiber loop ringdown (FLRD) utilizes an inexpensive telecommunications light source, a photodiode, and a section of single-mode fiber to form a uniform fiber optic sensor platform for sensing various quantities, such as pressure, temperature, strain, refractive index, chemical species, biological cells, and small volume of fluids. In FLRD, optical losses of a light pulse in a fiber loop induced by changes in a quantity are measured by the light decay time constants. FLRD measures time to detec...

  16. Intrinsic optical fiber sensor for sensing organophosphate nerve agent using the modified cladding approach

    Bansal, Lalitkumar; El-Sherif, Mahmoud

    2004-03-01

    The concept of modified cladding based sensors represents the largest class of intrinsic fiber optic chemical sensors. In this design, the passive cladding of the optical fiber is replaced by an active coating, called modified cladding. The analyte in this case diffuses into the coating and induces changes in the absorbance, fluorescence, or some other spectroscopic property of the modified cladding, the coating acts as a chemo-chromic transducer and sensing takes place by intensity modulation. This design i.e. of the coating based sensors, has found enormous applicability in the realm of chemical and biochemical sensing which also includes environmental monitoring and detection of chemical warfare agents. In this paper, the development of an intrinsic fiber optic sensor for detection of organophosphate dimethyl-methyl phoshopnate (DMMP) is presented. DMMP is a chemical precursor to the nerve agent sarin. The chemo-chromic transducer material used as a modified coating on the fiber core is NDSA (Naphthalene disulphonic acid) doped polypyrrole. This coating material shows conductivity and absorbance change when exposed to DMMP. The fabrication of the sensor device is a three step process which involves (a) etching a small section of the optical fiber to expose the core, (b) coating the etched section of the optical fiber with the polymer, (c) integration of sensor components and testing. Thin film characterization is done using the UV-Vis spectrophotometer on in-situ coated films of polypyrrole on a glass substrate to check for absorbance change upon exposure to DMMP. The development procedure is presented next and encouraging results are discussed.

  17. OptaSense distributed acoustic and seismic sensing using COTS fiber optic cables for infrastructure protection and counter terrorism

    Duckworth, Gregory L.; Ku, Emery M.

    2013-06-01

    The OptaSense® Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) technology can turn any cable with single-mode optical fiber into a very large and densely sampled acoustic/seismic sensor array—covering up to a 50 km aperture per system with "virtual" sensor separations as small as 1 meter on the unmodified cable. The system uses Rayleigh scattering from the imperfections in the fiber to return the optical signals measuring local fiber strain from seismic or air and water acoustic signals. The scalable system architecture can provide border monitoring and high-security perimeter and linear asset protection for a variety of industries—from nuclear facilities to oil and gas pipelines. This paper presents various application architectures and system performance examples for detection, localization, and classification of personnel footsteps, vehicles, digging and tunneling, gunshots, aircraft, and earthquakes. The DAS technology can provide a costeffective alternative to unattended ground sensors and geophone arrays, and a complement or alternative to imaging and radar sensors in many applications. The transduction, signal processing, and operator control and display technology will be described, and performance examples will be given from research and development testing and from operational systems on pipelines, critical infrastructure perimeters, railroads, and roadways. Potential new applications will be discussed that can take advantage of existing fiber-optic telecommunications infrastructure as "the sensor"—leading to low-cost and high-coverage systems.

  18. Theoretical analysis and experiment of micromechanics and mechanics-optics coupling of distributed optic-fiber crack sensing

    2011-01-01

    The micromechanical behaviors and mechanics-optics coupling effects of optic-fiber-concrete complex in the distributed optic-fiber sensing concrete-crack technology,which was used in health monitoring of Wu Gorge Bridge on Yangtze River and a large dam successfully,have been investigated.A micromechanical theoretical analysis method and micromechanical frictional contact bi-interface model,as well as a modified optical theoretical analysis method of the mechanics-optics coupling effects are presented.A series of verification experiments,including mechanical experiments and mechanics-optics coupling experiments,have been preformed.The results of micromechanical theoretical analysis and the analysis of the modified theory of mechanics-optics coupling along with mechanical and optical experimental data are shown to be in close agreement.Both the micromechanical theory and the modified theory of mechanics-optics coupling with their analysis methods can not only enhance credibility of this novel distributed sensing technology but also provide a way to understand its sensing mechanism and optimize its technical details and system.

  19. Development of eight-channel methane gas optical fiber sensing system

    Zhang, Tianyu; Wang, Weiqi; Gao, Liancong; Koscica, Thomas; Li, David

    2012-10-01

    This paper introduces an eight-channel methane gas optical fiber sensing system designed for underground coalmine methane gas monitoring. With eight self-designed gas sensor heads, this system can detect the concentration of methane gas at eight locations in a coal mine simultaneously. By wavelength modulation with the DFB laser diode, 1×8 WDM, a self-designed processing circuit, and data processing software, this system features a high sensitivity (10ppb). The response time of the system is less than 6 seconds. Extensive tests have been carried out on the system. It is shown that the performance of the optical fiber sensor system is generally better than conventional methane sensing systems currently in wide use in coalmines. It can be used in the coalmines for multi-point gas detecting using one light source and attendant central processing unit only, resulting in more versatility, reduced cost, and increased perational efficiency.

  20. Design and performance of fiber optic pressure cell based on polarimetric sensing

    Bock, Wojtek J.; Voet, Mark R.; Beaulieu, Mario; Chen, Jiahua

    1993-03-01

    In this paper we propose replacing a widely used but often difficult and cumbersome technique of hydraulic evaluation of stress in concrete materials with a new fiber-optic measurement device, which has all inherent advantages of fiber-optic sensors. The sensing element of the device consists of a highly birefringent (HB) polarization-maintaining optical fiber. The stress inside it induced by external pressure modulates the polarization state of the output light signal at the detection end of the system. The all-fiber instrumentation system of the sensor consists of a semiconductor pigtailed laser, input and output HB optical fibers, an analyzer and a computer-controlled synchronous detection system. A specially designed leadthrough integrated with the sensor head allowed us to insert the sensor inside a pressure pad filled with oil or alternatively with mercury. For calibration purposes, the pressure cell was placed inside a large pressure chamber designed to simulate the real environment. Characterization of the device for hysteresis, selectivity and sensitivity was performed for pressures up to 70 bar and for ambient temperatures. The described sensor is simple, cost-effective, safe in explosive environments and well adapted for stress monitoring in the large-scale structures.

  1. Double-Ended Calibration of Fiber-Optic Raman Spectra Distributed Temperature Sensing Data

    John Selker; Mark B. Hausner; Scott Tyler; Jop Jansen; Olivier Hoes; Susan C. Steele-Dunne; Nick van de Giesen

    2012-01-01

    Over the past five years, Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) along fiber optic cables using Raman backscattering has become an important tool in the environmental sciences. Many environmental applications of DTS demand very accurate temperature measurements, with typical RMSE < 0.1 K. The aim of this paper is to describe and clarify the advantages and disadvantages of double-ended calibration to achieve such accuracy under field conditions. By measuring back...

  2. Sensing nanometric displacement of a micro-/nano-fiber induced by optical forces by use of white light interferometry

    Qiu, Weiqia; Huang, Hankai; Yu, Jianhui; Dong, Huazhuo; Chen, Zhe; Lu, Huihui

    2015-07-01

    Sensing the nanometric displacement of a micro-/nano-fiber induced by optical forces is a key technology to study optical forces and optical momentum. When the gap between a micro-/nano-fiber and glass substrate becomes down to micrometer scale or less, a white light interference was observed. The gap changes when optical force arising from the propagating pump light along the micro-/nano-fiber causes a transversal nanometric displacement of a micro-/nanofiber, resulting in movement of the interferometric fringes. Therefore this movement of the interferometric fringes can be used to sense the nanometric displacement of the micro-/nano-fiber induced by optical forces. Experimental results show that the resolutions of this method can reach 7.27nm/pixel for tilted angle 0.8o between the micro-/nano-fiber and substrate. It is concluded that the white light interferometry method is suitable for measuring the weak optical force.

  3. Advanced materials and techniques for fiber-optic sensing

    Fibre-optic monitoring systems came of age in about 1999 upon the emergence of the world's first significant commercialising company - a spin-out from the UK's collaborative MAST project. By using embedded fibre-optic technology, the MAST project successfully measured transient strain within high-performance composite yacht masts. Since then, applications have extended from smart composites into civil engineering, energy, military, aerospace, medicine and other sectors. Fibre-optic sensors come in various forms, and may be subject to embedment, retrofitting, and remote interrogation. The unique challenges presented by each implementation require careful scrutiny before widespread adoption can take place. Accordingly, various aspects of design and reliability are discussed spanning a range of representative technologies that include resonant microsilicon structures, MEMS, Bragg gratings, advanced forms of spectroscopy, and modern trends in nanotechnology. (author)

  4. Two Fiber Optical Fiber Thermometry

    Jones, Mathew R.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Breeding, Shawn P.

    2000-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose sensing tip is given a metallic coating. The sensing tip of the fiber is essentially an isothermal cavity, so the emission from this cavity will be approximately equal to the emission from a blackbody. Temperature readings are obtained by measuring the spectral radiative heat flux at the end of the fiber at two wavelengths. The ratio of these measurements and Planck's Law are used to infer the temperature at the sensing tip. Optical fiber thermometers have high accuracy, excellent long-term stability and are immune to electromagnetic interference. In addition, they can be operated for extended periods without requiring re-calibration. For these reasons. it is desirable to use optical fiber thermometers in environments such as the International Space Station. However, it has recently been shown that temperature readings are corrupted by emission from the fiber when extended portions of the probe are exposed to elevated temperatures. This paper will describe several ways in which the reading from a second fiber can be used to correct the corrupted temperature measurements. The accuracy and sensitivity to measurement uncertainty will be presented for each method.

  5. Visible vs near-infrared optical fiber plasmonics: performance comparison for protein sensing

    Caucheteur, Christophe; Ribaut, Clotilde; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2016-04-01

    In this work, two plasmonic optical fiber sensor configurations are used for protein sensing and their relative performances in terms of limit of detection and sensitivity are compared. The first configuration consists in unclad 200 μm optical fibers that produce a broadband resonance in the visible wavelength range around 650 nm while the second configuration makes use of multiple narrowband resonances produced in the C+L bands with weakly tilted fiber Bragg gratings photo-inscribed in telecommunication-grade single-mode optical fibers. In both cases, the sensitive regions are surrounded by a ~50 nm gold layer so that the evanescent wave can excite a surface plasmon polariton at the metalsurrounding medium interface. Both configurations are used to sense green fluorescent proteins. Our experimental results demonstrate that the two sensor configurations present a complementary measurement dynamics as a function of the investigated concentration in the range 10-12 - 10-7 g/ml. We attribute this difference of sensitivity to the difference of penetration depth of the evanescent wave in the surrounding medium, which is proportional to the light wavelength.

  6. Fiber Optic Sensors for Health Monitoring of Morphing Airframes. Part 2; Chemical Sensing Using Optical Fibers with Bragg Gratings

    Wood, Karen; Brown, Timothy; Rogowski, Robert; Jensen, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Part 1 of this two part series described the fabrication and calibration of Bragg gratings written into a single mode optical fiber for use in strain and temperature monitoring. Part 2 of the series describes the use of identical fibers and additional multimode fibers, both with and without Bragg gratings, to perform near infrared spectroscopy. The demodulation system being developed at NASA Langley Research Center currently requires the use of a single mode optical fiber. Attempts to use this single mode fiber for spectroscopic analysis are problematic given its small core diameter, resulting in low signal intensity. Nonetheless, we have conducted a preliminary investigation using a single mode fiber in conjunction with an infrared spectrometer to obtain spectra of a high-performance epoxy resin system. Spectra were obtained using single mode fibers that contained Bragg gratings; however, the peaks of interest were barely discernible above the noise. The goal of this research is to provide a multipurpose sensor in a single optical fiber capable of measuring a variety of chemical and physical properties.

  7. Spectroscopic and fiber optic ethanol sensing properties Gd doped ZnO nanoparticles

    Noel, J. L.; Udayabhaskar, R.; Renganathan, B.; Muthu Mariappan, S.; Sastikumar, D.; Karthikeyan, B.

    2014-11-01

    We report the structural, optical and gas sensing properties of prepared pure and Gd doped ZnO nanoparticles through solgel method at moderate temperature. Structural studies are carried out by X-ray diffraction method confirms hexagonal wurtzite structure and doping induced changes in lattice parameters is observed. Optical absorption spectral studies shows red shift in the absorption peak corresponds to band-gap from 3.42 eV to 3.05 eV and broad absorption in the visible range after Gd doping is observed. Scanning electron microscopic studies shows increase in particle size where the particle diameters increase from few nm to micrometers after Gd doping. The clad modified ethanol fiber-optic sensor studies for ethanol sensing exhibits best sensitivity for the 3% Gd doped ZnO nanoparticles and the sensitivity get lowered incase of higher percentage of Gd doped ZnO sample.

  8. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  9. Nanoliter-scale, regenerable ion sensor: sensing with surface functionalized microstructured optical fiber

    Heng, Sabrina; Nguyen, Mai-Chi; Kostecki, Roman; Monro, Tanya M.; Abell, Andrew D.

    2013-05-01

    The first nanoliter-scale regenerable ion sensor based on microstructured optical fiber (MOF) is reported. The air holes of the MOF are functionalized with a monoazacrown bearing spiropyran to give a switchable sensor that detects lithium ions down to 100 nM in nanoliter-scale volumes. Ion binding is turned on and off on upon irradiation with light, with the sensor being unaffected by multiple rounds of photoswitching. Unbound ions are flushed from the fiber in the `off' state to allow the sensor to be reused. The integration of an ionophore into the sensor paves the way for the development of highly specific light-based sensing platforms that are readily adaptable to sense a particular ion simply by altering the ionophore design.

  10. A Self-Referencing Intensity-Based Fiber Optic Sensor with Multipoint Sensing Characteristics

    Sang-Jin Choi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A self-referencing, intensity-based fiber optic sensor (FOS is proposed and demonstrated. The theoretical analysis for the proposed design is given, and the validity of the theoretical analysis is confirmed via experiments. We define the measurement parameter, X, and the calibration factor, β, to find the transfer function, , of the intensity-based FOS head. The self-referencing and multipoint sensing characteristics of the proposed system are validated by showing the measured  and relative error versus the optical power attenuation of the sensor head for four cases: optical source fluctuation, various remote sensing point distances, fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs with different characteristics, and multiple sensor heads with cascade and/or parallel forms. The power-budget analysis and limitations of the measurement rates are discussed, and the measurement results of fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP coupon strain using the proposed FOS are given as an actual measurement. The proposed FOS has several benefits, including a self-referencing characteristic, the flexibility to determine FBGs, and a simple structure in terms of the number of devices and measuring procedure.

