WorldWideScience

Sample records for fiber optic sensing

  1. Optical fiber rotation sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Burns, William K; Kelley, Paul

    1993-01-01

    Optical Fiber Rotation Sensing is the first book devoted to Interferometric Fiber Optic Gyros (IFOG). This book provides a complete overview of IFOGs, beginning with a historical review of IFOG development and including a fundamental exposition of basic principles, a discussion of devices and components, and concluding with industry reports on state-of-the-art activity. With several chapters contributed by principal developers of this solid-state device, the result is an authoritative work which will serve as the resource for researchers, students, and users of IFOGs.* * State-of-t

  2. Specially fibers and relevant technologies for fiber optic sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiber optic sensing is one of the most important technologies in phonic sensing. Novel specially fibers and relevant technologies have been developed for various application fields, such as avionics, infrastructures, atomic plants and oil and gas industries. In this paper, recent progress in the fiber optic sensing is reviewed with a focus on the specialty fibers. (author)

  3. Fiber Optic Sensing: Prototype Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz Martin, Jesus; Gonzalez Torres, Jose

    2015-09-01

    Airbus DS Crisa has been developing an interrogator of Fiber Bragg Grating sensors [1], aimed at measuring, mainly, temperature and strain by means of fiber optic links. This activity, funded by Airbus DS Crisa, ESA and HBM Fibersensing, finalizes with the manufacturing of a prototype. The present paper describes in detail the main outcomes of the testing activities of this prototype. At the moment of writing the paper all the functional tests have been concluded. The environmental tests, thermal and mechanical, will be conducted with the FOS interrogator forming part of the RTU2015, described in [2].

  4. Ultra Small Integrated Optical Fiber Sensing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Van Daele

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a revolutionary way to interrogate optical fiber sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs and to integrate the necessary driving optoelectronic components with the sensor elements. Low-cost optoelectronic chips are used to interrogate the optical fibers, creating a portable dynamic sensing system as an alternative for the traditionally bulky and expensive fiber sensor interrogation units. The possibility to embed these laser and detector chips is demonstrated resulting in an ultra thin flexible optoelectronic package of only 40 μm, provided with an integrated planar fiber pigtail. The result is a fully embedded flexible sensing system with a thickness of only 1 mm, based on a single Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL, fiber sensor and photodetector chip. Temperature, strain and electrodynamic shaking tests have been performed on our system, not limited to static read-out measurements but dynamically reconstructing full spectral information datasets.

  5. Industrial applications of fiber optic sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desforges, Francois X.; Blocksidge, Robert

    1996-08-01

    Thanks to the growth of the fiber optics telecommunication industry, fiber optic components have become less expensive, more reliable and well known by potential fiber optic sensor users. LEDs, optical fibers, couplers and connectors are now widely distributed and are the building blocks for the fiber optic sensor manufacturer. Additionally, the huge demand in consumer electronics of the past 10 years has provided the manufacturer with cheap and powerful programmable logic components which reduce the development time as well as the cost of the associated instrumentation. This market trend has allowed Photonetics to develop, manufacture and sell fiber optic sensors for the last 10 years. The company contribution in the fields of fiber optic gyros (4 licenses sold world wide), white light interferometry and fiber optic sensor networks is widely recognized. Moreover, its 1992 acquisition of some of the assets of Metricor Inc., greatly reinforced its position and allowed it to pursue new markets. Over the past four years, Photonetics has done an important marketing effort to better understand the need of its customers. The result of this research has fed R&D efforts towards a new generation instrument, the Metricor 2000, better adapted to the expectations of fiber optic sensors users, thanks to its unique features: (1) universality -- the system can accept more than 20 different sensors (T, P, RI, . . .). (2) scalability -- depending on the customer needs, the system can be used with 1 to 64 sensors. (3) performance -- because of its improved design, overall accuracies of 0.01% FS can be reached. (4) versatility -- its modular design enables a fast and easy custom design for specific applications. This paper presents briefly the Metricor 2000 and its family of FO probes. Then, it describes two fiber optic sensing (FOS) applications/markets where FOS have proven to be very useful.

  6. Optical Fiber Sensing Using Quantum Dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faramarz Farahi

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in the application of semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantumdots, as biochemical sensors are reviewed. Quantum dots have unique optical properties thatmake them promising alternatives to traditional dyes in many luminescence basedbioanalytical techniques. An overview of the more relevant progresses in the application ofquantum dots as biochemical probes is addressed. Special focus will be given toconfigurations where the sensing dots are incorporated in solid membranes and immobilizedin optical fibers or planar waveguide platforms.

  7. Distributed sensing employing stimulated Brillouin scattering in optical fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Antman, Yair; Thévenaz, Luc; Zadok, Avinoam

    2012-01-01

    Disclosed are methods and devices for distributed sensing of a measurable parameter employing stimulated Brillouin scattering in an optical fiber. A frequency-modulated or phase-modulated light wave is transmitted into the optical fiber. A scattered light wave in the optical fiber is monitored for sensing a measurable parameter. In some embodiments, the calculating step may include calculating a distance of a sensed location along the optical fiber using the monitored time of arrival.

  8. Bridge SHM system based on fiber optical sensing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sheng; Fan, Dian; Fu, Jiang-hua; Huang, Xing; Jiang, De-sheng

    2015-09-01

    The latest progress of our lab in recent 10 years on the area of bridge structural health monitoring (SHM) based on optical fiber sensing technology is introduced. Firstly, in the part of sensing technology, optical fiber force test-ring, optical fiber vibration sensor, optical fiber smart cable, optical fiber prestressing loss monitoring method and optical fiber continuous curve mode inspection system are developed, which not only rich the sensor types, but also provides new monitoring means that are needed for the bridge health monitoring system. Secondly, in the optical fiber sensing network and computer system platform, the monitoring system architecture model is designed to effectively meet the integration scale and effect requirement of engineering application, especially the bridge expert system proposed integration of sensing information and informatization manual inspection to realize the mode of multi index intelligence and practical monitoring, diagnosis and evaluation. Finally, the Jingyue bridge monitoring system as the representative, the research on the technology of engineering applications are given.

  9. Fiber optic structures for dynamic stress sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaga, Robert; Lesiak, Piotr; Woli?ski, Tomasz R.

    2011-10-01

    The paper presents influence of the HB1500 bow-tie optical fiber coating on the fiber angular sensitivity for dynamic stress induced by an acoustic wave. An experimental setup is explained and fiber parameters are presented, what is a step forward to predict and simulate behavior of optical fibers embedded in composite materials. Both sensitivities of the fiber (with and without coating) are compared versus the angle between the birefringence axis and the acoustic wave propagation direction. An influence of the fiber coating has also been experimentally examined.

  10. Radiation distribution sensing with normal optical fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Kawarabayashi, J; Naka, R; Uritani, A; Watanabe, K I; Iguchi, T; Tsujimura, N

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a radiation distribution monitor using a normal plastic optical fiber. The monitor has a long operating length (10m-100m) and can obtain continuous radiation distributions. A principle of the position sensing is based on a time-of-flight technique. The characteristics of this monitor to beta particles, gamma rays and fast neutrons were obtained. The spatial resolutions for beta particles ( sup 9 sup 0 Sr sup - sup 9 sup 0 Y), gamma rays ( sup 1 sup 3 sup 7 Cs) and D-T neutrons were 30 cm, 37 cm and 13 cm, respectively. The detection efficiencies for the beta rays, the gamma rays and D-T neutrons were 0.11%, 1.6x10 sup - sup 5 % and 5.4x10 sup - sup 4 %, respectively. The effective attenuation length of the detection efficiency was 18m. New principle of the position sensing based on spectroscopic analysis was also proposed. A preliminary test showed that the spectrum observed at the end of the fiber depended on the position of the irradiated point. This fact shows that t...

  11. Advanced fiber optical chemical sensing networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many industrial processes or other phenomena of interest cannot be measured with conventional instruments because they are too hot, too cold, highly radioactive, or otherwise inaccessible to direct observation. Nuclear wastes stored in underground repositories, for example, will require in-situ monitoring. A new technology that uses long-distance fiber optics to transmit laser-excited fluorescence now makes it possible to remotely monitor such phenomena via optical cables at distances up to a kilometer. The basic system consists of a laser light source, a Raman-fluorescence scattering spectrometer, and an optical fiber linked to a measuring device at the other end. Laser-generated light passes through an aperture and is focused on the end of the optical fiber by a geometric beam splitter. The light passes through the fiber, interacts with the sample to be measured, and returns (now incoherent), where it is reflected by a mirror into the computerized spectrometer for analysis

  12. Extruded single ring hollow core optical fibers for Raman sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiminis, G.; Rowland, K. J.; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, H.; Spooner, N. A.; Monro, T. M.

    2014-05-01

    In this work we report the fabrication of the first extruded hollow core optical fiber with a single ring of cladding holes. A lead-silicate glass billet is used to produce a preform through glass extrusion to create a larger-scale version of the final structure that is subsequently drawn to an optical fiber. The simple single suspended ring structure allows antiresonance reflection guiding. The resulting fibers were used to perform Raman sensing of liquid samples filling the length of the fiber, demonstrating its potential for fiber sensing applications.

  13. Fiber optic sensing technology: emerging markets and trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huff, David B.; Lebby, Michael S.

    2007-07-01

    Recent technical advances in fiber optic sensor technology have brought fiber sensors into the mainstream. Using a wide variety of sensing elements, and interrogation techniques, these devices are finding applications in fields from power line management to homeland security. A variety of fiber sensor technologies, applications, and markets are discussed.

  14. Sensing characteristics of birefringent microstructured polymer optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szczurowski, Marcin K.; Frazao, Orlando; Baptista, J. M.; Nielsen, Kristian; Bang, Ole; Urbanczyk, Waclaw

    2011-01-01

    We experimentally studied several sensing characteristics of a birefringent microstructured polymer optical fiber. The fiber exhibits a birefringence of the order 2×10-5 at 1.3 μm because of two small holes adjacent to the core. In this fiber, we measured spectral dependence of phase and group mo...

  15. Fiber-Optic Sensing for In-Space Inspection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pena, Francisco; Richards, W. Lance; Piazza, Anthony; Parker, Allen R.; Hudson, Larry D.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation provides examples of fiber optic sensing technology development activities performed at NASA Armstrong. Examples of current and previous work that support in-space inspection techniques and methodologies are highlighted.

  16. Optical Fiber Sensing Based on Reflection Laser Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Gagliardi

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available An overview on high-resolution and fast interrogation of optical-fiber sensors relying on laser reflection spectroscopy is given. Fiber Bragg-gratings (FBGs and FBG resonators built in fibers of different types are used for strain, temperature and acceleration measurements using heterodyne-detection and optical frequency-locking techniques. Silica fiber-ring cavities are used for chemical sensing based on evanescent-wave spectroscopy. Various arrangements for signal recovery and noise reduction, as an extension of most typical spectroscopic techniques, are illustrated and results on detection performances are presented.

  17. RF modulated fiber optic sensing systems and their applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamovsky, G.; Eustace, J. G.

    1993-01-01

    A fiber optic sensing system with an intensity sensor and a Radio Frequency (RF) modulated source was shown to have sensitivity and resolution much higher than a comparable system employing low modulating frequencies or DC mode of operation. Also the RF modulation with an appropriate configuration of the sensing system provides compensation for the unwanted intensity losses. The basic principles and applications of a fiber optic sensing system employing an RF modulated source are described. In addition the paper discusses various configurations of the system itself, its components, and modulation and detection schemes. Experimental data are also presented.

  18. Optical Fiber Sensing Using Quantum Dots

    OpenAIRE

    Faramarz Farahi; José Luís Santos; Tito Trindade; Manuel António Martins; Pedro Jorge

    2007-01-01

    Recent advances in the application of semiconductor nanocrystals, or quantum dots, as biochemical sensors are reviewed. Quantum dots have unique optical properties that make them promising alternatives to traditional dyes in many luminescence based bioanalytical techniques. An overview of the more relevant progresses in the application of quantum dots as biochemical probes is addressed. Special focus will be given to configurations where the sensing dots are incorporated in sol...

  19. Fiber Optic Wing Shape Sensing on NASA's Ikhana UAV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This document discusses the development of fiber optic wing shape sensing on NASA's Ikhana vehicle. The Dryden Flight Research Center's Aerostructures Branch initiated fiber-optic instrumentation development efforts in the mid-1990s. Motivated by a failure to control wing dihedral resulting in a mishap with the Helios aircraft, new wing displacement techniques were developed. Research objectives for Ikhana included validating fiber optic sensor measurements and real-time wing shape sensing predictions; the validation of fiber optic mathematical models and design tools; assessing technical viability and, if applicable, developing methodology and approaches to incorporate wing shape measurements within the vehicle flight control system; and, developing and flight validating approaches to perform active wing shape control using conventional control surfaces and active material concepts.

  20. Extrinsic fiber optic displacement sensors and displacement sensing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kent A. (Roanoke, VA); Gunther, Michael F. (Blacksburg, VA); Vengsarkar, Ashish M. (Scotch Plains, NJ); Claus, Richard O. (Christiansburg, VA)

    1994-01-01

    An extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor comprises a single-mode fiber, used as an input/output fiber, and a multimode fiber, used purely as a reflector, to form an air gap within a silica tube that acts as a Fizeau cavity. The Fresnel reflection from the glass/air interface at the front of the air gap (reference reflection) and the reflection from the air/glass interface at the far end of the air gap (sensing reflection) interfere in the input/output fiber. The two fibers are allowed to move in the silica tube, and changes in the air gap length cause changes in the phase difference between the reference reflection and the sensing reflection. This phase difference is observed as changes in intensity of the light monitored at the output arm of a fused biconical tapered coupler. The extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor behaves identically whether it is surface mounted or embedded, which is unique to the extrinsic sensor in contrast to intrinsic Fabry-Perot sensors. The sensor may be modified to provide a quadrature phase shift extrinsic Fizeau fiber optic sensor for the detection of both the amplitude and the relative polarity of dynamically varying strain. The quadrature light signals may be generated by either mechanical or optical means. A plurality of the extrinsic sensors may connected in cascade and multiplexed to allow monitoring by a single analyzer.

  1. Multiparameter fiber optic sensing system for monitoring enhanced geothermal systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William A. Challener

    2014-12-04

    The goal of this project was to design, fabricate and test an optical fiber cable which supports multiple sensing modalities for measurements in the harsh environment of enhanced geothermal systems. To accomplish this task, optical fiber was tested at both high temperatures and strains for mechanical integrity, and in the presence of hydrogen for resistance to darkening. Both single mode (SM) and multimode (MM) commercially available optical fiber were identified and selected for the cable based on the results of these tests. The cable was designed and fabricated using a tube-within-tube construction containing two MM fibers and one SM fiber, and without supporting gel that is not suitable for high temperature environments. Commercial fiber optic sensing instruments using Raman DTS (distributed temperature sensing), Brillouin DTSS (distributed temperature and strain sensing), and Raleigh COTDR (coherent optical time domain reflectometry) were selected for field testing. A microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) pressure sensor was designed, fabricated, packaged, and calibrated for high pressure measurements at high temperatures and spliced to the cable. A fiber Bragg grating (FBG) temperature sensor was also spliced to the cable. A geothermal well was selected and its temperature and pressure were logged. The cable was then deployed in the well in two separate field tests and measurements were made on these different sensing modalities. Raman DTS measurements were found to be accurate to ±5°C, even with some residual hydrogen darkening. Brillouin DTSS measurements were in good agreement with the Raman results. The Rayleigh COTDR instrument was able to detect some acoustic signatures, but was generally disappointing. The FBG sensor was used to determine the effects of hydrogen darkening, but drift over time made it unreliable as a temperature or pressure sensor. The MEMS sensor was found to be highly stable and accurate to better than its 0.1% calibration.

  2. Fiber sensing system based on a bragg grating and optical time domain reflectometry

    OpenAIRE

    Chin, Sanghoon; Thévenaz, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Optic fiber sensor characterized in that the sensing fiber is provided with a continuous Bragg grating covering the entire fiber length which is dedicated to sensing and along which spatially resolved measurements are performed.

  3. Pressure sensing with optical fiber-tip air bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wenbing; Fu, Cailing; Wang, D. N.; Wang, Ying

    2013-09-01

    Optical fiber-tip air bubbles are demonstrated for pressure sensing with ultrahigh sensitivity. The air bubble locates in the end facet of a single mode fiber (SMF) that spliced with a silica tube, which is naturally formed and acts as a compressible Fabry-Prot interferometer (FPI) cavity when immersing the silica tube into liquid. The proposed device exhibits pressure sensitivity of <1000 nm/kPa. This kind of compressible FPI cavity may find potential applications in highly sensitive pressure and/or acoustic sensing.

  4. Distributed Fiber Optic Gas Sensing for Harsh Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Juntao Wu

    2008-03-14

    This report summarizes work to develop a novel distributed fiber-optic micro-sensor that is capable of detecting common fossil fuel gases in harsh environments. During the 32-month research and development (R&D) program, GE Global Research successfully synthesized sensing materials using two techniques: sol-gel based fiber surface coating and magnetron sputtering based fiber micro-sensor integration. Palladium nanocrystalline embedded silica matrix material (nc-Pd/Silica), nanocrystalline palladium oxides (nc-PdO{sub x}) and palladium alloy (nc-PdAuN{sub 1}), and nanocrystalline tungsten (nc-WO{sub x}) sensing materials were identified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to hydrogen; while the palladium doped and un-doped nanocrystalline tin oxide (nc-PdSnO{sub 2} and nc-SnO{sub 2}) materials were verified to have high sensitivity and selectivity to carbon monoxide. The fiber micro-sensor comprises an apodized long-period grating in a single-mode fiber, and the fiber grating cladding surface was functionalized by above sensing materials with a typical thickness ranging from a few tens of nanometers to a few hundred nanometers. GE found that the morphologies of such sensing nanomaterials are either nanoparticle film or nanoporous film with a typical size distribution from 5-10 nanometers. nc-PdO{sub x} and alloy sensing materials were found to be highly sensitive to hydrogen gas within the temperature range from ambient to 150 C, while nc-Pd/Silica and nc-WO{sub x} sensing materials were found to be suitable to be operated from 150 C to 500 C for hydrogen gas detection. The palladium doped and un-doped nc-SnO{sub 2} materials also demonstrated sensitivity to carbon monoxide gas at approximately 500 C. The prototyped fiber gas sensing system developed in this R&D program is based on wavelength-division-multiplexing technology in which each fiber sensor is identified according to its transmission spectra features within the guiding mode and cladding modes. The interaction between the sensing material and fossil fuel gas results in a refractive index change and optical absorption in the sensing layer. This induces mode coupling strength and boundary conditions changes and thereby shifts the central wavelengths of the guiding mode and cladding modes propagation. GE's experiments demonstrated that such an interaction between the fossil fuel gas and sensing material not only shifts the central wavelengths of the guide mode and cladding modes propagation, but also alters their power loss characteristics. The integrated fiber gas sensing system includes multiple fiber gas sensors, fiber Bragg grating-based temperature sensors, fiber optical interrogator, and signal processing software.

  5. Recent progress on mid-IR sensing with optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Robert A.; Gobel, R.; Goetz, R.; Lendl, B.; Edl-Mizaikoff, B.; Tacke, Maurus; Katzir, Abraham

    1995-09-01

    Chemical sensors are analytical systems for the evaluation of compound- or ion-specific or - selective signals produced by specific or selective chemical reactions taking place at the interface between the chemically modified sensor surface and the substrate. The well known electrochemical sensing schemes have greatly contributed that sensors are considered now as the 'third supporting pillar of analytical chemistry' besides chromatography and spectroscopy. The aim of this paper is to describe the novel capabilities of chemical modified IR-transparent fibers as chemical IR-sensors for the on-line analysis of chlorinated hydrocarbons and organic compounds in aqueous solutions and gaseous mixtures, glucose, and sucrose in aqueous solution as developed in our laboratory. Moreover, the relative merits of this new method wil be depicted in comparison to other sensing techniques. Optical fiber sensors are novel analysis systems, based on molecular spectroscopy in the UV/VIS/IR-range. They benefit from the tremendous development in the field of optical fibers, an offspring of the telecommunication industry and the electronic revolution during the last few years. With the development of new materials besides the well known quartz fibers for the UV/VIS/NIR-range the optical window for fiber optic sensors was enlarged from 0,2 to 20 micrometers recently. The fiber length was increased recently to up to 2 meters for silver halides and approximately 10 meters for chalcogenides. New applications for environmental, food, and clinical sensing as well as process analysis are the driving force for modern research in IR-optical fiber sensors using mainly sapphire (Al2O3), chalcogenide (As-Se-Te) and silver halide (AgBr/AgCl) fibers and flow injection analysis (FIA) systems. Few representative examples for each of the various optical sensor types will be presented. Particular attention will be given to the use of silver halide fibers for the simultaneous determination of traces of chlorinated hydrocarbons in water and to FIA-systems for the process analysis of beverages.

  6. Optical fiber sensing of human skin emanations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S.-W.; Wang, T.; Selyanchyn, R.; Korposh, S.; James, S. W.

    2015-07-01

    An evanescent-wave optical fibre sensor modified with tetrakis(4-sulfophenyl)porphine (TSPP) and poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) bilayers using an layer-by-layer (LbL) approach was tested to measure the gas emitted from human skin. Optical intensity changes at different wavelengths in the transmission spectrum of the porphyrin-based film were induced by the human skin gas and measured as sensor response. Influence of relative humidity, which can be a major interference to sensor response, was significantly different when compared to the influence of skin emanations. Responses of the current optical sensor system could be considered as composite sensor array, where different optical wavelengths act as channels that have selective response to specific volatile compounds. Data obtained from the sensor system was analyzed through principal component analysis (PCA). This approach enabled to distinguish skin odors of different people and their altered physiological conditions after alcohol consumption.

  7. Monitoring of Thermal Protection Systems using Robust Self-Organizing Optical Fiber Sensing Networks Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Objectives a) Development, evaluation and demonstration of a dynamically reconfigurable optical fiber sensing network that is interrogated using the optical...

  8. Exposed core microstructured optical fiber Bragg gratings: refractive index sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Smith, Stephen C; Monro, Tanya M

    2014-01-27

    Bragg gratings have been written in exposed-core microstructured optical fibers for the first time using a femtosecond laser. Second and third order gratings have been written and both show strong reflectivity at 1550 nm, with bandwidths as narrow as 60 pm. Due to the penetration of the guided field outside the fiber the Bragg reflections are sensitive to the external refractive index. As different modes have different sensitivities to refractive index but the same temperature sensitivity the sensor can provide temperature-compensated refractive index measurements. Since these Bragg gratings have been formed by physical ablation, these devices can also be used for high temperature sensing, demonstrated here up to 800C. The fibers have been spliced to single mode fiber for improved handling and integration with commercial interrogation units. PMID:24515155

  9. New trends and applications of optical fiber sensing technologies at the NEL-FOST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minghong; Huang, Chujia; Yuan, Yinquan; Ding, Liyun; Zhou, Ciming

    2015-07-01

    This paper reviews the recent development of optical fiber sensors at the National Engineering Laboratory for Optic Fiber Sensing Technologies (NEL-FOST) at Wuhan University of Technology. Integration of optical fiber with sensitive thin films will new possibilities for industry application, such as optical fiber hydrogen sensors based on Pt-doped WO3 coatings, fiber humidity sensors with porous oxide coating and high-temperature sapphire fiber sensors based on multilayer coating on fiber tip. Ultra-weak FBG array with thousand of FBGs with on-line draw tower technology will enable FBG sensing network with large capacity, also improved sensing performance and mechanical stability.

  10. Optical fiber sensing technology in the pipeline industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, A.M.B.; Llerena, R.W.A. [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mail: abraga@mec.puc-rio.br; roberan@mec.puc-rio.br; Valente, L.C.G.; Regazzi, R.D. [Gavea Sensors, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)]. E-mail: guedes@gaveasensors.com; regazzi@gaveasensors.com

    2003-07-01

    This paper is concerned with applications of optical fiber sensors to pipeline monitoring. The basic principles of optical fiber sensors are briefly reviewed, with particular attention to fiber Bragg grating technology. Different potential applications in the pipeline industry are discussed, and an example of a pipeline strain monitoring system based on optical fiber Bragg grating sensors is presented. (author)

  11. Frequency-Shifted Interferometry — A Versatile Fiber-Optic Sensing Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Fei Ye; Yiwei Zhang; Bing Qi; Li Qian

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optic sensing is a field that is developing at a fast pace. Novel fiber-optic sensor designs and sensing principles constantly open doors for new opportunities. In this paper, we review a fiber-optic sensing technique developed in our research group called frequency-shifted interferometry (FSI). This technique uses a continuous-wave light source, an optical frequency shifter, and a slow detector. We discuss the operation principles of several FSI implementations and show their applicati...

  12. Calibration and Deployment of a Fiber-Optic Sensing System for Monitoring Debris Flows

    OpenAIRE

    Tsung-Mo Tien; Hsiao-Yuen Yin; Ping-Sen Chen; Ching-Jer Huang; Chung-Ray Chu

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a novel fiber-optic sensing system, capable of monitoring debris flows or other natural hazards that produce ground vibrations. The proposed sensing system comprises a demodulator (BraggSCOPE, FS5500), which includes a broadband light source and a data logger, a four-port coupler and four Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) accelerometers. Based on field tests, the performance of the proposed fiber-optic sensing system is compared with that of a conventional sensing system that inclu...

  13. Extreme temperature sensing using brillouin scattering in optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Fellay, Alexandre

    Stimulated Brillouin scattering in silica-based optical fibers may be considered from two different and complementary standpoints. For a physicist, this interaction of light and pressure wave in a material, or equivalently in quantum theory terms between photons and phonons, gives some glimpses of the atomic structure of the solid and of its vibration modes. For an applied engineer, the same phenomenon may be put to good use as a sensing mechanism for distributed measurements, thanks to the dependence of the scattered light on external parameters such as the temperature, the pressure or the strain applied to the fiber. As far as temperature measurements are concerned, Brillouin-based distributed sensors have progressively gained wide recognition as efficient systems, even if their rather high cost still restricts the number of their applications. Yet they are generally used in a relatively narrow temperature range around the usual ambient temperature; in this domain, the frequency of the scattered light incre...

  14. Mechanically induced long period fiber gratings on single mode tapered optical fiber for structure sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulido-Navarro, Mara. G.; Marrujo-Garca, Sigifredo; lvarez-Chvez, Jos A.; Velzquez-Gonzlez, Jess S.; Martnez-Pin, Fernando; Escamilla-Ambrosio, Ponciano J.

    2015-08-01

    The modal characteristics of tapered single mode optical fibers and its strain sensing characteristics by using mechanically induced long period fiber gratings are presented in this work. Both Long Period Fiber Gratings (LPFG) and fiber tapers are fiber devices that couple light from the core fiber into the fiber cladding modes. The mechanical LPFG is made up of two plates, one flat and the other grooved. For this experiment the grooved plate was done on an acrylic slab with the help of a computer numerical control machine. The manufacturing of the tapered fiber is accomplished by applying heat using an oxygen-propane flame burner and stretching the fiber, which protective coating has been removed. Then, a polymer-tube-package is added in order to make the sensor sufficiently stiff for the tests. The mechanical induced LPFG is accomplished by putting the tapered fiber in between the two plates, so the taper acquires the form of the grooved plate slots. Using a laser beam the transmission spectrum showed a large peak transmission attenuation of around -20 dB. The resultant attenuation peak wavelength in the transmission spectrum shifts with changes in tension showing a strain sensitivity of 2pm/??. This reveals an improvement on the sensitivity for structure monitoring applications compared with the use of a standard optical fiber. In addition to the experimental work, the supporting theory and numerical simulation analysis are also included.

  15. Magnetic Sensing with Ferrofluid and Fiber Optic Connectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Homa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A simple, cost effective and sensitive fiber optic magnetic sensor fabricated with ferrofluid and commercially available fiber optic components is described in this paper. The system uses a ferrofluid infiltrated extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer (EFPI interrogated with an infrared wavelength spectrometer to measure magnetic flux density. The entire sensing system was developed with commercially available components so it can be easily and economically reproduced in large quantities. The device was tested with two different ferrofluid types over a range of magnetic flux densities to verify performance. The sensors readily detected magnetic flux densities in the range of 0.5 mT to 12.0 mT with measurement sensitivities in the range of 0.3 to 2.3 nm/mT depending on ferrofluid type. Assuming a conservative wavelength resolution of 0.1 nm for state of the art EFPI detection abilities, the estimated achievable measurement resolution is on the order 0.04 mT. The inherent small size and basic structure complimented with the fabrication ease make it well-suited for a wide array of research, industrial, educational and military applications.

  16. Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing of alpine snowpacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huwald, H.; Mutzner, R.; Williams, S. R.; Higgins, C. W.; Nolin, A. W.; Drake, S. A.; Selker, J. S.; Parlange, M. B.

    2011-12-01

    Small-scale surface topography and variations in snow density and in the snowpack matrix influence the snow temperature, a key variable for various heat flux components of the surface energy balance. Thus detailed knowledge on the spatial distribution and temporal evolution is crucial to quantify horizontal heterogeneity in the heat fluxes at the snow surface. We present measurements of small-scale temperature variations in alpine snow packs using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) together with traditional sensors such as thermocouples and thermistors. Almost a kilometer of fiber-optic cable was installed in the snow at Plaine Morte and Jungfraufirn glacier in the Swiss Alps, to obtain distributed information on snow temperature. The sensor cables were deployed in various configurations such as a fence-like structure anchored in the snowpack providing 2D snow temperature slices as snow accumulated and covered the fence, or a sensor tube with 4mm vertical resolution for high-resolution profiles. Measurements were taken at intervals of 5 minutes, with a spatial resolution of 1m and accuracy better than 0.1C. Besides the diurnal cycle, temperature data show some spatial variability along the transect. Subsurface heat fluxes were computed based on the Fourier heat equation using snow temperature and snow depth data, and an effective thermal conductivity of the snow derived from density measurements. Cable exposure to shortwave radiation near the surface and snow accumulation/compaction caused problems such as temperature overestimation and sagging of the cable between fence poles, respectively.

  17. Analyzing Fourier Transforms for NASA DFRC's Fiber Optic Strain Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiechtner, Kaitlyn Leann

    2010-01-01

    This document provides a basic overview of the fiber optic technology used for sensing stress, strain, and temperature. Also, the document summarizes the research concerning speed and accuracy of the possible mathematical algorithms that can be used for NASA DFRC's Fiber Optic Strain Sensing (FOSS) system.

  18. Dynamic Response of Tapered Optical Multimode Fiber Coated with Carbon Nanotubes for Ethanol Sensing Application

    OpenAIRE

    Arafat Shabaneh; Saad Girei; Punitha Arasu; Mohd Mahdi; Suraya Rashid; Suriati Paiman; Mohd Yaacob

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol is a highly combustible chemical universally designed for biomedical applications. In this paper, optical sensing performance of tapered multimode fiber tip coated with carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film towards aqueous ethanol with different concentrations is investigated. The tapered optical multimode fiber tip is coated with CNT using drop-casting technique and is annealed at 70 C to enhance the binding of the nanomaterial to the silica fiber tip. The optical fiber tip and the CNT se...

  19. Molecular alignment relaxation in polymer optical fibers for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stajanca, Pavol; Cetinkaya, Onur; Schukar, Marcus; Mergo, Pawel; Webb, David J.; Krebber, Katerina

    2016-03-01

    A systematic study of annealing behavior of drawn PMMA fibers was performed. Annealing dynamics were investigated under different environmental conditions by fiber longitudinal shrinkage monitoring. The shrinkage process was found to follow a stretched exponential decay function revealing the heterogeneous nature of the underlying molecular dynamics. The complex dependence of the fiber shrinkage on initial degree of molecular alignment in the fiber, annealing time and temperature was investigated and interpreted. Moreover, humidity was shown to have a profound effect on the annealing process, which was not recognized previously. Annealing was also shown to have considerable effect on the fiber mechanical properties associated with the relaxation of molecular alignment in the fiber. The consequences of fiber annealing for the climatic stability of certain polymer optical fiber-based sensors are discussed, emphasizing the importance of fiber controlled pre-annealing with respect to the foreseeable operating conditions.

  20. Optical sensing in high voltage transmission lines using power over fiber and free space optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosolem, Joo Batista; Bassan, Fabio Renato; Penze, Rivael Strobel; Leonardi, Ariovaldo Antonio; Fracarolli, Joo Paulo Vicentini; Floridia, Claudio

    2015-12-01

    In this work we propose the use of power over fiber (PoF) and free space optics (FSO) techniques to powering and receive signals from an electrical current sensor placed at high voltage potential using a pair of optical collimators. The technique evaluation was performed in a laboratorial prototype using 62.5/125 ?m multimode fiber to study the sensitivity of the optical alignment and the influence of the collimation process in the sensing system wavelengths: data communication (1310 nm) and powering (830 nm). The collimators were installed in a rigid electric insulator in order to maintain the stability of transmission.

  1. Frequency-Shifted Interferometry — A Versatile Fiber-Optic Sensing Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Ye

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-optic sensing is a field that is developing at a fast pace. Novel fiber-optic sensor designs and sensing principles constantly open doors for new opportunities. In this paper, we review a fiber-optic sensing technique developed in our research group called frequency-shifted interferometry (FSI. This technique uses a continuous-wave light source, an optical frequency shifter, and a slow detector. We discuss the operation principles of several FSI implementations and show their applications in fiber length and dispersion measurement, locating weak reflections along a fiber link, fiber-optic sensor multiplexing, and high-sensitivity cavity ring-down measurement. Detailed analysis of FSI system parameters is also presented.

  2. R&D on optical fiber sensors at the National Engineering Laboratary for Optic Fiber Sensing Technologies: fundamental and industrical aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minghong; Jiang, Desheng

    2012-02-01

    In this article, we review R&D on optical fiber sensors at the National Engineering Laboratory for Optic Fiber Sensing Technologies at Wuhan University of Technology, both from industrial and fundamental aspects. New concepts of optical sensors combined micro-machining of novel fiber structure with sensitive thin film are also proposed and discussed.

  3. Huge capacity fiber-optic sensing network based on ultra-weak draw tower gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minghong; Bai, Wei; Guo, Huiyong; Wen, Hongqiao; Yu, Haihu; Jiang, Desheng

    2016-03-01

    This paper reviews the work on huge capacity fiber-optic sensing network based on ultra-weak draw tower gratings developed at the National Engineering Laboratory for Fiber Optic Sensing Technology (NEL-FOST), Wuhan University of Technology, China. A versatile drawing tower grating sensor network based on ultra-weak fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) is firstly proposed and demonstrated. The sensing network is interrogated with time- and wavelength-division multiplexing method, which is very promising for the large-scale sensing network.

  4. Fiber-optic-coupled dosemeter for remote optical sensing of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote sensing technologies for the detection and measurement of ionizing radiation exposure are of current interest for applications such as patient dose verification during radiotherapy and the monitoring of environmental contaminants. Fiberoptic-based sensing is attractive due to the advantages of small size, low cost, long life and freedom from electromagnetic interference. Several fiberoptic-based radiation sensing systems have been described that utilize radiation induced changes in the optical characteristics of the fiber such as reduced transmission as a result of darkening of the glass, optical phase shifts due to heating, or changes in the birefringence of a polarization-maintaining fiber. The measurement of radiation induced darkening is limited in both sensitivity and dynamic range and requires long fiber lengths. Phase shift measurements require the use of single-mode lasers, phase sensitive interferometric detection, long fiber lengths and complex signal processing techniques. Alternatively, thermoluminescent (TL) phosphor powders have been coated onto fiberoptic cables and remote dosimetry measurements performed using traditional laser heating techniques. The sensitivity is limited by the requirement for a very thin layer of phosphor material, due to problems associated with light scattering and efficient heating by thermal diffusion. In this paper we report the development of an all-optical, fiber-optic-coupled, thermoluminescence dosemeter for remote radiation sensing that offers significant advantages compared to previous technologies. We recently reported the development of an optically transparent, TL glass material having exceptionally good characteristics for traditional dosimetry applications. We also reported a modified TL glass incorporating a rare earth ion dopant in order to absorb light from a semiconductor laser and utilize the absorbed light energy to internally heat the glass and release the trapped electrons. (author)

  5. Applications for fiber optic sensing in the upstream oil and gas industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Chris S.

    2015-05-01

    Fiber optic sensing has been used in an increasing number of applications in the upstream oil and gas industry over the past 20 years. In some cases, fiber optic sensing is providing measurements where traditional measurement technologies could not. This paper will provide a general overview of these applications and describe how the use of fiber optic sensing is enabling these applications. Technologies such as Bragg gratings, distributed temperature and acoustic sensing, interferometric sensing, and Brillouin scattering will be discussed. Applications for optic sensing include a range of possibilities from a single pressure measurement point in the wellbore to multizone pressure and flow monitoring. Some applications make use of fully distributed measurements including thermal profiling of the well. Outside of the wellbore, fiber optic sensors are used in applications for flowline and pipeline monitoring and for riser integrity monitoring. Applications to be described in this paper include in-flow profiling, well integrity, production monitoring, and steam chamber growth. These applications will cover well types such as injectors, producers, hydraulic fracturing, and thermal recovery. Many of these applications use the measurements provided by fiber optic sensing to improve enhanced oil recovery operations. The growing use of fiber optic sensors is providing improved measurement capabilities leading to the generation of actionable data for enhanced production optimization. This not only increases the recovered amount of production fluids but can also enhance wellbore integrity and safety.

  6. Measuring artificial recharge with fiber optic distributed temperature sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Matthew W; Bauer, Brian; Hutchinson, Adam

    2013-01-01

    Heat was used as a tracer to measure infiltration rates from a recharge basin. The propagation of diurnal oscillation of surface water temperature into the basin bed was monitored along a transect using Fiber Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (FODTS). The propagation rate was related to downward specific discharge using standard theory of heat advection and dispersion in saturated porous media. An estimate of the temporal variation of heat propagation was achieved using a wavelet transform to find the phase lag between the surface temperature diurnal oscillation and the correlated oscillation at 0.33 and 0.98 m below the bed surface. The wavelet results compared well to a constant velocity model of thermal advection and dispersion during periods of relatively constant discharge rates. The apparent dispersion of heat was found to be due primarily to hydrodynamic mechanisms rather than thermal diffusion. Specific discharge estimates using the FODTS technique also compared well to water balance estimates over a four month period, although there were occasional deviations that have yet to be adequately explained. The FODTS technique is superior to water balance in that it produces estimates of infiltration rate every meter along the cable transect, every half hour. These high resolution measurements highlighted areas of low infiltration and demonstrated the degradation of basin efficiency due to source waters of high suspended solids. FODTS monitoring promises to be a useful tool for diagnosing basin performance in an era of increasing groundwater demand. PMID:23110559

  7. Remote Management for Multipoint Sensing Systems Using Hetero-Core Spliced Optical Fiber Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee See Goh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and experimental verification of a multipoint sensing system with hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors and its remote management using an internet-standard protocol. The study proposes two different types of design and conducts experiments to verify those systems feasibility. In order to manage the sensing systems remotely, the management method uses a standard operation and maintenance protocol for internet: the Simple Network Management Protocol is proposed. The purpose of this study is to construct a multipoint sensing system remote management tool by which the system can also determine the status and the identity of fiber optic sensors. The constructed sensing systems are verified and the results have demonstrated that the first proposed system can distinguish the responses from different hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors remotely. The second proposed system shows that data communications are performed successfully while identifying the status of hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors remotely.

  8. Remote management for multipoint sensing systems using hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Lee See; Anoda, Yuji; Kazuhiro, Watanabe; Shinomiya, Norihiko

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the design and experimental verification of a multipoint sensing system with hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors and its remote management using an internet-standard protocol. The study proposes two different types of design and conducts experiments to verify those systems' feasibility. In order to manage the sensing systems remotely, the management method uses a standard operation and maintenance protocol for internet: the Simple Network Management Protocol is proposed. The purpose of this study is to construct a multipoint sensing system remote management tool by which the system can also determine the status and the identity of fiber optic sensors. The constructed sensing systems are verified and the results have demonstrated that the first proposed system can distinguish the responses from different hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors remotely. The second proposed system shows that data communications are performed successfully while identifying the status of hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors remotely. PMID:24379051

  9. NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) Fiber Optic Sensing System (FOSS) Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick; Hamory, Phil; Pena, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Attached is a power point presentation created to assist the Tech Transfer Office and the FOSS project team members in responding to inquiries from the public about the capabilities of the Fiber Optic Sensing System.

  10. Liquid Seal for Temperature Sensing with Fiber-Optic Refractometers

    OpenAIRE

    Ben Xu; Jianqing Li; Yi Li,; Jianglei Xie; Xinyong Dong

    2014-01-01

    Liquid sealing is an effective method to convert a fiber-optic refractometer into a simple and highly sensitive temperature sensor. A refractometer based on the thin-core fiber modal interferometer is sealed in a capillary tube filled with Cargille oil. Due to the thermo-optic effect of the sealing liquid, the high refractive-index sensitivity refractometer is subsequently sensitive to the ambient temperature. It is found that the liquid-sealed sensor produces a highest sensitivity of −2.30 n...

  11. Surface plasmon sensing of gas phase contaminants using optical fiber.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thornberg, Steven Michael; White, Michael I.; Rumpf, Arthur Norman; Pfeifer, Kent Bryant

    2009-10-01

    Fiber-optic gas phase surface plasmon resonance (SPR) detection of several contaminant gases of interest to state-of-health monitoring in high-consequence sealed systems has been demonstrated. These contaminant gases include H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and moisture using a single-ended optical fiber mode. Data demonstrate that results can be obtained and sensitivity is adequate in a dosimetric mode that allows periodic monitoring of system atmospheres. Modeling studies were performed to direct the design of the sensor probe for optimized dimensions and to allow simultaneous monitoring of several constituents with a single sensor fiber. Testing of the system demonstrates the ability to detect 70mTorr partial pressures of H{sub 2} using this technique and <280 {micro}Torr partial pressures of H{sub 2}S. In addition, a multiple sensor fiber has been demonstrated that allows a single fiber to measure H{sub 2}, H{sub 2}S, and H{sub 2}O without changing the fiber or the analytical system.

  12. Research On Fiber Optic Sensing Systems And Their Application As Final Repository Monitoring Tools

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For several years, fiber-optic sensing devices had been used for straightforward on/off monitoring functions such as presence and position detection. Recently, they gained interest as they offer a novel, exciting technology for a multitude of sensing applications. In the deep geological environment most physical properties, and thus most parameters important to safety, can be measured with fiber-optic technology. Typical examples are displacements, strains, radiation dose and dose rate, presence of some gases, temperature, pressure, etc. Their robustness, immunity to electromagnetic interference, as well as their large bandwidths and data rates ensure high reliability and superior performance. Moreover, the networking capabilities of meanwhile available fiber-optic sensors allow for efficient management of large sensor systems. Distributed sensing with multiple sensing locations on a single fiber reduces significantly the number of cables and connecting points. Reliable, cost effective, and maintenance-free solutions can thus be implemented

  13. Downhole fiber optic sensing: the oilfield service provider's perspective: from the cradle to the grave

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Neal G.; Maida, John L.

    2014-06-01

    For almost three decades, interest has continued to increase with respect to the application of fiber-optic sensing techniques for the upstream oil and gas industry. This paper reviews optical sensing technologies that have been and are being adopted downhole, as well as their drivers. A brief description of the life of a well, from the cradle to the grave, and the roles fiber-optic sensing can play in optimizing production, safety, and protection of the environment are also presented. The performance expectations (accuracy, resolution, stability, and operational lifetime) that oil companies and oil service companies have for fiber-optic sensing systems is described. Additionally, the environmental conditions (high hydrostatic pressures, high temperatures, shock, vibration, crush, and chemical exposure) that these systems must tolerate to provide reliable and economically attractive oilfield monitoring solutions are described.

  14. Applicability study of optical fiber distribution sensing to nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical fibers have advantages like flexible configuration, intrinsic immunity for electromagnetic fields etc., and they have been used for signal transmission and as optical fiber sensors (OFSs). By some of these sensor techniques, continuous or discrete distribution of physical parameters can be measured. Here, in order to discuss the applicability of these OFSs to nuclear facilities, irradiation experiments to optical fibers were carried out using the fast neutron source reactor 'YAYOI' and a 60Co ? source. It has been shown that, under irradiation with fast neutrons, the radiation induced loss increase almost linearly with the neutron fluence. On the other hand, when irradiated with 60Co ? rays, the loss shows a saturation tendency. As an example of the OFSs, applicability of the Raman distributed temperature sensor (RDTS) to the monitoring of nuclear facilities has been examined. Two correction techniques for radiation induced errors have been developed and for the demonstration of their feasibility, measurements were carried out along the primary piping system of the experimental fast reactor: JOYO. During the continuous measurements with the total dose of more than 107[R], the radiation induced errors showed a saturating tendency and the feasibility of the loss correction technique was demonstrated. Although the time response of the system should be improved, the RDTS can be expected as a noble temperature monitor in nuclear facilities. (author)

  15. Integration of fiber optical shape sensing with medical visualization for minimal-invasive interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paetz, Torben; Waltermann, Christian; Angelmahr, Martin; Ojdanic, Darko; Schade, Wolfgang; Witte, Michael; Hahn, Horst Karl

    2015-03-01

    We present a fiber optical shape sensing system that allows to track the shape of a standard telecom fiber with fiber Bragg grating. The shape sensing information is combined with a medical visualization platform to visualize the shape sensing information together with medical images and post-processing results like 3D models, vessel graphs, or segmentation results. The framework has a modular nature to use it for various medical applications like catheter or needle based interventions. The technology has potential in the medical area as it is MR-compatible and can easily be integrated in catheters and needles due to its small size.

  16. Single-frequency linear cavity erbium-doped fiber laser for fiber-optic sensing applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report a short-cavity fiber laser configured with a high-concentration erbium-doped fiber with stable single-frequency output. The fiber laser utilized a fiber Bragg grating inscribed into a piece of polarization-maintaining optical fiber as the output coupler to ensure a stable single frequency laser output. The polarization-maintaining optical fiber used in the output coupler is intended to provide the linearly polarized single-frequency laser output. The fiber laser had a maximum hundreds of micron-Watt level power output pumped by a fiber pigtailed laser diode working at 980 nm. Mode hopping phenomenon was eliminated in such a short-cavity fiber laser. Laser frequency stability less than 400 MHz over 10 minutes was obtained

  17. Polymer optical fiber large strain sensing technology based on bending loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Qian; Huang, Yin-guo; Lin, Yu-chi

    2011-11-01

    Based on the bending loss theory of polymer optical fiber, mathematical model of polymer optical fiber large strain sensing is established. Three different polymer optical fiber large strain sensitive structures are designed. And a corresponding intensity modulated polymer optical fiber large strain sensing system is established. The different aspects of properties of three designed sensitive structures are researched and compared by the means of ANSYS software simulation and experimental system. Experimental results show that the designed sensor of b-type structure is a large strain sensor, which has good performance. The b-type sensor's strain measurement range has up to 20%, moreover, its non-linear error is approximate 1.4%, and the system has advantages of high sensitivity.

  18. Temperature sensing up to 1300°C using suspended-core microstructured optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Smith, Stephen C; Nguyen, Linh Viet; Lang, Catherine; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Monro, Tanya M

    2016-02-22

    We demonstrate a new approach to high temperature sensing using femtosecond laser ablation gratings within silica suspended-core microstructured optical fibers. The simple geometry of the suspended-core fiber allows for femtosecond laser processing directly through the fiber cladding. Pure silica glass is used, allowing the sensor to be used up to temperatures as high as 1300°C while still allowing the fibre to be spliced to conventional fiber. The sensor can also be wavelength division multiplexed, with three sensors in a single fiber demonstrated. PMID:26907027

  19. Recent developments in optical fibers and how defense, security, and sensing can benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Régnier, E.; Burov, E.; Pastouret, A.; Boivin, D.; Kuyt, G.; Gooijer, F.; Bergonzo, A.; Berkers, A.; Signoret, P.; Troussellier, L.; Storaasli, O.; Nouchi, P.

    2009-05-01

    For many years, fiber manufacturers have devoted research efforts to develop fibers with improved radiation resistance, keeping the same advantages and basic properties as standard fibers. Today, both single-mode (SMF) and multimode (MMF) RadHard (for Radiation-Hardened) fibers are available; some of them are MIL-49291 certified and are already used, for example in military applications and at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in CERN or in certain nuclear power plants. These RadHard fibers can be easily connected to standard optical networks for classical data transfer or they can also be used for command control. Using some specific properties (Raman or Brillouin scattering, Bragg gratings...), such fibers can also be used as distributed sensing (temperature or strain sensors, etc) in radiation environments. At least, optical fibers can also be used for signal amplification, either in telecom networks, or in fiber lasers. This last category of fibers is called active fibers, in opposition to passive fibers used for simple signal transmission. Draka has also recently worked to improve the radiation-resistance of these active fibers, so that Draka can now offer RadHard fibers for full optical systems.

  20. Fiber-Optic Sensing System: Overview, Development and Deployment in Flight at NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Hon Man; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Richards, W. Lance

    2015-01-01

    An overview of the research and technological development of the fiber-optic sensing system (FOSS) at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Armstrong Flight Research Center (NASA AFRC) is presented. Theory behind fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors, as well as interrogation technique based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) is discussed. Assessment and validation of FOSS as an accurate measurement tool for structural health monitoring is realized in the laboratory environment as well as large-scale flight deployment.

  1. An optical fiber sensing technique for temperature distribution measurements in microwave heating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Daichi; Sugiyama, Jun-ichi; Zushi, Hiroaki; Murayama, Hideaki

    2015-08-01

    We introduce an optical fiber sensing technique that can measure the temperature distributions along a fiber during microwave heating. We used a long-length fiber Bragg grating (FBG) as an electromagnetic-immune sensor and interrogated temperature distributions along the FBG by an optical frequency domain reflectometry. Water in a glass tube with a length of 820 mm was heated in a microwave oven, and its temperature distribution along the glass tube was measured using the sensing system. The temperature distribution was obtained in 5 mm intervals. Infrared radiometry was also used to compare the temperature measurement results. Time and spatial variations of the temperature distribution profiles were monitored for several microwave input powers. The results clearly depict inhomogeneous temperature profiles. The applicability and effectiveness of the optical fiber distributed measurement technique in microwave heating are demonstrated.

