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1

Factors affecting plant absorption, transport and fate of plutonium  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This study determined the extent to which several agricultural plants control plutonium (Pu) uptake and provides a general understanding of the fate and behavior of Pu in plants after absorption. Investigations were directed toward variables affecting the accumulation of Pu by plants from soils, transport of Pu within the plant, factors affecting transport with plant age, effects of different plant species on transport processes, form of Pu deposited in plant tissues, and effect of chemical form on animal gut absorption of Pu. 18 references, 10 figures, 14 tables

2

Chemical factors affecting fission product transport in severe LMFBR accidents  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This study was performed as a part of a larger evaluation effort on LMFBR accident, source-term estimation. Purpose was to provide basic chemical information regarding fission product, sodium coolant, and structural material interactions required to perform estimation of fission product transport under LMFBR accident conditions. Emphasis was placed on conditions within the reactor vessel; containment vessel conditions are discussed only briefly

3

Factors affecting the retirement of commercial transport jet aircraft  

Science.gov (United States)

The historical background of the technology and economics of aircraft replacement and retirement in the prejet era is reviewed in order to determine whether useful insights can be obtained applicable to the jet era. Significant differences between the two periods are noted. New factors are identified and examined. Topics discussed include concern over current policies regarding deregulation, regulatory reform, and retroactive noise regulations; financing and compliance legislation; aging; economic environment and inflation; technological progress; fuel efficiency and cost; and a financial perspective of replacement decisions.

Spencer, F. A.

1979-01-01

4

FACTORS THAT AFFECT TRANSPORT MODE PREFERENCE FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS IN THE NATIONAL UNIVERSITY OF MALAYSIA BY LOGIT METHOD  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A study was carried out to examine the perceptions and preferences of students on choosing the type of transportation for their travels in university campus. This study focused on providing personal transport users road transport alternatives as a countermeasure aimed at shifting car users to other modes of transportation. Overall 456 questionnaires were conducted to develop a choice of transportation mode preferences. Consequently, Logit model and SPSS were used to identify the factors that affect the determination of the choice of transportation mode. Results indicated that by reducing travel time by 70% the amount of private cars users will be reduced by 84%, while reduction the travel cost was found to be highly improving the public modes of utilization. This study revealed positive aspects is needed to shift travellers from private modes to public. The positive aspect contributes to travel time and travel cost reduction, hence improving the services, whereby contributing to sustainability.

ALI AHMED MOHAMMED

2013-06-01

5

Factors affecting metabolic cost of transport during a multi-stage running race.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to investigate: (1) the role of , the fraction of (F) and the metabolic cost of transport (CoT) in determining performance during an ultra-endurance competition and (2) the effects of the race on several biomechanical and morphological parameters of the lower limbs that are likely to affect CoT. Eleven runners (aged 29-54 years) participated in an ultra-endurance competition consisting of three running stages of 25, 55 and 13 km on three consecutive days. Anthropometric characteristics, body composition, morphological properties of the gastrocnemius medialis, maximal explosive power of the lower limb and were determined before the competition. In addition, biomechanics of running and CoT were determined, before and immediately after each running stage. Performance was directly proportional to (r=0.77) and F (r=0.36), and inversely proportional to CoT (r=-0.30). Low CoT values were significantly related to high maximal power of the lower limbs (r=-0.74) and vertical stiffness (r=-0.65) and low footprint index (FPI, r=0.70), step frequency (r=0.62) and external work (r=0.60). About 50% of the increase in CoT during the stages of the competition was accounted for by changes in FPI, which represents a global evaluation of medio-lateral displacement of the foot during the whole stance phase, which in turn is associated with the myotendinous characteristics of the lower limb. Thus, lower CoT values were related to greater muscular power and lower FPI, suggesting that a better ankle stability is likely to achieve better performance in an ultra-endurance running competition. PMID:24265425

Lazzer, Stefano; Taboga, Paolo; Salvadego, Desy; Rejc, Enrico; Simunic, Bostjan; Narici, Marco V; Buglione, Antonio; Giovanelli, Nicola; Antonutto, Guglielmo; Grassi, Bruno; Pisot, Rado; di Prampero, Pietro E

2014-03-01

6

Structural factors affecting lithium transport in lithium-excess layered cathode materials  

Science.gov (United States)

Lithium ion batteries have drawn significant attention as the principle energy storage device powering today's mobile electronic equipment. Despite the increased usage, the performance of current lithium ion battery technology falls short of the requirements needed for large format applications such as electric vehicles. The layered lithium-excess oxide compounds Li[NixLi1/3-2x/3Mn2/3-x/3]O2 are of interest as a new generation of cathode materials for high energy density lithium ion batteries. Efforts to achieve a better understanding of the electrochemistry of lithium-excess materials require the connection of crystal structure to electrochemical properties. In this dissertation, a combination of advanced characterization techniques was used as a tool to understand the intercalation mechanism of the layered lithium-excess transition metal oxide Li[NixLi1/3-2x/3Mn 2/3-x/3]O2. The research identified that synthesis influences the structure of the material specifically the surface of the particles. The formation of a hydroxide rich surface film decreases the electrochemical performance. Post synthesis modifications including high pressure and high temperature leads to the formation of a second layered phase in the bulk; however, the treated samples display good electrochemical properties. This result underlines the flexibility of the structure of Li[NixLi1/3-2x/3Mn 2/3-x/3]O2, a feature uncommon to other layered transition metal oxides. Surface characterization of the layered lithium-excess cathodes following electrochemical cycling revealed the formation of a new surface phase 1 to 5 nm thick as well as insight to the complex cation rearrangement process and phase transformation. This part of the research identified that significant changes occurred during electrochemical cycling; however did not identify when the transformations occurred. Investigation using in situ techniques during the first electrochemical cycle shows that the structure undergoes irreversible changes in lattice parameters and microstrain. Microstrain analysis shows that the material undergoes large increases in microstrain during the voltage plateau region. During the charging cycle, charge compensation mechanisms such as oxygen removal and cation migration accommodates the microstrain; however during discharge, these compensation mechanisms do not exist; therefore, causing the microstrain to increase. The analysis of structural changes before, during and following electrochemical property testing has led to an increased understanding of the lithium transport mechanisms in the lithium-excess series of materials.

Fell, Christopher R.

7

Affective Factors: Anxiety  

Science.gov (United States)

Affective factors seem to play a crucial role in success or failure in second language acquisition. Negative attitudes can reduce learners' motivation and harm language learning, while positive attitudes can do the reverse. Discovering students' attitudes about language will help both teacher and student in teaching learning process. Anxiety is…

Tasnimi, Mahshad

2009-01-01

8

An Examination of the Sensitivity of Sulfur Dioxide, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrogen Dioxide Concentrations to the Important Factors Affecting Air Quality Inside a Public Transportation Bus  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The present study examined the sensitivity of sulfur dioxide (SO2), nitric oxide (NO), and nitrogen dioxide (NO2) concentrations to the important factors affecting air quality inside a public transportation bus. Additionally, this study quantified the in-bus contaminant concentrations in relation to the ranked statistically significant variables. The independent variables to which the monitored contaminant concentrations are the most sensitive to ...

Akhil Kadiyala; Ashok Kumar

2012-01-01

9

Assessing factors affecting the thermal properties of a passive thermal refuge using three-dimensional hydrodynamic flow and transport modeling  

Science.gov (United States)

Everglades restoration activities may cause changes to temperature and salinity stratification at the Port of the Islands (POI) marina, which could affect its suitability as a cold weather refuge for manatees. To better understand how the Picayune Strand Restoration Project (PSRP) may alter this important resource in Collier County in southwestern Florida, the USGS has developed a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model for the marina and canal system at POI. Empirical data suggest that manatees aggregate at the site during winter because of thermal inversions that provide warmer water near the bottom that appears to only occur in the presence of salinity stratification. To study these phenomena, the environmental fluid dynamics code simulator was used to represent temperature and salinity transport within POI. Boundary inputs were generated using a larger two-dimensional model constructed with the flow and transport in a linked overland-aquifer density-dependent system simulator. Model results for a representative winter period match observed trends in salinity and temperature fluctuations and produce temperature inversions similar to observed values. Modified boundary conditions, representing proposed PSRP alterations, were also tested to examine the possible effect on the salinity stratification and temperature inversion within POI. Results show that during some periods, salinity stratification is reduced resulting in a subsequent reduction in temperature inversion compared with the existing conditions simulation. This may have an effect on POI’s suitability as a passive thermal refuge for manatees and other temperature-sensitive species. Additional testing was completed to determine the important physical relationships affecting POI’s suitability as a refuge.

Decker, Jeremy D.; Swain, Eric D.; Stith, Bradley M.; Langtimm, Catherine A.

2013-01-01

10

Factors Affecting Biodiesel Production  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Biodiesel is a renewable alternate fuel to diesel engines that could be partially orfully replace or reduce the use of petroleum diesel fuel. Biodiesel can be produced fromplant and animal fats through transesterification reaction. The transesterification reaction isaffected by molar ratio of alcohol, presence of water and Free Fatty Acid content, reactiontemperature, catalyst concentration and agitation speed. This review paper discuss aboutthe factors involved in transesterification reaction.

M.Mathiyazhagan

2011-06-01

11

Factors Affecting Students' Performance  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Determinants of students' performance have been the subject of ongoing debate among educators, academics, and policy makers. There have been many studies that sought to examine this issue and their findings point out to hard work, previous schooling, parents’ education, family income and self motivation as factors that have a significant effect on the students GPA. Most of those studies have focused on students' performance in the U.S. and Europe. However, since cultural differences may...

Harb, Nasri; El-shaarawi, Ahmed

2006-01-01

12

Factors affecting microbial spoilage and shelf-life of chilled vacuum-packed lamb transported to distant markets: a review.  

Science.gov (United States)

Vacuum-packaging and stringent control of storage temperatures enable the export of meat to distant markets, supplying a chilled product that can favourably compete with local fresh meats. To save fuel and reduce emissions, the speed of ships travelling to international markets has decreased resulting in requirement for the shelf-life of chilled lamb to be extended beyond the recognised time of 60-70 days. Growth of microorganisms and ability to cause spoilage of vacuum-packed lamb are dependent on many factors, including the type and initial concentration of spoilage bacteria, meat pH, water activity, availability of substrates, oxygen availability and, most importantly, storage time and temperature of the packaged product. This paper reviews the existing knowledge of the spoilage bacteria affecting vacuum-packed lamb, discusses the impact of these bacteria on product quality, shelf-life and spoilage, and concludes that under specified conditions the shelf-life of chilled lamb can be extended to beyond 70 days. PMID:24875594

Mills, John; Donnison, Andrea; Brightwell, Gale

2014-09-01

13

An Examination of the Sensitivity of Sulfur Dioxide, Nitric Oxide, and Nitrogen Dioxide Concentrations to the Important Factors Affecting Air Quality Inside a Public Transportation Bus  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present study examined the sensitivity of sulfur dioxide (SO2, nitric oxide (NO, and nitrogen dioxide (NO2 concentrations to the important factors affecting air quality inside a public transportation bus. Additionally, this study quantified the in-bus contaminant concentrations in relation to the ranked statistically significant variables. The independent variables to which the monitored contaminant concentrations are the most sensitive to were determined using regression trees and the analysis of variance. A comprehensive one-year database, of the monitored contaminant concentrations and the independent factors that affect an indoor microenvironment (meteorology, monitoring periods, outdoor sources, and ventilation settings was developed to study the sensitivity of monitored in-bus contaminants. SO2 concentrations were extremely sensitive to the month, weather conditions, and heavy vehicles. NO concentrations were sensitive to the month/season, ventilation, and ambient temperature; while NO2 concentrations were additionally sensitive to the monitoring period and the ambient mixing ratio. Quantified in-bus relationships revealed NO and NO2 concentrations to be less than 0.6 ppm and 0.1 ppm, respectively. SO2 concentrations of 0.4 ppm were observed in the fall-winter months, when the lead heavy vehicles were at a minimum density of 56 per hour; < 0.4 ppm SO2 concentrations remained for the rest of the year.

Akhil Kadiyala

2012-06-01

14

Risk communication: factors affecting impact.  

Science.gov (United States)

The impact of risk communication depends upon a complex interaction between the characteristics of the audience, the source of the message, and its content. Audience perception of risk is influenced by demographic factors (e.g. age, gender), personality profile, past experience, and ideological orientation. It is also affected by cognitive biases (e.g. unrealistic optimism) and lay 'mental models' of the hazard. For food hazards, the important dimensions of risk are controllability, novelty and naturalness. The source must be trusted for a risk message to be effective. Trust is associated with believing the source is expert, unbiased, disinterested, and not sensationalising. To maximise impact, risk communications must have a content which triggers attention, achieves comprehension and can influence decision-making. It must be unambiguous, definitive and easily interpretable--rarely achievable particularly when risk is shrouded in scientific uncertainty. Risk messages initiate social processes of amplification and attenuation, consequently their ramifications are rarely controllable. PMID:10885109

Breakwell, G M

2000-01-01

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Psychological Factors Affecting Infertile Women  

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Full Text Available AIM: This study was performed to determine the psychological factors affecting infertile women presenting at the infertility outpatients department. METHOD: The sample of this cross-sectional study consisted of 344 women who presented at the IVF center of a special branch hospital or a university hospital, March 2008 through September 2008, as determined by the non-random sampling method. All participating women gave their informed consent. The data were collected using the Data Form that consisted of questions on socio-demographic features and the Infertility Distress Scale (IDS. In the results, percentages were provided along with the Kruskal-Wallis H, Mann-Whitney U and Spearman correlation tests. RESULTS: The mean IDS was 39.01±9.6. There was a statistically significant linear relationship between the mean IDS score and age (r=0.106, p=0.048, marriage duration (r=0.232, p<0.001 and duration of desire to have a child (r=0.217, p<0.001. Women who were primary school graduates (X²=13.03, p=0.004, did not work (p=0.007, had no social security benefits (p=0.021 or from low socioeconomic status (X²=24.85, p<0.001 had significantly higher mean IDS scores. CONCLUSION: The results of this study show women become more adversely affected by infertility as their age, duration of marriage, and duration of desire to have a child increase. Women who are primary school graduates, do not work, have no social security benefits or have lower income are affected more negatively. We believe that taking these features into account when evaluating and planning supportive approaches for women presenting at the infertility treatment center and determining the psychological state of the women using the IDS will increase treatment success. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2010; 9(5.000: 481-486

Sati Unal

2010-10-01

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Principal Factors Affecting IDBT Evolution  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Studies on Italian Double-entry Bookkeeping Thought (IDBT evolution are seldom found in such aspects as accounts with persons (AP, accounts with goods (AG, and accounts equilibria (AE, etc., so we studied IDBT evolution in the aspects stated above and the principal factors for IDBT evolution, including their selection, contribution and sequence in this thesis. By our analysis, IDBT evolved in such aspects as accounts with persons (AP, accounts with goods (AG, loss and net income accounts (LNIA, capital accounts (AC and accounts equilibria (AE, etc., and ripened in the period of 1430-1482. Principal factors affecting IDBT evolution can be ordered by contribution as follows: social conditions (SCS3 and relationships between supply and demand of accounting thought (RBSDAT2. And our related advice is as follows: governments should adopt appropriate policy, and help to build proper social conditions and strengthen the relationships between supply and demand of accounting thought to promote the evolution of accounting thought. Especially as to social conditions, IDBT evolution is mainly owing to external causes from the outside of Italy. Once the outside motive disappeared, IDBT would lose the strong power of evolution and slow down its pace. So governments should place more emphases on building proper social conditions by encouraging internal powers from the inside of Italy.

Changqing Liu

2011-12-01

17

Factors affecting the quality of bottled water.  

Science.gov (United States)

The ever-increasing popularity of bottled water means that it is important to analyze not only its mineral content but also, above all, its content of possible contaminants, especially the organic ones. In this respect, bottled waters are a special case, because apart from organic chemical contaminants derived from the well from which they were acquired, their secondary contamination is always possible, during treatment or storage or transport in unsuitable conditions (sunlight and elevated temperature). This paper describes how various factors, from the area around the well, and the method of drawing and treating water, to the manner in which the finished product is stored and transported may affect the quality of bottled waters. It also summarizes literature information on the levels of organic contaminants in various kinds of bottled water samples. PMID:23093103

Diduch, Malwina; Polkowska, ?aneta; Namie?nik, Jacek

2013-03-01

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An evaluation of the policy and techno-economic factors affecting the potential for biogas upgrading for transport fuel use in the UK  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Gaseous biofuels including biomethane, which has been shown to be more environmentally beneficial than liquid biofuels, should contribute to meeting the challenging UK targets set for the supplying of biofuels to the road transport fuel market. Under the Renewable Transport Fuel Obligations the financial incentives for the supply of biofuels have been volatile, e.g. 2008/2009 saw Renewable Transport Fuel Certificate values fall to zero. Any shortfall from the maximum value has significant implications for all biofuels. It is demonstrated that biomethane can be produced at a cost which is competitive with liquid biofuels and fossil fuels within the UK. Technologies such as water scrubbing, pressure swing adsorption and physical and chemical absorption are available to upgrade biogas generated by anaerobic digestion of organic wastes to transport fuel quality, and technologies such as membrane separation and cryogenic distillation are being modified for such an application. The manufacture and sale of biomethane as a transport fuel is also financially competitive with Combined Heat and Power. One limiting factor may be the additional cost of purchasing and maintaining biomethane fuelled vehicles. Support in this area could lead to the rapid expansion of biomethane transport fuel infrastructure and bring significant long term environmental and economic advantages. - Research highlights: ? A technical summary of commercially available biogas upgrading technologies is maable biogas upgrading technologies is made. ? An assessment of energetic, environmental and economic performance is included. ? Proposed financial subsidies for biomethane transport fuel are investigated. ? Biomethane can be financially competitive with liquid biofuels. ? The enhanced environmental performance of biomethane should be reflected by the level of subsidy.

19

Institutional issues affecting transportation of nuclear materials  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The institutional issues affecting transportation of nuclear materials in the United States represent significant barriers to meeting future needs in the transport of radioactive waste materials to their ultimate repository. While technological problems which must be overcome to perform such movements seem to be within the state-of-the-art, the timely resolution of these institutional issues seems less assured. However, the definition of these issues, as attempted in this paper, together with systematic analysis of cause and possible solutions are the essential elements of the Transportation Technology Center's Institutional Issues Program

20

FACTORS AFFECTING INTERNATIONAL LABOR MIGRATION  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available  The article reviews the evolution of the main theories that explain the labor migration system impacts on international labor migration are shown. Particular attention is paid to the analysis of external labor migration factors in Ukraine based on the use of the basic tenets of the "push and pull factors" theory.

?.?. ???????

2012-03-01

 
 
 
 
21

Factors affecting the fate and transport of glyphosate and AMPA into surface waters of agricultural watersheds in the United States and Europe  

Science.gov (United States)

Glyphosate [N-(phosphonomethyl)glycine] is a herbicide used extensively in almost all agricultural and urban areas of the United States and Europe. Although, glyphosate is used widely throughout the world in the production of many crops, it is predominately used in the United States on soybeans, corn, potatoes, and cotton that have been genetically modified to be tolerant to glyphosate. From 1992 to 2007, the agricultural use of glyphosate has increased from less than 10,000 Mg to more than 80,000 Mg, respectively. The greatest areal use is in the midwestern United States where glyphosate is applied on transgenic corn and soybeans. Because of the difficulty and expense in analyzing for glyphosate and AMPA (aminomethylphosphonic acid, a primary glyphosate degradate) in water, there have been only small scale studies on the fate and transport of glyphosate. The characterization of the transport of glyphosate and AMPA on a watershed scale is lacking. Glyphosate and AMPA were frequently detected in the surface waters of 4 agricultural watersheds in studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in the United States and at the Laboratory of Hydrology and Geochemistry of Strasbourg. Two of these basins were located in the midwestern United States where the major crops are corn and soybean, the third is located the lower Mississippi River Basin where the major crops are soybean, corn, rice, and cotton, and the fourth was located near Strasbourg, France where the use of glyphosate was on a vineyard. The load as a percent of use ranged from 0.009 to 0.86 percent and could be related to 3 factors: source strength, hydrology, and flowpath. Glyphosate use in a watershed results in some occurrence in surface water at the part per billion level; however, those watersheds most at risk for the offsite transport of glyphosate are those with high application rates, rainfall that results in overland runoff, and a flowpath that does not include transport through the soil.

Coupe, R.; Kalkhoff, S.; Capel, P.; Gregoire, C.

2012-04-01

22

Factors affecting vegetable stand establishment  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Several factors can influence stand establishment in vegetable crop production. Environmental conditions such as soil physical characteristics, temperature and moisture, various cultural practices, and diseases may all be limiting factors in establishing maximum stands and achieving the highest possible yields. Measures taken to increase stands include soil improvements, implementing cultural practices, and use of chemical and biological seed treatments. Combining seed treatments and cultural/tillage practices to minimize environmental constraints can lead to maximum stands and yields in the production of high quality vegetable crops.

Grassbaugh E. M.

1998-01-01

23

Factors Affecting Auditory Training Gains.  

Science.gov (United States)

A study was undertaken to determine which of nine variables were most related to success in auditory training, using as Ss 43 students at the National Technical Institute for the Deaf. Findings showed that the single largest contributing factor to postcourse gain was the entering English score. (PHR)

Moreau, Roberta M.

1980-01-01

24

Factors Affecting Performance of AODV  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In Mobile Ad Hoc Networks (MANETs it is hard for a route to sustain for a longer period of time due to the mobility of nodes. High mobility of nodes results in active route failure and re-route discoveries. Such frequent route discoveries result in decreased network performance. In this study we have analyzed in detail the affect of different node mobility parameters on the performance of AODV (Ad hoc on Demand Distance Vector Routing Protocol. Simulation results are provided at the end.

S.A. Hussain

2007-01-01

25

Teratogenic factors affect transcription factor expression.  