  11. Robust-fusion optic fiber distance and orientation integrated sensing technology

    Liu, Gui-xiong; Kuang, Yong-cong; Xu, Jing; Li, Xia-ni

    2005-02-01

    A robust-fusion optic fiber sensor technology of proximity distance and orientation integration is studied in this paper. A novel optic fiber sensing head with redundant information, which can measure distance and orientation in any pose as well as compensate fluctuation caused by changing parameters such as surface reflectivity, light intensity and characteristic shifting from photoelectric-converter device, is proposed. The implement method of sensor network compensation is introduced. An improved BP network arithmetic, which can enhance the dynamic characteristic and measurement accuracy of the sensing system, is presented. To speed up the convergence rate of BP network training, GA -BP training method is applied. An intelligent signal detecting and processing system based on DSP is designed, the strong data processing ability of DSP makes the system hardware structure simplified. The method of moderate output light power control is put forward for enlarging the measuring range. Experiment result shows that robust-fusion optic fiber proximity sensor system has the distance measuring range of 0.1~19.9mm and the orientation measuring range of 0~25°. The measuring time of each point is 92.5ms.

  12. Early work on fiber optic gyro technology at McDonnell Douglas and spinoffs leading to acoustic sensing, distributed sensing, and a secure fiber optic communication system

    Udd, Eric

    2006-08-01

    In the late 1970s the closed loop fiber optic gyro was invented and demonstrated at McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company in Huntington Beach, California. This development was followed by a series of derivative inventions that included the Sagnac acoustic sensor, Sagnac distributed sensors and finally a Sagnac secure fiber optic communication system. This paper provides an overview of these developments.

  13. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-07-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor is being developed that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Two critical materials issues are the cluster's ability to withstand high temperatures when immobilized in a porous the sol-gel support, and whether after heating to high temperatures, the sol-gel matrix maintains a high and constant permeability to oxygen to support rapid quenching of luminescence. We used a composite materials approach to prepare stable sensing layers on optical fibers. We dispersed 60 w/w% of a pre-cured sol-gel composite containing the potassium salt of molybdenum clusters (K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}) into a sol-gel binder solution, and established the conditions necessary for deposition of sol-gel films on optical fibers and planar substrates. The fiber sensor has an output signal of 5 nW when pumped with an inexpensive commercial 365 nm ultraviolet light emitting diode (LED). Quenching of the sensor signal by oxygen was observed up to a gas temperature of 175 C with no degradation of the oxygen permeability of the composite after high temperature cycling. On planar substrates the cluster containing composite responds within <1 second to a gas exchange from nitrogen to oxygen, indicating the feasibility of real-time oxygen detection.

  14. Fiber optic detector

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  15. Sensing of corrosion on aluminum surfaces by use of metallic optical fiber.

    Dong, Saying; Liao, Yanbiao; Tian, Qian

    2005-10-20

    We present a new method for monitoring aluminum corrosion by determining the kind of light output that is as corrosion occurs. We prepared some metallized multimode optical fibers by physical vacuum deposition of aluminum to monitor metal corrosion. The sensing area was 1-2 cm in length and had an uncladded part. We used scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) to observe the microappearance of the aluminum before and after corrosion by sodium hydroxide or hydrochloric acid. The film's thickness was also measured by SEM. The factors that affect the rate of corrosion were also investigated. PMID:16252643

  16. Application of Distributed Optical Fiber Sensing Technology in the Anomaly Detection of Shaft Lining in Grouting

    Chunde Piao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The rupture of the shaft lining caused by grouting has seriously undermined the safety in coal mining. Based on BOTDR distributed optical fiber sensing technology, this paper studied the layout method of optical fiber sensors and the anomaly detection method of the deformation and obtained the evolution law of shaft deformation triggered by grouting. The research results showed that the bonding problem of optical fiber sensors in damp environment could be effectively solved, by applying the binder consisting of sodium silicate and cement. Through BOTDR-based deformation detection, the real-time deformation of the shaft lining caused by grouting was immediately spotted. By comparing the respective strain of shaft lining deformation and concrete deformation, the risk range of shaft lining grouting was identified. With the additional strain increment of the shaft lining triggered by each process of grouting, the saturated condition of grouting volume in strata was analyzed, providing an important technical insight into the field construction and the safety of the shaft lining.

  17. Optic fiber sensor-based smart bridge cable with functionality of self-sensing

    He, Jianping; Zhou, Zhi; Jinping, Ou

    2013-02-01

    Bridge cables, characterized by distributed large span, serving in harsh environment and vulnerability to random damage, are the key load-sustaining components of cable-based bridges. To ensure the safety of the bridge structure, it is critical to monitor the loading conditions of these cables under lengthwise random damages. Aiming at obtaining accurate monitoring at the critical points as well as the general information of the cable force distributed along the entire cable, this paper presents a study on cable force monitoring by combining optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors and Brillouin optical time domain analysis/reflectory (BOTDA/R) sensing technique in one single optical fiber. A smart FRP-OF-FBG rebar based cable was fabricated by protruding a FRP packaged OF-FBG sensor into the bridge cable. And its sensing characteristics, stability under high stress state temperature self-compensation as well as BOTDA/R distributed data improvement by local FBG sensors have been investigated. The results show that FRP-OF-FBG rebar in the smart cable can deform consistantly along with the steel wire and the cable force obtained from the optical fiber sensors agree well with theoretical value with relative error less than ±5%. Besides, the temperature self-compensation method provides a significant cost-effective technique for the FRP-OF-FBG based cables' in situ cable force measurement. And furthermore, potential damages of the bridge cable, e.g. wire breaking and corrosion, can be characterized and symbolized by the discontinuity and fluctuation of the distributed BOTDA data thereafter accuracy improved by local FBG sensors.

  18. Optical sensing elements for nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) gas detection, a sol-gel method for making the sensing elements and fiber optic sensors incorporating nitrogen dioxide gas optical sensing elements

    Mechery, Shelly John; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2007-07-03

    A sensing element, a method of making a sensing element, and a fiber optic sensor incorporating the sensing element are described. The sensor can be used for the quantitative detection of NO.sub.2 in a mixture of gases. The sensing element can be made by incorporating a diazotizing reagent which reacts with nitrous ions to produce a diazo compound and a coupling reagent which couples with the diazo compound to produce an azo dye into a sol and allowing the sol to form an optically transparent gel. The sensing element changes color in the presence of NO.sub.2 gas. The temporal response of the absorption spectrum at various NO.sub.2 concentrations has also been recorded and analyzed. Sensors having different design configurations are described. The sensing element can detect NO.sub.2 gas at levels of parts per billion.

  19. Optical fiber networks for remote fiber optic sensors

    Montserrat Fernandez-Vallejo; Manuel Lopez-Amo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of optical fiber sensor networks for remote sensing. Firstly, the state of the art of remote fiber sensor systems has been considered. We have summarized the great evolution of these systems in recent years; this progress confirms that fiber-optic remote sensing is a promising technology with a wide field of practical applications. Afterwards, the most representative remote fiber-optic sensor systems are briefly explained, discussing their schemes, challeng...

  20. A comparative study between SMS interferometers and lossy mode resonace optical fiber devices for sensing applications

    Socorro, A. B.; Hernaez, M.; Del Villar, I.; Corres, J. M.; Arregui, F. J.; Matias, I. R.

    2015-05-01

    Optical fiber sensors are of great interest due to their intrinsic advantages over electronic sensors. In this work, the sensing characteristics of two different and novel optical fiber devices are compared, after simultaneously depositing a thin-film using the layer-by-layer assembly deposition process. The first one is an SMS structure, formed by splicing two single-mode fiber pigtails on both sides of a coreless multimode fiber segment. This structure induces an interferometric phenomenon that generates several attenuation and transmission bands along the spectrum. These bands are sensitive to variations in the surrounding refractive index, although this sensitivity has been enhanced by a TiO2/PSS thin-film. The other device is a 40 mm uncladded segment of a 200 μm-core multimode optical fiber. When coated by a TiO2/PSS thinfilm, part of the light transmitted into the uncladded core is coupled into the thin-film, generating a lossy mode resonance (LMR). The absorption peaks due to these phenomena red-shift as long as the thin-film thickness increases or the external RI becomes higher. The performance of these devices as refractometers and relative humidity sensors are tested. Results show that the LMR-based sensor is more sensitive in both situations, in spite of its lower sensitivity. Particularly, it presents a 7-fold sensitivity enhancement when measuring surrounding medium refractive index changes and a 10-fold sensitivity enhancement when measuring environmental relative humidity. To our knowledge, this is the first time that a comparative study between SMS and LMR sensors is performed.

  1. Application of Thin ZnO ALD Layers in Fiber-Optic Fabry-Pérot Sensing Interferometers

    Daria Majchrowicz; Marzena Hirsch; Paweł Wierzba; Michael Bechelany; Roman Viter; Małgorzata Jędrzejewska‑Szczerska

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigated the response of a fiber-optic Fabry-Pérot sensing interferometer with thin ZnO layers deposited on the end faces of the optical fibers forming the cavity. Standard telecommunication single-mode optical fiber (SMF-28) segments were used with the thin ZnO layers deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Measurements were performed with the interferometer illuminated by two broadband sources operating at 1300 nm and 1550 nm. Reflected interference signal was acqui...

  2. Preparation and Properties of Modified Sol-Gel Sensing Membrane for Fiber Optic Oxygen Sensor

    HUANG Jun; HAN Yun; ZHANG Tian-hua; JIANG De-sheng; YUE Fang-yu

    2004-01-01

    Modified sensing membranes based on fluorescence quenching were prepared by the sol-gel meth-od, using formamide as the drying control chemical additive, tetraethoxysilane as the main material, Ru( phen )3 Cl2 as the indicator. The membrane with the optimum thickness of 20- 50μm is uniform and crack-free,in which the indicator has a very small leaking rate. The membrane is immersed in water for 50h, the membranesensing parameter M decreases by less than 5% . The fiber optic oxygen sensor with the sensing membrane has adetection limit of 5 × 10-6 M( ppm ), a response time of less than 30s, excellent reproducibility and stability.

  3. High G effects on optical fiber based displacement sensing for re-entry bodies

    Nadler, Brett R.; Greene, Jon

    2006-08-01

    Re-entry bodies are subject to extreme conditions, among them the rigorous shock, vibration, and loading characteristics that can often induce noise or loss of measurement. Restrictions by the Department of Energy on spark sources within a sealed body require the exclusive use of fiber optics for sensing. A joint effort between Los Alamos National Laboratory and Lambda Instruments has developed and evaluated a white light interferometric fiber sensor to address these concerns while measuring displacements between high explosive components in potential flight applications. The sensor offers advantages with electro-magnetic immunity, non-contact sensing elements, and high sensitivity to movement. Gap values are calculated from the extrema of the sinusoidal wavelength pattern created by the Fabry-Perot cavity between the lens and explosive surface, collected by an optical spectrum analyzer and interpreted by an external computer. This paper focuses on the interferometric concept and experimental data received from the unit in real-time during centrifuge tests. Results from single and multimode versions are presented and reported in their effectiveness for 0-2 millimeter measurements.

  4. Heated fiber optic distributed temperature sensing: a tool for measuring soil water content

    Rodriguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Zubelzu, Sergio; Sánchez-Calvo, Raúl; Horcajo, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    . Finally, the soil water retention curve was estimated by fitting pairs of Tcum- values. Results showed the feasibility of heated fiber optics with distributed temperature sensing to estimate soil water content, and suggest its potential for its application under field conditions

  5. Changes in speckle patterns induced by load application onto an optical fiber and its possible application for sensing purpose

    Hasegawa, Makoto; Okumura, Jyun-ya; Hyuga, Akio

    2015-08-01

    Speckle patterns to be observed in an output light spot from an optical fiber are known to be changed due to external disturbances applied onto the optical fiber. In order to investigate possibilities of utilizing such changes in speckle patterns for sensing application, a certain load was applied onto a jacket-covered communication-grade multi-mode glass optical fiber through which laser beams emitted from a laser diode were propagating, and observed changes in speckle patterns in the output light spot from the optical fiber were investigated both as image data via a CCD camera and as an output voltage from a photovoltaic panel irradiated with the output light spot. The load was applied via a load application mechanism in which several ridges were provided onto opposite flat plates and a certain number of weights were placed there so that corrugated bending of the optical fiber was intentionally induced via load application due to the ridges. The obtained results showed that the number of speckles in the observed pattern in the output light spot as well as the output voltage from the photovoltaic panel irradiated with the output light spot showed decreases upon load application with relatively satisfactory repeatability. When the load was reduced, i.e., the weights were removed, the number of speckles then showed recovery. These results indicate there is a certain possibility of utilizing changes in speckle patterns for sensing of load application onto the optical fiber.

  6. In-situ strain sensing with fiber optic sensors embedded into stainless steel 316

    Havermann, Dirk; Mathew, Jinesh; Macpherson, William N.; Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2015-04-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors are embedded into Stainless Steel (SS) 316 components using bespoke Selective Laser Melting (SLM) technology. SS 316 material is added on substrates by SLM, incorporating U-shaped grooves with dimensions suitable to hold nickel coated optical fibers. Coated optical fibers containing fiber Bragg gratings for strain monitoring are placed in the groove. Melting subsequent powder layer on top of the fiber completes the embedding. Strain levels exceeding 3 mɛ are applied to specimens and are measured by embedded fiber optic sensors. Elastic deformation of the steel component is reliably measured by the Bragg grating from within the component with high accuracy. During plastic deformation of the steel the optical fiber is slipping due to poor adhesive bonding between fused silica and metal surround.

  7. Analysis of Faraday effect in multimode tellurite glass optical fiber for magneto-optical sensing and monitoring applications

    Boetti, Nadia Giovanna; Chen, Qiuping; Lousteau, Joris; Milanese, Daniel; Olivero, Massimo; Chen, Qiuling

    2012-01-01

    The design and fabrication of a tellurite glass multimode optical fiber for magneto-optical applications are presented and discussed. The analysis of the polarization shows that an optical beam, linearly polarized at the fiber input, changes to elliptically polarized with an ellipticity of 1∶4.5 after propagating down the fiber. However, the elliptical distribution remains unchanged with or without an applied magnetic field, demonstrating that no circular dichroism occurs within the fiber. Th...