  2. Dynamic Response of Tapered Optical Multimode Fiber Coated with Carbon Nanotubes for Ethanol Sensing Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arafat Shabaneh

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol is a highly combustible chemical universally designed for biomedical applications. In this paper, optical sensing performance of tapered multimode fiber tip coated with carbon nanotube (CNT thin film towards aqueous ethanol with different concentrations is investigated. The tapered optical multimode fiber tip is coated with CNT using drop-casting technique and is annealed at 70 °C to enhance the binding of the nanomaterial to the silica fiber tip. The optical fiber tip and the CNT sensing layer are micro-characterized using FESEM and Raman spectroscopy techniques. When the developed sensor was exposed to different concentrations of ethanol (5% to 80%, the sensor reflectance reduced proportionally. The developed sensors showed high sensitivity, repeatability and fast responses (<55 s towards ethanol.

  3. Characterization of Flexible Copolymer Optical Fibers for Force Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lukas J. Scherer

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, different polymer optical fibres for applications in force sensing systems in textile fabrics are reported. The proposed method is based on the deflection of the light in fibre waveguides. Applying a force on the fibre changes the geometry and affects the wave guiding properties and hence induces light loss in the optical fibre. Fibres out of three different elastic and transparent copolymer materials were successfully produced and tested. Moreover, the influence of the diameter on the sensing properties was studied. The detectable force ranges from 0.05 N to 40 N (applied on 3 cm of fibre length, which can be regulated with the material and the diameter of the fibre. The detected signal loss varied from 0.6% to 78.3%. The fibres have attenuation parameters between 0.16–0.25 dB/cm at 652 nm. We show that the cross-sensitivies to temperature, strain and bends are low. Moreover, the high yield strength (0.0039–0.0054 GPa and flexibility make these fibres very attractive candidates for integration into textiles to form wearable sensors, medical textiles or even computing systems.

  4. Use of nondestructive inspection and fiber optic sensing for damage characterization in carbon fiber fuselage structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neidigk, Stephen; Le, Jacqui; Roach, Dennis; Duvall, Randy; Rice, Tom

    2014-04-01

    To investigate a variety of nondestructive inspection technologies and assess impact damage characteristics in carbon fiber aircraft structure, the FAA Airworthiness Assurance Center, operated by Sandia National Labs, fabricated and impact tested two full-scale composite fuselage sections. The panels are representative of structure seen on advanced composite transport category aircraft and measured approximately 56"x76". The structural components consisted of a 16 ply skin, co-cured hat-section stringers, fastened shear ties and frames. The material used to fabricate the panels was T800 unidirectional pre-preg (BMS 8-276) and was processed in an autoclave. Simulated hail impact testing was conducted on the panels using a high velocity gas gun with 2.4" diameter ice balls in collaboration with the University of California San Diego (UCSD). Damage was mapped onto the surface of the panels using conventional, hand deployed ultrasonic inspection techniques, as well as more advanced ultrasonic and resonance scanning techniques. In addition to the simulated hail impact testing performed on the panels, 2" diameter steel tip impacts were used to produce representative impact damage which can occur during ground maintenance operations. The extent of impact damage ranges from less than 1 in2 to 55 in2 of interply delamination in the 16 ply skin. Substructure damage on the panels includes shear tie cracking and stringer flange disbonding. It was demonstrated that the fiber optic distributed strain sensing system is capable of detecting impact damage when bonded to the backside of the fuselage.

  5. Chalcogenide glass fibers: Optical window tailoring and suitability for bio-chemical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Pierre; Coleman, Garrett J.; Jiang, Shibin; Luo, Tao; Yang, Zhiyong

    2015-09-01

    Glassy materials based on chalcogen elements are becoming increasingly prominent in the development of advanced infrared sensors. In particular, infrared fibers constitute a desirable sensing platform due to their high sensitivity and versatile remote collection capabilities for in-situ detection. Tailoring the transparency window of an optical material to the vibrational signature of a target molecule is important for the design of infrared sensor, and particularly for fiber evanescent wave spectroscopy. Here we review the basic principles and recent developments in the fabrication of chalcogenide glass infrared fibers for application as bio-chemical sensors. We emphasize the challenges in designing materials that combine good rheological properties with chemical stability and sufficiently wide optical windows for bio-chemical sensing. The limitation in optical transparency due to higher order overtones of the amorphous network vibrations is established for this family of glasses. It is shown that glasses with wide optical window suffer from higher order overtone absorptions. Compositional engineering with heavy elements such as iodine is shown to widen the optical window but at the cost of lower chemical stability. The optical attenuations of various families of chalcogenide glass fibers are presented and weighed for their applications as chemical sensors. It is then shown that long-wave infrared fibers can be designed to optimize the collection of selective signal from bio-molecules such as cells and tissues. Issues of toxicity and mechanical resistance in the context of bio-sensing are also discussed.

  6. Erbium doped optical fiber lasers for magnetic field sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nascimento, I. M.; Baptista, J. M.; Jorge, P. A. S.; Cruz, J. L.; Andrs, M. V.

    2015-09-01

    In this work two erbium doped optical fiber laser configurations for magnetic field measurement are implemented and compared. The first laser is set-up in a loop configuration and requires only a single FBG (Fiber Bragg Grating), acting as mirror. A second laser employs a simpler linear cavity configuration but requires two FBGs with spectral overlap to form the laser cavity. A bulk magnetostrictive material made of Terfenol-D is attached to the laser FBGs enabling modulation of its operation wavelength by the magnetic field. Moreover, a passive interferometer was developed to demodulate the AC magnetic field information where the corresponding demodulation algorithms were software based. Both configurations are tested and compared with the results showing different sensitivities and resolutions. Better performance was accomplished with the double FBGs linear cavity configuration with a resolution of 0.05 mTRMS in the range of 8 to 16 mTRMS. For the same range the loop configuration attained a resolution of 0.48 mTRMS.

  7. Assessment of fiber optic sensors and other advanced sensing technologies for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corporation, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1996-03-01

    As a result of problems such as calibration drift in nuclear plant pressure sensors and the recent oil loss syndrome in some models of Rosemount pressure transmitters, the nuclear industry has become interested in fiber optic pressure sensors. Fiber optic sensing technologies have been considered for the development of advanced instrumentation and control (I&C) systems for the next generation of reactors and in older plants which are retrofitted with new I&C systems. This paper presents the results of a six-month Phase I study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. This initial Phase I study has recently been granted a two-year extension by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The next phase will evaluate fiber optic pressure sensors in specific nuclear plant applications in addition to other advanced methods for monitoring critical nuclear plant equipment.

  8. Fiber-optic Raman sensing of cell proliferation probes and molecular vibrations: Brain-imaging perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doronina-Amitonova, Lyubov V.; Fedotov, Il'ya V.; Ivashkina, Olga I.; Zots, Marina A.; Fedotov, Andrei B.; Anokhin, Konstantin V.; Zheltikov, Aleksei M.

    2012-09-01

    Optical fibers are employed to sense fingerprint molecular vibrations in ex vivo experiments on the whole brain and detect cell proliferation probes in a model study on a quantitatively controlled solution. A specifically adapted spectral filtering procedure is shown to allow the Raman signal from molecular vibrations of interest to be discriminated against the background from the fiber, allowing a highly sensitive Raman detection of the recently demonstrated EdU (5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine) labels of DNA synthesis in cells.

  9. [Development and application of six-channel fiber optic sensing drug dissolution monitor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Jun; Shen, Jing; Li, Li; Li, Xin-Xia; Chen, Jian

    2014-09-01

    The drug dissolution test is an important examination of drug testing, which plays a very important role in the drug quality assessment. Automation and proceduring monitoring of drug dissolution can be implemented by the optical fiber sensing technology. Two modes of detection of UV-Vis absorption and fluorescence quenching were established by software implementation, with xenon lamp, deuterium lamp or halogen tungsten lamp as fluorescence, UV and visible light source, branch Y type optical fiber as light path transmission medium, UV-Vis probe and fluorescence molecular probe as light response devices, and CCD as detector. Optical fiber sensing drug dissolution monitor not only solves the current problems of time-consuming, and sampling of off-line analysis, but also provides real-time information of drug dissolution process. Thus, our study may provide a better evaluation method for the drug quality control. PMID:25532369

  10. Hierarchical fiber-optic-based sensing system: impact damage monitoring of large-scale CFRP structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study proposes a novel fiber-optic-based hierarchical sensing concept for monitoring randomly induced damage in large-scale composite structures. In a hierarchical system, several kinds of specialized devices are hierarchically combined to form a sensing network. Specifically, numerous three-dimensionally structured sensor devices are distributed throughout the whole structural area and connected with an optical fiber network through transducing mechanisms. The distributed devices detect damage, and the fiber-optic network gathers the damage signals and transmits the information to a measuring instrument. This study began by discussing the basic concept of a hierarchical sensing system through comparison with existing fiber-optic-based systems, and an impact damage detection system was then proposed to validate the new concept. The sensor devices were developed based on comparative vacuum monitoring (CVM), and Brillouin-based distributed strain measurement was utilized to identify damaged areas. Verification tests were conducted step-by-step, beginning with a basic test using a single sensor unit, and, finally, the proposed monitoring system was successfully verified using a carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) fuselage demonstrator. It was clearly confirmed that the hierarchical system has better repairability, higher robustness, and a wider monitorable area compared to existing systems

  11. Advanced Fiber Optic-Based Sensing Technology for Unmanned Aircraft Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Piazza, Anthony; Ko, William L.; Chan, Patrick; Bakalyar, John

    2011-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of fiber optic sensing technology development activities performed at NASA Dryden in support of Unmanned Aircraft Systems. Examples of current and previous work are presented in the following categories: algorithm development, system development, instrumentation installation, ground R&D, and flight testing. Examples of current research and development activities are provided.

  12. Fiber Strain Measurement for Wide Region Quasidistributed Sensing by Optical Correlation Sensor with Region Separation Techniques

    OpenAIRE

    Salvador Sales; Koji Nonaka; Antonio Bueno; Xunjian Xu

    2010-01-01

    The useful application of optical pulse correlation sensor for wide region quasidistributed fiber strain measurement is investigated. Using region separation techniques of wavelength multiplexing with FBGs and time multiplexing with intensity partial reflectors, the sensor measures the correlations between reference pulses and monitoring pulses from several cascadable selected sensing regions. This novel sensing system can select the regions and obtain the distributed strain information in an...

  13. Remote Management for Multipoint Sensing Systems Using Hetero-Core Spliced Optical Fiber Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Lee See Goh; Yuji Anoda; Watanabe Kazuhiro; Norihiko Shinomiya

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the design and experimental verification of a multipoint sensing system with hetero-core spliced optical fiber sensors and its remote management using an internet-standard protocol. The study proposes two different types of design and conducts experiments to verify those systems' feasibility. In order to manage the sensing systems remotely, the management method uses a standard operation and maintenance protocol for internet: the Simple Network Management Protocol is prop...

  14. Fiber Optic Sensing Monitors Strain and Reduces Costs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    In applications where stress on a structure may vary widely and have an unknown impact on integrity, a common engineering strategy has been overbuilding to ensure a sufficiently robust design. While this may be appropriate in applications where weight concerns are not paramount, space applications demand a bare minimum of mass, given astronomical per-pound launch costs. For decades, the preferred solution was the tactic of disassembly and investigation between flights. Knowing there must be a better way, Dr. Mark Froggatt, of Langley Research Center, explored alternate means of monitoring stresses and damage to the space shuttle. While a tear-it-apart-and-have-a-look strategy was effective, it was also a costly and time consuming process that risked further stresses through the very act of disassembly and reassembly. An alternate way of monitoring the condition of parts under the enormous stresses of space flight was needed. Froggatt and his colleagues at Langley built an early-warning device to provide detailed information about even minuscule cracks and deformations by etching a group of tiny lines, or grating, on a fiber optic cable five-thousandths of an inch thick with ultraviolet light. By then gluing the fiber to the side of a part, such as a fuel tank, and shining a laser beam down its length, reflected light indicated which gratings were under stress. Inferring this data from measurements in light rather than in bonded gauges saved additional weight. Various shuttle components now employ the ultrasonic dynamic vector stress sensor (UDVSS), allowing stress detection by measuring light beamed from a built-in mini-laser. By measuring changes in dynamic directional stress occurring in a material or structure, and including phase-locked loop, synchronous amplifier, and contact probe, the UDVSS proved especially useful among manufacturers of aerospace and automotive structures for stress testing and design evaluation. Engineers could ensure safety in airplanes and spaceships with a narrower, not overbuilt, margin of safety. For this development, in 1997, Discover Magazine named Froggatt a winner in the "Eighth Annual Awards for Technological Innovation" from more than 4,000 entries.

  15. Research of AGC technology in a digital optical fiber sensing system with PGC modulation and demodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Jianfeng; Xiong, Shuidong; Zhang, Yan

    2014-11-01

    The magnitude of light intensity on the photo-to-electric detector fluctuates all the time in an optic fiber sensing system, because of the influence of various factors in the fiber optic sensing system and from the external environment. As a result of the excessive intensity, the electric signal will be overload after the amplifier circuit with constant enlargement factor, and when the light intensity becames too small, it will reduce the signal-to-noise ratio of the electric signal. Therefore, it is necessary to introduce an automatic gain control (AGC) module into the system, which can insure the electric signal in a reasonable magnitude. In order to solve the problem of optic intensity fluctuating in the optical fiber sensing system with PGC modulation and demodulation, in this paper, firstly, it is analyzed that the impact of different magnitudes of interferential intensity to the PGC demodulation in theory. Secondly, a reasonable control method is put forward and an AGC module based on the AD602 chip is designed and produced. Finally, it is proved that the optic fiber sensor system with an AGC module has strong ability to resist fluctuation of light intensity within 40dB.

  16. Distributed Long-Gauge Optical Fiber Sensors Based Self-Sensing FRP Bar for Concrete Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yongsheng; Wu, Zhishen

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin scattering-based distributed optical fiber (OF) sensing technique presents advantages for concrete structure monitoring. However, the existence of spatial resolution greatly decreases strain measurement accuracy especially around cracks. Meanwhile, the brittle feature of OF also hinders its further application. In this paper, the distributed OF sensor was firstly proposed as long-gauge sensor to improve strain measurement accuracy. Then, a new type of self-sensing fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) bar was developed by embedding the packaged long-gauge OF sensors into FRP bar, followed by experimental studies on strain sensing, temperature sensing and basic mechanical properties. The results confirmed the superior strain sensing properties, namely satisfied accuracy, repeatability and linearity, as well as excellent mechanical performance. At the same time, the temperature sensing property was not influenced by the long-gauge package, making temperature compensation easy. Furthermore, the bonding performance between self-sensing FRP bar and concrete was investigated to study its influence on the sensing. Lastly, the sensing performance was further verified with static experiments of concrete beam reinforced with the proposed self-sensing FRP bar. Therefore, the self-sensing FRP bar has potential applications for long-term structural health monitoring (SHM) as embedded sensors as well as reinforcing materials for concrete structures. PMID:26927110

  17. Optical fiber sensing of corroded materials with evanescent wave absorption measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namkung, Juock; Schwartz, Andy

    2012-06-01

    This research effort is to demonstrate a remote sensing method using optical fibers with a Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) interferometer as an evanescent wave spectroscopic technique. In addition to the usual advantages of optical fiber sensors, such as small size and weight, optical fibers can be embedded in aircraft structures in locations where humidity and corrosion can accumulate but cannot be directly observed. A fiber-optic-FTIR experimental setup, including several samples of field corroded materials, has been assembled to spectrally detect Aluminum Hydroxide [Al(OH)3] which is one of the major components of aluminum corrosion. Absorption spectra of Al(OH)3 have been collected using an Attenuated Total Reflection (ATR) crystal as a reference spectral signature. The absorption spectra of samples from a simulated corrosion process and from the field corroded structures have been collected and compared with the reference Al(OH)3 spectra. Chalcogenide optical fibers are used for remote sensing purposes to detect corrosion. Two distinctive absorption peaks, attributable to aluminum hydroxide, are noticed from the simulated corrosion and from the field corroded structures.

  18. Electrically Insulated Sensing of Respiratory Rate and Heartbeat Using Optical Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Ernesto Suaste-Gmez; Daniel Hernndez-Rivera; Snchez-Snchez, Anabel S.; Elsy Villarreal-Calva

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory and heart rates are among the most important physiological parameters used to monitor patients health. It is important to design devices that can measure these parameters without risking or altering the subjects health. In this context, a novel sensing method to monitor simultaneously the heartbeat and respiratory rate signals of patients within an electrically safety environment was developed and tested. An optical fiber-based sensor was used in order to detect two optical phen...

  19. Fiber-optic ultrasonic sensing systems using PS-FBG for damage monitoring in composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, Yoji; Wu, Qi

    2015-07-01

    Fiber-optic ultrasonic sensing systems have been developed for structural health monitoring of composite structures by introduction of phase-shifted fiber Bragg gratings (PS-FBGs). The systems can achieve the compatibility of high sensitivity and broadband performance. First, PS-FBG balanced sensing system was developed and succeeded in detection of small acoustic emission signals of composite laminates. Next, erbium fiber ring laser sensing system with inbuilt PS-FBG was developed. This system has high robustness due to its self-adjustment function for environmental disturbances and achieved much higher sensitivity and ultra-broadband respondency than piezoelectric ceramic sensors. These systems have large potential to realize the ultrasonic SHM.

  20. Fiber optic sensing system for monitoring of coal waste piles in combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveiros, D.; Ribeiro, J.; Carvalho, J. P.; Ferreira, J.; Pinto, A. M. R.; Perez-Herrera, R. A.; Diaz, S.; Lopez-Gil, A.; Dominguez-Lopez, A.; Esteban, O.; Martins, H. F.; Martin-Lopez, S.; Baierl, H.; Auguste, J.-L.; Jamier, R.; Rougier, S.; Santos, J. L.; Flores, D.; Roy, P.; Gonzlez-Herrez, M.; Lpez-Amo, M.; Baptista, J. M.

    2014-05-01

    The combustion of coal wastes resulting from mining is of particular environmental concern and therefore the importance of the proper management involving real-time assessment of their status and identification of probable evolution scenarios is recognized. Continuous monitoring of combustion temperature and emission levels of certain gases opens the possibility to plan corrective actions to minimize their negative impact in the surroundings. Optical fiber technology is well-suited to this purpose and in this work it is described the main attributes of a fiber optic sensing system projected to gather data on distributed temperature and gas emission in these harsh environments.

  1. A hydrostatic leak test for water pipeline by using distributed optical fiber vibration sensing system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Huijuan; Sun, Zhenshi; Qian, Ya; Zhang, Tao; Rao, Yunjiang

    2015-07-01

    A hydrostatic leak test for water pipeline with a distributed optical fiber vibration sensing (DOVS) system based on the phase-sensitive OTDR technology is studied in this paper. By monitoring one end of a common communication optical fiber cable, which is laid in the inner wall of the pipe, we can detect and locate the water leakages easily. Different apertures under different pressures are tested and it shows that the DOVS has good responses when the aperture is equal or larger than 4 mm and the inner pressure reaches 0.2 Mpa for a steel pipe with DN 91cm×EN 2cm.

  2. Fiber optic refractometric sensors using a semi-ellipsoidal sensing element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro Martinez, Amalia Nallely; Komanec, Matej; Nemecek, Tomas; Zvanovec, Stanislav; Khotiaintsev, Sergei

    2016-04-01

    We present theoretical and experimental results for a fiber optic refractometric sensor employing a semi-ellipsoidal sensing element made of polymethyl methacrylate. The double internal reflection of light inside the element provides sensitivity to the refractive index of the external analyte. We demonstrate that the developed sensor, operating at a wavelength of 632 nm, is capable of measurement within a wide range of refractive indices from n=1.00 to n=1.47 with sensitivity over 500 dB/RIU. A comparison of the developed sensor with two more complex refractometric sensors, one based on tapered optical fiber and the other based on suspended-core microstructure optical fiber, is presented. PMID:27139659

  3. Fiber Optic Shape Sensing for Tethered Marsupial Rovers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations Incorporated is proposing to design, build, and test a shape, length, and tension sensing tether for robotic exploration and sample-gathering...

  4. Fiber Optic Shape Sensing for Tethered Marsupial Rovers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Building upon the successful proof of concept work in Phase I, Luna Innovations Incorporated is proposing to design, build, and test a sensing tether for marsupial...

  5. Surface Plasmon Scattering in Exposed Core Optical Fiber for Enhanced Resolution Refractive Index Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizaveta Klantsataya

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Refractometric sensors based on optical excitation of surface plasmons on the side of an optical fiber is an established sensing architecture that has enabled laboratory demonstrations of cost effective portable devices for biological and chemical applications. Here we report a Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR configuration realized in an Exposed Core Microstructured Optical Fiber (ECF capable of optimizing both sensitivity and resolution. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of fabrication of a rough metal coating suitable for spectral interrogation of scattered plasmonic wave using chemical electroless plating technique on a 10 μm diameter exposed core of the ECF. Performance of the sensor in terms of its refractive index sensitivity and full width at half maximum (FWHM of SPR response is compared to that achieved with an unstructured bare core fiber with 140 μm core diameter. The experimental improvement in FWHM, and therefore the detection limit, is found to be a factor of two (75 nm for ECF in comparison to 150 nm for the large core fiber. Refractive index sensitivity of 1800 nm/RIU was achieved for both fibers in the sensing range of aqueous environment (1.33–1.37 suitable for biosensing applications.

  6. Ratiometric optical fiber sensor for dual sensing of copper ion and dissolved oxygen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Cheng-Shane; Chuang, Chih-Yung

    2015-12-20

    This paper develops a new ratiometric optical dual sensor for Cu2+ ions and dissolved oxygen (DO) incorporating a sol-gel matrix doped with palladium tetrakis pentafluorophenyl porphine as the oxygen-sensitive material, CdSe quantum dots as the Cu2+ ion-sensing material, and 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin as the Cu2+/DO practically independent fluorescent dye. The feasibility of coating an optical fiber with the sensing film to fabricate a ratiometric optical fiber dual sensor is investigated. Using an LED with a central wavelength of 405nm as an excitation source, it is shown that the emission wavelengths of the Cu2+ ion-sensitive, DO-sensitive dye and the reference dye have no spectral overlap and therefore permit Cu2+ ion and DO concentration to be measured using a ratiometric-based method. The ratiometric optical fiber dual sensor has been tested with regard to monitoring different Cu2+ ion (0-10?M) and DO concentrations (0-38mg/L). The results show that the luminescence properties of the Cu2+ ion sensor are independent of the presence of the oxygen sensor and have a uniquely good linear response in the 0-10?M range. The proposed ratiometric sensing approach presented in this study has the advantage of suppressing spurious fluctuations in the intensity of the excitation source. PMID:26837033

  7. Comprehensive long distance and real-time pipeline monitoring system based on fiber optic sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikles, Marc; Ravet, Fabien; Briffod, Fabien [Omnisens S.A., Morges (Switzerland)

    2009-07-01

    An increasing number of pipelines are constructed in remote regions affected by harsh environmental conditions. These pipeline routes often cross mountain areas which are characterized by unstable grounds and where soil texture changes between winter and summer increase the probability of hazards. Due to the long distances to be monitored and the linear nature of pipelines, distributed fiber optic sensing techniques offer significant advantages and the capability to detect and localize pipeline disturbance with great precision. Furthermore pipeline owner/operators lay fiber optic cable parallel to transmission pipelines for telecommunication purposes and at minimum additional cost monitoring capabilities can be added to the communication system. The Brillouin-based Omnisens DITEST monitoring system has been used in several long distance pipeline projects. The technique is capable of measuring strain and temperature over 100's kilometers with meter spatial resolution. Dedicated fiber optic cables have been developed for continuous strain and temperature monitoring and their deployment along the pipeline has enabled permanent and continuous pipeline ground movement, intrusion and leak detection. This paper presents a description of the fiber optic Brillouin-based DITEST sensing technique, its measurement performance and limits, while addressing future perspectives for pipeline monitoring. (author)

  8. Fiber Loop Ringdown — a Time-Domain Sensing Technique for Multi-Function Fiber Optic Sensor Platforms: Current Status and Design Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Chuji Wang

    2009-01-01

    Fiber loop ringdown (FLRD) utilizes an inexpensive telecommunications light source, a photodiode, and a section of single-mode fiber to form a uniform fiber optic sensor platform for sensing various quantities, such as pressure, temperature, strain, refractive index, chemical species, biological cells, and small volume of fluids. In FLRD, optical losses of a light pulse in a fiber loop induced by changes in a quantity are measured by the light decay time constants. FLRD measures time to detec...

  9. Intrinsic optical fiber sensor for sensing organophosphate nerve agent using the modified cladding approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Lalitkumar; El-Sherif, Mahmoud

    2004-03-01

    The concept of modified cladding based sensors represents the largest class of intrinsic fiber optic chemical sensors. In this design, the passive cladding of the optical fiber is replaced by an active coating, called modified cladding. The analyte in this case diffuses into the coating and induces changes in the absorbance, fluorescence, or some other spectroscopic property of the modified cladding, the coating acts as a chemo-chromic transducer and sensing takes place by intensity modulation. This design i.e. of the coating based sensors, has found enormous applicability in the realm of chemical and biochemical sensing which also includes environmental monitoring and detection of chemical warfare agents. In this paper, the development of an intrinsic fiber optic sensor for detection of organophosphate dimethyl-methyl phoshopnate (DMMP) is presented. DMMP is a chemical precursor to the nerve agent sarin. The chemo-chromic transducer material used as a modified coating on the fiber core is NDSA (Naphthalene disulphonic acid) doped polypyrrole. This coating material shows conductivity and absorbance change when exposed to DMMP. The fabrication of the sensor device is a three step process which involves (a) etching a small section of the optical fiber to expose the core, (b) coating the etched section of the optical fiber with the polymer, (c) integration of sensor components and testing. Thin film characterization is done using the UV-Vis spectrophotometer on in-situ coated films of polypyrrole on a glass substrate to check for absorbance change upon exposure to DMMP. The development procedure is presented next and encouraging results are discussed.

  10. OptaSense distributed acoustic and seismic sensing using COTS fiber optic cables for infrastructure protection and counter terrorism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duckworth, Gregory L.; Ku, Emery M.

    2013-06-01

    The OptaSense® Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) technology can turn any cable with single-mode optical fiber into a very large and densely sampled acoustic/seismic sensor array—covering up to a 50 km aperture per system with "virtual" sensor separations as small as 1 meter on the unmodified cable. The system uses Rayleigh scattering from the imperfections in the fiber to return the optical signals measuring local fiber strain from seismic or air and water acoustic signals. The scalable system architecture can provide border monitoring and high-security perimeter and linear asset protection for a variety of industries—from nuclear facilities to oil and gas pipelines. This paper presents various application architectures and system performance examples for detection, localization, and classification of personnel footsteps, vehicles, digging and tunneling, gunshots, aircraft, and earthquakes. The DAS technology can provide a costeffective alternative to unattended ground sensors and geophone arrays, and a complement or alternative to imaging and radar sensors in many applications. The transduction, signal processing, and operator control and display technology will be described, and performance examples will be given from research and development testing and from operational systems on pipelines, critical infrastructure perimeters, railroads, and roadways. Potential new applications will be discussed that can take advantage of existing fiber-optic telecommunications infrastructure as "the sensor"—leading to low-cost and high-coverage systems.

  11. Analysis of the acoustic response in water and sand of different fiber optic sensing cables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, Joachim; Facchini, Massimo; Lowell, Mark

    2015-05-01

    Distributed Acoustic Sensing (DAS) is a highly promising technology to efficiently monitor assets for energy production and transportation, both off- and on-shore, such as boreholes, pipelines and risers. The aim of the hereby-presented measurements is to evaluate the sensitivity of the different optical fiber cables to acoustic signals in sand and water, independently from the DAS read-out unit type and manufacturer. Acoustic sensing cables specifically designed by BRUGG Cables are characterized and compared to standard telecommunication cables. The spectral response of each cable was quantified using an all-fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer. The response was also measured with calibrated microphones in order to convert the measurements into absolute physical units (Pascal). The measurement campaign is part of an investigation program for a reliable DAS system, which comprises the sensing cable (including installation procedure), the interrogator unit and suitable software.

  12. Research and application of optical fiber sensing technology in wireless temperature monitoring of switchgear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Weibing; Zhang, Cui

    2013-09-01

    In view of the high voltage, strong magnetic field environment of high voltage switchgear, the isolation contact temperature measurement scheme of optical fiber based on wireless sensor technology realizes the contact temperature monitoring of high-voltage switchgear. In this scheme, good thermal conductivity and insulation ceramic materials are selected as outer jacket material sensing probe, and the program has a good solution to the problem of high and low voltage isolation; Combination of optical fiber composite insulator for wireless sensing, solves the problem of high voltage insulation, but also to avoid the "creeping" phenomenon due to dust. The package structure and reasonable installation solve the cross sensitivity of strain. Application shows that the precision of temperature measurement of the system can reach 0.5 and can work in a variety of harsh environment. It can improve the reliability of the operation of electrical equipment significantly and has considerable practical value for the normal operation of the whole power system.

  13. Seepage and settlement monitoring for earth embankment dams using fully distributed sensing along optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, P. Y.; Zhou, Y.; Thvenaz, Luc; Jiang, G. L.

    2008-12-01

    A method for seepage and settlement monitoring in earth embankment dams using fully distributed sensing along optical fibres is proposed. A model is developed for simulating and monitoring seepage and settlement systems. This model relates the strains and the temperature changes to the fiber Brillouin gain spectrum in the embankment dam embedding the optical fiber sensors. The model consists of two parts. Submodel 1 addresses the simulation of seepage inside the embankment dam. Submodel 2 relates the measurement of the fiber Brillouin gain spectrum to the changes in temperature and strain inside the embankment dam. Both the changes in temperature and strain during the process are used to reveal serious seepages and settlements occurring inside the embankment dam. The continuously decreasing temperature curve shows an abrupt dramatic increasing rate, which shows that the change is not caused by the temperature of the seepage water but the strain. In this paper, as an example, a model filled with the soil from Yellow River is built and bare optical fibers are embedded under different soil layers near the seepage path. The simulated seepage flows under various flow rates are monitored using the optical fibers and measured by a DiTeSt -STA202 distributed temperature and strain analyzer. A partial settlement within the embankment dam model is observed.

  14. Two Fiber Optical Fiber Thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Mathew R.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Breeding, Shawn P.

    2000-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose sensing tip is given a metallic coating. The sensing tip of the fiber is essentially an isothermal cavity, so the emission from this cavity will be approximately equal to the emission from a blackbody. Temperature readings are obtained by measuring the spectral radiative heat flux at the end of the fiber at two wavelengths. The ratio of these measurements and Planck's Law are used to infer the temperature at the sensing tip. Optical fiber thermometers have high accuracy, excellent long-term stability and are immune to electromagnetic interference. In addition, they can be operated for extended periods without requiring re-calibration. For these reasons. it is desirable to use optical fiber thermometers in environments such as the International Space Station. However, it has recently been shown that temperature readings are corrupted by emission from the fiber when extended portions of the probe are exposed to elevated temperatures. This paper will describe several ways in which the reading from a second fiber can be used to correct the corrupted temperature measurements. The accuracy and sensitivity to measurement uncertainty will be presented for each method.

  15. Sensing nanometric displacement of a micro-/nano-fiber induced by optical forces by use of white light interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Weiqia; Huang, Hankai; Yu, Jianhui; Dong, Huazhuo; Chen, Zhe; Lu, Huihui

    2015-07-01

    Sensing the nanometric displacement of a micro-/nano-fiber induced by optical forces is a key technology to study optical forces and optical momentum. When the gap between a micro-/nano-fiber and glass substrate becomes down to micrometer scale or less, a white light interference was observed. The gap changes when optical force arising from the propagating pump light along the micro-/nano-fiber causes a transversal nanometric displacement of a micro-/nanofiber, resulting in movement of the interferometric fringes. Therefore this movement of the interferometric fringes can be used to sense the nanometric displacement of the micro-/nano-fiber induced by optical forces. Experimental results show that the resolutions of this method can reach 7.27nm/pixel for tilted angle 0.8o between the micro-/nano-fiber and substrate. It is concluded that the white light interferometry method is suitable for measuring the weak optical force.

  16. Fiber Optic Sensors for Health Monitoring of Morphing Airframes. Part 2; Chemical Sensing Using Optical Fibers with Bragg Gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Karen; Brown, Timothy; Rogowski, Robert; Jensen, Brian

    2000-01-01

    Part 1 of this two part series described the fabrication and calibration of Bragg gratings written into a single mode optical fiber for use in strain and temperature monitoring. Part 2 of the series describes the use of identical fibers and additional multimode fibers, both with and without Bragg gratings, to perform near infrared spectroscopy. The demodulation system being developed at NASA Langley Research Center currently requires the use of a single mode optical fiber. Attempts to use this single mode fiber for spectroscopic analysis are problematic given its small core diameter, resulting in low signal intensity. Nonetheless, we have conducted a preliminary investigation using a single mode fiber in conjunction with an infrared spectrometer to obtain spectra of a high-performance epoxy resin system. Spectra were obtained using single mode fibers that contained Bragg gratings; however, the peaks of interest were barely discernible above the noise. The goal of this research is to provide a multipurpose sensor in a single optical fiber capable of measuring a variety of chemical and physical properties.

  17. Distributed fiber-optic temperature sensing: recent improvements and Nagra's applications in the Mont Terri URL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: The application of fiber-optic sensors in large experiments in underground rock laboratories (URL) and for monitoring of pilot repositories offers several advantages in contrast to conventional sensors. By means of optical fibers distributed temperature and deformation measurements can be performed without electric or mechanical components at the measurement location reducing the risk of corrosion and sensor failure. As fiber-optic strain sensors are to some extend still in a prototype stage, we focus here on Raman spectra distributed fiber-optic temperature sensing (DTS). In DTS a fiber-optic cable, which is the temperature sensor, is connected to a light reading unit that sends laser-pulses into the fiber. The backscattered light is detected with high temporal resolution. From the two-way-light-travel-time the location of backscattering is determined. For the temperature information the amplitude ratio of the Stokes and anti-Stokes signals is analyzed. The Stokes and anti- Stokes signals are the result of the Raman effect. The ratio of these signals provides a quantity that depends only on the temperature of the fiber at the location of backscatter. With commercial DTS setups it is possible to measure the temperature distribution along several kilometer long cables with a temperature resolution of 0.01 C and a spatial resolution of 1 m. Recent developments in DTS focus on better temperature precision and resolution. This advancement can be achieved by experiment-specific calibration techniques and sensor-layout as well as improved instruments. To realize high spatial resolution (cm range) wrapped fiber-optic cables can be applied. Another promising approach to monitor moisture along a fiber-optic cable installed in unconsolidated material are heatable cables. We will present a selection of the most recent advancements which may improve temperature monitoring in natural and engineered clay-barriers using DTS. In addition, first results and experiences of Nagra's DTS applications in the Mont Terri URL will be presented. Fiber-optic sensors were installed within the Full-Scale Emplacement (FE) Experiment. The FE-experiment is a full-scale heater test also simulating the construction, emplacement and backfilling of a repository tunnel according to the Swiss concept for high level waste. The THM evolution in the host rock (near- and far-field), tunnel lining and the engineered barrier system will be monitored by several hundred conventional sensors. In addition to thermo-resistive conventional temperature sensors fiber-optic cables amend the temperature monitoring. In the host rock 45 m long inclinometer casings are equipped with fiber-optic cables to observe the longitudinal temperature evolution above the tunnel. The temperature distribution at the interface engineered barrier - tunnel lining is planned to be monitored by fiber-optic cables covering the surface of the tunnel lining. The fiber-optics in combination with the conventional temperature sensors will result in detailed insights into non-uniformity of heat transport within the engineered barrier and the host rock caused by spatial and temporal variability of thermal conductivity and therewith saturation and porosity. (authors)

  18. An optical fiber sensor for remote pH sensing and imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jian; Wang, Lili

    2012-03-01

    A fiber-optical probe for pH sensing and real-time imaging is successfully fabricated by connecting a polymer imaging fiber and a gradient index (GRIN) lens rod which was modified with a sensing film. By employing an improved metallographic microscope, an optical system is designed to cooperate with the probe. This novel technique has high-quality imaging capabilities for observing remote samples while measuring pH. The linear range of the probe is pH 1.2-3.5. This technique overcomes the difficulty that high-quality images cannot be obtained when directly using conventional imaging bundles for pH sensing and imaging. As preliminary applications, the corrosion behavior of an iron screw and the reaction process of rust were investigated in buffer solutions of pH 2.0 and 2.9, respectively. The experiment demonstrated that the pH values of the analytes' surface were higher than that of buffer solutions due to the chemical reaction. It provides great potential for applications in optical multifunctional detection, especially in chemical sensing and biosensing. PMID:22449307

  19. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  20. Self-referencing fiber optic particle plasmon resonance sensing system for real-time biological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chin-Wei; Chiang, Chang-Yue; Chen, Chien-Hsing; Chiang, Chung-Sheng; Wang, Chih-To; Chau, Lai-Kwan

    2016-01-01

    We present the design and experimental verification of a self-referencing dual-channel fiber optic particle plasmon resonance (FOPPR) sensing system for compensation of thermal and bulk-composition effects as well as nonspecific adsorption in real-time biosensing of complex samples. A theoretical model is first proposed and then a systematic experimental approach is used to verify the model. The sensing system comprises an analysis fiber sensor and a reference fiber sensor in a single microfluidic chip, where the analysis fiber is functionalized with a recognition molecule. The compensation still works even if the surface coverages of gold nanoparticles on the reference and analysis fibers are not exactly the same. The potential of this approach is illustrated by a model biosensing experiment in which the detection of anti-biotin is compensated for bulk refractive index change, nonspecific adsorption and/or color interference, in various sample media. The percent recovery is 103.2% under both the effects of bulk refractive index change and nonspecific adsorption and is 93.9% under both the effects of color interference and nonspecific adsorption, suggesting that the compensation is effective. PMID:26695266

  1. Nanoliter-scale, regenerable ion sensor: sensing with surface functionalized microstructured optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Sabrina; Nguyen, Mai-Chi; Kostecki, Roman; Monro, Tanya M.; Abell, Andrew D.

    2013-05-01

    The first nanoliter-scale regenerable ion sensor based on microstructured optical fiber (MOF) is reported. The air holes of the MOF are functionalized with a monoazacrown bearing spiropyran to give a switchable sensor that detects lithium ions down to 100 nM in nanoliter-scale volumes. Ion binding is turned on and off on upon irradiation with light, with the sensor being unaffected by multiple rounds of photoswitching. Unbound ions are flushed from the fiber in the `off' state to allow the sensor to be reused. The integration of an ionophore into the sensor paves the way for the development of highly specific light-based sensing platforms that are readily adaptable to sense a particular ion simply by altering the ionophore design.

  2. Structural health monitoring of composite-based UAVs using simultaneous fiber optic interrogation by static Rayleigh-based distributed sensing and dynamic fiber Bragg grating point sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tur, Moshe; Sovran, Ido; Bergman, Arik; Motil, Avi; Shapira, Osher; Ben-Simon, Uri; Kressel, Iddo

    2015-09-01

    Embedded fiber-optic strain sensing networks for airworthy assessment of operational Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) are presented. Sensing is based on in-flight fiber Bragg grating technology, as well as on on-ground Rayleigh backscattering distributed strain sensing. While the in-flight instrumentation monitors loads, looking for excessive values, the Rayleigh-based technique is used for high spatial resolution strain distribution along the UAV wings, under prescribed loading. Consistency of measurements over time indicates structural integrity. Simultaneous strain measurements using both distributed Rayleigh and fiber Bragg gratings, on the same fiber, promises to combine high spatial resolution, though practically static measurements with dynamic, though discrete ones.

  3. A Self-Referencing Intensity-Based Fiber Optic Sensor with Multipoint Sensing Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Jin Choi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available A self-referencing, intensity-based fiber optic sensor (FOS is proposed and demonstrated. The theoretical analysis for the proposed design is given, and the validity of the theoretical analysis is confirmed via experiments. We define the measurement parameter, X, and the calibration factor, β, to find the transfer function, , of the intensity-based FOS head. The self-referencing and multipoint sensing characteristics of the proposed system are validated by showing the measured  and relative error versus the optical power attenuation of the sensor head for four cases: optical source fluctuation, various remote sensing point distances, fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs with different characteristics, and multiple sensor heads with cascade and/or parallel forms. The power-budget analysis and limitations of the measurement rates are discussed, and the measurement results of fiber-reinforced plastic (FRP coupon strain using the proposed FOS are given as an actual measurement. The proposed FOS has several benefits, including a self-referencing characteristic, the flexibility to determine FBGs, and a simple structure in terms of the number of devices and measuring procedure.

  4. Robust-fusion optic fiber distance and orientation integrated sensing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Gui-xiong; Kuang, Yong-cong; Xu, Jing; Li, Xia-ni

    2005-02-01

    A robust-fusion optic fiber sensor technology of proximity distance and orientation integration is studied in this paper. A novel optic fiber sensing head with redundant information, which can measure distance and orientation in any pose as well as compensate fluctuation caused by changing parameters such as surface reflectivity, light intensity and characteristic shifting from photoelectric-converter device, is proposed. The implement method of sensor network compensation is introduced. An improved BP network arithmetic, which can enhance the dynamic characteristic and measurement accuracy of the sensing system, is presented. To speed up the convergence rate of BP network training, GA -BP training method is applied. An intelligent signal detecting and processing system based on DSP is designed, the strong data processing ability of DSP makes the system hardware structure simplified. The method of moderate output light power control is put forward for enlarging the measuring range. Experiment result shows that robust-fusion optic fiber proximity sensor system has the distance measuring range of 0.1~19.9mm and the orientation measuring range of 0~25°. The measuring time of each point is 92.5ms.

  5. Early work on fiber optic gyro technology at McDonnell Douglas and spinoffs leading to acoustic sensing, distributed sensing, and a secure fiber optic communication system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udd, Eric

    2006-08-01

    In the late 1970s the closed loop fiber optic gyro was invented and demonstrated at McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company in Huntington Beach, California. This development was followed by a series of derivative inventions that included the Sagnac acoustic sensor, Sagnac distributed sensors and finally a Sagnac secure fiber optic communication system. This paper provides an overview of these developments.

  6. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-07-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor is being developed that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Two critical materials issues are the cluster's ability to withstand high temperatures when immobilized in a porous the sol-gel support, and whether after heating to high temperatures, the sol-gel matrix maintains a high and constant permeability to oxygen to support rapid quenching of luminescence. We used a composite materials approach to prepare stable sensing layers on optical fibers. We dispersed 60 w/w% of a pre-cured sol-gel composite containing the potassium salt of molybdenum clusters (K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}) into a sol-gel binder solution, and established the conditions necessary for deposition of sol-gel films on optical fibers and planar substrates. The fiber sensor has an output signal of 5 nW when pumped with an inexpensive commercial 365 nm ultraviolet light emitting diode (LED). Quenching of the sensor signal by oxygen was observed up to a gas temperature of 175 C with no degradation of the oxygen permeability of the composite after high temperature cycling. On planar substrates the cluster containing composite responds within <1 second to a gas exchange from nitrogen to oxygen, indicating the feasibility of real-time oxygen detection.

  7. Application of optical fiber sensing technique to fast breeder reactor plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical fiber thermometers have some characteristics such as non-induction for electromagnetic interference noises, capability of measuring continuous temperature distribution ranging to even some km along the fiber by differing from conventional electric spot-type sensors such as thermocouple, and so on, so it can be expected to largely contribute to safety and reliability from viewpoints of monitoring and maintenance of plants, by applying the characteristics to temperature measurements of apparatuses and pipings in a fast breeder reactor (FBR) plant. As temperature measuring technology using optical fibers is already practiced at fire detection of buildings, tunnels, and so on, because of increasing transmission loss based on effects of radiation when using at nuclear reactor plants, it is important to adequately compensate this increase. Here was introduced an R and D result to make practice on temperature and radiation measuring methods at radiation environment, by applying optical fiber sensing technique to the fast breeder test-reactor, 'Joyo' of a sodium cooling-type FBR of JNC. (G.K.)

  8. An Implantable Neural Sensing Microsystem with Fiber-Optic Data Transmission and Power Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon-Kyu Song

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a prototype cortical neural sensing microsystem for brain implantable neuroengineering applications. Its key feature is that both the transmission of broadband, multichannel neural data and power required for the embedded microelectronics are provided by optical fiber access. The fiber-optic system is aimed at enabling neural recording from rodents and primates by converting cortical signals to a digital stream of infrared light pulses. In the full microsystem whose performance is summarized in this paper, an analog-to-digital converter and a low power digital controller IC have been integrated with a low threshold, semiconductor laser to extract the digitized neural signals optically from the implantable unit. The microsystem also acquires electrical power and synchronization clocks via optical fibers from an external laser by using a highly efficient photovoltaic cell on board. The implantable unit employs a flexible polymer substrate to integrate analog and digital microelectronics and on-chip optoelectronic components, while adapting to the anatomical and physiological constraints of the environment. A low power analog CMOS chip, which includes preamplifier and multiplexing circuitry, is directly flip-chip bonded to the microelectrode array to form the cortical neurosensor device.

  9. Temperature sensing in high voltage transmission lines using fiber Bragg grating and free-space-optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floridia, Claudio; Rosolem, Joao B.; Leonardi, Ariovaldo A.; Hortencio, Claudio A.; Fonseca, Romeu F.; Moreira, Rodrigo O. C.; Souza, Giovani C. L.; Melo, Altair L.; Nascimento, Carlos A. M.

    2013-05-01

    In this work we proposed the use of free-space-optics (FSO) to transmit and receive the optical signals from optical fiber placed in ground potential to the FBG fiber optics at high voltage potential, using a pair of optical collimators. The technique evaluation was performed in a prototype for the study of sensitivity to optical alignment and in an external environment using emulated sensing systems for both bus bar and overhead transmission line with real isolator chain. It has been shown that the FSO system allows collimators operate at distances of 500 mm to 2.000 mm. This range of distances is similar to the length of insulator's chain up to 230 kV. It was also shown that the proposed system can be used in real external environment for bus bar temperature monitoring in substations, where, even if the time out of the system is of 45%, with major interruption time of almost 15 hours, the majority of the interruption time was less than 18 minutes long. On the other hand, system has to be improved in order to be used in overhead transmission line. As tested for a real isolator chain the system shown a time out of 80.3%, with significant number of events of interruption acquisition time greater than 150 minutes. It is believed that for overhead power lines, system must be installed in rigid surge arresters or in a line post where it is expected to have similar results as in substation bus bars monitoring.

  10. Fiber optic detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  11. Sensing of corrosion on aluminum surfaces by use of metallic optical fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Saying; Liao, Yanbiao; Tian, Qian

    2005-10-20

    We present a new method for monitoring aluminum corrosion by determining the kind of light output that is as corrosion occurs. We prepared some metallized multimode optical fibers by physical vacuum deposition of aluminum to monitor metal corrosion. The sensing area was 1-2 cm in length and had an uncladded part. We used scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) to observe the microappearance of the aluminum before and after corrosion by sodium hydroxide or hydrochloric acid. The film's thickness was also measured by SEM. The factors that affect the rate of corrosion were also investigated. PMID:16252643

  12. Sensing of corrosion on aluminum surfaces by use of metallic optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Saying; Liao, Yanbiao; Tian, Qian

    2005-10-01

    We present a new method for monitoring aluminum corrosion by determining the kind of light output that is as corrosion occurs. We prepared some metallized multimode optical fibers by physical vacuum deposition of aluminum to monitor metal corrosion. The sensing area was 1 2 cm in length and had an uncladded part. We used scanning-electron microscopy (SEM) to observe the microappearance of the aluminum before and after corrosion by sodium hydroxide or hydrochloric acid. The film's thickness was also measured by SEM. The factors that affect the rate of corrosion were also investigated.

  13. Overview of Fiber Optic Sensor Technologies for Strain/Temperature Sensing Applications in Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramakrishnan, Manjusha; Rajan, Ginu; Semenova, Yuliya; Farrell, Gerald

    2016-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the different types of fiber optic sensors (FOS) that can be used with composite materials and also their compatibility with and suitability for embedding inside a composite material. An overview of the different types of FOS used for strain/temperature sensing in composite materials is presented. Recent trends, and future challenges for FOS technology for condition monitoring in smart composite materials are also discussed. This comprehensive review provides essential information for the smart materials industry in selecting of appropriate types of FOS in accordance with end-user requirements. PMID:26784192

  14. Optical Fiber Networks for Remote Fiber Optic Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Montserrat Fernandez-Vallejo; Manuel Lopez-Amo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of optical fiber sensor networks for remote sensing. Firstly, the state of the art of remote fiber sensor systems has been considered. We have summarized the great evolution of these systems in recent years; this progress confirms that fiber-optic remote sensing is a promising technology with a wide field of practical applications. Afterwards, the most representative remote fiber-optic sensor systems are briefly explained, discussing their schemes, challenges, ...

  15. Optical sensing elements for nitrogen dioxide (NO.sub.2) gas detection, a sol-gel method for making the sensing elements and fiber optic sensors incorporating nitrogen dioxide gas optical sensing elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechery, Shelly John; Singh, Jagdish P.

    2007-07-03

    A sensing element, a method of making a sensing element, and a fiber optic sensor incorporating the sensing element are described. The sensor can be used for the quantitative detection of NO.sub.2 in a mixture of gases. The sensing element can be made by incorporating a diazotizing reagent which reacts with nitrous ions to produce a diazo compound and a coupling reagent which couples with the diazo compound to produce an azo dye into a sol and allowing the sol to form an optically transparent gel. The sensing element changes color in the presence of NO.sub.2 gas. The temporal response of the absorption spectrum at various NO.sub.2 concentrations has also been recorded and analyzed. Sensors having different design configurations are described. The sensing element can detect NO.sub.2 gas at levels of parts per billion.

  16. Fiber optic sensing system for temperature and gas monitoring in coal waste pile combustion environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viveiros, D.; Ribeiro, J.; Ferreira, J.; Lopez-Albada, A.; Pinto, A. M. R.; Perez-Herrera, R. A.; Diaz, S.; Lopez-Gil, A.; Dominguez-Lopez, A.; Esteban, O.; Martin-Lopez, S.; Auguste, J.-L.; Jamier, R.; Rougier, S.; Silva, S. O.; Frazo, O.; Santos, J. L.; Flores, D.; Roy, P.; Gonzalez-Herraez, M.; Lopez-Amo, M.; Baptista, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    It is presented an optical fiber sensing system projected to operate in the demanding conditions associated with coal waste piles in combustion. Distributed temperature measurement and spot gas sensing are requirements for such a system. A field prototype has been installed and is continuously gathering data, which will input a geological model of the coal waste piles in combustion aiming to understand their dynamics and evolution. Results are presented on distributed temperature and ammonia measurement, being noticed any significant methane emission in the short time period considered. Carbon dioxide is also a targeted gas for measurement, with validated results available soon. The assessment of this technology as an effective and reliable tool to address the problem of monitoring coal waste piles in combustion opens the possibility of its widespread application in view of the worldwide presence of coal related fires.