Science.gov (United States)

Chemical compounds are produced every day, many with adverse effects on human health, and hence it is vital to predict the risks to humans simply, rapidly, and accurately. Teratogens have a serious impact on fetal development. This has been studied mainly by phenotypic analysis of experimental animals. However, since phenotypes can vary within different species, we established a new evaluation system based on our recent finding that teratogens influence Hox gene expression in mice. Similarly to the Hox gene expression changes, the expression patterns of several transcription factors involved in development, including the Dlx, Irx, Sall, and T-box families, were altered after 6 h of exposure to retinoic acid (RA) or 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD). The expression changes in Dlx4, Dlx6, Irx5, Sall2, Sall3, Sall4, Tbx10, and Tbx22 were linked to teratogen-induced phenotypes, and our results indicate that expression changes in developmental transcription factors can help to predict teratogenic risk. PMID:23649242

Kojima, Takuya; Asano, Shinya; Takahashi, Naoki

2013-01-01

26

Factors affecting gamma ray transmission  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Gamma ray transmission and the parameters which affect this process; attenuation coefficients, cross-section, effective atomic numbers and electron densities, were studied for brass, Fe, Al, PVC and perspex, using gamma spectroscopy. The comparsion between experimental and theoretical values is make; thses are found to be in good agreement. The inverse relations between energy and attenuation coefficients, as well as cross-section were emphasized. In the energy range (661.6 Ke V-1332.5 Ke V), the effective atomic numbers showed a constant behavior with energy. Brass shows up as a good attenuating material, while other samples are re,atively weak attenators. The effect of the compostion of the compound appears obviously in this study. (authors).

27

Factors affecting forage stand establishment  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Significant advances have been made in our knowledge of forage seed physiology, technology, and stand establishment practices; however, stand establishment continues to be one of the most common production problems affecting forage crops in the USA. There is a need for research on stand establishment of forage crops under abiotic and biotic stress. Although the forage seed industry produces and markets seed of high quality, new methods of assessing seed vigor are needed and their use should be expanded in the industry to enable matching seed lot performance to specific environmental conditions where performance can be maximized. Seed treatment and seed coating are used in the forage seed industry, and studies have shown they are of benefit in some environments. There is an increase in no-tillage seeding of forage crops, but improvements in the no-tillage planting equipment are needed to make them better suited to small seeds. Other recent developments in seeding techniques include broadcasting seed with dry granular and fluid fertilizers, which improves the efficiency of the seeding operation.

Sulc R.M.

1998-01-01

28

Host factors affecting disease transmission.  

Science.gov (United States)

In prevention of transmission of infectious disease, the host uses a variety of protective mechanisms and can elicit many different responses. Nonspecific defense mechanisms include an intact integument (skin and mucous membranes). The host also can use specialized substances it may secrete, such as mucin or fatty acids to prevent colonization or to inhibit growth of potential pathogens. Specialized surface structures are also used by the host in prevention of disease transmission. These structures include cells composed of keratin and cells with cilia. Additionally, nonspecific protection can be achieved through the actions of the host's nonpathogenic microflora. If these nonspecific barriers to microorganism invasion are breached, other host interactions occur. Complement has many nonspecific actions that may be used to control invasion of microorganisms. PMLs are an additional line of defense the host has available in prevention of infection. These cells are responsible for intracellular killing of pathogens through the use of enzymatic and oxidative mechanisms. The mononuclear phagocyte system allows for elimination of foreign material and debris from the inflammatory reaction. Additionally, the macrophages process and present antigens to T lymphocytes. B lymphocytes differentiate to produce plasma cells, which produce specific antibodies aimed at the invading microorganism. T lymphocytes are involved in the killing of pathogenic microorganisms and in the production of powerful immune modulators known as lymphokines. Fever and inflammation also serve to stimulate reactions aimed at destroying and removing the pathogen from the host system. These factors all play an important role in prevention of disease transmission in a human host. PMID:8641520

Muzyka, B C

1996-04-01

29

Factors affecting calculation of L  

Science.gov (United States)

A detectable extraterrestrial civilization can be modeled as a series of successive regimes over time each of which is detectable for a certain proportion of its lifecycle. This methodology can be utilized to produce an estimate for L. Potential components of L include quantity of fossil fuel reserves, solar energy potential, quantity of regimes over time, lifecycle patterns of regimes, proportion of lifecycle regime is actually detectable, and downtime between regimes. Relationships between these components provide a means of calculating the lifetime of communicative species in a detectable state, L. An example of how these factors interact is provided, utilizing values that are reasonable given known astronomical data for components such as solar energy potential while existing knowledge about the terrestrial case is used as a baseline for other components including fossil fuel reserves, quantity of regimes over time, and lifecycle patterns of regimes, proportion of lifecycle regime is actually detectable, and gaps of time between regimes due to recovery from catastrophic war or resource exhaustion. A range of values is calculated for L when parameters are established for each component so as to determine the lowest and highest values of L. roadmap for SETI research at the SETI Institute for the next few decades. Three different approaches were identified. 1) Continue the radio search: build an affordable array incorporating consumer market technologies, expand the search frequency, and increase the target list to 100,000 stars. This array will also serve as a technology demonstration and enable the international radio astronomy community to realize an array that is a hundred times larger and capable (among other things) of searching a million stars. 2) Begin searches for very fast optical pulses from a million stars. 3) As Moore's Law delivers increased computational capacity, build an omni-directional sky survey array capable of detecting strong, transient, radio signals from billions of stars. SETI could succeed tomorrow, or it may be an endeavor for multiple generations. We are a very young technology in a very old galaxy. While our own leakage radiation continues to outshine the Sun at many frequencies, we remain detectable to others. When our use of the spectrum becomes more efficient, it will be time to consider deliberate transmissions and the really tough questions: Who will speak for Earth? What will they say?

Ciotola, Mark P.

2001-08-01

30

Fluorescein. Physiochemical factors affecting its fluorescence.  

Science.gov (United States)

Fluorescein's property of fluorescence is reviewed. Of the many factors which affect its fluorescence, concentration is probably the most important and it best explains why leaking aqueous turns fluorescein bright green during Seidel's test. The intensity and pattern of fluorescein staining of corneal lesions is probably due to the concentration and distribution of fluorescein in the cornea. The concentration of fluorescein achieved in the retinal blood vessels during fluorescein angiography affects its fluorescence. PMID:7046118

Romanchuk, K G

1982-01-01

31

Factors Affecting Profitability of Layer Hens Enterprises  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Problem statement: Layer hen enterprises suffer from low profitability or losses in many of developing countries all over the world. Jordan is not an acceptance. Approach: This study aimed at investigating the influence of ten main factors affecting the profitability of layer hen producers. The investigated factors include price of purchased pullet, feed price, cost of labor, cost of veterinary service and medicine, building and machinery depreciation, repairs and maintenance an...

Ebraheem Altahat; Ali AL-Sharafat; Mohammad Altarawneh

2012-01-01

32

Factors Affecting Smoking Tendency and Smoking Intensity  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to measure the relative effect of relevant explanatory variable on smoking tendency and smoking intensity. Design/methodology/approach: Using survey data collected by the Israeli Bureau of Statistics in 2003-2004, a probit procedure is estimated for analyzing factors that affect the probability of being a…

David, Nissim Ben; Zion, Uri Ben

2009-01-01

33

Factors affecting the outcome in subdural empyema.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The case reports of 102 patients with subdural empyema, diagnosed in the years 1935-83, were reviewed to determine the factors affecting the outcome. Statistical analysis (likelihood ratio tests with chi square approximation and logistic regression) showed that year of diagnosis (p less than 0.01) and level of consciousness at the moment of diagnosis (p less than 0.01) had a significant bearing on the chance to survive and that these same two factors (each factor p less than 0.01) and extent ...

Mauser, H. W.; Houwelingen, H. C.; Tulleken, C. A.

1987-01-01

34

Space Weather affects on Air Transportation  

Science.gov (United States)

In Europe, legislation requires the airline industry to monitor the occupational exposure of aircrew to cosmic radiation. However, there are other significant impacts of space weather phenomena on the technological systems used for day-to-day operations which need to be considered by the airlines. These were highlighted by the disruption caused to the industry by the period of significant solar activity in late October and early November 2003. Next generation aircraft will utilize increasingly complex avionics as well as expanding the performance envelopes. These and future generation platforms will require the development of a new air-space management infrastructure with improved position accuracy (for route navigation and landing in bad weather) and reduced separation minima in order to cope with the expected growth in air travel. Similarly, greater reliance will be placed upon satellites for command, control, communication and information (C3I) of the operation. However, to maximize effectiveness of this globally interoperable C3I and ensure seamless fusion of all components for a safe operation will require a greater understanding of the space weather affects, their risks with increasing technology, and the inclusion of space weather information into the operation. This paper will review space weather effects on air transport and the increasing risks for future operations cause by them. We will examine how well the effects can be predicted, some of the tools that can be used and the practicalities of using such predictions in an operational scenario. Initial results from the SOARS ESA Space Weather Pilot Project will also be discussed,

Jones, J. B. L.; Bentley, R. D.; Dyer, C.; Shaw, A.

35

The factors affecting the recarburization process indicators  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The article presents the factors affecting the carburizing rates obtained (rate and efficiency during the process of melting cast iron. The analysis includes the recarburizer type (anthracite, natural and synthetic graphite, petroleum coke and particle size. Further factors considered in work are the methods of recarburization (recarburizer introduction to a solid charge and on the surface of the metal bath and the parameters of the melt (temperature and chemical composition. The analysis was based on experiments performed, the calculation results of computer simulations and literature data.

K. Janerka

2011-07-01

36

Human Factor Issues Affecting CAD Implementations  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Industrial companies have been implementing Computer Aided Engineering tools for many years with varying degrees of success. In the early implementations considerable emphasis was placed upon the organisational structure necessary to receive and optimise system output. However, it is becoming increasingly clear that any successful CAE implementation has to satisfy three inter-related factors of technology, organisation and human issues. This paper presents the results of an investigation into human factors affecting successful CAD implementation, undertaken through selected case studies and a more general survey of UK industry.

C. Short

2000-01-01

37

Factors affecting gene transformation in mangosteen  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Factors affecting gene transformation in mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L.) were investigated. Types of explants, strains and densities of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and co-culture methods were examined to optimize gene transformation. The results showed that among strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens tested, LBA 4404 containing pBI 121 gave the calli with the highest resistance to kanamycin. Kanamycin at the concentration of 50-100 mg/l was the best range for selection of transformants. Hig...

Sompong Te-chato*; Vitoon Chaipakdee

2003-01-01

38

Experimental factors affecting white strobe pulse frequency  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Changes made to the standard strobe compositions used as a baseline, and the resultant effects in intensity, duration and pulse frequency are described. The changes involved variations in particle sizes and mix ratios in order to cause performance changes in the original pyrotechnic strobe composition. Several factors, such as binder material, binder percentage, the addition of sulfur or antimony trisulfide and sulfates were found to affect strobe frequency. Technical data, photographic and videotape evidence of burning characteristics are highlighted. 3 refs., 7 figs.

Domanico, J. A. [Edgewood Chemical Biological Center (United States)

2000-04-01

39

FACTORS AFFECTING THE SPORT RELATED CONSUMER EXPENDITURES  

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Full Text Available In recent years there has been a significant change in the importance given to economic and social role of sport related economic activities since sport has changed to a much broader concept involving sport clubs, associations, organizations and businesses where the implementation of carefully designed marketing strategies became vital for success. This study aims to explore the factors affecting the sport related consumer expenditures. Empirical results were obtained by means of a questionnaire survey in Izmir, the third biggest city in Turkey. The results include demographic and socio-economic analysis of respondents, their practices about sport related activities and expenditures associated with these activities. Six factors were obtained from the factor analysis depending on the respondents’ attitudes towards sporting activities were examined for their effects on sport related expenditures of the consumers.

Aykan CANDEM?R

2012-01-01

40

Factors affecting the determination of cerebrovascular reactivity  

Science.gov (United States)

Background and Purpose Cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR), measures the ability of the cerebrovasculature to respond to vasoactive stimuli such as CO2. CVR is often expressed as the ratio of cerebral blood flow change to CO2 change. We examine several factors affecting this measurement: blood pressure, stimulus pattern, response analysis and subject position. Methods Step and ramp increases in CO2 were implemented in nine subjects, seated and supine. Middle cerebral artery blood flow velocity (MCAv), and mean arterial pressure (MAP) were determined breath-by-breath. Cerebrovascular conductance (MCAc) was estimated as MCAv/MAP. CVR was calculated from both the relative and absolute measures of MCAc and MCAv responses. Results MAP increased with CO2 in some subjects so that relative CVR calculated from conductance responses were less than those calculated from CVR calculated from velocity responses. CVR measured from step responses were affected by the response dynamics, and were less than those calculated from CVR measured from ramp responses. Subject position did not affect CVR. Conclusions (1) MAP increases with CO2 and acts as a confounding factor for CVR measurement; (2) CVR depends on the stimulus pattern used; (3) CVR did not differ from the sitting versus supine in these experiments; (4) CVR calculated from absolute changes of MCAv was less than that calculated from relative changes. PMID:25328852

Regan, Rosemary E; Fisher, Joseph A; Duffin, James

2014-01-01

 
 
 
 
41

Reappraising factors affecting mourning dove perch coos  

Science.gov (United States)

Results confirmed pairing as the primary factor influencing perch-cooing rates of wild mourning doves (Zenaida macroura). Marked unmated males cooed at substantially higher rates (6.2x) than mated males, had greater probability of cooing (2.3x) during 3-minute periods, and continued cooing longer each morning than mated males. Population density was not a major factor affecting cooing. Unmated males cooed more frequently in the presence of other cooing doves (P < 0.05) than when alone, but the number of additional doves above 1 was unimportant. Cooing rates of both mated and unmated males on areas with dissimilar dove densities were not significantly different. Within limits of standard call-count procedure, weather exerted no detectable influence on cooing.

Sayre, M.W.; Atkinson, R.D.; Baskett, T.S.; Haas, G.H.

1978-01-01

42

AN OVERVIEW ON FACTORS AFFECTING GLOBAL HRM  

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Full Text Available The mounting economic interdependence of countries globally through rising volume and multiplicity of cross border transactions in goods and services and international capital flows, and also through the more rapid and prevalent diffusion of technology had influences organizations that compete for customers with high expectations for performance, quality, and cost. The globe trade and industry order is changing speedily. Evolutionary transformations are taking place at revolutionary speed, principally pressed by strong external forces, arising out of a desire to rising competitiveness and competence. The organizations of world are no longer defined by national boundaries. Globalization also put forth stress on the Human Resource Management (HRM function to adjust to changing organizational needs, add greater value and hence, HRM is especially involved with those employees who are working across national boundaries in multinational or global enterprises. Functioning on an international level entails that the assumption of a universality of HR policies and practices and the faith in to administer in one best way has become indefensible. Aglobal organization wishes a worldwide HRM system that features decision making from a global point of view, managers from across national boundaries, and thoughts contributed by people from a diversity of cultures. The participants from different countries and cultures contribute ideas from a position of equality, rather than the home country's culture dominating. Organizations that function in more than one country must be acquainted with the countries that are not identical and differ in terms of many factors. This present research paper is an attempt to reviews major factors affecting HRM. The intention of this study is to examine the challenges/factors affecting the role of HRM.

G. G. Gondane

2014-09-01

43

Factors Affecting Profitability of Layer Hens Enterprises  

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Full Text Available Problem statement: Layer hen enterprises suffer from low profitability or losses in many of developing countries all over the world. Jordan is not an acceptance. Approach: This study aimed at investigating the influence of ten main factors affecting the profitability of layer hen producers. The investigated factors include price of purchased pullet, feed price, cost of labor, cost of veterinary service and medicine, building and machinery depreciation, repairs and maintenance and miscellaneous costs, length of production cycle, feed conversion ratio, mortality rate, egg sale price and laying percentage. Results: The study used a multiple regression profit model to estimate the effect of the above mentioned factors on profit per kg egg produced. The direction and quantity of relationship between profit per kg egg and variables affecting profit were investigated. Data from 40 operating and randomly selected egg production enterprises in the country was collected. Data was obtained directly from the producers during April to mid August 2010. Semi structured interviews were conducted with a pre-tested questionnaire. The data obtained via interview surveys were processed to calculate profit per kg egg and other relevant information for inclusion in a profit function model. Fifteen eggs are registered to be 1 kg in the study. Cost and income items used to calculate profit in the study. The results of the study revealed that the feed price was found to be the factor which has the highest negative impact on the profitability showing the coefficient-3.01. The egg sale price was with high positive impact on profitability showing the coefficient 2.633. Conclusion/Recommendations: From the results of the study it could be concluded that higher prices of purchased or breeding pullet, higher feed price, higher cost of labor, higher cost of veterinary service and medicine, higher other costs including building and machinery depreciation, repairs and maintenance and miscellaneous costs, higher feed quantity to be converted to eggs and higher mortality rate are associated with lower profitability of laying hen enterprises, while higher length of production cycle, higher egg sale price and higher laying percentage are associated with higher profitability. Critical limits indicated for various cost components should be used as a guideline to adjust budget in commercial egg operation thereby, ensuring higher net profit per bird.

Ebraheem Altahat

2012-01-01

44

Factors affecting passive monitoring of radon  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In recent years, increasing cancer has been expressed as a possible health hazards associated with long-term exposures to a large population at a low level of radon in the environment. Because radon is ubiquitous nuclide, nation-wide monitoring is necessary to determine lung cancer risk. For such purpose, passive sampling methods with track etch detector or charcoal adsorption collector may have the advantage in lower cost and convenience. The charcoal adsorption collector is considered in this study. Various factors may significantly affect the charcoal adsorption mechanism on its practical application. Moisture effects are discussed here as having major impact on radon collection by charcoal. Set of equations are presented in this report to describe adsorption of radon including moisture effects. (author) 61 refs

45

Factors affecting success of agricultural producers groups  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Poor organisation of agricultural markets in Poland remains one of the biggest problems for agricultural sector. There are about 510 agricultural producer groups, but only 2% of Polish farmers selling for market are members. Knowledge on cooperation determinants and different aspects of producer groups performance is crucial to build references for policy makers and producer groups’ managers. The aim of the article was to discuss factors affecting success of producers groups understood as a level of members’ satisfaction. Data for 2006 and 2011 from 30 producers groups in fruit and vegetable sector were analysed using logit model. Three determinants occurred to be statistically important: scope of a group functions, informal cooperation with farmers before starting a formal cooperation and homogeneity of farms.

Aleksandra Chlebicka

2011-01-01

46

EXPLORE SIGNIFICANT FACTORS TO AFFECT CUSTOMER INVOLVEMENT  

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Full Text Available Although literature review supported the concept that customer loyalty, brand equity and perceived risk are significant factors to affect customer involvement, very limited studies have extensively examined the relationship among those variables. This research applied quantitative study to comprehensively explore the relationship between customer loyalty, brand equity, perceived risk and customer involvement for consumers. The population for this research was identified as consumers having the shopping experience for digital camera. The findings supported the hypothesis that customer loyalty, brand equity and perceived risk have significant and positive relationship to customer involvement. The findings identified the predictors of customer loyalty, brand equity and perceived risk on the customer involvement and generated the recommendations for corporate operations and future scholar studies.

Yu-Jia Hu

2012-01-01

47

Factors Affecting Informal Economy of Rural Turkey  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this study, the informal economy in the rural areas of Turkey has been measured and factors affecting the informal economy have been analyzed. The informal economy has been discussed with regards to three main issues, namely unpaid household labor force usage, own consumption of crop and animal products and informal sales. Although the household labor force is mainly used in farms for agricultural and off-farm activities, the rate of idle labor has been found to be highly significant. It has been found that milk has the largest share of animal produce values consumed by the household, while particularly processed milk products are sold informally and that the consumption and sales values of animal produce processed in the households are required to be added to the unrecorded value calculation. Consumption of crops varies depending on the type of product. The own consumption ratio of crops is affected by the size of the enterprise, the number of individuals in the households and particularly the access to the markets of the enterprises in each region. An average informal value of 6,400.04 USD has been calculated per household, which is higher than the farm income, accounting for 4/5 of total household income. This can be attributed to the fact that the farms are generally small family enterprises with limited market-access opportunities.

Sertac Gonenc

2007-01-01

48

Factors Affecting E-Service Satisfaction  

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Full Text Available User satisfaction is an important predictor of online consumer behavior and the success of a web-based system. If customers are satisfied with the services received through the online system, it is likely they will keep using the system. To examine factors affecting user satisfaction with e-services, a questionnaire was distributed to a random sample of (615 students out of (5918 at Petra University in Jordan to explore their perceptions. Regression analysis was conducted to test the hypotheses. The results indicated that website design, navigation, and personalization were found to be predictors of e-service satisfaction. The results of this study provide a comprehensive set of implications for practitioners and researchers. This study shows how the website design, navigation, and personalization play a crucial role in the overall evaluation of e-service satisfaction. Management of universities need to be aware that a bad experience with website design, navigation, and personalization can affect satisfaction, if a student has a bad experience regarding interactivity, customization, or website design, then a student might make an overall e-service judgment even before a transaction can take place. If customers believe that an organization’s website is hard to use, poorly designed, and doesn’t take into consideration distinguished services for each user, then customers are likely to move to other organizations’ websites.

Mohammed Mufaddy Al-Kasasbeh

2011-03-01

49

Factors Affecting Informal Economy of Rural Turkey  

Science.gov (United States)

In this study, the informal economy in the rural areas of Turkey has been measured and factors affecting the informal economy have been analyzed. The informal economy has been discussed with regards to three main issues, namely unpaid household labor force usage, own consumption of crop and animal products and informal sales. Although the household labor force is mainly used in farms for agricultural and off-farm activities, the rate of idle labor has been found to be highly significant. It has been found that milk has the largest share of animal produce values consumed by the household, while particularly processed milk products are sold informally and that the consumption and sales values of animal produce processed in the households are required to be added to the unrecorded value calculation. Consumption of crops varies depending on the type of product. The own consumption ratio of crops is affected by the size of the enterprise, the number of individuals in the households and particularly the access to the markets of the enterprises in each region. An average informal value of 6,400.04 USD has been calculated per household, which is higher than the farm income, accounting for 4/5 of total household income. This can be attributed to the fact that the farms are generally small family enterprises with limited market-access opportunities.