  8. A surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS-active optical fiber sensor based on a three-dimensional sensing layer

    Chunyu Liu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To fabricate a new surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS-active optical fiber sensor, the design and preparation of SERS-active sensing layer is one of important topics. In this study, we fabricated a highly sensitive three-dimensional (3D SERS-active sensing layer on the optical fiber terminal via in situ polymerizing a porous polymer material on a flat optical fiber terminal through thermal-induced process, following with the photochemical silver nanoparticles growth. The polymerized polymer formed a 3D porous structure with the pore size of 0.29–0.81 μm, which were afterward decorated with abundant silver nanoparticles with the size of about 100 nm, allowing for higher SERS enhancement. This SERS-active optical fiber sensor was applied for the determination of 4-mercaptopyridine, crystal violet and maleic acid The enhancement factor of this SERS sensing layer can be reached as about 108. The optical fiber sensor with high sensitive SERS-active porous polymer is expected for online analysis and environment detection.

  9. Torsion sensing characteristics of long period fiber gratings fabricated by femtosecond laser in optical fiber

    Duan, Ji'an; Xie, Zheng; Wang, Cong; Zhou, Jianying; Li, Haitao; Luo, Zhi; Chu, Dongkai; Sun, Xiaoyan

    2016-09-01

    With the alignment of the fiber core systems containing dual-CCDs and high-precision electric displacement platform, twisted long period fiber gratings (T-LPFGs) were fabricated in two different twisted SMF-28 fibers by femtosecond laser. The torsion characteristics of the T-LPFGs were experimentally and theoretical investigated and demonstrated in this study. The achieved torsion sensitivity is 117.4 pm/(rad/m) in the torsion range -105-0 rad/m with a linearity of 0.9995. Experimental results show that compared with the ordinary long period fiber gratings, the resonance wavelength of the gratings presents an opposite symmetrical shift depending on the twisting direction after the applied torsion is removed. In addition, high sensitivity could be obtained, which is very suitable for the applications in the torsion sensor. These results are important for the design of new torsion sensors based on T-LPFGs fabricated by femtosecond laser.

  10. Coating-free reflection technique for fiber-optic sensors based on multimode interference: A temperature sensing study

    Taue, Shuji; Takahashi, Tsuyoshi; Fukano, Hideki

    2016-08-01

    A novel reflection technique for use in fiber-optic sensors is investigated and applied to a multimode interference structure. The reflectivity at a fiber end face is increased with two operations. Firstly, the light intensity is increased toward the periphery of the end-face by adjusting the fiber length, which is determined theoretically. Secondly, the fiber end-face is deformed into an ellipsoid by heating it with a gas torch. The deformed shape is characterized from microscopic images. The reflected light intensity is increased by more than 10 dB as a result of controlling the fiber length and deforming its end-face. Temperature sensing was performed using the reflection-type multimode interference structure immersed in temperature-controlled silicone oil. The resulting sensitivity was 0.028 °C for a 29.60 mm sensing region, achieved without using any reflection coating.

  11. Integrated Optical Fiber Sensing System by Combing Large-Scale Distributed BOTDA/R and Localized FBGs

    Zhi Zhou; Jianping He; Jinping Ou

    2012-01-01

    Structural health monitoring (SHM) has been regarded as a significant tool for the safety of civil infrastructures. Local fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor and distributed Brillouin optical fiber sensor have been successfully applied in civil engineering fields. Unfortunately, neither single FBG nor single Brillouin sensing technique can satisfy the requirements of simultaneously positioning full-scale structural damages and accurate local damage details. So it still matters to establish balan...

  12. A tactile sensing element based on a hetero-core optical fiber for force measurement and texture detection

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Koyama, Yuya; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2014-05-01

    Tactile sensing technology can measure a given property of an object through physical contact between a sensing element and the object. Various tactile sensing techniques have been developed for several applications such as intelligent robots, tactile interface, medical support and nursing care support. A desirable tactile sensing element for supporting human daily life can be embedded in the soft material with high sensitivity and accuracy in order to prevent from damaging to human or object physically. This report describes a new tactile sensing element. Hetero-core optical fibers have high sensitivity of macro-bending at local sensor portion and temperature independency, including advantages of optical fiber itself; thin size, light weight, flexible transmission line, and immunity to electro-magnetic interference. The proposed tactile sensing element could detect textures of touched objects through the optical loss caused by the force applied to the sensing element. The characteristics of the sensing element have been evaluated, in which the sensing element has the monotonic and non-linear sensitivity against the normal force ranged from 0 to 5 N with lower accuracy than 0.25 dB. Additionally, texture detection have been successfully demonstrated in which small surface figures of 0.1 mm in height were detected with spatial resolution of 0.4 mm.

  13. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D. J. Osborn; Po Zhang

    2006-09-30

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications has been developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. We report on a fiber optic technique for detection of gas phase oxygen up to 100 C based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the luminescence from molybdenum chloride clusters, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}. The inorganic sensing film is a composite of sol-gel particles embedded in a thin, oxygen permeable sol-gel binder. The particles are comprised of thermally stable, luminescent K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14} clusters dispersed in a fully equilibrated sol-gel matrix. From 40 to 100 C, the fiber sensor switches {approx}6x in intensity in response to alternating pulses of <0.001% O2 and 21% O{sub 2} between two well defined levels with a response time of 10 s. The sensor signal is a few nW for an input pump power of 250 {micro}W. The normalized sensor signal is linear with molar oxygen concentration and fits the theoretical Stern-Volmer relationship. Although the sensitivity decreases with temperature, sensitivity at 100 C is 160 [O{sub 2}]{sup -1}. These parameters are well suited for in-situ, real-time monitoring of oxygen for industrial process control applications.

  14. A Finite Element Analysis of Fiber Optic Acoustic Sensing Mandrel for Acoustic pressure with Increased Sensitivity

    Prashil M. Junghare

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available - This paper investigates the influence of material properties on the performance of an optical fiber wound mandrel composite fiber optic interferometer mandrel by using the ANSYS Cad tool, The acoustic sensitivity of an optical fiber considered analytically, High sensitivity obtained with low young modulus, very thick polymer coatings. The thick coating realized by embedding optical fiber in polyurethane. A flexible composite fiber-optic interferometric acoustic sensor has been developed by wrapping single mode fiber in a winding manner and then embedding a fiber in a thin polyurethane layer. The acoustic sensitivity has to be found more in a frequency range of (2.5-5.0 KHz. In this paper we studied the structural and material properties of a mandrel sensor with foaming layer in such way to get the optimal performance. The sensor was found to be compatible with water. Also the performance of optical fiber is analytically verified using the MATLAB software. In this paper the design was simulated in ANSYS Cad Tool, to verify the sensitivity of the Optical Mach-Zehnder Interferometric Sensor for increased sensitivity. The main objective and focus of the above work is concentrated on choosing the optimal foaming layer material by varying the Young Modulus E to choose the perfect foaming material for implementing in the design of mandrel.

  15. Modeling of Distributed Sensing of Elastic Waves by Fiber-Optic Interferometry.

    Agbodjan Prince, Just; Kohl, Franz; Sauter, Thilo

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with the transduction of strain accompanying elastic waves in solids by firmly attached optical fibers. Stretching sections of optical fibers changes the time required by guided light to pass such sections. Exploiting interferometric techniques, highly sensitive fiber-optic strain transducers are feasible based on this fiber-intrinsic effect. The impact on the actual strain conversion of the fiber segment's shape and size, as well as its inclination to the elastic wavefront is studied. FEM analyses show that severe distortions of the interferometric response occur when the attached fiber length spans a noticeable fraction of the elastic wavelength. Analytical models of strain transduction are presented for typical transducer shapes. They are used to compute input-output relationships for the transduction of narrow-band strain pulses as a function of the mechanical wavelength. The described approach applies to many transducers depending on the distributed interaction with the investigated object. PMID:27608021

  16. LSPR enhanced gasoline sensing with a U-bent optical fiber

    Paul, D.; Dutta, S.; Biswas, R.

    2016-08-01

    We report here a gasoline sensor utilizing localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) phenomenon of metal nanoparticles (NPs) with a U-bent optical fiber. The optical response of the noble metal NPs upon interaction with gasoline has been simulated and experimentally demonstrated. The increase in gasoline vapor over a period of time induces a change in the refractive index of the adjacent medium of nanoparticle colloids, adhering to the probe, and thus the variation has been observed accordingly. This change in the refractive index in the close proximity to noble metals NPs produces a measurable variation in the output signal that has been correlated with the increase in the concentration of gasoline. The sensor provides better sensitivity corresponding to AgNPs when compared to AuNPs. However, in terms of stability, AuNPs-based LSPR performs better than the AgNPs-based plasmonic response. The present sensing set-up offers a light weight, robust and easy to implement platform that has potent application in detecting volatile liquids very effectively.

  17. Fiber-Optic Shape Sensing for Intelligent Solar Sail Deployment Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations proposes to develop a distributed fiber-optic shape sensor to provide a control system for the deployment of ultra-lightweight inflatable support...

  18. Advanced Modular, Multi-Channel, High Speed Fiber Optic Sensing System for Acoustic Emissions Monitoring Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) proposes to prove the feasibility of innovations based on ultra-light-weight, ultra-high-speed, multi-channel,...

  19. Cryogenic Liquid Level-Sensing using Fiber-Optic Strain Sensor (FOSS) Technology Project

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Armstrong innovators have developed a highly accurate method for measuring liquid levels using optical fibers. Unlike liquid level gauges that rely on discrete...

  20. Standardization in fiber-optic sensing for structural safety: activities in the ISHMII and IEC

    Habel, Wolfgang R.; Krebber, K.; Daum, W.

    2015-03-01

    Fiber-optic sensors are increasingly established in the sensor market. Their advantages have unquestionably been verified by numerous demonstrations to enhance the operational performance of aged structures or to monitor the structural behavior of safety-relevant structures or their components. However, there are some barriers in use due to a lack of extensive standardization of fiber-optic sensors. This leads very often to restraints in the user's community. The paper shows the status in international standardization of fiber-optic sensors as well as current activities in leading institutions such as IEC and ISHMII and others with the purpose of providing relevant standards for a broader use of selected fiber-optic sensor technologies.

  1. Fiber optical tweezers for microscale and nanoscale particle manipulation and force sensing

    Liu, Yuxiang

    2011-12-01

    Optical tweezers have been an important tool in biology and physics for studying single molecules and colloidal systems. Most of current optical tweezers are built with microscope objectives, which are: i) expensive, ii) bulky and hard to integrate, iii) sensitive to environmental fluctuations, iv) limited in terms of working distances from the substrate, and v) rigid with the requirements on the substrate (transparent substrate made with glass and with a fixed thickness). These limitations of objective-based optical tweezers prevent them from being miniaturized. Fiber optical tweezers can provide a solution for cost reduction and miniaturization, and these optical tweezers can be potentially used in microfluidic systems. However, the existing fiber optical tweezers have the following limitations: i) low trapping efficiency due to weakly focused beams, ii) lack of the ability to control the positions of multiple particles simultaneously, and iii) limited functionalities. The overall objective of this dissertation work is to further the fundamental understanding of fiber optical tweezers through experimental study and modeling, and to develop novel fiber optical tweezers systems to enhance the capability and functionalities of fiber optical tweezers as microscale and nanoscale manipulators/sensors. The contributions of this dissertation work are summarized as follows. i) An enhanced understanding of the inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers (DFOTs) system has been achieved. Stable three dimensional (3D) optical trapping of a single micron-sized particle has been experimentally demonstrated. This is the first time that the trapping efficiency has been calibrated and the stiffness of the trap has been obtained in the experiments, which has been carried out by using two methods: the drag force method and power spectrum analysis. Such calibration enables the system to be used as a picoNewton-level force sensor in addition to a particle manipulator. The influence of

  2. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    Jung, Chuck C.; Saaski, Elric W.; McCrae, David A.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes a novel fiber optic-based hydrogen sensor. The sensor consists of a thin-film etalon, constructed on the distal end of a fiber optic. The exterior mirror of the etalon is palladium or a palladium-alloy, which undergoes an optical change upon exposure to hydrogen. Data is presented on fiber optic sensors constructed with palladium and several alloys of palladium. The linearity of the optical response of these sensors to hydrogen is examined. Etalons made with pure palladium are found to be desirable for sensing low concentrations of hydrogen, or for one-time exposure to high concentrations of hydrogen. Etalons made from palladium alloys are found to be more desirable in applications were repeated cycling in high concentrations of hydrogen occurs.

  3. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn; Po Zhang

    2006-06-30

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Our approach towards immobilizing the potassium salt of the molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the far end of an optical fiber is to embed the cluster in a thermally cured sol-gel matrix particle. This particle-in-binder approach affords fibers with greatly improved mechanical properties, as compared to previous approaches. The sensor was characterized in 2-21% gas phase oxygen at 40, 70 and 100 C. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  4. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III

    2004-10-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. High temperature measurements of the emission of clusters in sol gel films show that the luminescence intensity from the films follow a 1/T relationship from room temperature to 150 C, and then declines at a slower rate at higher temperatures. The large number of photons available at 230 C is consistent with simple low cost optics for fiber optic probes based on the emission from clusters in sol gel films.

  5. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the 3O2 quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. High temperature measurements of the emission of clusters in sol gel films show that the luminescence intensity from the films follow a 1/T relationship from room temperature to 150 C, and then declines at a slower rate at higher temperatures. The large number of photons available at 230 C is consistent with simple low cost optics for fiber optic probes based on the emission from clusters in sol gel films

  6. Fiber optic fluid detector

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  7. Optimized design and simulation of high temperature pressure pipeline strain monitoring with optical fiber sensing technology

    Zhang, Feng; Liu, Yueming; Lou, Jun

    2011-08-01

    methods mentioned above cannot satisfy the strain change monitoring of high temperature pressure piping. In this paper a novel method is presented using optical Fiber Bragg Grating sensor to carry on the real-time monitoring of the high temperature pressure piping surface strain change. firstly the stress and strain analysis of the high temperature pressure piping surface is given based on the established theoretical model, then optimized design and simulation is accomplished with computer ANSYS software. In the end a optimized set-up is put forward and discussed.

  8. [INVITED] State of the art of Brillouin fiber-optic distributed sensing

    Motil, Avi; Bergman, Arik; Tur, Moshe

    2016-04-01

    Fiber-optic distributed sensing, employing the Brillouin effect, is already a commercially available measurement technique for the accurate estimation of the static strain/temperature fields along tens of kilometers with a spatial resolution of the order of a meter. Furthermore, relentless research efforts are paving the way to even much wider usability of the technique through recently achieved enhanced performance in each of its critical dimensions: measurement range has been extended to hundreds of kilometers; spatial resolution is of the order of a centimeter or less, signal to noise ratio has been significantly improved; fast dynamic events can be captured at kHz's sampling rates; and a much better understanding of the underlying physics has been obtained, along with the formulation of figures of merit, and the preparation and early adoption of appropriate standards and guidelines. This paper describes the basics, as well as the state of the art, of the leading Brillouin interrogation methods, with emphasis on the significant progress made in the last 3 years. It also includes a short introduction to coding, which has proven instrumental in many of the recently obtained performance records.