  17. Sensing interrogation technique for fiber-optic interferometer type of sensors based on a single-passband RF filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hao; Zhang, Shiwei; Fu, Hongyan; Zhou, Bin; Chen, Nan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, a sensing interrogation system for fiber-optic interferometer type of sensors by using a single-passband radio-frequency (RF) filter has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The fiber-optic interferometer based sensors can give continuous optical sampling, and along with dispersive medium a single-passband RF frequency response can be achieved. The sensing parameter variation on the fiber-optic interferometer type of sensors will affect their free spectrum range, and thus the peak frequency of the RF filter. By tracking the central frequency of the passband the sensing parameter can be demodulated. As a demonstration, in our experiment a fiber Mach-Zehnder interferometer (FMZI) based temperature sensor has been interrogated. By tracking the peak frequency of the passband the temperature variation can be monitored. In our experiment, the sensing responsivity of 10.5 MHz/C, 20.0 MHz/C and 41.2 MHz/C, when the lengths of sensing fiber are 1 m, 2 m and 4 m have been achieved. PMID:26906846

  18. Nanocrystalline diamond microelectrode on fused silica optical fibers for electrochemical and optical sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogdanowicz, Robert; Sobaszek, Micha?; Ficek, Mateusz; Gnyba, Marcin; Ryl, Jacek; Siuzdak, Katarzyna; ?mietana, Mateusz

    2015-07-01

    Fabrication process of thin boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond (B-NCD) microelectrode on fused silica single mode optical fiber has been investigated. The B-NCD films were deposited on the fibers using Microwave Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (MW PA CVD) at glass substrate temperature of 475 C. We have obtained homogenous, continuous and polycrystalline surface morphology with the mean grain size in the range of 100-250 nm and high sp3 content in B-NCD films. The films deposited on glass reference samples exhibit high refractive index (n?2.05 at ?=550 nm) and low extinction coefficient. Furthermore, cyclic voltammograms (CV) were recorded to determine the electrochemical window and reaction reversibility at the B-NCD fibre-based electrode. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) measurements in aqueous media consisting of 5mM K3[Fe(CN)6] in 0.1M Na2SO4 demonstrated a width of the electrochemical window up to 2.5 V and relatively fast kinetics expressed by a redox peak splitting below 500 mV. Moreover, thanks to high-n B-NCD overlay, the coated fibers can be also used for enhancing sensitivity of long-period gratings (LPGs) induced in the fibers. The LPG is capable for measuring variations in refractive index of surrounding liquid by tracing shift in resonance appearing in transmitted spectrum. Possible combined CV and LPG-based measurements are discussed in this work.

  19. In-situ strain sensing with fiber optic sensors embedded into stainless steel 316

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havermann, Dirk; Mathew, Jinesh; Macpherson, William N.; Maier, Robert R. J.; Hand, Duncan P.

    2015-04-01

    Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors are embedded into Stainless Steel (SS) 316 components using bespoke Selective Laser Melting (SLM) technology. SS 316 material is added on substrates by SLM, incorporating U-shaped grooves with dimensions suitable to hold nickel coated optical fibers. Coated optical fibers containing fiber Bragg gratings for strain monitoring are placed in the groove. Melting subsequent powder layer on top of the fiber completes the embedding. Strain levels exceeding 3 m? are applied to specimens and are measured by embedded fiber optic sensors. Elastic deformation of the steel component is reliably measured by the Bragg grating from within the component with high accuracy. During plastic deformation of the steel the optical fiber is slipping due to poor adhesive bonding between fused silica and metal surround.

  20. Fiber bragg gratings in polymer optical fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Harbach, Nico Gérard; Salathé, René-Paul

    2009-01-01

    Polymer optical fibers (POF) have received increased attention in recent years in the fields of data communication and sensing applications. The lower cost and higher flexibility are the main advantages of POF compared to silica fibers and make them interesting candidates for Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor applications. FBG are convenient measurement devices for strain and temperature measurements, as they can be multiplexed within one fiber yielding a sensor array and the fiber can be embe...

  1. Fiber bragg gratings in polymer optical fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Harbach, Nico Gérard

    2008-01-01

    Polymer optical fibers (POF) have received increased attention in recent years in the fields of data communication and sensing applications. The lower cost and higher flexibility are the main advantages of POF compared to silica fibers and make them interesting candidates for Fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor applications. FBG are convenient measurement devices for strain and temperature measurements, as they can be multiplexed within one fiber yielding a sensor array and the fiber can be embe...

  2. Spatio-temporal noise and drift in fiber optic distributed temperature sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Distributed temperature sensing (DTS) allows for simultaneous measurement at many remote locations along an optical fiber probe and is a valuable tool in a broad range of applications, such as downhole oil production, dike structural monitoring or fire protection. The specific requirements on spatial, temporal and temperature resolution and on absolute measurement uncertainty vary with the applications. We investigate the spatio-temporal noise and drift properties of two exemplary Raman backscatter DTS systems and discuss the effect of spatial and temporal data averaging. An Allan deviation analysis provides insight into the optimal degree of averaging for a given distance range along the fiber probe. A temperature calibration procedure is employed to retrieve the temperature sensitivity of the DTS system and to compensate for the systematic spatial slope of recorded DTS temperature measurement traces. In response to small temperature steps of a thermally homogeneous and stable water bath environment, we observe a temperature resolution of approximately 0.05 °C at a chosen 1000 m sampling distance along the fiber probe

  3. A tactile sensing element based on a hetero-core optical fiber for force measurement and texture detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Koyama, Yuya; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2014-05-01

    Tactile sensing technology can measure a given property of an object through physical contact between a sensing element and the object. Various tactile sensing techniques have been developed for several applications such as intelligent robots, tactile interface, medical support and nursing care support. A desirable tactile sensing element for supporting human daily life can be embedded in the soft material with high sensitivity and accuracy in order to prevent from damaging to human or object physically. This report describes a new tactile sensing element. Hetero-core optical fibers have high sensitivity of macro-bending at local sensor portion and temperature independency, including advantages of optical fiber itself; thin size, light weight, flexible transmission line, and immunity to electro-magnetic interference. The proposed tactile sensing element could detect textures of touched objects through the optical loss caused by the force applied to the sensing element. The characteristics of the sensing element have been evaluated, in which the sensing element has the monotonic and non-linear sensitivity against the normal force ranged from 0 to 5 N with lower accuracy than 0.25 dB. Additionally, texture detection have been successfully demonstrated in which small surface figures of 0.1 mm in height were detected with spatial resolution of 0.4 mm.

  4. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D. J. Osborn; Po Zhang

    2006-09-30

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications has been developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. We report on a fiber optic technique for detection of gas phase oxygen up to 100 C based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the luminescence from molybdenum chloride clusters, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}. The inorganic sensing film is a composite of sol-gel particles embedded in a thin, oxygen permeable sol-gel binder. The particles are comprised of thermally stable, luminescent K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14} clusters dispersed in a fully equilibrated sol-gel matrix. From 40 to 100 C, the fiber sensor switches {approx}6x in intensity in response to alternating pulses of <0.001% O2 and 21% O{sub 2} between two well defined levels with a response time of 10 s. The sensor signal is a few nW for an input pump power of 250 {micro}W. The normalized sensor signal is linear with molar oxygen concentration and fits the theoretical Stern-Volmer relationship. Although the sensitivity decreases with temperature, sensitivity at 100 C is 160 [O{sub 2}]{sup -1}. These parameters are well suited for in-situ, real-time monitoring of oxygen for industrial process control applications.

  5. A Fourier domain mode-locked fiber laser based on dual-pump fiber optical parametric amplification and its application for a sensing system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Fourier domain mode-locked (FDML) fiber laser based on dual-pump fiber optical parametric amplification (FOPA) is proposed and demonstrated. The output spectrum of the proposed FDML fiber laser covers a sweeping wavelength range from 1540.8 to 1559.8 nm with a sweeping frequency of 31.688 kHz. A comparison of two FDML fiber lasers which are based on dual-pump FOPA and one-pump FOPA is also presented. A novel sensing system based on the FDML laser and a fiber Bragg grating, by which the sensing signal can be measured in the time domain instead of the frequency domain, is also demonstrated. (paper)

  6. High-Tg TOPAS microstructured polymer optical fiber for fiber Bragg grating strain sensing at 110 degrees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markos, Christos; Stefani, Alessio; Nielsen, Kristian; Rasmussen, Henrik K.; Yuan, Scott Wu; Bang, Ole

    2013-01-01

    We present the fabrication and characterization of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) in an endlessly single-mode microstructured polymer optical fiber (mPOF) made of humidity-insensitive high-Tg TOPAS cyclic olefin copolymer. The mPOF is the first made from grade 5013 TOPAS with a glass transition...

  7. Cardiac-induced localized thoracic motion detected by a fiber optic sensing scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allsop, Thomas; Lloyd, Glynn; Bhamber, Ranjeet S.; Hadzievski, Ljupco; Halliday, Michael; Webb, David J.; Bennion, Ian

    2014-11-01

    The cardiovascular health of the human population is a major concern for medical clinicians, with cardiovascular diseases responsible for 48% of all deaths worldwide, according to the World Health Organization. The development of new diagnostic tools that are practicable and economical to scrutinize the cardiovascular health of humans is a major driver for clinicians. We offer a new technique to obtain seismocardiographic signals up to 54 Hz covering both ballistocardiography (below 20 Hz) and audible heart sounds (20 Hz upward), using a system based on curvature sensors formed from fiber optic long period gratings. This system can visualize the real-time three-dimensional (3-D) mechanical motion of the heart by using the data from the sensing array in conjunction with a bespoke 3-D shape reconstruction algorithm. Visualization is demonstrated by adhering three to four sensors on the outside of the thorax and in close proximity to the apex of the heart; the sensing scheme revealed a complex motion of the heart wall next to the apex region of the heart. The detection scheme is low-cost, portable, easily operated and has the potential for ambulatory applications.

  8. Standardization in fiber-optic sensing for structural safety: activities in the ISHMII and IEC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Wolfgang R.; Krebber, K.; Daum, W.

    2015-03-01

    Fiber-optic sensors are increasingly established in the sensor market. Their advantages have unquestionably been verified by numerous demonstrations to enhance the operational performance of aged structures or to monitor the structural behavior of safety-relevant structures or their components. However, there are some barriers in use due to a lack of extensive standardization of fiber-optic sensors. This leads very often to restraints in the user's community. The paper shows the status in international standardization of fiber-optic sensors as well as current activities in leading institutions such as IEC and ISHMII and others with the purpose of providing relevant standards for a broader use of selected fiber-optic sensor technologies.

  9. Cryogenic Liquid Level-Sensing using Fiber-Optic Strain Sensor (FOSS) Technology Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Armstrong innovators have developed a highly accurate method for measuring liquid levels using optical fibers. Unlike liquid level gauges that rely on discrete...

  10. Fiber-Optic Shape Sensing for Intelligent Solar Sail Deployment Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Luna Innovations proposes to develop a distributed fiber-optic shape sensor to provide a control system for the deployment of ultra-lightweight inflatable support...

  11. Advanced Modular, Multi-Channel, High Speed Fiber Optic Sensing System for Acoustic Emissions Monitoring Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) proposes to prove the feasibility of innovations based on ultra-light-weight, ultra-high-speed, multi-channel,...

  12. Semiconductor Optical Amplifier (SOA)-Fiber Ring Laser and Its Application to Stress Sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Yoshitaka Takahashi; Shinji Sekiya; Tatsuro Suemune

    2011-01-01

    We have developed a novel optical fiber ring laser using a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) as the gain medium, and taking advantage of polarization anisotropy of its gain. The frequency difference of the bi-directional laser is controlled by birefringence which is introduced in the ring laser cavity. The beat frequency generated by combining two counter-propagating oscillations is proportional to the birefringence, the fiber ring laser of the present study is, therefore, applicable to t...

  13. Fiber optical tweezers for microscale and nanoscale particle manipulation and force sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxiang

    2011-12-01

    Optical tweezers have been an important tool in biology and physics for studying single molecules and colloidal systems. Most of current optical tweezers are built with microscope objectives, which are: i) expensive, ii) bulky and hard to integrate, iii) sensitive to environmental fluctuations, iv) limited in terms of working distances from the substrate, and v) rigid with the requirements on the substrate (transparent substrate made with glass and with a fixed thickness). These limitations of objective-based optical tweezers prevent them from being miniaturized. Fiber optical tweezers can provide a solution for cost reduction and miniaturization, and these optical tweezers can be potentially used in microfluidic systems. However, the existing fiber optical tweezers have the following limitations: i) low trapping efficiency due to weakly focused beams, ii) lack of the ability to control the positions of multiple particles simultaneously, and iii) limited functionalities. The overall objective of this dissertation work is to further the fundamental understanding of fiber optical tweezers through experimental study and modeling, and to develop novel fiber optical tweezers systems to enhance the capability and functionalities of fiber optical tweezers as microscale and nanoscale manipulators/sensors. The contributions of this dissertation work are summarized as follows. i) An enhanced understanding of the inclined dual-fiber optical tweezers (DFOTs) system has been achieved. Stable three dimensional (3D) optical trapping of a single micron-sized particle has been experimentally demonstrated. This is the first time that the trapping efficiency has been calibrated and the stiffness of the trap has been obtained in the experiments, which has been carried out by using two methods: the drag force method and power spectrum analysis. Such calibration enables the system to be used as a picoNewton-level force sensor in addition to a particle manipulator. The influence of system parameters on the trapping performance has been carefully investigated through both experimental and numerical studies. ii) Multiple traps have been created and carefully studied with the inclined DFOTs for the first time. Three traps, one 3D trap and two 2D traps, have been experimentally created at different vertical levels with adjustable separations and positions. iii) Multiple functionalities have been achieved and studied for the first time with the inclined DFOTs. Particle separation, grouping, stacking, rod alignment, rod rotation, and optical binding have been experimentally demonstrated. The multiple functionalities allow the inclined DFOTs to find applications in the study of interaction forces in colloidal systems as well as parallel particle manipulation in drug delivery systems. iv) Far-field superfocusing effect has been investigated and successfully demonstrated with a fiber-based surface plasmonic (SP) lens for the first time. A planar SP lens with a set of concentric nanoscale rings on a fiber endface has been developed. For the first time, a focus size that is comparable to the smallest achievable focus size of high NA objective lenses has been achieved with the fiber-based SP lens. The fiber-based SP lens can bridge the nanoscale particles/systems and the macroscale power sources/detectors, which has been a long standing challenge for nanophotonics. In addition to optical trapping, the fiber-based SP lens will impact many applications including high-resolution lithography, high-resolution fluorescence detection, and sub-wavelength imaging. v) Trapping ability enhanced with the fiber-based SP lens has been successfully demonstrated. With the help of the fiber-based SP lens, the trapping efficiency of fiber optical tweezers has been significantly enhanced, which is comparable with that of objective-based optical tweezers. A submicron-sized bacterium has been successfully trapped in three dimensions for the first time with optical tweezers based on single fibers.

  14. Reflectance response of tapered optical fiber coated with graphene oxide nanostructured thin film for aqueous ethanol sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabaneh, A. A.; Girei, S. H.; Arasu, P. T.; Rahman, W. B. W. A.; Bakar, A. A. A.; Sadek, A. Z.; Lim, H. N.; Huang, N. M.; Yaacob, M. H.

    2014-11-01

    In this work, optical sensing performance of tapered multimode fiber tip coated with graphene oxide (GO) nanostructured thin film towards aqueous ethanol with different concentrations is investigated. The tapering process of the optical fiber is done by a glass processing machine. The multimode optical fiber tip is dip-coated with GO and annealed at 70 C to enhance the binding of the nanomaterials to the silica fiber. FESEM, Raman microscopy and XRD analyses are performed to micro-characterize the GO thin films. The morphology of the GO is observed to be in sheets forms. The reflectance response of the GO coated fiber tip is compared with the uncoated tip. The measurements are taken using a spectrophotometer in the optical wavelength range of 550-720 nm. The reflectance response of the GO coated fiber tip reduced proportionally, upon exposure to ethanol with concentration range of 5-80%. The dynamic response of the developed sensor showed strong reversibility and repeatability when it is exposed to ethanol with concentrations of 5%, 20% and 40% in distilled water. At room temperature, the sensor shows fast response and recovery as low as 19 and 25 s, respectively.

  15. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn; Po Zhang

    2006-06-30

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Our approach towards immobilizing the potassium salt of the molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the far end of an optical fiber is to embed the cluster in a thermally cured sol-gel matrix particle. This particle-in-binder approach affords fibers with greatly improved mechanical properties, as compared to previous approaches. The sensor was characterized in 2-21% gas phase oxygen at 40, 70 and 100 C. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  16. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III

    2004-10-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. High temperature measurements of the emission of clusters in sol gel films show that the luminescence intensity from the films follow a 1/T relationship from room temperature to 150 C, and then declines at a slower rate at higher temperatures. The large number of photons available at 230 C is consistent with simple low cost optics for fiber optic probes based on the emission from clusters in sol gel films.

  17. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the 3O2 quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. High temperature measurements of the emission of clusters in sol gel films show that the luminescence intensity from the films follow a 1/T relationship from room temperature to 150 C, and then declines at a slower rate at higher temperatures. The large number of photons available at 230 C is consistent with simple low cost optics for fiber optic probes based on the emission from clusters in sol gel films

  18. Measurement and analysis of water vapor inside optical components for optical fiber H2O sensing system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang; Chang, Jun; Song, Fujun; Wang, Fupeng; Zhu, Cunguang; Liu, Zhi; Zhang, Sasa; Liu, Xiangzhi

    2013-09-10

    Water vapor existing inside internal end-face gaps of optical components of an optical fiber H2O sensing system makes it possible to influence the measurement accuracy and stability. The influence principle has been briefly analyzed based on the structure of three main optical components: a distributed feedback laser diode (DFB-LD), a collimator, and a photoelectric diode (PD). With application of a differential technique, the influence of water vapor inside the DFB-LD can be removed. With reasonable recombination of the collimator and the PD in a dual-beam detection system, the influence of water vapor inside the collimator and the PD's end-face gaps has been suppressed from more than 1.57×10(-3) to as low as -2.175×10(-5) in absorbance. After H2O isolation processing water vapor inside the end-face gaps of the DFB-LD, the collimator, and the PD can be utilized as a reference to design a simple but feasible H2O sensor. As a result, good linearity with an R2 of 0.9964 has been realized in a concentration range of 39-2110 ppm during an application test, and a long-term test of the designed H2O sensor against the S8000 with a difference of 10 ppm has been achieved. PMID:24085118

  19. [INVITED] State of the art of Brillouin fiber-optic distributed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motil, Avi; Bergman, Arik; Tur, Moshe

    2016-04-01

    Fiber-optic distributed sensing, employing the Brillouin effect, is already a commercially available measurement technique for the accurate estimation of the static strain/temperature fields along tens of kilometers with a spatial resolution of the order of a meter. Furthermore, relentless research efforts are paving the way to even much wider usability of the technique through recently achieved enhanced performance in each of its critical dimensions: measurement range has been extended to hundreds of kilometers; spatial resolution is of the order of a centimeter or less, signal to noise ratio has been significantly improved; fast dynamic events can be captured at kHz's sampling rates; and a much better understanding of the underlying physics has been obtained, along with the formulation of figures of merit, and the preparation and early adoption of appropriate standards and guidelines. This paper describes the basics, as well as the state of the art, of the leading Brillouin interrogation methods, with emphasis on the significant progress made in the last 3 years. It also includes a short introduction to coding, which has proven instrumental in many of the recently obtained performance records.

  20. Optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer with pH sensitive hydrogel film for hazardous gases sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Yangzi; Chen, Li Han; Chan, Chi Chiu; Dong, Xinyong; Yang, Jingyi; Tou, Zhi Qiang; So, Ping Lam

    2015-09-01

    An optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) coated with polyvinyl alcohol/poly-acrylic acid (PVA/PAA) hydrogel film for toxic gases measurement has been developed. Splicing a short section of hollow core fiber between two single mode fibers forms the FPI. Dip-coated pH-sensitive PVA/PAA hydrogel film on the fiber end performs as a receptor for binding of volatile acids or ammonia, which makes the sensing film swelling or shrinking and results in the dip wavelength shift of the FPI. By demodulating the evolution of reflection spectrum for various concentrations of volatile acids, a sensitivity of 20.8 nm/ppm is achieved with uniform linearity.

  1. Sub-cm Resolution Distributed Fiber Optic Hydrogen Sensing with Nano-Engineered TiO2

    CERN Document Server

    Poole, Zsolt; Yan, Aidong; Lin, Yuankun; Chen, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    The 3D nano-structuring on the 2) to be reduced and matched with the cladding of optical fiber(n~1.46) for low-loss integration. A high temperature capable hydrogen sensor composed of D-shaped optical fiber with palladium nanoparticles infused nanoporous (~5nm) TiO2 film is demonstrated. The behavior of the developed sensor was characterized by examining the wavelength of an incorporated Fiber Bragg Grating and by observing the transmission losses at temperatures up to 700C. In addition, with frequency domain reflectometry the distributed sensing potential of the developed sensor for hydrogen concentrations of up to 10% is examined. The results show the possibility of detecting chemical gradients with sub-cm resolution at very high temperatures(>500C).

  2. Modal-interference-based temperature sensing using plastic optical fibers: markedly enhanced sensitivity near glass-transition temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Goki; Hayashi, Neisei; Tabaru, Marie; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2015-07-01

    We developed strain and temperature sensors based on multimode interference in perfluorinated graded-index (GI) plastic optical fibers, and investigate their sensing performance at 1300 nm. At room temperature, we achieve ultra-high sensitivities of strain and temperature of -112 pm/?? and +49.8 nm/C/m, the absolute value of which are approximately 7.2 and over 1800 times as large as those in silica GI multimode fibers, respectively. We also find that the temperature sensitivity is drastically enhanced with increasing temperature toward ~80 C, where phase transition of core polymer partially occurs.

  3. Optical fiber tactile sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejczy, A. K. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A tactile sensor comprises an array of cells which are covered by an elastic membrane, having an exposed surface which is adapted to come in contact with an object. Light is conducted to each cell from a light source by an optical fiber which terminates at the cell. Reflected light from the cell is conducted by an optical fiber to a light processor, which senses changes in the light received thereby from an ambient level whenever an object comes in contact with the membrane surface above the cell.

  4. Optical Fiber Sensing of SF6 Degradation in High-Voltage Switchgear

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irawan, R.; Scelsi, G. B.; Woolsey, G. A.

    Sulphur hexafluoride (SF6) is used as an insulator in high-voltage systems. An electrical breakdown dissociates (SF6). Therefore, the insulating efficiency is degraded. If the (SF6) is not renewed, failure of the system can occur. A monitoring device for (SF6) loss is required, and an optical fiber sensor for continuous monitoring of (SF6) degradation in high-voltage switchgear has been developed. Dissociation products of the (SF6) discharge include HF and atomic F, both of which react readily with silica. This reactivity is utilized in our sensor, where etching of a glass fiber surface modifies the transmission characteristics of the fiber.

  5. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D. J. Osborn; Po Zhang

    2006-09-30

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Our approach towards immobilizing the potassium salt of the molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the far end of an optical fiber is to embed the cluster in a thermally cured sol-gel matrix particle. Due to the improved mechanical properties of this approach high temperature sensor measurements were performed up to 100 C. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  6. Fiber optic monitoring device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samborsky, James K. (605 Groves Blvd., N. Augusta, SC 29841)

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  7. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2006-01-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Previously we described a particle-in-binder approach to immobilizing the potassium salt of a molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the tips of optical fibers. Compared to previous methods, the particle-in-binder approach affords fibers with greatly improved mechanical properties. We have extensively characterized two fiber sensors at high temperature. We obtain quenching ratios between pure nitrogen and 21% oxygen as high as 3.9 x at 70 C. For the first sensor at 60 C we obtained a {+-} 1% variation in the quenching ratio over 6 cycles of measurement, and monitored the device performance over 23 days. We were able to operate the second sensor continuously for 14 hours at 70 C, and the sensor quenching ratio was stable to 5% over that time period. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  8. Detection of plasma equilibrium shifts with fiber-optic sensing of image currents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasma shifts generate opposite-polarity net shell image currents at diametrically opposed shell locations. In theory these image currents can be detected by Faraday rotation fiber-optic current sensors wound around the shell sections. In practice the validity of the measurement depends on the extent of suppression of the linear birefringence induced by the fiber coil bending and lateral pressure. Circular birefringence bias twist of 60 turns/m of 125-μm o.d. single-mode fiber is sufficient for 2-in. radii of curvature bends, in agreement with theory, while 100 turns/m of 80-μm o.d. fiber have not been successful with 1-in. radii of curvature, contrary to calculations. Different means for further suppression of linear birefringence are discussed

  9. Application of Thin ZnO ALD Layers in Fiber-Optic Fabry-Pérot Sensing Interferometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majchrowicz, Daria; Hirsch, Marzena; Wierzba, Paweł; Bechelany, Michael; Viter, Roman; Jędrzejewska‑Szczerska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigated the response of a fiber-optic Fabry-Pérot sensing interferometer with thin ZnO layers deposited on the end faces of the optical fibers forming the cavity. Standard telecommunication single-mode optical fiber (SMF-28) segments were used with the thin ZnO layers deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Measurements were performed with the interferometer illuminated by two broadband sources operating at 1300 nm and 1550 nm. Reflected interference signal was acquired by an optical spectrum analyzer while the length of the air cavity was varied. Thickness of the ZnO layers used in the experiments was 50 nm, 100 nm, and 200 nm. Uncoated SMF-28 fiber was also used as a reference. Based on the results of measurements, the thickness of the ZnO layers and the length of the cavity were selected in order to achieve good visibility. Following, the interferometer was used to determine the refractive index of selected liquids. PMID:27011188

  10. Application of Thin ZnO ALD Layers in Fiber-Optic Fabry-Pérot Sensing Interferometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daria Majchrowicz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigated the response of a fiber-optic Fabry-Pérot sensing interferometer with thin ZnO layers deposited on the end faces of the optical fibers forming the cavity. Standard telecommunication single-mode optical fiber (SMF-28 segments were used with the thin ZnO layers deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD. Measurements were performed with the interferometer illuminated by two broadband sources operating at 1300 nm and 1550 nm. Reflected interference signal was acquired by an optical spectrum analyzer while the length of the air cavity was varied. Thickness of the ZnO layers used in the experiments was 50 nm, 100 nm, and 200 nm. Uncoated SMF-28 fiber was also used as a reference. Based on the results of measurements, the thickness of the ZnO layers and the length of the cavity were selected in order to achieve good visibility. Following, the interferometer was used to determine the refractive index of selected liquids.

  11. Application of Thin ZnO ALD Layers in Fiber-Optic Fabry-Pérot Sensing Interferometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majchrowicz, Daria; Hirsch, Marzena; Wierzba, Paweł; Bechelany, Michael; Viter, Roman; Jędrzejewska-Szczerska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we investigated the response of a fiber-optic Fabry-Pérot sensing interferometer with thin ZnO layers deposited on the end faces of the optical fibers forming the cavity. Standard telecommunication single-mode optical fiber (SMF-28) segments were used with the thin ZnO layers deposited by Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD). Measurements were performed with the interferometer illuminated by two broadband sources operating at 1300 nm and 1550 nm. Reflected interference signal was acquired by an optical spectrum analyzer while the length of the air cavity was varied. Thickness of the ZnO layers used in the experiments was 50 nm, 100 nm, and 200 nm. Uncoated SMF-28 fiber was also used as a reference. Based on the results of measurements, the thickness of the ZnO layers and the length of the cavity were selected in order to achieve good visibility. Following, the interferometer was used to determine the refractive index of selected liquids. PMID:27011188

  12. Advantage of multi-mode sapphire optical fiber for evanescent-field SERS sensing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chen, H.; Tian, F.; Chi, J.; Kaňka, Jiří; Du, H.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 39, č. 20 (2014), 5822-5825. ISSN 0146-9592 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11038 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Fiber optics sensors * Backscattering * Nanomaterials Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 3.292, year: 2014

  13. Infrared Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    Successive years of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Langley Research Center to Sensiv Inc., a joint venture between Foster-Miller Inc. and Isorad, Ltd., assisted in the creation of remote fiber optic sensing systems. NASA's SBIR interest in infrared, fiber optic sensor technology was geared to monitoring the curing cycles of advanced composite materials. These funds helped in the fabrication of an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. Foster-Miller ingenuity allowed infrared transmitting optical fibers to combine with Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy to enable remote sensing. Sensiv probes operate in the mid-infrared range of the spectrum, although modifications to the instrument also permits its use in the near-infrared region. The Sensiv needle-probe is built to be placed in a liquid or powder and analyze the chemicals in the mixture. Other applications of the probe system include food processing control; combustion control in furnaces; and maintenance problem solving.

  14. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III

    2004-07-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Alkali salts of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} were synthesized and heated to 280 C for one hour in air. Optical measurements of the thermally treated material confirm the potential of the salts as lumophores in high temperature fiber optic sensors. In addition sol-gel films containing Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} were dip coated on quartz substrates and heated at 200 C for one hour. Conditions were developed for successfully immobilizing monomeric complexes that are compatible with sol-gel processing.

  15. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2006-05-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Previously we described a particle-in-binder approach to immobilizing the potassium salt of the molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, at the tips of optical fibers. Compared to previous methods, the particle-in-binder approach affords fibers with greatly improved mechanical properties. The response of the sensor to oxygen at 40, 70 and 100 C was measured in 2-21% gas phase oxygen. The normalized sensor signal is linear with molar oxygen concentration and fits the theoretical Stern-Volmer relationship. Although the sensitivity decreases with temperature, at 100 C the sensitivity is 160 [O{sub 2}]{sup -1}. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  16. Drastic sensitivity enhancement of temperature sensing based on multimodal interference in polymer optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, Goki; Hayashi, Neisei; Tabaru, Marie; Mizuno, Yosuke; Nakamura, Kentaro

    2015-07-01

    It has been reported that temperature sensors based on modal interference in perfluorinated graded-index polymer optical fibers show extremely high temperature sensitivity at room temperature. In this work, we confirm that the temperature sensitivity (absolute value) is significantly enhanced when the temperature increases toward ?70 C, which is close to the glass-transition temperature of the core polymer. When the core diameter is 62.5 m, the sensitivity at 72 C at 1300 nm is 202 nm/C/m, which is approximately 26 times the value obtained at room temperature and >7000 times the highest value previously reported using a silica multimode fiber.

  17. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-10-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. Previously we immobilized the potassium salt of a molybdenum cluster, K{sub 2}M{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, in a sol-gel matrix and showed that the luminescence is stable after 54 hours at 200 C, but the quenching ratios were low and the films delaminated after thermal cycling due to densification of the matrix. Three new approaches to solve decreased quenching over time and delamination of films off fiber tips were investigated. In the first approach K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14} embedded in cured sol-gel particles were incorporated into a TEOS based sol-gel. These gave enhanced quenching (6x), but delaminated. Our second approach was to use a commercial cyanoacrylate glue to immobilize the particles onto the tip of an optical fiber. This gave better adhesion and good quenching initially, but eventually the glue degraded upon heating. Our third approach was to use a 55% OtMOS/ TEOS sol-gel binder. Films based on this new sol-gel binder show high quenching ({approx}6x) and superior mechanical stability even after thermal cycling. Sensor measurements on an optical fiber containing K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14} embedded in cured sol-gel particles were obtained from 100 to 25 C. The signal intensity in nitrogen was stable at 2.8 {+-} 0.2 nW, and the quenching ratio (ratio of signal in N{sub 2} vs. 21 % O{sub 2}) varied from 4.4 to 6.9X. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  18. Optical Fiber Chemical Sensor with Sol-Gel Derived Refractive Material as Transducer for High Temperature Gas Sensing in Clean Coal Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shiquan Tao

    2006-12-31

    The chemistry of sol-gel derived silica and refractive metal oxide has been systematically studied. Sol-gel processes have been developed for preparing porous silica and semiconductor metal oxide materials. Micelle/reversed micelle techniques have been developed for preparing nanometer sized semiconductor metal oxides and noble metal particles. Techniques for doping metal ions, metal oxides and nanosized metal particles into porous sol-gel material have also been developed. Optical properties of sol-gel derived materials in ambient and high temperature gases have been studied by using fiber optic spectroscopic techniques, such as fiber optic ultraviolet/visible absorption spectrometry, fiber optic near infrared absorption spectrometry and fiber optic fluorescence spectrometry. Fiber optic spectrometric techniques have been developed for investigating the optical properties of these sol-gel derived materials prepared as porous optical fibers or as coatings on the surface of silica optical fibers. Optical and electron microscopic techniques have been used to observe the microstructure, such as pore size, pore shape, sensing agent distribution, of sol-gel derived material, as well as the size and morphology of nanometer metal particle doped in sol-gel derived porous silica, the nature of coating of sol-gel derived materials on silica optical fiber surface. In addition, the chemical reactions of metal ion, nanostructured semiconductor metal oxides and nanometer sized metal particles with gas components at room temperature and high temperatures have also been investigated with fiber optic spectrometric methods. Three classes of fiber optic sensors have been developed based on the thorough investigation of sol-gel chemistry and sol-gel derived materials. The first group of fiber optic sensors uses porous silica optical fibers doped with metal ions or metal oxide as transducers for sensing trace NH{sub 3} and H{sub 2}S in high temperature gas samples. The second group of fiber optic sensors uses sol-gel derived porous silica materials doped with nanometer particles of noble metals in the form of fiber or coating for sensing trace H{sub 2}, NH{sub 3} and HCl in gas samples at for applications ambient temperature. The third classes of fiber optic sensors use sol-gel derived semiconductor metal oxide coating on the surface of silica optical fiber as transducers for selectively sensing H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4} and CO at high temperature. In addition, optical fiber temperature sensors use the fluorescence signal of rare-earth metal ions doped porous silica optical fiber or the optical absorption signal of thermochromic metal oxide materials coated on the surface of silica optical fibers have also been developed for monitoring gas temperature of corrosive gas. Based on the results obtained from this project, the principle of fiber optic sensor techniques for monitoring matrix gas components as well as trace components of coal gasification derived syngas has been established. Prototype sensors for sensing trace ammonia and hydrogen sulfide in gasification derived syngas have been built up in our laboratory and have been tested using gas samples with matrix gas composition similar to that of gasification derived fuel gas. Test results illustrated the feasibility of these sensors for applications in IGCC processes.

  19. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-04-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. One of the critical materials issues is to demonstrate that the luminescent cluster immobilized in the sol-gel porous support can withstand high temperature. At the same time the sol-gel matrix must have a high permeability to oxygen. Using a potassium salt of the molybdenum clusters, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, we have established the conditions necessary for deposition of optical quality sol-gel films. From spectroscopic measurements of the film we have shown that the cluster luminescence is stable following heat cycling of 54 hours at 200 C. Quenching of a factor of 1.5X between pure nitrogen and 21% oxygen was observed from in-situ measurements of films heated directly at 200 C. An automated system for characterizing fiber optic oxygen sensors up to 220 C with a temporal resolution better than 10 s is under construction. We estimate a signal of 6 x 10{sup 8} photons/s after complete quenching in 21% oxygen. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  20. Fiber optic calorimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using fiber for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processing to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microradian (μrad) to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 radians (rad) of phase shift per milliwatt of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% 240Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium

  1. Behavior of Random Hole Optical Fibers under Gamma Ray Irradiation and Its Potential Use in Radiation Sensing Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anbo Wang

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Effects of radiation on sensing and data transmission components are of greatinterest in many applications including homeland security, nuclear power generation, andmilitary. A new type of microstructured optical fiber (MOF called the random hole opticalfiber (RHOF has been recently developed. The RHOFs can be made in many differentforms by varying the core size and the size and extent of porosity in the cladding region.The fibers used in this study possessed an outer diameter of 110 μm and a core ofapproximately 20 μm. The fiber structure contains thousands of air holes surrounding thecore with sizes ranging from less than 100 nm to a few μm. We present the first study ofthe behavior of RHOF under gamma irradiation. We also propose, for the first time to ourknowledge, an ionizing radiation sensor system based on scintillation light from ascintillator phosphor embedded within a holey optical fiber structure. The RHOF radiationresponse was compared to normal single mode and multimode commercial fibers(germanium doped core, pure silica cladding and to those of radiation resistant fibers (puresilica core with fluorine doped cladding fibers. The comparison was done by measuringradiation-induced absorption (RIA in all fiber samples at the 1550 nm wavelength window(1545 ± 25 nm. The study was carried out under a high-intensity gamma ray field from a 60Co source (with an exposure rate of 4x104 rad/hr at an Oak Ridge National Laboratory gamma ray irradiation facility. Linear behavior, at dose values less than 106 rad, was observed in all fiber samples except in the pure silica core fluorine doped cladding fiber which showed RIA saturation at 0.01 dB. RHOF samples demonstrated low RIA (0.02 and 0.005 dB compared to standard germanium doped core pure silica cladding (SMF and MMF fibers. Results also showed the possibility of post-fabrication treatment to improve the radiation resistance of the RHOF fibers.

  2. Fiber optic connector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajic, Slobodan (Knoxville, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenior City, TN)

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled.

  3. 300 m optic fiber Bragg grating temperature sensing system for seawater measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xingrong; Li Yongqian; Wen Zhengyang, E-mail: li_xingrong@yahoo.cn [Department of Electronics and Communication Engineering, North China Electric Power University, Baoding 071003 (China)

    2011-02-01

    Optic fiber grating sensor is a research hotspot.It has been used on many occasions,and how to use it for ocean detection is a new research directions. The paper introduced the calibration work of FBG temperature sensors. It confirmed that from being armored package,the sensors can eliminate the water pressure effect. From the calibration experiment and data processing,60 sensors has little error were screened out for experiment. 300 m long optic fiber Bragg grating sensor array was designed.The marine experiments were achived in South China Sea with 300 meters long Bragg grating array and got the seawater profile temperature. Proposed the curve fitting method to process the data based on Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm. By curve fitting to the data acquired,the precision was better than 0.2 deg. C, which verified the effectiveness of the method.This result has practical value.

  4. [INVITED] Cell sensing with near-infrared plasmonic optical fiber sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caucheteur, Christophe; Malachovska, Viera; Ribaut, Clotilde; Wattiez, Ruddy

    2016-04-01

    Surface Plasmon resonance (SPR) optical fiber biosensors are a miniaturized counterpart to the bulky prism configuration that offer remote operation in very small volumes of analyte. They have the potential to yield in situ (or even possibly in vivo) molecular detection. They usually result from a gold-coated fiber segment for which the core-guided light is brought into contact with the surrounding medium. Recently, SPR excitation was achieved with tilted fiber Bragg gratings (TFBGs) photo-imprinted in the fiber core and surrounded by a thin gold layer. These gratings probe the surrounding medium with near-infrared narrowband (~100 pm linewidth) resonances, which enhances both the penetration depth of the evanescent field in the external medium and the wavelength resolution of the interrogation. They also constitute the unique configuration able to probe all the fiber cladding modes individually, with high Q-factors. We use these unique spectral features in this work to target and detect extracellular membrane receptors in native membranes of different human epithelial cell lines. A differential diagnosis has been demonstrated between two systems, a cell line with overexpressed membrane receptors (the positive control) and another cell line with a low number of these receptors (a negative control). Such results bring an important step towards the demonstration of in situ diagnosis.

  5. Design of System for Monitoring Seepage of Levee Engineering Based on Distributed Optical Fiber Sensing Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Huaizhi Su; Yeyuan Kang

    2013-01-01

    Seepage is the major factor and monitoring index of levee safety. Leakage may be undetected by conventional monitoring methods and techniques, but optical fiber distributed temperature sensor (DTS) temperature measuring system can achieve real-time temperature monitoring in internal soil of levees. According to the temperature field obtained by DTS system, monitoring and inversion methods of seepage velocity based on double-line heat source and single-line heat source are introduced, respecti...

  6. Application of optical fiber distributed sensing to health monitoring of concrete structures

    OpenAIRE

    Villalba Herrero, Sergi; Casas Rius, Joan Ramon

    2013-01-01

    The use of Optical Backscatter Reflectometer (OBR) sensors is a promising measurement technology for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) as it offers the possibility of continuous monitoring of strain and temperature along the fiber. Several applications to materials used in the aeronautical construction have demonstrated the feasibility of such technique. These materials (composites, steel, aluminum) apart from having a smooth surface where the bonding of the sensor is easily carried out, the...

  7. Industrial Qualification Process for Optical Fibers Distributed Strain and Temperature Sensing in Nuclear Waste Repositories

    OpenAIRE

    Delepine-Lesoille, S; X. Phéron; Bertrand, J; Pilorget, G.; G. Hermand; Farhoud, R.; Ouerdane, Y.; Boukenter, A; Girard, S.; L. Lablonde; D. Sporea; LANTICQ, V

    2012-01-01

    Temperature and strain monitoring will be implemented in the envisioned French geological repository for high- and intermediate-level long-lived nuclear wastes. Raman and Brillouin scatterings in optical fibers are efficient industrial methods to provide distributed temperature and strain measurements. Gamma radiation and hydrogen release from nuclear wastes can however affect the measurements. An industrial qualification process is successfully proposed and implemented. Induced measurement u...

  8. Current sensing in magnetic fusion experiments by Faraday rotation in single-mode optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We find that sensors exploiting the Faraday effect in single-mode optical fibers are practical means of measuring large currents in the MFE environment. Work still needs to be done to overcome the effects of linear birefringence. We have seen distortion caused by dynamic stress-induced birefringence and shown the importance of physically eliminating it because of the difficulty of treating it analytically

  9. Research on corrosion detection for steel reinforced concrete structures using the fiber optical white light interferometer sensing technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xuefeng; Cui, Yanjun; Wei, Heming; Kong, Xianglong; Zhang, Pinglei; Sun, Changsen

    2013-06-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of steel rebar corrosion monitoring technique for steel reinforced concrete structures is proposed, designed, and tested. The technique is based on the fiber optical white light interferometer (WLI) sensing technique. Firstly, a feasibility test was carried out using an equal-strength beam for comparison of strain sensing ability between the WLI and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The comparison results showed that the sensitivity of the WLI is sufficient for corrosion expansion strain monitoring. Then, two WLI corrosion sensors (WLI-CSs) were designed, fabricated, and embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion. Their performance was studied in an accelerated electrochemical corrosion test. Experimental results show that expansion strain along the fiber optical coil winding area can be detected and measured accurately by the proposed sensor. The advantages of the proposed monitoring technique allow for quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring to be executed in real time for reinforced concrete structures and with low cost.

  10. Research on corrosion detection for steel reinforced concrete structures using the fiber optical white light interferometer sensing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a novel kind of steel rebar corrosion monitoring technique for steel reinforced concrete structures is proposed, designed, and tested. The technique is based on the fiber optical white light interferometer (WLI) sensing technique. Firstly, a feasibility test was carried out using an equal-strength beam for comparison of strain sensing ability between the WLI and a fiber Bragg grating (FBG). The comparison results showed that the sensitivity of the WLI is sufficient for corrosion expansion strain monitoring. Then, two WLI corrosion sensors (WLI-CSs) were designed, fabricated, and embedded into concrete specimens to monitor expansion strain caused by steel rebar corrosion. Their performance was studied in an accelerated electrochemical corrosion test. Experimental results show that expansion strain along the fiber optical coil winding area can be detected and measured accurately by the proposed sensor. The advantages of the proposed monitoring technique allow for quantitative corrosion expansion monitoring to be executed in real time for reinforced concrete structures and with low cost. (paper)

  11. Optical fibre sensing of plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The progress of optical fiber technology for communications has induced an interest in, among others, the sensing of a wide range of physical, and chemical quantities. Any application of optical fibers that are crucial for communication are significant for sensing, e.g. small dimension, insulating materials, immunity to high voltage field etc. In the present paper basic points of optical fiber sensing are summarized. It is noted optical fiber sensors come in two forms, intrinsic and extrinsic. In the former the fiber itself works as sensing element, in addition to data transmission lines. In an intrinsic sensor, a single fiber transmits the light from the source to the detector and the light is modulated while it is in the fiber. On the other hand, in the extrinsic sensor, the light leaves the input fiber to be modulated before being collected by the second output fiber. Characteristic of the light that can be modulated are amplitude, phase, polarization, and wavelength. The paper describes the modulation in some details. (author)

  12. High-resolution temperature sensing in the Dead Sea using fiber optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnon, A.; Lensky, N. G.; Selker, J. S.

    2014-02-01

    The thermal stratification of the Dead Sea was observed in high spatial and temporal resolution by means of fiber-optics temperature sensing. The aim of the research was to employ the novel high-resolution profiler in studying the dynamics of the thermal structure of the Dead Sea and the related processes including the investigation of the metalimnion fluctuations. The 18 cm resolution profiling system was placed vertically through the water column supported by a buoy 450 m from shore, from 2 m above to 53 m below the water surface (just above the local seafloor), covering the entire seasonal upper layer (the metalimnion had an average depth of ˜20 m). Temperature profiles were recorded every 5 min. The May to July 2012 data set allowed quantitative investigation of the thermal morphology dynamics, including objective definitions of key locations within the metalimnion based on the temperature depth profile and its first and second depth derivatives. Analysis of the fluctuation of the defined metalimnion locations showed strong anticorrelation to measured sea level fluctuations. The slope of the sea level versus metalimnion depth was found to be related to the density ratio of the upper layer and the underlying main water body, according to the prediction of a two-layer model. The heat content of the entire water column was calculated by integrating the temperature profiles. The vertically integrated apparent heat content was seen to vary by 50% in a few hours. These fluctuations were not correlated to the atmospheric heat fluxes, nor to the momentum transfer, but were highly correlated to the metalimnion and the sea level fluctuations (r = 0.84). The instantaneous apparent heat flux was 3 orders of magnitude larger than that delivered by radiation, with no direct correlation to the frequency of radiation and wind in the lake. This suggests that the source of the momentary heat flux is lateral advection due to internal waves (with no direct relation to the diurnal cycle). In practice, it is shown that snap-shot profiles of the Dead Sea as obtained with standard thermal profilers will not represent the seasonal typical status in terms of heat content of the upper layer.

  13. Remote optical sensing on the nanometer scale with a bowtie aperture nano-antenna on a SNOM fiber tip

    CERN Document Server

    Atie, Elie M; Eter, Ali El; Salut, Roland; Nedeljkovic, Dusan; Tannous, Tony; Baida, Fadi I; Grosjean, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nano-antennas have proven the outstanding ability of sensing chemical and physical processes down to the nano-meter scale. Sensing is usually achieved within the highly confined optical fields generated resonantly by the nano-antennas, i.e. in contact to the nano-structures. In these paper, We demonstrate the sensing capability of nano-antennas to their larger scale environment, well beyond their plasmonic confinement volume, leading to the concept of 'remote' (non contact) sensing on the nano-meter scale. On the basis of a bowtie-aperture nano-antenna (BNA) integrated at the apex of a SNOM fiber tip, we introduce an ultra-compact, move-able and background-free optical nano-sensor for the remote sensing of a silicon surface (up to distance of 300 nm). Sensitivity of the BNA to its large scale environment is high enough to expect the monitoring and control of the spacing between the nano-antenna and a silicon surface with sub-nano-meter accuracy. This work paves the way towards a new class of nano-po...

  14. An air flow sensor for neonatal mechanical ventilation applications based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, a simple and low-cost air flow sensor, based on a novel fiber-optic sensing technique has been developed for monitoring air flows rates supplied by a neonatal ventilator to support infants in intensive care units. The device is based on a fiber optic sensing technique allowing (a) the immunity to light intensity variations independent by measurand and (b) the reduction of typical shortcomings affecting all biomedical fields (electromagnetic interference and patient electrical safety). The sensing principle is based on the measurement of transversal displacement of an emitting fiber-optic cantilever due to action of air flow acting on it; the fiber tip displacement is measured by means of a photodiode linear array, placed in front of the entrance face of the emitting optical fiber in order to detect its light intensity profile. As the measurement system is based on a detection of the illumination pattern, and not on an intensity modulation technique, it results less sensitive to light intensity fluctuation independent by measurand than intensity-based sensors. The considered technique is here adopted in order to develop two different configurations for an air flow sensor suitable for the measurement of air flow rates typically occurring during mechanical ventilation of newborns: a mono-directional and a bi-directional transducer have been proposed. A mathematical model for the air flow sensor is here proposed and a static calibration of two different arrangements has been performed: a measurement range up to 3.00 10?4 m3/s (18.0 l/min) for the mono-directional sensor and a measurement range of 3.00 10?4 m3/s (18.0 l/min) for the bi-directional sensor are experimentally evaluated, according to the air flow rates normally encountered during tidal breathing of infants with a mass lower than 10 kg. Experimental data of static calibration result in accordance with the proposed theoretical model: for the mono-directional configuration, the coefficient of determination r2 is equal to 0.997; for the bi-directional configuration, the coefficient of determination r2 is equal to 0.990 for positive flows (inspiration) and 0.988 for negative flows (expiration). Measurement uncertainty ?Q of air flow rate has been evaluated by means of the propagation of distributions and the percentage error in the arrangement of bi-directional sensor ranges from a minimum of about 0.5% at ?18.0 l/min to a maximum of about 9% at ?12.0 l/min.