Gonenc, Sertac; Tanrivermis, Harun

50

Phonon affected transport through molecular quantum dots.  

Science.gov (United States)

To describe the interaction of molecular vibrations with electrons at a quantum dot contacted to metallic leads, we extend an analytical approach that we previously developed for the many-polaron problem. Our scheme is based on an incomplete variational Lang-Firsov transformation, combined with a perturbative calculation of the electron-phonon self-energy in the framework of generalized Matsubara functions. This allows us to describe the system at weak-to-strong coupling and intermediate-to-large phonon frequencies. We present results for the quantum dot spectral function and for the kinetic coefficient that characterizes the electron transport through the dot. With these results we critically examine the strengths and limitations of our approach, and discuss the properties of the molecular quantum dot in the context of polaron physics. We place particular emphasis on the importance of corrections to the concept of an anti-adiabatic dot polaron suggested by the complete Lang-Firsov transformation. PMID:21832393

Loos, J; Koch, T; Alvermann, A; Bishop, A R; Fehske, H

2009-09-30

51

FACTORS AFFECTING PHARMACOKINETIC DISPOSITION OF DRUGS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Absorption of drugs from the gastrointestinal tract is a complex process the variability of which is influenced by many physicochemical and physiologic factors. The two most important physicochemical factors that affect both the extent and the rate of absorption are lipophilicity and solubility. The rate and extent of absorption are governed by the solubility, permeability and stability of the drug, with solubility being a pH-dependent parameter for weak acids and bases. The gastrointestinal tract can be viewed as discrete sections with a variety of differential local pH environments ranging from the acidic stomach to the more basic small intestine. The multiple peaking, double peaking or secondary peaking phenomena can occur in the disposition of a variety of xenobiotics during drug development (the pre-clinical phase and in subsequent clinical studies and use. The physicochemical and physiological mechanisms underlying the occurrence of this phenomenon are often multi factorial and include but are not limited to solubility-limited absorption, modified-release formulations, complexation, enterohepatic recirculation, gastric emptying and the intestinal transit time, site-specific absorption, gastric secretion-enteral reabsorption. Double peak absorption has been described with several orally administered drugs such as cimetidine furosemide, piroxicam, ranitidine, talinolol, alprazolam and phenazopyridine.

Mehta Hiren R

2011-05-01

52

Research of Factors Affecting Pension Funds Efficiency  

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Full Text Available Currently Lithuania has an old-age pension system of three pillars.Unfortunately, when making an investment decision, too few factors are used that affect strategy effectiveness. It is necessary to develop tools to better assess the risks and more accurately simulate the potential long-term investment scenarios.The article deals with the investment strategy to the second and third pillar pension funds in order to maximize investment returns and reduce risks. A smart software tool allows you to simulate an accrual depending on the rate of return, the accumulation period, the level of contributions, the fund’s profitability and other factors.The study shows that using the Social Insurance Fund contributions, personal contributions and the state provided additives can accumulate significantly greater amounts of money than collecting only the second pillar pension funds contributions. For implementation of the proposed methodology it is necessary to ensure a minimum level of personal pension scheme members fundraising to the third pillar pension funds. On the other hand, the study revealed that in some cases investment to private pension funds can be useless.Private pension funds have become popular between unprofessional investors who don’t have sufficient knowledge. Research shows that financial institutions do not always provide the optimal proposals. Advanced software tools can help make better investment decisions. Commercial tools usually show potential profits of investment, but not always pay sufficient attention to potential risks. This article analyzes both good and bad investment scenarios.

Virgilijus Sakalauskas

2011-12-01

53

BiP Negatively Affects Ricin Transport  

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Full Text Available The AB plant toxin ricin binds both glycoproteins and glycolipids at the cell surface via its B subunit. After binding, ricin is endocytosed and then transported retrogradely through the Golgi to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER. In the ER, the A subunit is retrotranslocated to the cytosol in a chaperone-dependent process, which is not fully explored. Recently two separate siRNA screens have demonstrated that ER chaperones have implications for ricin toxicity. ER associated degradation (ERAD involves translocation of misfolded proteins from ER to cytosol and it is conceivable that protein toxins exploit this pathway. The ER chaperone BiP is an important ER regulator and has been implicated in toxicity mediated by cholera and Shiga toxin. In this study, we have investigated the role of BiP in ricin translocation to the cytosol. We first show that overexpression of BiP inhibited ricin translocation and protected cells against the toxin. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated depletion of BiP enhanced toxin translocation resulting in increased cytotoxicity. BiP-dependent inhibition of ricin toxicity was independent of ER stress. Our findings suggest that in contrast to what was shown with the Shiga toxin, the presence of BiP does not facilitate, but rather inhibits the entry of ricin into the cytosol.

Kirsten Sandvig

2013-05-01

54

Factors that affect toilet training in children  

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Full Text Available Objective: To identify age of initiation of toilet training and affecting factors for children. Material and Methods: 861 children were included in this study. "Chi square test", "Mann-Whitney U Test" and "Kruskall-Wallis Variance Analysis" statistical analysis methods have been applied. Ethical permission has been provided by local ethical committee. Results: 861 children under age of five were evaluated in this study (average age was 4±0.9; 433 children were boy (50.3%, 428 children were girl (49.7%. Age of initiation of toilet training was younger than 1 years old for 45 children (5.2%, between 13-18 month for 223 children (25.9%, between 19-24 month for 307 children (35.7%, between 25-30 month for 201 children (23.3% and older than 30 month for 85 children (9.9%. That families who live below hunger threshold and small families initiate toilet training earlier that other families were determined (p=0.001. Children in 19-24 month have shorter duration of toilet training than other groups (p<0.05. That children who live in shanty have longer duration of toilet training than children who live in apartment were determined (p=0,031. That 219 children (25.4% who had faced traumatic experiences which may affect training process, recently have longer duration of toilet training than other children (p=0,008. Duration of the training is shorter for f amilies who did not use toilet training methods than families who used methods. Conclusion: In our study, we found that age of initiation of toilet training is smaller for children who belong to family which has low level of income and small families. Duration of training is the longer for children whose initiation of toilet training was earlier than 18 month and later than 30 month, live in shanty, faced traumatic experiences.

Serdar Önen

2012-01-01

55

Factors affecting gene transformation in mangosteen  

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Full Text Available Factors affecting gene transformation in mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana L. were investigated. Types of explants, strains and densities of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, and co-culture methods were examined to optimize gene transformation. The results showed that among strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens tested, LBA 4404 containing pBI 121 gave the calli with the highest resistance to kanamycin. Kanamycin at the concentration of 50-100 mg/l was the best range for selection of transformants. Higher density of agrobacteria tended to promote higher frequency of transformation. The best co-culture method was dipping the explant in a solution of agrobacteria for 10 minutes, followed by culturing onto co-culture medium without antibiotic for 48 hours. Among the explants used to co- culture with bacteria, half leaf treatment gave the best result for transformation; however, callus proliferation and plantlet regeneration were inferior to whole leaf treatment. Activity of ?-Glucuronidase (GUS could not be detected, thus resistance to kanamycin was used for detecting transformability. Shoot primordia could be induced from kanamycin-resistant calli grown in regeneration medium. After maintenance by subculturing to the same medium 2 to 3 times in 2-3 months, the developed shoots turned brown and finally died. Hence, the transformed plant of mangosteen was not obtained from this experiment.

Sompong Te-chato

2003-05-01

56

Factors affecting small axial cooling fan performance  

Science.gov (United States)

Many factors such as outer diameter, hub ratio, blade numbers, shape and stagger angle affect the performance of small cooling fans. A small cooling fan was simulated using CFD software for three blade stagger angles (30.5°, 37.5°, 44.5°)and obtained the internal flow field and the static characteristics. Research indicated that the stagger angle has an obvious effect on the static characteristics of a fan. For flow rates below 0.0104 m3/s, total pressure is the greatest when the stagger angle is 37.5°; flow rates higher than 0.0104 m3/s, the total pressure is greatest when the stagger angle is 44.5° For the same flow rates, the velocity at inlet of pressure surface increases with increasing stagger angle, but the change of velocity on the suction surface is very small. For one model, vortices and the speed of revolution surfaces decrease with tip clearance increasing. But for other three models, increasing the stagger angle, the vortex intensity and speed of revolution surfaces at same height tip clearance increases, simultaneously, the position of vortex offset from the top of the rotor blade to the suction surface.

Wang, Lihong; Jin, Yingzi; Cui, Baoling; Jin, Yuzhen; Lin, Jin; Wang, Yanping; Wu, Chuanyu

2010-04-01

57

Factors Affecting Career Progress of MBA Students  

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Full Text Available This paper explored the factors that affect career progress of students in the MBA program of the University of the Philippines.To understand career progression, four measures of career progress were used in this study, namely: number of promotions, number of years in between promotions, total cash compensation, and number of administrative levels from the company president. On the other hand, the factors used to explain career progess included human capital, organizational, interpersonal and demographic variables.The results showed that the different measures of career progress had distinct determinants implying different dynamics. It appeared that measures of career progress that are sensitive to the value employers attach to the individual (Whitely, Dougherty, & Dreher, 1991 such as total compensation, total number of promotion and years per promotion were related with human capital factors such as work experience and number of companies worked for. On the other hand, measures that relate to centrality if the position, in which market forces have less impact, were associated with organizational variables such as organization size and the demographic variable gender.While gender did not explain variation in total compensation, number of promotions and number of uears between promotions, these null results are important for two reasons. First, it implies that the female MBA students were at par with their male counterparts as fas as these measures of career progress are concerned. Second, it challenges the generalizability of the finding of gender segregation at the organizational level-where men receive significantly higher wages that women-which is a common finding among studies done in the United States. The results using the MBA students as sample show that income and promotion parity may indeed be achievable and this brings hope to women in general.However, the statistical significance of gender in explaining career progress as centrality of position does not augur well for women. This result implies that despite the fact that the women in the sample were intelligent (that is, they passed the stringent MBA screening, motivated and obviously were able to manage their time well-being able to balance work, school and in some cases, family responsibilities-they were still far removed from the top. These women still faced some hostile environment that prevented them from fully contributing to making decisions that matter.

Vivien T. Supangco

2001-06-01

58

Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors  

Science.gov (United States)

... Current Issue Past Issues Research News From NIH Low Calorie Diet Affects Aging-Related Factors Past Issues / ... to learn more about the effects of sustained low-calorie diets in humans on factors affecting aging. ...

59

Factors affecting proximal tubular reabsorption during development  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Studies performed in several animal species have demonstrated that glomerulotubular balance is maintained throughout development despite the many changes that occur in the factors known to control it. In an attempt to understand the nature of this phenomenon the authors quantified the magnitude and described the profile of these changes in guinea pigs. The changes in physical forces were assessed from measurements of hydrostatic and oncotic pressures, whereas those in the permeability characteristics of the proximal tubule epithelium were estimated from permanence to radioactivity-labelled macromolecules of graded radii, histologic measurements of the intercellular channels, and measurements of end-proximal ratio of tubular fluid-to-plasma osmolality (TF/P/sub osm/). Between 1 and 50 days of age the net pressure for reabsorption increased from 15.0 to 30.9 mmHg with the major change occurring during the first 2-3 wk of postnatal life. The urinary recovery of [3H]inulin, [14C]sucrose, and [14C]creatinine, injected in the early segment of proximal tubules did not vary with age. The urinary recovery of [14C]mannitol increased from 92% at birth to 100% at 49 days of age. The length of the zonulae occludens and the width of the intercellular channels did not change during this period. The findings support the hypothesis that during early postnatal life glomerulotubular balance is made possible by a high permeability of the proximal tubule, which compensates for the low net reabsorptive pressure. As the animal matures and the proximal tubule epithelium becomes tighter, for glomerulotubular balance to be maintained, an increase in the number of intercellular channels and in the active transport of sodium need to be postulated

60

Factors affecting the stability of chloroplast membranes in vitro  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Factors which affect the stability of light-induced atebrin fluorescence quenching activity in chloroplast membranes, a measure of the electron transport dependent formation of energy-linked H/sup +/ gradients, were investigated in vitro. Class II spinach chloroplast membranes were isolated and stored at 0 to 4/sup 0/C and aliquots were subsequently tested for their retention of energizing capacity. The main factors which increase the stability of this activity were found to be (a) isolation in a potassium-containing medium but storage in a sucrose medium containing a low concentration of electrolytes; (b) the presence of butylated hydroxytoluene (an antioxidant), and a protein such as bovine serum albumin to remove free fatty acids in the medium during storage. Under these conditions, the energization capacity of chloroplasts is retained for more than 40 days.

Takaoki, T.; Torres-Pereira, J.; Packer, L.

1974-01-01

 
 
 
 
61

Factors affecting ejection risk in rollover crashes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Ejection greatly increases the risk of injury and fatality in a rollover crash. The purpose of this study was to determine the crash, vehicle, and occupant characteristics that affect the risk of ejection in rollovers. Information from real world rollover crashes occurring from 2000 - 2010 was obtained from the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) in order to analyze the effect of the following parameters on ejection risk: seatbelt use, rollover severity, vehicle type, seating position, roof crush, side curtain airbag deployment, glazing type, and occupant age, gender, and size. Seatbelt use was found to reduce the risk of partial ejection and virtually eliminate the risk of complete ejection. For belted occupants, the risk of partial ejection risk was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, light trucks and vans (LTVs), and larger occupants. For unbelted occupants, the risk of complete ejection was significantly increased in rollover crashes involving more roof inversions, LTVs, far side occupants, and higher levels of roof crush. Roof crush was not a significant predictor of ejection after normalizing for rollover severity. Curtain airbag deployment was associated with reduced rates of partial and complete ejection, but the effect was not statistically significant, perhaps due to the small sample size (n = 89 raw cases with curtain deployments). A much greater proportion of occupants who were ejected in spite of curtain airbag deployment passed through the sunroof and other portals as opposed to the adjacent side window compared to occupants who were ejected in rollovers without a curtain airbag deployment. The primary factors that reduce ejection risk in rollover crashes are, in generally decreasing order of importance: seatbelt use, fewer roof inversions, passenger car body type, curtain airbag deployment, near side seating position, and small occupant size. PMID:23169130

Funk, James R; Cormier, Joseph M; Bain, Charles E; Wirth, Jeffrey L; Bonugli, Enrique B; Watson, Richard A

2012-01-01

62

Factors Affecting Transfer of Training in Thailand  

Science.gov (United States)

To begin the validation process for the Learning Transfer System Inventory (LTSI) in Thailand, research replicating Holton, Bates, and Ruona's study (2000) was conducted in Thailand. The LTSI was administered to 1,029 employees. Exploratory factor analysis and MANOVA were used to identify factors. A factor structure almost identical to that of…

Yamnill, Siriporn; McLean, Gary N.

2005-01-01

63

Factors Affecting Turkish Students' Achievement in Mathematics  

Science.gov (United States)

Following past researches, student background, learning strategies, self-related cognitions in mathematics and school climate variables were important for achievement. The purpose of this study was to identify a number of factors that represent the relationship among sets of interrelated variables using principal component factor analysis and…

Demir, Ibrahim; Kilic, Serpil; Depren, Ozer

2009-01-01

64

Epidemiological Factors Affecting Low Birth Weight  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine the epidemiological factors influencing low birthweight. The prominent factors associated with low birth weight (LBW such as maternal age, parity,obstetric and maternal anthropometry were studied in a rural community of district Dehradun. Theaverage birth weight of all newborns was 2.67± 0.42 kg and 23.84% of newborns were LBW. Thefactors which were significant for LBW were antenatal care, parity, inter-pregnancy interval, gestationalweight, and bad obstetric history. However, the relationship between maternal age and height withlow birth weight was not found to be statistically significant (p>.05.

K.S. Negi, S.D. Kandpal, M. Kukreti

2006-01-01

65

Methane transport and emissions from soil as affected by water table and vascular plants  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Background: The important greenhouse gas (GHG) methane is produced naturally in anaerobic wetland soils. By affecting the production, oxidation and transport of methane to the atmosphere, plants have a major influence upon the quantities emitted by wetlands. Different species and functional plant groups have been shown to affect these processes differently, but our knowledge about how these effects are influenced by abiotic factors such as water regime and temperature remains limited. Here...

Bhullar, Gurbir S.; Iravani, Majid; Edwards, Peter J.; Olde Venterink, Harry

2013-01-01

66

Factors Affecting Attitudes toward Juvenile Sex Offenders  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and factors influencing those attitudes. Additionally, the influences of perpetrator characteristics such as age, gender, and ethnicity on societal attitudes towards intervention requirements were also investigated. Overall, attitudes toward juvenile sex offenders and their treatment…

Sahlstrom, Kimberly J.; Jeglic, Elizabeth L.

2008-01-01

67

Factors affecting alum-protein interactions.  

Science.gov (United States)

Alum (or aluminum-containing) adjuvants are key components of many vaccines currently on the market. The immuno-potentiation effect of alum adjuvants is presumably due to their interaction with antigens, leading to adsorption on the alum particle surface. Understanding the mechanism of antigen adsorption/desorption and its influencing factors could provide guidance on formulation design and ensure proper in-vivo immuno-potentiation effect. In this paper, surface adsorption of several model proteins on two types of aluminum adjuvants (Alhydrogel(®) and Adjuphos(®)) are investigated to understand the underlying adsorption mechanisms, capacities, and potential influencing factors. It was found that electrostatic interactions are the major driving force for surface adsorption of all the model proteins except ovalbumin. Alhydrogel has a significantly higher adsorption capacity than Adjuphos. Several factors significantly change the adsorption capacity of both Alhydrogel and Adjuphos, including molecular weight of protein antigens, sodium chloride, phosphate buffer, denaturing agents, and size of aluminum particles. These important factors need to be carefully considered in the design of an effective protein antigen-based vaccine. PMID:24607202

Huang, Min; Wang, Wei

2014-05-15

68

Factors That Affect Performance in Accounting Classes.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study determined (1) effect of high school bookkeeping on college accounting performance, (2) relationship of performance to potential measured by SCAT, (3) influence of first on subsequent study. For number one, five factors were studied: (1) whether bookkeeping was taken in high school, (2) at which high school, (3) how many courses, (4)…

San Mateo Coll., CA.

69

SOME FACTORS AFFECTING UNDERGRADUATE ACADEMIC ACHIEVEMENT.  

Science.gov (United States)

A related series of studies, most of which have been published previously, is described. These studies form a coherent whole and demonstrate the development of a theme, namely, the identification of factors in the student and the medical school which, in their interaction, influenced undergraduate academic performance at one medical school. In the population concerned no reliable positive or negative correlation could be demonstrated between cognitive ability and academic performance, when the former was measured by the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale and the Medical College Admission Test, and the latter by the current assessment methods of the medical school. Other factors, including socioeconomic and individual personality variables, are at present under investigation as to their effect on academic achievement. It is emphasized that the results of these studies cannot be regarded as valid for all medical schools, but the methods employed can be generalized. PMID:14278025

HUNTER, R C

1965-04-01

70

Factors Affecting Labour Productivity in Manufacturing Enterprises  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The article presents the results of the analysis of the factors influencing labour productivity in the manufacturing business sector in 20042008. Labour productivity was analyzed in the context of the assets productivity, technical equipment of work, labour intensity of production, wages, value added and depreciation costs, and using linear stepwise regression. The study shows that despite significant progress, the level of labour productivity in domestic manufacturing significantly lower than the average in the European Union. Lower than in Poland, the level of labour productivity gain only companies in Romania, Bulgaria, Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia. Estimated parameters of the regression function showed that the most important determinants of labour productivity in manufacturing are technical equipment of work, labour intensity of production, assets productivity, level of added value in relation to revenues. These factors explain the variability of labour productivity in 20042008 in a high degree.

Zbigniew Go?a?

2011-07-01

71

Internal factors affecting the jury members verdict  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The article is devoted to the analysis of socio-demographic and individual psychological characteristics that influence the verdict of jury. The study involved 38 men and women aged 25 to 64 years. With the help of a questionnaire, developed on the basis of legal development model by J. Tapp and F. Levine, we revealed levels of jury members’ legal conscience, which, together with socio-demographic characteristics and personality characteristics of the subjects, identified by R. Cattell 16PF Questionnaire, were related to the responses on the Questionnaire while returning verdict on specially selected criminal cases with implicit guilt of the defendant. According to the study, it was determined that the socio-demographic characteristics of the jurors did not significantly affect their verdict, and among the psychological characteristics of the jurors the greatest impact on their verdict has the level of legal development. Thus, depending on the nature of the crime (violent, non-violent or committed through negligence, the same level of legal conscience differently affect the decision of jurors.

Kalashnikova A.S.

2013-09-01

72

Factors Affecting The Retention Of Knowledge Workers  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

One of the characteristics of knowledge workers is their high level of mobility. The cost of labour turnover of these key resources is high in both financial and non financial terms. There is thus a need to understand what the factors are that underpin the retention cognitions of knowledge workers. Data was collected from 306 knowledge workers in full time employment representing a wide range of demographic groupings. The results showed that job satisfaction and organisational commitment do n...

Wilhelm Jordaan; Margie Sutherland

2004-01-01

73

Risk factors affecting pancreatic fistulas after pancreaticoduodenectomy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the risk factors of pancreatic leakage after pancreaticoduodenectomy.METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 172 consecutive patients who had undergone pancreatico-duodenectomy at Inha University Hospital between April 1996 and March 2006. We analyzed the pancreatic fistula rate according to the clinical characteristics, the pathologic and laboratory findings, and the anastomotic methods.RESULTS: The incidence of developing pancreatic fistulas in patients older than 60 years of age was 21.7% (25/115, while the incidence was 8.8% (5/57 for younger patients; the difference was significant (P = 0.03. Patients with a dilated pancreatic duct had a lower rate of post-operative pancreatic fistulas than patients with a non-dilated duct (P = 0.001. Other factors, including clinical features, anastomotic methods, and pathologic diagnosis, did not show any statistical difference.CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated that pancreatic fistulas are related to age and a dilated pancreatic duct. The surgeon must take these risk factors into consideration when performing a pancre-aticoduodenectomy.