  9. A surface plasmon resonance probe without optical fibers as a portable sensing device

    A surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor integrating a small sensor probe, a laser emission diode, a photo detector, and a polarizer was developed as a portable sensing device. The sensor probe was made with a glass cylinder, 50 mm long and 1.5 mm in diameter, that was connected directly to a beam splitter without optical fibers. The SPR spectrum obtained with this probe system showed a 10% reflectivity minimum at 690 nm. Shifts of the SPR spectrum induced by refractive index (RI) changes in the sample were measured by detecting the reflection light intensity at 670 nm. When the sensitivity was compared using a BIAcoreTM SPR instrument, the lowest sensor response of 1 mV observed with the SPR probe system coincided with 1.4 x 10-6 of the RI changes. The RI resolution of the SPR probe was estimated with experimentally evaluated noise on the signal, and, consequently, it was concluded that the RI resolution was 1.2 x 10-5. Moreover, immunoreaction was demonstrated with adsorbed bovine serum albumin (BSA) and anti-BSA antibody as an analyte. As a result, 50 ng mL-1 of the lower detection limit was estimated

  10. A novel fiber optic humidity sensing element%一种新型光纤湿度敏感元件

    姚岚; 余海湖; 姜德生

    2001-01-01

    The ionic self-assembly technology is used to deposit polymer multilayer thin films onto the end faces of optical fibers. The assemblies of the polymer multilayers and the working principle of the fiber optic humidity-sensing element is introduced. The specialties of this polymer multilayer sensing element are investigated.%利用离子自组装技术在光纤端面上制备了具有多层结构的、含有亲水基团的聚电解质感湿薄膜,介绍了这种光纤湿度敏感元件的工作原理,测试了其感湿特性。

  11. Blind Source Separation Model of Earth-Rock Junctions in Dike Engineering Based on Distributed Optical Fiber Sensing Technology

    2015-01-01

    Distributed temperature sensing (DTS) provides an important technology support for the earth-rock junctions of dike projects (ERJD), which are binding sites between culvert, gates, and pipes and dike body and dike foundation. In this study, a blind source separation model is used for the identification of leakages based on the temperature data of DTS in leakage monitoring of ERJD. First, a denoising method is established based on the temperature monitoring data of distributed optical fiber in...

  12. Optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer with pH sensitive hydrogel film for hazardous gases sensing

    Zheng, Yangzi; Chen, Li Han; Chan, Chi Chiu; Dong, Xinyong; Yang, Jingyi; Tou, Zhi Qiang; So, Ping Lam

    2015-09-01

    An optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) coated with polyvinyl alcohol/poly-acrylic acid (PVA/PAA) hydrogel film for toxic gases measurement has been developed. Splicing a short section of hollow core fiber between two single mode fibers forms the FPI. Dip-coated pH-sensitive PVA/PAA hydrogel film on the fiber end performs as a receptor for binding of volatile acids or ammonia, which makes the sensing film swelling or shrinking and results in the dip wavelength shift of the FPI. By demodulating the evolution of reflection spectrum for various concentrations of volatile acids, a sensitivity of 20.8 nm/ppm is achieved with uniform linearity.

  13. Fiber optic monitoring device

    Samborsky, James K.

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  14. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D. J. Osborn; Po Zhang

    2006-09-30

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Our approach towards immobilizing the potassium salt of the molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the far end of an optical fiber is to embed the cluster in a thermally cured sol-gel matrix particle. Due to the improved mechanical properties of this approach high temperature sensor measurements were performed up to 100 C. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  15. Fiber optic calorimetry

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using optical fibers for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processing to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microrad to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 rad of phase shift per mW of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% 240Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium

  16. Fiber Optic Calorimetry

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using optical fibers for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processes to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microradian (microrad) to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 radians (rad) of phase shift per milliwatt of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% 240Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium

  17. Fiber Optic Calorimetry

    Rudy, C.; Bayliss, S.; Bracken, D.; Bush, J.; Davis, P.

    1997-12-12

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using optical fibers for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processes to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microradian ({micro}rad) to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 radians (rad) of phase shift per milliwatt of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% {sup 240}Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium.

  18. Fiber optic calorimetry

    Rudy, C.R.; Bayliss, S.C.; Bracken, D.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Bush, I.J.; Davis, P.G. [Optiphase, Inc., Van Nuys, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using optical fibers for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processing to allow phase shifts as small as 1 {micro}rad to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 rad of phase shift per mW of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% {sup 240}Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium.

  19. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2006-01-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Previously we described a particle-in-binder approach to immobilizing the potassium salt of a molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the tips of optical fibers. Compared to previous methods, the particle-in-binder approach affords fibers with greatly improved mechanical properties. We have extensively characterized two fiber sensors at high temperature. We obtain quenching ratios between pure nitrogen and 21% oxygen as high as 3.9 x at 70 C. For the first sensor at 60 C we obtained a {+-} 1% variation in the quenching ratio over 6 cycles of measurement, and monitored the device performance over 23 days. We were able to operate the second sensor continuously for 14 hours at 70 C, and the sensor quenching ratio was stable to 5% over that time period. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  20. Application of Thin ZnO ALD Layers in Fiber-Optic Fabry-Pérot Sensing Interferometers

    Daria Majchrowicz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigated the response of a fiber-optic Fabry-Pérot sensing interferometer with thin ZnO layers deposited on the end faces of the optical fibers forming the cavity. Standard telecommunication single-mode optical fiber (SMF-28 segments were used with the thin ZnO layers deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD. Measurements were performed with the interferometer illuminated by two broadband sources operating at 1300 nm and 1550 nm. Reflected interference signal was acquired by an optical spectrum analyzer while the length of the air cavity was varied. Thickness of the ZnO layers used in the experiments was 50 nm, 100 nm, and 200 nm. Uncoated SMF-28 fiber was also used as a reference. Based on the results of measurements, the thickness of the ZnO layers and the length of the cavity were selected in order to achieve good visibility. Following, the interferometer was used to determine the refractive index of selected liquids.

  1. Application of Thin ZnO ALD Layers in Fiber-Optic Fabry-Pérot Sensing Interferometers.

    Majchrowicz, Daria; Hirsch, Marzena; Wierzba, Paweł; Bechelany, Michael; Viter, Roman; Jędrzejewska-Szczerska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigated the response of a fiber-optic Fabry-Pérot sensing interferometer with thin ZnO layers deposited on the end faces of the optical fibers forming the cavity. Standard telecommunication single-mode optical fiber (SMF-28) segments were used with the thin ZnO layers deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Measurements were performed with the interferometer illuminated by two broadband sources operating at 1300 nm and 1550 nm. Reflected interference signal was acquired by an optical spectrum analyzer while the length of the air cavity was varied. Thickness of the ZnO layers used in the experiments was 50 nm, 100 nm, and 200 nm. Uncoated SMF-28 fiber was also used as a reference. Based on the results of measurements, the thickness of the ZnO layers and the length of the cavity were selected in order to achieve good visibility. Following, the interferometer was used to determine the refractive index of selected liquids. PMID:27011188

  2. Advantage of multi-mode sapphire optical fiber for evanescent-field SERS sensing

    Chen, H.; Tian, F.; Chi, J.; Kaňka, Jiří; Du, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 20 (2014), 5822-5825. ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11038 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Fiber optics sensors * Backscattering * Nanomaterials Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.292, year: 2014

  3. Advances in Using Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing to Identify the Mixing of Waters

    Briggs, M. A.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Rosenberry, D. O.; Harvey, J. W.; Lane, J. W., Jr.; Hare, D. K.; Boutt, D. F.; Voytek, E. B.; Buckley, S.

    2014-12-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) provides thermal data through space and time along linear cables. When installed along a streambed, FO-DTS can capture the influence of upwelling groundwater (GW) as thermal anomalies. The planning of labor-intensive physical measurements can make use of FO-DTS data to target areas of focused GW discharge that can disproportionately affect surface-water (SW) quality and temperature. Typical longitudinal FO-DTS spatial resolution ranges 0.25 to1.0 m, and cannot resolve small-scale water-column mixing or sub-surface diurnal fluctuations. However, configurations where the cable is wrapped around rods can improve the effective vertical resolution to sub-centimeter scales, and the pipes can be actively heated to induce a thermal tracer. Longitudinal streambed and high-resolution vertical arrays were deployed at the upper Delaware River (PA, USA) and the Quashnet River (MA, USA) for aquatic habitat studies. The resultant datasets exemplify the varied uses of FO-DTS. Cold anomalies found along the Delaware River steambed coincide with zones of known mussel populations, and high-resolution vertical array data showed relatively stable in-channel thermal refugia. Cold anomalies at the Quashnet River identified in 2013 were found to persist in 2014, and seepage measurements and water samples at these locations showed high GW flux with distinctive chemistry. Cable location is paramount to seepage identification, particularly in faster flowing deep streams such as the Quashnet and Delaware Rivers where steambed FO-DTS identified many seepage zones with no surface expression. The temporal characterization of seepage dynamics are unique to FO-DTS. However, data from Tidmarsh Farms, a cranberry bog restoration site in MA, USA indicate that in slower flowing shallow steams GW inflow affects surface temperature; therefore infrared imaging can provide seepage location information similar to FO-DTS with substantially less effort.

  4. Coaxial fiber-optic chemical-sensing excitation-emission matrix fluorometer.

    Kim, Yoon-Chang; Jordan, James A; Chávez, Diana; Booksh, Karl S

    2011-02-01

    Great reductions in the overall size and complexity of high throughput multichannel UV-visible fluorometers were achieved by coupling a compact optical fiber array to compact dispersive transmission optics. The coaxial configuration centers on the insertion of a silica/silica optical fiber into the hollow region of a UV-fused silica capillary waveguide. The outer core delivers the maximum power of the narrow wavelength region of the excitation spectrum created by coupling a xenon arc discharge lamp to a compact spectrometer. The molecular fluorescence resulting from the interaction of light emitted at the distal end of the hollow waveguide and the sample matrix is received and transmitted to a CCD via a compact dispersive grating-prism (grism) optical assembly. A linear array of the coaxial optical fibers permits a full excitation-emission matrix spectrum of the analyte matrix to be projected onto the face of the CCD. The in situ identification and monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was carried out for the initial application testing for this prototype. PMID:21283188

  5. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2006-05-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Previously we described a particle-in-binder approach to immobilizing the potassium salt of the molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the tips of optical fibers. Compared to previous methods, the particle-in-binder approach affords fibers with greatly improved mechanical properties. The response of the sensor to oxygen at 40, 70 and 100 C was measured in 2-21% gas phase oxygen. The normalized sensor signal is linear with molar oxygen concentration and fits the theoretical Stern-Volmer relationship. Although the sensitivity decreases with temperature, at 100 C the sensitivity is 160 [O{sub 2}]{sup -1}. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  6. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-10-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Previously we immobilized the potassium salt of a molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}M{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, in a sol-gel matrix and showed that the luminescence is stable after 54 hours at 200 C, but the quenching ratios were low and the films delaminated after thermal cycling due to densification of the matrix. Three new approaches to solve decreased quenching over time and delamination of films off fiber tips were investigated. In the first approach K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14} embedded in cured sol-gel particles were incorporated into a TEOS based sol-gel. These gave enhanced quenching (6x), but delaminated. Our second approach was to use a commercial cyanoacrylate glue to immobilize the particles onto the tip of an optical fiber. This gave better adhesion and good quenching initially, but eventually the glue degraded upon heating. Our third approach was to use a 55% OtMOS/ TEOS sol-gel binder. Films based on this new sol-gel binder show high quenching ({approx}6x) and superior mechanical stability even after thermal cycling. Sensor measurements on an optical fiber containing K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14} embedded in cured sol-gel particles were obtained from 100 to 25 C. The signal intensity in nitrogen was stable at 2.8 {+-} 0.2 nW, and the quenching ratio (ratio of signal in N{sub 2} vs. 21 % O{sub 2}) varied from 4.4 to 6.9X. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  7. Optical Fiber Chemical Sensor with Sol-Gel Derived Refractive Material as Transducer for High Temperature Gas Sensing in Clean Coal Technology

    Shiquan Tao

    2006-12-31

    The chemistry of sol-gel derived silica and refractive metal oxide has been systematically studied. Sol-gel processes have been developed for preparing porous silica and semiconductor metal oxide materials. Micelle/reversed micelle techniques have been developed for preparing nanometer sized semiconductor metal oxides and noble metal particles. Techniques for doping metal ions, metal oxides and nanosized metal particles into porous sol-gel material have also been developed. Optical properties of sol-gel derived materials in ambient and high temperature gases have been studied by using fiber optic spectroscopic techniques, such as fiber optic ultraviolet/visible absorption spectrometry, fiber optic near infrared absorption spectrometry and fiber optic fluorescence spectrometry. Fiber optic spectrometric techniques have been developed for investigating the optical properties of these sol-gel derived materials prepared as porous optical fibers or as coatings on the surface of silica optical fibers. Optical and electron microscopic techniques have been used to observe the microstructure, such as pore size, pore shape, sensing agent distribution, of sol-gel derived material, as well as the size and morphology of nanometer metal particle doped in sol-gel derived porous silica, the nature of coating of sol-gel derived materials on silica optical fiber surface. In addition, the chemical reactions of metal ion, nanostructured semiconductor metal oxides and nanometer sized metal particles with gas components at room temperature and high temperatures have also been investigated with fiber optic spectrometric methods. Three classes of fiber optic sensors have been developed based on the thorough investigation of sol-gel chemistry and sol-gel derived materials. The first group of fiber optic sensors uses porous silica optical fibers doped with metal ions or metal oxide as transducers for sensing trace NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S in high temperature gas samples. The second group of

  8. Application Specific Optical Fibers

    Pal, Bishnu P.

    2010-01-01

    In this chapter we have attempted to provide a unified summary description of the most important propagation characteristics of an optical fiber followed by discussion on several variety of special fibers for realizing fiber amplifiers, dispersion compensating fibers, microstructured optical fibers, and so on. Even though huge progress has been made on development of optical fibers for telecom application, a need for developing special fibers, not necessarily for telecom alone, has arisen. Th...