  15. Optical Fiber Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-01-01

    F&S Inc. developed and commercialized fiber optic and microelectromechanical systems- (MEMS) based instrumentation for harsh environments encountered in the aerospace industry. The NASA SBIR programs have provided F&S the funds and the technology to develop ruggedized coatings and coating techniques that are applied during the optical fiber draw process. The F&S optical fiber fabrication facility and developed coating methods enable F&S to manufacture specialty optical fiber with custom designed refractive index profiles and protective or active coatings. F&S has demonstrated sputtered coatings using metals and ceramics and combinations of each, and has also developed techniques to apply thin coatings of specialized polyimides formulated at NASA Langley Research Center. With these capabilities, F&S has produced cost-effective, reliable instrumentation and sensors capable of withstanding temperatures up to 800? C and continues building commercial sales with corporate partners and private funding. More recently, F&S has adapted the same sensing platforms to provide the rapid detection and identification of chemical and biological agents

  16. Evaluation of temperature distribution sensing method for fast reactor using optical fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Atsushi; Nakazawa, Masaharu [Tokyo Univ. (Japan); Ichige, Satoshi [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Oarai, Ibaraki (Japan). Oarai Engineering Center

    1999-12-01

    Optical fiber sensors (OFSs) have many advantages like flexible configuration, intrinsic immunity for electromagnetic fields, and so on. For these reasons, it is very useful to apply OFSs to fast reactor plants for remote inspection and surveillance. However, under irradiation, because of radiation-induced transmission loss of optical fibers, OFSs have radiation-induced errors. Therefore, to apply OFSs to nuclear facilities, we have to estimate and correct the errors. In this report, Raman Distributed Temperature Sensor (RDTS; one of the OFSs) has been installed at the primary coolant loop of the experimental fast reactor JOYO of JNC (Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute). Two correction techniques (correction technique with two thermocouples and correction technique with loop arrangement) for radiation-induced errors have been developed and demonstrated. Because of the radiation-induced loss, measured temperature distributions had radiation-induced errors. However, during the continuous measurements with the total dose of more than 8 x 10{sup 3}[C/kg](3 x 10{sup 7}[R]), the radiation induced errors showed a saturation tendency. In case of the temperature distributions with fluorine doped fiber, with one of the correction techniques, the temperature errors reduced to 1{approx}2degC and the feasibility of the loss correction techniques was demonstrated. For these results, it can be said that RDTS can be applied as a temperature distribution monitor in harsh radiation environments like fast reactor plants. (author)

  17. Interferometric Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae Young Choi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Fiber optic interferometers to sense various physical parameters including temperature, strain, pressure, and refractive index have been widely investigated. They can be categorized into four types: Fabry-Perot, Mach-Zehnder, Michelson, and Sagnac. In this paper, each type of interferometric sensor is reviewed in terms of operating principles, fabrication methods, and application fields. Some specific examples of recently reported interferometeric sensor technologies are presented in detail to show their large potential in practical applications. Some of the simple to fabricate but exceedingly effective Fabry-Perot interferometers, implemented in both extrinsic and intrinsic structures, are discussed. Also, a wide variety of Mach-Zehnder and Michelson interferometric sensors based on photonic crystal fibers are introduced along with their remarkable sensing performances. Finally, the simultaneous multi-parameter sensing capability of a pair of long period fiber grating (LPG is presented in two types of structures; one is the Mach-Zehnder interferometer formed in a double cladding fiber and the other is the highly sensitive Sagnac interferometer cascaded with an LPG pair.

  18. System and method for determination of the reflection wavelength of multiple low-reflectivity bragg gratings in a sensing optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jason P. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    A system and method for determining a reflection wavelength of multiple Bragg gratings in a sensing optical fiber comprise: (1) a source laser; (2) an optical detector configured to detect a reflected signal from the sensing optical fiber; (3) a plurality of frequency generators configured to generate a signal having a frequency corresponding to an interferometer frequency of a different one of the plurality of Bragg gratings; (4) a plurality of demodulation elements, each demodulation element configured to combine the signal produced by a different one of the plurality of frequency generators with the detected signal from the sensing optical fiber; (5) a plurality of peak detectors, each peak detector configured to detect a peak of the combined signal from a different one of the demodulation elements; and (6) a laser wavenumber detection element configured to determine a wavenumber of the laser when any of the peak detectors detects a peak.

  19. Fiber Bragg grating sensing system using a TO-can-based compact optical module for wavelength demodulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hong Joo; Lee, Jun Ho; Roh, Cheong Hyun; Hahn, Cheol-Koo; Choi, Young Bok; Kim, Jeong Soo; Park, Jung Ho

    2015-12-01

    A combined scheme using the light source of a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA) and an optical signal processing unit (OSPU) based on the compact TO-can package is fabricated and characterized for a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensing system. Due to the optical feedback behavior from the FBG sensor, the RSOA is self-injection locked and lasing occurs at the Bragg wavelength. Using the wavelength-dependent filter method, all of the components in the OSPU are compactly integrated on the TO-can package with a height of 17.6 mm and diameter of 6.0 mm. The wavelength demodulating output signals are based on the optical power difference, depending only on the wavelengths without the effect of input optical power variations. The sensitivity of the output signal to temperature shows 0.026 dB/°C. The entire FBG sensing system has an excellent linear response to temperatures controlled with an accuracy of ±0.3°C.

  20. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III; Po Zhang

    2005-01-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. One of the critical materials issues is to demonstrate that the luminescent cluster immobilized in the sol-gel porous support can withstand high temperature. At the same time the sol-gel matrix must have a high permeability to oxygen. Using a potassium salt of the molybdenum clusters, K{sub 2}Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 14}, we have established the conditions necessary for deposition of optical quality sol-gel films. From spectroscopic measurements of the film we have shown that the cluster luminescence is stable following heat cycling of 1 hour at 250 C. Quenching of a factor of 4X between pure nitrogen and 21% oxygen was observed for films cured directly at 200 C. These are promising results for a high temperature fiber optical oxygen sensor based on molybdenum chloride clusters.

  1. Optical Fiber Distributed Sensing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) Strain Measurements Taken During Cryotank Y-Joint Test Article Load Cycling at Liquid Helium Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Prosser, William H.; Hare, David A.; Moore, Thomas C.; Kenner, Winfred S.

    2007-01-01

    This paper outlines cryogenic Y-joint testing at Langley Research Center (LaRC) to validate the performance of optical fiber Bragg grating strain sensors for measuring strain at liquid helium temperature (-240 C). This testing also verified survivability of fiber sensors after experiencing 10 thermal cool-down, warm-up cycles and 400 limit load cycles. Graphite composite skins bonded to a honeycomb substrate in a sandwich configuration comprised the Y-joint specimens. To enable SHM of composite cryotanks for consideration to future spacecraft, a light-weight, durable monitoring technology is needed. The fiber optic distributed Bragg grating strain sensing system developed at LaRC is a viable substitute for conventional strain gauges which are not practical for SHM. This distributed sensing technology uses an Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometer (OFDR). This measurement approach has the advantage that it can measure hundreds of Bragg grating sensors per fiber and the sensors are all written at one frequency, greatly simplifying fiber manufacturing. Fiber optic strain measurements compared well to conventional strain gauge measurements obtained during these tests. These results demonstrated a high potential for a successful implementation of a SHM system incorporating LaRC's fiber optic sensing system on the composite cryotank and other future cryogenic applications.

  2. Fiber Singular Optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Volyar

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The present review is devoted to the optical vortex behavior both in free space and optical fibers. The processes of the vortex transformations in perturbed optical fibers are analyzed on the base of the operator of the spin – orbit interaction in order to forecast the possible ways of manufacturing the vortex preserving fibers and their applications in supersensitive optical devices.

  3. Fiber Singular Optics

    OpenAIRE

    A.V. Volyar

    2002-01-01

    The present review is devoted to the optical vortex behavior both in free space and optical fibers. The processes of the vortex transformations in perturbed optical fibers are analyzed on the base of the operator of the spin – orbit interaction in order to forecast the possible ways of manufacturing the vortex preserving fibers and their applications in supersensitive optical devices.

  4. Data processing in safety monitoring for earth embankment dams using fully distributed sensing along optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, A. H.; Zeng, H. Y.; Zhu, P. Y.; Leng, Y. B.

    2009-11-01

    In this study we present a method to sort measured-data and process signal for special hydrodynamic monitoring system based on distributed optical fiber sensors. The procedure consists of defining the attribute of the data, data processing and information matching. The data of for-processing-part are processed regularly, which directly provides results for the user from the monitoring system. These results go into the next step to add environmental parameters, which includes weather, special events and season information. Information fusion and matching operation of the result and environment information enhances the accuracy of hidden hazard early warning.

  5. Fiber optic strain, temperature and shape sensing via OFDR for ground, air and space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bos, Joseph; Klein, Justin; Froggatt, Mark; Sanborn, Eric; Gifford, Dawn

    2013-09-01

    Optical Frequency Domain Reflectometry (OFDR) is used to interrogate fiber sensors adhered to various structures. Temperatures in excess of 1000°C are observed on a thermal-barrier coated stainless steel test plate as it is exposed to a high-temperature torch. The surface temperature distribution is mapped with 5 mm spatial resolution at 100 Hz, revealing large spatial and temporal thermal gradients at coating defect locations. Results and response times are compared with conventional K type thermocouples. Also presented in this work, are real-time position, shape and twist measurements of a simple structure as it is subjected to various loads.

  6. Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, William Lance; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing technology has emerged in recent years offering tremendous advantages over conventional aircraft instrumentation systems. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over their conventional counterparts are well established; they are lighter, smaller, and can provide enormous numbers of measurements at a fraction of the total sensor weight. After a brief overview of conventional and fiber-optic sensing technology, this paper presents an overview of the research that has been conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in recent years to advance this promising new technology. Research and development areas include system and algorithm development, sensor characterization and attachment, and real-time experimentally-derived parameter monitoring for ground- and flight-based applications. The vision of fiber optic smart structure technology is presented and its potential benefits to aerospace vehicles throughout the lifecycle, from preliminary design to final retirement, are presented.

  7. Remote optical sensing on the nanometer scale with a bowtie aperture nano-antenna on a fiber tip of scanning near-field optical microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Plasmonic nano-antennas have proven the outstanding ability of sensing chemical and physical processes down to the nanometer scale. Sensing is usually achieved within the highly confined optical fields generated resonantly by the nano-antennas, i.e., in contact to the nanostructures. In this paper, we demonstrate the sensing capability of nano-antennas to their larger scale environment, well beyond their plasmonic confinement volume, leading to the concept of “remote” (non contact) sensing on the nanometer scale. On the basis of a bowtie-aperture nano-antenna (BNA) integrated at the apex of a SNOM (Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy) fiber tip, we introduce an ultra-compact, moveable, and background-free optical nanosensor for the remote sensing of a silicon surface (up to distance of 300 nm). Sensitivity of the BNA to its large scale environment is high enough to expect the monitoring and control of the spacing between the nano-antenna and a silicon surface with sub-nanometer accuracy. This work paves the way towards an alternative class of nanopositioning techniques, based on the monitoring of diffraction-free plasmon resonance, that are alternative to nanomechanical and diffraction-limited optical interference-based devices

  8. Remote optical sensing on the nanometer scale with a bowtie aperture nano-antenna on a fiber tip of scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atie, Elie M.; Xie, Zhihua; El Eter, Ali; Salut, Roland; Baida, Fadi I.; Grosjean, Thierry, E-mail: thierry.grosjean@univ-fcomte.fr [Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR CNRS 6174, Université de Franche-Comté, Département d' Optique P.M. Duffieux, 15B avenue des Montboucons, 25030 Besançon cedex (France); Nedeljkovic, Dusan [Lovalite s.a.s., 7 rue Xavier Marmier, 25000 Besançon (France); Tannous, Tony [Department of Physics, University of Balamand, P.O. Box 100 Tripoli (Lebanon)

    2015-04-13

    Plasmonic nano-antennas have proven the outstanding ability of sensing chemical and physical processes down to the nanometer scale. Sensing is usually achieved within the highly confined optical fields generated resonantly by the nano-antennas, i.e., in contact to the nanostructures. In this paper, we demonstrate the sensing capability of nano-antennas to their larger scale environment, well beyond their plasmonic confinement volume, leading to the concept of “remote” (non contact) sensing on the nanometer scale. On the basis of a bowtie-aperture nano-antenna (BNA) integrated at the apex of a SNOM (Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy) fiber tip, we introduce an ultra-compact, moveable, and background-free optical nanosensor for the remote sensing of a silicon surface (up to distance of 300 nm). Sensitivity of the BNA to its large scale environment is high enough to expect the monitoring and control of the spacing between the nano-antenna and a silicon surface with sub-nanometer accuracy. This work paves the way towards an alternative class of nanopositioning techniques, based on the monitoring of diffraction-free plasmon resonance, that are alternative to nanomechanical and diffraction-limited optical interference-based devices.

  9. Remote optical sensing on the nanometer scale with a bowtie aperture nano-antenna on a fiber tip of scanning near-field optical microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atie, Elie M.; Xie, Zhihua; El Eter, Ali; Salut, Roland; Nedeljkovic, Dusan; Tannous, Tony; Baida, Fadi I.; Grosjean, Thierry

    2015-04-01

    Plasmonic nano-antennas have proven the outstanding ability of sensing chemical and physical processes down to the nanometer scale. Sensing is usually achieved within the highly confined optical fields generated resonantly by the nano-antennas, i.e., in contact to the nanostructures. In this paper, we demonstrate the sensing capability of nano-antennas to their larger scale environment, well beyond their plasmonic confinement volume, leading to the concept of "remote" (non contact) sensing on the nanometer scale. On the basis of a bowtie-aperture nano-antenna (BNA) integrated at the apex of a SNOM (Scanning Near-field Optical Microscopy) fiber tip, we introduce an ultra-compact, moveable, and background-free optical nanosensor for the remote sensing of a silicon surface (up to distance of 300 nm). Sensitivity of the BNA to its large scale environment is high enough to expect the monitoring and control of the spacing between the nano-antenna and a silicon surface with sub-nanometer accuracy. This work paves the way towards an alternative class of nanopositioning techniques, based on the monitoring of diffraction-free plasmon resonance, that are alternative to nanomechanical and diffraction-limited optical interference-based devices.

  10. Microstructured optical fiber Bragg grating-based strain and temperature sensing in the concrete buffer of the Belgian supercontainer concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geernaert, Thomas; Sulejmani, Sanne; Sonnenfeld, Camille; Luyckx, Geert; Chah, Karima; Areias, Lou; Mergo, Pawel; Urbanczyk, Waclaw; Van Marcke, Philippe; Coppens, Erik; Thienpont, Hugo; Berghmans, Francis

    2014-05-01

    We present the use of microstructured optical fiber Bragg grating-based sensors for strain and temperature monitoring inside the concrete buffer of the Belgian supercontainer concept, demonstrated in a half-scale test in 2013. This test incorporated several optical fiber sensors inside the concrete buffer for production and condition monitoring. The optical fiber sensors presented here consist of small carbon-reinforced composite plates in which highly birefringent Butterfly microstructured optical fibers, equipped with fiber Bragg gratings, were embedded. The double reflection spectrum of these MOFGBs allows to simultaneously monitor strain and temperature, as confirmed by comparison with data obtained from thermocouples and vibrating-wire sensors installed near the MOFBGs.

  11. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III

    2004-04-01

    A reflection mode fiber optic oxygen sensor that can operate at high temperatures for power plant applications is being developed. The sensor is based on the {sup 3}O{sub 2} quenching of the red emission from hexanuclear molybdenum chloride clusters. The luminescence of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} immobilized in a sol-gel matrix was measured as a function of heater temperature up to 200 C, in an inert environment. While the luminescence decreased with temperature, the integrated intensity at 200 C should be sufficient to enable detection of the luminescence in a fiber geometry. Previously we found that aging Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} at temperatures above 250 C converts the canary yellow Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} to a non-luminescent gray solid. Optical and thermal aging experiments show that the alkali metal salts of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} have higher thermal stabilities and remain luminescent after aging at 280 C.

  12. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  13. Fiber Optics Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  14. The Fiber Optic Connection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the fiber optics programs at the Career and Technical Center in Berlin, Pennsylvania and the Charles S. Monroe Technology Center in Loudoun County, Virginia. Discusses the involvement of the Fiber Optic Association with education, research and development, manufacturing, sales, distribution, installation, and maintenance of fiber optic

  15. Drastic sensitivity enhancement of temperature sensing based on modal interference in plastic optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Numata, G.; Hayashi, N.; Tabaru, M.; Mizuno, Y.; Nakamura, K.

    2015-09-01

    It has been reported that temperature sensors based on modal interference in perfluorinated graded-index (GI) plastic optical fibers (POFs) show the world's highest temperature sensitivity of +49.8 nm/C/m at 1300 nm at room temperature, which is over 1800 times the value in silica multimode fibers (MMFs). In this work, we newly find that the temperature sensitivity (absolute value) is significantly enhanced with increasing temperature toward ~70C, which is close to the glass-transition temperature of the core polymer. When the core diameter is 62.5 ?m, the sensitivity at 72 C at 1300 nm is +202 nm/C/m, which is approximately 26 times the value obtained at room temperature and even over 7000 times the highest value previously reported using a silica MMF. As the glass-transition temperature of polymers can be generally set to an arbitrary value, this characteristic could be used to develop POF-based temperature sensors with ultra-high sensitivity not only at ~70C but at arbitrary temperature in future.

  16. Improvement of plastic optical fiber microphone based on moisture pattern sensing in devoiced breath

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taki, Tomohito; Honma, Satoshi; Morisawa, Masayuki; Muto, Shinzo

    2008-03-01

    Conversation is the most practical and common form in communication. However, people with a verbal handicap feel a difficulty to produce words due to variations in vocal chords. This research leads to develop a new devoiced microphone system based on distinguishes between the moisture patterns for each devoiced breaths, using a plastic optical fiber (POF) moisture sensor. In the experiment, five POF-type moisture sensors with fast response were fabricated by coating swell polymer with a slightly larger refractive index than that of fiber core and were set in front of mouth. When these sensors are exposed into humid air produced by devoiced breath, refractive index in cladding layer decreases by swelling and then the POF sensor heads change to guided type. Based on the above operation principle, the output light intensities from the five sensors set in front of mouth change each other. Using above mentioned output light intensity patterns, discernment of devoiced vowels in Japanese (a,i,u,e,o) was tried by means of DynamicProgramming-Matching (DP-matching) method. As the result, distinction rate over 90% was obtained to Japanese devoiced vowels. Therefore, using this system and a voice synthesizer, development of new microphone for the person with a functional disorder in the vocal chords seems to be possible.

  17. Multipoint Pressure and Temperature Sensing Fiber Optic Cable for Monitoring CO2 Sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Challener, William

    2014-12-31

    This report describes the work completed on contract DE-FE0010116. The goal of this two year project was to develop and demonstrate in the laboratory a highly accurate multi-point pressure measurement fiber optic cable based on MEMS pressure sensors suitable for downhole deployment in a CO2 sequestration well. The sensor interrogator was also to be demonstrated in a remote monitoring system and environmental testing was to be completed to indicate its downhole survivability over a lengthy period of time (e.g., 20 years). An interrogator system based on a pulsed laser excitation was shown to be capable of multiple (potentially 100+) simultaneous sensor measurements. Two sensors packages were completed and spliced in a cable onto the same fiber and measured. One sensor package was subsequently measured at high temperatures and pressures in supercritical CO2, while the other package was measured prior and after being subjected to high torque stresses to mimic downhole deployment. The environmental and stress tests indicated areas in which the package design should be further improved.

  18. Monitoring of Thermal Protection Systems Using Robust Self-Organizing Optical Fiber Sensing Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance

    2013-01-01

    The general aim of this work is to develop and demonstrate a prototype structural health monitoring system for thermal protection systems that incorporates piezoelectric acoustic emission (AE) sensors to detect the occurrence and location of damaging impacts, and an optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor network to evaluate the effect of detected damage on the thermal conductivity of the TPS material. Following detection of an impact, the TPS would be exposed to a heat source, possibly the sun, and the temperature distribution on the inner surface in the vicinity of the impact measured by the FBG network. A similar procedure could also be carried out as a screening test immediately prior to re-entry. The implications of any detected anomalies in the measured temperature distribution will be evaluated for their significance in relation to the performance of the TPS during re-entry. Such a robust TPS health monitoring system would ensure overall crew safety throughout the mission, especially during reentry

  19. Application of optical fiber distributed sensing to health monitoring of concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villalba, Sergi; Casas, Joan R.

    2013-08-01

    The use of Optical Backscatter Reflectometer (OBR) sensors is a promising measurement technology for Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) as it offers the possibility of continuous monitoring of strain and temperature along the fiber. Several applications to materials used in the aeronautical construction have demonstrated the feasibility of such technique. These materials (composites, steel, aluminum) apart from having a smooth surface where the bonding of the sensor is easily carried out, they also have a continuous strain field when subject to external loading and therefore the bonding of the OBR on the material surface is not in danger for high levels of loading as the OBR can easily follow the strain in the material. The application of such type of sensor to concrete structures may present some difficulties due to (1) the roughness of the concrete surface and the heterogeneity due to the presence of aggregates of several sizes, (2) the fact that reinforced concrete cracks at very low level of load, appearance of a discontinuity in the surface and the strain field that may provoke a break or debonding of the optical fiber. However the feasibility of using OBR in the SHM of civil engineering constructions made of concrete is also of great interest, mainly because in this type of structures it is impossible to know where the crack may appear and therefore severe cracking (dangerous for the structure operation) can appear without warning of the monitoring if sensors are not placed in the particular location where the crack appears. In order to explore the potentiality of detecting cracks as they appear without failure or debonding, as well as the compatibility of the OBR bonding to the concrete surfaces, this paper shows the test carried out in the loading up to failure of a concrete slab.

  20. Sapphire ball lensed fiber probe for common-path optical coherence tomography in ocular imaging and sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Mingtao; Huang, Yong; Kang, Jin U

    2013-03-26

    We describe a novel common-path optical coherence tomography (CP-OCT) fiber probe design using a sapphire ball lens for cross-sectional imaging and sensing in retina vitrectomy surgery. Single mode Gaussian beam (TEM(00)) simulation was used to optimize lateral resolution and working distance (WD) of the common-path probe. A theoretical sensitivity model for CP-OCT was prosed to assess its optimal performance based an unbalanced photodetector configuration. Two probe designs with working distances (WD) 415?m and 1221?m and lateral resolution 11?m and 18?m, respectively were implemented with sensitivity up to 88dB. The designs are also fully compatible with conventional Michelson interferometer based OCT configurations. The reference plane of the probe, located at the distal beam exit interface of the single mode fiber (SMF), was encased within a 25-gauge hypodermic needle by the sapphire ball lens facilitates its applications in bloody and harsh environments. The performances of the fiber probe with 11?m of lateral resolution and 19?m of axial resolution were demonstrated by cross-sectional imaging of a cow cornea and retina in vitro with a 1310nm swept source OCT system. This probe was also attached to a piezoelectric motor for active compensation of physiological tremor for handheld retinal surgical tools. PMID:24392202

  1. Subsea downhole optical sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential for subsea downhole optical fibre sensing to optimize hydrocarbon production and hence contribute to enhanced oil recovery is described. The components of susbea downhole optical sensing systems are reviewed and the performance of a new subsea optical fibre feed-through for downhole optical fibre sensing reported.

  2. Highly distributed multi-point, temperature and pressure compensated, fiber optic oxygen sensors (FOxSense) for aircraft fuel tank environment and safety monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Edgar A.; Kempen, Cornelia; Sun, Sunjian; Esterkin, Yan

    2014-09-01

    This paper describes recent progress towards the development and qualification of a highly distributed, multi-point, all optical pressure and temperature compensated, fiber optic oxygen sensor (FOxSense™) system for closed-loop monitoring and safety of the oxygen ullage environment inside fuel tanks of military and commercial aircraft. The alloptical FOxSense™ system uses a passive, multi-parameter (O2/T&P) fiber optic sensor probe with no electrical connections leading to the sensors install within the fuel tanks of an aircraft. The all optical sensor consists of an integrated multi-parameter fiber optic sensor probe that integrates a fuel insensitive fluorescence based optical oxygen optrode with built-in temperature and pressure optical optrodes for compensation of temperature and pressure variants induced in the fluorescence response of the oxygen optrode. The distributed (O2/T&P) fiber optic sensors installed in the fuel tanks of the aircraft are connected to the FOxSense optoelectronic system via a fiber optic cable conduit reaching to each fuel tank in the aircraft. A multichannel frequency-domain fiber optic sensor read-out (FOxSense™) system is used to interrogate the optical signal of all three sensors in real-time and to display the fuel tank oxygen environment suitable for aircraft status and alarm applications. Preliminary testing of the all optical fiber optic oxygen sensor have demonstrated the ability to monitor the oxygen environment inside a simulated fuel tank in the range of 0% O2 to 40% O2 concentrations, temperatures from (-) 40°C to (+) 60°C, and altitudes from 0-ft to 40,000-ft.

  3. Statistical mapping of zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwakanyamale, Kisa; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Slater, Lee D.

    2013-01-01

    Fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) increasingly is used to map zones of focused groundwater/surface-water exchange (GWSWE). Previous studies of GWSWE using FO-DTS involved identification of zones of focused GWSWE based on arbitrary cutoffs of FO-DTS time-series statistics (e.g., variance, cross-correlation between temperature and stage, or spectral power). New approaches are needed to extract more quantitative information from large, complex FO-DTS data sets while concurrently providing an assessment of uncertainty associated with mapping zones of focused GSWSE. Toward this end, we present a strategy combining discriminant analysis (DA) and spectral analysis (SA). We demonstrate the approach using field experimental data from a reach of the Columbia River adjacent to the Hanford 300 Area site. Results of the combined SA/DA approach are shown to be superior to previous results from qualitative interpretation of FO-DTS spectra alone.

  4. Fiber optic micro accelerometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    2005-07-26

    An accelerometer includes a wafer, a proof mass integrated into the wafer, at least one spring member connected to the proof mass, and an optical fiber. A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially reflective surface on the proof mass and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. The two partially reflective surfaces are used to detect movement of the proof mass through the optical fiber, using an optical detection system.

  5. Fiber optics engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Azadeh, Mohammad

    2009-01-01

    Covering fiber optics from an engineering perspective, this text emphasizes data conversion between electrical and optical domains. Techniques to improve the fidelity of this conversion (from electrical to optical domain, and vice versa) are also covered.

  6. An Efficient Wavelength variation approach for Bend Sensing in Single mode-Multimode-Single mode Optical Fiber Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Samee Khan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Several aspects of the SMS edge filters have been investigated, including the effect of bending the SMS fiber cores due to fabrication tolerances, polarization dependence, and temperature dependence. These aspects can impair the performance of a wavelength measurement system. There are several approaches which have been proposed and demonstrated to achieve high resolution and accuracy of wavelength measurement. Bending effects due to the splicing process on the spectral characteristics of SMS fibre structure-based edge filters are investigated experimentally with the help of MATLAB. A limit for the tolerable of the cores of an SMS fibre structure-based edge filter is proposed, beyond which the edge filters spectral performance degrades unacceptably. We use Wavelength variation approach by which we reduce the power loss due to the bending in the optical fiber. Due to the power loss the power transmission is increases and efficiency reduces. So by wavelength variation approach we developed an efficient spectrometer capable of performing a wide variety of coherent multidimensional measurements at optical wavelengths. In this approach we fixed the power and perform variation in the wavelength to sense the bending accurately. The two major components of the largely automated device are a spatial beam shaper which controls the beam geometry and a spatiotemporal pulse shaper which controls the temporal waveform of the femtosecond pulse in each beam. By which we sense the distortion to reduce the power transmission. We apply our algorithm for performing several comparison considerations which shows the performance of our algorithm which is better in comparison to the previous work.

  7. Improving Photovoltaic Energy Production with Fiber-Optic Distributed Temperature Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hausner, M. B.; Berli, M.

    2014-12-01

    The efficiency of solar photovoltaic (PV) generators declines sharply with increased temperatures. Peak solar exposure often occurs at the same time as peak temperatures, but solar PV installations are typically designed based on solar angle. In temperate areas, the peak temperatures may not be high enough to induce significant efficiency losses. In some of the areas with the greatest potential for solar development, however, summer air temperatures regularly reach 45 °C and PV panel temperatures exceed the air temperatures. Here we present a preliminary model of a PV array intended to optimize solar production in a hot and arid environment. The model begins with the diurnal and seasonal cycles in the angle and elevation of the sun, but also includes a meteorology-driven energy balance to project the temperatures of the PV panels and supporting structure. The model will be calibrated and parameterized using a solar array at the Desert Research Institute's (DRI) Renewable Energy Deployment and Display (REDD) facility in Reno, Nevada, and validated with a similar array at DRI's Las Vegas campus. Optical fibers will be installed on the PV panels and structural supports and interrogated by a distributed temperature sensor (DTS) to record the spatial and temporal variations in temperature. Combining the simulated panel temperatures, the efficiency-temperature relationship for the panels, and the known solar cycles at a site will allow us to optimize the design of future PV collectors (i.e., the aspect and angle of panels) for given production goals.

  8. Polymer optical fibers integrated directly into 3D orthogonal woven composites for sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study demonstrates that standard polymer optical fibers (POF) can be directly integrated into composites from 3D orthogonal woven preforms during the weaving process and then serve as in-situ sensors to detect damage due to bending or impact loads. Different composite samples with embedded POF were fabricated of 3D orthogonal woven composites with different parameters namely number of y-/x-layers and x-yarn density. The signal of POF was not affected significantly by the preform structure. During application of resin using VARTM technique, significant drop in backscattering level was observed due to pressure caused by vacuum on the embedded POF. Measurements of POF signal while in the final composites after resin cure indicated that the backscattering level almost returned to the original level of un-embedded POF. The POF responded to application of bending and impact loads to the composite with a reduction in the backscattering level. The backscattering level almost returned back to its original level after removing the bending load until damage was present in the composite. Similar behavior occurred due to impact events. As the POF itself is used as the sensor and can be integrated throughout the composite, large sections of future 3D woven composite structures could be monitored without the need for specialized sensors or complex instrumentation. (paper)

  9. Monitoring of Thermal Protection Systems and MMOD using Robust Self-Organizing Optical Fiber Sensing Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance

    2014-01-01

    The general aim of this work is to develop and demonstrate a prototype structural health monitoring system for thermal protection systems that incorporates piezoelectric acoustic emission (AE) sensors to detect the occurrence and location of damaging impacts, such as those from Micrometeoroid Orbital Debris (MMOD). The approach uses an optical fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor network to evaluate the effect of detected damage on the thermal conductivity of the TPS material. Following detection of an impact, the TPS would be exposed to a heat source, possibly the sun, and the temperature distribution on the inner surface in the vicinity of the impact measured by the FBG network. A similar procedure could also be carried out as a screening test immediately prior to re-entry. The implications of any detected anomalies in the measured temperature distribution will be evaluated for their significance in relation to the performance of the TPS during reentry. Such a robust TPS health monitoring system would ensure overall crew safety throughout the mission, especially during reentry.

  10. Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maram, Jonathan M.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed sensor measures temperatures over wide range, from cryogenic liquids to burning gases. Made in part of optical fibers, sensor lighter in weight than thermocouple and immune to electromagnetic interference. Device does not respond to temperatures elsewhere than at sensing tip. Thermal expansion and contraction of distance between fiber end and mirror alters interference between light reflected from those two surfaces, thereby giving interferometric indication of temperatures.

  11. Optical Fiber Fusion Splicing

    CERN Document Server

    Yablon, Andrew D

    2005-01-01

    This book is an up-to-date treatment of optical fiber fusion splicing incorporating all the recent innovations in the field. It provides a toolbox of general strategies and specific techniques that the reader can apply when optimizing fusion splices between novel fibers. It specifically addresses considerations important for fusion splicing of contemporary specialty fibers including dispersion compensating fiber, erbium-doped gain fiber, polarization maintaining fiber, and microstructured fiber. Finally, it discusses the future of optical fiber fusion splicing including silica and non-silica based optical fibers as well as the trend toward increasing automation. Whilst serving as a self-contained reference work, abundant citations from the technical literature will enable readers to readily locate primary sources.

  12. Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optical Remote Sensing Laboratory deploys rugged, cutting-edge electro-optical instrumentation for the collection of various event signatures, with expertise in...

  13. Rayleigh fiber optics gyroscope

    OpenAIRE

    Kung, A.; Budin, J.; Thévenaz, Luc; Robert, P. A.

    1997-01-01

    A novel kind of fiber-optic gyroscope based on Rayleigh backscattering in a fiber-ring resonator is presented in this letter. Information on the rotation rate is obtained from the composed response of the fiber ring to an optical time-domain reflectometry (OTDR) instrument. The developed model based on the coherence properties of the Rayleigh scattering yields a polarization-insensitive and low-cost gyroscope

  14. A Bragg Wavelength-Insensitive Fiber Bragg Grating Ultrasound Sensing System that Uses a Broadband Light and No Optical Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Tsuda

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available An optical filter is incorporated in a conventional ultrasound detection system that uses a fiber Bragg grating (FBG and broadband light source, to demodulate the FBG sensor signal. A novel ultrasound sensing system that does not require an optical filter is presented herein. Ultrasound could be detected via the application of signal processing techniques, such as signal averaging and frequency filters, to the photodetector output that corresponds to the intensity of the reflected light from a broadband light-illuminated FBG. Ultrasonic sensitivity was observed to be enhanced when an FBG was installed as a resonant sensor. This FBG ultrasound detection system is small and cheap to fabricate because it does not use a demodulating optical filter. The experimental results demonstrate that this system could be applied to ultrasonic damage inspection and acoustic emission measurements. Furthermore, this system was able to detect ultrasound despite the amount of strain or temperature that was applied to the FBG sensor because the ultrasound detection was not sensitive to the Bragg wavelength of the FBG sensor.

  15. A Bragg wavelength-insensitive fiber Bragg grating ultrasound sensing system that uses a broadband light and no optical filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuda, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    An optical filter is incorporated in a conventional ultrasound detection system that uses a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and broadband light source, to demodulate the FBG sensor signal. A novel ultrasound sensing system that does not require an optical filter is presented herein. Ultrasound could be detected via the application of signal processing techniques, such as signal averaging and frequency filters, to the photodetector output that corresponds to the intensity of the reflected light from a broadband light-illuminated FBG. Ultrasonic sensitivity was observed to be enhanced when an FBG was installed as a resonant sensor. This FBG ultrasound detection system is small and cheap to fabricate because it does not use a demodulating optical filter. The experimental results demonstrate that this system could be applied to ultrasonic damage inspection and acoustic emission measurements. Furthermore, this system was able to detect ultrasound despite the amount of strain or temperature that was applied to the FBG sensor because the ultrasound detection was not sensitive to the Bragg wavelength of the FBG sensor. PMID:22163995

  16. Full-scale prestress loss monitoring of damaged RC structures using distributed optical fiber sensing technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Chunguang; Zhou, Zhi; Ou, Jinping

    2012-01-01

    For the safety of prestressed structures, prestress loss is a critical issue that will increase with structural damage, so it is necessary to investigate prestress loss of prestressed structures under different damage scenarios. Unfortunately, to date, no qualified techniques are available due to difficulty for sensors to survive in harsh construction environments of long service life and large span. In this paper, a novel smart steel strand based on the Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA) sensing technique was designed and manufactured, and then series of tests were used to characterize properties of the smart steel strands. Based on prestress loss principle analysis of damaged structures, laboratory tests of two similar beams with different damages were used to verify the concept of full-scale prestress loss monitoring of damaged reinforced concrete (RC) beams by using the smart steel strands. The prestress losses obtained from the Brillouin sensors are compared with that from conventional sensors, which provided the evolution law of prestress losses of damaged RC beams. The monitoring results from the proposed smart strand can reveal both spatial distribution and time history of prestress losses of damaged RC beams. PMID:22778590

  17. Full-Scale Prestress Loss Monitoring of Damaged RC Structures Using Distributed Optical Fiber Sensing Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunguang Lan

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available For the safety of prestressed structures, prestress loss is a critical issue that will increase with structural damage, so it is necessary to investigate prestress loss of prestressed structures under different damage scenarios. Unfortunately, to date, no qualified techniques are available due to difficulty for sensors to survive in harsh construction environments of long service life and large span. In this paper, a novel smart steel strand based on the Brillouin optical time domain analysis (BOTDA sensing technique was designed and manufactured, and then series of tests were used to characterize properties of the smart steel strands. Based on prestress loss principle analysis of damaged structures, laboratory tests of two similar beams with different damages were used to verify the concept of full-scale prestress loss monitoring of damaged reinforced concrete (RC beams by using the smart steel strands. The prestress losses obtained from the Brillouin sensors are compared with that from conventional sensors, which provided the evolution law of prestress losses of damaged RC beams. The monitoring results from the proposed smart strand can reveal both spatial distribution and time history of prestress losses of damaged RC beams.

  18. Fiber optic laser rod

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  19. Fiber optics in SHIVA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHIVA is a twenty arm laser which is controlled with a network of fifty computers, interconnected with digital fiber optic links. Three different fiber optic systems employed on the Shiva laser will be described. Two of the systems are for digital communications, one at 9600 baud and the other at 1 megabaud. The third system uses fiber optics to distribute diagnostic triggers with subnanosecond jitter

  20. An Efficient Wavelength variation approach for Bend Sensing in Single mode- Multimode-Single mode Optical Fiber Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Samee Khan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Several aspects of the SMS edge filters have beeninvestigated, including the effect of bending the SMS fibercores due to fabrication tolerances, polarizationdependence, and temperature dependence. These aspectscan impair the performance of a wavelength measurementsystem. There are several approaches which have beenproposed and demonstrated to achieve high resolution andaccuracy of wavelength measurement. Bending effects dueto the splicing process on the spectral characteristics ofSMS fibre structure-based edge filters are investigatedexperimentally with the help of MATLAB. A limit for thetolerable of the cores of an SMS fibre structure-based edgefilter is proposed, beyond which the edge filters spectralperformance degrades unacceptably. We use Wavelengthvariation approach by which we reduce the power loss dueto the bending in the optical fiber. Due to the power lossthe power transmission is increases and efficiency reduces.So by wavelength variation approach we developed anefficient spectrometer capable of performing a wide varietyof coherent multidimensional measurements at opticalwavelengths. In this approach we fixed the power andperform variation in the wavelength to sense the bendingaccurately. The two major components of the largelyautomated device are a spatial beam shaper which controlsthe beam geometry and a spatiotemporal pulse shaperwhich controls the temporal waveform of the femtosecondpulse in each beam. By which we sense the distortion toreduce the power transmission. We apply our algorithm forperforming several comparison considerations whichshows the performance of our algorithm which is better incomparison to the previous work

  1. Specialty fiber optic applications for harsh and high radiation environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risch, Brian G.

    2015-05-01

    Since the first commercial introduction in the 1980s, optical fiber technology has undergone an almost exponential growth. Currently over 2 billion fiber kilometers are deployed globally with 2014 global optical fiber production exceeding 300 million fiber kilometers. 1 Along with the staggering growth in optical fiber production and deployment, an increase in optical fiber technologies and applications has also followed. Although the main use of optical fibers by far has been for traditional data transmission and communications, numerous new applications are introduced each year. Initially the practical application of optical fibers was limited by cost and sensitivity of the optical fibers to stress, radiation, and other environmental factors. Tremendous advances have taken place in optical fiber design and materials allowing optical fibers to be deployed in increasingly harsh environments with exposure to increased mechanical and environmental stresses while maintaining high reliability. With the increased reliability, lower cost, and greatly expanded range of optical fiber types now available, new optical fiber deployments in harsh and high radiation environments is seeing a tremendous increase for data, communications, and sensing applications. An overview of key optical fiber applications in data, communications, and sensing for harsh environments in industrial, energy exploration, energy generation, energy transmission, and high radiation applications will be presented. Specific recent advances in new radiation resistant optical fiber types, other specialty optical fibers, optical fiber coatings, and optical fiber cable materials will be discussed to illustrate long term reliability for deployment of optical fibers in harsh and high radiation environments.

  2. Single- and few-moded lithium aluminosilicate optical fiber for athermal Brillouin strain sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragic, P D; Ryan, C; Kucera, C J; Cavillon, M; Tuggle, M; Jones, M; Hawkins, T W; Yablon, A D; Stolen, R; Ballato, J

    2015-11-01

    Results are presented toward realizing a true single-mode fiber whose Brillouin frequency shift is independent of temperature, while its dependence on strain is comparable to conventional high-silica-content single-mode fibers. Demonstrated here is a fiber with a negative thermal sensitivity d?/dT of -0.26??MHz/K and a strain sensitivity of +406??MHz/%. The suppression of the Brillouin thermal response is enabled by the large thermal expansion coefficient of the group I oxide-containing silica glass network. PMID:26512511

  3. Remote optical sensing on the nanometer scale with a bowtie aperture nano-antenna on a SNOM fiber tip

    OpenAIRE

    Atie, Elie M.; Xie, Zhihua; Eter, Ali El; Salut, Roland; Nedeljkovic, Dusan; Tannous, Tony; Baida, Fadi I.; Grosjean, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    Plasmonic nano-antennas have proven the outstanding ability of sensing chemical and physical processes down to the nano-meter scale. Sensing is usually achieved within the highly confined optical fields generated resonantly by the nano-antennas, i.e. in contact to the nano-structures. In these paper, We demonstrate the sensing capability of nano-antennas to their larger scale environment, well beyond their plasmonic confinement volume, leading to the concept of 'remote' (non contact) sensing ...

  4. Fiber-optic pH sensing system with microscopic spatial resolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podrazký, Ondřej; Mrázek, Jan; Vytykáčová, Soňa; Proboštová, Jana; Kašík, Ivan

    Bellingham : SPIE, 2015, s. 9506121-9506126. ISBN 9781628416275. ISSN 0277-786X. [Conference on Optical Sensor s. Prague (CZ), 13.04.2015-16.04.2015] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR(CZ) TA04011400 Institutional support: RVO:67985882 Keywords : Biological materials * Electromagnetic fields * Optical sensor s Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers

  5. Fiber optical parametric oscillator

    OpenAIRE

    García Sánchez, Enric

    2015-01-01

    The parametric gain of a four-wave mixing (FWM) process in a configuration of a fiber optical parametric oscillator (FOPO) is one option to achieve the conversion of high peak power pulses at frequencies reachable with rare-earth doped fibers. The point is that rare-earth doped fiber lasers and amplifiers have restrictions in the wavelength coverage due to the available dopants and their electronic transitions. Thus, to extend this coverage, silica fibers are being used as nonlinear media to ...

  6. Fiber optic hydrophone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmenko, Paul J. (Livermore, CA); Davis, Donald T. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optic fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends.

  7. Fiber optic attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzetti, Mike F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber optic attenuator of the invention is a mandrel structure through which a bundle of optical fibers is wrapped around in a complete circle. The mandrel structure includes a flexible cylindrical sheath through which the bundle passes. A set screw on the mandrel structure impacts one side of the sheath against two posts on the opposite side of the sheath. By rotating the screw, the sheath is deformed to extend partially between the two posts, bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius controlled by rotating the set screw. Bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius causes light in each optical fiber to be lost in the cladding, the amount depending upon the radius about which the bundle is bent.

  8. Random-access distributed fiber sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Zadok, Avinoam; Antman, Yair; Primerov, Nikolay; Denisov, Andrey; SANCHO Juan; Thévenaz, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Optical sensing offers an attractive solution to the societal concern for prevention of natural and human-generated threats and for efficient use of natural resources. The unprecedented properties of optical fibers make them ideal for implementing a ‘nervous system’ in structural health monitoring: they are small, low-cost and electrically and chemically inert. In particular, the nonlinear interaction of stimulated Brillouin scattering allows for the distributed measurement of strain and temp...

  9. Shape Sensing Using a Multi-Core Optical Fiber Having an Arbitrary Initial Shape in the Presence of Extrinsic Forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogge, Matthew D. (Inventor); Moore, Jason P. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Shape of a multi-core optical fiber is determined by positioning the fiber in an arbitrary initial shape and measuring strain over the fiber's length using strain sensors. A three-coordinate p-vector is defined for each core as a function of the distance of the corresponding cores from a center point of the fiber and a bending angle of the cores. The method includes calculating, via a controller, an applied strain value of the fiber using the p-vector and the measured strain for each core, and calculating strain due to bending as a function of the measured and the applied strain values. Additionally, an apparent local curvature vector is defined for each core as a function of the calculated strain due to bending. Curvature and bend direction are calculated using the apparent local curvature vector, and fiber shape is determined via the controller using the calculated curvature and bend direction.

  10. Microstructured Optical Fibers Filled with Carbon Nanotubes: Photonic Bandgap Modification and Sensing Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pisco, Marco; Consales, Marco; Cutolo, Antonello; Aversa, Patrizia; PENZA Michele; Giordano, Michele; Cusano, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    In conclusion, the research activities devoted to the integration of MOFs with SWCNTs in order to develop new in-fiber active and passive optoelectronic devices are reviewed. The infiltration of SWCNTs inside the MOF holes has been accomplished through the deposition of multiple SWCNTs monolayer by means of the LB method. The far field characterizations revealed the success of the SWCNTs deposition demonstrating the partial filling of the nanotubes within MOFs. Also, the obtained results demo...

  11. Optical fiber Sagnac interferometer for sensing scalar directional refraction: Application to magnetochiral birefringence

    OpenAIRE

    Loas, Goulc'Hen; Alouini, Mehdi; Vallet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We present a setup dedicated to the measurement of the small scalar directional anisotropies associated to the magnetochiral interaction. The apparatus, based on a polarization-independent fiber Sagnac interferometer, is optimized to be insensitive to circular anisotropies and to residual absorption. It can thus characterize samples of biological interests, for which the two enantiomers are not available and/or which present poor transmission. The signal-to-noise ratio is shown to be limited ...

  12. Multi optical path generator for fiber optic strain sensors multiplexing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hao; Yuan, Yonggui; Yuan, Libo

    2015-07-01

    A multi optical path generator based on a tunable long Fabry-Perot optical fiber cavity is proposed and demonstrated. It would be used in an optical fiber sensing system which could multiplex a number of fiber sensors with different gauge lengths. Using this optical path generator, we can get a sequence of light beams with different optical paths, which will be coupled to the fiber sensor array in the sensing system. The multi optical path lengths generated by the device are analyzed and discussed. And the relative intensity of the corresponding light beam is calculated. The multiplexing capability caused by the optical path generator is discussed and the experimental results are confirmed this. The system can be used in strain or deformation sensing for smart structure health monitoring.

  13. One step method to attach gold nanoparticles onto the surface of an optical fiber used for refractive index sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garca, J. A.; Monzn-Hernndez, D.; Manrquez, J.; Bustos, E.

    2016-01-01

    Localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) has recently emerged as an efficient and powerful tool for bio-photonic applications due to its high sensitivity to refractive index changes. One technique to excite LSP is by the interaction of the evanescent wave of the light guided by an optical fiber with metallic nanoparticles deposited over the surface of the fiber. This paper proposes a novel, simple, and fast method to attach gold nanoparticles to the optical fiber surface, which can be used to construct highly sensitive refractive index sensors based on localized surface plasmon resonance. A hetero-core structured fiber, composed by a small section of single-mode fiber inserted in a multimode fiber, was coated with nanoparticles using the method proposed here. A sensor sensitivity and resolution of 765 nm/RIU and ?1 10-4 RIU, respectively, were estimated over a refractive index range of 1.333-1.365. This coating method is appealing to construct optical fiber refractive index sensors since it is very simple and low cost.

  14. Fiber optics standard dictionary

    CERN Document Server

    Weik, Martin H

    1997-01-01

    Fiber Optics Vocabulary Development In 1979, the National Communications System published Technical InfonnationBulle­ tin TB 79-1, Vocabulary for Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications, written by this author. Based on a draft prepared by this author, the National Communications System published Federal Standard FED-STD-1037, Glossary of Telecommunications Terms, in 1980 with no fiber optics tenns. In 1981, the first edition of this dictionary was published under the title Fiber Optics and Lightwave Communications Standard Dictionary. In 1982, the then National Bureau of Standards, now the National Institute of Standards and Technology, published NBS Handbook 140, Optical Waveguide Communications Glossary, which was also published by the General Services Admin­ istration as PB82-166257 under the same title. Also in 1982, Dynamic Systems, Inc. , Fiberoptic Sensor Technology Handbook, co-authored and edited by published the this author, with an extensive Fiberoptic Sensors Glossary. In 1989, the handbook w...

  15. Optical fiber spectrophotometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method called 'Two Arm's Photo out and Electricity Send-back' is introduced. UV-365 UV/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer has been reequipped by this way with 5 meters long optical fiber. Another method called 'One Arm's Photo out and Photo Send-back' is also introduced. λ19 UV/VIS/NIR spectrophotometer has been reequipped by this way with 10 meters long optical fiber. Optical fiber spectrophotometer can work as its main set. So it is particularly applicable to radio activity work

  16. Development of special optical fibers for evanescent-wave chemical sensing

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matějec, Vlastimil; Chomát, Miroslav; Hayer, Miloš; Kašík, Ivan; Berková, Daniela; Abdelmalek, F.; Jaffrezic-Renault, N.

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 5 (1999), s. 883-888. ISSN 0011-4626. [Czech-Chinese Workshop on Advanced Materials for Optoelectronics - AMFO'98. Prague, 15.06.1998-17.06.1998] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA102/98/1358; GA ČR GA102/96/0939 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918; Joint project No.4104 AS CR and CNRS France Keywords : optical sensors * optical fibres Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.328, year: 1999

  17. Highly sensitive and simple method for refractive index sensing of liquids in microstructured optical fibers using four-wave mixing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frosz, Michael Henoch; Stefani, Alessio; Bang, Ole

    2011-01-01

    We present both experimental measurements and simulations for a simple fiber-optical liquid refractive index sensor, made using only commercially available components and without advanced postprocessing of the fiber. Despite the simplicity, we obtain the highest sensitivity experimentally...... demonstrated to date for aqueous solutions (refractive index around 1.33), which is relevant for extensions to biosensing. The sensor is based on measuring the spectral shift of peaks arising from four-wave mixing (FWM), when filling the holes of a microstructured fiber with different liquid samples and...

  18. Comparison of evanscent-wave and leaky-wave fiber optic sensing structures for gas detection

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrázek, Jan; Matějec, Vlastimil; Chomát, Miroslav; Renault, N. J.; Dzyadevych, S.; Rose, K.

    [Monastir] : [Faculté des Sciences de Monastir], 2004. s. 121. [Journees Maghreb-Europe sur les Materiaux et Leurs Applications aux Dispositifs et Capteurs MADICA 2004 /4./. 29.11.2004-01.12.2004, Tunis] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2067918 Keywords : fibre optic sensors * gas sensors Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering

  19. Optical fiber Sagnac interferometer for sensing scalar directional refraction: application to magnetochiral birefringence

    CERN Document Server

    Loas, Goulc'hen; Vallet, Marc

    2014-01-01

    We present a set-up dedicated to the measurement of the small scalar directional anisotropies associated to the magnetochiral interaction. The apparatus, based on a polarization-independent fiber Sagnac interferometer, is optimized to be insensitive to circular anisotropies and to residual absorption. It can thus characterize samples of biological interests, for which the two enantiomers are not available and/or which present poor transmission. The signal-to-noise ratio is shown to be limited only by the source intensity noise, leading to a detection limit of Df = 500 nrad.Hz-1/2. It yields a limit on the magnetochiral index nMC < 4 10-13 T-1 at 1550 nm for the organic molecules tested.