Yun-Mee Choe, Keon-Young Lee, Cheong-Ah Oh, Joung-Bum Lee, Sun Keun Choi, Yoon-Seok Hur, Sei-Joong Kim, Young Up Cho, Seung-Ik Ahn, Kee-Chun Hong, Seok-Hwan Shin, Kyung-Rae Kim

2008-12-01

74

Factors affecting fuel rate in Corex process  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The Corex process has been developed as an alternative to the blast furnace where 80-85% non-coking coal and 15-20% coke is used as fuel for heat generation, production of reduction gases and to maintain adequate char bed permeability in the melter-gasifier. Non-coking coals, which can be used in Corex, have to meet certain physical, chemical and high temperature properties for stable process and to attain high performance levels. JSW Steel operates largest Corex based integrated steel plant with two modules each of 0.8 Mtpa capacity where several coals have been used so far and the type of coal used significantly influenced operation. Statistical analysis shows that the significant parameters affecting fuel rate are moisture, volatile matter, slag rate and melting rate. It was observed that at high rate of production, stability and permeability of char bed becomes critical hence coals producing char of high strength after reaction are required.

Kumar, P.P.; Gupta, D.; Naha, T.K.; Gupta, S.S. [JSW Steel Ltd., Bellary (India)

2006-08-15

75

Factors Affecting Industrial Cogeneration of Electricity.  

Science.gov (United States)

This research addresses the need to understand the conditions under which industrial firms will generate their own electricity. Utility companies need this information to plan their future expansion. Equipment manufacturers need this information to plan their production and industrial firms need it to help make decisions. The specific purpose of this research was to determine which factors are good determinates of industrial cogeneration. This research used a two-pronged triangulation approach. The first approach was a statistical analysis of levels of cogeneration and selected production variables for industrial firms. The second approach was a survey of industrial firms, energy consultants and utility personnel. The statistical analysis found most of the variance in on-site cogeneration is explained using variables that directly impact the economics of cogeneration. These variables included the cost of energy sources, steam usage, and the use of other fuels. The survey confirmed these results and added the cost of the cogeneration equipment as an another important factor in explaining on-site cogeneration.

Richardson, Ronny Lee

76

Scale Development: Factors Affecting Diet, Exercise, and Stress Management (FADESM)  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background The objective of this study was to develop scales measuring personal and environmental factors that affect dietary fat intake behavior, physical activity, and stress management in low-income mothers. Methods FADESM (factors affecting diet, exercise, and stress management) scales were developed using the Social Cognitive Theory to measure personal (outcome expectancies, self-efficacy, emotional coping response) and environmental (physical envi...

Nitzke Susan; Brown Roger; Chang Mei-Wei

2008-01-01

77

Genetic factors affecting susceptibility to udder pathogens.  

Science.gov (United States)

Many studies have identified genetic factors underlying resistance or susceptibility to mastitis in dairy cows and heifers. Some authors focused on polygenic variation while others searched for genes and/or quantitative trait loci with major effects on mastitis. Classical traits related to mastitis include somatic cell counts, electrical conductivity and clinical cases of the disease. With the development of automatic milking devices and '-omics' technologies, new traits are considered, such as acute phase proteins, immunological assays, and milk flow patterns, and new biological pathways are discovered, for example the role of mammary epithelium and the nervous system. The usefulness of these traits for the identification of resistant cows is discussed in relation to the biological mechanisms underlying the development of the disease. In addition, the utility of these traits for genetic improvement is reviewed. Finally, the problem of durability in resistance is addressed, including co-evolution and the cost of resistance. PMID:18930606

Detilleux, J C

2009-02-16

78

Treatment Compliance Affecting Factors in Hypertension  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Hypertension is to be responsible for death which accounts for 6% of adult deaths all over the world. It is the third ranks among causes of death. These ranks are similar both in developed and developing countries. Hypertension has important role causes of death. But, hypertension can be prevented to great extent. On the other hand, a lot of countries in the world hypertension control rates are reported to be inadequate in sample communities representing the general society and in patients treated under health service conditions. Patient no adherence to treatment is one of the significant factors in failing to raise blood pressure (BP control over 25% around the world and in our country. No adherence reason of hypertension treatment was examined in this review article. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2009; 8(2.000: 167-172

Rabia Hacihasanoglu

2009-04-01

79

Examining Factors Affecting Classroom Attendance and Performance  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available

Abstract: This study examined the relationship between four class attitudinal variables and how it affects class attendance and performance. A questionnaire was administered to 134 undergraduate students at medium sized college in Taiwan. The data included questions about the participant’s rating of the level of difficulty of the course (Difficulty, the topics covered in the course (Topics, their motivation towards attending the course (Motivation, and whether or not the participants felt that the course is practical and useful to their future (Practicality. The results of the Pearson correlation coefficients showed that 4 out of the 15 correlations were statistically significant. The negative correlation found between motivation and topics; and practicality and topics suggest the attitude that when choosing courses, students tend to choose courses that they think would easy to pass. The finding that none of the variables were significantly correlated to course attendance and course performance suggests that the strongest predictor of success of a course is based on the student’s level of attendance. This lead to the discussion in the conclusion about pedagogical implications for what teachers can do in their classrooms.

Peter Tze-Ming Chou

2012-02-01

80

Economic Factors Affecting Diversified Farming Systems  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In response to a shift toward specialization and mechanization during the 20th century, there has been momentum on the part of a vocal contingent of consumers, producers, researchers, and policy makers who call for a transition toward a new model of agriculture. This model employs fewer synthetic inputs, incorporates practices which enhance biodiversity and environmental services at local, regional, and global scales, and takes into account the social implications of production practices, market dynamics, and product mixes. Within this vision, diversified farming systems (DFS have emerged as a model that incorporates functional biodiversity at multiple temporal and spatial scales to maintain ecosystem services critical to agricultural production. Our aim is to provide an economists' perspective on the factors which make diversified farming systems (DFS economically attractive, or not-so-attractive, to farmers, and to discuss the potential for and roadblocks to widespread adoption. We focus on how a range of existing and emerging factors drive profitability and adoption of DFS. We believe that, in order for DFS to thrive, a number of structural changes are needed. These include: 1 public and private investment in the development of low-cost, practical technologies that reduce the costs of production in DFS, 2 support for and coordination of evolving markets for ecosystem services and products from DFS and 3 the elimination of subsidies and crop insurance programs that perpetuate the unsustainable production of staple crops. We suggest that subsidies and funding be directed, instead, toward points 1 and 2, as well as toward incentives for consumption of nutritious food.

Maria S. Bowman

2013-03-01

 
 
 
 
81

Factors Affecting The Retention Of Knowledge Workers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available One of the characteristics of knowledge workers is their high level of mobility. The cost of labour turnover of these key resources is high in both financial and non financial terms. There is thus a need to understand what the factors are that underpin the retention cognitions of knowledge workers. Data was collected from 306 knowledge workers in full time employment representing a wide range of demographic groupings. The results showed that job satisfaction and organisational commitment do not predict knowledge workers’ proposed future length of service.Factor analysis revealed seven underlying dimensions of retention cognitions. Cluster analysis revealed nine distinct clusters of knowledge workers with regard to their retention cognitions. High levels of individualism, need for challenge and focus on personal development were demonstrated. The implications of these findings are discussed. Opsomming
Een van die eienskappe van kenniswerkers is hulle hoë vlak van mobiliteit. Die koste van arbeidsomset van hierdie sleutelbronne is hoog in beide finansiële en nie-finansiële terme. Daar bestaan dus ’n behoefte om die faktore wat onderliggend is aan die retensiekognisies van kenniswerkers te verstaan. Data is ingesamel van 306 kenniswerkers in voltydse diens wat ’n wye reeks demografiese groeperings verteenwoordig. Die resultate dui daarop dat werktevredenheid en organisasieverbondenheid nie die kenniswerkers se verwagte lengte van diens voorspel nie. Faktorontleding het sewe onderliggende dimensies van retensiekognisies blootgelê. ’n Bondelontleding het nege duidelike bondels van kenniswerkers ten opsigte van hulle retensiekognisies onderskei. Hoë vlakke van individualisme, behoefte aan uitdaging en fokus op persoonlike ontwikkeling is aangedui. Die implikasies van hierdie bevindinge word bespreek.

Wilhelm Jordaan

2004-11-01

82

Factors Affecting Patient Satisfaction During Endoscopic Procedures  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Objective: To assess the quality and patient satisfaction in Endoscopy Unit of Shifa International Hospital. Study Design: Cross-sectional survey. Place and Duration of Study: Division of Gastroenterology, Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, Pakistan, from July 2011 to January 2012. Methodology: Quality and patient satisfaction after the endoscopic procedure was assessed using a modified GHAA-9 questionnaire. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 16. Results: A total of 1028 patients were included with a mean age of 45 A+- 14.21 years. Out of all the procedures, 670 (65.17%) were gastroscopies, 181 (17.60%) were flexible sigmoidoscopies and 177 (17.21%) were colonoscopies. The maximum unsatisfactory responses were on the waiting time before the procedure (13.13 %), followed by unsatisfactory explanation of the procedure and answers to questions (7.58%). Overall, unsatisfied impression was 4.86%. The problem rate was 6.22%. Conclusion: The quality of procedures and level of satisfaction of patients undergoing a gastroscopy or colonoscopy was generally good. The factors that influence the satisfaction of these patients are related to communication between doctor and patient, doctor's manner and waiting time for the procedure. Feedback information in an endoscopy unit may be useful in improving standards, including the performance of endoscopists. (author)

83

FACTORS AFFECTING VASECTOMY ACCEPTABILITY IN ETHIOPIA  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available ABSTRACT: Vasectomy is one of the most effective but less utilized types of contraception method which could addresses the involvement of males to the family planning. The aim of the study was therefore to investigate the awareness about and practice of men towards vasectomy among workers in Dashen brewery, Ethiopia. Descriptive cross sectional study was conducted using pre tested self-administered questioner to assess the Knowledge, attitude and factors associated with low utilization of vasectomy. A total of 187 study participants were included to this study using single population proportion formula and random sampling technique. Majority of the participants 155 (82.9% never heard about vasectomy as a contraception method. Their knowledge about vasectomy is generally very poor as large proportion of respondents didn’t know how it works, its effectiveness and its effect on their sexual performance. None of the respondents have ever used vasectomy as a modern male contraception method. Misleading information towards its impact on sexual performance/desire was reported as a main reason not to use this method. Among others need of more children, unavailability of services, lack of information, spouse refusal and religious concerns were mentioned as a potential reasons for their negative perception towards vasectomy. Lack of awareness, myths and rumors, limited access to services, and indifference and bias on the part of providers about vasectomy limit its popularity in Ethiopia. Therefore, it is vital to introduce appropriate educational plan to increase awareness and usage of vasectomy in Ethiopia.

E. Admasu , Negalign chekol , Temesegen Chekol , Z. Shewamene*, Zelalem Eteffa

2013-04-01

84

[The psychological factors affecting athletic performance].  

Science.gov (United States)

The physical and mental health complex is claimed as achievement of the XXI. century, whereby also among the sportsmen and sportswomen, beside the somatic medicine, growing attention is devoted to the psyche as well. The sports psychiatry was dragged in and put into service to enhance performance after all biological weapons run out of ammunition, and the long-awaited results still failed to come about. Moreover, despite the energy increasingly invested it was going from bad to worse. Among athletes many psychiatric disorders call attention, either by the high prevalence or by the development of a specific syndrome. Symptoms of depression (depression after the competition, depression following the failure at the competition), chronic stress, anxiety, fatigue syndrome of overtraining, enervation, sleep disturbances, eating problems, burnout, eating disorders (anorexia athletics, athlete triad), personality factors and the chemical addiction are all extremely important. The present study is the first to summarize the most crucial psychiatric disorders that may have great significance in the athlete population, in varying degrees according to the individual sports. PMID:20442052

Resch, Mária

2010-05-16

85

Factors affecting the performance of ultrasonic flowmeters  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A programme of work is currently underway at NEL to investigate and characterise the performance of liquid ultrasonic meters over a wide range of conditions. This paper presents the results of laboratory evaluations in addition to the initial results of combined flow and flowmeter modelling. Two-phase, oil/gas performance tests were conducted on commercially available meters of 4-inch nominal bore. Specific results have been selected to illustrate performance variations related to factors in meter design and operation. Two-phase, oil/water performance tests with water-cuts of up to 15 % were also conducted on the above meters. These results are presented in their entirety. The results show deviations from single-phase performance which vary for each meter design. Baseline calibration results for four commercially available clamp-on meters are presented. The results were obtained in good installation conditions on stainless steel pipes of 4-inch and 8-inch nominal bore. The results show different levels of accuracy associated with each meter and a general conformation with predicted behaviour. The final section of the paper presents results obtained by a systematic numerical method of determining the flow profile sensitivity of various meter configurations. The results provide quantitative confirmation of the reduced sensitivity of multipath designs to variations in the velocity profile. (author)

Brown, G.J.

1997-07-01

86

Factors affecting chromatin stability of bovine spermatozoa.  

Science.gov (United States)

The structural stability of transcriptionally inert paternal chromatin is of vital importance for the fertilization process and early embryonic development. Accordingly, a series of eight experiments were conducted during a 7-month period to investigate: (1) effects of bull breed, individuality, successive ejaculations, semen quality characteristics (SQC), semen dilution rates and hypothermic storage of semen in a Tris-egg yolk extender on incidence of sperm nuclear chromatin instability (NCI), and (2) effects of the interaction between variation of NCI within a frozen ejaculate and variation of oocytes quality due to maturation time and/or season on the efficiency of in vitro embryo production (IVEP). Semen samples were collected once a week from six bulls using an AV and only ejaculates (n=220) of >0.30x10(9) sperm/ml and >or=60% motility were used. NCI was measured by: (1) detection of lysine-rich histones in sperm chromatin using aniline blue staining, (2) sperm susceptibility to acid-induced nuclear DNA denaturation in situ using acridine orange test, and (3) sperm susceptibility to nuclear chromatin decondensation (NCD). Bovine oocytes (n=695) were matured in vitro for 18 or 24 h, fertilized after sperm selection through a swim-up procedure and cultured for 72 h. The results showed that the 2nd ejaculates were superior to the 1st ones with respect to chromatin stability. Dilution of semen to 49.67+/-8.56x10(6) sperm/ml (1:19) decreased resistance of sperm to NCD. Cooling of semen had no significant effect on chromatin stability. Cryopreservation of semen augmented sperm vulnerability to DNA denaturation. Improvement of SQC (semen volume, sperm motility, velocity, viability and morphological normalcy) was generally concomitant with increase of sperm resistance to NCI. While Blonde d'Aquitaine bulls had a resistance to NCD higher than Limousine bulls in fresh semen, the former showed a greater susceptibility to DNA denaturation than the latter in cooled semen. Individuality significantly influenced NCI. The variability of NCI within a frozen ejaculate affected efficiency of IVEP. Significant negative correlations were observed between incidence of NCI and both fertilization rate and developmental capacity of embryos after maturation of oocytes for 18 h. The significant variation in IVEP traits due to season was independent of the effect of sperm chromatin instability. PMID:17398042

Khalifa, T A A; Rekkas, C A; Lymberopoulos, A G; Sioga, A; Dimitriadis, I; Papanikolaou, Th

2008-03-01

87

Critical Factors that Affecting Efficiency of Solar Cells  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A solar cell or photovoltaic cell is a device which generates electricity directly from visible light. However, their efficiency is fairly low. So, the solar cell costs expensive according to other energy resources products. Several factors affect solar cell efficiency. This paper presents the most important factors that affecting efficiency of solar cells. These effects are cell temperature, MPPT (maximum power point tracking and energy conversion efficiency. The changing of these factors improves solar cell efficiency for more reliable applications.

Furkan Dincer

2010-05-01

88

Critical Factors that Affecting Efficiency of Solar Cells  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

A solar cell or photovoltaic cell is a device which generates electricity directly from visible light. However, their efficiency is fairly low. So, the solar cell costs expensive according to other energy resources products. Several factors affect solar cell efficiency. This paper presents the most important factors that affecting efficiency of solar cells. These effects are cell temperature, MPPT (maximum power point tracking) and energy conversion efficiency. The changing of these factors i...

Furkan Dincer; Mehmet Emin Meral

2010-01-01

89

Factorization of Transport Coefficients in Macroporous Media  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

We prove the fundamental theorem about factorization of the phenomenological coefficients for transport in macroporous media. By factorization we mean the representation of the transport coefficients as products of geometric parameters of the porous medium and the parameters characteristic of the multicomponent fluid saturating the porous space. The two permeabilities of the porous medium, the convective and the diffusional ones, are separated. A similarity between the diffusional permeability and the porosity-tortuosity factor of the Kozeny-Carman theory is demonstrated. We do not make any specific assumption about stochastic or deterministic structure of the porous medium. The fluxes in fluid on the pore level are described by general relations of the non-equilibrium thermodynamics.

Shapiro, Alexander; Stenby, Erling Halfdan

2000-01-01

90

Factors Affecting the Occurrence of Faculty-Doctoral Student Coauthorship  

Science.gov (United States)

Using faculty narratives, this study identifies factors affecting the occurrence of faculty-doctoral student coauthorship. Norms of the discipline, resources, faculty goals for students, faculty goals for themselves, and institutional expectations emerged as dominant factors. Each factor is explored separately and as part of an interlocking…

Maher, Michelle A.; Timmerman, Briana Crotwell; Feldon, David F.; Strickland, Denise

2013-01-01

91

Factors affecting return to driving post-stroke.  

LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

BACKGROUND: Stroke can affect a person\\'s ability to drive, an important means of transportation in the developed world. AIMS: To determine percentage of patients and factors associated with return to driving post-stroke in a service with emphasis on driver assessment. METHODS: Retrospective study of patients discharged from the Stroke Service of our 470-bed teaching hospital from 1998 to 2002. RESULTS: Of 72 drivers pre-stroke, 54% recalled a driving assessment and 68% returned to driving. Younger patients (58.6 +\\/- 12.0 vs. 66.5 +\\/- 10.5, p = 0.008) with lower Modified Rankin Score (median 1 vs. 2, p = 0.0001) and normal cognition (55 vs. 43%, p = 0.45) were more likely to resume driving. More patients who were assessed returned to driving than those who were not (74 vs. 61%, p = 0.31). CONCLUSIONS: A relatively high level of return to driving can be achieved post-stroke with a pro-active approach to driver assessment and rehabilitation. A structured assessment and referral programme should be offered where appropriate.

Tan, K M

2012-02-01

92

The Direct and Indirect Factors on Affecting Organizational Sustainability  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Successful firms pursue organizational sustainability. The aim of this study is to explore the direct and indirect factors affecting on organizational sustainability. Indirect factors being those that first influence competitive advantage, and then affecting organizational sustainability. This study analyzes 145 articles retrieved from the SDOL (Science Driect Online database that were published between 2009 and January 2013. Papers were retrieved using ‘organizational sustainability’ and ‘competitive advantage’ as keywords, searching on ‘Abstract, Title, Keywords’, and subject headings of ‘Business, Management and Accounting’. The results identify that 13 indirect factors and 3 direct factors can have an impact on organizational sustainability.

Meng-Shan Tsai

2013-11-01

93

Kjell J. Nilssen; Factors affecting energy expenditure in reindeer  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The thesis Factors affecting energy expenditure in reindeer by Kjell J. Nilssen was approved for the Phil, dr's degree at the University of Tromsø. The dissertation took place in Tromsø December 15.1984.

Sven Skjenneberg (ed.

1984-05-01

94

Kjell J. Nilssen; Factors affecting energy expenditure in reindeer  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The thesis Factors affecting energy expenditure in reindeer by Kjell J. Nilssen was approved for the Phil, dr's degree at the University of Tromsø. The dissertation took place in Tromsø December 15.1984.

Sven Skjenneberg (ed. in chief)

1984-01-01

95

FACTORS AFFECTING INTENT TO PURCHASE VIRTUAL GOODS IN ONLINE GAMES  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Online games increasingly sell virtual goods to generate real income. As a result, it isincreasingly important to identify factors and theory of consumption values that affect intent topurchase virtual goods in online games. However, very little research has been devoted to thetopic. This study is an empirical investigation of the factors and theory of consumption valuesthat affect intent to purchase virtual goods in online games. The study determines the effects ofgame type, satisfaction wit...

Cheng-Hsun Ho; Ting-Yun Wu

2012-01-01

96

What Factors Affect Response to Ads? A Perspective.  

Science.gov (United States)

The concept of "frame of reference" offers a perspective from which to examine the many factors which affect advertising response. The advertiser is interested in affecting two types of overt behavior. First, the individual is induced to select a particular stimulus (the advertisement) from competing stimuli (such as other people, noise, and other…

Rotzoll, Kim B.

97

Age as an Affective Factor in Second Language Acquisition  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper examines the relationship of age factor to second language acquisition. Age as an affective factor brings about different performance stages in second as well as first language learning. Traditionally, research in Critical Period Hypothesis and other variables has derived two major aspects of language learning--the younger = the better…

Bista, Krishna K.

2008-01-01

98

FACTORS AFFECTING TRACE METAL MOBILITY IN SUBSURFACE SOILS  

Science.gov (United States)

Field and laboratory studies were conducted to examine factors affecting metal movement in subsurface materials to groundwater and how these factors interact. Subsoil pH as with surface soils was found to be the property that most influenced metal immobilization. The inclusion of...