  9. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-04-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. One of the critical materials issues is to demonstrate that the luminescent cluster immobilized in the sol-gel porous support can withstand high temperature. At the same time the sol-gel matrix must have a high permeability to oxygen. Using a potassium salt of the molybdenum clusters, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, we have established the conditions necessary for deposition of optical quality sol-gel films. From spectroscopic measurements of the film we have shown that the cluster luminescence is stable following heat cycling of 54 hours at 200 C. Quenching of a factor of 1.5X between pure nitrogen and 21% oxygen was observed from in-situ measurements of films heated directly at 200 C. An automated system for characterizing fiber optic oxygen sensors up to 220 C with a temporal resolution better than 10 s is under construction. We estimate a signal of 6 x 10{sup 8} photons/s after complete quenching in 21% oxygen. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  10. Fiber optic calorimetry

    Rudy, C.; Bayliss, S.; Bracken, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Bush, J.; Davis, P. [Optiphase, Inc., Van Nuys, CA (United States)

    1998-01-01

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using fiber for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processing to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microradian ({mu}rad) to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 radians (rad) of phase shift per milliwatt of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% {sup 240}Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium.

  11. Fiber optic calorimetry

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using fiber for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processing to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microradian (μrad) to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 radians (rad) of phase shift per milliwatt of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% 240Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium

  12. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  13. Fiber optic connector

    Rajic, Slobodan; Muhs, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled.

  14. Behavior of Random Hole Optical Fibers under Gamma Ray Irradiation and Its Potential Use in Radiation Sensing Applications

    Anbo Wang

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Effects of radiation on sensing and data transmission components are of greatinterest in many applications including homeland security, nuclear power generation, andmilitary. A new type of microstructured optical fiber (MOF called the random hole opticalfiber (RHOF has been recently developed. The RHOFs can be made in many differentforms by varying the core size and the size and extent of porosity in the cladding region.The fibers used in this study possessed an outer diameter of 110 μm and a core ofapproximately 20 μm. The fiber structure contains thousands of air holes surrounding thecore with sizes ranging from less than 100 nm to a few μm. We present the first study ofthe behavior of RHOF under gamma irradiation. We also propose, for the first time to ourknowledge, an ionizing radiation sensor system based on scintillation light from ascintillator phosphor embedded within a holey optical fiber structure. The RHOF radiationresponse was compared to normal single mode and multimode commercial fibers(germanium doped core, pure silica cladding and to those of radiation resistant fibers (puresilica core with fluorine doped cladding fibers. The comparison was done by measuringradiation-induced absorption (RIA in all fiber samples at the 1550 nm wavelength window(1545 ± 25 nm. The study was carried out under a high-intensity gamma ray field from a 60Co source (with an exposure rate of 4x104 rad/hr at an Oak Ridge National Laboratory gamma ray irradiation facility. Linear behavior, at dose values less than 106 rad, was observed in all fiber samples except in the pure silica core fluorine doped cladding fiber which showed RIA saturation at 0.01 dB. RHOF samples demonstrated low RIA (0.02 and 0.005 dB compared to standard germanium doped core pure silica cladding (SMF and MMF fibers. Results also showed the possibility of post-fabrication treatment to improve the radiation resistance of the RHOF fibers.

  15. Industrial Qualification Process for Optical Fibers Distributed Strain and Temperature Sensing in Nuclear Waste Repositories

    Delepine-Lesoille, S; X. Phéron; Bertrand, J; Pilorget, G.; G. Hermand; Farhoud, R.; Ouerdane, Y.; Boukenter, A; Girard, S.; L. Lablonde; D. Sporea; LANTICQ, V

    2012-01-01

    Temperature and strain monitoring will be implemented in the envisioned French geological repository for high- and intermediate-level long-lived nuclear wastes. Raman and Brillouin scatterings in optical fibers are efficient industrial methods to provide distributed temperature and strain measurements. Gamma radiation and hydrogen release from nuclear wastes can however affect the measurements. An industrial qualification process is successfully proposed and implemented. Induced measurement u...

  16. A Sensing Element Based on a Bent and Elongated Grooved Polymer Optical Fiber

    Wen-Fu Xie; Yung-Chuan Chen; Li-Wen Chen; Wei-Hua Lu

    2012-01-01

    An experimental and numerical investigation is performed into the power loss induced in grooved polymer optical fibers (POFs) subjected to combined bending and elongation deformations. The power loss is examined as a function of both the groove depth and the bend radius. An elastic-plastic three-dimensional finite element model is constructed to simulate the deformation in the grooved region of the deformed specimens. The results indicate that the power loss increases significantly with an in...

  17. Measuring the viscosity of whole bovine lens using a fiber optic oxygen sensing system

    Thao, Mai T.; Perez, Daniel; Dillon, James; Gaillard, Elizabeth R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To obtain a better understanding of oxygen and nutrient transport within the lens, the viscosity of whole lenses was investigated using a fiber optic oxygen sensor (optode). The diffusion coefficient of oxygen was calculated using the Stokes-Einstein equation at the slip boundary condition. Methods The optode was used to measure the oxygen decay signal in samples consisting of different glycerol/water solutions with known viscosities. The oxygen decay signal was fitted to a double exp...

  18. Review on Optical Fiber Sensing Technologies for Industrical Applications at the NEL-FOST

    Yang, Minghong; Li, Sheng; Jiang, Desheng

    2014-01-01

    International audience The research on engineering experiment is a key step in translating technical development to industrial application. According to our practical experience for more than 30 years and some applications of the fire alarm system, bridge, coal and power safety ensuring system, this paper reviews on engineering technique problems in the application of fiber optic sensor and their solutions, which may provide some references for wider industrial applications.

  19. Current sensing in magnetic fusion experiments by Faraday rotation in single-mode optical fibers

    We find that sensors exploiting the Faraday effect in single-mode optical fibers are practical means of measuring large currents in the MFE environment. Work still needs to be done to overcome the effects of linear birefringence. We have seen distortion caused by dynamic stress-induced birefringence and shown the importance of physically eliminating it because of the difficulty of treating it analytically

  20. Research on corrosion detection for steel reinforced concrete structures using the fiber optical white light interferometer sensing technique

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Cui, Yanjun; Wei, Heming; Kong, Xianglong; Zhang, Pinglei; Sun, Changsen

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of steel rebar corrosion monitoring technique for steel reinforced concrete structures is proposed, designed, and tested. The technique is based on the fiber optical white light interferometer (WLI) sensing technique. Firstly, a feasibility test was carried out using an equal-strength beam for comparison of strain sensing ability between the WLI and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The comparison results showed that the sensitivity of the WLI is sufficient for corrosion expansion strain monitoring. Then, two WLI corrosion sensors (WLI-CSs) were designed, fabricated, and embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion. Their performance was studied in an accelerated electrochemical corrosion test. Experimental results show that expansion strain along the fiber optical coil winding area can be detected and measured accurately by the proposed sensor. The advantages of the proposed monitoring technique allow for quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring to be executed in real time for reinforced concrete structures and with low cost.

  1. Research on corrosion detection for steel reinforced concrete structures using the fiber optical white light interferometer sensing technique

    In this paper, a novel kind of steel rebar corrosion monitoring technique for steel reinforced concrete structures is proposed, designed, and tested. The technique is based on the fiber optical white light interferometer (WLI) sensing technique. Firstly, a feasibility test was carried out using an equal-strength beam for comparison of strain sensing ability between the WLI and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The comparison results showed that the sensitivity of the WLI is sufficient for corrosion expansion strain monitoring. Then, two WLI corrosion sensors (WLI-CSs) were designed, fabricated, and embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion. Their performance was studied in an accelerated electrochemical corrosion test. Experimental results show that expansion strain along the fiber optical coil winding area can be detected and measured accurately by the proposed sensor. The advantages of the proposed monitoring technique allow for quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring to be executed in real time for reinforced concrete structures and with low cost. (paper)

  2. Small-diameter optical fiber and high-speed wavelength interrogator for FBG/PZT hybrid sensing system

    Komatsuzaki, Shinji; Kojima, Seiji; Hongo, Akihito; Takeda, Nobuo; Sakurai, Takeo

    2007-04-01

    We have been developing a sensing system for checking the health of aircraft structures made of composite materials. In this system, lead zirconium titanate (PZT) actuators generate elastic waves that travel through the composite material and are received by embedded fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. By analyzing the change in received waveforms, we can detect various kinds of damage. The frequency of the elastic waves is several hundred kHz, which is too high for a conventional optical spectrum analyzer to detect the wavelength change. Moreover, a conventional single-mode optical fiber cannot be used for an embedded FBG sensor because it is so thick that it induces defects in the composite material structure when it is embedded. We are thus developing a wavelength interrogator with an arrayed waveguide grating (AWG) that can detect the high-speed wavelength change and a small-diameter optical fiber (cladding diameter of 40µm) that does not induce defects. We use an AWG to convert the wavelength change into an output power change by using the wavelength dependency of the AWG transmittance. For this conversion, we previously used two adjacent output ports that cover the reflection spectrum of an FBG sensor. However, this requires controlling the temperature of the AWG because the ratio of the optical power change to the wavelength change is very sensitive to the relationship of the center wavelengths between an FBG sensor and the output ports of the AWG. We have now investigated the use of a denser AWG and six adjacent output ports, which covers the reflection spectrum of an FBG sensor, for detecting the elastic waves. Experimental results showed that this method can suppress the sensitivity of the power change ratio to the relationship of the center wavelengths between an FBG sensor and the output ports. Although our improved small-diameter optical fiber does not induce structural defects in the composite material when it is embedded, there is some micro or macro

  3. Remote optical sensing on the nanometer scale with a bowtie aperture nano-antenna on a SNOM fiber tip

    Atie, Elie M; Eter, Ali El; Salut, Roland; Nedeljkovic, Dusan; Tannous, Tony; Baida, Fadi I; Grosjean, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nano-antennas have proven the outstanding ability of sensing chemical and physical processes down to the nano-meter scale. Sensing is usually achieved within the highly confined optical fields generated resonantly by the nano-antennas, i.e. in contact to the nano-structures. In these paper, We demonstrate the sensing capability of nano-antennas to their larger scale environment, well beyond their plasmonic confinement volume, leading to the concept of 'remote' (non contact) sensing on the nano-meter scale. On the basis of a bowtie-aperture nano-antenna (BNA) integrated at the apex of a SNOM fiber tip, we introduce an ultra-compact, move-able and background-free optical nano-sensor for the remote sensing of a silicon surface (up to distance of 300 nm). Sensitivity of the BNA to its large scale environment is high enough to expect the monitoring and control of the spacing between the nano-antenna and a silicon surface with sub-nano-meter accuracy. This work paves the way towards a new class of nano-po...

  4. High-resolution temperature sensing in the Dead Sea using fiber optics

    Arnon, A.; Lensky, N. G.; Selker, J. S.

    2014-02-01

    The thermal stratification of the Dead Sea was observed in high spatial and temporal resolution by means of fiber-optics temperature sensing. The aim of the research was to employ the novel high-resolution profiler in studying the dynamics of the thermal structure of the Dead Sea and the related processes including the investigation of the metalimnion fluctuations. The 18 cm resolution profiling system was placed vertically through the water column supported by a buoy 450 m from shore, from 2 m above to 53 m below the water surface (just above the local seafloor), covering the entire seasonal upper layer (the metalimnion had an average depth of ˜20 m). Temperature profiles were recorded every 5 min. The May to July 2012 data set allowed quantitative investigation of the thermal morphology dynamics, including objective definitions of key locations within the metalimnion based on the temperature depth profile and its first and second depth derivatives. Analysis of the fluctuation of the defined metalimnion locations showed strong anticorrelation to measured sea level fluctuations. The slope of the sea level versus metalimnion depth was found to be related to the density ratio of the upper layer and the underlying main water body, according to the prediction of a two-layer model. The heat content of the entire water column was calculated by integrating the temperature profiles. The vertically integrated apparent heat content was seen to vary by 50% in a few hours. These fluctuations were not correlated to the atmospheric heat fluxes, nor to the momentum transfer, but were highly correlated to the metalimnion and the sea level fluctuations (r = 0.84). The instantaneous apparent heat flux was 3 orders of magnitude larger than that delivered by radiation, with no direct correlation to the frequency of radiation and wind in the lake. This suggests that the source of the momentary heat flux is lateral advection due to internal waves (with no direct relation to the diurnal

  5. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique.

    Battista, L; Sciuto, S A; Scorza, A

    2013-03-01

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 × 10(-4) m(3)∕s (18.0 l∕min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of ±3.00 × 10(-4) m(3)∕s (±18.0 l∕min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed theoretical model: for the mono

  6. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 × 10−4 m3/s (18.0 l/min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of ±3.00 × 10−4 m3/s (±18.0 l/min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed theoretical model: for the mono-directional configuration, the

  7. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique

    Battista, L.; Sciuto, S. A.; Scorza, A.

    2013-03-01

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 × 10-4 m3/s (18.0 l/min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of ±3.00 × 10-4 m3/s (±18.0 l/min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed theoretical model: for the mono-directional configuration, the

  8. Industrial Qualification Process for Optical Fibers Distributed Strain and Temperature Sensing in Nuclear Waste Repositories

    S. Delepine-Lesoille

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and strain monitoring will be implemented in the envisioned French geological repository for high- and intermediate-level long-lived nuclear wastes. Raman and Brillouin scatterings in optical fibers are efficient industrial methods to provide distributed temperature and strain measurements. Gamma radiation and hydrogen release from nuclear wastes can however affect the measurements. An industrial qualification process is successfully proposed and implemented. Induced measurement uncertainties and their physical origins are quantified. The optical fiber composition influence is assessed. Based on radiation-hard fibers and carbon-primary coatings, we showed that the proposed system can provide accurate temperature and strain measurements up to 0.5 MGy and 100% hydrogen concentration in the atmosphere, over 200 m distance range. The selected system was successfully implemented in the Andra underground laboratory, in one-to-one scale mockup of future cells, into concrete liners. We demonstrated the efficiency of simultaneous Raman and Brillouin scattering measurements to provide both strain and temperature distributed measurements. We showed that 1.3 μm working wavelength is in favor of hazardous environment monitoring.

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging-guided interstitial application of laser aided by fiber optic temperature sensing

    Farahani, Keyvan; Shellock, Frank G.; Lufkin, Robert B.; Castro, Dan J.

    1992-04-01

    In order to further understand signal variations observed on magnetic resonance imaging scans of interstitial laser heating, a commercial multichannel fluoroptic thermometer, equipped with fiber optic sensors, was employed in conjunction with the laser/MRI phototherapy system. Three calibrated fiber optic sensors of the thermometer were used to measure temperature changes in ex-vivo sheep's brain at various distances directly across from the beam of a Nd:YAG laser emitted from a bare fiber. Laser was operated at 5 W for 220 sec. Temperature was measured every 10 seconds and MR images were acquired during and after laser irradiation until temperature in all probes returned to the equilibrium level of prelaser irradiation. Image contrast analysis of the heated region showed that MRI signal variations, during heating and cooling periods, correlated well with the changes in temperature. It is concluded that direct thermometry of MRI-monitored laser application will aid in understanding the effects of high focal heating on the MRI signal.