  20. Photoelastic Fiber-Optic Accelerometers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei

    This dissertation introduces a completely new class of fiber-optic accelerometers based on the principles of photoelasticity. Two different types of accelerometers are designed and developed. The first is a general purpose accelerometer which employs a sensing element made from an optically sensitive photoelastic plastic; the unit is designed with a relatively low natural frequency and a high sensitivity. The second is a shock accelerometer which employs a glass GRIN lens as its sensing element; the unit is designed with a relatively high frequency and a wide measurement range. In both cases, a low-cost LED is employed as an incoherent light source; multimode optical fibers having a hard plastic cladding are used to transmit signals between the acceleration transducer and the conditioning electronics. The dissertation includes a brief introduction to accelerometer measurement in which current applications and associated problems are presented; detailed descriptions of the operating principles and design criteria considered when building an accelerometer; prior related research; discussions involving photoelastic fiber-optic transducers; a comprehensive analysis of sensing elements; the designs for the overall measurement systems; and, the results obtained by testing prototypes produced from the final designs. The qualitative and quantitative analyses contained herein represent a unique blend of mechanics, physics and electro-optics. A number of new discoveries are reported especially in conjunction with the analysis of the GRIN lens. Several new definitions are introduced, some of which make it possible to compare the performance of the photoelastic fiber-optic accelerometers to that of their more conventional counterparts. The test results show that both accelerometers meet their design requirements and their performance is comparable to some of the best accelerometers commercially available.

  1. Simulating Optical Fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edgar, Dale

    1988-01-01

    Described is a demonstration of Snell's law using a laser beam and an optical fiber. Provided are the set-up method of the demonstration apparatus and some practical suggestions including "index matching" technique using vaseline. (YP)

  2. Fiber Optics: No Illusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A campus computer center at Hofstra University (New York) that holds 70 terminals for student use was first a gymnasium, then a language laboratory. Strands of fiber optics are used for the necessary wiring. (MLF)

  3. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Bruce R. (1985 Willis, Batesburg, SC 29006); Prather, William S. (2419 Dickey Rd., Augusta, GA 30906)

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer.

  4. Electrospun amplified fiber optics

    OpenAIRE

    Morello, Giovanni; Camposeo, Andrea; Moffa, Maria; Pisignano, Dario

    2015-01-01

    A lot of research is focused on all-optical signal processing, aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for an efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods, involving high-temperature processes performed in highly pure environment, slow down the fabrication and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, ...

  5. Fiber optics: A research paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drone, Melinda M.

    1987-01-01

    Some basic aspects concerning fiber optics are examined. Some history leading up to the development of optical fibers which are now used in the transmission of data in many areas of the world is discussed. Basic theory of the operation of fiber optics is discussed along with methods for improving performance of the optical fiber through much research and design. Splices and connectors are compared and short haul and long haul fiber optic networks are discussed. Fiber optics plays many roles in the commercial world. The use of fiber optics for communication applications is emphasized.

  6. Fiber Optical Micro-detectors for Oxygen Sensing in Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D. J. Osborn

    2003-09-30

    Spectroscopy of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} immobilized in a sol-gel matrix and heated to 200 C has been performed. Oxygen quenching of the luminescence was observed. Aging Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} to temperatures above 250 C converts the canary yellow Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} to a non-luminescent gray solid. Preliminary experiments point to oxidation of the clusters as the likely cause of thermally induced changes in the physical and optical properties of the clusters.

  7. Optical remote sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Prasad, Saurabh; Chanussot, Jocelyn

    2011-01-01

    Optical remote sensing relies on exploiting multispectral and hyper spectral imagery possessing high spatial and spectral resolutions respectively. These modalities, although useful for most remote sensing tasks, often present challenges that must be addressed for their effective exploitation. This book presents current state-of-the-art algorithms that address the following key challenges encountered in representation and analysis of such optical remotely sensed data: challenges in pre-processing images, storing and representing high dimensional data, fusing different sensor modalities, patter

  8. Optical Waveguide Sensing and Imaging

    CERN Document Server

    Bock, Wojtek J; Tanev, Stoyan

    2008-01-01

    The book explores various aspects of existing and emerging fiber and waveguide optics sensing and imaging technologies including recent advances in nanobiophotonics. The focus is both on fundamental and applied research as well as on applications in civil engineering, biomedical sciences, environment, security and defence. The main goal of the multi-disciplinarry team of Editors was to provide an useful reference of state-of-the-art overviews covering a variety of complementary topics on the interface of engineering and biomedical sciences.

  9. Nonlinear effects in optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, Mario F

    2011-01-01

    Cutting-edge coverage of nonlinear phenomena occurring inside optical fibers Nonlinear fiber optics is a specialized part of fiber optics dealing with optical nonlinearities and their applications. As fiber-optic communication systems have become more advanced and complex, the nonlinear effects in optical fibers have increased in importance, as they adversely affect system performance. Paradoxically, the same nonlinear phenomena also offer the promise of addressing the bandwidth bottleneck for signal processing for future ultra-high speed optical networks. Nonlinear Effects in Optical Fiber

  10. Assessment of a fiber-optic distributed-temperature-sensing system to monitor the thermal dynamics of vegetated roof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cousiño, J. A.; Hausner, M. B.; Victorero, F.; Bonilla, C.; Gironas, J. A.; Vera, S.; Bustamante, W.; Rojas, V.; Pasten, P.; Suarez, F. I.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetated (green) roofs include a growing media and vegetation layer, and offer a range of benefits such as the reduction of: the heat island effect, rooftop runoff peak flows, roof surface temperatures, energy used for cooling or heating buildings, and noise levels inside infrastructures. Vegetated roofs also offer aesthetic benefits and increase the biodiversity of the urban environment, and are increasingly used in sustainable urban development. Understanding the thermal dynamics of vegetated roofs will make it possible to improve their design and to better assess their impacts on energy efficiency. Here, we evaluate the first vertical high-resolution distributed-temperature-sensing (DTS) system installed in a vegetated roof. This system allows a continuous measurement of the thermal profile within a vegetated roof - going from the interior, upward through the drainage layers and soil substrate of the vegetated roof and ending in the air above the vegetation. Temperatures can be observed as frequently as every 30 s at a spatial resolution on the order of centimeters. This DTS system was installed in the "Laboratory of Vegetal Infrastructure of Buildings" (LIVE - its acronym in Spanish), located in the San Joaquín Campus of the Pontifical Catholic University, Santiago, Chile. The laboratory features 18 experimental modules to investigate different configurations of the vegetated roof layers. The LIVE was designed with the installation of the optical fibers in mind, and the DTS system allows simultaneous monitoring of three or four modules of the LIVE. In this work, we describe the design of this DTS deployment, the calibration metrics obtained using the software provided by the manufacturers, and other calibration algorithms previously developed. We compare the results obtained using single- and double-ended measurements, highlighting strengths and weaknesses of DTS methods. Finally, we present the observations obtained from this biophysical environment highlighting the features that are harder to observe using more traditional methods to measure temperature.

  11. FIBER OPTICAL MICRO-DETECTORS FOR OXYGEN SENSING IN POWER PLANTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gregory L. Baker; Ruby N. Ghosh; D.J. Osborn III

    2003-07-01

    Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12}, a cluster compound whose luminescence depends on the ambient concentration of oxygen, is the basis for a real-time oxygen sensor for combustion applications. Previously, the properties of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} have largely been studied at room temperature; these studies have now been extended to 200 C. Optical microscopy shows that Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} undergoes a steady change in color as it is heated from room temperature to 200 C, changing from canary yellow to crimson and then back to canary yellow. Concurrent thermal gravimetric analyses show a small weight loss for Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} that is consistent with loss of water or HCl from the clusters. These changes are reversible. Absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopy of Mo{sub 6}Cl{sub 12} heated to 200 C for two hours shows no change in the photophysical parameters compared to the control sample that was not heat cycled.

  12. A comparison of thermal infrared to fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing for evaluation of groundwater discharge to surface water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hare, Danielle K.; Briggs, Martin A.; Rosenberry, Donald O.; Boutt, David F.; Lane, John W.

    2015-11-01

    Groundwater has a predictable thermal signature that can be used to locate discrete zones of discharge to surface water. As climate warms, surface water with strong groundwater influence will provide habitat stability and refuge for thermally stressed aquatic species, and is therefore critical to locate and protect. Alternatively, these discrete seepage locations may serve as potential point sources of contaminants from polluted aquifers. This study compares two increasingly common heat tracing methods to locate discrete groundwater discharge: direct-contact measurements made with fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (FO-DTS) and remote sensing measurements collected with thermal infrared (TIR) cameras. FO-DTS is used to make high spatial resolution (typically m) thermal measurements through time within the water column using temperature-sensitive cables. The spatial-temporal data can be analyzed with statistical measures to reveal zones of groundwater influence, however, the personnel requirements, time to install, and time to georeference the cables can be burdensome, and the control units need constant calibration. In contrast, TIR data collection, either from handheld, airborne, or satellite platforms, can quickly capture point-in-time evaluations of groundwater seepage zones across large scales. However the remote nature of TIR measurements means they can be adversely influenced by a number of environmental and physical factors, and the measurements are limited to the surface "skin" temperature of water features. We present case studies from a range of lentic to lotic aquatic systems to identify capabilities and limitations of both technologies and highlight situations in which one or the other might be a better instrument choice for locating groundwater discharge. FO-DTS performs well in all systems across seasons, but data collection was limited spatially by practical considerations of cable installation. TIR is found to consistently locate groundwater seepage zones above and along the streambank, but submerged seepage zones are only well identified in shallow systems (e.g. <0.5 m depth) with moderate flow. Winter data collection, when groundwater is relatively warm and buoyant, increases the water surface expression of discharge zones in shallow systems.

  13. Liquid Crystal Devices for Optical Communications and Sensing Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Mathews, Sunish

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is focussed on the design and development of liquid crystal based tunable photonic devices for applications in optical communications and optical sensing, with an emphasis on all-fiber device configuration. The infiltration of liquid crystals into photonic crystal fiber provides a suitable common platform to design and fabricate simple and compact all-fiber tunable photonic devices which can be easily integrated with optical fiber networks and sensing systems. Based on the infiltr...

  14. Intelligent fiber sensing system for the oil field area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Wenju; Ma, Linping

    2010-08-01

    Optical Fiber strain sensor using fiber Bragg grating are poised to play a major role in structural health from military to civil engineering. Fiber Bragg Grating sensor is a practical type of fiber optic sensors. Its measurement is encoded with the wavelength of the optical signal reflected from fiber Bragg grating. The method of measuring the absolute optical wavelength is a critical component of the fiber optic sensing system. To reliably detect very small changes in the environment at the sensor, the interrogation system must provide accurate and repeatable wavelength measurements. Energy sources are increasingly scarce in the world. Getting oil from the oil-wells has become more and more difficult. Therefore, new technology to monitor the oil-well condition has become extremely important. The traditional electrical sensor system is no longer useful because of the down-hole's high temperature and high pressure environment. The optical fiber sensing system is the first choice to monitor this condition. This system will reduce the cost and increase the productivity. In the high pressure and high temperature environment, the traditional packed fiber grating pressure-temperature sensor will be no longer reliability. We have to find a new fiber grating temperature-pressure sensor element and the interrogation system. In this work we use the very narrow bandwidth birefringent fiber grating as the sensing element. We obtain the interrogation system has 0.1 pm resolution.

  15. Compact Fiber Optic Strain Sensors (cFOSS) Element

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Armstrong researchers are reducing the Fiber Optic Sensing Sysme (FOSS) technology’s size, power requirement, weight, and cost to effectively extend...

  16. In-situ temperature measurement of the McMurdo Ice Shelf and ice shelf cavity using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobs, S.; Tyler, S. W.; Holland, D. M.; Zagorodnov, V.; Stern, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    Ocean-ice interactions in ice shelf cavities have great potential to affect ice shelf mass balance and stability. In-situ temperature of the ice shelf and ocean water column at Windless Bight, Antarctica, was remotely monitored using fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS). Fiber-optic cables were installed in two boreholes completed using a combination of electromechanical and hot point drilling. Between November 2011 and January 2013 a set of moorings, comprising of fiber-optic cables for distributed temperature sensing, an independent thermistor string and pressure-temperature transducers were monitored. Data presented summarizes the field deployment of the system between November 2011 and January 2013. Heat serves as natural tracer in environmental systems and is useful for identifying fluxes across boundaries. The heat flux near the ice-ocean interface is estimated from the temperature gradient in the lower ice shelf. Variation in the ice shelf temperature near the ice-ocean interface can be seen. Finally, these new data show the intrusion of warm water under the ice shelf previously observed in 2012.

  17. Silicon fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pocha, Michael D. (Livermore, CA); Swierkowski, Steve P. (Livermore, CA); Wood, Billy E. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-10-02

    A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially or wholly reflective surface on the free end of an integrated elongate channel or an integrated bounding wall of a chip of a wafer and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. Such a constructed device can be utilized to detect one or more physical parameters, such as, for example, strain, through the optical fiber using an optical detection system to provide measuring accuracies of less than aboutb0.1%.

  18. Chemical Sensing Using Fiber Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Hans-Peter Loock; Barnes, Jack A.; Adrienne H. Cheung; Jessica Litman; Helen Waechter

    2010-01-01

    Waveguide-based cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRD) can be used for quantitative measurements of chemical concentrations in small amounts of liquid, in gases or in films. The change in ring-down time can be correlated to analyte concentration when using fiber optic sensing elements that change their attenuation in dependence of either sample absorption or refractive index. Two types of fiber cavities, i.e., fiber loops and fiber strands containing reflective elements, are distinguished. Both ...

  19. Fiber optic chemical sensor constructed with different types of optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Tianyou; Xing, Xuekun; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    1992-03-01

    Optical fiber sensors have gained much attention in recent years. Optical fiber based chemical sensors often use a reaction chamber within which a chemical reaction involving the sensing species occurs. A color change may result from this chemical reaction and, with light passing through the reaction chamber, the light intensity can be modulated by this color change. Consequently, this change in light intensity can be used to quantify the sensing species present. In most of these chemical sensors, either one or two optical fibers will be used. If a single fiber is used, the signal derived from the chemical reaction is relatively weak. On the other hand, if either one or two optical fibers are used, a mirror-finished surface is usually required for the reflection of light to the detector. In this research, optical fiber sensors are constructed using two different types of fibers. One is a quartz fiber and the other is a plastic fiber. The plastic fiber is more flexible and can be bent or connected with a slant surface at the top of the fiber at 45 degree(s). Two types of sensors were constructed--a temperature sensor employing a thermochromic solution and a pH sensor using a pH sensitive dye. By using the two types of fiber, a mirror-finished surface is no longer necessary. The weak signal due to the use of a single fiber is also minimized.

  20. Fiber optic gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Peng (Inventor); Buric, Michael P. (Inventor); Swinehart, Philip R. (Inventor); Maklad, Mokhtar S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gas sensor includes an in-fiber resonant wavelength device provided in a fiber core at a first location. The fiber propagates a sensing light and a power light. A layer of a material is attached to the fiber at the first location. The material is able to absorb the gas at a temperature dependent gas absorption rate. The power light is used to heat the material and increases the gas absorption rate, thereby increasing sensor performance, especially at low temperatures. Further, a method is described of flash heating the gas sensor to absorb more of the gas, allowing the sensor to cool, thereby locking in the gas content of the sensor material, and taking the difference between the starting and ending resonant wavelengths as an indication of the concentration of the gas in the ambient atmosphere.

  1. Dosimetry by optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Cea-Leti continues to perfect a prototype system to measure the radioactivity by optical fiber captor, developed in the frame of a collaboration with Cogema, whom one of the objectives is the operational dosimetry of extremities. This experimental device, developed by the Dein, uses a micro detector (diameter 200 ? m) with luminescence optically stimulated (O.S.L.) placed at the extremity of an off-centring optical fiber (40 m for the actual prototype). The detector material is a doped alkaline-earth sulfate, developed by the University of Montpellier. It shows the property to restore the image of absorbed dose under the shape of a visible luminescence when it is submitted to a stimulation in infrared radiation. In the prototype, this stimulation is given by a laser diode coupled to the fiber. Different detector materials have been tested, two have been kept for the prototype development: MgS and CaS. (N.C.)

  2. Optical fiber stripper positioning apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fyfe, Richard W. (Las Vegas, NV); Sanchez, Jr., Amadeo (Las Vegas, NV)

    1990-01-01

    An optical fiber positioning apparatus for an optical fiber stripping device is disclosed which is capable of providing precise axial alignment between an optical fiber to be stripped of its outer jacket and the cutting blades of a stripping device. The apparatus includes a first bore having a width approximately equal to the diameter of an unstripped optical fiber and a counter bore axially aligned with the first bore and dimensioned to precisely receive a portion of the stripping device in axial alignment with notched cutting blades within the stripping device to thereby axially align the notched cutting blades of the stripping device with the axis of the optical fiber to permit the notched cutting blades to sever the jacket on the optical fiber without damaging the cladding on the optical fiber. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus further includes a fiber stop which permits determination of the length of jacket to be removed from the optical fiber.

  3. Theoretical understanding of an alternating dielectric multilayer-based fiber optic SPR sensor and its application to gas sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present work, a detailed theoretical analysis of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based fiber optic sensor with an alternating dielectric multilayer system is carried out. The dielectric system consists of silica and titanium oxide layers. The effect of critical design parameters on the sensor's sensitivity and detection accuracy is studied. The results are explained in terms of appropriate physical phenomena, wherever required. Based on the analysis, a new design of a fiber optic SPR sensor for gas detection is proposed. The analysis of such a gas sensor is carried out for four metals separately for a clear understanding. The proposed gas sensor is able to provide reasonably high values of all the performance parameters simultaneously, as required for an efficient detection of gaseous media

  4. Fluoride glass fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Aggarwal, Ishwar D

    1991-01-01

    Fluoride Glass Fiber Optics reviews the fundamental aspects of fluoride glasses. This book is divided into nine chapters. Chapter 1 discusses the wide range of fluoride glasses with an emphasis on fluorozirconate-based compositions. The structure of simple fluoride systems, such as BaF2 binary glass is elaborated in Chapter 2. The third chapter covers the intrinsic transparency of fluoride glasses from the UV to the IR, with particular emphasis on the multiphonon edge and electronic edge. The next three chapters are devoted to ultra-low loss optical fibers, reviewing methods for purifying and

  5. Optical fiber telecommunications IIIb

    CERN Document Server

    Koch, Thomas L

    2012-01-01

    Updated to include the latest information on light wave technology, Optical Fiber Telecommunication III, Volumes A & B are invaluable for scientists, students, and engineers in the modern telecommunications industry. This two-volume set includes the most current research available in optical fiber telecommunications, light wave technology, and photonics/optoelectronics. The authors cover important background concepts such as SONET, coding device technology, andWOM components as well as projecting the trends in telecommunications for the 21st century.Key Features* One of the hottest subjects of

  6. Towards biochips using microstructured optical fiber sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rindorf, Lars Henning; Hoiby, Poul Erik; Jensen, Jesper Bo; Pedersen, Lars Hagsholm; Bang, Ole; Geschke, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we present the first incorporation of a microstructured optical fiber (MOF) into biochip applications. A 16-mm-long piece of MOF is incorporated into an optic-fluidic coupler chip, which is fabricated in PMMA polymer using a CO2 laser. The developed chip configuration allows the...... continuous control of liquid flow through the MOF and simultaneous optical characterization. While integrated in the chip, the MOF is functionalized towards the capture of a specific single-stranded DNA string by immobilizing a sensing layer on the microstructured internal surfaces of the fiber. The sensing...

  7. Reduced Gravity Zblan Optical Fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    2000-01-01

    Two optical fiber pullers have been designed for pulling ZBLAN optical fiber in reduced gravity. One fiber puller was designed, built and flown on board NASA's KC135 reduced gravity aircraft. A second fiber puller has been designed for use on board the International Space Station.

  8. Assessment of fiber optic pressure sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a six-month Phase 1 study to establish the state-of-the-art in fiber optic pressure sensing and describes the design and principle of operation of various fiber optic pressure sensors. This study involved a literature review, contact with experts in the field, an industrial survey, a site visit to a fiber optic sensor manufacturer, and laboratory testing of a fiber optic pressure sensor. The laboratory work involved both static and dynamic performance tests. In addition, current requirements for environmental and seismic qualification of sensors for nuclear power plants were reviewed to determine the extent of the qualification tests that fiber optic pressure sensors may have to meet before they can be used in nuclear power plants. This project has concluded that fiber optic pressure sensors are still in the research and development stage and only a few manufacturers exist in the US and abroad which supply suitable fiber optic pressure sensors for industrial applications. Presently, fiber optic pressure sensors are mostly used in special applications for which conventional sensors are not able to meet the requirements

  9. A miniature fiber-optic sensor for high-resolution and high-speed temperature sensing in ocean environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guigen; Han, Ming; Hou, Weilin; Matt, Silvia; Goode, Wesley

    2015-05-01

    Temperature measurement is one of the key quantifies in ocean research. Temperature variations on small and large scales are key to air-sea interactions and climate change, and also regulate circulation patterns, and heat exchange. The influence from rapid temperature changes within microstructures are can have strong impacts to optical and acoustical sensor performance. In this paper, we present an optical fiber sensor for the high-resolution and high-speed temperature profiling. The developed sensor consists of a thin piece of silicon wafer which forms a Fabry-Pérot interferometer (FPI) on the end of fiber. Due to the unique properties of silicon, such as large thermal diffusivity, notable thermo-optic effects and thermal expansion coefficients of silicon, the proposed sensor exhibits excellent sensitivity and fast response to temperature variation. The small mass of the tiny probe also contributes to a fast response due to the large surface-tovolume ratio. The high reflective index at infrared wavelength range and surface flatness of silicon endow the FPI a spectrum with high visibilities, leading to a superior temperature resolution along with a new data processing method developed by us. Experimental results indicate that the fiber-optic temperature sensor can achieve a temperature resolution better than 0.001°C with a sampling frequency as high as 2 kHz. In addition, the miniature footprint of the senor provide high spatial resolutions. Using this high performance thermometer, excellent characterization of the realtime temperature profile within the flow of water turbulence has been realized.

  10. Optical fiber-applied radiation detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique to measure radiation by using plastic scintillation fibers doped radiation fluorescent (scintillator) to plastic optical fiber for a radiation sensor, was developed. The technique contains some superiority such as high flexibility due to using fibers, relatively easy large area due to detecting portion of whole of fibers, and no electromagnetic noise effect due to optical radiation detection and signal transmission. Measurable to wide range of and continuous radiation distribution along optical fiber cable at a testing portion using scintillation fiber and flight time method, the optical fiber-applied radiation sensing system can effectively monitor space radiation dose or apparatus operation condition monitoring. And, a portable type scintillation optical fiber body surface pollution monitor can measure pollution concentration of radioactive materials attached onto body surface by arranging scintillation fiber processed to a plate with small size and flexibility around a man to be tested. Here were described on outline and fundamental properties of various application products using these plastic scintillation fiber. (G.K.)

  11. Porous solgel fiber as a transducer for highly sensitive chemical sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shiquan; Winstead, Christopher B; Singh, Jagdish P; Jindal, Rajeev

    2002-08-15

    A novel solgel process for making porous silica fiber and doping the fiber core with sensing material is described. A CoCl(2) -doped solgel fiber was fabricated and was used to construct an active-core optical fiber moisture sensor. Test results show that the sensitivity of the active-core optical fiber sensor is much higher than that of an evanescent-wave-based optical fiber sensor. PMID:18026453

  12. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprehn, Gregory A.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Sandler, Pamela H.

    1997-01-01

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency.

  13. Fiber Optics and Library Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Michael

    1984-01-01

    This article examines fiber optic technology, explains some of the key terminology, and speculates about the way fiber optics will change our world. Applications of fiber optics to library systems in three major areas--linkage of a number of mainframe computers, local area networks, and main trunk communications--are highlighted. (EJS)

  14. Review on optical fiber sensors with sensitive thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minghong; Dai, Jixiang

    2012-03-01

    The combination of fiber optics with nano-structure technologies and sensitive thin films offers great potential for the realization of novel sensor concepts. Miniatured optical fiber sensors with thin films as sensitive elements could open new fields for optical fiber sensor applications. Thin films work as sensitive elements and transducer to get response and feedback from environments, in which optical fibers are employed to work as signal carrier. This article presents some research work conducted at the National Engineering Laboratory for Optical Fiber Sensing Technologies in recent years. Concrete examples are: Pd/WO3 co-sputtered coating as sensing material for optical hydrogen sensors shows robust mechanical stability and meanwhile good sensing performance; TbDyFe magnetostrictive coating directly deposited on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) demonstrates its possibility of miniature optical magnetic field/current sensors, and 40-pm shift of the FBG wavelength happens at a magnetic field order of 50 mT.

  15. Integration of thin films with fiber micro-structures for sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minghong; Wang, Min; Zhang, Guilin

    2013-06-01

    The combination of fiber optics with micro-structure technologies and sensitive thin films offers great potential for the realization of novel sensor concepts. Minitured optical fiber sensors with thin films as sensitive elements could open new fields for optical fiber sensor applications. Thin films work as sensitive elements and transducer to get response and feedback from environments, optical fiber here are employed to signal carrier. This paper reviews some works on the integration of thin films with fiber micro-structures for sensing application, which are currently conducted at the National Engineering Laboratory for Fiber Optic Sensing Technologies, Wuhan University of Technology.

  16. Nonlinear fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind

    2012-01-01

    Since the 4e appeared, a fast evolution of the field has occurred. The 5e of this classic work provides an up-to-date account of the nonlinear phenomena occurring inside optical fibers, the basis of all our telecommunications infastructure as well as being used in the medical field. Reflecting the big developments in research, this new edition includes major new content: slow light effects, which offers a reduction in noise and power consumption and more ordered network traffic-stimulated Brillouin scattering; vectorial treatment of highly nonlinear fibers; and a brand new chapter o

  17. Dynamic fiber Bragg grating sensing method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Siu Chun Michael; Ren, Liang; Li, Hongnan; Song, Gangbing

    2016-02-01

    The measurement of high frequency vibrations is important in many scientific and engineering problems. This paper presents a novel, cost effective method using fiber optic fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) for the measurement of high frequency vibrations. The method uses wavelength matched FBG sensors, with the first sensor acting as a transmission filter and the second sensor acting as the sensing portion. Energy fluctuations in the reflection spectrum of the second FBG due to wavelength mismatch between the sensors are captured by a photodiode. An in-depth analysis of the optical circuit is provided to predict the behavior of the method as well as identify ways to optimize the method. Simple demonstrations of the method were performed with the FBG sensing system installed on a piezoelectric transducer and on a wind turbine blade. Vibrations were measured with sampling frequencies up to 1 MHz for demonstrative purposes. The sensing method can be multiplexed for use with multiple sensors, and with care, can be retrofitted to work with FBG sensors already installed on a structure.

  18. Introduction to optical fiber sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Optical fiber sensors have many advantages over other types of sensors, for example: Low weight, immunity from EMI, electrical isolation, chemical passivity, and high sensitivity. In this seminar, a brief explanation of the optical fiber sensors, their use, and their advantages will be given. After, a description of the main optical fiber sensor components will be presented. Principles of some kinds of optical fiber sensors will be presented, and the principle of the fiber-optic rotation sensor and its realization will be discussed in some details, as well as its main applications. (author). 5 refs, 8 figs, 2 tabs

  19. Operation of optical fiber sensors in hydrogen-rich atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Cicero; Triques, Adriana L. C.; Braga, Arthur; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Llerena, Roberth; Takahashi, Victor

    2010-09-01

    The application of optical fiber sensors in hydrogen rich atmospheres and temperatures as high as 300 °C is presented and discussed. Two well known optical fiber sensor technologies are evaluated: (1) distributed temperature sensing, based on Raman scattering, and (2) fiber Bragg gratings. Results show that a new generation of gratings and possibly of fibers that are more hydrogen resistant, both optically and mechanically, are needed.

  20. Fiber optic hydrogen sensors: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minghong; Dai, Jixiang

    2014-12-01

    Hydrogen is one of the next generation energies in the future, which shows promising applications in aerospace and chemical industries. Hydrogen leakage monitoring is very dangerous and important because of its low ignition energy, high combustion efficiency, and smallest molecule. This paper reviews the state-of-art development of the fiber optic hydrogen sensing technology. The main developing trends of fiber optic hydrogen sensors are based on two kinds of hydrogen sensitive materials, i.e. palladium-alloy thin films and Pt-doped WO3 coatings. In this review work, the advantages and disadvantages of these two kinds of sensing technologies will be evaluated.

  1. Advances on Optical Fiber Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Luciano Mescia; Francesco Prudenzano

    2013-01-01

    In this review paper some recent advances on optical fiber sensors are reported. In particular, fiber Bragg grating (FBG), long period gratings (LPGs), evanescent field and hollow core optical fiber sensors are mentioned. Examples of recent optical fiber sensors for the measurement of strain, temperature, displacement, air flow, pressure, liquid-level, magnetic field, and the determination of methadone, hydrocarbons, ethanol, and sucrose are briefly described.

  2. Development and testing of redundant optical fiber sensing systems with self-control, for underground nuclear waste disposal site monitoring. Vol. 1: Summary and evaluation. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiber optic sensors have been developed or further developed, for specific tasks of the research project reported, as for instance detecting and signalling changes of geophysical or geochemical parameters in underground waste storage sites which are of relevance to operating safety. Such changes include e.g. materials dislocations, extensions, temperatures, humidity, pH value and presence of gaseous carbon dioxide and hydrogen. The measuring principle chosen is the fiber Bragg Grating method, as a particularly versatile method easy to integrate into fiber optic networks. After development and successful lab-scale testing of all sensors, except for the gas sensors, field test systems have been made for underground applications and have been tested in situ in the experimental Konrad mine of DBE. Most of the problems discovered with these tests could be resolved within the given project period, so that finally field-test proven sensing systems are available for further activities. The report explains the system performance with a concrete example which shows inter alia beneficial aspects of the system with respect to on-site operation, and the potentials offered in establishing more direct connections between numerical safety analyses and measured results. (orig./CB)

  3. Large-strain optical fiber sensing and real-time FEM updating of steel structures under the high temperature effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steel buildings are subjected to fire hazards during or immediately after a major earthquake. Under combined gravity and thermal loads, they have non-uniformly distributed stiffness and strength, and thus collapse progressively with large deformation. In this study, large-strain optical fiber sensors for high temperature applications and a temperature-dependent finite element model updating method are proposed for accurate prediction of structural behavior in real time. The optical fiber sensors can measure strains up to 10% at approximately 700?C. Their measurements are in good agreement with those from strain gauges up to 0.5%. In comparison with the experimental results, the proposed model updating method can reduce the predicted strain errors from over 75% to below 20% at 800?C. The minimum number of sensors in a fire zone that can properly characterize the vertical temperature distribution of heated air due to the gravity effect should be included in the proposed model updating scheme to achieve a predetermined simulation accuracy. (paper)

  4. Advanced Pulse Coding Techniques for Distributed Optical Fiber Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    MARCELO A. SOTO; Thévenaz, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Advanced optical pulse coding methods to enhance the performance of distributed optical fiber sensors are reviewed. In particular, the latest implementations dedicated to high-performance long-range Raman and Brillouin based distributed sensing are described.

  5. Optical Fiber Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report of work done on NASA Grant NAG-1-443. The work covers the period from July 1, 1992 to December 1, 1998. During this period several distinct but related research studies and work tasks were undertaken. These different subjects are enumerated below with a description of the work done on each of them. The focus of the research was the development of optical fibers for use as distributed temperature and stress sensors. The initial concept was to utilize the utilize the temperature and stress dependence of emission from rare earth and transition metal ions substitutionally doped into crystalline or glass fibers. During the course of investigating this it became clear that fiber Bragg gratings provided a alternative for making the desired measurements and there was a shift of research focus on to include the photo-refractive properties of germano-silicate glasses used for most gratings and to the possibility of developing fiber laser sources for an integrated optical sensor in the research effort. During the course of this work several students from Christopher Newport University and other universities participated in this effort. Their names are listed below. Their participation was an important part of their education.

  6. In-Line Fiber Optic Interferometric Sensors in Single-Mode Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    De-Wen Duan; Min Liu; Di Wu; Tao Zhu(GCAP-CASPER, Physics Department, Baylor University, One Bear Place, # 97316, Waco, TX 76798-7316, U.S.A.)

    2012-01-01

    In-line fiber optic interferometers have attracted intensive attention for their potential sensing applications in refractive index, temperature, pressure and strain measurement, etc. Typical in-line fiber-optic interferometers are of two types: Fabry-Perot interferometers and core-cladding-mode interferometers. It’s known that the in-line fiber optic interferometers based on single-mode fibers can exhibit compact structures, easy fabrication and low cost. In this paper, ...

  7. Characterization of long-period fiber grating as load sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta-Mascotte, E.; Estudillo-Ayala, J. M.; Mata-Chávez, R. I.; Guzmán-Chávez, A. D.; Jauregui-Vázquez, D.; Sierra-Hernández, J. M.; Hernández-Garcia, J. C.; Vargas-Rodríguez, E.; Rojas-Laguna, R.

    2014-09-01

    We show the sensing of load by means mechanically induced long-period fiber grating (MLPFG) made by applying pressure by means a screw to a pair of grooved plates over single-mode fiber. We used a torquemeter in order to obtain precision in the adjustment screw and thus establish an equilibrium pressure applied to a specific region of the optical fiber to form the long-period grating mechanically induced fiber. The increase the torque to screw, the resonance wavelength of MLPFG increases its depth over 16 dB. We use a detector to observe the changes amplitude according to the fiber pressure.

  8. Online fiber optic spectrophotometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hare, D.R.; O' Rourke, P.E.; Prather, W.S.

    1988-01-01

    A fiber optic diode array process analyzer has been developed and installed in a radiochemical separations facility at the Savannah River Plant. The analyzer monitors the uranium and nitrate concentration of seven aqueous process streams in a uranium purification process. The analyzer remotely controls the sampling of each process stream and monitors the relative flow rate through each sampler. Spectrophotometric data from the analyzer is processed by multivariate data analysis to give both uranium and nitrate concentrations as well as an indication of the quality of the data. The analyzer system consists of a DuPont Instruments diode array process analyzer, xenon arc lamp, fiber-optic multiplexer, and IBM industrial AT computer. Fused silica optical fibers (600 micrometer core diameter) connect the analyzer to monitor up to ten locations in series. In addition to the seven process locations, the analyzer also monitors a reference optical fiber and an inline uranyl nitrate standard. Process stream samplers are controlled by Opto 22 hardware and electric solenoid valves interfaced to the analyzer computer through an RS-422 communication link. Absorption data from each location is fed into a Partial Least Squares (PLS) model of the uranyl nitrate system for conversion into uranium and nitrate concentrations. The model also outputs a residual variance which is a very sensitive indicator of interferences in the system and is used to verify the quality of the calculated results. Results from the analyzer computer are sent by another Opto 22 interface to a distributed control system which is used to run the uranium purification process. 8 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homuth, Emil F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  10. Optical fiber laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hakimi, F.; Po, H.; Snitzer, E.

    1987-07-14

    An optical fiber laser is described comprising: a gain cavity including a single mode optical fiber of given length having a core with a given index of refraction and a cladding surrounding the core and having an index of refraction lower than that of the core. The core comprises a host glass having incorporated a laser gain material with a fluorescence spectrum having at least one broadband region in which there is at least one peak emission line; filter means optically coupled to one end of the gain cavity and reflective to radiation emitted from the gain material over a predetermined wavelength interval about the peak emission line to provide feedback in the gain cavity; an etalon filter section butt coupled to the remaining end of the gain cavity optical fiber, the etalon filter section comprising a pair of filters spaced apart in parallel by a predetermined length of material transparent to any radiation emitted from the gain cavity. The predetermined length of the transparent material is such that the etalon filter section is no longer than the distance over which the wave train energy from the fiber core remains substantially planar so that the etalon filter section is inside the divergent region to enhance feedback in the gain cavity; and means for pumping energy into the gain cavity to raise the interval energy level such that only a small part of the ion population, corresponding to a predetermined bandwidth about the peak emission line, is raised above laser threshold. The laser emits radiation only over narrow lines over a narrow wavelength interval centered about the peak emission line.

  11. Photometric device using optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote measurements in radioactive environment are now possible with optical fibers. Measurement instruments developed by CEA are constitued of: - an optical probe (5 mm to 1 meter optical path length), - a photometric measurement device, - optical fiber links. 'TELEPHOT' is a photometric device for industrial installations. It is uses interferentiel filters for 2 to 5 simultaneous wave lengths. 'CRUDMETER' measures the muddiness of water. It can be equipped with a high sensitivity cell of 50 cm optical path length tested up to 250 bars. Coupling a double beam spectrophotometer to a remote optical probe, up to 1 meter optical path length, is carried out by means of an optical device using optical fibers links, eventually several hundred meter long. For these equipments special step index large core fibers, 1 to 1.5 mm in diameter, have been developed as well connectors. For industrial control and research these instruments offer new prospect thanks to optical fibers use

  12. Shedding Light on Fiber Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    Explains the principles of fiber optics as a medium for light-wave communication. Current uses of fiber systems on college campuses include voice, video, and local area network applications. A group of seven school districts in Minnesota are linked via fiber-optic cables. Other uses are discussed. (MLF)

  13. Submicrometer organic silica gel fiber for oxygen sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xinghua; Li, Le; Yuan, Libo; Li, Shouzhu; Luo, Shenzi; Liu, Yanxin; Peng, Lirong

    2011-12-01

    We introduce the electrospinning method into fabricating oxygen-sensitive submicrometer scale optical fiber. Uniform tris (4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenathroline) ruthenium(II) dichloride ([Ru(dpp)(3)](2+)Cl(2))-doped fibers with a diameter of 900 nm are obtained by electrospinning the organic silicon sol solution derived from tetraethyl orthosilicate and n-Octyltriethoxysilane (C(14)H(32)O(3)Si). The experimental results show that the single gel fiber exhibits excellent optical and sensing properties. A laser with a wavelength of 452 nm can be efficiently launched into the fiber and guide along the fiber to excite the fluorescence. Then, we find that [Ru(dpp)(3)](2+)-gel fiber has favorable optical and sensing characteristics, and the Stern-Volmer plots are linear in the full concentration range of O(2) (0-100 vol. %). The ratio of I(0)/I(100), where I(0) and I(100) respectively represent the fluorescence intensities of the fiber exposed to 100% N(2) and 100% O(2), as the sensitivity of the fiber is 3.5. Simultaneously, the fiber can make a quick response within 100 ms. This method provides an effective and convenient way to fabricate highly uniform nanoscale or microscale optical waveguides for photonic devices. PMID:22139274

  14. Review: optical fiber sensors for civil engineering applications

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, CKY; Wan, KT; Inaudi, D.; X. Bao; Habel, W; Zhou, Z; Ou, J; Ghandehari, M; Wu, HC; Imai, M

    2015-01-01

    Optical fiber sensor (OFS) technologies have developed rapidly over the last few decades, and various types of OFS have found practical applications in the field of civil engineering. In this paper, which is resulting from the work of the RILEM technical committee “Optical fiber sensors for civil engineering applications”, different kinds of sensing techniques, including change of light intensity, interferometry, fiber Bragg grating, adsorption measurement and distributed sensing, are briefly...

  15. A photoelastic fiber optic strain gage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wei; Gilbert, John A.; Katsunis, Constantine

    1992-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a photoelastic fiber optic strain gage sensitive to transverse strain. The sensing element is made from an epoxy resin which is stress frozen to passively achieve the quadrature condition. Light, emitted from an LED operating at 820 nm, is transmitted to and from the sensing element via multimode fibers and the signal is detected using a dual channel operational photodiode/amplifier. This unique combination of optics and electronics produces a fiber optic sensor having a high signal to noise ratio which is lead-in/out insensitive. Results show that strains on the order of 1 microstrain can be measured over an 800 microstrain range and that dummy gages can be used for temperature compensation.

  16. Optical fiber smartphone spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2016-05-15

    An optical fiber-based smartphone spectrometer incorporating an endoscopic fiber bundle is demonstrated. The endoscope allows transmission of the smartphone camera LED light to a sample, removing complications from varying background illumination. The reflected spectra collected from a surface or interface is dispersed onto the camera CMOS using a reflecting diffraction grating. A spectral resolution as low as δλ∼2.0  nm over a bandwidth of Δλ∼250  nm is obtained using a slit width, ωslit=0.7  mm. The instrument has vast potential in a number of industrial applications including agricultural produce analysis. Spectral analysis of apples shows straightforward measurement of the pigments anthocyanins, carotenoid, and chlorophyll, all of which decrease with increasing storage time. PMID:27176971

  17. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se) semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array

  18. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. W. Tang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  19. An optical fiber tip micrograting thermometer

    OpenAIRE

    FENG, JING; Ding, Ming; Kou, Jun-Long; Xu, Fei; Lu, Yan-qing

    2011-01-01

    An ~12-?m-long Bragg grating was engraved in an ~5-?m-diameter optical fiber tip by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. An ~10-dB extinction was achieved at 1570 nm with only 11 indentations. The grating was used for temperature sensing, and it exhibited a temperature sensitivity of ~22 pm/°C

  20. Microstructured optical fiber refractive index sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Town, Graham E.; McCosker, Ravi; Yuan, Scott Wu; Bang, Ole

    2010-01-01

    We describe a dual-core microstructured optical fiber designed for refractive index sensing of fluids. We show that by using the exponential dependence of intercore coupling on analyte refractive index, both large range and high sensitivity can be achieved in the one device. We also show that...

  1. Fiber optic light sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudyk, Wayne; Flynn, Kyle F

    2015-06-01

    We describe a low-cost fiber optic sensor for measuring photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in turbulent flow. Existing technology was combined in a novel way for probe development addressing the need for a small but durable instrument for use in flowing water. Optical components including fiber optics and a wide-spectrum light detector were used to separate light collection from electronic detection so that measurements could be completed in either the field or laboratory, in air or underwater. Connection of the detector to Arduino open-source electronics and a portable personal computer (PC) enabled signal processing and allowed data to be stored in a spreadsheet for ease of analysis. Calibration to a commercial cosine-corrected instrument showed suitable agreement with the added benefit that the small sensor face allowed measurements in tight spaces such as close to the streambed or within leafy or filamentous plant growth. Subsequently, we applied the probe in a separate study where over 35 experiments were successfully completed to characterize downward light attenuation in filamentous algae in turbulent flow. PMID:26009160

  2. Optical fiber network : Cisco part

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Lu

    2014-01-01

    This thesis describes a experimental optical fiber network. The thesis was based on the industrial placement work to design a laboratory network. The purpose of this thesis was to provide designs for setting an optical fiber network in the city of Kuopio. The project work was started by searching information and usable technology in the books from the library and the Internet. Most of the broadband and/or fiber optical networks use OSPF together with MPLS as their networking protocols. Th...

  3. Formation and applications of nanoparticles in silica optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Blanc, Wilfried

    2015-01-01

    Optical fibers are the basis for applications that have grown considerably in recent years (telecommunications, sensors, fiber lasers, etc). Despite undeniable successes, it is necessary to develop new generations of amplifying optical fibers that will overcome some limitations typical of silica glass. In this sense, the amplifying Transparent Glass Ceramics (TGC), and particularly the fibers based on this technology, open new perspectives that combine the mechanical and chemical properties of a glass host with the augmented spectroscopic properties of embedded nanoparticles. This paper is an opportunity to make a state of the art on silica-based optical fibers containing nanoparticles of various types, particularly rare-earth-doped oxide nanoparticles, and on the methods for making such fibers. In the first section of this article, we will review basics on standard optical fibers and on nanoparticle-doped fibers. In the second section we will recall some fabrication methods used for standard optical fibers, ...

  4. Fiber optic and laser sensors V; Proceedings of the Meeting, San Diego, CA, Aug. 17-19, 1987

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Paula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The papers contained in this volume focus on recent developments in fiber optic and laser sensors. Topics discussed include electric and magnetic field sensors, fiber optic pressure sensors, fiber optic gyros, fiber optic sensors for aerospace applications, fiber sensor multiplexing, temperature sensors, and specialized fiber optic sensors. Papers are presented on remote fiber optic sensors for angular orientation; fiber optic rotation sensor for space missions; adaptation of an electro-optic monitoring system to aerospace structures; optical fiber sensor for dust concentration measurements; and communication-sensing system using a single optical fiber.

  5. Fiber optic micro sensor for the measurement of tendon forces

    OpenAIRE

    Behrmann Gregory P; Hidler Joseph; Mirotznik Mark S

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A fiber optic sensor developed for the measurement of tendon forces was designed, numerically modeled, fabricated, and experimentally evaluated. The sensor incorporated fiber Bragg gratings and micro-fabricated stainless steel housings. A fiber Bragg grating is an optical device that is spectrally sensitive to axial strain. Stainless steel housings were designed to convert radial forces applied to the housing into axial forces that could be sensed by the fiber Bragg grating. The meta...

  6. Fiber structure based on a depressed inner cladding fiber for bend, refractive index and temperature sensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fiber-optic structure based on a section of a double-clad fiber with depressed inner cladding is investigated for bend, refractive index and temperature sensing. The structure is formed by splicing a section of SM630 fiber between two standard fibers SMF-28. The operation principle relies on the sensitivity of cladding modes that are induced at a splice of fibers having different refractive index profiles. The mode structure of the double cladding fiber and the mechanism of formation of dips in the transmission spectra are discussed. The transmission spectra of the structure are measured for different curvatures of the inserted fiber section. The shift of dips to long wavelengths with increasing curvature of the fiber is observed and its dependence on the fiber section length and the direction of bending is investigated. The sensitivities of the spectral dips to the external refractive index and temperature are also measured. (paper)

  7. A fiber-optic voltage sensor based on macrobending structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengfei; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang; Farrell, Gerald

    2011-07-01

    We propose and demonstrate an optical voltage sensing scheme based on a macrobending optical fiber in a ratiometric power measurement system. This novel approach to sensing has not been utilized before and has the advantage that the sensor involves simple fabrication compared to existing fiber-optic voltage sensors. To prove the feasibility of such a fiber-optic sensor, a sensor for a voltage range from 0˜100 V is demonstrated, with a resolution of 0.5 V. The sensor is robust, linear, and shows a competitive measurement resolution. The sensor can be easily scaled to suit other voltage levels and be effectively combined with optical current sensors.

  8. Simulation of a surface plasmon resonance-based fiber-optic sensor for gas sensing in visible range using films of nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A surface plasmon resonance-based fiber-optic sensor coated with nanocomposite film for sensing small concentrations of gases in the visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum has been analyzed. The nanocomposites considered are nanoparticles of Ag, Au and indium tin oxide (ITO) with their varying fraction dispersed in the host dielectric matrix of WO3, SnO2 and TiO2. For analysis, the effective indices of nanocomposites are calculated by adopting the MaxwellGarnett model for nanoparticles of dimensions much smaller than the wavelength of radiation used for investigation. The effects of the volume fraction of nanoparticles in different nanocomposites and the thickness of the nanocomposite layer on the sensitivity of the sensor have been studied. It has been found that the sensor with the ITOTiO2 coated nanocomposite with a small volume fraction and optimized film thickness possesses higher sensitivity

  9. Sensing properties of periodic stack of nano-films deposited with various vapor-based techniques on optical fiber end-face

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koba, Marcin; RóŻycki-Bakon, Radosław; Firek, Piotr; Śmietana, Mateusz

    2015-07-01

    This work presents a study on sensing capabilities of stacks of nano-films deposited on a single-mode optical fiber end-faces. The stacks consist of periodically interchanging thin-film layers of materials characterized by different refractive indices (RI). The number of layers is relatively small to encourage light-analyte interactions. Two different deposition techniques are considered, i.e., radio frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RF PECVD) and physical vapor deposition by reactive magnetron sputtering (RMS). The former technique allows to deposit stacks consisting of silicon nitride nano-films, and the latter is well suited for aluminum and titanium oxides alternating layers. The structures are tested for external RI and temperature measurements.

  10. Fiber optics chemical sensor FOCA 2000

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunner, Robert J.; Doupovec, Juraj; Kvasnik, Frank

    1999-07-01

    A modular fiberoptic sensorial instrument for (bio-)chemical analyses will be presented. The sensing mechanism is based on Capillary Optical Fiber (COF). A measurand of liquids or gaseous form present in the COF cavity influences the chemical transducer covering the inner wall of fiber, and by this way changes the intensity of guided radiation. The wavelength scanning through the characteristic region enables the identification and quantitative analysis of the measurand. Every COF modulus is sesibilized for specific chemicals. The application of new immobilized chemical transducer and theoretical description of the sensing effects will be presented, too.

  11. A novel optical-fiber based surface plasmon resonance sensing architecture and its application to gastric cancer diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Alexandre; Boehm, Jonathan; Penno, Megan; Hoffmann, Peter; Monro, Tanya M.

    2011-05-01

    The management of threats such as pandemics and explosives, and of health and the environment requires the rapid deployment of highly sensitive detection tools. Sensors based on Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) allow rapid, labelfree, highly sensitive detection, and indeed this phenomenon underpins the only label-free optical biosensing technology that is available commercially. In these sensors, the existence of surface plasmons is inferred indirectly from absorption features that correspond to the coupling of light to the surface plasmon. Although SPR is not intrinsically a radiative process, under certain conditions the surface plasmon can itself couple to the local photon states, and emit light. Here we show for the first time that by collecting and characterising this re-emitted light, it is possible to realise new SPR sensing architectures that are more compact, versatile and robust than existing approaches. It is applicable to a range of SPR geometries, including optical fibres. As an example, this approach has been used to demonstrate the detection of a protein identified as a being a biomarker for cancer.

  12. Restraint-free wearable sensing clothes using a hetero-core optic fiber for measurements of arm motion and walking action

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Michiko; Sasaki, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Kazuhiro

    2007-04-01

    In recent years, unrestrained monitoring human posture and action is a field of increasing interest in the welfare of the elderly and the sport-biomechanics. The scope is this study is that we develop a wearable sensing clothes, which can detect entire body posture and motion using a hetero-core optic fiber sensor. This newly developed sensor can offers several advantages such as the simplicity of structure and fabrication, the stable single mode based operation, the temperature independent property, and the precise loss controllability on given macro bending. These properties are suitable for implementing unrestrained wearable clothes. In this paper, for monitoring flexion of joint without the disturbance of the rucks in the clothes, we proposed and fabricated the improved module structured in the joint ranging 0-90 degree. Additionally, in order to reduce the number of transmission line to be added due to monitoring the whole body posture and motion, we tested that two hetero-core sensors which are tandem placed in a single transmission line have been discriminated by the temporal differential of the optical loss. As a result, we have successfully demonstrated that the wearable sensing clothes could monitor arm motion and human walking without restraint to human daily behavior.