99

Physical factors affecting the electrically assisted thermal bitumen recovery  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In the heavy oil industry, thermal processes are used to enhance oil recovery by increasing the reservoir temperature which results in better oil mobility. Low frequency heating (LFH) is a technology using electrical conductivity of connate water to propagate current between electrodes, thus generating heat in the reservoir through the Joule effect. During the preheating and production periods, many physical factors may affect the LFH process and the aim of this study was to determine which factors affect the process and how, using a particular pattern of electrodes. Simulations were conducted using the CMG Stars reservoir simulator under different configurations, conditions and parameters. Important physical properties and operational conditions affecting the LFH process were determined and results showed that convection heat, bulk electrical conductivity and power distribution can be improved by salt water circulation. This paper highlighted the physical factors affecting LFH efficiency and these findings will be useful for future process design.

Bogdanov, I.I.; Torres, J.-A.; Kamp, A.M. [CHLOE, University of Pau (France); Corre, B. [CSTJF, Total (France)

2011-07-01

100

Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter and Multidrug Resistance 1 Genes: Parasite Risk Factors that Affect Treatment Outcomes for P. falciparum Malaria after Artemether-Lumefantrine and Artesunate-Amodiaquine  

Science.gov (United States)

Adequate clinical and parasitologic cure by artemisinin combination therapies relies on the artemisinin component and the partner drug. Polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes are associated with decreased sensitivity to amodiaquine and lumefantrine, but effects of these polymorphisms on therapeutic responses to artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) have not been clearly defined. Individual patient data from 31 clinical trials were harmonized and pooled by using standardized methods from the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network. Data for more than 7,000 patients were analyzed to assess relationships between parasite polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1 and clinically relevant outcomes after treatment with AL or ASAQ. Presence of the pfmdr1 gene N86 (adjusted hazards ratio = 4.74, 95% confidence interval = 2.29 – 9.78, P < 0.001) and increased pfmdr1 copy number (adjusted hazards ratio = 6.52, 95% confidence interval = 2.36–17.97, P < 0.001) were significant independent risk factors for recrudescence in patients treated with AL. AL and ASAQ exerted opposing selective effects on single-nucleotide polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1. Monitoring selection and responding to emerging signs of drug resistance are critical tools for preserving efficacy of artemisinin combination therapies; determination of the prevalence of at least pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y should now be routine. PMID:25048375

Venkatesan, Meera; Gadalla, Nahla B.; Stepniewska, Kasia; Dahal, Prabin; Nsanzabana, Christian; Moriera, Clarissa; Price, Ric N.; Martensson, Andreas; Rosenthal, Philip J.; Dorsey, Grant; Sutherland, Colin J.; Guerin, Philippe; Davis, Timothy M. E.; Menard, Didier; Adam, Ishag; Ademowo, George; Arze, Cesar; Baliraine, Frederick N.; Berens-Riha, Nicole; Bjorkman, Anders; Borrmann, Steffen; Checchi, Francesco; Desai, Meghna; Dhorda, Mehul; Djimde, Abdoulaye A.; El-Sayed, Badria B.; Eshetu, Teferi; Eyase, Frederick; Falade, Catherine; Faucher, Jean-Francois; Froberg, Gabrielle; Grivoyannis, Anastasia; Hamour, Sally; Houze, Sandrine; Johnson, Jacob; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Kariuki, Simon; Kiechel, Jean-Rene; Kironde, Fred; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; LeBras, Jacques; Malmberg, Maja; Mwai, Leah; Ngasala, Billy; Nosten, Francois; Nsobya, Samuel L.; Nzila, Alexis; Oguike, Mary; Otienoburu, Sabina Dahlstrom; Ogutu, Bernhards; Ouedraogo, Jean-Bosco; Piola, Patrice; Rombo, Lars; Schramm, Birgit; Some, A. Fabrice; Thwing, Julie; Ursing, Johan; Wong, Rina P. M.; Zeynudin, Ahmed; Zongo, Issaka; Plowe, Christopher V.; Sibley, Carol Hopkins

2014-01-01

 
 
 
 
101

Factors Affecting Milk Production in Buffaloes: A Case Study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study quantified the effect of major factors affecting the milk production in buffaloes. The important factors considered for the estimation of milk production included the value of dry fodder, the value of green fodder, the value of concentrate, number of lactations and the value of labour hours. A production function for milk was estimated by employing Ordinary Least Square (OLS regression. In the estimated model among all the relevant variables, green fodder, lactation number and labour hours were found to be the influential factors affecting milk production in this species.

Maqsood Hussain*, Abdul Ghafoor1and Abdul Saboor2

2010-04-01

102

Web-based Factors Affecting Online Purchasing Behaviour  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The growing use of internet and online purchasing among young consumers in Malaysia provides a huge prospect in e-commerce market, specifically for B2C segment. In this market, if E-marketers know the web-based factors affecting online buyers' behaviour, and the effect of these factors on behaviour of online consumers, then they can develop their marketing strategies to convert potential customers into active one, while retaining existing online customers. Review of previous studies related to the online purchasing behaviour in B2C market has point out that the conceptualization and empirical validation of the online purchasing behaviour of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) literate users, or ICT professional, in Malaysia has not been clearly addressed. This paper focuses on (i) web-based factors which online buyers (ICT professional) keep in mind while shopping online; and (ii) the effect of web-based factors on online purchasing behaviour. Based on the extensive literature review, a conceptual framework of 24 items of five factors was constructed to determine web-based factors affecting online purchasing behaviour of ICT professional. Analysis of data was performed based on the 310 questionnaires, which were collected using a stratified random sampling method, from ICT undergraduate students in a public university in Malaysia. The Exploratory factor analysis performed showed that five factors affecting online purchase behaviour are Information Quality, Fulfilment/Reliability/Customer Service, Website Design, Quick and Details, and Privacy/Security. The result of Multiple Regression Analysis indicated that Information Quality, Quick and Details, and Privacy/Security affect positively online purchase behaviour. The results provide a usable model for measuring web-based factors affecting buyers' online purchase behaviour in B2C market, as well as for online shopping companies to focus on the factors that will increase customers' online purchase.

103

Factors Affecting the Habitability of Earth-like Planets  

Science.gov (United States)

Habitability is a measure of an environment's potential to support life. For exoplanets, the concept of habitability can be used broadly - to inform our calculations of the possibility and distribution of life elsewhere - or as a practical tool to inform mission designs and to prioritize specific targets in the search for extrasolar life. Although a planet's habitability does depend critically on the effect of stellar type and planetary semi-major axis on climate balance, work in the interdisciplinary field of astrobiology has identified many additional factors that can affect a planet's environment and its potential ability to support life. Life requires material for metabolism and structures, a liquid medium for chemical transport, and an energy source to drive metabolism and other life processes. Whether a planet's surface or sub-surface can provide these requirements is the result of numerous planetary and astrophysical processes that affect the planet's formation and evolution. Many of these factors are interdependent, and fall into three main categories: stellar effects, planetary effects and planetary system effects. Key abiotic processes affecting the resultant planetary environment include photochemistry (e.g. Segura et al., 2003; 2005), stellar effects on climate balance (e.g. Joshii et al., 2012; Shields et al., 2013), atmospheric loss (e.g. Lopez and Fortney, 2013), and gravitational interactions with the star (e.g. Barnes et al., 2013). In many cases, the effect of these processes is strongly dependent on a specific planet's existing environmental properties. Examples include the resultant UV flux at a planetary surface as a product of stellar activity and the strength of a planet's atmospheric UV shield (Segura et al., 2010); and the amount of tidal energy available to a planet to drive plate tectonics and heat the surface (Barnes et al., 2009), which is in turn due to a combination of stellar mass, planetary mass and composition, planetary orbital parameters and the gravitational influence of other planets in the system. A thorough assessment of a planet's environment and its potential habitability is a necessary first step in the search for biosignatures. Targeted environmental characteristics include surface temperature and pressure (e.g. Misra et al., 2013), a census of bulk and trace atmospheric gases, and whether there are signs of liquid water on the planetary surface (e.g. Robinson et al., 2010). The robustness of a planetary biosignature is dependent on being able to characterize the environment sufficiently well, and to understand likely star-planet interactions, to preclude formation of a biosignature gas via abiotic processes such as photochemistry (e.g. Segura et al., 2007; Domagal-Goldman et al., 2011; Grenfell et al., 2012). Here we also discuss potential false positives for O2 and O3, which, in large quantities, are often considered robust biosignatures for oxygenic photosynthesis. There is clearly significant future work required to better identify and understand the key environmental processes and interactions that allow a planet to support life, and to distinguish life's global impact on an environment from the environment itself.

Meadows, Victoria; NAI-Virtual Planetary Laboratory Team

2014-03-01

104

Scale Development: Factors Affecting Diet, Exercise, and Stress Management (FADESM  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective of this study was to develop scales measuring personal and environmental factors that affect dietary fat intake behavior, physical activity, and stress management in low-income mothers. Methods FADESM (factors affecting diet, exercise, and stress management scales were developed using the Social Cognitive Theory to measure personal (outcome expectancies, self-efficacy, emotional coping response and environmental (physical environment, social environment, situation factors affecting dietary fat intake behavior, physical activity, and stress management. Low-income African American and white mothers were recruited from the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children in three counties in Michigan. In Phase one, 45 mothers completed individual cognitive interviews. Content analyses were performed. In Phase two, items modified from the cognitive interviews were administered to 216 mothers. Factor analysis and multiple indicators/multiple causes were performed. Results Results of cognitive interviews were used to revise items for the instrument that was tested in Phase two. The factor solution revealed 19 dimensions to measure personal and environmental factors affecting dietary fat intake behavior (three dimensions, physical activity (eight dimensions, and stress management (eight dimensions. Results of multiple indicators/multiple causes model showed scale invariance. Of 19 dimensions, 15 had Cronbach alpha between 0.76 and 0.94 and four were between 0.66 and 0.69. All dimensions had composite construct reliability scores between 0.74 to 0.97 and satisfactory construct and discriminant validities. Conclusion The theory-based FADESM scales have documented good validity and reliability for measuring factors affecting dietary fat intake behavior, physical activity, and stress management in low-income women. Results of this study support the use of these scales with low-income African American and white mothers in community settings.

Nitzke Susan

2008-02-01

105

Factors Affecting Forest Area Changes in Cambodia: An Econometric Approach  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Clarifying factors affecting forest area changes is critical to implementing REDD+ scheme properly. We analyzed some socio-economic factors and clarified their relationships with deforestation in Cambodia for the period of 2002 to 2010. A panel data analysis was conducted for 18 provinces, while six other provinces were deleted from the list because only a small amount of their land was forested. Time effects, cross-sectional dependence, serial correlation in idiosyncratic errors, and heteros...

Tetsuya Michinaka; Motoe Miyamoto; Yasuhiro Yokota; Heng Sokh; Sethaphal Lao; Vuthy Ma

2013-01-01

106

EXPLORING THE FACTORS AFFECTING EMPLOYEES’ ADOPTION AND USE OF INNOVATION  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This paper explores the factors affecting innovation adoption by individual employees within an organization in Australia. Following a qualitative research approach, this paper uses a series of in-depth interviews and focus group discussions involving academic and administrative employees at a tertiary educational institution in Australia. The qualitative approach is adopted to have a deeper insight into the complexities and dynamism associated with the factors influencing innovation adoption...

Majharul Talukder; Ali Quazi

2010-01-01

107

An experiment on the factors affecting simple reaction time  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Reaction time is considered as an important measure that affects performance of an individual both in business and private life. Especially, reaction time, which can be defined as a period of time being required for giving appropriate responses to the perceived stimuli, is an important factor in terms of efficiency of organization and also health and safety at work. Moreover, reaction time is regarded as an important factor in product design. In this study, an experiment is designed to reveal...

Hale Akkocao?lu; Burcu Kaya; Ufuk Türen

2013-01-01

108

Factors affecting the diffusion of online end user literature searching.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify factors that affect diffusion of usage of online end user literature searching. Fifteen factors clustered into three attribute sets (innovation attributes, organizational attributes, and marketing attributes) were measured to study their effect on the diffusion of online searching within institutions. METHODS: A random sample of sixty-seven academic health sciences centers was selected and then 1,335 library and informatics staff members at th...

Ash, J. S.

1999-01-01

109

Factors Affecting Role Stress and Burnout among School Counselors  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study is to determine factors affecting role stress and burnout among practicing school counselors as measured by the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Educators Survey (MBI-ES) and the Role Conflict and Ambiguity Scale. The MBI-ES utilizes three subscales to measure burnout: emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal…

Willingham, Wendy Elizabeth

2009-01-01

110

Factors Affecting Performance in an Introductory Sociology Course  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examines factors affecting students' performances in an Introductory Sociology course over five semesters. Employing simple and ordered logit regression models, the author explains final grades by focusing on individual demographic and educational characteristics that students bring into the classroom. The results show that a student's…

Kwenda, Maxwell

2011-01-01

111

The Synergistic Effect of Affective Factors on Student Learning Outcomes  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigates how affective and self-related factors impact participation in science learning and environmental awareness and responsibility. Using PISA 2006 datasets from Taiwan and Canada having similar level of science competency, the model for this study verifies and expands an earlier model by examining the relationships among…

Jack, Brady Michael; Lin, Huann-shyang; Yore, Larry D.

2014-01-01

112

Students' Views on Factors Affecting Empathy in Medical Education  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: Empathy is a prominent goal of medical education that is too often underachieved. Using concept mapping, the authors constructed a student-generated conceptual model of factors viewed as affecting empathy during medical education. Methods: During the 2005-2006 academic year, 293 medical students and interns answered a brainstorming…

Winseman, Jeffrey; Malik, Abid; Morison, Julie; Balkoski, Victoria

2009-01-01

113

Motivational Factors Affecting Online Learning by Japanese MBA Students  

Science.gov (United States)

In Japan, Internet based learning is still at an early stage. However, adult learners in Japanese society expect the development of flexible e-learning programs. This case study examines motivational factors affecting online learning in a Japanese and Australian MBA program, using observations, interviews and a questionnaire survey. The data were…

Kikuchi, Hisayo

2006-01-01

114

Developing Worksheet Based on Science Process Skills: Factors Affecting Solubility  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study is to develop a worksheet about the factors affecting solubility, which could be useful for the prospective science teachers (PST) to remind and regain their science process skills (SPS). The pilot study of the WS was carried out with 32 first grade PST during the 2007-2008 academic year in the education department at…

Karsli, Fethiye; Sahin, Cigdem

2009-01-01

115

Family Mobility: An Examination of Factors Affecting Migration.  

Science.gov (United States)

The major purpose of this study was to examine one set of factors affecting family mobility, as well as to ascertain the circumstances influencing a choice of destination. Data employed were based upon the 1960 one-in-a-thousand sample Census. Family unit movement was distinguished from individual movement, as was mobility from migration. Major…

Kirschenbaum, Alan B.

116

Factors Affecting the Development and Use of Learning Objects  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explored barriers and facilitating factors affecting the development and use of learning objects in developing instructional materials and their use in supporting individualized learning. Over a two-month period, students in a graduate-level instructional design course developed instructional materials incorporating learning objects or…

Moisey, Susan D.; Ally, Mohamed; Spencer, Bob

2006-01-01

117

Key Factors Affecting Conceptual Gains from CAL Materials.  

Science.gov (United States)

Identifies key factors affecting conceptual gains from using a CAL (computer-assisted learning) package and their application to a college practical laboratory class. Considers students' biographical characteristics, design features of the CAL package, and the way that the CAL was integrated into the curriculum. (Author/LRW)

Watson, Barbara

2001-01-01

118

Factors affecting visual inspection of thin film network  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A study was made of various factors that affect the visual inspection of thin film networks. The effect of various types of reflected illumination, the effect of defect size or shape, the time required for inspection, and the inspection uniformity were evaluated. The use of polarized light is recommended for the visual inspection of thin film networks.

Hines, R.E.

1978-01-01

119

Factors Affecting Wedding Banquet Venue Selection of Thai Wedding Couples  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The wedding day is one of the most important days for couples, so they want their ceremony to be as near to perfect as possible. Finding a venue for the wedding banquet is the first stage of the couple’s planning and many factors affect this decision. The objective of this research was to study the factors that affect the selection of wedding banquet venues among Thai wedding couples. This study obtained data via questionnaires and used statistical tests such as the Mann-Whitney U test and one-way analysis of variance. Results showed that among the 30 factors that were assessed by 222 respondents, good service from employees, food quality, the venue’s atmosphere, size of the event room and facilities in the wedding room were the five most important factors determining the attractiveness of a wedding banquet venue. The results demonstrated that respondents who organized a wedding banquet at a hotel prioritized the atmosphere. In contrast, respondents who organized a wedding banquet at a restaurant placed highest priority on the facilities of the wedding room. Results showed that significant differences regarding the factors that affect the selection of wedding banquet venues exist across groups with different demographic variables (i.e., age, income, education level.

Kulkanya Napompech

2014-01-01

120

Factors affecting the performance of professional nurses in Namibia  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english BACKGROUND: Professional nurses play a vital role in the provision of health care globally. The performance of health care workers, including professional nurses, link closely to the productivity and quality of care provision within health care organisations. It was important to identify factors inf [...] luencing the performance of professional nurses if the quality of health care delivery was to improved. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to identify factors affecting the performance of professional nurses in Namibia. METHOD: A quantitative, descriptive survey was used to collect data by means of a questionnaire. A random sample of 180 professional nurses was selected from six hospitals in three regions of Namibia. RESULTS: Factors affecting the performance of nurses negatively were identified such as: lack of recognition of employees who are performing well, quality performance outcomes and an absence of a formal performance appraisal system and poor working conditions. Various factors contribute to both the positive and negative performance of professional nurses in Namibia. Strategies were developed for addressing the negative factors that could positively affect the performance of professional nurses in Namibia. CONCLUSIONS: This study emphasises the importance of developing strategies to promote the performance of nurses; build knowledge and expertise; develop mechanisms for improving the performance of nurses; expand leadership and management capacity; and generate information and knowledge through research.

Magdalene H., Awases; Marthie C., Bezuidenhout; Janetta H., Roos.

2013-01-01

 
 
 
 
121

Factors affecting farm diversification in rice-wheat  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The risk in agriculture sector is due to various factors like weather and market conditions, particularly the demand of the commodities. This uncertainty can result in variable returns (farm income) to the decisions that farmers make in a particular season. Diversification is a frequently used risk management strategy that involves participation in more than one activity. It has the added advantage of mitigating price risk as well as fluctuations in outputs. The main purpose of this paper was to determine the factors affecting crop diversification. For determining the effect of different factors on diversification a multiple regression model was used. The values of Entropy index computed for measuring horizontal diversification were taken as dependent variable and different factors affecting diversification were taken as independent variables. The results showed that the main factors affecting diversification were size of land holding, age of respondent, education level of respondent, farming experience of respondent, off farm income of respondent, distance of farm from main road, distance of farm from main market and farm machinery. (author)

122

Factors affecting the performance of professional nurses in Namibia.  

Science.gov (United States)

Background: Professional nurses play a vital role in the provision of health care globally. The performance of health care workers, including professional nurses, link closely to the productivity and quality of care provision within health care organisations. It was important to identify factors influencing the performance of professional nurses if the quality of health care delivery was to improved.Objectives: The aim of the present study was to identify factors affecting the performance of professional nurses in Namibia.Method: A quantitative, descriptive survey was used to collect data by means of a questionnaire. A random sample of 180 professional nurses was selected from six hospitals in three regions of Namibia.Results: Factors affecting the performance of nurses negatively were identified such as: lack of recognition of employees who are performing well, quality performance outcomes and an absence of a formal performance appraisal system and poor working conditions. Various factors contribute to both the positive and negative performance of professional nurses in Namibia. Strategies were developed for addressing the negative factors that could positively affect the performance of professional nurses in Namibia.Conclusions: This study emphasises the importance of developing strategies to promote the performance of nurses; build knowledge and expertise; develop mechanisms for improving the performance of nurses; expand leadership and management capacity; and generate information and knowledge through research. PMID:23718720

Awases, Magdalene H; Bezuidenhout, Marthie C; Roos, Janetta H

2013-01-01

123

Factors affecting the performance of professional nurses in Namibia  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english BACKGROUND: Professional nurses play a vital role in the provision of health care globally. The performance of health care workers, including professional nurses, link closely to the productivity and quality of care provision within health care organisations. It was important to identify factors inf [...] luencing the performance of professional nurses if the quality of health care delivery was to improved. OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to identify factors affecting the performance of professional nurses in Namibia. METHOD: A quantitative, descriptive survey was used to collect data by means of a questionnaire. A random sample of 180 professional nurses was selected from six hospitals in three regions of Namibia. RESULTS: Factors affecting the performance of nurses negatively were identified such as: lack of recognition of employees who are performing well, quality performance outcomes and an absence of a formal performance appraisal system and poor working conditions. Various factors contribute to both the positive and negative performance of professional nurses in Namibia. Strategies were developed for addressing the negative factors that could positively affect the performance of professional nurses in Namibia. CONCLUSIONS: This study emphasises the importance of developing strategies to promote the performance of nurses; build knowledge and expertise; develop mechanisms for improving the performance of nurses; expand leadership and management capacity; and generate information and knowledge through research.

Magdalene H., Awases; Marthie C., Bezuidenhout; Janetta H., Roos.

124

An Evaluation of Factors Affecting E-learner\\\\\\'s Satisfaction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Worldwide, the e-learning has a growth, but failures exist. Previous researches showed that user’s satisfaction is one of the most important factors in assessing the success of e-learning system implementation and a variety of factors affecting users' satisfaction. In this research, eight independent variables namely learner Internet self-efficacy, instructor response timeliness, e-learning course flexibility, e-learning course quality, technology quality, system usefulness, system ease of use, and diversity in assessment with nine hypotheses were discussed. The Spearman's correlation analysis was used to test initial eight hypotheses and a stepwise multiple linear regression model was conducted to test the ninth hypothesis. The results revealed that e-learning course flexibility, e-learning course quality, technology quality, and diversity in assessment were the critical factors affecting e-learner satisfaction that could not be neglected when implementing successful e-learning courses.