  10. Interferometric Fiber Optic Sensors

    Hae Young Choi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  11. System and method for determination of the reflection wavelength of multiple low-reflectivity bragg gratings in a sensing optical fiber

    Moore, Jason P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A system and method for determining a reflection wavelength of multiple Bragg gratings in a sensing optical fiber comprise: (1) a source laser; (2) an optical detector configured to detect a reflected signal from the sensing optical fiber; (3) a plurality of frequency generators configured to generate a signal having a frequency corresponding to an interferometer frequency of a different one of the plurality of Bragg gratings; (4) a plurality of demodulation elements, each demodulation element configured to combine the signal produced by a different one of the plurality of frequency generators with the detected signal from the sensing optical fiber; (5) a plurality of peak detectors, each peak detector configured to detect a peak of the combined signal from a different one of the demodulation elements; and (6) a laser wavenumber detection element configured to determine a wavenumber of the laser when any of the peak detectors detects a peak.

  12. Optical Fiber Distributed Sensing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Strain Measurements Taken During Cryotank Y-Joint Test Article Load Cycling at Liquid Helium Temperatures

    Allison, Sidney G.; Prosser, William H.; Hare, David A.; Moore, Thomas C.; Kenner, Winfred S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines cryogenic Y-joint testing at Langley Research Center (LaRC) to validate the performance of optical fiber Bragg grating strain sensors for measuring strain at liquid helium temperature (-240 C). This testing also verified survivability of fiber sensors after experiencing 10 thermal cool-down, warm-up cycles and 400 limit load cycles. Graphite composite skins bonded to a honeycomb substrate in a sandwich configuration comprised the Y-joint specimens. To enable SHM of composite cryotanks for consideration to future spacecraft, a light-weight, durable monitoring technology is needed. The fiber optic distributed Bragg grating strain sensing system developed at LaRC is a viable substitute for conventional strain gauges which are not practical for SHM. This distributed sensing technology uses an Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR). This measurement approach has the advantage that it can measure hundreds of Bragg grating sensors per fiber and the sensors are all written at one frequency, greatly simplifying fiber manufacturing. Fiber optic strain measurements compared well to conventional strain gauge measurements obtained during these tests. These results demonstrated a high potential for a successful implementation of a SHM system incorporating LaRC's fiber optic sensing system on the composite cryotank and other future cryogenic applications.

  13. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-01-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. One of the critical materials issues is to demonstrate that the luminescent cluster immobilized in the sol-gel porous support can withstand high temperature. At the same time the sol-gel matrix must have a high permeability to oxygen. Using a potassium salt of the molybdenum clusters, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, we have established the conditions necessary for deposition of optical quality sol-gel films. From spectroscopic measurements of the film we have shown that the cluster luminescence is stable following heat cycling of 1 hour at 250 C. Quenching of a factor of 4X between pure nitrogen and 21% oxygen was observed for films cured directly at 200 C. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  14. Fiber Singular Optics

    A. V. Volyar

    2002-01-01

    The present review is devoted to the optical vortex behavior both in free space and optical fibers. The processes of the vortex transformations in perturbed optical fibers are analyzed on the base of the operator of the spin – orbit interaction in order to forecast the possible ways of manufacturing the vortex preserving fibers and their applications in supersensitive optical devices.

  15. Remote optical sensing on the nanometer scale with a bowtie aperture nano-antenna on a fiber tip of scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Plasmonic nano-antennas have proven the outstanding ability of sensing chemical and physical processes down to the nanometer scale. Sensing is usually achieved within the highly confined optical fields generated resonantly by the nano-antennas, i.e., in contact to the nanostructures. In this paper, we demonstrate the sensing capability of nano-antennas to their larger scale environment, well beyond their plasmonic confinement volume, leading to the concept of “remote” (non contact) sensing on the nanometer scale. On the basis of a bowtie-aperture nano-antenna (BNA) integrated at the apex of a SNOM (Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy) fiber tip, we introduce an ultra-compact, moveable, and background-free optical nanosensor for the remote sensing of a silicon surface (up to distance of 300 nm). Sensitivity of the BNA to its large scale environment is high enough to expect the monitoring and control of the spacing between the nano-antenna and a silicon surface with sub-nanometer accuracy. This work paves the way towards an alternative class of nanopositioning techniques, based on the monitoring of diffraction-free plasmon resonance, that are alternative to nanomechanical and diffraction-limited optical interference-based devices

  16. Remote optical sensing on the nanometer scale with a bowtie aperture nano-antenna on a fiber tip of scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Atie, Elie M.; Xie, Zhihua; El Eter, Ali; Salut, Roland; Baida, Fadi I.; Grosjean, Thierry, E-mail: thierry.grosjean@univ-fcomte.fr [Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR CNRS 6174, Université de Franche-Comté, Département d' Optique P.M. Duffieux, 15B avenue des Montboucons, 25030 Besançon cedex (France); Nedeljkovic, Dusan [Lovalite s.a.s., 7 rue Xavier Marmier, 25000 Besançon (France); Tannous, Tony [Department of Physics, University of Balamand, P.O. Box 100 Tripoli (Lebanon)

    2015-04-13

    Plasmonic nano-antennas have proven the outstanding ability of sensing chemical and physical processes down to the nanometer scale. Sensing is usually achieved within the highly confined optical fields generated resonantly by the nano-antennas, i.e., in contact to the nanostructures. In this paper, we demonstrate the sensing capability of nano-antennas to their larger scale environment, well beyond their plasmonic confinement volume, leading to the concept of “remote” (non contact) sensing on the nanometer scale. On the basis of a bowtie-aperture nano-antenna (BNA) integrated at the apex of a SNOM (Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy) fiber tip, we introduce an ultra-compact, moveable, and background-free optical nanosensor for the remote sensing of a silicon surface (up to distance of 300 nm). Sensitivity of the BNA to its large scale environment is high enough to expect the monitoring and control of the spacing between the nano-antenna and a silicon surface with sub-nanometer accuracy. This work paves the way towards an alternative class of nanopositioning techniques, based on the monitoring of diffraction-free plasmon resonance, that are alternative to nanomechanical and diffraction-limited optical interference-based devices.

  17. Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation

    Richards, William Lance; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing technology has emerged in recent years offering tremendous advantages over conventional aircraft instrumentation systems. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over their conventional counterparts are well established; they are lighter, smaller, and can provide enormous numbers of measurements at a fraction of the total sensor weight. After a brief overview of conventional and fiber-optic sensing technology, this paper presents an overview of the research that has been conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in recent years to advance this promising new technology. Research and development areas include system and algorithm development, sensor characterization and attachment, and real-time experimentally-derived parameter monitoring for ground- and flight-based applications. The vision of fiber optic smart structure technology is presented and its potential benefits to aerospace vehicles throughout the lifecycle, from preliminary design to final retirement, are presented.

  18. Microstructured optical fiber Bragg grating-based strain and temperature sensing in the concrete buffer of the Belgian supercontainer concept

    Geernaert, Thomas; Sulejmani, Sanne; Sonnenfeld, Camille; Luyckx, Geert; Chah, Karima; Areias, Lou; Mergo, Pawel; Urbanczyk, Waclaw; Van Marcke, Philippe; Coppens, Erik; Thienpont, Hugo; Berghmans, Francis

    2014-05-01

    We present the use of microstructured optical fiber Bragg grating-based sensors for strain and temperature monitoring inside the concrete buffer of the Belgian supercontainer concept, demonstrated in a half-scale test in 2013. This test incorporated several optical fiber sensors inside the concrete buffer for production and condition monitoring. The optical fiber sensors presented here consist of small carbon-reinforced composite plates in which highly birefringent Butterfly microstructured optical fibers, equipped with fiber Bragg gratings, were embedded. The double reflection spectrum of these MOFGBs allows to simultaneously monitor strain and temperature, as confirmed by comparison with data obtained from thermocouples and vibrating-wire sensors installed near the MOFBGs.

  19. Optical fiber-based devices and applications

    Perry Ping SHUM; Jonathan C. KNIGHT; Jesper LAEGSGAARD; Dora Juan Juan HU

    2010-01-01

    @@ Optical fiber technology has undergone tremendous growth and development over the last 40 years. Optical fibers constitute an information super highway and are vital in enabling the proliferating use of the Internet. Optical fiber is also an enabling technology which can find applications in sensing, imaging, biomedical, machining, etc. There have been a few milestones in the advancement of optical fiber technology. Firstly, the invention and development of the laser some 50 years ago made optical communications possible. Secondly, the fabrication of low-loss optical fibers has been a key element to the success of optical communication.

  20. Deformation monitoring of long GFRP bar soil nails using distributed optical fiber sensing technology

    Hong, Cheng-Yu; Yin, Jian-Hua; Zhang, Yi-Fan

    2016-08-01

    This paper introduces a new measurement technology characterized by the use of distributed optical fiber sensor (OFSs) for monitoring the strain and temperature distribution of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) bar soil nails. Laboratory tension tests were used to verify the performance of the OFSs for strain and elongation monitoring of GFRP bars. The measured strain data from the OFSs agree fairly well with the data from strain gauges in calibration tests. In field monitoring tests, two GFRP bar soil nails were installed with OFSs and pure strain data were used to evaluate the performance of GFRP bar soil nails after installation in a practical slope. Both the strain and temperature distributions measured by the OFSs show symmetric features. A Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) measurement unit was used to collect temperature and strain data from the OFSs. The monitoring data show that the accumulative elongations of the soil nails present a continuous but limited increase with time in the field. The achieved maximum elongations of soil nails were less than 0.4 mm. The measured axial elongations of the soil nails were also validated using corresponding data predicted by a theoretical model. The test results from the present study prove that BOTDA based sensors are useful for the investigation of the average strain distributions (or elongation) of long soil nails and these data are useful for the estimation of the potential sliding surface of the entire soil nailing system.

  1. Fiber optic chemical sensors

    Jung, Chuck C.; McCrae, David A.; Saaski, Elric W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides a broad overview of the field of fiber optic chemical sensors. Several different types of fiber optic sensors and probes are described, and references are cited for each category discussed.

  2. Crossed Optical Fiber Sensor Arrays for High-Spatial-Resolution Sensing: Application to Dissolved Oxygen Concentration Measurements

    M. Veronica Rigo; Peter Geissinger

    2012-01-01

    Optical fiber sensors using luminescent probes located along an optical fiber in the cladding of this fiber are of great interest for monitoring physical and chemical properties in their environment. The interrogation of a luminophore with a short laser pulse propagating through the fiber core allows for the measurement of the location of these luminophores. To increase the spatial resolution of such a measurements and to measure multiple analytes and properties in a confined space, a crossed...

  3. Fiber optic chemical sensors on Mars

    Butler, M.A.; Ricco, A.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grunthaner, F.J.; Lane, A.L. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States)

    1993-12-31

    A fiber optic chemical sensing instrument is described that will measure the reactivity of the martian soil and atmosphere. The self- contained instrument monitors reflectivity changes in reactive thin films caused by chemical reactions with the martian soil or atmosphere. Data from over 200 separate thin-film-coated optical fibers are recorded simultaneously. This fiber optic sensing technology has many advantages for planetary exploration and monitoring applications on manned spacecraft, in addition to many practical terrestrial uses.

  4. Specialty optical fibers: revisited

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2011-10-01

    The paper contains description of chosen aspects of analysis and design of tailored optical fibers. By specialty optical fibers we understand here the fibers which have complex construction and which serve for the functional processing of optical signal rather than long distance transmission. Thus, they are called also instrumentation optical fibers. The following issues are considered: transmission properties, transformation of optical signal, fiber characteristics, fiber susceptibility to external reactions. The technology of tailored optical fibers offers a wider choice of the design tools for the fiber itself, and then various devices made from these fiber, than classical technology of communication optical fibers. The consequence is different fiber properties, nonstandard dimensions and different metrological problems. The price to be paid for wider design possibilities are bigger optical losses of these fibers and weaker mechanical properties, and worse chemical stability. These fibers find their applications outside the field of telecommunications. The applications of instrumentation optical fibers combine other techniques apart from the photonics ones like: electronic, chemical and mechatronic.

  5. Multipoint Pressure and Temperature Sensing Fiber Optic Cable for Monitoring CO2 Sequestration

    Challener, William

    2014-12-31

    This report describes the work completed on contract DE-FE0010116. The goal of this two year project was to develop and demonstrate in the laboratory a highly accurate multi-point pressure measurement fiber optic cable based on MEMS pressure sensors suitable for downhole deployment in a CO2 sequestration well. The sensor interrogator was also to be demonstrated in a remote monitoring system and environmental testing was to be completed to indicate its downhole survivability over a lengthy period of time (e.g., 20 years). An interrogator system based on a pulsed laser excitation was shown to be capable of multiple (potentially 100+) simultaneous sensor measurements. Two sensors packages were completed and spliced in a cable onto the same fiber and measured. One sensor package was subsequently measured at high temperatures and pressures in supercritical CO2, while the other package was measured prior and after being subjected to high torque stresses to mimic downhole deployment. The environmental and stress tests indicated areas in which the package design should be further improved.

  6. Detection of plasma equilibrium shifts with fiber optic sensing of image currents

    The radial equilibrium position of Reverse Field Pinch experiments is determined by the j x B force on the plasma. The current density is that of the toroidal plasma current and the B field is the vertical magnetic field which is present in the plasma. This magnetic field is the result of several components. The main field, generated by the toroidal current windings, is corrected by adjustable trim windings to achieve a desired equilibrium position. There is an additional component to the field due to induced image currents in the close fitting conducting shell which encircles the plasma. These currents vary in time due to the finite L/R time of the conducting shell. It is the object of this paper to investigate the possibility of measuring these shell currents accurately using fiber optics so as to provide an analog signal to the equilibrium feedback circuit. 7 refs., 7 figs

  7. Monitoring of Thermal Protection Systems Using Robust Self-Organizing Optical Fiber Sensing Networks

    Richards, Lance

    2013-01-01

    The general aim of this work is to develop and demonstrate a prototype structural health monitoring system for thermal protection systems that incorporates piezoelectric acoustic emission (AE) sensors to detect the occurrence and location of damaging impacts, and an optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor network to evaluate the effect of detected damage on the thermal conductivity of the TPS material. Following detection of an impact, the TPS would be exposed to a heat source, possibly the sun, and the temperature distribution on the inner surface in the vicinity of the impact measured by the FBG network. A similar procedure could also be carried out as a screening test immediately prior to re-entry. The implications of any detected anomalies in the measured temperature distribution will be evaluated for their significance in relation to the performance of the TPS during re-entry. Such a robust TPS health monitoring system would ensure overall crew safety throughout the mission, especially during reentry

  8. Sapphire ball lensed fiber probe for common-path optical coherence tomography in ocular imaging and sensing

    Zhao, Mingtao; Huang, Yong; Kang, Jin U.