  13. Fiber-optic thermometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sapphire fiber-optic thermometer which was developed at the National Bureau of Standards (NBS) has been evaluated up to 1600 K. The thermometer operates by emitting radiation from a thin-film metal cup on a sapphire light pipe which is immersed in the hot gas to be measured. Characteristic blackbody emission of the thermometer is transmitted through a controlled optical path to a photodiode. Simultaneous measurements at two wavelengths (596 and 702 nm) were made, and their ratio was used to derive two-color radiation measurements. Several tip geometries and platinum thin-film lengths were investigated to verify blackbody conditions. A reference platinum platinum-rhodium thermocouple was used for calibration and comparison, and a discussion of errors in the two-color ratio method is presented

  14. Chemical Sensing Using Fiber Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Peter Loock

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Waveguide-based cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRD can be used for quantitative measurements of chemical concentrations in small amounts of liquid, in gases or in films. The change in ring-down time can be correlated to analyte concentration when using fiber optic sensing elements that change their attenuation in dependence of either sample absorption or refractive index. Two types of fiber cavities, i.e., fiber loops and fiber strands containing reflective elements, are distinguished. Both types of cavities were coupled to a variety of chemical sensor elements, which are discussed and compared.

  15. Optical Fiber Sensors for Smart Structures : A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Kundu

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available This review describes recent advances in optical fiber sensors for smart structures. After discussing the fabrication on technology and strain sensing of fiber-optic sensors in a brief introduction, the detailed accounts of signal processing techniques employed in them are given. The application areas of fiber-optic sensors are also described briefly with necessary references. Future trend of work is indicated in the concluding remarks.

  16. Fundamentals of plastic optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Koike, Yasuhiro

    2014-01-01

    Polymer photonics is an interdisciplinary field which demands excellence both in optics (photonics) and materials science (polymer). However, theses disciplines have developed independently, and therefore the demand for a comprehensive work featuring the fundamentals of photonic polymers is greater than ever.This volume focuses on Polymer Optical Fiber and their applications. The first part of the book introduces typical optical fibers according to their classifications of material, propagating mode, and structure. Optical properties, the high bandwidth POF and transmission loss are discussed,

  17. Fluorescing optical fibers and uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Present available industrial Plastic Optical Fibers are made of an optical core of either Poly Methyl Methacrylate, Polystyrene, or Polycarbonate. Three main fiber families are produced: - transparent fibers, used to transmit light or signals; - scintillating fibers, doped with two or more dopants to let them able to detect particles by radiating blue or green light, measured with a photomultiplier; - fluorescent fibers, doped with a single dopant, and able to shift the ambient incident radiation into another radiation of longer wavelength. New PS core fluorescent fibers are made so far with different absorption and fluorescent reemission wavelength bands. Some optical characteristics of the materials employed for blue, green, yellow, orange fibers are described. Applications in the light sensors field already exist such as light intensity detectors for electric arcs, fog or particle detectors

  18. Temperature sensing on tapered single mode fiber using mechanically induced long period fiber gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrujo-García, Sigifredo; Velázquez-González, Jesús Salvador; Pulido-Navarro, María. Guadalupe; González-Ocaña, Ernesto; Mújica-Ascencio, Saúl; Martínez-Piñón, Fernando

    2015-09-01

    The modeling of a temperature optical fiber sensor is proposed and experimentally demonstrated in this work. The suggested structure to obtain the sensing temperature characteristics is by the use of a mechanically induced Long Period Fiber Grating (LPFG) on a tapered single mode optical fiber. A biconical fiber optic taper is made by applying heat using an oxygen-propane flame burner while stretching the single mode fiber (SMF) whose coating has been removed. The resulting geometry of the device is important to analyze the coupling between the core mode to the cladding modes, and this will determine whether the optical taper is adiabatic or non-adiabatic. On the other hand, the mechanical LPFG is made up of two plates, one grooved and other flat, the grooved plate was done on an acrylic slab with the help of a computerized numerical control machine (CNC). In addition to the experimental work, the supporting theory is also included.

  19. Fiber optics opens window on stream dynamics:

    OpenAIRE

    Selker, John; Giesen, Nick de; Westhoff, Martijn; Luxemburg, Wim; Parlange, Marc B

    2006-01-01

    A new approach to monitoring surface waters using distributed fiber optic temperature sensing is presented, allowing resolutions of temperature of 0.01°C every meter along a fiber optic cable of up to 10,000 m in length. We illustrate the potential of this approach by quantifying both stream temperature dynamics and groundwater inflows to the Maisbich, a first-order stream in Luxembourg (49°47'N, 6°02'E). The technique provides a very rich dataset, which may be of interest to many types of en...

  20. Resonance optical activity in multihelicoidal optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexeyev, C N; Lapin, B P; Yavorsky, M A

    2016-03-01

    We have studied the effect of optical activity (OA) in optical fibers with multihelical distribution of refractive index profiles near the resonance wavelength, at which the conversion of an incident Gaussian beam into an optical vortex (and vice versa) takes place. We have shown that at such a wavelength the polarization vector of the input Gaussian beam rotates within the fiber at an average rate proportional to the difference in propagation constants of left- and right-circularly polarized optical vortices with the same topological charge. We also show that for certain fiber lengths the magnitude of OA can greatly exceed its average level and reach anomalously high values. PMID:26974091

  1. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  2. A Fiber-Optic Voltage Sensor Based on Macrobending Structure

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Pengfei; Semenova, Yuliya; Wu, Qiang; Farrell, Gerald

    2011-01-01

    We propose and demonstrate an optical voltage sensing scheme based on a macrobending optical fiber in a ratiometric power measurement system. This novel approach to sensing has not been utilized before and has the advantage that the sensor involves simple fabrication compared to existing fiber-optic voltage sensors. To prove the feasibility of such a fiber-optic sensor, a sensor for a voltage range from 0 similar to 100 V is demonstrated, with a resolution of 0.5 V. The sensor is robust, line...

  3. Evaluation of the heat-storage capability of shallow aquifers using active heat tracer tests and Fiber-Optics Distributed-Temperature-Sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suibert Oskar Seibertz, Klodwig; Chirila, Marian Andrei; Bumberger, Jan; Dietrich, Peter; Vienken, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    In the course of the energy transition, geothermal energy storage and heat generation and cooling have proven to be environmental friendly alternatives to conventional energy. However, to ensure sustain usage, the heat transport behavior of aquifers and its distribution has to be studied. A tool to achieve this is the active heat tracer test, eg. Leaf et al. (2012). If active heat tracer tests are combined with in aquifer heat testing via electric heating-cables, eg. Liu et al. (2013), it is possible to observe heat transport and temperature signal decay without disturbing the original pressure field within the aquifer. In this field study a two channel High-Resolution-Fiber-Optic-Distributed-Temperature-Sensing and Pt100 were used to measure temperature signals within in two wells of 1.4 m distance, where the temperature difference was generated using a self regulating heating cable in the upstream well. High resolution Distributed-Temperature-Sensing measurements were achieved by coiling the fiber around screened plastic tubes. The upstream well was also used to observe heating (Δ Tmax approx. 24K) and temperature signal decay, while the downstream well was used to observe heat transport between both wells. The data was analyzed and compared to thermal conductivity of soil samples and Direct-Push (DP) Electrical-Conductivity-Logging and DP Hydraulic-Profiling results. The results show good agreement between DP data and temperature measurements proving the active heat tracer test is a suitable tool for providing reliable information on aquifer heat-storage capability. References Leaf, A.T., Hart, D.J., Bahr, J.M.: Active Thermal Tracer Tests for Improved Hydrostratigraphic Characterization. Ground Water, vol. 50, 2012 Liu, G., Knobbe, S., Butler, J.J.Jr.: Resolving centimeter-scale flows in aquifers and their hydrostratigraphic controls. Geophysical Research Letters, vol. 40, 2013

  4. Spatial and temporal resolution requirements for quench detection in (RE)Ba2Cu3Ox magnets using Rayleigh-scattering-based fiber optic distributed sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, W. K.; Flanagan, G.; Schwartz, J.

    2013-10-01

    One of the key remaining challenges to safe and reliable operation of large, high temperature superconductor (HTS)-based magnet systems is quench detection and protection. Due to the slow quench propagation in HTS systems, the conventional discrete voltage-tap approach developed for NbTi and Nb3Sn magnets may not be sufficient. In contrast, a distributed temperature profile, generated by a distributed temperature sensor and facilitating continuous monitoring of the temperature at any monitored locations within a magnet with high spatial resolution, may be required. One such distributed temperature sensing option is the use of Rayleigh-based fiber optic sensors (FOS), which are immune to electromagnetic interference. The detection of a quench via Rayleigh-based FOS relies on converting the spectral shifts in the Rayleigh scattering spectra into temperature variations. As a result, the higher the spatial sampling resolution the larger the data processing volume, and thus the lower the temporal sampling resolution. So, for effective quench detection, which requires the quick and accurate identification of a hot spot, it is important to find a balance between the spatial and temporal resolutions executable on a given data acquisition and processing (DAQ) system. This paper discusses a method for finding an appropriate DAQ technology that matches the characteristic of a superconducting coil, and determining the acceptable resolutions for efficient and safe quench detection. A quench detection algorithm based on distributed temperature sensing is proposed and its implementation challenges are discussed.

  5. Data acquisition with fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kist, R.

    The advantages of using fiber optic sensors for data acquisition are discussed, and their present utilization in this area is examined. Because of their high cost, these sensors are not likely to be competitive in general metrological applications in the near future. They do, however, provide important advantages in specific areas such as isolation against high voltage and immunity against electromagnetic fields and explosive and/or corrosive environments. They also offer the possibility of miniaturized and compact packaging of the sensing element an application within a broad temperature range. Multimode fiber optic sensors for parameters such as temperature, pressure, and refractive index have more immediate commercial potential than monomode fiber optic sensors, which have higher costs. The latter allow for high precision solutions of metrological tasks under specific conditions, and will be utilized in the foreseeable future.

  6. Fiber optic strain measurement for machine monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, L.; Mueller, M. S.; Koch, A. W.

    2007-06-01

    Monitoring machines during operation is an important issue in measurement engineering. The usual approach to monitoring specific machine components is using strain gauges. Strain gauges, however, may sometimes not be used if conditions are harsh or installation space is limited. Fiber optic sensors seem to be an alternative here, but dynamic health monitoring has been dificult so far. The focus of this field study is to measure vibration characteristics of machine parts during operation using fiber optic sensors with the objective of early damage detection. If that was possible, downtime and maintenance costs could be minimized. Therefore a field test for dynamic fiber optic strain measurement on a roller bearing was carried out. The test setup consisted of the bearing built into a gear test stand and equipped with an array of fiber Bragg grating sensors. Fifteen fiber sensors were interrogated with a sample rate of 1 kHz and the vibration pattern was extracted. The radial load distribution was measured with high spatial resolution and a high degree of compliance with simulation data was found. The findings suggest that fiber optic health monitoring for machine components is feasible and reasonable. Especially with the help of distributed sensing on various components extensive health monitoring on complex technical systems is possible.

  7. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  8. Multiplexed fiber optic displacement sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multiplexed bend loss type single-mode fiber-optic sensor system was prepared to measure the displacement of several cm of the civil engineering structures such as many bridges, tunnels and various buildings. This bend loss type fiber-optic sensor used the signal difference between two reflection signals due to various bend losses generating at a pair of optical connectors by using OTDR (optical time domain reflectometer) for measuring displacements. The experiments were conducted for showing the measurement feasibility on the range of 10 cm, and the multiplexing experiments were also performed to measure the displacements of 5 measuring positions of an object by setting these 5 fiber-optic sensors on a single mode fiber simultaneously.

  9. Research progress of photonic crystal fibers for gas sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lei; Wei, Yubin; Liu, Tongyu

    2013-09-01

    Because of its special structure, photonic crystal fiber(PCF) has shown great potential in gas sensing. Probe beam with the test gas can directly interact within a PCF. PCF gas sensor with a very small amount of gas can be interact with light in optical fiber in a long distance. And you can change the parameters of the fibers can be improved sensor sensitivity, etc. The status of solid core PCF and hollow-core PCF as a gas sensor is introduced respectively in this paper.

  10. Sensing via optical interference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan C. Bailey

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Chemical and biological sensing are problems of tremendous contemporary technological importance in multiple regulatory and human health contexts, including environmental monitoring, water quality assurance, workplace air quality assessment, food quality control, many aspects of biodiagnostics, and, of course, homeland security. Frequently, what is needed, or at least wanted, are sensors that are simultaneously cheap, fast, reliable, selective, sensitive, robust, and easy to use. Unfortunately, these are often conflicting requirements. Over the past few years, however, a number of promising ideas based on optical interference effects have emerged. Each is based to some extent on advances in the design and fabrication of functional materials. Generally, the advances are of two kinds: chemo- and bio-selective recognition and binding, and efficient methods for micropatterning or microstructuring.

  11. Optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer cavity fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining and fusion splicing for refractive index sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, C R; Hu, T Y; Wang, D N

    2012-09-24

    We demonstrate a fiber in-line Fabry-Perot interferometer cavity sensor for refractive index measurement. The interferometer cavity is formed by drilling a micro-hole at the cleaved fiber end facet, followed by fusion splicing. A micro-channel is inscribed by femtosecond laser micromachining to vertically cross the cavity to allow liquid to flow in. The refractive index sensitivity obtained is ~994 nm/RIU (refractive index unit). Such a device is simple in configuration, easy for fabrication and reliable in operation due to extremely low temperature cross sensitivity of ~4.8 × 10(-6) RIU/°C. PMID:23037431

  12. Fiber optic multiplex optical transmission system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, C. H. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A multiplex optical transmission system which minimizes external interference while simultaneously receiving and transmitting video, digital data, and audio signals is described. Signals are received into subgroup mixers for blocking into respective frequency ranges. The outputs of these mixers are in turn fed to a master mixer which produces a composite electrical signal. An optical transmitter connected to the master mixer converts the composite signal into an optical signal and transmits it over a fiber optic cable to an optical receiver which receives the signal and converts it back to a composite electrical signal. A de-multiplexer is coupled to the output of the receiver for separating the composite signal back into composite video, digital data, and audio signals. A programmable optic patch board is interposed in the fiber optic cables for selectively connecting the optical signals to various receivers and transmitters.

  13. Polymer optical fiber bragg grating sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Yuan, Scott Wu; Andresen, Søren; Bang, Ole

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings are reported. We have written fiber Bragg gratings for 1550 nm and 850 nm operations, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer....

  14. Radiation damage in optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While plastic-clad-silica (PCS) fiber shows the greatest radiation resistance, PCS fiber has been difficult to reliably connectorize for routine field operations. For this reason, all-glass fibers have been studied as an alternative to PCS. Based on available literature and some preliminary tests at Los Alamos, we have concentrated on fluorosilicate clad, step index, pure silica core fibers. This paper reviews recent laboratory data for these fibers relative to the PCS fibers. This paper also discusses use of a fiber (or any optical medium) on a Cerenkov radiation-to-light transducer. Since the radiation induces attenuation in the medium, the light output is not proportional to the radiation input. The nonlinearity introduced by this attenuation is calculated

  15. Fiber optic pressure sensors for nuclear power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Black, C.L. [Analysis and Measurement Services Corp., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1995-04-01

    In the last few years, the nuclear industry has experienced some problems with the performance of pressure transmitters and has been interested in new sensors based on new technologies. Fiber optic pressure sensors offer the potential to improve on or overcome some of the limitations of existing pressure sensors. Up to now, research has been motivated towards development and refinement of fiber optic sensing technology. In most applications, reliability studies and failure mode analyses remain to be exhaustively conducted. Fiber optic sensors have currently penetrated certain cutting edge markets where they possess necessary inherent advantages over other existing technologies. In these markets (e.g. biomedical, aerospace, automotive, and petrochemical), fiber optic sensors are able to perform measurements for which no alternate sensor previously existed. Fiber optic sensing technology has not yet been fully adopted into the mainstream sensing market. This may be due to not only the current premium price of fiber optic sensors, but also the lack of characterization of their possible performance disadvantages. In other words, in conservative industries, the known disadvantages of conventional sensors are sometimes preferable to unknown or not fully characterized (but potentially fewer and less critical) disadvantages of fiber optic sensors. A six-month feasibility study has been initiated under the auspices of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) to assess the performance and reliability of existing fiber optic pressure sensors for use in nuclear power plants. This assessment will include establishment of the state of the art in fiber optic pressure sensing, characterization of the reliability of fiber optic pressure sensors, and determination of the strengths and limitations of these sensors for nuclear safety-related services.

  16. Fiber Optics: A Bright Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, James, Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an overview of the impact of fiber optics on telecommunications and its application to information processing and library services, including information retrieval, news services, remote transmission of library services, and library networking. (RAA)

  17. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCollum, Tom (Sterling, VA); Spector, Garry B. (Fairfax, VA)

    1994-01-01

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

  18. Small Business Innovations (Fiber Optics)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    Foster-Miller, Inc. Waltham, MA developed the In-Situ Fiber Optic Polymer Reaction Monitor which could lead to higher yields and lower costs in complex composite manufacturing. The monitor, developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Langley Research Center, uses an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. It is the first analytical system capable of directly measuring the chemistry of advanced composite materials.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of fiber optical components for application in guiding, sensing and molding of THz and mid-IR radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazhorova, Anna

    The terahertz (THz) range refers to electromagnetic waves with frequencies between 100 GHz and 10 THz, or wavelengths between 3 mm and 30 m. Light between radio waves and infrared has some unique properties. Within the scope of this work I would like to address three main research topics. In Chapter 2, I describe fabrication method and THz characterization of composite films containing either aligned metallic (tin alloy) microwires or chalcogenide As2Se3 microwires. The microwire arrays are made by stack-and-draw fiber fabrication technique using multi-step co-drawing of low-melting-temperature metals or semiconductor glasses together with polymers. Fibers are then stacked together and pressed into composite films. Transmission through metamaterial films is studied in the whole THz range (0.1-20 THz) using a combination of FTIR and TDS. Metal containing metamaterials are found to have strong polarizing properties, while semiconductor containing materials are polarization independent and could have a designable high refractive index. Using the transfer matrix theory, it was shown how to retrieve the complex polarization dependent refractive index of the composite films. We then detail the selfconsistent algorithm for retrieving the optical properties of the metal alloy used in the fabrication of the metamaterial layers by using an effective medium approximation. Finally, we study challenges in fabrication of metamaterials with sub-micrometer metallic wires by repeated stack-and-draw process by comparing samples made using 2, 3 and 4 consecutive drawings. When using metallic alloys we observe phase separation effects and nano-grids formation on small metallic wires. In Chapter 3, we have studied fabrication and bacteria detection application of the lowloss subwavelength THz microstructured fibers. One of the key difficulties in the design of terahertz waveguides lies in the fact that almost all materials are highly absorbing in the terahertz region. Since the lowest absorption loss occurs in dry gases, an efficient waveguide design must maximize the fraction of power guided in the gas. Different types of THz waveguides have been proposed based on this concept including a subwavelength waveguide featuring a core with a size much smaller than the wavelength of light in which a large fraction of the guided light is found outside of the lossy core region. A practical design of such a waveguide was recently proposed in our research group and presents a subwavelength fiber suspended on thin bridges in the middle of a larger protective tube. Large channels formed by the bridges and a tube make a convenient opto-microfluidic system that is easy to fill with liquid analytes or purge with dry gases. Particularly, the THz subwavelength waveguide used in our experiments features a 150 m core fiber suspended by three 20 m-thick bridges in the center of a 5.1 mm diameter tube of 4 cm in length. This waveguide design presents several important advantages for bio-sensing applications. First, the waveguide structure allows direct and convenient access to the fiber core and to the evanescent wave guided around it. Second, the outer cladding effectively isolates the core-guided mode from the surrounding environment, (e.g. fiber holders), thereby preventing the undesirable external perturbations of the terahertz signal. Finally, in Chapter 4, low-loss chalcogenide capillary-based waveguides that operate both in the mid-IR and THz spectral ranges are investigated. Chalcogenide glasses have attracted strong interest in a view of optical applications in the near-IR and mid-IR spectral ranges (1-14 m) due to their relatively low losses and high nonlinearities. Furthermore, chalcogenide glass-based microstructured fibers open many interesting possibilities for a large number of applications in the mid-IR spectral range, where applications in optical sensing, supercontinuum generation and single-mode propagation of IR light, transmission of the CO and CO2 laser radiation have already been demonstrated. We believe that chalcogenide glasses c

  20. The fiber optic probe hydrophone

    OpenAIRE

    Wurster, Clemens; Staudenraus, Joachim; Eisenmenger, Wolfgang

    1994-01-01

    We present a new type of hydrophone based on a fiber-optic sensor principle for shock wave and ultrasonic measurements in water. Its detection mechanism is based on the change of the optical reflection coefficient at the end surface of a glass fiber in water by pressure signals. The relation between the intensity of the reflected light and the water pressure is defined by material constants so that calibration by reference is not necessary. Shock wave measurements were made with the fiber opt...

  1. Power system applications of fiber optic sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnston, A.R.; Jackson, S.P.; Kirkham, H.; Yeh, C.

    1986-06-01

    Three topics are covered: Electric Field Measurement, Fiber Optic Temperature Sensing, and Optical Power Transfer. Work was done on the measurement of ac and dc electric fields. A prototype sensor for measuring alternating fields was made using a very simple electroscope approach. An electronic field mill sensor for dc fields was made using a fiber optic readout, so that the entire probe could be operated isolated from ground. There are several instances in which more precise knowledge of the temperature of electrical power apparatus would be useful. This report describes a number of methods whereby the distributed temperature profile can be obtained using a fiber optic sensor. The ability to energize electronics by means of an optical fiber has the advantage that electrical isolation is maintained at low cost. In order to accomplish this, it is necessary to convert the light energy into electrical form by means of photovoltaic cells. JPL has developed an array of PV cells in gallium arsenide specifically for this purpose. This work is described.

  2. Power system applications of fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, A. R.; Jackson, S. P.; Kirkham, H.; Yeh, C.

    1986-01-01

    This document is a progress report of work done in 1985 on the Communications and Control for Electric Power Systems Project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. These topics are covered: Electric Field Measurement, Fiber Optic Temperature Sensing, and Optical Power transfer. Work was done on the measurement of ac and dc electric fields. A prototype sensor for measuring alternating fields was made using a very simple electroscope approach. An electronic field mill sensor for dc fields was made using a fiber optic readout, so that the entire probe could be operated isolated from ground. There are several instances in which more precise knowledge of the temperature of electrical power apparatus would be useful. This report describes a number of methods whereby the distributed temperature profile can be obtained using a fiber optic sensor. The ability to energize electronics by means of an optical fiber has the advantage that electrical isolation is maintained at low cost. In order to accomplish this, it is necessary to convert the light energy into electrical form by means of photovoltaic cells. JPL has developed an array of PV cells in gallium arsenide specifically for this purpose. This work is described.

  3. Fiber Ring Optical Gyroscope (FROG)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a one meter diameter fiber ring optical gyro, using 1.57 kilometers of single mode fiber, are described. The various noise components: electronic, thermal, mechanical, and optical, were evaluated. Both dc and ac methods were used. An attempt was made to measure the Earth rotation rate; however, the results were questionable because of the optical and electronic noise present. It was concluded that fiber ring optical gyroscopes using all discrete components have many serious problems that can only be overcome by discarding the discrete approach and adapting an all integrated optic technique that has the laser source, modulator, detector, beamsplitters, and bias element on a single chip.

  4. Using high-resolution fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing to measure spatially resolved speed and temperature of airflows in a shallow gully

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christoph; Sayde, Chadi; Selker, John

    2015-04-01

    We present a novel observational technique that was applied to study transient shallow cold-air drainages and pools in undulating terrain in weak-wind conditions. Wind speed and air temperature at thousands of closely co-located locations were measured simultaneously at high spatial (0.25m) and temporal (5s) resolution using paired passive and actively heated optical fibers with a distributed temperature sensing system (DTS). The fibers were deployed in a transect across a shallow gully with a total length of 230 m at three levels (0.5, 1, and 2m above ground level) during the Shallow Cold Pool (SCP) Experiment in Northern Colorado, USA in October and November 2012. While we previously demonstrated that air temperature and the thermal structure of the near-surface turbulence can be observed with the DTS technique (Thomas et al., 2012, Zeeman et al., 2014), the novelty here consists of additionally measuring wind speed on horizontal scales of several hundreds of meters with fine resolution. Analogous to a hot-wire anemometer, the approach is based on the principal of velocity-dependent heat transfer from a heated surface. We present the theoretical basis for the DTS wind and temperature measurements and validate it against point observations from sonic anemometers and thermo-hygrometers. A space-time analysis of the near-surface gully flow and temperature field is presented based upon the observations subject to an orthogonal multi-resolution decomposition for selected cases. The temporal variability of near-surface air temperature was largest half-way up the slope caused be shifts of the very sharp thermal boundary between the density driven cold-air drainage flow in the gully bottom and the lower density air on the slopes, which was significantly warmed by enhanced downward mixing of sensible heat in the lee of the gully shoulder. Stationary horizontal temperature gradients at this thermal boundary amounted to 6 to 8 K m-1 and persisted for several hours unless the cold-air pool was displaced from the gully by intermittently strong external wind forcing. Even gentle surface heterogeneity can have dramatic impacts on the structure of the near-surface flow, turbulence, and heat transport, which calls for spatial observations to quantify and compensate for the location bias of traditional single-point flow and flux measurements. The novel approach, which allows studying the spatial structure of the surface layer on scales spanning four orders of magnitude (0.1 - 1000m), opens up many important opportunities for testing fundamental assumptions and concepts in micrometeorology including, but not limited to turbulent length scales, the validity of Taylors hypothesis and ergodicity, surface heterogeneity, and internal boundary layers. References: Thomas, C.K., Kennedy, A.M., Selker, J.S., Moretti, A., Schroth, M.H., Smoot, A.R., Tufillaro, N.B., Zeeman, M.J., 2012. High-resolution fibre-optic temperature sensing: A new tool to study the two-dimensional structure of atmospheric surface layer flow. Boundary-Layer Meteorol. 142, 177-192. DOI: 10.1007/s10546-011-9672-7 Zeeman MJ, Selker JS, Thomas CK. Near-surface motion in the nocturnal, stable boundary layer observed with fibre-optic distributed temperature sensing. Boundary- Layer Meterology. 2014:online first. doi:10.1007/s10546-014-9972-9.

  5. Optimize Etching Based Single Mode Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Kumar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a description of etching process for fabrication single mode optical fiber sensors. The process of fabrication demonstrates an optimized etching based method to fabricate single mode fiber (SMF optic sensors in specified constant time and temperature. We propose a single mode optical fiber based temperature sensor, where the temperature sensing region is obtained by etching its cladding diameter over small length to a critical value. It is observed that the light transmission through etched fiber at 1550 nm wavelength optical source becomes highly temperature sensitive, compared to the temperature insensitive behavior observed in un-etched fiber for the range on 30ºC to 100ºC at 1550 nm. The sensor response under temperature cycling is repeatable and, proposed to be useful for low frequency analogue signal transmission over optical fiber by means of inline thermal modulation approach.

  6. Achromatic optical diode in fiber optics

    CERN Document Server

    Berent, Michal; Vitanov, Nikolay V

    2013-01-01

    We propose a broadband optical diode, which is composed of one achromatic reciprocal quarter-wave plate and one non-reciprocal quarter-wave plate, both placed between two crossed polarizers. The presented design of achromatic wave plates relies on an adiabatic evolution of the Stokes vector, thus, the scheme is robust and efficient. The possible simple implementation using fiber optics is suggested.

  7. Utilization of Infrared Fiber Optic in the Automotive Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Dennis S.; Brantley, Lott W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Fiber optics are finding a place in the automotive industry. Illumination is the primary application today. Soon, however, fiber optics will be used for data communications and sensing applications. Silica fiber optics and plastic fibers are sufficient for illumination and communication applications however, sensing applications involving high temperature measurement and remote gas analysis would benefit from the use of infrared fiber optics. Chalcogonide and heavy metal fluoride glass optical fibers are two good candidates for these applications. Heavy metal fluoride optical fibers are being investigated by NASA for applications requiring transmission in the infrared portion of the electromagnetic spectrum. Zirconium-Barium-Lanthanum-Aluminum-Sodium-Fluoride (ZBLAN) is one such material which has been investigated. This material has a theoretical attenuation coefficient 100 times lower than that of silica and transmits into the mid-IR. However, the measured attenuation coefficient is higher than silica due to impurities and crystallization. Impurities can be taken care of by utilizing cleaner experimental protocol. It has been found that crystallization can be suppressed by processing in reduced gravity. Fibers processed in reduced gravity on the KC135 reduced gravity aircraft were found to be free of crystals while those processed on the ground were found to have crystals. These results will be presented along with plans for producing continuous lengths of ZBLAN optical fiber on board the International Space Station.

  8. Robust Mapping of Incoherent Fiber-Optic Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Harry E.; Deason, Brent E.; DePlachett, Charles P.; Pilgrim, Robert A.; Sanford, Harold S.

    2007-01-01

    A method and apparatus for mapping between the positions of fibers at opposite ends of incoherent fiber-optic bundles have been invented to enable the use of such bundles to transmit images in visible or infrared light. The method is robust in the sense that it provides useful mapping even for a bundle that contains thousands of narrow, irregularly packed fibers, some of which may be defective. In a coherent fiber-optic bundle, the input and output ends of each fiber lie at identical positions in the input and output planes; therefore, the bundle can be used to transmit images without further modification. Unfortunately, the fabrication of coherent fiber-optic bundles is too labor-intensive and expensive for many applications. An incoherent fiber-optic bundle can be fabricated more easily and at lower cost, but it produces a scrambled image because the position of the end of each fiber in the input plane is generally different from the end of the same fiber in the output plane. However, the image transmitted by an incoherent fiber-optic bundle can be unscrambled (or, from a different perspective, decoded) by digital processing of the output image if the mapping between the input and output fiber-end positions is known. Thus, the present invention enables the use of relatively inexpensive fiber-optic bundles to transmit images.

  9. Structure state detection and damage assessment system with fiber optic sensing array and neural network signal processing techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Yaqing; Huang, Shanglian; Chen, Weimin; Tang, Jun

    1994-08-01

    The principle and structure of a structure state detection and damage assessment system are given. A novel fiberoptic sensing array and suitable neural network signal processing techniques are described. The experimental results on structural member of gypsum show that the system can monitor physical states of structures and can be developed into smart structures with potential applications in areas such as space aeronautics, ship and civil engineering, etc.

  10. Monolithic fiber optic sensor assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Scott

    2015-02-10

    A remote sensor element for spectrographic measurements employs a monolithic assembly of one or two fiber optics to two optical elements separated by a supporting structure to allow the flow of gases or particulates therebetween. In a preferred embodiment, the sensor element components are fused ceramic to resist high temperatures and failure from large temperature changes.

  11. Irradiation Effects in Optical Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Dan, Sporea; Simonpietro, Agnello; Mario, Gelardi Franco

    2010-01-01

    Eleven types of commercially available optical fibers operating in the UV spectral range were investigated as they were subjected to gamma, beta, and neutron irradiation. The evaluation of the irradiation induced colour centres was done by off-line optical absorption measurements, EPR, and luminescence. E'-Si and H(I) defects were revealed by EPR, the

  12. Fiber optic fire detection technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrostatic application of paint was, and still is, the most technically feasible method of reducing VOC (volatile organic compounds) emissions, while reducing the cost to apply the coatings. Prior to the use of electrostatics, only two sides of the traditional fire triangle were normally present in the booth, fuel (solvent), and oxygen (air). Now the third leg (the ignition source) was present at virtually all times during the production operation in the form of the electrostatic charge and the resulting energy in the system. The introduction of fiber optics into the field of fire detection was for specific application to the electrostatic painting industry, but specifically, robots used in the application of electrostatic painting in the automotive industry. The use of fiber optics in this hazard provided detection for locations that have been previously prohibited or inaccessible with the traditional fire detection systems. The fiber optic technology that has been adapted to the field of fire detection operates on the principle of transmission of photons through a light guide (optic fiber). When the light guide is subjected to heat, the cladding on the light guide melts away from the core and allows the light (photons) to escape. The controller, which contains the emitter and receiver is set-up to distinguish between partial loss of light and a total loss of light. Glass optical fibers carrying light offer distinct advantages over wires or coaxial cables carrying electricity as a transmission media. The uses of fiber optic detection will be expanded in the near future into such areas as aircraft, cable trays and long conveyor runs because fiber optics can carry more information and deliver it with greater clarity over longer distances with total immunity to all kinds of electrical interference

  13. Multifunctional optical system-on-a-chip for heterogeneous fiber optic sensor networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Miao; Pang, Cheng; Gupta, Ashwani

    2015-08-01

    In this article, we review our recent progress on the development of a multifunctional optical system-on-a-chip platform, which can be used for achieving heterogeneous wireless fiber optical sensor networks. A multifunctional optical sensor platform based on the micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) technology is developed. The key component of the multifunctional optical sensor platform is a MEMS based tunable Fabry-Prot (FP) filter, which can be used as a phase modulator or a wavelength tuning device in a multifunctional optical sensing system. Mechanics model of the FP filter and optics model of the multifunctional optical sensing system are developed to facilitate the design of the filter. The MEMS FP filter is implemented in a multifunctional optical sensing system including both Fabry-Perot interferometer based sensors and Fiber Bragg grating sensors. The experimental results indicate that this large dynamic range tunable filter can enable high performance heterogeneous optical sensing for many applications.

  14. Implementation of a High-Speed FPGA and DSP Based FFT Processor for Improving Strain Demodulation Performance in a Fiber-Optic-Based Sensing System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Douglas L.

    2005-01-01

    NASA's Aviation Safety and Security Program is pursuing research in on-board Structural Health Management (SHM) technologies for purposes of reducing or eliminating aircraft accidents due to system and component failures. Under this program, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) is developing a strain-based structural health-monitoring concept that incorporates a fiber optic-based measuring system for acquiring strain values. This fiber optic-based measuring system provides for the distribution of thousands of strain sensors embedded in a network of fiber optic cables. The resolution of strain value at each discrete sensor point requires a computationally demanding data reduction software process that, when hosted on a conventional processor, is not suitable for near real-time measurement. This report describes the development and integration of an alternative computing environment using dedicated computing hardware for performing the data reduction. Performance comparison between the existing and the hardware-based system is presented.

  15. Fiber-diffraction Interferometer using Coherent Fiber Optic Taper

    OpenAIRE

    Kihm, Hagyong; Lee, Yun-Woo

    2010-01-01

    We present a fiber-diffraction interferometer using a coherent fiber optic taper for optical testing in an uncontrolled environment. We use a coherent fiber optic taper and a single-mode fiber having thermally-expanded core. Part of the measurement wave coming from a test target is condensed through a fiber optic taper and spatially filtered from a single-mode fiber to be reference wave. Vibration of the cavity between the target and the interferometer probe is common to both reference and me...

  16. Fiber optic chemical sensors: The evolution of high- density fiber-optic DNA microarrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Jane A.

    2001-06-01

    Sensors were developed for multianalyte monitoring, fermentation monitoring, lactate analysis, remote oxygen detection for use in bioremediation monitoring and in a fuel spill clean-up project, heavy metal analysis, and high density DNA microarrays. The major focus of this thesis involved creating and improving high-density DNA gene arrays. Fiber optic sensors are created using fluorescent indicators, polymeric supports, and optical fiber substrates. The fluorescent indicator is entrapped in a polymer layer and attached to the tip of the optical fiber. The tip of the fiber bearing the sensing layer (the distal end) is placed in the sample of interest while the other end of the fiber (the proximal end) is connected to an analysis system. Any length of fiber can be used without compromising the integrity or sensitivity of the system. A fiber optic oxygen sensor was designed incorporating an oxygen sensitive fluorescent dye and a gas permeable polymer attached to an optical fiber. The construction simplicity and ruggedness of the sensor enabled its deployment for in situ chemical oxidation and bioremediation studies. Optical fibers were also used as the substrate to detect biomolecules in solution. To monitor bioprocesses, the production of the analyte of interest must be coupled with a species that is optically measurable. For example, oxygen is consumed in many metabolic functions. The fiber optic oxygen sensor is equipped with an additional sensing layer. Upon contact with a specific biochemical in the sample, a reaction occurs in the additional sensing layer that either consumes or produces oxygen. This dual layer system was used to monitor the presence of lactate, an important metabolite for clinical and bioprocess analysis. In many biological and environmental systems, the generation of one species occurs coincidentally with the generation or consumption of another species. A multianalyte sensor was prepared that can monitor the simultaneous activity of pH, CO2 and O2. This sensor is useful for monitoring bioprocesses such as (beer) fermentation and for clinical situations such as blood gas analysis. DNA sensors were created by attaching short single strands of DNA (probes) to the fiber tip. A matching single strand (target) forms a strong interacting pair with the probe upon contact. The target strands in a sample are labeled with a fluorescent dye. When a probe-target pair is formed and excitation light is sent down the fiber, the fiber bearing the pair emits light that is captured and detected. A high density DNA array was created by isolating thousands of discrete DNA sensors on the tip of an imaging optical fiber. This array was made possible by the formation of microwells on the imaging fiber tip. Microspheres functionalized with DNA were placed in the wells of the fiber and each microsphere was independently and simultaneously monitored. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  17. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensor Based on Multimode Interference Effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A novel fiber optic temperature sensor based on multimode interference was designed, fabricated and tested. The sensor is very simple and inexpensive since we only need to splice a section of multimode fiber between two single mode fibers. Using this device a sensing range of 25 deg. C to 375 deg. C is demonstrated. We should also highlight that due to the pass-band filter response of MMI devices, multiplexing is rather simple by just changing the length of the multimode section.

  18. Laser-Pulse/Fiber-Optic Liquid-Leak Detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padgett, M. E.

    1986-01-01

    Several potential leak sites monitored using single sensing fiber. Fluid systems monitored quickly for leaks in remote, hazardous, or inaccessible locations by system of compact, lightweight fiber-optic leak sensors presently undergoing development. Sensors installed at potential leak sites as joints, couplings, and fittings. Sensor read by sending laser pulse along fiber, then noting presence or relative amplitude of return pulse. Leak-monitoring technique applicable to wide range of fluid systems and minimizes human exposure to toxic or dangerous fluids.

  19. All-optical storage and processing in optical fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Thévenaz, Luc; Primerov, Nikolay; Chin, Sanghoon; Antman, Yair; Denisov, Andrey; Zadok, Avi; Santagiustina, Marco

    2012-01-01

    The recent possibility to generate and read dynamic Bragg gratings in optical fibers by the interaction of multiple optical waves through stimulated Brillouin scattering has opened a new field to realize all-optical fiber-based functions.

  20. A fiber-optic current sensor for aerospace applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Rose, A. H.; Tang, D.; Day, G. W.

    1990-01-01

    A robust, accurate, broadband, alternating current sensor using fiber optics is being developed for space applications at power frequencies as high as 20 kHz. It can also be used in low and high voltage 60-Hz terrestrial power systems and in 400-Hz aircraft systems. It is intrinsically electromagnetic interference (EMI) immune and has the added benefit of excellent isolation. The sensor uses the Faraday effect in optical fiber and standard polarimetric measurements to sense electrical current. The primary component of the sensor is a specially treated coil of single-mode optical fiber, through which the current carrying conductor passes. Improved precision is accomplished by temperature compensation by means of signals from a novel fiber-optic temperature sensor embedded in the sensing head. The technology used in the sensor is examined and the results of precision tests conducted at various temperatures within the wide operating range are given. The results of early EMI tests are also given.

  1. Modeling Climate Change and Thermal Restoration Strategies in a Northern California Stream Using HEAT SOURCE and Distributed Temperature Sensing Fiber-optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, R. M.; Stubblefield, A. P.

    2013-12-01

    Land uses which modify stream channel structure and riparian vegetation can alter the mechanisms of heat transfer within a stream. Stream temperature is a crucial abiotic factor which governs aquatic biota quantity, distribution, and overall health. The IPCC has projected stream temperature to increase with changes in global climate due to elevated air temperature and changes in precipitation patterns. Stream temperature modeling can investigate current and future stream temperature conditions. Heat Source, developed by Oregon Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ), was applied to a one kilometer section of the North Fork of the Salmon River, a tributary of the Klamath River, northern California, USA. Heat Source accounts for internal and external thermal energy transfers to predict stream temperature at point locations. Inputs include meteorologic, geomorphologic, hydrologic and topographic measurements from the study site. The Salmon River watershed has a legacy of historic hydraulic gold mining which has changed channel morphology and created extensive denuded gravel bars. The Salmon River is listed as thermally impaired under California's List of Impaired Water Bodies 303(d) with mainstem temperature commonly exceeding salmonid temperature thresholds. The objective of this research was to utilize Heat Source to predict effects of climate change, riparian management, and channel geometry on stream temperature. This study employed Distributed Temperature Sensing fiber-optics (DTS) to detect stream heating and cooling at one meter resolution which was then used to calibrate Heat Source at the study reach. Predicted values closely matched DTS measurements reflecting shifting responses to air temperature, riparian vegetation distribution, and channel geometry conditions. Heat Source modeling of climate change scenarios using forecasted 2049 and 2099 elevated air temperatures are presented. Furthermore, temperature impacts of increased riparian vegetation density and stream channelization were investigated as possible thermal restoration strategies to buffer streams from elevated temperatures resulting from climate change.

  2. Handbook of fiber optics theory and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Yeh, Chai

    2013-01-01

    Dr. Yeh supplies a firm theoretical foundation in such topics as propagation of light through fibers, fiber fabrication, loss mechanisms, and dispersion properties. He then expands from this into such practical areas as fiber splicing, measuring loss in fibers, fiber-based communications networks, remote fiber sensors, and integrated optics. Whether involved in fiber optics research, design, or practical implementation of systems, this handbook will be extremely useful.Key Features* Here is a comprehensive, ""one-stop"" reference with state-of-the-art information on fiber optics Included is da

  3. Subwavelength and nanometer diameter optical fibers

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, Limin

    2011-01-01

    Subwavelength and Nanometer Diameter Optical Fibers provides a comprehensive and up-to-date coverage of research on nanoscale optical fibers including the basic physics and engineering aspects of the fabrication, properties and applications. The book discusses optical micro/nanofibers that represent a perfect fusion of optical fibers and nanotechnology on subwavelength scale and covers a broad range of topics in modern optical engineering, photonics and nanotechnology spanning from fiber optics, near-field optics, nonlinear optics, atom optics to nanofabrication and microphotonic components/de

  4. Feasibility of soil moisture monitoring with heated fiber optics

    OpenAIRE

    Sayde, C.; Gregory, C.; Gil-Rodriguez, M.; Tufillaro, N.; Tyler, S.; Giesen, N. C.; English, M.; Cuenca, R; Selker, J. S.

    2010-01-01

    Accurate methods are needed to measure changing soil water content from meter to kilometer scales. Laboratory results demonstrate the feasibility of the heat pulse method implemented with fiber optic temperature sensing to obtain accurate distributed measurements of soil water content. A fiber optic cable with an electrically conductive armoring was buried in variably saturated sand and heated via electrical resistance to create thermal pulses monitored by observing the distributed Raman back...

  5. Fiber Optic Vibration Sensor Based on the Tilted Fiber Bragg Grating

    OpenAIRE

    Jiali An; Tao Liu(Institut für Theoretische Teilchenphysik, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), D-76128 Karlsruhe, Germany); Yongxing Jin

    2013-01-01

    A temperature-insensitive fiber optic vibration sensor based on the tilted fiber Bragg grating (TFBG) is presented. The sensing head is formed by insertion of a small section of MMF between a single-mode fiber and the TFBG. The reflection light from this tilted fiber Bragg grating includes two parts: the reflected Bragg mode and the cladding modes. The cladding modes were coupled back into the core mode as a function of the multimode fiber. The power of the cladding modes is sensitive to vibr...

  6. FIBER OPTIC LIGHTING SYSTEMS

    OpenAIRE

    Munir BATUR; Ufuk PARALI; Ucan, Osman Nuri

    2013-01-01

    Recently there have been many important and valuable developments in the communication industry. The huge increase in the sound, data and visual communications has caused a parallel increase in the demand for systems with wider capacity, higher speed and higher quality. Communication systems that use light to transfer data are immensely increased. There have recently many systems in which glass or plastic fiber cables were developed for light wave to be transmitted from a source to a target p...

  7. Fundamental study on the development of fiber optic sensor for real-time sensing of CaCO3 scale formation in geothermal water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Takuya; Imai, Kenichiro; Tan, Shin Y; Yong, Yun T; Rahman, Faidz A; Hata, Noriko; Taguchi, Shigeru; Ueda, Akira; Kuramitz, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    This study proposes an optical fiber sensor for calcium carbonate (CaCO3) scale formation in water. The sensor is easily fabricated by removing the cladding of a multimode fiber to expose the core towards the surrounding medium in order to detect refractive index change. A variation of the transmittance response from the high refractive index of CaCO3 which precipitated on the fiber core surface was observed. The proposed setup can be used to analyze the transmittance response over wide range of wavelength using white light as a source and also a spectroscopy detector. The curve of the transmittance percentage over time showed that a fiber core with 200 ?m has higher sensitivity as compared to a fiber core with 400 ?m. The findings from this study showed that the sensor detection region at near infrared (NIR) wavelengths showed better sensitivity than visible light (VIS) wavelengths. Field tests were conducted using natural geothermal water at Matsushiro, Japan in order to verify the performance of the proposed sensor. The optical response was successfully evaluated and the analytical results confirmed the capability of monitoring scale formation in a geothermal water environment. PMID:25765379

  8. Feasibility of giant fiber-optic gyroscopes

    OpenAIRE

    Schiller, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The availability of long-distance, underground fiber-optic links opens a perspective of implementing interferometric fiber-optic gyroscopes embracing very large areas. We discuss the potential sensitivity, some disturbances and approaches to overcome them.

  9. All-optical fiber compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple all-optical fiber compressor, based on an idea of dispersion management using a fiber of positive dispersion in the first part and of negative dispersion in the second one at the working wavelength, is investigated. The method allows a combination of the advantages of the classic fiber-grating and of the multisoliton compression. It is possible to improve substantially the quality of the compressed pulse compared to the multisoliton compression. The compression factor could be increased up to 2-2.5 times when the fraction of the input pulse energy appearing within the compressed pulse enhances more than 2 times. Thus, the peak power of the compressed pulse is able to increase about 5 times and the quality of the obtained pulses should be comparable with those obtained by the fiber-grating compressor

  10. Recent progress in distributed fiber optic sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bao, Xiaoyi; Chen, Liang

    2012-01-01

    Rayleigh, Brillouin and Raman scatterings in fibers result from the interaction of photons with local material characteristic features like density, temperature and strain. For example an acoustic/mechanical wave generates a dynamic density variation; such a variation may be affected by local temperature, strain, vibration and birefringence. By detecting changes in the amplitude, frequency and phase of light scattered along a fiber, one can realize a distributed fiber sensor for measuring localized temperature, strain, vibration and birefringence over lengths ranging from meters to one hundred kilometers. Such a measurement can be made in the time domain or frequency domain to resolve location information. With coherent detection of the scattered light one can observe changes in birefringence and beat length for fibers and devices. The progress on state of the art technology for sensing performance, in terms of spatial resolution and limitations on sensing length is reviewed. These distributed sensors can be used for disaster prevention in the civil structural monitoring of pipelines, bridges, dams and railroads. A sensor with centimeter spatial resolution and high precision measurement of temperature, strain, vibration and birefringence can find applications in aerospace smart structures, material processing, and the characterization of optical materials and devices. PMID:23012508

  11. Recent Progress in Distributed Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyi Bao

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Rayleigh, Brillouin and Raman scatterings in fibers result from the interaction of photons with local material characteristic features like density, temperature and strain. For example an acoustic/mechanical wave generates a dynamic density variation; such a variation may be affected by local temperature, strain, vibration and birefringence. By detecting changes in the amplitude, frequency and phase of light scattered along a fiber, one can realize a distributed fiber sensor for measuring localized temperature, strain, vibration and birefringence over lengths ranging from meters to one hundred kilometers. Such a measurement can be made in the time domain or frequency domain to resolve location information. With coherent detection of the scattered light one can observe changes in birefringence and beat length for fibers and devices. The progress on state of the art technology for sensing performance, in terms of spatial resolution and limitations on sensing length is reviewed. These distributed sensors can be used for disaster prevention in the civil structural monitoring of pipelines, bridges, dams and railroads. A sensor with centimeter spatial resolution and high precision measurement of temperature, strain, vibration and birefringence can find applications in aerospace smart structures, material processing, and the characterization of optical materials and devices.

  12. Fiber-Optic Continuous Liquid Sensor for Cryogenic Propellant Gauging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu. Wei

    2010-01-01

    An innovative fiber-optic sensor has been developed for low-thrust-level settled mass gauging with measurement uncertainty optical fiber to measure liquid level and liquid distribution of cryogenic propellants. Every point of the sensing fiber is a point sensor that not only distinguishes liquid and vapor, but also measures temperature. This sensor is able to determine the physical location of each point sensor with 1-mm spatial resolution. Acting as a continuous array of numerous liquid/vapor point sensors, the truly distributed optical sensing fiber can be installed in a propellant tank in the same manner as silicon diode point sensor stripes using only a single feedthrough to connect to an optical signal interrogation unit outside the tank. Either water or liquid nitrogen levels can be measured within 1-mm spatial resolution up to a distance of 70 meters from the optical interrogation unit. This liquid-level sensing technique was also compared to the pressure gauge measurement technique in water and liquid nitrogen contained in a vertical copper pipe with a reasonable degree of accuracy. It has been demonstrated that the sensor can measure liquid levels in multiple containers containing water or liquid nitrogen with one signal interrogation unit. The liquid levels measured by the multiple fiber sensors were consistent with those virtually measured by a ruler. The sensing performance of various optical fibers has been measured, and has demonstrated that they can survive after immersion at cryogenic temperatures. The fiber strength in liquid nitrogen has also been measured. Multiple water level tests were also conducted under various actual and theoretical vibration conditions, and demonstrated that the signal-to-noise ratio under these vibration conditions, insofar as it affects measurement accuracy, is manageable and robust enough for a wide variety of spacecraft applications. A simple solution has been developed to absorb optical energy at the termination of the optical sensor, thereby avoiding any feedback to the optical interrogation unit

  13. Fiber Optics: Deregulate and Deploy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suwinski, Jan H.

    1993-01-01

    Describes fiber optic technology, explains its use in education and commercial settings, and recommends regulations and legislation that will speed its use to create broadband information networks. Topics discussed include distance learning; interactive video; costs; and the roles of policy makers, lawmakers, public advocacy groups, and consumers.…

  14. Adjustable Optical-Fiber Attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzetti, Mike F.

    1994-01-01

    Adjustable fiber-optic attenuator utilizes bending loss to reduce strength of light transmitted along it. Attenuator functions without introducing measurable back-reflection or insertion loss. Relatively insensitive to vibration and changes in temperature. Potential applications include cable television, telephone networks, other signal-distribution networks, and laboratory instrumentation.