Davood Karimzadegan Moghadam

2012-03-01

125

An experiment on the factors affecting simple reaction time  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Reaction time is considered as an important measure that affects performance of an individual both in business and private life. Especially, reaction time, which can be defined as a period of time being required for giving appropriate responses to the perceived stimuli, is an important factor in terms of efficiency of organization and also health and safety at work. Moreover, reaction time is regarded as an important factor in product design. In this study, an experiment is designed to reveal the factors that affect simple reaction time and the effects of (discrete / continuous variables such as age, height, weight, gender, sight defects, smoking and alcohol use, regular habits of sports and academic achievement on reaction time of individuals are investigated, and the findings are interpreted.

Hale Akkocao?lu

2013-10-01

126

Factors Affecting the Performance of Labour in Nigerian Construction Sites  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The paper identified some factors perceived to be negatively affecting the performance of construction labour and also examined how these factors vary from site to site in the Nigerian construction industry. To achieve this, structured questionnaires were administered on contractors and labour (operatives on forty construction sites in the study area to sample their opinions. A Likert statistical technique was employed for the analysis in this perspective. The result indicated that unfair wages (RI = 0.89, negative influencing factors (RI = 0.85 and lack of motivation (RI = 0.79 were ranked high by the labour while the contractors ranked lack of training (RI = 0.84, poor communication (RI = 0.79 and inclement weather (RI = 0.71 as being affecting the performance labour in this respect. It was recommended, among other things, that contractors must study the peculiarities of their workers and identify their main motivators.

Fagbenle Olabosipo I

2011-05-01

127

Relationship between Factors of Construction Resources Affecting Project Cost  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The success of any construction project highly depends on how proper and effective the management of construction resources flow. Studies show that various resources factors affected cost management and have resulted to significant amount of cost overrun worldwide. However, a few investigations had been carried out in Malaysia regarding the effect of resources in construction industry. Hence, this study focuses on identifying significant resource factors causing construction cost overrun and also assessing the relationship between these factors. Data collection was carried out through a structured questionnaire survey consisting of 20 factors identified through a comprehensive literature review. Data was analyzed using statistical software package SPSS. The Cronbach’s alpha of the data was 0.910 which means that the collected data was highly reliable. The factors were ranked through mean rank approach and it was found that 3 most significant factors are “fluctuation of prices of materials”, “cash flow and financial difficulties faced by contractors” and “shortages of materials”. While the least significant factors in causing cost overrun are “insufficient numbers of equipment”, “relationship between management and labour”, and “labour absenteeism”. The result of Spearman test indicates that “cash flow and financial difficulties faced by contractors” with “financial difficulties of owner” correlate strongly at a significant level of 0.752. This identification of factors and relationships will help construction community in controlling resopurce factors for achieving project completion within the budget.

Ismail Abdul Rahman

2012-12-01

128

FACTORS AFFECTING INTENT TO PURCHASE VIRTUAL GOODS IN ONLINE GAMES  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Online games increasingly sell virtual goods to generate real income. As a result, it isincreasingly important to identify factors and theory of consumption values that affect intent topurchase virtual goods in online games. However, very little research has been devoted to thetopic. This study is an empirical investigation of the factors and theory of consumption valuesthat affect intent to purchase virtual goods in online games. The study determines the effects ofgame type, satisfaction with the game, identification with the character, and theory ofconsumption values on intent to purchase virtual goods. The study used a survey to collectinformation from 523 virtual game users. Study results showed that game type is a moderatingvariable that affects intent to purchase virtual goods. And it demonstrated that role-playing gameusers are affected by theory of consumption values: functional quality, playfulness, and socialrelationship support. Moreover, war-strategy game users are affected by satisfaction with thegame, identification with the character, and theory of consumption values: price, utility, andplayfulness. The study also presents conclusions, proposes applications, and describesopportunities for further research.

Cheng-Hsun Ho

2012-10-01

129

Factors Affecting Hoteliers’ Decision to Advertise in Travel Magazine  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Advertising is a paid, mass-mediated attempt to persuade. That mean Advertising is paid communication by a company or organization that wants its information disseminated through a communication medium designed to reach more than one person, typically a large number or mass of people and advertising includes an attempt to persuade consumer to like the brand and because of that liking to eventually buy the brand. Advertising in travel magazine is one of the promotional methods to promote hoteliers products or services to the market place. By advertising in travel magazine, it can reach the target audience, educate them about the products or services, and move them closer to make a purchase. The purpose of the research is to recognize and rank the factors affecting hotelier’s decision to advertise in travel magazine. The respondents for the research are those hoteliers operating in Malaysia. The factors for this research are reached target readers, cost of advertising, contents of the magazine, frequency of advertising and media of advertising. The result of the research shows two of the factors significantly affecting hoteliers advertising decision. Furthermore, cost of advertising ranks the first follow by reach target readers, contents of magazine, media of advertising and frequency of advertising ranks the last. This research will help the publisher of travel magazine to understand and recognize the ranking of factors affecting hoteliers’ decision to advertise in travel magazine.

Mohd Faiz Hilmi

2011-09-01

130

Factors affecting corticosteroid concentrations in yellow-bellied marmots.  

Science.gov (United States)

1. Bound and total corticosteroid concentrations of yellow-bellied marmots (Marmota flaviventris) were lowest in May after emergence from hibernation and peaked in August prior to immergence. 2. Total corticosteroids were affected by age but not by sex or reproductive status. 3. There was no consistent relationship between measures of population density and concentrations of corticosteroids; when a significant relationship occurred, only 22-34% of the variation was explained. 4. Social status and social behavior were the major factors affecting corticosteroid concentrations. PMID:1673377

Armitage, K B

1991-01-01

131

Factors Affecting Zebra Mussel Kill by the Bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The specific purpose of this research project was to identify factors that affect zebra mussel kill by the bacterium Pseudomonas fluorescens. Test results obtained during this three-year project identified the following key variables as affecting mussel kill: treatment concentration, treatment duration, mussel siphoning activity, dissolved oxygen concentration, water temperature, and naturally suspended particle load. Using this latter information, the project culminated in a series of pipe tests which achieved high mussel kill inside power plants under once-through conditions using service water in artificial pipes.

Daniel P. Molloy

2004-02-24

132

Single-tooth replacement: factors affecting different prosthetic treatment modalities  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background The choice between several treatment options for replacing a single missing tooth is influenced by clinical, dentist- and patient-immanent factors. This study aimed to determine the patient factors that would affect the treatment decision to replace a single missing tooth and to assess the satisfaction with several options. Method 200 volunteers involved (121 females and 79 males divided into four groups, Group A: consisted of patients with conventional fixed partial dentures or patients with resin bonded fixed partial dentures. Group B: consisted of patients who received removable partial dentures while Group C: consisted of patients who received a single implant supported crown, and a control group D: consisted of patients who received no treatment. Data were collected using a questionnaire. Results The highest percentage of males within groups (58% was within the removable prostheses category. The majority of the subjects in the study reported that the main reason for replacing a missing tooth was for esthetic and function. Most important factor affecting the choice between treatment modalities was damaging the neighboring teeth. Pain, post operative sensitivity and dental phobia were important factors in choosing the prosthesis type and affected the control group patients not to have any treatment. The highest satisfaction percentage among groups studied was recorded for dental implants then FPD groups, while the least percentage were in both the control and RPD groups, for all aspects of function, esthetic and speech efficiency. Conclusions The final choice between FPD, RPD and implant depended on several factors which affected the decision making; among these is cost and patients' awareness of the different treatment options.

Al-Quran Firas A

2011-12-01

133

Analysis of Factors that Affect e-Governance .  

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Full Text Available e-Governance is an application of ICT (Information & Communication technology to provide government services to its citizens and organizations. Punjab is one of the leading states in implementation of e-Governance but still there are some obstacles in its effective implementation at rural level. This research paper highlights the factors that are affecting the implementation of e-Governance. It also includes a survey questionnaire which takes all the factors into account and before starting actual survey a pilot study for this questionnaire was done which confirms its acceptance

Dr. Pardeep Mittal

2013-05-01

134

Analysis on Psychological Factors to Affect the Vocal Stage Performance  

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Full Text Available

The stage performance is an important part of artistic practice for vocal students. To perfectly express the music on stage is the dream of every vocal music performer. This essay is about analysis of the psychological factors to affect the vocal stage performance and to explore the reasons for stage fright and the methods to overcome this, to enable students to further enhance the level of their vocal music.

Key words: Vocal music; Stage performance; Psychological factor

Xihong CHEN

2012-11-01

135

Socioeconomic Factors Affecting Adoption of Sunflower Varieties in Sindh  

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Full Text Available This research study is based on primary data collection from sunflower growers to assess the socioeconomic factors that are affecting the adoption of sunflower varieties in Sindh.Data samples have been selected from two districts; Badin and Thatta, as these districts are considered main sunflower growing areas in Sindh. The results reveal that Sunflower growers are using Hybrid varieties i.e. 43 percent planted Hysun-33, 29 percent Hysun-38 and 28 percent Hysun-37 varieties. The finding of research using multinomial logistic regression suggests that farm size and level of education significantly affected the adoption of sunflower varieties. These factors are statistically significant at p<0.05. Theother variables such as tenancy status and source of income are not statistically significant in the adoption of sunflower varieties in Sindh.

Ghulam Ali Jariko (Corresponding Author

2011-09-01

136

The quantum walk search algorithm: Factors affecting efficiency  

CERN Document Server

We numerically study the quantum walk search algorithm of Shenvi, Kempe and Whaley [PRA \\textbf{67} 052307] and the factors which affect its efficiency in finding an individual state from an unsorted set. Previous work has focused purely on the effects of the dimensionality of the dataset to be searched. Here, we consider the effects of interpolating between dimensions, connectivity of the dataset, and the possibility of disorder in the underlying substrate: all these factors affect the efficiency of the search algorithm. We show that, as well as the strong dependence on the spatial dimension of the structure to be searched, there are also secondary dependencies on the connectivity and symmetry of the lattice, with greater connectivity providing a more efficient algorithm. In addition, we also show that the algorithm can tolerate a non-trivial level of disorder in the underlying substrate.

Lovett, Neil B; Heath, Robert M; Kendon, Viv

2011-01-01

137

Factors affecting the dermal bioavailability of hydrocarbons in soil  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The science of risk assessment has advanced significantly in recent years, in a continuing effort to more accurately represent potential human health effects from exposure to chemicals in the environment. This paper describes some environmental factors that affect the behavior of chemicals in soil and the relationship of this chemical behavior to the prediction of dermal exposures relating to soil contamination. The information presented in this paper suggests that the mass transfer of chemicals from the soil to the skin is as much an issue in dermal exposures to soil-sorbed chemicals as the actual absorption of the chemical through the skin. Relevant factor affecting the sorption, desorption, and mass transfer of hydrocarbon chemicals in soil are discussed. A summary of the scientific literature related to research on chemicals sorbed to soil is also presented

138

Factors Affecting Intercropping and Conservation Tillage Practices in Eeastern Ethiopia  

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Full Text Available In order to combat adverse effects of farmland degradation it is necessary for farmers to adopt sustainable land management and conservation strategies like intercropping and conservation tillage. However, efforts to adopt these strategies are very minimal in Ethiopia. In an attempt to address the objectives of examining factors affecting use of intercropping and conservation tillage practices, this study utilized plot- and household-level data collected from 211 farm households and employed a bivariate probit model for its analysis. The study revealed that intercropping and conservation tillage decisions are interdependent, and that they are also significantly affected by various factors. In addition, conservation tillage and intercropping practices as short- term interventions are found to augment the long-term interventions like terraces, diversion ditches, and tree plantations. The paper highlights important policy implications that are required to encourage intercropping and conservation tillage measures.

S. Bauer

2012-03-01

139

Factors Affecting Intercropping and Conservation Tillage Practices in Eeastern Ethiopia  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In order to combat adverse effects of farmland degradation it is necessary for farmers to adopt sustainable land management and conservation strategies like intercropping and conservation tillage. However, efforts to adopt these strategies are very minimal in Ethiopia. In an attempt to address the objectives of examining factors affecting use of intercropping and conservation tillage practices, this study utilized plot- and household-level data collected from 211 farm households and employed ...

Bauer, S.; Ketema, M.

2012-01-01

140

Factors Affecting D-7-Stigmastenol in Palestinian Olive Oil  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The level of delta-7-stigmastenol (D-7-stigmastenol) contained in olive oil is a new criterion for oil quality, particularly its purity from adulteration with other seed oils. In this study, 79 olive samples were collected and analyzed from different areas of Palestine to study the factors affecting D-7-stigmastenol levels in the oil. These areas included the provinces of Jericho, Hebron, Bethlehem, Ramallah, Salfeet, Nablus, Jenin, Tulkarem and Qalqilyah. The study began in October 2007 and ...

Abu-alruz, K.; Afaneh, I. A.; Quasem, J. M.; Hmidat, M. A.; Abbady, J.; Mazahreh, A. S.

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
141

Factors affecting the adoption of quality assurance technologies in healthcare  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Purpose – In the light of public concern and of strong policy emphasis on quality and safety in the nursing care of patients in hospital settings, this paper focuses on the factors affecting the adoption of innovative quality assurance technologies. Design/methodology/approach – Two sets of complementary literatures were mined for key themes. Next, new empirical insights were sought. Data gathering was conducted in three phases. The first involved contact with NHS Technology Hubs and ...

Storey, John

2013-01-01

142

Environmental factors affecting tourists' experience in South African national parks  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study, the first of its kind involving South African National Parks, aimed to determine which environmental factors in these parks have a negative effect on tourists’ experience, and whether tourists who visit parks frequently are more aware of environmental impacts than those who visit only occasionally. The findings will help to inform South African National Parks (SANParks) management about the impacts of tourism in the parks and how these affect tourists’ experience. Data was obt...

Saayman, Melville; Du Plessis, Liezel; Merwe, Petrus

2012-01-01

143

Factors affecting the stabiliti of the ground crane runway  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Immediate or obvious causes of these circumstances might be considered using supply and demand terminology. Long distances between homes and schools, and the shortage of proper sanitation for girls could be major factors that affect the supply side In addition sexual harassment by older boys and male teachers seems to be serious in some schools. On the demand side three levels can be identified. At the individual level, the biggest reason for girls to drop out of school is failure to pass exa...

?????????, ?. ?.; ?????, ?. ?.; ??????????, ?. ?.

2013-01-01

144

Factors That Affect Body Mass Index of Adults  

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Full Text Available The aim of the study is to determine the factors that contribute to the body mass index (BMI of adults and evaluate the eating habits of the individuals. The study was conducted on 498 adults whose ages were ranging from 20 to 85 (39.1±14.9 year. The data were collected using a questionnaire form that consisted of questions concerning general characteristics of individuals, frequency of food consumption and eating habits. Food types in the food consumption frequency were grouped together according to Nutrition Guide for Turkey. Body weights and heights of the individuals were measured. BMI of the 55% of the individuals participated in the study is 25 or higher than 25. The average BMI of the individuals differs according to age, educational, marital, smoking status, parity and sleep duration (p0.05. A statistically significant correlation was found between BMI of participants and their habit of eating at night, appetite and use of sweeteners (p<0.05. Individuals with BMI<25 were determined to have a lower consumption frequency of milk and dairy products and fruits-vegetables monthly (p<0.05. In this study; age, educational, marital, smoking status and sleep duration were found to affect body mass index. Analysis of genetic and environmental factors affecting obesity is required to reveal the factors affecting body mass index of individuals more clearly.

Esma Asil

2014-01-01

145

Factors affecting industrial wood, material production yield in Turkey’s natural beech forests  

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Full Text Available The objectives of the present study are to determine the most important factors affecting industrial wood material production yield in natural oriental beech forests in Turkey using a multifaceted approach and to help entrepreneurs consider these factors to develop more sensitive and realistic production plans. In Günye Forest Management in Bart?n province of the West Black Sea Region of Turkey, 41 production units were chosen as the study area. The 1277 ha study area was included in the 2007 and 2010 production management plan. The general state of the stand, natural stand structure, and production methods and tools are the factors thought most strongly affect industrial wood material production yield; 26 variables representing these factors were evaluated in the study. Through multidimensional statistical analyses, including main components, factor and regression  analysis, we found that the most important factors affecting production yield were fertility, aspect of land, skidding method, stand structure, skidding distance, growing stock, transportation and harmful abiotic factors. Production units were divided into three groups based on yield rates and the 26 variables, using discriminate analysis. From the results of the study, a sample model can be developed to help forest managers predict and plan annual industrial wood production more sensitively and realistically.

Atilla Atik

2014-07-01

146

EXPLORING THE FACTORS AFFECTING EMPLOYEES’ ADOPTION AND USE OF INNOVATION  

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Full Text Available This paper explores the factors affecting innovation adoption by individual employees within an organization in Australia. Following a qualitative research approach, this paper uses a series of in-depth interviews and focus group discussions involving academic and administrative employees at a tertiary educational institution in Australia. The qualitative approach is adopted to have a deeper insight into the complexities and dynamism associated with the factors influencing innovation adoption process in organizational settings. The findings of this research highlight the need for broadening an understanding of the key factors affecting employee’s decisions to uptake the adoption of innovation. The results provide important clues for comprehending the factors influencing and determining the employee’s adoption and continued use of innovation in the work environment. In the face of the current trend towards end-user applications of technological innovation, the results suggest some guidelines for management toward effective and efficient adoption and use of innovation in organizational settings. This paper has highlighted the above findings and their implications for management practices related to innovation management in an Australian organizational setting. This paper also identifies possible limitations and future research potential in the relevant field.

Majharul Talukder

2010-01-01

147

Factors Affecting the Efficiency of Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation by Rhizobium  

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Full Text Available Recent reports pointed to a decline in agricultural dependence on symbiotic nitrogen fixation, and in the use of rhizobial inoculants. The aim of the present review was to study the environmental factors that affect the efficiency of symbiotic nitrogen fixation by Rhizobium in soil. These factors included pH, salinity, moisture, temperature, microorganisms, organic matter and soil texture. The overall conclusion is that symbiotic nitrogen fixation by Rhizobium is a critical biological process. Environmental stresses are generally the limiting factors of the symbiotic nitrogen fixation. With the selection of the appropriate legume and rhizobial inoculant, nitrogen fixation can be increased and concomitantly food production can be improved even under environmentally stressed conditions.

Abdullah M. K. Al-Falih

2002-01-01

148

FACTORS AFFECTING TEACHERS’ USE OF INFORMATION AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGY  

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Full Text Available Research studies in the past decade have shown that computer technology is an effective means for widening educational opportunities, but most teachers neither use technology as an instructional delivery system nor integrate technology into their curriculum. Studies reveal a number of factors influencing teachers’ decisions to use ICT in the classroom: non-manipulative and manipulative school and teacher factors. These factors are interrelated. The success of the implementation of ICT is not dependent on the availability or absence of one individual factor, but is determined through a dynamic process involving a set of interrelated factors. It is suggested that ongoing professional development must be provided for teachers to model the new pedagogies and tools for learning with the aim of enhancing the teaching-learning process. However, it is important for teacher trainers and policy makers to understand the factors affecting effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different approaches to ICT use in teacher training so training strategies can be appropriately explored to make such changes viable to all.

Mojgan Afshari

2009-01-01

149

An Improved Reinforcement Learning System Using Affective Factors  

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Full Text Available As a powerful and intelligent machine learning method, reinforcement learning (RL has been widely used in many fields such as game theory, adaptive control, multi-agent system, nonlinear forecasting, and so on. The main contribution of this technique is its exploration and exploitation approaches to find the optimal solution or semi-optimal solution of goal-directed problems. However, when RL is applied to multi-agent systems (MASs, problems such as “curse of dimension”, “perceptual aliasing problem”, and uncertainty of the environment constitute high hurdles to RL. Meanwhile, although RL is inspired by behavioral psychology and reward/punishment from the environment is used, higher mental factors such as affects, emotions, and motivations are rarely adopted in the learning procedure of RL. In this paper, to challenge agents learning in MASs, we propose a computational motivation function, which adopts two principle affective factors “Arousal” and “Pleasure” of Russell’s circumplex model of affects, to improve the learning performance of a conventional RL algorithm named Q-learning (QL. Compared with the conventional QL, computer simulations of pursuit problems with static and dynamic preys were carried out, and the results showed that the proposed method results in agents having a faster and more stable learning performance.

Takashi Kuremoto

2013-07-01

150

Factors Affecting D-7-Stigmastenol in Palestinian Olive Oil  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The level of delta-7-stigmastenol (D-7-stigmastenol contained in olive oil is a new criterion for oil quality, particularly its purity from adulteration with other seed oils. In this study, 79 olive samples were collected and analyzed from different areas of Palestine to study the factors affecting D-7-stigmastenol levels in the oil. These areas included the provinces of Jericho, Hebron, Bethlehem, Ramallah, Salfeet, Nablus, Jenin, Tulkarem and Qalqilyah. The study began in October 2007 and ended in July 2008. The following 11 factors were taken into consideration during sample collection: olive fly infection, topography, olive storage before pressing, geographical area, effect of olive seeds during oil extraction, effect of pressing temperature, presence of olive leaves during oil extraction, soil type, maturity index of the olive fruit, olive variety and oil preservation and storage in terms of storage container types. The results show that soil type, region, maturity index and olive fly infection are the main factors affecting D-7-stigmastenol. Pressing temperature, olive storage before pressing, olive variety and oil storage showed a moderate effect. Olive seeds, topography and presence of olive leaves had a negligible effect on D-7-stigmastenol levels in the oil.

K. Abu-Alruz

2011-01-01

151

Polymorphisms in Plasmodium falciparum Chloroquine Resistance Transporter and Multidrug Resistance 1 Genes: Parasite Risk Factors That Affect Treatment Outcomes for P. falciparum Malaria After Artemether-Lumefantrine and Artesunate-Amodiaquine.  