    2013-03-01

    We describe a novel common-path optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) fiber probe design using a sapphire ball lens for cross-sectional imaging and sensing in retina vitrectomy surgery. Single mode Gaussian beam (TEM00) simulation was used to optimize lateral resolution and working distance (WD) of the common-path probe. A theoretical sensitivity model for CP-OCT was prosed to assess its optimal performance based an unbalanced photodetector configuration. Two probe designs with working distances (WD) 415μm and 1221μm and lateral resolution 11μm and 18μm, respectively were implemented with sensitivity up to 88dB. The designs are also fully compatible with conventional Michelson interferometer based OCT configurations. The reference plane of the probe, located at the distal beam exit interface of the single mode fiber (SMF), was encased within a 25-gauge hypodermic needle by the sapphire ball lens facilitates its applications in bloody and harsh environments. The performances of the fiber probe with 11μm of lateral resolution and 19μm of axial resolution were demonstrated by cross-sectional imaging of a cow cornea and retina in vitro with a 1310nm swept source OCT system. This probe was also attached to a piezoelectric motor for active compensation of physiological tremor for handheld retinal surgical tools.

  9. Measuring centimeter-resolution air temperature profiles above land and water using fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Sigmund, Armin; Pfister, Lena; Olesch, Johannes; Thomas, Christoph K.

    2016-04-01

    The precise determination of near-surface air temperature profiles is of special importance for the characterization of airflows (e.g. cold air) and the quantification of sensible heat fluxes according to the flux-gradient similarity approach. In contrast to conventional multi-sensor techniques, measuring temperature profiles using fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) provides thousands of measurements referenced to a single calibration standard at much reduced costs. The aim of this work was to enhance the vertical resolution of Raman scatter DTS measurements up to the centimeter-scale using a novel approach for atmospheric applications: the optical fiber was helically coiled around a meshed fabric. In addition to testing the new fiber geometry, we quantified the measurement uncertainty and demonstrated the benefits of the enhanced-resolution profiles. The fiber-optic cable was coiled around a hollow column consisting of white reinforcing fabric supported by plexiglass rings every meter. Data from two columns of this type were collected for 47 days to measure air temperature vertically over 3.0 and 5.1 m over a gently inclined meadow and over and in a small lake, respectively. Both profiles had a vertical resolution of 1 cm in the lower section near the surface and 5 cm in the upper section with an along-fiber instrument-specific averaging of 1.0 m and a temporal resolution of 30 s. Measurement uncertainties, especially from conduction between reinforcing fabric and fiber-optic cable, were estimated by modeling the fiber temperature via a detailed energy balance approach. Air temperature, wind velocity and radiation components were needed as input data and measured separately. The temperature profiles revealed valuable details, especially in the lowest 1 m above surface. This was best demonstrated for nighttime observations when artefacts due to solar heating did not occur. For example, the dynamics of a cold air layer was detected in a clear night

  10. Highly distributed multi-point, temperature and pressure compensated, fiber optic oxygen sensors (FOxSense) for aircraft fuel tank environment and safety monitoring

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Sunjian; Esterkin, Yan

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes recent progress towards the development and qualification of a highly distributed, multi-point, all optical pressure and temperature compensated, fiber optic oxygen sensor (FOxSense™) system for closed-loop monitoring and safety of the oxygen ullage environment inside fuel tanks of military and commercial aircraft. The alloptical FOxSense™ system uses a passive, multi-parameter (O2/T&P) fiber optic sensor probe with no electrical connections leading to the sensors install within the fuel tanks of an aircraft. The all optical sensor consists of an integrated multi-parameter fiber optic sensor probe that integrates a fuel insensitive fluorescence based optical oxygen optrode with built-in temperature and pressure optical optrodes for compensation of temperature and pressure variants induced in the fluorescence response of the oxygen optrode. The distributed (O2/T&P) fiber optic sensors installed in the fuel tanks of the aircraft are connected to the FOxSense optoelectronic system via a fiber optic cable conduit reaching to each fuel tank in the aircraft. A multichannel frequency-domain fiber optic sensor read-out (FOxSense™) system is used to interrogate the optical signal of all three sensors in real-time and to display the fuel tank oxygen environment suitable for aircraft status and alarm applications. Preliminary testing of the all optical fiber optic oxygen sensor have demonstrated the ability to monitor the oxygen environment inside a simulated fuel tank in the range of 0% O2 to 40% O2 concentrations, temperatures from (-) 40°C to (+) 60°C, and altitudes from 0-ft to 40,000-ft.

  11. Statistical mapping of zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    Mwakanyamale, Kisa; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Slater, Lee D.

    2013-10-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) increasingly is used to map zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange (GWSWE). Previous studies of GWSWE using FO-DTS involved identification of zones of focused GWSWE based on arbitrary cutoffs of FO-DTS time-series statistics (e.g., variance, cross-correlation between temperature and stage, or spectral power). New approaches are needed to extract more quantitative information from large, complex FO-DTS data sets while concurrently providing an assessment of uncertainty associated with mapping zones of focused GSWSE. Toward this end, we present a strategy combining discriminant analysis (DA) and spectral analysis (SA). We demonstrate the approach using field experimental data from a reach of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 Area site. Results of the combined SA/DA approach are shown to be superior to previous results from qualitative interpretation of FO-DTS spectra alone.

  12. Statistical mapping of zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    Mwakanyamale, Kisa; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Slater, Lee D.

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) increasingly is used to map zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange (GWSWE). Previous studies of GWSWE using FO-DTS involved identification of zones of focused GWSWE based on arbitrary cutoffs of FO-DTS time-series statistics (e.g., variance, cross-correlation between temperature and stage, or spectral power). New approaches are needed to extract more quantitative information from large, complex FO-DTS data sets while concurrently providing an assessment of uncertainty associated with mapping zones of focused GSWSE. Toward this end, we present a strategy combining discriminant analysis (DA) and spectral analysis (SA). We demonstrate the approach using field experimental data from a reach of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 Area site. Results of the combined SA/DA approach are shown to be superior to previous results from qualitative interpretation of FO-DTS spectra alone.

  13. Fiber optics engineering

    Azadeh, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Covering fiber optics from an engineering perspective, this text emphasizes data conversion between electrical and optical domains. Techniques to improve the fidelity of this conversion (from electrical to optical domain, and vice versa) are also covered.

  14. The Fiber Optic Connection.

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the fiber optics programs at the Career and Technical Center in Berlin, Pennsylvania and the Charles S. Monroe Technology Center in Loudoun County, Virginia. Discusses the involvement of the Fiber Optic Association with education, research and development, manufacturing, sales, distribution, installation, and maintenance of fiber optic…

  15. Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory deploys rugged, cutting-edge electro-optical instrumentation for the collection of various event signatures, with expertise in...

  16. An Efficient Wavelength variation approach for Bend Sensing in Single mode-Multimode-Single mode Optical Fiber Sensors

    Abdul Samee Khan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Several aspects of the SMS edge filters have been investigated, including the effect of bending the SMS fiber cores due to fabrication tolerances, polarization dependence, and temperature dependence. These aspects can impair the performance of a wavelength measurement system. There are several approaches which have been proposed and demonstrated to achieve high resolution and accuracy of wavelength measurement. Bending effects due to the splicing process on the spectral characteristics of SMS fibre structure-based edge filters are investigated experimentally with the help of MATLAB. A limit for the tolerable of the cores of an SMS fibre structure-based edge filter is proposed, beyond which the edge filter’s spectral performance degrades unacceptably. We use Wavelength variation approach by which we reduce the power loss due to the bending in the optical fiber. Due to the power loss the power transmission is increases and efficiency reduces. So by wavelength variation approach we developed an efficient spectrometer capable of performing a wide variety of coherent multidimensional measurements at optical wavelengths. In this approach we fixed the power and perform variation in the wavelength to sense the bending accurately. The two major components of the largely automated device are a spatial beam shaper which controls the beam geometry and a spatiotemporal pulse shaper which controls the temporal waveform of the femtosecond pulse in each beam. By which we sense the distortion to reduce the power transmission. We apply our algorithm for performing several comparison considerations which shows the performance of our algorithm which is better in comparison to the previous work.

  17. Improving Photovoltaic Energy Production with Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Hausner, M. B.; Berli, M.

    2014-12-01

    The efficiency of solar photovoltaic (PV) generators declines sharply with increased temperatures. Peak solar exposure often occurs at the same time as peak temperatures, but solar PV installations are typically designed based on solar angle. In temperate areas, the peak temperatures may not be high enough to induce significant efficiency losses. In some of the areas with the greatest potential for solar development, however, summer air temperatures regularly reach 45 °C and PV panel temperatures exceed the air temperatures. Here we present a preliminary model of a PV array intended to optimize solar production in a hot and arid environment. The model begins with the diurnal and seasonal cycles in the angle and elevation of the sun, but also includes a meteorology-driven energy balance to project the temperatures of the PV panels and supporting structure. The model will be calibrated and parameterized using a solar array at the Desert Research Institute's (DRI) Renewable Energy Deployment and Display (REDD) facility in Reno, Nevada, and validated with a similar array at DRI's Las Vegas campus. Optical fibers will be installed on the PV panels and structural supports and interrogated by a distributed temperature sensor (DTS) to record the spatial and temporal variations in temperature. Combining the simulated panel temperatures, the efficiency-temperature relationship for the panels, and the known solar cycles at a site will allow us to optimize the design of future PV collectors (i.e., the aspect and angle of panels) for given production goals.

  18. Polymer optical fibers integrated directly into 3D orthogonal woven composites for sensing

    This study demonstrates that standard polymer optical fibers (POF) can be directly integrated into composites from 3D orthogonal woven preforms during the weaving process and then serve as in-situ sensors to detect damage due to bending or impact loads. Different composite samples with embedded POF were fabricated of 3D orthogonal woven composites with different parameters namely number of y-/x-layers and x-yarn density. The signal of POF was not affected significantly by the preform structure. During application of resin using VARTM technique, significant drop in backscattering level was observed due to pressure caused by vacuum on the embedded POF. Measurements of POF signal while in the final composites after resin cure indicated that the backscattering level almost returned to the original level of un-embedded POF. The POF responded to application of bending and impact loads to the composite with a reduction in the backscattering level. The backscattering level almost returned back to its original level after removing the bending load until damage was present in the composite. Similar behavior occurred due to impact events. As the POF itself is used as the sensor and can be integrated throughout the composite, large sections of future 3D woven composite structures could be monitored without the need for specialized sensors or complex instrumentation. (paper)

  19. Monitoring of Thermal Protection Systems and MMOD using Robust Self-Organizing Optical Fiber Sensing Networks

    Richards, Lance

    2014-01-01

    The general aim of this work is to develop and demonstrate a prototype structural health monitoring system for thermal protection systems that incorporates piezoelectric acoustic emission (AE) sensors to detect the occurrence and location of damaging impacts, such as those from Micrometeoroid Orbital Debris (MMOD). The approach uses an optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor network to evaluate the effect of detected damage on the thermal conductivity of the TPS material. Following detection of an impact, the TPS would be exposed to a heat source, possibly the sun, and the temperature distribution on the inner surface in the vicinity of the impact measured by the FBG network. A similar procedure could also be carried out as a screening test immediately prior to re-entry. The implications of any detected anomalies in the measured temperature distribution will be evaluated for their significance in relation to the performance of the TPS during reentry. Such a robust TPS health monitoring system would ensure overall crew safety throughout the mission, especially during reentry.

  20. Optical Fiber Fusion Splicing

    Yablon, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date treatment of optical fiber fusion splicing incorporating all the recent innovations in the field. It provides a toolbox of general strategies and specific techniques that the reader can apply when optimizing fusion splices between novel fibers. It specifically addresses considerations important for fusion splicing of contemporary specialty fibers including dispersion compensating fiber, erbium-doped gain fiber, polarization maintaining fiber, and microstructured fiber. Finally, it discusses the future of optical fiber fusion splicing including silica and non-silica based optical fibers as well as the trend toward increasing automation. Whilst serving as a self-contained reference work, abundant citations from the technical literature will enable readers to readily locate primary sources.

  1. Rayleigh fiber optics gyroscope

    Kung, A.; Budin, J.; Thévenaz, Luc; Robert, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    A novel kind of fiber-optic gyroscope based on Rayleigh backscattering in a fiber-ring resonator is presented in this letter. Information on the rotation rate is obtained from the composed response of the fiber ring to an optical time-domain reflectometry (OTDR) instrument. The developed model based on the coherence properties of the Rayleigh scattering yields a polarization-insensitive and low-cost gyroscope

  2. Fiber optic laser rod

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  3. Fiber optics in SHIVA

    SHIVA is a twenty arm laser which is controlled with a network of fifty computers, interconnected with digital fiber optic links. Three different fiber optic systems employed on the Shiva laser will be described. Two of the systems are for digital communications, one at 9600 baud and the other at 1 megabaud. The third system uses fiber optics to distribute diagnostic triggers with subnanosecond jitter

  4. Optical fiber technology 2012

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.; Wójcik, Waldemar

    2013-01-01

    The Conference on Optical Fibers and Their Applications, Nał˛eczów 2012, in its 14th edition, which has been organized since more than 35 years, has summarized the achievements of the local optical fiber technology community, for the last year and a half. The conference specializes in developments of optical fiber technology, glass and polymer, classical and microstructured, passive and active. The event gathered around 100 participants. There were shown 60 presentations ...

  5. Hydrogen Optical Fiber Sensors

    Lieberman, Robert A.; Beshay, Manal; Cordero, Steven R.

    2008-07-28

    Optically-based hydrogen sensors promise to deliver an added level of safety as hydrogen and fuel cell technologies enter the mainstream. More importantly, they offer reduced power consumption and lower cost, which are desirable for mass production applications such as automobiles and consumer appliances. This program addressed two of the major challenges previously identified in porous optrode-based optical hydrogen sensors: sensitivity to moisture (ambient humidity), and interference from the oxygen in air. Polymer coatings to inhibit moisture and oxygen were developed in conjunction with newer and novel hydrogen sensing chemistries. The results showed that it is possible to achieve sensitive hydrogen detection and rapid response with minimal interference from oxygen and humidity. As a result of this work, a new and more exciting avenue of investigation was developed: the elimination of the porous optrode and deposition of the sensor chemistry directly into the polymer film. Initial results have been promising, and open up a wider range of potential applications from extended optical fiber sensing networks, to simple plastic "stickers" for use around the home and office.