  15. Applications of fiber optics in physical protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this NUREG is to provide technical information useful for the development of fiber-optic communications and intrusion detection subsystems relevant to physical protection. There are major sections on fiber-optic technology and applications. Other topics include fiber-optic system components and systems engineering. This document also contains a glossary, a list of standards and specifications, and a list of fiber-optic equipment vendors

  16. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  17. Catching Attention in Fiber Optics Class

    CERN Document Server

    Kezerashvili, G Ya

    2004-01-01

    Following a brief review on the history and the current development of fiber optics, the significance of teaching fiber optics for science and non-science major college students is addressed. Several experimental demonstrations designed to aid the teaching and learning process in fiber optics lectures are presented. Sample laboratory projects are also proposed to help the students to understand the physical principles of fiber optics.

  18. Applications of fiber optics in physical protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buckle, T.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to provide technical information useful for the development of fiber-optic communications and intrusion detection subsystems relevant to physical protection. There are major sections on fiber-optic technology and applications. Other topics include fiber-optic system components and systems engineering. This document also contains a glossary, a list of standards and specifications, and a list of fiber-optic equipment vendors.

  19. Silica glass optical fibers. Sekiei kei hikari fiber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshida, K. (Furukawa Electric Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan). Yokohama Lab.)

    1990-07-05

    A report is made on the structure, materials, basic characteristics and method of production of silica glass optical fibers for optical communication already put to practical use, as well as on recent optical fiber having new structures. Silica fiber consists of the core and clad made of silica glass, and various kinds of silica glasses are used for making the fibers. Standard transmission characteristics, structural dimensions, applications, etc. of the silica glass optical fibers are shown. The manufacturing processes of silica glass optical fibers can be divided into base material production process and drawing process for making the base material in fiber form, and there are 4 types of manufacturing methods. Optical fiber whose zero dispersion wave length is transferred near 1.55 {mu} m is called a dispersion shift single mode optical fiber, which can be used for large capacity and long distance transmission. Entire fluroine doped shift single mode optical fiber and hermetically coated optical fiber whose water resistance and hydrogen resistance are markedly improved are also outlined. 4 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Nonlinear fiber optics formerly quantum electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind

    1995-01-01

    The field of nonlinear fiber optics has grown substantially since the First Edition of Nonlinear Fiber Optics, published in 1989. Like the First Edition, this Second Edition is a comprehensive, tutorial, and up-to-date account of nonlinear optical phenomena in fiber optics. It synthesizes widely scattered research material and presents it in an accessible manner for students and researchers already engaged in or wishing to enter the field of nonlinear fiber optics. Particular attention is paid to the importance of nonlinear effects in the design of optical fiber communication systems. This is

  1. New optical fiber type: microporous sol-gel-clad optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skutnik, Bolesh J.

    1999-04-01

    A new type of optical fiber has been developed. It is made with all pure silica in both the core and cladding. This is possible because the cladding is a micro porous silica produced by a modified sol-gel technology. The formation and characteristics of this new optical fiber type are described. In particular the optical and mechanical properties are illustrated and described. The strength and fatigue of these optical fibers are very good, even without additional protective jackets. Unjacketed fibers have mean Weibull strengths in bending of 6.5 to 7.6 GPa with Weibull slopes in the 40 to 60 range. Fatigue results for fibers tested in ambient air, ambient water and boiling water are presented. The dynamic and static fatigue parameters are around 20. The micro porous structure of the sol-gel cladding provides sites for attaching different moieties which could activate biochemical reactions or be useful as sensing sites. Based on preliminary experiments, some possibilities are presented. In general this new structure can provide opportunities for as yet unidentified applications where chemicals and or light must be brought in close contact with body tissue to effect beneficial reactions there.

  2. Crack monitoring capability of plastic optical fibers for concrete structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jinlei; Bao, Tengfei; Chen, Rui

    2015-08-01

    Optical fibers have been widely used in structural health monitoring. Traditional silica fibers are easy to break in field applications due to their brittleness. Thus, silica fibers are proposed to be replaced by plastic optical fibers (POFs) in crack monitoring in this study. Moreover, considering the uncertainty of crack propagation direction in composite materials, the influence of the angles between fibers and cracks on the monitoring capability of plastic optical fibers is studied. A POF sensing device was designed and the relationship between light intensity loss and crack width under different fiber/crack angles was first measured through the device. Then, three-point bend tests were conducted on concrete beams. POFs were glued to the bottom surfaces of the beams and light intensity loss with crack width was measured. Experimental results showed that light intensity loss in plastic optical fibers increased with crack width increase. Therefore, application of plastic optical fibers in crack monitoring is feasible. Moreover, the results also showed that the sensitivity of the POF crack sensor decreased with the increase of angles between fibers and cracks.

  3. Career Directions--Fiber Optic Installer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic communication is a method of transmitting information from one place to another by sending pulses of light through an optical fiber that is roughly the diameter of a human hair. The light forms an electromagnetic carrier wave that is modulated to carry information. Each optical fiber is capable of carrying an enormous amount of

  4. Career Directions--Fiber Optic Installer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tech Directions, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Fiber-optic communication is a method of transmitting information from one place to another by sending pulses of light through an optical fiber that is roughly the diameter of a human hair. The light forms an electromagnetic carrier wave that is modulated to carry information. Each optical fiber is capable of carrying an enormous amount of…

  5. Surface Plasmon Resonance-Based Fiber Optic Sensors: Principle, Probe Designs, and Some Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Verma, R. K.; Gupta, B. D.

    2009-01-01

    Surface plasmon resonance technique in collaboration with optical fiber technology has brought tremendous advancements in sensing of various physical, chemical, and biochemical parameters. In this review article, we present the principle of SPR technique for sensing and various designs of the fiber optic SPR probe reported for the enhancement of the sensitivity of the sensor. In addition, we present few examples of the surface plasmon resonance- (SPR-) based fiber optic sensors. The present r...

  6. Fiber-optical microphones and accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Stefani, Alessio; Bang, Ole; Jacobsen, Torben K.; Rose, Bjarke; Herholdt-Rasmussen, Nicolai; Nielsen, Finn Kryger; Andresen, Søren; Sørensen, Ole Brøsted; Hansen, Knud Styhr

    2010-01-01

    Polymer optical fibers (POFs) are ideal for applications as the sensing element in fiber-optical microphones and accelerometers based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) due to their reduced Young’s Modulus of 3.2GPa, compared to 72GPa of Silica. To maximize the sensitivity and the dynamic range of the...... device the outer diameter and the length of the sensing fiber segment should be as small as possible. To this end we have fabricated 3mm FBGs in single-mode step-index POFs of diameter 115 micron, using 325nm UV writing and a phase-mask technique. 6mm POF sections with FBGs in the center have been glued...... to standard Silica SMF28 fibers. These POF FBGs have been characterized in terms of temperature and strain to find operating regimes with no hysteresis. Commercial fast wavelength interrogators (KHz) are shown to be able to track the thin POF FBGs and they are finally applied in a prototype...

  7. Polydimethylsiloxane fibers for optical fiber sensor of displacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martincek, Ivan; Pudis, Dusan; Gaso, Peter

    2013-09-01

    The paper describes the preparation of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) fiber integrated on the conventional optical fibers and their use for optical fiber displacement sensor. PDMS fiber was made of silicone elastomer Sylgard 184 (Dow Corning) by drawing from partially cured silicone. Optical fiber displacement sensor using PDMS fiber is based on the measurement of the local minimum of optical signal in visible spectral range generated by intermodal interference of circularly symmetric modes. Position of the local minimum in spectral range varies by stretching the PDMS fiber of 230 ?m in the wavelength range from 688 to 477 nm. In the stretched PDMS fiber is possible to determine the longitudinal displacement with an accuracy of approximately 1 micrometer.

  8. Enhancing Optical Communications with Brand New Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morioka, Toshio; Awaji, Yoshinari; Ryf, Roland; Winzer, Peter; Richardson, David; Poletti, Francesco

    2012-01-01

    Optical fibers have often been considered to offer effectively infinite capacity to support the rapid traffic growth essential to our information society. However, as demand has grown and technology has developed, we have begun to realize that there is a fundamental limit to fiber capacity of ~ 100...... Tb/s per fiber for systems based on conventional single-core single-mode optical fiber as the transmission medium. This limit arises from the interplay of a number of factors including the Shannon limit, optical fiber nonlinearities, the fiber fuse effect, as well as optical amplifier bandwidth. This...

  9. Multi-point fiber-optic refractive index sensor by using coreless fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiuxin; Zhang, Xinpu; Liu, Yun; Liu, Zigeng; Peng, Wei

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel multi-point fiber-optic refractive index (RI) sensor based on two different length coreless fibers spliced between single mode fibers (SMFs). The sensing probe operated based on multimode interference. A multi-point interferometer with 25 mm and 30 mm coreless fiber is fabricated and the measurement of RI is realized by measuring the wavelength shift of resonance dips in the transmission spectrum of the multi-point interferometer. Experimental characterization for a multi-point refractometer is presented. In the RI range of 1.3288-1.3666, the corresponding RI sensitivities are 148.60 nm/RIU and 119.27 nm/RIU for each point, respectively. We demonstrate that this multi-point fiber optic interferometer can be used as a simple transducer for RI sensing with comparable sensitivity.

  10. Radiation damage in optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In connection with efforts to construct an optical fiber which is radiation resistant, it is important to understand the mechanisms for radiation-related damage and the effects of the various glass constituents on the basic silica structure. The present investigation is concerned with the results of studies involving an application of transmission, thermoluminescence, and photoluminescence techniques. It is found that for doses up to at least 30,000 rads the induced transmission loss is linear for a wavelength of 0.82 micron. While a high phosphorous content reduces the sensitivity of the fibers to radiation, a low concentration (around 2 mol%) actually increases the sensitivity

  11. Selective Serial Multi-Antibody Biosensing with TOPAS Microstructured Polymer Optical Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiliyanov, Grigoriy Andreev; Høiby, Poul E.; Pedersen, Lars H.; Bang, Ole

    2013-01-01

    We have developed a fluorescence-based fiber-optical biosensor, which can selectively detect different antibodies in serial at preselected positions inside a single piece of fiber. The fiber is a microstructured polymer optical fiber fabricated from TOPAS cyclic olefin copolymer, which allows for...... UV activation of localized sensor layers inside the holes of the fiber. Serial fluorescence-based selective sensing of Cy3-labelled α-streptavidin and Cy5-labelled α-CRP antibodies is demonstrated....

  12. Fiber optic bundle array wide field-of-view optical receiver for free space optical communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahn, Daniel V; Brown, David M; Rolander, Nathan W; Sluz, Joseph E; Venkat, Radha

    2010-11-01

    We propose a design for a free space optical communications (FSOC) receiver terminal that offers an improved field of view (FOV) in comparison to conventional FSOC receivers. The design utilizes a microlens to couple the incident optical signal into an individual fiber in a bundle routed to remote optical detectors. Each fiber in the bundle collects power from a solid angle of space; utilizing multiple fibers enhances the total FOV of the receiver over typical single-fiber designs. The microlens-to-fiber-bundle design is scalable and modular and can be replicated in an array to increase aperture size. The microlens is moved laterally with a piezoelectric transducer to optimize power coupling into a given fiber core in the bundle as the source appears to move due to relative motion between the transmitter and receiver. The optimum position of the lens array is determined via a feedback loop whose input is derived from a position sensing detector behind another lens. Light coupled into like fibers in each array cell is optically combined (in fiber) before illuminating discrete detectors. PMID:21042349

  13. Optical fiber reliability in subsea monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarkar, Kaustubh; Ostroverkhov, Victor; Balasubramaniam, Mahadevan; Rubinsztajn, Slawomir; Koste, Glenn; Dekate, Sachin; Mandal, Sudeep; Stecher, Thomas

    2015-05-01

    Fiber optic cables have been successfully deployed in ocean floors for decades to enable trans-oceanic telecommunication. The impact of strain and moisture on optical fibers has been thoroughly studied in the past 30 years. Cable designs have been developed to minimize strain on the fibers and prevent water uptake. As a result, the failure rates of optical fibers in subsea telecommunication cables due to moisture and strain are negligible. However, the relatively recent use of fiber optic cables to monitor temperature, acoustics, and especially strain on subsea equipment adds new reliability challenges that need to be mitigated. This paper provides a brief overview of the design for reliability considerations of fiber optic cables for subsea asset condition monitoring (SACM). In particular, experimental results on fibers immersed in water under varying accelerated conditions of static stress and temperature are discussed. Based on the data, an assessment of the survivability of optical fibers in the subsea monitoring environment is presented.

  14. Generalized fiber Fourier optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cincotti, Gabriella

    2011-06-15

    A twofold generalization of the optical schemes that perform the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) is given: new passive planar architectures are presented where the 2 2 3 dB couplers are replaced by M M hybrids, reducing the number of required connections and phase shifters. Furthermore, the planar implementation of the discrete fractional Fourier transform (DFrFT) is also described, with a waveguide grating router (WGR) configuration and a properly modified slab coupler. PMID:21686007

  15. Interferometric fiber-optic bending / nano-displacement sensor using plastic dual-core fiber

    CERN Document Server

    Qu, H; Skorobogatiy, M

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate an interferometric fiber-optic bending/micro-displacement sensor based on a plastic dual-core fiber with one end coated with a silver mirror. The two fiber cores are first excited with the same laser beam, the light in each core is then back-reflected at the mirror-coated fiber-end, and, finally, the light from the two cores is made to interfere at the coupling end. Bending of the fiber leads to shifting interference fringes that can be interrogated with a slit and a single photodetector. We find experimentally that the resolution of our bending sensor is ~3x10-4 m-1 for sensing of bending curvature, as well as ~70 nm for sensing of displacement of the fiber tip. We demonstrate operation of our sensor using two examples. One is weighting of the individual micro-crystals of salt, while the other one is monitoring dynamics of isopropanol evaporation.

  16. Optical fiber interferometer for the study of ultrasonic waves in composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claus, R. O.; Zewekh, P. S.; Turner, T. M.; Wade, J. C.; Rogers, R. T.; Garg, A. O.

    1981-01-01

    The possibility of acoustic emission detection in composites using embedded optical fibers as sensing elements was investigated. Optical fiber interferometry, fiber acoustic sensitivity, fiber interferometer calibration, and acoustic emission detection are reported. Adhesive bond layer dynamical properties using ultrasonic interface waves, the design and construction of an ultrasonic transducer with a two dimensional Gaussian pressure profile, and the development of an optical differential technique for the measurement of surface acoustic wave particle displacements and propagation direction are also examined.

  17. Optical Fiber Grating based Sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Susanne

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis differenct optical fiber gratings are used for sensor purposes. If a fiber with a core concentricity error (CCE) is used, a directional dependent bend sensor can be produced. The CCE direction can be determined by means of diffraction. This makes it possible to produce long......-period gratings in a fiber with a CCE direction parallel or perpendicular to the writing direction. The maximal bending sensitivity is independent on the writing direction, but the detailed bending response is different in the two cases. A temperature and strain sensor, based on a long-period grating and two...... sampled gratings, was produced and investigated. It is based on the different temperature and strain response of these gratings. Both a transfer matrix method and an overlap calculation is performed to explain the sensor response. Another type of sensor is based on tuning and modulation of a laser...

  18. Fiber optic and laser sensors IX; Proceedings of the Meeting, Boston, MA, Sept. 3-5, 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaula, Ramon P. (Editor); Udd, Eric (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The present volume on fiber-optic and laser sensors discusses industrial applications of fiber-optic sensors, fiber-optic temperature sensors, fiber-optic current sensors, fiber-optic pressure/displacement/vibration sensors, and generic fiber-optic systems. Attention is given to a fiber-sensor design for turbine engines, fiber-optic remote Fourier transform IR spectroscopy, near-IR fiber-optic temperature sensors, and an intensity-type fiber-optic electric current sensor. Topics addressed include fiber-optic magnetic field sensors based on the Faraday effect in new materials, diaphragm size and sensitivity for fiber-optic pressure sensors, a microbend pressure sensor for high-temperature environments, and linear position sensing by light exchange between two lossy waveguides. Also discussed are two-mode elliptical-core fiber sensors for measurement of strain and temperature, a fiber-optic interferometric X-ray dosimeter, fiber-optic interferometric sensors using multimode fibers, and optical fiber sensing of corona discharges.

  19. 7 CFR 1755.903 - Fiber optic service entrance cables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... suitable coating. Each fiber must be continuous throughout its length. (2) Optical fibers must meet the... the end user stipulates a low water peak fiber, the optical fibers must meet the fiber attributes of... bending loss fiber, the optical fibers must meet the fiber attributes of Table 7-1, G.657 class...

  20. Active Optical Fibers Doped with Ceramic Nanocrystals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Mrazek

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Erbium-doped active optical fiber was successfully prepared by incorporation of ceramic nanocrystals inside a core of optical fiber. Modified chemical vapor deposition was combined with solution-doping approach to preparing preform. Instead of inorganic salts erbium-doped yttrium-aluminium garnet nanocrystals were used in the solution-doping process. Prepared preform was drawn into single-mode optical fiber with a numerical aperture 0.167. Optical and luminescence properties of the fiber were analyzed. Lasing ability of prepared fiber was proofed in a fiber-ring set-up. Optimal laser properties were achieved for a fiber length of 20~m. The slope efficiency of the fiber-laser was about 15%. Presented method can be simply extended to the deposition of other ceramic nanomaterials.

  1. Color centers in optic fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Short-living and stationary color centers are studied in optic fibers (OF) with concentration of OH 1000 ppm at the temperatures of 77-300 K. As it was demonstrated in [1] concentration of OH of 1000 ppm in the optic fibers at room temperature does not observed. The studies showed that under irradiation at 77 K the color centers are formed with the absorption bands at 215, 260, 330 and 550 nm. In this work the idea was proposed that under irradiation with 105 Rad non-bridge oxygen atoms is not formed. This is supported by the researches showing that the band 215 nm, which is formed by E - centers, disappears at two values of temperature. The first E - centers disappear at 77 K, whereas the second one at 310 K. Here, the first E - center can be observed at 470-500 nm. Based on the stated above we assume that the values of OH concentration at 1000 ppm in optic fibers are not correct. It is obtained that at low temperatures of 77 - 300 K new phenomena are observed, i.e. existence of two E - color with peaks at 215 nm. The values of temperature at which these centers exist are different, the first exist at temperature up to 85 K, and the second one up to 300 K. (author) Reference: 1. V.B. Gavrilov, A.I. Golutvan, Yu.S. Gershtein et al. Absorption spectra in pure quartz optic fibers gamma-irradiated with 60Co source. // Instrumentation and techniques of experiment.- 1997.- No 4.- p. 23-32.

  2. Integrated optical chip in fiber optic gyros

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunduru, Vardhani; VaraLakshmi, R.; Dhanunjay, .; Karthik, .

    2010-02-01

    Fiber optic gyroscope is an important development in the field of fiber optic sensors. It is now considered an alternative technology to the mechanical and laser gyroscopes for the inertial guidance and control applications. The advantages of FOG over mechanical gyroscopes are many like instantaneous operation, wide dynamic range, no g-sensitivity, maintenance free, and capability to withstand high shock and vibration and so on. The advantages over laser gyroscopes include cost effectiveness, light weight, low power consumption and improved ruggedness. The optical gyroscope principle was first demonstrated by Sagnac in 1913. Optical gyroscopes implemented so far use Sagnac effect, which states that an optical path difference induced by counter propagating beams in a rotating reference frame is proportional to the absolute rotation. The main requirement of a FOG is perfect reciprocity, i.e. in the absence of rotation, the counter propagating beams inside the fiber must travel identical paths thus resulting in zero phase shift. The phase shift in a Sagnac interferometer not only comprises of a non-reciprocal sources that set practical performance limits. These non-reciprocal sources generate random time varying output resulting in a bias drift even under zero rotation rates, which causes serious problems in present day gyroscope. In a FOG the reciprocal configuration ensures the bias stability, signal processing is used to obtain maximum sensitivity, a broad band source is used to eliminate the effect of back scattering, polarization coupling and Kerr effect and the closed loop operation is used to linearize the scale factor and improve its stability.

  3. Fiber-optic communication systems

    CERN Document Server

    Agrawal, Govind P

    2010-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive account of fiber-optic communication systems. The 3rd edition of this book is used worldwide as a textbook in many universities. This 4th edition incorporates recent advances that have occurred, in particular two new chapters. One deals with the advanced modulation formats (such as DPSK, QPSK, and QAM) that are increasingly being used for improving spectral efficiency of WDM lightwave systems. The second chapter focuses on new techniques such as all-optical regeneration that are under development and likely to be used in future communication systems. All othe

  4. Distribution automation applications of fiber optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, Harold; Johnston, A.; Friend, H.

    1989-01-01

    Motivations for interest and research in distribution automation are discussed. The communication requirements of distribution automation are examined and shown to exceed the capabilities of power line carrier, radio, and telephone systems. A fiber optic based communication system is described that is co-located with the distribution system and that could satisfy the data rate and reliability requirements. A cost comparison shows that it could be constructed at a cost that is similar to that of a power line carrier system. The requirements for fiber optic sensors for distribution automation are discussed. The design of a data link suitable for optically-powered electronic sensing is presented. Empirical results are given. A modeling technique that was used to understand the reflections of guided light from a variety of surfaces is described. An optical position-indicator design is discussed. Systems aspects of distribution automation are discussed, in particular, the lack of interface, communications, and data standards. The economics of distribution automation are examined.

  5. Use of optical fibers in spectrophotometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Lawrence W.

    1988-01-01

    The use of single or small numbers of fiber optic fibers in astronomical spectroscopy with the goal of greater spectrophotometric and radial velocity accuracy is discussed. The properties of multimode step index fibers which are most important for this application are outlined, as are laboratory tests of currently available fibers.

  6. Engineering modes in optical fibers with metamaterial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Min; Mortensen, Asger; Qiu, Min

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we report a preliminary theoretical study on optical fibers with fine material inclusions whose geometrical inhomogeneity is almost indistinguishable by the operating wavelength.We refer to such fibers as metamaterial optical fibers, which can conceptually be considered as an...

  7. Flight demonstration of fiber optic sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elster, Jennifer L.; Trego, Angela; Catterall, Charles; Averett, Josh; Jones, Mark E.; Evans, Mishell K.; Fielder, Bob

    2003-07-01

    Luna Innovations has developed a prototype 8-channel fiber optic sensor system to demonstrate fiber optic sensor operation in flight environments. As an intial flight demonstration, long period grating (LPG) relative humidity sensors along with extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric (EFPI) pressure and temperature sensors were installed in an aging Delta 767-300ER jet. The fiber optic signal-conditioning system is a multi-purpose platform that can also be used to operate other types of fiber optic LPG and EFPI sensors, including strain gages, metal-ion corrosion sensors, and fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensors. The system configuration and operation is described.

  8. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor using Multimode Interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Perez, V I; Sanchez-Mondragon, J J [INAOE, Apartado Postal 51 y 216, Puebla 72000 (Mexico); Basurto-Pensado, M A [CIICAp, Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Morelos (Mexico); LiKamWa, P [CREOL, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816 (United States); May-Arrioja, D A, E-mail: iruiz@inaoep.mx, E-mail: mbasurto@uaem.mx, E-mail: delta_dirac@hotmail.com, E-mail: daniel_may_arrioja@hotmail.com [UAT Reynosa Rodhe, Universidad Autonoma de Tamaulipas (Mexico)

    2011-01-01

    Based on the theory of multimode interference (MMI) and self-image formation, we developed a novel intrinsic optical fiber pressure sensor. The sensing element consists of a section of multimode fiber (MMF) without cladding spliced between two single mode fibers (SMF). The MMI pressure sensor is based on the intensity changes that occur in the transmitted light when the effective refractive index of the MMF is changed. Basically, a thick layer of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is placed in direct contact with the MMF section, such that the contact area between the PDMS and the fiber will change proportionally with the applied pressure, which results in a variation of the transmitted light intensity. Using this configuration, a good correlation between the measured intensity variations and the applied pressure is obtained. The sensitivity of the sensor is 3 {mu}V/psi, for a range of 0-60 psi, and the maximum resolution of our system is 0.25 psi. Good repeatability is also observed with a standard deviation of 0.0019. The key feature of the proposed pressure sensor is its low fabrication cost, since the cost of the MMF is minimal.

  9. Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor using Multimode Interference

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the theory of multimode interference (MMI) and self-image formation, we developed a novel intrinsic optical fiber pressure sensor. The sensing element consists of a section of multimode fiber (MMF) without cladding spliced between two single mode fibers (SMF). The MMI pressure sensor is based on the intensity changes that occur in the transmitted light when the effective refractive index of the MMF is changed. Basically, a thick layer of Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) is placed in direct contact with the MMF section, such that the contact area between the PDMS and the fiber will change proportionally with the applied pressure, which results in a variation of the transmitted light intensity. Using this configuration, a good correlation between the measured intensity variations and the applied pressure is obtained. The sensitivity of the sensor is 3 μV/psi, for a range of 0-60 psi, and the maximum resolution of our system is 0.25 psi. Good repeatability is also observed with a standard deviation of 0.0019. The key feature of the proposed pressure sensor is its low fabrication cost, since the cost of the MMF is minimal.

  10. Fiber-optically sensorized composite wing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Joannes M.; Black, Richard J.; Moslehi, Behzad; Oblea, Levy; Patel, Rona; Sotoudeh, Vahid; Abouzeida, Essam; Quinones, Vladimir; Gowayed, Yasser; Soobramaney, Paul; Flowers, George

    2014-04-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) immune and light-weight, fiber-optic sensor based Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) will find increasing application in aerospace structures ranging from aircraft wings to jet engine vanes. Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) has been developing multi-functional fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor systems including parallel processing FBG interrogators combined with advanced signal processing for SHM, structural state sensing and load monitoring applications. This paper reports work with Auburn University on embedding and testing FBG sensor arrays in a quarter scale model of a T38 composite wing. The wing was designed and manufactured using fabric reinforced polymer matrix composites. FBG sensors were embedded under the top layer of the composite. Their positions were chosen based on strain maps determined by finite element analysis. Static and dynamic testing confirmed expected response from the FBGs. The demonstrated technology has the potential to be further developed into an autonomous onboard system to perform load monitoring, SHM and Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) of composite aerospace structures (wings and rotorcraft blades). This platform technology could also be applied to flight testing of morphing and aero-elastic control surfaces.

  11. Research progress in the key device and technology for fiber optic sensor network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Deming; Sun, Qizhen; Lu, Ping; Xia, Li; Sima, Chaotan

    2016-03-01

    The recent research progress in the key device and technology of the fiber optic sensor network (FOSN) is introduced in this paper. An architecture of the sensor optical passive network (SPON), by employing hybrid wavelength division multiplexing/time division multiplexing (WDM/TDM) techniques similar to the fiber communication passive optical network (PON), is proposed. The network topology scheme of a hybrid TDM/WDM/FDM (frequency division multiplexing) three-dimension fiber optic sensing system for achieving ultra-large capacity, long distance, and high resolution sensing performance is performed and analyzed. As the most important device of the FOSN, several kinds of light source are developed, including the wideband multi-wavelength fiber laser operating at C band, switchable and tunable 2 μm multi-wavelength fiber lasers, ultra-fast mode-locked fiber laser, as well as the optical wideband chaos source, which have very good application prospects in the FOSN. Meanwhile, intelligent management techniques for the FOSN including wideband spectrum demodulation of the sensing signals and real-time fault monitoring of fiber links are presented. Moreover, several typical applications of the FOSN are also discussed, such as the fiber optic gas sensing network, fiber optic acoustic sensing network, and strain/dynamic strain sensing network.

  12. Sensitivity enhancement of fiber optic FBG sensor for acoustic emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dae-Cheol; Yoon, Dong-Jin; Kwon, Il-Bum; Lee, Seung-Suk

    2009-03-01

    A fiber optic Bragg grating based acoustic emission sensor system is developed to provide on-line monitoring of cracks or leaks in reactor vessel head penetration of nuclear power plants. Various type of fiber Bragg grating sensor including the variable length of sensing part was fabricated and prototype sensor system was tested by using PZT pulser and pencil lead break sources. In this study, we developed a cantilever type fiber sensor to enhance the sensitivity and to resonant frequency control. Two types of sensor attachment were used. First, the fiber Bragg grating sensor was fully bonded to the surface using bonding agent. Second one is that one part of fiber was partially bonded to surface and the other part of fiber will be remained freely. The resonant frequency of the fiber Bragg grating sensor will depend on the length of sensing part. Various kinds of resonant type fiber Bragg grating acoustic emission sensors were developed. Also several efforts were done to enhance the sensitivity of FBG AE sensor, which include FBG spectrum optimization and electrical and optical noise reduction. Finally, based on the self-developed acquisition system, a series of tests demonstrate the ability of the developed fiber sensor system to detect a pencil lead break event and continuous leak signal.

  13. Real-time In-Flight Strain and Deflection Monitoring with Fiber Optic Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen R.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews Dryden's efforts to develop in-flight monitoring based on Fiber Optics. One of the motivating factors for this development was the breakup of the Helios aircraft. On Ikhana the use of fiber optics for wing shape sensing is being developed. They are being used to flight validate fiber optic sensor measurements and real-time wing shape sensing predictions on NASA's Ikhana vehicle; validate fiber optic mathematical models and design tools; Assess technical viability and, if applicable, develop methodology and approach to incorporate wing shape measurements within the vehicle flight control system, and develop and flight validate advanced approaches to perform active wing shape control.

  14. Development of a Miniature, Semi-Distributed Sapphire Fiber Optic Thermometer for Harsh and High Temperature Environments

    OpenAIRE

    DePew, Keith Alan

    2013-01-01

    Fiber optic temperature sensing has become a well-defined field in the past few decades [1] through the use of Fiber Bragg Gratings, Fabry-Perot interferometry, and pyrometry, to list several techniques in use today.  The use of fiber optics offers significant advantages over electronic sensing in terms of size and insensitivity to harsh conditions such as extreme temperatures and corrosive environments.  The availability of optical sapphire materials, including fibers, has allowed the creati...

  15. Fiber Optics For Aircraft Engine/Inlet Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumbick, Robert J.

    1982-01-01

    A review of NASA programs which focus on the use of fiber optics for aircraft engine/inlet control is presented. Fiber optics for aircraft control is attractive because of its inherent immunity to EMI and RFI noise. Optical signals can be safely transmitted through areas that contain flammable or explosive materials. The use of optics also makes remote sensing feasible, eliminating the need for electrical wires to be connected between sensors and computers. Using low level optical signals to control actuators is also feasible when power is generated at the actuator. For engine/inlet control applications, fiber optic cables and cornectors will be subjected to nacelle air temperatures. These temperatures range between -55C to 260C. Each application of fiber optics for aircraft control has different requirements for both the optical cables and optical connectors. Sensors that measure position and speed using slotted plates can use lossy cables and bundle type connectors if data transfer is in the parallel mode. If position and speed signals are multiplexed cable and connector requirements change. Other sensors that depend on changes in transmission through materials require dependable characteristics of both the optical cable and optical connectors. A variety of sensor types are reviewed, including rotary position encoders, tachometers, temperature sensors, and blade tip clearance sensors for compressors and turbines. Research on a gallium arsenide photoswitch for optically-switched actuators that operate at 250C is also described.

  16. Fiber-Optic Ammonia Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Michael T.

    2003-01-01

    Reversible, colorimetric fiber-optic sensors are undergoing development for use in measuring concentrations of ammonia in air at levels relevant to human health [0 to 50 parts per million (ppm)]. A sensor of this type includes an optical fiber that has been modified by replacing a portion of its cladding with a polymer coat that contains a dye that reacts reversibly with ammonia and changes color when it does so. The change in color is measured as a change in the amount of light transmitted from one end of the fiber to the other. Responses are reversible and proportional to the concentration of ammonia over the range from 9 to 175 ppm and in some cases the range of reversibility extends up to 270 ppm. The characteristic time for the response of a sensor to rise from 10 to 90 percent of full scale is about 25 seconds. These sensors are fully operational in pure carbon dioxide and are not adversely affected by humidity. This work was done by Michael T. Carter

  17. Fiber Optics Physics and Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Mitschke, Fedor

    2010-01-01

    Telephone, telefax, email and internet -- the key ingredient of the inner workings is the conduit: the line which is designed to carry massive amounts of data at breakneck speed. In their data-carrying capacity optical fiber lines beat other technologies (copper cable, microwave beacons, satellite links) hands down, at least in the long haul. This book tells you all you want to know about optical fibers: Their structure, their light-guiding mechanism, their material and manufacture, their use. Several effects tend to degrade the signal as it travels down the fiber: they are spelled out in detail. Nonlinear processes are given due consideration for a twofold reason: On the one hand they are fundamentally different from the more familiar processes in electrical cable. On the other hand, they form the basis of particularly interesting and innovative applications, provided they are understood well enough. A case in point is the use of so-called solitons, i.e. special pulses of light which have the wonderful prope...

  18. Miners-Iron test of optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experiment is described in which a number of optical fibers will be exposed to nuclear radiation in the Miners-Iron event at the Nevada Test Site. Two polymer clad silicon fibers and a borosilicate clad fiber will experience a dose of several Mrads, while a second set will experience about 0.1 Mrad. Attenuation and luninescence experiments are planned. Optic fibers will also be used for cables

  19. The Effects of High Temperature and Nuclear Radiation on the Optical Transmission of Silica Optical Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawn, David P.

    Distributed measurements made with fiber optic instrumentation have the potential to revolutionize data collection for facility monitoring and process control in industrial environments. Dozens of sensors etched into a single optical fiber can be used to instrument equipment and structures so that dozens of spatially distributed temperature measurements, for example, can be made quickly using one optical fiber. Optically based sensors are commercially available to measure temperature, strain, and other physical quantities that can be related to strain, such as pressure and acceleration. Other commercially available technology eliminates the need to etch discrete sensors into an optical fiber and allows temperature measurements to be made along the length of an ordinary silica fiber. Distributed sensing with optical instrumentation is commonly used in the petroleum industry to measure the temperature and pressure profiles in down hole applications. The U.S. Department of Energy is interested in extending the distributed sensing capabilities of optical instrumentation to high temperature reactor radiation environments. For this technology extension to be possible, the survivability of silica optical fibers needed to be determined in this environment. In this work the optical attenuation added to silica optical fiber exposed simultaneously to reactor radiation and temperatures to 1000°C was experimentally determined. Optical transmission measurements were made in-situ from 400nm-2300nm. For easy visualization, all of the results generated in this work were processed into movies that are available publicly [1]. In this investigation, silica optical fibers were shown to survive optically and mechanically in a reactor radiation environment to 1000°C. For the combined high temperature reactor irradiation experiments completed in this investigation, the maximum attenuation increase in the low-OH optical fibers was around 0.5db/m at 1550nm and 0.6dB/m at 1300nm. The radiation induced optical attenuation primarily affected wavelengths less than 1000nm and this attenuation cannot be avoided in silica. Thermal effects dominated the increase in attenuation at wavelengths above 1000nm and it may be possible to mitigate these effects. Fortuitously, commercial optical instrumentation typically utilizes wavelengths centered around 1300nm and 1550nm where the radiation induced attenuation was minimal. The maximum continuous use temperature of silica optical fiber may be limited to 900°C with intermittent use to 1000°C. The silica optical fibers tested in this project are inexpensive and commercially available. Optical sensors were not tested in this project and development and testing of radiation hard optical sensors is recommended as future work.

  20. Comparison of optical fiber Bragg grating hydrogen sensors with Pd-based thin films and sol-gel WO3 coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Minghong; Li, Zhi; Dai, Jixiang; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Yi; Zhuang, Zhi

    2013-09-01

    Pd-based thin films and sol-gel WO3 coatings are two kinds of hydrogen sensitive elements used in hydrogen concentration sensing and detection. Optical fiber hydrogen sensors are very promising solutions for flammable hydrogen detection, when the sensitive materials are integrated with optical fiber sensors. This paper reviews the sensing performance of optical fiber hydrogen sensors with these two sensitive materials, which are developed at the National Engineering Laboratory for Optical Fiber Sensing Technologies in Wuhan University of Technology.

  1. Comparison of optical fiber Bragg grating hydrogen sensors with Pd-based thin films and sol–gel WO3 coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pd-based thin films and sol–gel WO3 coatings are two kinds of hydrogen sensitive elements used in hydrogen concentration sensing and detection. Optical fiber hydrogen sensors are very promising solutions for flammable hydrogen detection, when the sensitive materials are integrated with optical fiber sensors. This paper reviews the sensing performance of optical fiber hydrogen sensors with these two sensitive materials, which are developed at the National Engineering Laboratory for Optical Fiber Sensing Technologies in Wuhan University of Technology. (paper)

  2. A Highly Sensitive Fiber Optic Sensor Based on Two-Core Fiber for Refractive Index Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    Daniel Alberto May-Arrioja; Miguel Torres-Cisneros; José Javier Sánchez-Mondragón; José Rafael Guzmán-Sepúlveda; Rafael Guzmán-Cabrera

    2013-01-01

    A simple and compact fiber optic sensor based on a two-core fiber is demonstrated for high-performance measurements of refractive indices (RI) of liquids. In order to demonstrate the suitability of the proposed sensor to perform high-sensitivity sensing in a variety of applications, the sensor has been used to measure the RI of binary liquid mixtures. Such measurements can accurately determine the salinity of salt water solutions, and detect the water content of adulterated alcoholic beverage...

  3. Fabrication of a Porous Fiber Cladding Material Using Microsphere Templating for Improved Response Time with Fiber Optic Sensor Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Paul E. Henning; M. Veronica Rigo; Peter Geissinger

    2012-01-01

    A highly porous optical-fiber cladding was developed for evanescent-wave fiber sensors, which contains sensor molecules, maintains guiding conditions in the optical fiber, and is suitable for sensing in aqueous environments. To make the cladding material (a poly(ethylene) glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) polymer) highly porous, a microsphere templating strategy was employed. The resulting pore network increases transport of the target analyte to the sensor molecules located in the cladding, which im...

  4. Flight testing of a fiber optic temperature sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, M. J.; Tregay, G. W.; Calabrese, P. R.

    1993-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor (FOTS) system consisting of an optical probe, a flexible fiber optic cable, and an electro-optic signal processor was fabricated to measure the gas temperature in a turbine engine. The optical probe contained an emissive source embedded in a sapphire lightguide coupled to a fiber-optic jumper cable and was retrofitted into an existing thermocouple probe housing. The flexible fiber optic cable was constructed with 200 micron core, polyimide-coated fiber and was ruggedized for an aircraft environment. The electro-optic signal processing unit was used to ratio the intensities of two wavelength intervals and provided an analog output value of the indicated temperature. Subsequently, this optical sensor system was installed on a NASA Dryden F-15 Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC) Aircraft Engine and several flight tests were conducted. Over the course of flight testing, the FOTS system's response was proportional to the average of the existing thermocouples sensing the changes in turbine engine thermal conditions.

  5. Fiber optic probes for laser light scattering: Ground based evaluation for micgrogravity flight experimentation. Integrated coherent imaging fiber optic systems for laser light scattering and other applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadwal, Harbans Singh

    1994-01-01

    The research work presented in this report has established a new class of backscatter fiber optics probes for remote dynamic light scattering capability over a range of scattering angles from 94 degrees to 175 degrees. The fiber optic probes provide remote access to scattering systems, and can be utilized in either a noninvasive or invasive configuration. The fiber optics create an interference free data channel to inaccessible and harsh environments. Results from several studies of concentrated suspension, microemulsions, and protein systems are presented. The second part of the report describes the development of a new technology of wavefront processing within the optical fiber, that is, integrated fiber optics. Results have been very encouraging and the technology promises to have significant impact on the development of fiber optic sensors in a variety of fields ranging from environmental monitoring to optical recording, from biomedical sensing to photolithography.

  6. Homodyne fiber optic backscatter dynamic light scattering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhadwal, Harbans S

    2007-12-01

    Optical homodyne detection in the backscatter direction is achieved through a pair of collinearly located fibers in a cylindrical probe body. One fiber illuminates the scattering solution while the other fiber provides optical mixing of the backscattered optical field with a local oscillator derived from the Fresnel reflections at the glass interfaces of the sample container. Homodyne detection is possible over a broad range of particle size and sample concentration with a single probe design. PMID:18059943

  7. Nanoparticle-doped radioluminescent silica optical fibers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mrázek, Jan; Nikl, Martin; Kašík, Ivan; Podrazký, Ondřej; Aubrecht, Ivo; Beitlerová, Alena

    Vol. 9228. Bellingham : SPIE, 2014 - (Dorosz, J.; Romaniuk, R.), s. 922805 ISBN 978-1-62841-275-8. ISSN 0277-786X. [15th Symposia on Optical Fibers and their Applications. Bialystok (PL), 29.01.2014-01.02.2014] Institutional support: RVO:67985882 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : Fiber optic sensors * Nanoparticles * Optical fibers Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering; CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry (FZU-D)

  8. Thermal Strain Analysis of Optic Fiber Sensors

    OpenAIRE

    Chih-Ying Huang; Shiuh-Chuan Her

    2013-01-01

    An optical fiber sensor surface bonded onto a host structure and subjected to a temperature change is analytically studied in this work. The analysis is developed in order to assess the thermal behavior of an optical fiber sensor designed for measuring the strain in the host structure. For a surface bonded optical fiber sensor, the measuring sensitivity is strongly dependent on the bonding characteristics which include the protective coating, adhesive layer and the bonding length. Thermal str...

  9. High Temperature Endurable Fiber Optic Accelerometer

    OpenAIRE

    Yeon-Gwan Lee; Jin-Hyuk Kim; Chun-Gon Kim

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a low frequency fiber optic accelerometer for application in high temperature environments of civil engineering structures. The reflection-based extrinsic fiber optic accelerometer developed in this study consists of a transmissive grating panel, reflective mirror, and two optical fiber collimators as the transceiver whose function can be maintained up to 130°C. The dynamic characteristics of the sensor probe were investigated and the correlation between the natural freque...

  10. Investigations on birefringence effects in polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hu, Xiaolian; Saez-Rodriguez, D.; Bang, Ole; Webb, D. J.; Caucheteur, C.

    2014-01-01

    Step-index polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (POFBGs) and microstructured polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (mPOFBGs) present several attractive features, especially for sensing purposes. In comparison to FBGs written in silica fibers, they are more sensitive to temperature and pressure...... because of the larger thermo-optic coefficient and smaller Young's modulus of polymer materials. (M)POFBGs are most often photowritten in poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) materials using a continuous-wave 325 nm HeCd laser. For the first time to the best of our knowledge, we study photoinduced...... birefringence effects in (m)POFBGs. To achieve this, highly reflective gratings were inscribed with the phase mask technique. They were then monitored in transmission with polarized light. For this, (m)POF sections a few cm in length containing the gratings were glued to angled silica fibers. Polarization...

  11. Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Stefani, Alessio; Bang, Ole; Andresen, Søren; Nielsen, Finn Kryger; Jacobsen, Torben; Rose, Bjarke; Herholdt-Rasmussen, Nicolai

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are reported. We have written 3mm FBGs for 1550nm operation, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer.

  12. Optical fiber lasers and amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snitzer, E.; Po, H.; Tumminelli, R.P.; Hakimi, F.

    1989-03-21

    An optical fiber is described, which comprises: a substantially single-mode core having an index of refraction n/sub 1/ comprised of laser material disposed within a multi-mode cladding having an index of refraction n/sub 2/; and a further cladding having an index of refraction n/sub 3/ surrounding the multi-mode cladding with substantially no space between the further cladding and the multi-mode cladding; wherein the single-mode core is disposed at an offset from the geometric center of the multi-mode cladding.

  13. A Polymer Optical Fiber Fuel Level Sensor: Application to Paramotoring and Powered Paragliding

    OpenAIRE

    David Sánchez Montero; Carmen Vázquez; Pedro Contreras Lallana

    2012-01-01

    A low-cost intensity-based polymer optical fiber (POF) sensor for fuel level measurements in paramotoring and powered paragliding is presented, exploiting the advantages of the optical fiber sensing technology. Experimental results demonstrate that the best option can be performed by stripping the fiber at the desired discrete points to measure the fuel level as well as with a gauge-shape fiber bending. The prototype has a good linearity, better than 4% full scale (F.S.), and sensitivity arou...

  14. The development of advanced optical fibers for long-​wave infrared transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Pierre Lucas; Catherine Boussard-Pledel; Allison Wilhelm; Sylvain Danto; Xiang-Hua Zhang; Patrick Houizot; Sebastien Maurugeon; Clément Conseil; Bruno Bureau

    2013-01-01

    Long-wave infrared fibers are used in an increasing number of applications ranging from thermal imaging to bio-sensing. However, the design of optical fiber with low-loss in the far-infrared requires a combination of properties including good rheological characteristics for fiber drawing and low phonon energy for wide optical transparency, which are often mutually exclusive and can only be achieved through fine materials engineering. This paper presents strategies for obtaining low loss fiber...

  15. A Large Area Fiber Optic Gyroscope on multiplexed fiber network

    OpenAIRE

    Clivati, Cecilia; Calonico, Davide; Giovanni A. Costanzo; Mura, Alberto; Pizzocaro, Marco; Levi, Filippo

    2012-01-01

    We describe a fiber optical gyroscope based on the Sagnac effect realized on a multiplexed telecom fiber network. Our loop encloses an area of 20 km^2 and coexists with Internet data traffic. This Sagnac interferometer achieves a sensitivity of about 1e-8 (rad/s)/sqrt(Hz), thus approaching ring laser gyroscopes without using narrow-linewidth laser nor sophisticated optics. The proposed gyroscope is sensitive enough for seismic applications, opening new possibilities for this kind of optical f...

  16. A Large Area Fiber Optic Gyroscope on multiplexed fiber network

    OpenAIRE

    Costanzo, Giovanni Antonio; Pizzocaro, Marco; Clivati, Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    We describe a fiber optical gyroscope based on the Sagnac effect realized on a multiplexed telecom fiber network. Our loop encloses an area of 20 km2 and coexists with Internet data traffic. This Sagnac interferometer achieves a sensitivity of about (10-8 rad/s)/sqrt(Hz), thus approaching ring laser gyroscopes without using narrow linewidth laser nor sophisticated optics. The proposed gyroscope is sensitive enough for seismic applications, opening new possibilities for this kind of optical fi...

  17. Optical Fiber Embedded in Epoxy Glass Unidirectional Fiber Composite System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina Severin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to embed silica optical fibers in composites (epoxy vinyl ester matrix reinforced with E-glass unidirectional fibers in mass fraction of 60% in order to further monitor the robustness of civil engineering structures (such as bridges. A simple system was implemented using two different silica optical fibers (F1double coating of 172 m diameter and F2single coating of 101.8 m diameter respectively. The optical fibers were dynamically tensile tested and Weibull plots were traced. Interfacial adhesion stress was determined using pull-out test and stress values were correlated to fracture mechanisms based on SEM observations. In the case of the optical fiber (OF (F1/resin system and OF (F1/composite system, poor adhesion was reported that may be correlated to interface fracture at silica core level. Relevant applicable results were determined for OF (F2/composite system.

  18. Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yuan, Scott Wu; Stefani, Alessio; Bang, Ole; Andresen, Søren; Nielsen, Finn Kryger; Jacobsen, Torben; Rose, Bjarke; Herholdt-Rasmussen, Nicolai

    2010-01-01

    Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are reported. We have written 3mm FBGs for 1550nm operation, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer.......Fiber-optical accelerometers based on polymer optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are reported. We have written 3mm FBGs for 1550nm operation, characterized their temperature and strain response, and tested their performance in a prototype accelerometer....

  19. Material and technology trends in fiber optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Kay; Unger, Sonja; Aichele, Claudia; Lindner, Florian; Grimm, Stephan; Litzkendorf, Doris; Kobelke, Jens; Bierlich, Jörg; Wondraczek, Katrin; Bartelt, Hartmut

    2014-08-01

    The increasing fields of applications for modern optical fibers present great challenges to the material properties and the processing technology of fiber optics. This paper gives an overview of the capabilities and limitations of established vapor deposition fiber preform technologies, and discusses new techniques for improved and extended doping properties in fiber preparation. In addition, alternative fabrication technologies are discussed, such as a powder-based process (REPUSIL) and an optimized glass melting method to overcome the limits of conventional vapor deposition methods concerning the volume fabrication of rare earth (RE)-doped quartz and high silica glasses. The new preform technologies are complementary with respect to enhanced RE solubility, the adjustment of nonlinear fiber properties, and the possibility of hybrid fiber fabrication. The drawing technology is described based on the requirements of specialty fibers such as adjusted preform and fiber diameters, varying coating properties, and the microstructuring of fiber configurations as low as in the nanometer range.

  20. Optical Fiber Sensor Instrumentation for Slagging Coal Gasifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anbo Wang; Kristie Cooper

    2008-07-19

    Coal gasifier is one of the most promising solutions for clean fossil energy. Refractory thickness monitoring and online real-time temperature measurement is needed for improved reliability and advanced process control for current and future generation power plants. The objective of this program is to design and implement an optical fiber based sensing system that could potentially be used to monitor refractory wall thickness and temperature inside a coal gasifier. For the thickness monitoring, the system should be able to operate at temperatures up to 1000 C. For this temperature range, silica fiber can still work so it is chosen for the sensor design. The measurement is based on a photon counting optical time domain reflectometer. A narrow light pulse is launched into a silica fiber which could be embedded into the gasifier refractory wall, and is partially reflected by the far end of the fiber. The time of flight of the light pulse in the fiber then gives an indication of the position of the fiber end, which is a function of the wall thickness when the fiber is embedded. Results obtained show a measurement accuracy of {+-}2cm in environment of 1000 C with a saw cut fiber end. When the fiber end is corroded by sodium carbide at 900 C, the accuracy is {+-}3cm. For the temperature measurement, a single crystal sapphire fiber sensor is designed. The sapphire fiber guides the broadband light from a light emitting diode to a sapphire wafer functioning as a Fabry-Perot interferometer and the wafer optical thickness is a function of temperature. The returned optical signal is then demodulated by multimode fiber based whitelight interferometry. The system was tested up to 1500 C with a measurement accuracy of {+-}10 C for the entire measurement range.