Science.gov (United States)

Adequate clinical and parasitologic cure by artemisinin combination therapies relies on the artemisinin component and the partner drug. Polymorphisms in the Plasmodium falciparum chloroquine resistance transporter (pfcrt) and P. falciparum multidrug resistance 1 (pfmdr1) genes are associated with decreased sensitivity to amodiaquine and lumefantrine, but effects of these polymorphisms on therapeutic responses to artesunate-amodiaquine (ASAQ) and artemether-lumefantrine (AL) have not been clearly defined. Individual patient data from 31 clinical trials were harmonized and pooled by using standardized methods from the WorldWide Antimalarial Resistance Network. Data for more than 7,000 patients were analyzed to assess relationships between parasite polymorphisms in pfcrt and pfmdr1 and clinically relevant outcomes after treatment with AL or ASAQ. Presence of the pfmdr1 gene N86 (adjusted hazards ratio = 4.74, 95% confidence interval = 2.29 - 9.78, P artemisinin combination therapies; determination of the prevalence of at least pfcrt K76T and pfmdr1 N86Y should now be routine. PMID:25048375

Venkatesan, Meera; Gadalla, Nahla B; Stepniewska, Kasia; Dahal, Prabin; Nsanzabana, Christian; Moriera, Clarissa; Price, Ric N; Mårtensson, Andreas; Rosenthal, Philip J; Dorsey, Grant; Sutherland, Colin J; Guérin, Philippe; Davis, Timothy M E; Ménard, Didier; Adam, Ishag; Ademowo, George; Arze, Cesar; Baliraine, Frederick N; Berens-Riha, Nicole; Björkman, Anders; Borrmann, Steffen; Checchi, Francesco; Desai, Meghna; Dhorda, Mehul; Djimdé, Abdoulaye A; El-Sayed, Badria B; Eshetu, Teferi; Eyase, Frederick; Falade, Catherine; Faucher, Jean-François; Fröberg, Gabrielle; Grivoyannis, Anastasia; Hamour, Sally; Houzé, Sandrine; Johnson, Jacob; Kamugisha, Erasmus; Kariuki, Simon; Kiechel, Jean-René; Kironde, Fred; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; LeBras, Jacques; Malmberg, Maja; Mwai, Leah; Ngasala, Billy; Nosten, Francois; Nsobya, Samuel L; Nzila, Alexis; Oguike, Mary; Otienoburu, Sabina Dahlström; Ogutu, Bernhards; Ouédraogo, Jean-Bosco; Piola, Patrice; Rombo, Lars; Schramm, Birgit; Somé, A Fabrice; Thwing, Julie; Ursing, Johan; Wong, Rina P M; Zeynudin, Ahmed; Zongo, Issaka; Plowe, Christopher V; Sibley, Carol Hopkins

2014-10-01

152

Factors Affecting The Entrepreneurial Behavior Of TUMS Research Centers Managers  

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Full Text Available  Background and Aim: Entrepreneurial roles can be performed by managers at different levels. In fact, entrepreneurship can be interpreted as a tendency adopted by managers towards their environment in which they should have the ability to discover new opportunities for their innovative activities. This study aims to identify factors affecting entrepreneurial behavior of research centers managers at Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS.  Materials and Methods: Considering the sample size determined through Cochran’s formula, 90 questionnaires were distributed among TUMS research centers managers. The data were analyzed based on structural equation modeling applying partial least squares approach through Smartpls.2 software.  Results: Of the 90 questionnaires distributed, 67 were acceptable for study. The model created for effective factors enjoyed an acceptable goodness of fit index (GOF=0.49. Factors loading for the observed variables were above 0.4 and the constructs had an acceptable level of reliability and validity.  Conclusion : The results show that contextual and behavioral factors have a positive effect on entrepreneurial behavior and that structural factors have a negative effect on it. 

Mahdi Khayatan

2014-09-01

153

Evaluation of factors affecting diffusion in compacted bentonite  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The information available from the open literature and studies on exclusion, sorption and diffusion mechanisms of ionic and neutral species in bentonite has been compiled and re-examined in relation to the microstructure of bentonite. The emphasis is placed on a more thorough understanding of the diffusion processes taking place in compacted bentonite. Despite the scarcity of experiments performed with neutral diffusants, these imply that virtually all the pores in compacted bentonite are accessible to neutral species. Anion exclusion, induced by the overlap of electrical double layers, may render the accessible porosity for anions considerably less than the porosity obtained from the water content of the clay. On the basis of the compiled data, it is highly probable that surface diffusion plays a significant role in the transport of cations in bentonite clays. Moreover, easily soluble compounds in bentonite can affect the ionic strength of porewater and, consequently, exclusion, equilibrium between cations, and surface diffusion

154

Factors affecting surface and release properties of thin PDMS films  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Polydimethysiloxane (PDMS) elastomers are commonly used as dielectric electroactive polymers (DEAP). DEAP films are used in making actuators, generators and sensors. In the large scale manufacture of DEAP films, release of films from the substrate (carrier web) induces some defects and pre-strain in the films which affect the overall performance of the films. The current research is directed towards investigating factors affecting the peel force and release of thin, corrugated polydimethylsiloxane films used in DEAP films. It has been shown that doping the PDMS films with small quantities of perfluoroether allylamide (PFE) lowered the surface energy which could ease the release. This is further investigated together with an evaluation of the resulting change in actuator performance. The relationship between the adhesive energy, surface energy, Young’s modulus and peel force of the films is analyzed.

Vudayagiri, Sindhu; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

2013-01-01

155

Scoping experimental analysis of factors affecting cask contamination weeping  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

One issue of particular concern to both the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the US Department of Energy (DOE) involves the control of in-transit 'weeping' of surface contamination on pool-loaded spent fuel transportation casks. Weeping is the release of semi-fixed radioactive particulates from an exterior surface of a transportation cask some time after removal from a fuel pool. Effective prevention requires an understanding of the physical processes and the determination of related parameters which contribute to the weeping phenomenon. A program is underway at Sandia Laboratories to experimentally address the following goals: induce weeping under controlled conditions; isolate and identify what contaminants adsorption and release; and provide a basis for the development of decontamination or contaminant blocking methods to prevent weeping. The first set of experiments, reported herein, concentrated on inducing weeping, isolating and identifying the contaminants, and scoping macroscopic variables affecting weeping. a second series of tests is underway to characterize bonding and release mechanisms, and to suggest effective decontamination means. 4 refs., 2 tabs

156

Escherichia coli regulatory mutation affecting lysine transport and lysine decarboxylase.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

A spontaneous thiosine-resistant mutant of Escherichia coli was shown to have the following characteristics: lowered initial rate of lysine uptake and lowered plateau level of accumulation of exogenous lysine by both the lysine-specific and the general basic amino acid transport systems; altered repressibility of these two lysine transport systems; a derepressed level of lysine decarboxylase; normal growth rate; parental levels of lysyl-transfer ribonucleic acid synthetase and the inducible a...

Popkin, P. S.; Maas, W. K.

1980-01-01

157

Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described, particularly in relation to their imvolvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis

158

Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data, and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described particularly in relation to their involvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus, are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis

159

Factors Affecting the End-User Computing Satisfaction  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In this study we investigate factors that are affecting the end-user computing of accounting information system satisfaction from financial managers' point of view. Our sample is selected from companies listed on Tehran Stock Exchange. This research is a descriptive - empirical field study. The required data is collected by sending out questionnaires to the financial managers of the sampled companies. Our findings indicate that, the information content, ease of using accounting information system, accuracy and correctness of information, format of the reports and timeliness of information have an impact on the end-user computing satisfaction.

Mohsen Dastgir

2012-07-01

160

Factors affecting lactate and malate utilization by Selenomonas ruminantium.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Lactate utilization by Selenomonas ruminantium is stimulated in the presence of malate. Because little information is available describing lactate-plus-malate utilization by this organism, the objective of this study was to evaluate factors affecting utilization of these two organic acids by two strains of S. ruminantium. When S. ruminantium HD4 and H18 were grown in batch culture on DL-lactate and DL-malate, both strains coutilized both organic acids for the initial 20 to 24 h of incubation ...

Evans, J. D.; Martin, S. A.

1997-01-01

 
 
 
 
161

Chinese multinationals: how do institutional factors affect their location patterns?  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper analyses the impact of various host country institutional factors on the location patterns of 29 large Chinese multinationals. From a sample of 127 outward foreign direct investment (FDI decisions made in 52 countries, our findings suggest that a greater difficulty in doing business and a high political risk in the host country do not discourage Chinese multinationals. However, the presence of overseas Chinese in the host country, a larger absolute host market size and a higher volume of Chinese exports to that country affect positively.

Diego Quer Ramón

2011-11-01

162

[Psychological factors affecting medical conditions--a method of measurement].  

Science.gov (United States)

Improving the way of diagnosing diseases is reflected in changes which are being introduced into the existing systems of classifications. Researchers aim to create such a system that will be free of assumptions that are controversial and difficult to approve on the medical basis. Currently completed works associated with the preparation and introduced the DSM-5, in which they prepared criteria for the assessment psychological factors affecting medical conditions and their method of measurement. An interview which is presented in this article has been created for the evaluation of those groups of syndromes and has been translated into the Polish language. PMID:25344974

Basi?ska, Malgorzata A; Wo?niewicz, Agnieszka

2014-01-01

163

Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described, particularly in relation to their imvolvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

Lemontt, J F

1979-01-01

164

Genetic and physiological factors affecting repair and mutagenesis in yeast  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Current views of DNA repair and mutagenesis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae are discussed in the light of recent data, and with emphasis on the isolation and characterization of genetically well-defined mutations that affect DNA metabolism in general (including replication and recombination). Various pathways of repair are described particularly in relation to their involvement in mutagenic mechanisms. In addition to genetic control, certain physiological factors such as cell age, DNA replication, and the regulatory state of the mating-type locus, are shown to also play a role in repair and mutagenesis.

Lemontt, J F

1979-01-01

165

Human Factors Affecting the Patient's Acceptance of Wireless Biomedical Sensors  

Science.gov (United States)

In monitoring arrhythmia, the quality of medical data from the ECG sensors may be enhanced by being based on everyday life situations. Hence, the development of wireless biomedical sensors is of growing interest, both to diagnose the heart patient, as well as to adjust the regimen. However, human factors such as emotional barriers and stigmatization, may affect the patient's behavior while wearing the equipment, which in turn may influence quality of data. The study of human factors and patient acceptance is important both in relation to the development of such equipment, as well as in evaluating the quality of data gathered from the individual patient. In this paper, we highlight some important aspects in patient acceptance by comparing results from a preliminary clinical trial with patients using a wireless ECG sensor for three days out-of-hospital service, to available published results from telehomecare projects, and discuss important aspects to be taken into account in future investigations.

Fensli, Rune; Boisen, Egil

166

Service-Oriented Factors Affecting the Adoption of Smartphones  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: English Abstract in english This research investigates the adoption factors of smartphones focusing on the differences of smartphone and feature phone users. We used Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) which incorporates service-oriented and device-oriented functional attributes as exogenous variables for a product-service syste [...] m such as smartphones. In addition, Decision Tree (DT) and customer surveys were conducted. As a study results, we found that the service-oriented functional attributes - 'wireless internet' and 'mobile applications' - affect the adoption of smartphones regardless of users. However, the DT results revealed that the more important factor is 'mobile applications' to smartphone users but 'wireless internet' for feature phone users. In conclusion, we discovered that a strategy emphasis on the service-oriented attributes is needed for the adoption of smartphones.

Youngmo, Kang; Mingook, Lee; Sungjoo, Lee.

167

Service-Oriented Factors Affecting the Adoption of Smartphones  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Chile | Language: English Abstract in english This research investigates the adoption factors of smartphones focusing on the differences of smartphone and feature phone users. We used Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) which incorporates service-oriented and device-oriented functional attributes as exogenous variables for a product-service syste [...] m such as smartphones. In addition, Decision Tree (DT) and customer surveys were conducted. As a study results, we found that the service-oriented functional attributes - 'wireless internet' and 'mobile applications' - affect the adoption of smartphones regardless of users. However, the DT results revealed that the more important factor is 'mobile applications' to smartphone users but 'wireless internet' for feature phone users. In conclusion, we discovered that a strategy emphasis on the service-oriented attributes is needed for the adoption of smartphones.

Youngmo, Kang; Mingook, Lee; Sungjoo, Lee.

2014-07-01

168

Factors Affecting English Language Teaching and Learning in Higher Education  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This paper reports part of a study that aims to explore factors affecting the efficacy of non-major English teaching and learning in Vietnamese higher education through an investigation of classroom practices. Eight non-participant class observations were conducted at HUTECH University, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam. The study’s findings show that many factors hinder the quality of English teaching and learning: uninteresting teaching style; insufficient time for communicative activities; grammar-driven teaching; unreasonable time-management; unclear instructions; large class sizes; teachers’ limited ability in classroom organization; unequal students’ English levels; inadequate lesson preparation; teachers’ limited use of teaching aids and technology; and students’ lack of confidence in using oral English in class activities. Based on these results, recommendations are given to improve the quality of non-major English teaching and learning, at HUTECH University in particular and in Vietnamese higher education in general.

Hong Thi Nguyen

2014-07-01

169

11-Year Experience with Gastroschisis: Factors Affecting Mortality and Morbidity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objective: The aim of the study was the evaluation of patients treated with a diagnosis of gastroschisis and to establish the factors which affected the morbidity and mortality.Methods: Twenty-nine patients, managed for gastroschisis during 2000-2010 were reviewed retrospectively. Patients were analysed in respect to gestational age, birth weight, associated anomalies, type of delivery, operative procedures, postoperative complications, total parenteral nutrition (TPN related complications. The factors affecting mortality and morbidity were determined .Findings: Associated abnormalities were present in 24% of the patients. Eleven patients underwent elective reduction in the incubator (Bianchi procedure without anaesthesia. Eight patients had delayed reduction with silo and ten patients had primary closure. Although the type of delivery had an effect on morbidity but not mortality, gestational age, birth weight, and the operative procedure performed had no effect on morbidity or mortality. Duration until tolerance of oral intake, and of TPN and hospitalization were found to be statistically significantly shorter in the group of babies delivered by caesarean section.Conclusion: The mortality of gastroschisis is reported to be decreasing with the development of antenatal care, neonatal intensive care and TPN. In our study the most important cause of mortality was the abdominal compartment syndrome and multi-organ failure in the early years. Long hospitalization periods and sepsis were the main causes of mortality in recent years.

Derya Erdo?an

2012-09-01

170

Factors Affecting Ankle Support Device Usage in Young Basketball Players  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This cross-sectional study explores factors affecting the decision of basketball players to wear ankle support devices (ASDs. A questionnaire regarding attitudes towards ASD usage was developed based on the Health Belief Model (HBM. The questionnaire assessed HBM perceptions (susceptibility, severity, benefits, and barriers and modifying factors (demographic, personal history of ankle injury, influence of coach to preventive action that may affect an athlete’s decision to wear ASDs. One hundred forty basketball players competing at the recreational, high school, or university levels completed the questionnaire, with the questionnaires being completed at the basketball gymnasium or at home. It was found that athletes whose coaches enforced ASD use were significantly more likely to wear them (OR: 35.71; 95% CI: 10.01, 127.36, as were athletes who perceived ankle injuries to be severe (OR: 2.77; 95% CI: 1.04, 7.37. Previous injury did not significantly increase the odds of using an ASD. The combined influence of coach enforcement and previous injury had the greatest effect on increasing ASD use. The largest barrier to ASD use was a lack of aesthetic appeal. Strategies aimed at increasing players’ willingness to wear ankle protection should be emphasized among coaches and parents as this may increase use of ASDs.

Michael D. Cusimano

2013-05-01

171

Factors Affecting Success and Complication of Percutaneous Nephrolithotomy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Aim: Percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL is the first choice renal stones especially larger than 2 cm, and high success rates can be achieved after PNL. But several severe complications may be occurred. In this study, factors which affect the success rate and complications were investigated. Material and Method: Between July 2004 and August 2007, 176 patients (102 men/74 women underwent PNL operation. Because of the bilateral renal stones PNL was performed in two separate sessions of 9 patients. Percutaneous access was doing in prone position. Factors affecting the success and complication data were collected. Results: Mean age was 47.610,7 (17%uFFFD76 year, median=47. Complete success rate was detected 77.8% with the direct X-rays taken in the first postoperative day. The success rate was up to 87% after the additional post-treatment therapy. Success rates were 83.1% for complex stones and 89.4% for simple stones (p

Soner Yalç?nkaya

2012-04-01

172

Factors affecting the leaching of lead from UPVC pipes.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper summarizes the results of a series of studies on the various factors that affect the leaching of lead from unplasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (UPVC) pipes. Factors that were studied include temperature, pH and extractants. Results showed that, for a given UPVC pipe, the rate of leaching of lead depended primarily on temperature and the nature of extractants. While the rate of leaching of lead was quite low with distilled water, it was very much enhanced by the presence of low concentration of anions such as Cl(-), HPO inf4 (sup2-) HCO inf3 (sup-) , NO inf3 (sup-) , SO inf4 (sup2-) and EDTA. EDTA, being a strong complexing agent, was most effective. Rates of leaching were found to be higher at elevated temperature except in the cases of HPO inf4 (sup2-) and EDTA. Effect of pH was not pronounced. The temperature at which the UPVC pipes were extruded was found to affect the rate of leaching of lead. Pipes extruded at 190°C were found to have lower rate of leaching than those extruded at 180°C and 170°C. Analysis of the pipes by Scanning Electron Microscopy showed that the distribution of lead in the pipes extruded at 190°C was more uniform than those extruded at 170°C. PMID:24233940

Koh, L L; Wong, M K; Gan, L M; Yap, C T

1991-10-01

173

Factors affecting the reproductive potential of dairy cows  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Various factors that affect fertility were examined in high yielding dairy cows. In cows treated for the synchronization of oestrous cycles, manifestation of oestrus following synchronization treatment was affected by the body condition score in the winter; 74% of the cows had a low score. Primiparous cows that were thin or fat had a low conception rate. The conception rate of multiparous cows with different body condition scores did not differ in the winter. However, in the summer, thin, medium-low, medium-high and fat cows had a conception rate of 15, 36, 48 and 27%, respectively (P4) levels five days before the first post-partum AI affected conception rates. Primiparous cows with low (?2 ng/mL), medium (2.1-4.0 ng/mL) and high (?4.1 ng/mL) P4 levels had a conception rate of 28, 17 and 61%, respectively (P4 had a conception rate of 25, 46 and 52%, respectively (P<0.02). Cows in their fifth or later lactation that were fed straw as their sole roughage had a conception rate of 23% and a 120 day pregnancy rate of 23%. Cows of the same parities that were fed hay had a conception rate of 50% (P<0.05) and a pregnancy rate of 80% (P<0.005). (author). 15 refs, 5 tabs

174

Systematic factors that affect ostrich egg incubation traits  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english Data obtained from a pair-mated ostrich flock maintained at Oudtshoorn, South Africa, were used to estimate environmental and genetic parameters for egg weight (EWT), water loss of incubated eggs up to 21 days (WL21), water loss up to 35 days (WL35), pipping time (PT) and weight of day-old chicks (C [...] WT). Between 13806 and 19913 artificially incubated ostrich eggs during the 2003 to 2006 production years were used. Systematic factors affecting these traits such as production year, breeding season, female age, incubator type, storage time and ostrich breed, were initially assessed in single-trait-analyses, using ASREML. Eggs and chicks produced by Zimbabwean Blue (ZB) females were 5 and 7% heavier, respectively, than those produced by South African Black (SAB) females. WL21 and WL35 were not significantly different between ZB and SAB birds. There were trends for within-season effects on EWT and CWT, but no general, robust trend applicable to all years could be discerned. Season had a significant effect on WL21, WL35 and PT. An increase was apparent in EWT, CWT and PT with an increase in female age. There was a linear increase in pipping time as egg storage time prior to incubation increased. Incubator type had an effect on WL21 and WL35. Systematic factors affect traits such as WL21, WL35 and PT and should be accounted for before the estimation of genetic parameters. These factors should be considered when planning commercial ostrich husbandry and artificial incubation operations.

Z., Brand; S.W.P., Cloete; C.R., Brown; I.A., Malecki.

2008-04-01

175

Systematic factors that affect ostrich egg incubation traits  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english Data obtained from a pair-mated ostrich flock maintained at Oudtshoorn, South Africa, were used to estimate environmental and genetic parameters for egg weight (EWT), water loss of incubated eggs up to 21 days (WL21), water loss up to 35 days (WL35), pipping time (PT) and weight of day-old chicks (C [...] WT). Between 13806 and 19913 artificially incubated ostrich eggs during the 2003 to 2006 production years were used. Systematic factors affecting these traits such as production year, breeding season, female age, incubator type, storage time and ostrich breed, were initially assessed in single-trait-analyses, using ASREML. Eggs and chicks produced by Zimbabwean Blue (ZB) females were 5 and 7% heavier, respectively, than those produced by South African Black (SAB) females. WL21 and WL35 were not significantly different between ZB and SAB birds. There were trends for within-season effects on EWT and CWT, but no general, robust trend applicable to all years could be discerned. Season had a significant effect on WL21, WL35 and PT. An increase was apparent in EWT, CWT and PT with an increase in female age. There was a linear increase in pipping time as egg storage time prior to incubation increased. Incubator type had an effect on WL21 and WL35. Systematic factors affect traits such as WL21, WL35 and PT and should be accounted for before the estimation of genetic parameters. These factors should be considered when planning commercial ostrich husbandry and artificial incubation operations.

Z., Brand; S.W.P., Cloete; C.R., Brown; I.A., Malecki.