  6. Remote optical sensing on the nanometer scale with a bowtie aperture nano-antenna on a SNOM fiber tip

    Atie, Elie M.; Xie, Zhihua; Eter, Ali El; Salut, Roland; Nedeljkovic, Dusan; Tannous, Tony; Baida, Fadi I.; GROSJEAN, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nano-antennas have proven the outstanding ability of sensing chemical and physical processes down to the nano-meter scale. Sensing is usually achieved within the highly confined optical fields generated resonantly by the nano-antennas, i.e. in contact to the nano-structures. In these paper, We demonstrate the sensing capability of nano-antennas to their larger scale environment, well beyond their plasmonic confinement volume, leading to the concept of 'remote' (non contact) sensing ...

  7. Sensing Study of An Optical Fiber Strain Gauge%光纤应变片的传感研究

    李川; 张以谟; 李欣; 刘铁根; 陈希明

    2001-01-01

    This paper brings out an optic fiber s train sensor based on an optic fiber strain gauge.Monitoring the bending loss of optic fiber bonded on the optic fiber strain gauge,the strain and the deformation can be obtained.The measuring results for the micro-displacement an d the strain indicate that the optic fiber strain gauge of fers a monitoring method both strain and distortion.And the strain response of the optic fiber strain gauge is more sensitive than the one of resistance strain gauge.%本文设计了基于光纤应变片的光纤应变传感器,方法基于测量粘贴于其上的光纤弯曲损耗来获取应变量和形变量。通过微位移架上的位移测量实验与悬臂梁上的应变测量实验,结果表明该光纤应变片提供了同时适合于应变与形变的检测方式。值得一提的是,该光纤应变片的应变响应灵敏度优于电阻应变片的应变响应。

  8. Fiber-optic pH sensing system with microscopic spatial resolution

    Podrazký, Ondřej; Mrázek, Jan; Vytykáčová, Soňa; Proboštová, Jana; Kašík, Ivan

    Bellingham: SPIE, 2015, s. 9506121-9506126. ISBN 9781628416275. ISSN 0277-786X. [Conference on Optical Sensor s. Prague (CZ), 13.04.2015-16.04.2015] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA04011400 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Biological materials * Electromagnetic fields * Optical sensor s Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  9. Fiber-optic pH sensing system with microscopic spatial resolution

    Podrazký, Ondřej; Mrázek, Jan; Vytykáčová, Soňa; Proboštová, Jana; Kašík, Ivan

    Bellingham : SPIE, 2015, s. 9506121-9506126. ISBN 9781628416275. ISSN 0277-786X. [Conference on Optical Sensor s. Prague (CZ), 13.04.2015-16.04.2015] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA04011400 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Biological materials * Electromagnetic fields * Optical sensor s Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  10. Soil-embedded optical fiber sensing cable interrogated by Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry (B-OTDR) and optical frequency-domain reflectometry (OFDR) for embedded cavity detection and sinkhole warning system

    Lanticq, V.; Bourgeois, E.; Magnien, P.; Dieleman, L.; Vinceslas, G.; Sang, A.; Delepine-Lesoille, S.

    2009-03-01

    A soil-embedded optical fiber sensing cable is evaluated for an embedded cavity detection and sinkhole warning system in railway tunnels. Tests were performed on a decametric structure equipped with an embedded 110 m long fiber optic cable. Both Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry (B-OTDR) and optical frequency-domain reflectometry (OFDR) sensing techniques were used for cable interrogation, yielding results that were in good qualitative agreement with finite-element calculations. Theoretical and experimental comparison enabled physical interpretation of the influence of ground properties, and the analysis of embedded cavity size and position. A 5 mm embedded cavity located 2 m away from the sensing cable was detected. The commercially available sensing cable remained intact after soil collapse. Specificities of each technique are analyzed in view of the application requirements. For tunnel monitoring, the OFDR technique was determined to be more viable than the B-OTDR due to higher spatial resolution, resulting in better detection and size determination of the embedded cavities. Conclusions of this investigation gave outlines for future field use of distributed strain-sensing methods under railways and more precisely enabled designing a warning system suited to the Ebersviller tunnel specificities.

  11. Fiber optic hydrophone

    Kuzmenko, Paul J.; Davis, Donald T.

    1994-01-01

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optic fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends.

  12. Fiber optic attenuator

    Buzzetti, Mike F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber optic attenuator of the invention is a mandrel structure through which a bundle of optical fibers is wrapped around in a complete circle. The mandrel structure includes a flexible cylindrical sheath through which the bundle passes. A set screw on the mandrel structure impacts one side of the sheath against two posts on the opposite side of the sheath. By rotating the screw, the sheath is deformed to extend partially between the two posts, bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius controlled by rotating the set screw. Bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius causes light in each optical fiber to be lost in the cladding, the amount depending upon the radius about which the bundle is bent.

  13. High-Tg TOPAS microstructured polymer optical fiber for fiber Bragg grating strain sensing at 110 degrees

    Markos, Christos; Stefani, Alessio; Nielsen, Kristian; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Yuan, Scott Wu; Bang, Ole

    2013-01-01

    temperature of Tg = 135°C and we experimentally demonstrate high strain operation (2.5%) of the FBG at 98°C and stable operation up to a record high temperature of 110°C. The Bragg wavelengths of the FBGs are around 860 nm, where the propagation loss is 5.1dB/m, close to the fiber loss minimum of 3.67dB/m at...

  14. Random-access distributed fiber sensing

    Zadok, Avinoam; Antman, Yair; Primerov, Nikolay; Denisov, Andrey; SANCHO Juan; Thévenaz, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Optical sensing offers an attractive solution to the societal concern for prevention of natural and human-generated threats and for efficient use of natural resources. The unprecedented properties of optical fibers make them ideal for implementing a ‘nervous system’ in structural health monitoring: they are small, low-cost and electrically and chemically inert. In particular, the nonlinear interaction of stimulated Brillouin scattering allows for the distributed measurement of strain and temp...

  15. Preparation and Properties of Sensing Membrane for Fiber Optic Oxygen Sensor

    2002-01-01

    Four sensing membranes based on fluorescence quenching were prepared by sol-gel method and CA membrane method,and the Ru(Ⅱ) complexes,Ru(bpy)3Cl2 and Ru(phen)3Cl2,were used as the indicators.The results indicate that the volume fraction of oxygen φo2 have a linear relationship in large scale with tanφ0/tanφfor all of the sensing membranes.They have super properties such as excellent limit of detection,fast response time and good reproducibility.The stability of the sensing membranes made by sol-gel method is better than those by CA membranes,but the uniformity of the latter is better than that of the former.

  16. A real-time structural parametric identification system based on fiber optic sensing and neural network algorithms

    Wu, Zhishen; Xu, Bin

    2003-07-01

    A structural parametric identification strategy based on neural networks algorithms using dynamic macro-strain measurements in time domain from a long-gage strain sensor by fiber optic sensing technique such as Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensor is developed. An array of long-gage sensors is bounded on the structure to measure reliably and accurately macro-strains. By the proposed methodology, the structural parameter of stiffness can be identified. A beam model with known mass distribution is considered as an object structure. Without any eigenvalue analysis or optimization computation, the structural parameter of stiffness can be identified. First an emulator neural network is presented to identify the beam structure in current state. Free vibration macro-strain responses of the beam structure are used to train the emulator neural network. The trained emulator neural network can be used to forecast the free vibration macro-strain response of the beam structure with enough precision and decide the difference between the free vibration macro-strain responses of other assumed structure with different structural parameters and those of the original beam structure. The root mean square (RMS) error vector is presented to evaluate the difference. Subsequently, corresponding to each assumed structure with different structural parameters, the RMS error vector can be calculated. By using the training data set composed of the structural parameters and RMS error vector, a parametric evaluation neural network is trained. A beam structure is considered as an existing structure, based on the trained parametric evaluation neural network, the stiffness of the beam structure can be forecast. It is shown that the parametric identification strategy using macro-strain measurement from long-gage sensors has the potential of being a practical tool for a health monitoring methodology applied to civil engineering structures.

  17. Optical fiber Sagnac interferometer for sensing scalar directional refraction: Application to magnetochiral birefringence

    Loas, Goulc'Hen; Alouini, Mehdi; Vallet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    International audience We present a setup dedicated to the measurement of the small scalar directional anisotropies associated to the magnetochiral interaction. The apparatus, based on a polarization-independent fiber Sagnac interferometer, is optimized to be insensitive to circular anisotropies and to residual absorption. It can thus characterize samples of biological interests, for which the two enantiomers are not available and/or which present poor transmission. The signal-to-noise rat...

  18. Fiber optic detector for immuno-testing

    Partin, Judy K.; Ward, Thomas E.; Grey, Alan E.

    1992-01-01

    A portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals in air or a gas by exchanging the target chemical for a fluoroescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  19. Fiber optics standard dictionary

    Weik, Martin H

    1997-01-01

    Fiber Optics Vocabulary Development In 1979, the National Communications System published Technical InfonnationBulle­ tin TB 79-1, Vocabulary for Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications, written by this author. Based on a draft prepared by this author, the National Communications System published Federal Standard FED-STD-1037, Glossary of Telecommunications Terms, in 1980 with no fiber optics tenns. In 1981, the first edition of this dictionary was published under the title Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications Standard Dictionary. In 1982, the then National Bureau of Standards, now the National Institute of Standards and Technology, published NBS Handbook 140, Optical Waveguide Communications Glossary, which was also published by the General Services Admin­ istration as PB82-166257 under the same title. Also in 1982, Dynamic Systems, Inc. , Fiberoptic Sensor Technology Handbook, co-authored and edited by published the this author, with an extensive Fiberoptic Sensors Glossary. In 1989, the handbook w...

  20. Optical fiber spectrophotometer

    A method called 'Two Arm's Photo out and Electricity Send-back' is introduced. UV-365 UV/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer has been reequipped by this way with 5 meters long optical fiber. Another method called 'One Arm's Photo out and Photo Send-back' is also introduced. λ19 UV/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer has been reequipped by this way with 10 meters long optical fiber. Optical fiber spectrophotometer can work as its main set. So it is particularly applicable to radio activity work

  1. Comparison of evanscent-wave and leaky-wave fiber optic sensing structures for gas detection

    Mrázek, Jan; Matějec, Vlastimil; Chomát, Miroslav; Renault, N. J.; Dzyadevych, S.; Rose, K.

    [Monastir] : [Faculté des Sciences de Monastir], 2004. s. 121. [Journees Maghreb-Europe sur les Materiaux et Leurs Applications aux Dispositifs et Capteurs MADICA 2004 /4./. 29.11.2004-01.12.2004, Tunis] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : fibre optic sensors * gas sensors Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  2. Optical fiber Sagnac interferometer for sensing scalar directional refraction: application to magnetochiral birefringence

    Loas, Goulc'hen; Vallet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We present a set-up dedicated to the measurement of the small scalar directional anisotropies associated to the magnetochiral interaction. The apparatus, based on a polarization-independent fiber Sagnac interferometer, is optimized to be insensitive to circular anisotropies and to residual absorption. It can thus characterize samples of biological interests, for which the two enantiomers are not available and/or which present poor transmission. The signal-to-noise ratio is shown to be limited only by the source intensity noise, leading to a detection limit of Df = 500 nrad.Hz-1/2. It yields a limit on the magnetochiral index nMC < 4 10-13 T-1 at 1550 nm for the organic molecules tested.

  3. Optical remote sensing

    Prasad, Saurabh; Chanussot, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    Optical remote sensing relies on exploiting multispectral and hyper spectral imagery possessing high spatial and spectral resolutions respectively. These modalities, although useful for most remote sensing tasks, often present challenges that must be addressed for their effective exploitation. This book presents current state-of-the-art algorithms that address the following key challenges encountered in representation and analysis of such optical remotely sensed data: challenges in pre-processing images, storing and representing high dimensional data, fusing different sensor modalities, patter

  4. Fiber optic data transmission

    Shreve, Steven T.

    1987-01-01

    The Ohio University Avionics Engineering Center is currently developing a fiber optic data bus transmission and reception system that could eventually replace copper cable connections in airplanes. The original form of the system will transmit information from an encoder to a transponder via a fiber optic cable. An altimeter and an altitude display are connected to a fiber optic transmitter by copper cable. The transmitter converts the altimetry data from nine bit parallel to serial form and send these data through a fiber optic cable to a receiver. The receiver converts the data using a cable similar to that used between the altimeter and display. The transmitting and receiving ends also include a display readout. After completion and ground testing of the data bus, the system will be tested in an airborne environment.

  5. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    Buchanan, Bruce R.; Prather, William S.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer.

  6. Fiber optics welder

    Higgins, R.W.; Robichaud, R.E.

    A system is described for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45/sup 0/ angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  7. Electrospun Amplified Fiber Optics

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    A lot of research is focused on all-optical signal processing, aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for an efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods, involving high-temperature processes performed in highly pure environment, slow down the fabrication and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, ...

  8. Optical Waveguide Sensing and Imaging

    Bock, Wojtek J; Tanev, Stoyan

    2008-01-01

    The book explores various aspects of existing and emerging fiber and waveguide optics sensing and imaging technologies including recent advances in nanobiophotonics. The focus is both on fundamental and applied research as well as on applications in civil engineering, biomedical sciences, environment, security and defence. The main goal of the multi-disciplinarry team of Editors was to provide an useful reference of state-of-the-art overviews covering a variety of complementary topics on the interface of engineering and biomedical sciences.

  9. Fiber optics: A research paper

    Drone, Melinda M.

    1987-01-01

    Some basic aspects concerning fiber optics are examined. Some history leading up to the development of optical fibers which are now used in the transmission of data in many areas of the world is discussed. Basic theory of the operation of fiber optics is discussed along with methods for improving performance of the optical fiber through much research and design. Splices and connectors are compared and short haul and long haul fiber optic networks are discussed. Fiber optics plays many roles in the commercial world. The use of fiber optics for communication applications is emphasized.

  10. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D. J. Osborn

    2003-09-30

    Spectroscopy of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} immobilized in a sol-gel matrix and heated to 200 C has been performed. Oxygen quenching of the luminescence was observed. Aging Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} to temperatures above 250 C converts the canary yellow Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} to a non-luminescent gray solid. Preliminary experiments point to oxidation of the clusters as the likely cause of thermally induced changes in the physical and optical properties of the clusters.