  1. Nanoparticle-doped radioluminescent silica optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, J.; Nikl, M.; Kasik, I.; Podrazky, O.; Aubrecht, J.; Beitlerova, A.

    2014-05-01

    This contribution deals with the preparation and characterization of the silica optical fibers doped by nanocrystalline zinc silicate. The sol-gel approach was employed to prepare colloidal solution of zinc silicate precursors. Prepared sol was thermally treated to form nanocrystalline zinc silicate disperzed inside amorphous silica matrix or soaked inside the porous silica frit deposed inside the silica substrate tube which was collapsed into preform and drawn into optical fiber. Single mode optical fiber with the core diameter 15 ?m and outer diamer 125 ?m was prepared. Optical and waveguiding properties of the fiber were analyzed. Concentration of the zinc silicate in the fiber was 0.93 at. %. Radioluminescence properties of nanocrystalline zinc silicate powder and of the prepared optical fiber were investigated. The nanoparticle doped samples appear a emission maximum at 390 nm.

  2. Optical properties of curing epoxies and applications to the fiber optic composite cure sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afromowitz, Martin A.; Lam, Kai-Yuen

    1990-02-01

    An account is given of a fiber-optic technique for the in situ determination of a thermosetting polymer's cure-endpoint which requires no calibration. The technique involves (1) preparation and full cure of a short sensing-fiber element from the thermosetting resin in question; (2) the embedding of the fiber element within the panel during layup; (3) the joining of multimode silica fibers to each end of the sensing fiber in such a way that they extend beyond the panel that is to be cured; and (4) transmission of LED near-IR light through the fiber arrangement, in order to measure the intensity of the transmitted light with a photodetector. Because the fully cured resin has a greater refractive index than the uncured or partially cured resin, it acts as an efficient waveguide whose numerical aperture varies over the course of cure, decaying to zero transmission at conclusion of the curing process.

  3. Online fiber-optic spectrophotometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Hare, D.R.; O' Rourke, P.E.; Prather, W.S.

    1989-01-01

    The Savannah River Plant operates two radio-chemical separations areas to recover uranium and plutonium from nuclear reactor fuel and target assemblies. Chemical processes in these areas are controlled based on laboratory analysis of samples extracted from the process. While analytical results from the laboratory are reliable, the process of pulling samples, transporting them to the laboratory, analyzing them, and then reporting results is time consuming and potentially exposes many workers to highly radioactive solutions. To improve the timeliness of chemical information and reduce personnel radiation exposure, the Savannah River Laboratory has developed an online fiber optic spectrophotometer which combines three new technologies, fiber optics, diode array spectrophotometers, and multivariate data analysis. The analyzer monitors the uranium and nitrate concentration of seven aqueous process streams in a uranium purification process. The analyzer remotely controls the sampling of each process stream and monitors the relative flow rate through each sampler. Spectrophotometric data from the analyzer is processed by multivariate data analysis to give both uranium and nitrate concentrations as well as an indication of the quality of the data.

  4. Welding-fume-induced transmission loss in tapered optical fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ji-Haeng

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a method for sensing welding fumes in real time. This method is based on the results of nanoparticle-induced optical-fiber loss experiments that show that the losses are determined by the nanoparticle density and the taper waist. The tapered fiber is obtained by applying heat radiated from hot quartz, and monitoring is done in real time. First, the durability of the tapered fiber during the welding process is proven. Then, the loss is categorized by using the sizes of welding fume particles. The sensitivity to welding fumes increases with increasing size of the particles; consequently, the dimension of the taper waist decreases.

  5. Grazing incidence angle based sensing approach integrated with fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared (FO-FTIR) spectroscopy for remote and label-free detection of medical device contaminations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contamination of medical devices has become a critical and prevalent public health safety concern since medical devices are being increasingly used in clinical practices for diagnostics, therapeutics and medical implants. The development of effective sensing methods for real-time detection of pathogenic contamination is needed to prevent and reduce the spread of infections to patients and the healthcare community. In this study, a hollow-core fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy methodology employing a grazing incidence angle based sensing approach (FO-FTIR-GIA) was developed for detection of various biochemical contaminants on medical device surfaces. We demonstrated the sensitivity of FO-FTIR-GIA sensing approach for non-contact and label-free detection of contaminants such as lipopolysaccharide from various surface materials relevant to medical device. The proposed sensing system can detect at a minimum loading concentration of approximately 0.7 μg/cm2. The FO-FTIR-GIA has the potential for the detection of unwanted pathogen in real time

  6. Grazing incidence angle based sensing approach integrated with fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared (FO-FTIR) spectroscopy for remote and label-free detection of medical device contaminations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hassan, Moinuddin, E-mail: moinuddin.hassan@fda.hhs.gov; Ilev, Ilko [Optical Therapeutics and Medical Nanophotonics Laboratory, Division of Biomedical Physics, Office of Science and Engineering Laboratories, Center for Devices and Radiological Health, U.S. Food and Drug Administration, Silver Spring, Maryland 20993 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Contamination of medical devices has become a critical and prevalent public health safety concern since medical devices are being increasingly used in clinical practices for diagnostics, therapeutics and medical implants. The development of effective sensing methods for real-time detection of pathogenic contamination is needed to prevent and reduce the spread of infections to patients and the healthcare community. In this study, a hollow-core fiber-optic Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy methodology employing a grazing incidence angle based sensing approach (FO-FTIR-GIA) was developed for detection of various biochemical contaminants on medical device surfaces. We demonstrated the sensitivity of FO-FTIR-GIA sensing approach for non-contact and label-free detection of contaminants such as lipopolysaccharide from various surface materials relevant to medical device. The proposed sensing system can detect at a minimum loading concentration of approximately 0.7 μg/cm{sup 2}. The FO-FTIR-GIA has the potential for the detection of unwanted pathogen in real time.

  7. Application of Fiber Optics and Compound Collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fantone, S. D.

    1984-01-01

    The utilization of fiber optics and compound flux collectors as optical components in stellar photometers is discussed. Basic principles are outlined for such components and systems issues are addressed.

  8. Brillouin Corrosion Expansion Sensors for Steel Reinforced Concrete Structures Using a Fiber Optic Coil Winding Method

    OpenAIRE

    Xingjun Lv; Jinping Ou; Jie Lu; Guofu Qiao; Peng Gong; Xuefeng Zhao

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, a novel kind of method to monitor corrosion expansion of steel rebars in steel reinforced concrete structures named fiber optic coil winding method is proposed, discussed and tested. It is based on the fiber optical Brillouin sensing technique. Firstly, a strain calibration experiment is designed and conducted to obtain the strain coefficient of single mode fiber optics. Results have shown that there is a good linear relationship between Brillouin frequency and applied strain. ...

  9. Undervannsovervåking ved hjelp av fiberoptisk hydrofon : Underwater surveillance using a fiber optic hydrophone

    OpenAIRE

    Grønhaug, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Since the 1970s fiber optics has been introduced as a replacement in many industrial areas, especially in the field of communications. Another field which has been and is greatly researched is the use of fiber optic cables in sensing of temperature, strain and acoustic pressure. The common sensor for the detection of acoustic pressure under water is the piezoelectric hydrophone, however the use of an optical fiber as the sensor can provide benefits over the piezoelectric type. No electric cur...

  10. New Methods of Enhancing the Thermal Durability of Silica Optical Fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Karol Wysokiński; Tomasz Stańczyk; Katarzyna Gibała; Tadeusz Tenderenda; Anna Ziołowicz; Mateusz Słowikowski; Małgorzata Broczkowska; Tomasz Nasiłowski

    2014-01-01

    Microstructured optical fibers can be precisely tailored for many different applications, out of which sensing has been found to be particularly interesting. However, placing silica optical fiber sensors in harsh environments results in their quick destruction as a result of the hydrolysis process. In this paper, the degradation mechanism of bare and metal-coated optical fibers at high temperatures under longitudinal strain has been determined by detailed analysis of the thermal behavior of s...

  11. Dynamic Characterization of Polymer Optical Fibers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stefani, Alessio; Andresen, Søren; Yuan, Wu; Bang, Ole

    2012-01-01

    With the increasing interest in fiber sensors based on polymer optical fibers, it becomes fundamental to determine the real applicability and reliability of this type of sensor. The viscoelastic nature of polymers gives rise to questions about the mechanical behavior of the fibers. In particular...

  12. An optical fiber optofluidic particle aspirator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugan, Ganapathy S.; Belal, Mohammad; Grivas, Christos; Ding, Ming; Wilkinson, James S.; Brambilla, Gilberto

    2014-09-01

    A fiberized optofluidic particle trapping device based on a micro-slot fabricated in a standard single-mode optical fiber by femtosecond laser micromachining is demonstrated. While fluidic convective motions move a large number of microparticles into the slot, the optical mode propagating in the nearby optical fiber core is exploited to trap and propel the particles inside the slot, thereby facilitating their collection at one of the slot extremities. The combined effect of fluidic and optical trapping allows for the collection of particles from as far as 60 ?m away from the optical trap. Application to particle and live cell trapping and propulsion is demonstrated.

  13. Laboratory Equipment Type Fiber Optic Refractometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. F. Carome

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Using fiber optics and micro optics technologies we designed aninnovative fiber optic index of refraction transducer that has uniqueproperties. On the base of this transducer a laboratory equipment typefiber optic refractometer was developed for liquid index of refractionmeasurements. Such refractometer may be used for medical,pharmaceutical, industrial fluid, petrochemical, plastic, food, andbeverage industry applications. For example, it may be used formeasuring the concentrations of aqueous solutions: as the concentrationor density of a solute increase, the refractive index increasesproportionately. The paper describes development work related to designof laboratory type fiber optic refractometer and describes experimentsto evaluation of its basic properties.

  14. Fiber-based distance sensing interferometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurner, Klaus; Quacquarelli, Francesca Paola; Braun, Pierre-Franois; Dal Savio, Claudio; Karrai, Khaled

    2015-04-01

    We present an interferometric displacement sensor based on a folded low-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity. The fiber-optic sensor uses a quadrature detection scheme based on the wavelength modulation of a DFB laser. This enables measuring position changes over a range of 1 m for velocities up to 2 m/s. The sensor is well suited to work in extreme environments such as ultrahigh vacuum, cryogenic temperatures, or high magnetic fields and supports multichannel applications. The interferometer achieves a repeatability of 0.44??nm(3?) at a working distance of 20 mm, a resolution of 1 pm, and an accuracy of 1 nm. PMID:25967221

  15. Interfacial characterization of soil-embedded optical fiber for ground deformation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently fiber-optic sensing technologies have been applied for performance monitoring of geotechnical structures such as slopes, foundations, and retaining walls. However, the validity of measured data from soil-embedded optical fibers is strongly influenced by the properties of the interface between the sensing fiber and the soil mass. This paper presents a study of the interfacial properties of an optical fiber embedded in soil with an emphasis on the effect of overburden pressure. Laboratory pullout tests were conducted to investigate the load-deformation characteristics of a 0.9 mm tight-buffered optical fiber embedded in soil. Based on a tri-linear interfacial shear stress-displacement relationship, an analytical model was derived to describe the progressive pullout behavior of an optical fiber from soil matrix. A comparison between the experimental and predicted results verified the effectiveness of the proposed pullout model. The test results are further interpreted and discussed. It is found that the interfacial bond between an optical fiber and soil is prominently enhanced under high overburden pressures. The apparent coefficients of friction of the optical fiber/soil interface decrease as the overburden pressure increases, due to the restrained soil dilation around the optical fiber. Furthermore, to facilitate the analysis of strain measurement, three working states of a soil-embedded sensing fiber were defined in terms of two characteristic displacements. (paper)

  16. Recent advances toward a fiber optic sensor for nerve agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshay, Manal; Cordero, Steven R.; Mukamal, Harold; Ruiz, David; Lieberman, Robert A.

    2008-04-01

    We report advances made on the development of a fiber optic nerve agent sensor having its entire length as the sensing element. Upon exposure to sarin gas or its simulant, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, the cladding changes color resulting in an alteration of the light intensity throughput. The optical fiber is multimode and consists of a fused-silica core and a nerve agent sensitive cladding. The absorption characteristics of the cladding affect the fiber's spectral attenuation and limit the length of light guiding fiber that can be deployed continuously. The absorption of the cladding is also dependent on the sensor formulation, which in turn influences the sensitivity of the fiber. In this paper, data related to the trade-off of sensitivity, spectral attenuation, and length of fiber challenged will be reported. The fiber is mass produced using a conventional fiber optic draw tower. This technology could be used to protect human resources and buildings from dangerous chemical attacks, particularly when large areas or perimeters must be covered. It may also be used passively to determine how well such areas have been decontaminated.

  17. Laboratory Equipment Type Fiber Optic Refractometer

    OpenAIRE

    Carome, E. F.; M. Benca; L. Ovsenik; J. Turan

    2002-01-01

    Using fiber optics and micro optics technologies we designed aninnovative fiber optic index of refraction transducer that has uniqueproperties. On the base of this transducer a laboratory equipment typefiber optic refractometer was developed for liquid index of refractionmeasurements. Such refractometer may be used for medical,pharmaceutical, industrial fluid, petrochemical, plastic, food, andbeverage industry applications. For example, it may be used formeasuring the concentrations of aqueou...

  18. Optical fiber sensors for harsh environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Juncheng; Wang, Anbo

    2007-02-06

    A diaphragm optic sensor comprises a ferrule including a bore having an optical fiber disposed therein and a diaphragm attached to the ferrule, the diaphragm being spaced apart from the ferrule to form a Fabry-Perot cavity. The cavity is formed by creating a pit in the ferrule or in the diaphragm. The components of the sensor are preferably welded together, preferably by laser welding. In some embodiments, the entire ferrule is bonded to the fiber along the entire length of the fiber within the ferrule; in other embodiments, only a portion of the ferrule is welded to the fiber. A partial vacuum is preferably formed in the pit. A small piece of optical fiber with a coefficient of thermal expansion chosen to compensate for mismatches between the main fiber and ferrule may be spliced to the end of the fiber.

  19. Silver metaphosphate glass wires inside silica fibers-a new approach for hybrid optical fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Chhavi; Rodrigues, Bruno P; Wieduwilt, Torsten; Kobelke, Jens; Wondraczek, Lothar; Schmidt, Markus A

    2016-02-22

    Phosphate glasses represent promising candidates for next-generation photonic devices due to their unique characteristics, such as vastly tunable optical properties, and high rare earth solubility. Here we show that silver metaphosphate wires with bulk optical properties and diameters as small as 2 µm can be integrated into silica fibers using pressure-assisted melt filling. By analyzing two types of hybrid metaphosphate-silica fibers, we show that the filled metaphosphate glass has only negligible higher attenuation and a refractive index that is identical to the bulk material. The presented results pave the way towards new fiber-type optical devices relying on metaphosphate glasses, which are promising materials for applications in nonlinear optics, sensing and spectral filtering. PMID:26906989

  20. Development of on-fiber optical sensors utilizing chromogenic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Jianming; El-Sherif, Mahmoud A.

    1999-01-01

    On-fiber optical sensors, designed with chromogenic materials used as the fiber modified cladding, were developed for sensing environmental conditions. The design was based on the previously developed on-fiber devices. It is known that the light propagation characteristics in optical fibers are strongly influenced by the refractive index of the cladding materials. Thus, the idea of the on- fiber devices is based on replacing the passive optical fiber cladding with active or sensitive materials. For example, temperature sensors can be developed by replacing the fiber clad material with thermochromic materials. In this paper, segmented polyurethane-diacetylene copolymer (SPU), was selected as the thermochromic material for temperature sensors applications. This material has unique chromogenic properties as well as the required mechanical behaviors. During UV exposure and heat treatment, the color of the SPU copolymer varies with its refractive index. The boundary condition between core and cladding changes due to the change of the refractive index of the modified cladding material. The method used for the sensor development presented involves three steps: (a) removing the fiber jacket and cladding from a small region, (b) coating the chromogenic materials onto the modified region, and (c) integrating the optical fiber sensor components. The experimental set-up was established to detect the changes of the output signal based on the temperature variations. For the sensor evaluation, real-time measurements were performed under different heating-cooling cycles. Abrupt irreversible changes of the sensor output power were detected during the first heating-cooling cycle. At the same time, color changes of the SPU copolymer were observed in the modified region of the optical fiber. For the next heating-cooling cycles, however, the observed changes were almost completely reversible. This result demonstrates that a low-temperature sensor can be built by utilizing the chromogenic SPU copolymer as the modified cladding material.

  1. Optical display for radar sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szu, Harold; Hsu, Charles; Willey, Jefferson; Landa, Joseph; Hsieh, Minder; Larsen, Louis V.; Krzywicki, Alan T.; Tran, Binh Q.; Hoekstra, Philip; Dillard, John T.; Krapels, Keith A.; Wardlaw, Michael; Chu, Kai-Dee

    2015-05-01

    Boltzmann headstone S = kB Log W turns out to be the Rosette stone for Greek physics translation optical display of the microwave sensing hieroglyphics. The LHS is the molecular entropy S measuring the degree of uniformity scattering off the sensing cross sections. The RHS is the inverse relationship (equation) predicting the Planck radiation spectral distribution parameterized by the Kelvin temperature T. Use is made of the conservation energy law of the heat capacity of Reservoir (RV) change T Δ S = -ΔE equals to the internal energy change of black box (bb) subsystem. Moreover, an irreversible thermodynamics Δ S > 0 for collision mixing toward totally larger uniformity of heat death, asserted by Boltzmann, that derived the so-called Maxwell-Boltzmann canonical probability. Given the zero boundary condition black box, Planck solved a discrete standing wave eigenstates (equation). Together with the canonical partition function (equation) an average ensemble average of all possible internal energy yielded the celebrated Planck radiation spectral (equation) where the density of states (equation). In summary, given the multispectral sensing data (equation), we applied Lagrange Constraint Neural Network (LCNN) to solve the Blind Sources Separation (BSS) for a set of equivalent bb target temperatures. From the measurements of specific value, slopes and shapes we can fit a set of Kelvin temperatures T's for each bb targets. As a result, we could apply the analytical continuation for each entropy sources along the temperature-unique Planck spectral curves always toward the RGB color temperature display for any sensing probing frequency.

  2. Molecular self assembly on optical fiber-based fluorescence sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayyagari, Madhu S. R.; Gao, Harry H.; Bihari, Bipin; Chittibabu, Kethinni G.; Kumar, Jayant; Marx, Kenneth A.; Kaplan, David L.; Tripathy, Sukant K.

    1994-03-01

    We discuss the molecular self-assembly on optical fibers in which a novel method for protein attachment to the sensing tip of the fiber is used. Our objective is to assemble a conjugated polythiophene copolymer as an attachment vehicle. Subsequent attachment of the photodynamic phycobiliprotein serves as the fluorescence probe element. Following our earlier experiments from Langmuir-Blodgett deposition of these polymeric materials as thin films on glass substrates, we extended the technique to optical fibers. First, the bare fiber surface is silanized with a C18 silane compound. The copolymer (3-undecylthiophene-co-3- methanolthiophene, biotinylated at the methanol moiety) assembly on the fiber is carried out presumable through van der Waals interactions between the hydrophobic fiber surface and the undecyl alkyl chains on the polymer backbone. A conjugated Str-PE (streptavidin covalently attached to phycoerythrin) complex is then attached to the copolymer via the conventional biotin-streptavidin interaction. The conjugated polymer not only supports the protein but, in principle, may help to transduce the signal generated by phycoerythrin to the fiber. Our results from fluorescence intensity measurements proved the efficacy of this system. An improved methodology is also sought to more strongly attach the conjugated copolymer to the fiber surface, and a covalent scheme is developed to polymerize and biotinylate polythiophene in situ on the fiber surface.

  3. Design tools for microstructured optical fiber fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchak, Peter; Crowdy, Darren; Stokes, Yvonne; Chen, Michael

    2015-11-01

    The advent of microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) has opened up possibilities for controlling light not available with conventional optical fiber. A MOF, which differs from a conventional fiber by having an array of air channels running along its length, is fabricated by heating and drawing a glass preform at low Reynolds number. However, because surface tension causes the cross section to deform, the geometry of the channels in the fiber differs from the preform. As a result, fabricating a desired fiber configuration may necessitate extensive trial and error. In this talk, we describe our work on fiber drawing, which has led to methods for predicting the fiber geometries that result at given draw conditions. More importantly, our methods can be used to obtain the preform configuration required to produce a fiber with a desired arrangement of channels. We have implemented our methods in software tools to facilitate preform design.

  4. Fiber-optic based instrumentation for water and air monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper real-time in-situ water and air monitoring capabilities based on fiber-optic sensing technology are described. This relatively new technology combines advances in fiber optic and optoelectronics with chemical spectorscopic techniques to enable field environmental monitoring of sub ppm quantities of specific pollutants. The advantages of this technology over conventional sampling methods are outlined. As it is the more developed area the emphasis is on water quality monitoring rather than air. Examples of commercially available, soon-to be available and laboratory systems are presented. One such example is a system used to detect hydrocarbon spills and leaking of underground hydrocarbon storage tanks

  5. Multimode Waveguide Devices For Fiber Optic Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boiarski, A. A.; Sriram, S.

    1988-12-01

    Multimode polymer waveguide circuit fabrication techniques were used to produce several low-cost devices applicable to fiber optic sensor instruments. A 2x1 coupler with 3% reference tap was constructed with 250 and 500 #m diameter plastic fiber pigtails. This coupler had a 2 dB excess loss and could be used to replace the bulk-optic, 3 dB beamsplitter in a fiber optic instrumentation package. Further, a miniature fiber-tipped pressure sensor was produced using waveguide circuit-based photofabrication principles. This device could provide a disposable, catheter-tipped sensor for blood pressure monitoring.

  6. Fiber optic sensors for gas turbine control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Emily Yixie (Inventor); Petrucco, Louis Jacob (Inventor); Daum, Wolfgang (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting flashback occurrences in a premixed combustor system having at least one fuel nozzle includes at least one photodetector and at least one fiber optic element coupled between the at least one photodetector and a test region of the combustor system wherein a respective flame of the fuel nozzle is not present under normal operating conditions. A signal processor monitors a signal of the photodetector. The fiber optic element can include at least one optical fiber positioned within a protective tube. The fiber optic element can include two fiber optic elements coupled to the test region. The optical fiber and the protective tube can have lengths sufficient to situate the photodetector outside of an engine compartment. A plurality of fuel nozzles and a plurality of fiber optic elements can be used with the fiber optic elements being coupled to respective fuel nozzles and either to the photodetector or, wherein a plurality of photodetectors are used, to respective ones of the plurality of photodetectors. The signal processor can include a digital signal processor.

  7. Fiber-optic liquid level sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01

    A fiber-optic liquid level sensor measures the height of a column of liquid through the hydrostatic pressure it produces. The sensor employs a fiber-optic displacement sensor to detect the pressure-induced displacement of the center of a corrugated diaphragm.

  8. Radiation cured coatings for fiber optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A continuous protective coating is formed on a fiber optic by coating the fiber optic in a bath of a liquid radiation curable composition at a temperature up to 900C and exposing the coated conductor to ultraviolet or high energy ionizing radiation to cure the coating

  9. Fiber optic intracranial pressure sensor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorosz, Jan; Kruczkowski, Krzysztof

    1990-07-01

    Fiber optics, thanks to its many advantages finds new areas of ap plication in medicine. This paper describes a fiber optic pressure sensor system. A short sensor theory, a building of a sensor probe and a callibration during measure methode are given.

  10. A microstructured Polymer Optical Fiber Biosensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emiliyanov, Grigoriy Andreev; Jensen, Jesper Bo; Hoiby, Poul E.; Bang, Ole; Pedersen, Lars H.

    2006-01-01

    We demonstrate selective detection of fluorophore labeled antibodies from minute samples probed by a sensor layer of the complementary biomolecules immobilized inside the air holes of microstructured Polymer Optical Fibers.......We demonstrate selective detection of fluorophore labeled antibodies from minute samples probed by a sensor layer of the complementary biomolecules immobilized inside the air holes of microstructured Polymer Optical Fibers....

  11. Fiber Optics: A New World of Possibilities in Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, John

    1990-01-01

    The background and history of light and fiber optics are discussed. Applications for light passed either directly or indirectly through optical fibers are described. Suggestions for science activities that use fiber optics are provided. (KR)

  12. Method for producing angled optical fiber tips in the laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davenport, John J.; Hickey, Michelle; Phillips, Justin P.; Kyriacou, Panicos A.

    2016-02-01

    A simple laboratory method is presented for producing optical fibers with tips polished at various angles. Angled optical fiber tips are used in applications such as optical sensing and remote laser surgery, where they can be used to control the angle of light leaving the fiber or direct it to the side. This allows for greater control and allows areas to be reached that otherwise could not. Optical fibers were produced with tip angles of 45 deg using a Perspex mounting block with an aluminum base plate. The dispersion of light leaving the tip was tested using a blue (470 nm) LED. The angle imposed an angular shift on the light diffracting out of the tip of approximately 30 deg. Additionally, some light reflected from the tip surface to diffract at 90 deg through the side of the fiber. These observations are consistent with theory and those seen by other studies, validating the method. The method was simple to perform and does not require advanced manufacturing tools. The method is suitable for producing small quantities of angle-tipped optical fibers for research applications.

  13. Optical fiber biosensor based on multiple total internal reflections in heterodyne interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shinn-Fwu; Chiu, Jyh-Shyan; Wang, Ming-Jen

    2007-07-01

    In this paper, an optical fiber biosensor based on multiple total internal reflections in heterodyne interferometry is proposed. The sensor is made of a long U-shaped multimode optical fiber which cladding is removed from the sensing portion of the fiber. With the optical fiber biosensor the phase shift difference due to the multiple total internal reflections (MTIR) effect between the P and S-polarizations is measured by using heterodyne interferometry with the optical fiber biosensor. Substituting the phase shift difference into Fresnel's equations, the refractive index for the tested medium can be calculated. The resolution of the sensor can reach 1.5810 -6 refractive index unit (RIU). The optical fiber biosensor could be valuable for chemical, biological and biochemical sensing. It has some merits, such as, high resolution and stability, small size and real-time measurement.

  14. Power system applications of fiber optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkham, H.; Johnston, A.; Lutes, G.; Daud, T.; Hyland, S.

    1984-01-01

    Power system applications of optical systems, primarily using fiber optics, are reviewed. The first section reviews fibers as components of communication systems. The second section deals with fiber sensors for power systems, reviewing the many ways light sources and fibers can be combined to make measurements. Methods of measuring electric field gradient are discussed. Optical data processing is the subject of the third section, which begins by reviewing some widely different examples and concludes by outlining some potential applications in power systems: fault location in transformers, optical switching for light fired thyristors and fault detection based on the inherent symmetry of most power apparatus. The fourth and final section is concerned with using optical fibers to transmit power to electric equipment in a high voltage situation, potentially replacing expensive high voltage low power transformers. JPL has designed small photodiodes specifically for this purpose, and fabricated and tested several samples. This work is described.

  15. Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Lance; Parker, Allen; Chan, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this task is to investigate, develop, and demonstrate a low-cost swept lasing light source for NASA DFRC's fiber optics sensing system (FOSS) to perform structural health monitoring on current and future aerospace vehicles. This is the regular update of the Tunable Laser Development for In-flight Fiber Optic Based Structural Health Monitoring Systems website.

  16. Optical fiber sensor having an active core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egalon, Claudio Oliveira (Inventor); Rogowski, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    An optical fiber is provided. The fiber is comprised of an active fiber core which produces waves of light upon excitation. A factor ka is identified and increased until a desired improvement in power efficiency is obtained. The variable a is the radius of the active fiber core and k is defined as 2 pi/lambda wherein lambda is the wavelength of the light produced by the active fiber core. In one embodiment, the factor ka is increased until the power efficiency stabilizes. In addition to a bare fiber core embodiment, a two-stage fluorescent fiber is provided wherein an active cladding surrounds a portion of the active fiber core having an improved ka factor. The power efficiency of the embodiment is further improved by increasing a difference between the respective indices of refraction of the active cladding and the active fiber core.

  17. Fiber optic D dimer biosensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Grant, Sheila A. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic sensor for D dimer (a fibrinolytic product) can be used in vivo (e.g., in catheter-based procedures) for the diagnosis and treatment of stroke-related conditions in humans. Stroke is the third leading cause of death in the United States. It has been estimated that strokes and stroke-related disorders cost Americans between $15-30 billion annually. Relatively recently, new medical procedures have been developed for the treatment of stroke. These endovascular procedures rely upon the use of microcatheters. These procedures could be facilitated with this sensor for D dimer integrated with a microcatheter for the diagnosis of clot type, and as an indicator of the effectiveness, or end-point of thrombolytic therapy.

  18. Fiber Optic Temperature Sensors for Thermal Protection Systems Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Intelligent Fiber Optic Systems Corporation (IFOS) proposes an innovative fiber optic-based, multiplexable, highly ruggedized, integrated sensor system for...

  19. Characteristics of optical fibers to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, various reports have been issued on the radiation resistivity of optical fibers. Many of them treated the examination on the increase of transmission loss and the recovery characteristics after stopping irradiation when ?- or X-ray, neutron or electron beam was irradiated to optical fibers. Lately, however, the theoretical studies which were focused to the optical bleaching effect and the change of glass structure were also presented. In this report, the radiation characteristics of the optical fibers employed for communication and control cables and the various phenomena which have been the problems in image guides and light guides are described. The optical fibers used for the experiment were the graded index fibers of Ge- and P-doped core, and the SI type fibers of OH-doped silica glass core and highly pure silica glass core. The increase of transmission loss was measured on these fibers of 15 to 100 m length. For communication and control optical fibers, the loss was determined by the amount of dose, and did not depend on dose rate in GI type, but the loss depended on both dose and dose rate in SI type. For the optical fibers employed for image and light guides, in addition to the increase of loss by irradiation, it is generally said that the generation of fluorescence from optical fibers should also be carefully investigated. When X-ray was irradiated to the fibers of silica glass core, the generation of fluorescence increased with the increase of dose. This suggests that the problems such as the increase of background due to fluorescence may occur when light guides and the like are used in radiation fields. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  20. Long distance fiber-optic displacement sensor based on fiber collimator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A simple fiber-optic displacement sensor based on reflective intensity modulated technology is demonstrated using a fiber collimator. The sensing range is over 30 cm, which is over 100 times that of the conventional fiber-optic displacement sensor based on the normal single-mode fiber. The measured data are fitted into linear equation very well and the values of R-square are more than 0.995. The sensitivity of the device achieves 0.426 dB/cm over the range of 5-30 cm. By applying the relative technique, the errors resulted from the fluctuation of light source and influences of environment are effectively eliminated, and the stability for wide range measurement can be improved. The simplicity of the design, high dynamic range, stability and the ease of the fabrication make it suitable for applications in industries.

  1. Honeywell FLASH fiber optic motherboard evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stange, Kent

    1996-10-01

    The use of fiber optic data transmission media can make significant contributions in achieving increasing performance and reduced life cycle cost requirements placed on commercial and military transport aircraft. For complete end-to-end fiber optic transmission, photonics technologies and techniques need to be understood and applied internally to the aircraft line replaceable units as well as externally on the interconnecting aircraft cable plant. During a portion of the Honeywell contribution to Task 2A on the Fly- by-Light Advanced System Hardware program, evaluations were done on a fiber optic transmission media implementation internal to a Primary Flight Control Computer (PFCC). The PFCC internal fiber optic transmission media implementation included a fiber optic backplane, an optical card-edge connector, and an optical source/detector coupler/installation. The performance of these optical media components were evaluated over typical aircraft environmental stresses of temperature, vibration, and humidity. These optical media components represent key technologies to the computer end-to-end fiber optic transmission capability on commercial and military transport aircraft. The evaluations and technical readiness assessments of these technologies will enable better perspectives on productization of fly-by-light systems requiring their utilizations.

  2. Feasibility Study on Fiber-optic Radiation Sensor for Remote Gamma-ray Spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, we fabricated a fiber-optic radiation sensor using an optical fiber and various scintillators. To select an adequate inorganic scintillator for the sensing probe of fiber-optic radiation sensor, 5 types of scintillators were evaluated. The spectra of gamma-rays emitted from a Na-22 radiation source were measured by using the manufactured sensors. As a result, the BGO was suitable for the sensing probe of fiber-optic radiation sensor due to its high scintillation output and exact photoelectric peak for the gamma-ray energy. The basic principle of radiation detection is to detect the signals caused by interactions between radiations and materials. There are various types of radiation detectors depending on types of radiation to be detected and physical quantities to be measured. As one of the radiation detectors, a fiber-optic radiation sensor using a scintillator and an optical fiber has two advantages such as no space restraint and remote sensing. Moreover, in nuclear environments, this kind of sensor has immunities for electromagnetic field, temperature, and pressure. Thus, the fiber-optic radiation sensor can be used in various fields including nondestructive inspection, radioactive waste management, nuclear safety, radiodiagnosis and radiation therapy. As a fundamental study of the fiber-optic radiation sensor for remote gamma-ray spectroscopy, in this study, we fabricated a fiber-optic radiation sensor using an optical fiber and various scintillators. To select an adequate inorganic scintillator for the sensing probe of fiber-optic radiation sensor, 5 types of scintillators were evaluated. The spectra of gamma-rays emitted from a Na-22 radiation source were measured by using the manufactured sensors

  3. Nonlinear optical reshaping in optical fibers for ultrafast applications

    OpenAIRE

    Millot, Guy; Finot, Christophe; Fatome, Julien; Hammani, Kamal; Pitois, Stéphane; Kibler, Bertrand

    2011-01-01

    Several promising applications demonstrate all the benefits expected from the interaction of dispersive and nonlinear effects in single mode optical fibers: pulse shaping, ultra-short pulse source conception, rogue wave generation and high bit-rate optical communications.

  4. Curved Piezoelectric Actuators for Stretching Optical Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Assemblies containing curved piezoceramic fiber composite actuators have been invented as means of stretching optical fibers by amounts that depend on applied drive voltages. Piezoceramic fiber composite actuators are conventionally manufactured as sheets or ribbons that are flat and flexible, but can be made curved to obtain load-carrying ability and displacement greater than those obtainable from the flat versions. In the primary embodiment of this invention, piezoceramic fibers are oriented parallel to the direction of longitudinal displacement of the actuators so that application of drive voltage causes the actuator to flatten, producing maximum motion. Actuator motion can be transmitted to the optical fiber by use of hinges and clamp blocks. In the original application of this invention, the optical fiber contains a Bragg grating and the purpose of the controlled stretching of the fiber is to tune the grating as part of a small, lightweight, mode-hop-free, rapidly tunable laser for demodulating strain in Bragg-grating strain-measurement optical fibers attached to structures. The invention could also be used to apply controllable tensile force or displacement to an object other than an optical fiber.

  5. Nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor based on four-wave mixing in microstructured optical fiber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gu, Bobo; Yuan, Scott Wu; Frosz, Michael H.; Zhang, A. Ping; He, Sailing; Bang, Ole

    2012-01-01

    We demonstrate a nonlinear fiber-optic strain sensor, which uses the shifts of four-wave mixing Stokes and anti-Stokes peaks caused by the strain-induced changes in the structure and refractive index of a microstructured optical fiber. The sensor thus uses the inherent nonlinearity of the fiber a...

  6. Characterization of the stress and refractive-index distributions in optical fibers and fiber-based devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebenstreit, Florian

    2011-07-01

    Optical fiber technology continues to advance rapidly as a result of the increasing demands on communication systems and the expanding use of fiber-based sensing. New optical fiber types and fiber-based communications components are required to permit higher data rates, an increased number of channels, and more flexible installation requirements. Fiber-based sensors are continually being developed for a broad range of sensing applications, including environmental, medical, structural, industrial, and military. As optical fibers and fiber-based devices continue to advance, the need to understand their fundamental physical properties increases. The residual-stress distribution (RSD) and the refractive-index distribution (RID) play fundamental roles in the operation and performance of optical fibers. Custom RIDs are used to tailor the transmission properties of fibers used for long-distance transmission and to enable fiber-based devices such as long-period fiber gratings (LPFGs). The introduction and modification of RSDs enable specialty fibers, such as polarization-maintaining fiber, and contribute to the operation of fiber-based devices. Furthermore, the RSD and the RID are inherently linked through the photoelastic effect. Therefore, both the RSD and the RID need to be characterized because these fundamental properties are coupled and affect the fabrication, operation, and performance of fibers and fiber-based devices. To characterize effectively the physical properties of optical fibers, the RSD and the RID must be measured without perturbing or destroying the optical fiber. Furthermore, the techniques used must not be limited in detecting small variations and asymmetries in all directions through the fiber. Finally, the RSD and the RID must be characterized concurrently without moving the fiber to enable the analysis of the relationship between the RSD and the RID. Although many techniques exist for characterizing the residual stress and the refractive index in optical fibers, there is no existing methodology that meets all of these requirements. Therefore, the primary objective of the research presented in this thesis was to provide a methodology that is capable of characterizing concurrently the three-dimensional RSD and RID in optical fibers and fiber-based devices. This research represents a detailed study of the requirements for characterizing optical fibers and how these requirements are met through appropriate data analysis and experimental apparatus design and implementation. To validate the developed methodology, the secondary objective of this research was to characterize both unperturbed and modified optical fibers. The RSD and the RID were measured in a standard telecommunications-grade optical fiber, Corning SMF-28. The effects of cleaving this fiber were also analyzed and the longitudinal variations that result from cleaving were explored for the first time. The fabrication of carbon-dioxide-laser-induced (CO2 -laser-induced) LPFGs was also examined. These devices provide many of the functionalities required for fiber-based communications components as well as fiber-based sensors, and they offer relaxed fabrication requirements when compared to LPFGs fabricated by other methods. The developed methodology was used to perform the first measurements of the changes that occur in the RSD and the RID during LPFG fabrication. The analysis of these measurements ties together many of the existing theories of CO2-laser-induced LPFG fabrication to present a more coherent understanding of the processes that occur. In addition, new evidence provides detailed information on the functional form of the RSD and the RID in LPFGs. This information is crucial for the modeling of LPFG behavior, for the design of LPFGs for specific applications, for the tailoring of fabrication parameters to meet design requirements, and for understanding the limitations of LPFG fabrication in commercial optical fibers. Future areas of research concerning the improvement of the developed methodology, the need to characterize other fibers and fiber-based devices, and the characterization of CO2-laser-induced LPFGs are identified and discussed.

  7. MEMS based optical cross connects for fiber optical communication

    OpenAIRE

    Zickar, Michael; Rooij, Nico de

    2006-01-01

    MEMS based optical cross connects experience a growing market demand. They are used in optical fiber networks as well as optical measurement systems where they add functionality or increase the performance of the systems. 2x2 MEMS optical cross connects proved excellent performance and large optical cross connects with over 100 input and output channels are used to route the worldwide data traffic. However, large optical cross connects have a high cost. Medium sized optical cross connects hav...

  8. Method and apparatus for distributed sensing of volatiles using a long period fiber grating sensor with modulated plastic coating for environmental monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Adrian (Inventor); Kossakovski, Dmitri A. (Inventor); Bearman, Gregory H. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Optical time domain reflectometry caused by absorption of a volatile or analyte into the fiber optic cladding is used as an optical nose. The fiber optics (14) are covered with a gas permeable film (44) which is patterned to leave millimeter wide gas permeable notches (48a-48d). The notches contain a sensing polymer that responds to different gases by expanding or contracting.

  9. Bio-chemical sensor based on imperfected plastic optical fiber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babchenko, Anatoly; Chernyak, Valeri; Maryles, Jonathan

    2007-05-01

    In this paper we report results for an intrinsic evanescent field sensor based on not-regular plastic optical fiber with polymer film containing Malachite Green MG +([PhC(C 6H 4NMe II) 3] +) as an absorption reagent, which coats the fiber's imperfected area. A theoretical model was developed which shows that changes of light in such structure result from the attenuation of light in the strait and bent imperfected fiber. In this model, the imperfected area with malachite green polymer film is replaced by a uniform layer with a complex refractive index. The changes in color and absorption characteristics of the polymer film depend on the acidic and basic environmental properties in the sensing area. Additional increase of the evanescent field interaction can be achieved by decrease the bending radius of the fiber with the coated imperfection area at the middle of the bent fiber. An imperfected plastic optical fiber with Malachite Green coating has been presented for the detection of ammonia vapor. The initial results show that depending on the sensing application demands, it is possible to design a high sensitive sensor with a relatively long response time, while when the demands require fast response times the sensor with less sensitivity can be used. In addition, the sensors' sensitivity can be calibrated in real-time by changing the bending radius.

  10. Low-cost fiber-optic chemochromic hydrogen detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.; Hishmeh, G.; Ciszek, P.; Lee, S.H. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The ability to detect hydrogen gas leaks economically and with inherent safety is an important technology that could facilitate commercial acceptance of hydrogen fuel in various applications. In particular, hydrogen fueled passenger vehicles will require hydrogen leak detectors to signal the activation of safety devices such as shutoff valves, ventilating fans, alarms, etc. Such detectors may be required in several locations within a vehicle--wherever a leak could pose a safety hazard. It is therefore important that the detectors be very economical. This paper reports progress on the development of low-cost fiber-optic hydrogen detectors intended to meet the needs of a hydrogen-fueled passenger vehicle. In the design, the presence of hydrogen in air is sensed by a thin-film coating at the end of a polymer optical fiber. When the coating reacts reversibly with the hydrogen, its optical properties are changed. Light from a central electro-optic control unit is projected down the optical fiber where it is reflected from the sensor coating back to central optical detectors. A change in the reflected intensity indicates the presence of hydrogen. The fiber-optic detector offers inherent safety by removing all electrical power from the leak sites and offers reduced signal processing problems by minimizing electromagnetic interference. Critical detector performance requirements include high selectivity, response speed and durability as well as potential for low-cost production.

  11. Poly aniline Nano fiber as Modified Cladding for Optical Fiber Sensor to Detect Acetone Vapor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, we used poly aniline nano fiber as modified cladding material for a fiber optic sensor system to detect the acetone vapor. The sensor was designed based on variation of evanescent field absorption on the core-modified cladding interface when exposed with varied acetone vapor. Poly aniline nano fiber synthesized by interfacial polymerization was coated onto the un-cladded core and acts as sensing element. Response of the fiber optic sensor was investigated by measuring the transmission light intensity via fiber optic sensor system while exposed with acetone vapor. Based on the sensor response curve, it is obtained a very fast response time of 30 s and recovery time of 10 s. The fiber optic sensor also exhibits a good reversibility and repeatability. Sensitivity of the sensor to variation of acetone vapor pressure was obtained 1.25 %/mmHg, that means the transmission intensity of the sensor changes 1.25 % for acetone vapor change of 1 mmHg. (author)

  12. The Soliton Transmissions in Optical Fibers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leos Bohac

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to familiarize readers with the basic analytical propagation model of short optical pulses in optical fiber. Based on this model simulation of propagation of the special type of pulse, called a soliton, will be carried out. A soliton transmission is especially attractive in the fiber optic telecommunication systems as it does not change a pulses shape during propagating right-down the fiber link to the receiver. The model of very short pulse propagation is based on the numerical solution of the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE, although in some specific cases it is possible to solve it analytically.

  13. Fiber optic communications fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kumar, Shiva

    2014-01-01

    Fiber-optic communication systems have advanced dramatically over the last four decades, since the era of copper cables, resulting in low-cost and high-bandwidth transmission. Fiber optics is now the backbone of the internet and long-distance telecommunication. Without it we would not enjoy the benefits of high-speed internet, or low-rate international telephone calls. This book introduces the basic concepts of fiber-optic communication in a pedagogical way. The important mathematical results are derived by first principles rather than citing research articles. In addition, physical interpre

  14. Characterization of Fiber Optic CMM Probe System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    K.W.Swallow

    2007-05-15

    This report documents a study completed on the fiber optic probe system that is a part of the Werth optical CMM. This study was necessary due to a lack of documentation from the vendor for the proper use and calibration of the fiber probe, and was performed in support of the Lithographie Galvanoformung Abformung (LIGA) development program at the FM&T. As a result of this study, a better understanding of the fiber optic probe has been developed, including guidelines for its proper use and calibration.

  15. Side-emitting fiber optic position sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-02-12

    A side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. In one embodiment, a concentrated beam of light source illuminates the side of a side-emitting fiber optic at an unknown axial position along the fiber's length. Some of this side-illuminated light is in-scattered into the fiber and captured. As the captured light is guided down the fiber, its intensity decreases due to loss from side-emission away from the fiber and from bulk absorption within the fiber. By measuring the intensity of light emitted from one (or both) ends of the fiber with a photodetector(s), the axial position of the light source is determined by comparing the photodetector's signal to a calibrated response curve, look-up table, or by using a mathematical model. Alternatively, the side-emitting fiber is illuminated at one end, while a photodetector measures the intensity of light emitted from the side of the fiber, at an unknown position. As the photodetector moves further away from the illuminated end, the detector's signal strength decreases due to loss from side-emission and/or bulk absorption. As before, the detector's signal is correlated to a unique position along the fiber.

  16. Fiber optic, Faraday rotation current sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veeser, L. R.; Day, G. W.

    The Second Megagauss Conference in 1979 reported experiments using the Faraday magneto-optic effect in a glass rod to measure large electric current pulses or magnetic fields. Since then we have seen the development of single-mode optical fibers carrying polarized light in a closed loop around a current load. A fiber optic Faraday rotation sensor will integrate the flux, instead of sampling it at a discrete point, to get a measurement independent of the current distribution. Early Faraday rotation experiments using optical fibers to measure currents dealt with problems such as fiber birefringence and difficulties in launching light into the tiny fiber cores. We have built on those experiments, working to reduce the effects of shocks and obtaining higher bandwidths, absolute calibration, and computerized recording and data analysis, to develop the Faraday rotation sensors into a routine current diagnostic. For large current pulses we find reduced sensitivity to electromagnetic interference and other backgrounds than for Rogowski loops; often the fiber optic sensors are useful where conductive probes cannot be used at all. The fiber optic sensors and some practical matters involved in fielding them are described.

  17. Micromachined fiber optic Fabry-Perot underwater acoustic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fuyin; Shao, Zhengzheng; Hu, Zhengliang; Luo, Hong; Xie, Jiehui; Hu, Yongming

    2014-08-01

    One of the most important branches in the development trend of the traditional fiber optic physical sensor is the miniaturization of sensor structure. Miniature fiber optic sensor can realize point measurement, and then to develop sensor networks to achieve quasi-distributed or distributed sensing as well as line measurement to area monitoring, which will greatly extend the application area of fiber optic sensors. The development of MEMS technology brings a light path to address the problems brought by the procedure of sensor miniaturization. Sensors manufactured by MEMS technology possess the advantages of small volume, light weight, easy fabricated and low cost. In this paper, a fiber optic extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometric underwater acoustic probe utilizing micromachined diaphragm collaborated with fiber optic technology and MEMS technology has been designed and implemented to actualize underwater acoustic sensing. Diaphragm with central embossment, where the embossment is used to anti-hydrostatic pressure which would largely deflect the diaphragm that induce interferometric fringe fading, has been made by double-sided etching of silicon on insulator. By bonding the acoustic-sensitive diaphragm as well as a cleaved fiber end in ferrule with an outer sleeve, an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer has been constructed. The sensor has been interrogated by quadrature-point control method and tested in field-stable acoustic standing wave tube. Results have been shown that the recovered signal detected by the sensor coincided well with the corresponding transmitted signal and the sensitivity response was flat in frequency range from 10 Hz to 2kHz with the value about -154.6 dB re. 1/μPa. It has been manifest that the designed sensor could be used as an underwater acoustic probe.

  18. Interferometric microstructured polymer optical fiber ultrasound sensor for optoacoustic endoscopic imaging in biomedical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gallego, Daniel; Sáez-Rodríguez, David; Webb, David; Bang, Ole; Lamela, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    to conventional piezoelectric transducers. These kind of sensors, made of biocompatible polymers, are good candidates for the sensing element in an optoacoustic endoscope because of its high sensitivity, its shape and its non-brittle and non-electric nature. The acoustic sensitivity of the intrinsic......We report a characterization of the acoustic sensitivity of microstructured polymer optical fiber interferometric sensors at ultrasonic frequencies from 100kHz to 10MHz. The use of wide-band ultrasonic fiber optic sensors in biomedical ultrasonic and optoacoustic applications is an open alternative...... fiber optic interferometric sensors depends strongly of the material which is composed of. In this work we compare experimentally the intrinsic ultrasonic sensitivities of a PMMA mPOF with other three optical fibers: a singlemode silica optical fiber, a single-mode polymer optical fiber and a multimode...

  19. Radiation resistant fiber optic materials and waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ionizing radiation response of a variety of radiation resistant bulk glasses and optical fibers has been measured. The spectral character and time dependence of the radiation-induced optical losses in high purity silicas and silica-containing fibers has been determined for a range of doses and dose rates. Intrinsic optical loss and radiation response measurements on several types of cerium-protected silicate glasses and fibers have indicated that moderate loss (approximately 100 db/km), high numerical aperture, radiation resistant fiber waveguides are achievable by cerium doping of silicates provided that sufficiently pure materials are utilized. Total fiber loss data, that is, radiation-induced loss plus intrinsic loss, have been generated vs time following pulsed irradiation

  20. Internal and External Optical Feedback Effect in Fiber Linear Lasers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junping Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, models of internal and external optical feedback effect in fiber linear lasers have been presented. The effects of optical feedback could be equivalent to the variation of laser cavity loss, and the output expressions of two models are deduced. According to the simulation results, the optical feedback system in fiber linear lasers has the same phase sensitivity as the traditional self-mixing effect in semiconductor lasers. The experimental results show a good agreement with the simulated results. Comparing the output of internal structure with that of external structure, we can conclude that the internal optical feedback system can get higher output gain and stripe depth, which reveals that the internal feedback structure has better sensing characteristics