176

Study of factors affecting the appearance of colors under microscopes  

Science.gov (United States)

The variation of colors in microscopy systems can be quite critical for some users. To address this problem, a study is conducted to analyze how different factors such as size of the sample, intensity of the microscope's light source and the characteristics of the material like chroma and saturation can affect the color appearance through the eyepiece of the microscope. To study the changes in colors considering these factors, the spectral reflectance of 24 colors of GretagMacbeth Classic ColorChecker® and Mini ColorChecker® which are placed under a Nikon ECLIPSE MA200 microscope®2 using dark filed and bright field illuminations which result in different intensity levels, is measured using a spectroradiometer®3 which was placed in front of the eyepiece of the microscope. The results are compared with the original data from N. Ohta1. The evaluation is done by observing the shift in colors in the CIE 1931 Chromaticity Diagram and the CIELAB space, also by applying a wide set of color-difference formulas, namely: CIELAB, CMC, BFD, CIE94, CIEDE2000, DIN99d and DIN99b. Furthermore, to emphasize on the color regions in which the highest difference is observed, the authors have obtained the results from another microscope; Olympus SZX10®4, which in this case the measurement is done by mounting the spectroradiometer to the camera port of the microscope. The experiment leads to some interesting results, among which is the consistency in the highest difference observed considering different factors or how the change in saturation of the samples of the same hue can affect the results.

Zakizadeh, Roshanak; Martinez-Garcia, Juan; Raja, Kiran B.; Siakidis, Christos

2013-11-01

177

Determination of Factors Affecting HRTEM Gate Dielectric Thickness Measurement Uncertainty  

Science.gov (United States)

Because high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) relies on a complex contrast mechanism to produce images of gate dielectric films in cross section, there are many factors affecting the uncertainty of thickness measurements based on these images. A preliminary survey revealed approximately 50 parameters that affect the uncertainty in a gate dielectric dimensional metrology experiment using HRTEM, along with approximately 1,200 two-term interactions and almost 20,000 three-term interactions. Using established design-of-experiment (DEX) methodologies, I performed a screening experiment based on a 2IV(8-4) fractional factorial design to determine which factors had the greatest impact on the absolute error of the thickness measurements. Absolute error was determined by simulating HRTEM micrographs using a multislice calculation. The model used for the simulation consisted of a variable SiO2 film approximately 2 nm thick positioned between two pieces of crystalline Si. This approximation to a gate stack was built atom-by-atom using commercial molecular modeling software supplemented with custom Tcl scripts to assemble the gate structures from simpler primitives. By varying the molecular model, sample parameters such as crystallographic orientation, film thickness, density, and along-beam thickness can be varied precisely. Instrument parameters and details of the imaging conditions are inputs to the multislice calculation, a simulation technique that has been vetted by the microscopy community and has been in use for decades. Beam tilt, defocus, and vibration amplitude were the main factors found to have the largest effects, while beam-tilt?defocus and defocus?vibration were the most important two-term interactions.

Scott, John Henry J.

2003-09-01

178

Geolocation by light: accuracy and precision affected by environmental factors  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

1. Geolocation by light allows for tracking animal movements, based on measurements of light intensity over time by a data-logging device (‘geolocator’). Recent developments of ultra-light devices (<2 g) broadened the range of target species and boosted the number of studies using geolocators. However, an inherent problem of geolocators is that any factor or process that changes the natural light intensity pattern also affects the positions calculated from these light patterns. Although the most important factors have been identified, estimation of their effect on the accuracy and precision of positions estimated has been lacking but is very important for the analyses and interpretation of geolocator data. 2. The ‘threshold method’ is mainly used to derive positions by defining sunrise and sunset times from the light intensity pattern for each recorded day. This method requires calibration: a predefined sun elevation angle for estimating latitude by fitting the recorded day / night lengthsto theoretical values across latitudes. Therewith, almost constant shading can be corrected for by finding the appropriate sun elevation angle. 3. Weather, topography and vegetation are the most important factors that influence light intensities. We demonstrated their effect on the measurement of day /night length, time of solar midnight /noon and the resulting position estimates using light measurements from stationary geolocators at known places and from geolocators mounted on birds. Furthermore, we investigated the influence of different calibration methods on the accuracy of the latitudinal positions. 4. All three environmental factors can influence the light intensity pattern significantly. Weather and an animal’s behaviour result in increased noise in positioning, whereas topography and vegetation result in systematic shading and biased positions. Calibration can significantly shift the estimated latitudes and potentially increase the accuracy, but detailed knowledge about the particular confounding factors and the behaviour of the studied animal is crucial for the choice of the most appropriate calibration method.

Lisovski, Simeon; Hewson, Chris M.

2012-01-01

179

Crucial Factors Affecting Stress: A Study among Undergraduates in Pakistan  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Stress is normally unavoidable part of everyone’s life living in this world. It portrays a negative notion that can have an impact on one’s mental and physical well-being. The core intention of this study was to detect the most influencing factors of stress affecting undergraduates. The four factors that had taken under consideration were Family stress, Emotional stress, Financial Stress and Social Stress. To accomplish this research stress inventory has developed using scientific methods. Respondents were undergraduate students of university with different demographics. Results has presented graphically, descriptively and inferentially using SPSS and Excel. Pearson’s chi-square and correlation has applied to verify the relationship between stress factors and demographics. Results show that living persuasively under strict rules and regulations can be a family stressor. Unavailability of best choices and paramount match to live with as a partner can be an emotional stress. Less income students find difficulty to spend money on buying and enjoying which is a predictor of financial stress. Pressurized life and squat admiration from people has lied under Social stress. Other verdicts are also deemed according to Pakistani cultural context.

Kashif Ud Din Khan

2013-02-01

180

FACTORS AFFECTING EMPLOYEE JOB SATISFACTION OF PHARMACEUTICAL SECTOR  

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Full Text Available The Pharmaceutical sector plays a vital role in underpinning the economic development of a country. This study attempts to evaluate job satisfaction of employees in different pharmaceutical companies. It focuses on the relative importance of job satisfaction factors and their impacts on the overall job satisfaction of employees. It also investigates the impacts of pharmaceutical type, work experience, age, and sex differences on the attitudes toward job Satisfaction. The result shows that salary, efficiency in work, fringe supervision, and co-worker relation are the most important factors contributing to job satisfaction. The overall job satisfaction of the employees in pharmaceutical sector is at the positive level. The nature of business operation, the work culture and the level of job satisfaction have undergone sea change for the pharmaceutical companies. As a business proposition initiated huge investment whereas majority of their stocks is going down bringing a high level of apprehension related to job security among its employees. This research paper highlights some of these problems and presents a picture of level of job satisfaction among employees of pharmaceutical companies. It also identifies unique issues of job satisfaction in the companies. Pharmaceuticals Companies are selected for the research because they are currently undergoing continued expansion. In order to gain competitive advantage and adapt to the dramatic changing environment, it is important for them to achieve management efficiency by increasing employee satisfaction in the organisation. Hence this research was mainly undertaken to investigate on the significance of factors such as working conditions, pay and promotion, job security, fairness, relationship with co-workers and supervisors in affecting the job satisfaction. This paper presents a comprehensive diagnosis of job satisfaction indices of pharmaceutical business, the factors causing the dissatisfaction & suggestions to improve them.

Mosammod Mahamuda Parvin

2011-10-01

 
 
 
 
181

The antiepileptic drug phenytoin affects sodium transport in toad epithelium.  

Science.gov (United States)

The effects of phenytoin on isolated Pleurodema thaul toad skin were investigated. Low (micromolar) concentrations of the antiepileptic agent applied to the outside surface of the toad epithelium increased the electrical parameters (short-circuit current and potential difference) by over 40%, reflecting stimulation of Na(+) transport, whereas higher (millimolar concentrations, outside and inside surface) decreased both electric parameters, the effect being greater at the inside surface (40% and 80% decrease, respectively). The amiloride test showed that the stimulatory effect was accompanied by an increase and the inhibitory effect by a decrease in the sodium electromotive force (ENa). It is concluded that the drug interaction with membrane lipid bilayers might result in a distortion of the lipid-protein interface contributing to disturbance of Na(+) epithelial channel activity. After applying the Na(+)-K(+)-ATPase blocker ouabain and replacing the Na(+) ions in the outer Ringer's solution by choline, it was concluded that both active and passive transport are involved in sodium absorption, although active transport predominates. PMID:16314149

Suwalsky, Mario; Mennickent, Sigrid; Norris, Beryl; Cárdenas, Hernan

2006-01-01

182

Percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation of osteoid osteomas: factors affecting therapeutic outcome  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

To examine factors which affect local recurrence of osteoid osteomas treated with percutaneous CT-guided radiofrequency thermocoagulation. A prospective study was carried out on 45 patients with osteoid osteoma who underwent percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation with a minimum follow-up of 12 months There were seven local recurrences (16%); all occurred within the first year. Local recurrence was significantly related to a non-diaphyseal location (P<0.01). There was no significant relationship (P=0.05) between local recurrence and age of the patient, duration of symptoms, previous treatment, size of the lesion, positive biopsy, radiofrequency generator used or the number of needle positions. There were no complications. Osteoid osteomas in a non-diaphyseal location are statistically more likely to recur than those in a diaphyseal location when treated with CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency thermocoagulation. This relationship between local recurrence and location has not been previously reported. (orig.)

183

studies on some factors affecting oxidative low density lipoprotein  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

the present study was performed to evaluate the effect of occupational radiation exposure on some oxidant antioxidant parameters in addition to other factors affecting oxidative stress such as age, smoking, hypertension, high sedimentation rate for this purpose. a total of 131 individuals were included in this study 81 of them working in the radiation field the age was from 27 to 63 years. the occupational time from five to more than 25 where the control groups was composed of 50 healthy volunteers who had never worked in radiology related job otherwise with the same characteristics . the parameters tested are LDL, HDL, triglycerides, cholesterol, vitamin E, SOD, MDA, hemoglobin, fasting blood sugar, urea, creatinine, and liver enzymes GOT, GPT.our results show that time of exposure to radiation shows remarkable effect beginning with decrease of vitamin E after five years exposure,extending to MDA, triglycerides and LDL which increased while SOD decreased

184

Factors affecting the low temperature pumpability of used engine oils  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

A large number of studies have been published on the low temperature pumpability characteristics of fresh oils; however, less is known about the effects of oil aging on this property. In laboratory viscometric tests, fuel dilution, mechanical shearing, oxidative degradation and oil contaminants were all shown to significantly affect low temperature fluidity of multigrade engine oil formulations sensitive to slow cool gelation. Moreover, the cooling and shear rate applied to the test oil was found to play an important role in the overall impact of these factors. For example, fuel dilution may improve cold cranking viscosity while degrading slow-cool MRV performance. These laboratory viscometric studies have been supplemented by full scale All-Weather Chassis Dynamometer testing comparing the pumpability performance of new and used SAE 10W-30 engine oils.

May, C.J.; Habeeb

1987-01-01

185

FACTORS AFFECTED DECARBOXYLATION ACTIVITY OF ENTEROCOCCUS FAECIUM ISOLATED FROM RABBIT  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false SK JA X-NONE Biogenic amines (BA are basic nitrogenous compounds formed mainly by decarboxylation of amino acids. There are generated in course of microbial, vegetable and animal metabolisms. The aim of the study was to monitor factors affected production of biogenic amines by Enterococcus faecium, which is found in rabbit meat. Biogenic amines were analyzed by means of UPLC (ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography equipped with a UV/VIS DAD detector. Decarboxylation activity of E. faecium was mainly influenced by the cultivation temperature and the amount of NaCl in this study. E. faecium produced most of the monitored biogenic amines levels: tyramine ?2500 mg.l-1; putrescine ?30 mg.l-1; spermidine ?10 mg.l-1 and cadaverine ?5 mg.l-1.doi:10.5219/182

František Bu?ka

2012-04-01

186

Five Factors Affecting Stability and Security in the Middle East  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available There are five factors that affect security and stability in the Middle East. The first of these is the ticking bomb of sectarianism between the Sunni and Shiite strands of Islam, which have become more widespread in recent years due to the politisation of sectarian tensions and their transformation among some actors to a means to achieve political demands. Secondly, the impact of the Arab revolutions and the accompanying rise of Islamist groups through the new democratic tendencies encouraged by those revolutions. Thirdly, Iran’s behaviour through the use of both direct and indirect threats to several countries in the region. Fourthly, the existence of a fertile environment for terrorist groups in Yemen. Finally, the struggle between Arabs and Israelis over the existence of the State of Israel and the plight of the Palestinians. This article provides a clear set of linkages between these and investigates them with the intention of enhancing understanding and encouraging debate.

Yahya Alshammari

2012-12-01

187

Factors affecting focusing performance of continuous phase plate concentration  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

To improve the far field focal spot in inertial confinement fusion, the paper analyzes the main factors affecting the focusing performance of continuous phase plates. The encircled energy fraction and the far-field root-mean-square spot size are analyzed. The results show that, the aperture error, alignment error and amplitude distortion error have little effect on the focusing ability of continuous phase plates. The wavefront distortion lowers the energy concentrated especially when the correlation length is equivalent to the minimum spatial period (about 10 mm) of continuous phase plates. Thus improving the correlation length of the wavefront distortion in the inertial confinement fusion system is an effective way to improve the energy concentration degree of the focal spot. (authors)

188

Factors affecting tuberculosis retreatment defaults in Nanded, India.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was carried out to determine factors affecting tuberculosis retreatment defaults in Nanded, India. All patients registered as tuberculosis retreatment cases (n = 107 excluding deaths during treatment) were interviewed by home visits. Their sociodemographic characteristics and treatment history were recorded and later compared with their treatment outcomes. Among the patients registered for re-treatment of tuberculosis (n = 112), 24 (21.4%) defaulted on treatment. The rate of default was 25.8% among those who had previously defaulted on treatment. Those who were employed, illiterate and alcoholics were 3.5, 3.5 and 3.4 times more likely to default, respectively, than others; these differences were significant. PMID:21073036

Bhagat, Vijay Manohar; Gattani, Prakash Laxminarayan

2010-09-01

189

Simulated lidar waveforms for understanding factors affecting waveform shape  

Science.gov (United States)

Full-waveform LIDAR is a technology which enables the analysis of the 3-D structure and arrangement of objects. An in-depth understanding of the factors that affect the shape of the full-waveform signal is required in order to extract as much information as possible from the signal. A simple model of LIDAR propagation has been created which simulates the interaction of LIDAR energy with objects in a scene. A 2-dimensional model tree allows controlled manipulation of the geometric arrangement of branches and leaves with varying spectral properties. Results suggest complex interactions of the LIDAR energy with the tree canopy, including the occurrence of multiple bounces for energy reaching the ground under the canopy. Idealized sensor instrument response functions incorporated in the simulation illustrate a large impact on waveform shape. A waveform recording laser rangefinder has been built which will allow validation or model results; preliminary collection results are presented here.

Kim, Angela M.; Olsen, Richard C.

2011-06-01

190

Factors affecting survival in total artificial heart recipients before transplantation.  

Science.gov (United States)

To identify factors affecting the successful bridge to transplantation, experience with 32 recipients of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart was reviewed. Between patients with and without a successful bridge, there were no significant differences in preoperative hepatorenal function or postoperative hemodynamics, but there were significant differences in body size. When recipients were divided according to body surface areas of less than or greater than 1.8 m2, the smaller patients more frequently developed respirator dependence (73% vs. 18%, p less than 0.01), renal failure (53% vs. 18%, p less than 0.05), and hepatic failure and sepsis, resulting in less frequent qualification for transplantation (20% vs. 65%, p less than 0.05). There were no successful bridge operations in seven patients with body surface areas of less than 1.7 m2, and only one success in nine patients who were less than 170 cm in height, despite use of a smaller stroke volume model. The smaller patients had poorer ventricular filling, which was largely compensated for by the drive controls set for significantly longer diastole and higher vacuum, resulting in similar hemodynamics between the groups. The results suggest that device fitting as manifested by body size is an important factor affecting major organ recovery and subsequent transplantation in recipients of the Jarvik-7 artificial heart. A paracorporeal device may be advisable for patients with body surface areas of less than 1.8 m2 or who were less than 175 cm in height until an even smaller model with a better fit in the thorax becomes available. PMID:2225424

Kawaguchi, A T; Gandjbakhch, I; Pavie, A; Muneretto, C; Solis, E; Bors, V; Leger, P; Vaissier, E; Levasseur, J P; Szefner, J

1990-11-01

191

Factors Affecting Furfural as a Nematicide on Turf  

Science.gov (United States)

Recently a furfural nematicide Multiguard Protect EC was launched for use on turfgrasses in the United States. A series of greenhouse experiments were conducted to determine the concentration and exposure time required for this formulation to irreversibly affect Belonolaimus longicaudatus, and to study factors that might affect the practicality of furfural use in turfgrass systems. One experiment exposed B. longicaudatus to increasing concentrations of furfural (0 to 990 ppm) in vitro for either 24 or 48 hr, followed by inoculation onto bermudagrass. A second experiment evaluated effects of exposure of B. longicaudatus to increasing concentrations of furfural in soil solution on bermudagrass with or without an organic thatch layer. A third experiment evaluated effects on B. longicaudatus of increasing concentrations of furfural applied as a spray treatment to creeping bentgrass. Results from the in vitro exposure experiment found decreasing numbers of B. longicaudatus with increasing furfural concentration beginning with the lowest concentration tested (270 ppm). Belonolaimus longicaudatus were virtually eliminated with furfural concentrations ? 720 ppm. Similarly, exposure to increasing concentration of furfural in soil solution resulted in increasing reduction in numbers of B. longicaudatus. Presence of thatch slightly reduced the population density of B. longicaudatus. Spray application of furfural only reduced numbers of B. longicaudatus at the two highest rates (3,600 and 4,950 ppm). PMID:24379484

Luc, J. E.; Crow, W. T.

2013-01-01

192

Cassava sector development in Cameroon: Production and marketing factors affecting price  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Regular and available supply is the prerequisite of an effective and efficient commercialization process. Using multivariate regression analysis on field data, this research appraises the production and marketing factors that influence cassava market price. The production factors include cultivated area, planting material, yield, and farmers’ field schools; while farmers access to a paved road, having a telephone, the transportation costs of fresh roots, the level of root perishability, and the prices of rice and maize stand as marketing factors. The results show that farmers who attended farmers’ field school adopted improved planting materials, propagated them in their localities and the yields in these communities increased significantly. The farm size also has a significant influence on the availability of fresh roots. On the marketing side, transportation costs, access to a paved road, the prices of rice and maize significantly affect cassava’s market price and tighten the relationship between producers and marketers. We conclude that to increase fresh roots supply, roads leading to cultivating areas should be paved, better transportation provided, communication costs reduced, even distribution of planting materials and appropriate warehouses.

Elise Stephanie Meyo Mvodo

2012-09-01

193

The exogenous factors affecting the cost efficiency of power generation  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This paper employs a stochastic frontier analysis (SFA) to examine cost efficiency and scale economies in Taiwan Power Company (TPC) by using the panel data covering the period of 1995-2006. In most previous studies, the efficiency estimated by the Panel Data without testing the endogeneity may bring about a biased estimator resulting from the correlation between input and individual effect. A Hausman test is conducted in this paper to examine the endogeneity of input variables and thus an appropriate model is selected based on the test result. This study finds that the power generation executes an increasing return to scale across all the power plants based on the pooled data. We also use installed capacity, service years of the power plant, and type of fuel as explanatory variable for accounting for the estimated cost efficiency of each plant by a logistic regression model to examine the factor affecting the individual efficiency estimates. The results demonstrate that the variable of installed capacity keeps a positive relationship with cost efficiency while the factor of working years has a negative relationship.

194

Factors Affecting Forest Area Changes in Cambodia: An Econometric Approach  

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Full Text Available Clarifying factors affecting forest area changes is critical to implementing REDD+ scheme properly. We analyzed some socio-economic factors and clarified their relationships with deforestation in Cambodia for the period of 2002 to 2010. A panel data analysis was conducted for 18 provinces, while six other provinces were deleted from the list because only a small amount of their land was forested. Time effects, cross-sectional dependence, serial correlation in idiosyncratic errors, and heteroskedasticity were tested, and robust variance matrix estimations were obtained to solve the problems of heteroskedasticity and serial correlation. The model estimation results showed that population, gross agricultural production and large-scale plantation development have negative impacts on forest area changes. On the other hand, the impacts of rice cultivation, gross industrial production, household income and house floor area by household were found not to be significant. Overall, however, the results indicated that forests in Cambodia still face pressure from the increases in population, agriculture production, and the enlargement of land development. As the increase in productivity of agriculture gives a better use of current agricultural land and lessens the pressure on forest, intensifying agriculture is important. It is also important to develop industry and other economic ventures to grow national economy while not imposing pressure on forest. This research reminds decision makers to use discretion when developing large-scale plantations.

Tetsuya Michinaka

2013-04-01

195

Factors affecting job satisfaction among the radiologic technologists  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Job satisfaction is very important for adequate manpower management in the medical field. To study job satisfaction among the radiologic technologists, 344 cases were reviewed in five university hospitals and one general hospital. Self-administered questionnaire was used to study their socioeconomic characteristics, working conditions, job satisfaction, and the factors affecting there job satisfaction. The results were as follows : 1. There was statistically significant difference in job satisfaction according to the their department of employment, position, and hospital characteristics. 2. The group that was satisfied with their salary had a higher job satisfaction score, whereas others who were not satisfied ranked lower. 3. The positive answering group on the ability and job recognition ranked higher score on the job satisfaction than the negative answering group. 4. The group that was in good relationship with their superiors and co-workers scored higher on job satisfaction. From the above results, the job satisfaction was high for the group with positive thinking and reply, but the intentin to change their job was low. Considering the fact that these results represent only 6 hospitals from limited arease, therefore, necessary to include more medical facilities nationwide, especially small-medium sized clinics or hospitals where the difficulty with high turnover rate of employment is expected, to study further various factors involving job satisfaction in the future

196

Renovascular hypertension: factors affecting the outcome following surgical revascularisation.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was conducted at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, Pakistan to evaluate factors that affect outcome following revascularisation in patients with renovascular hypertension. We included all the patients diagnosed to have renovascular hypertension, confirmed by renal angiography, between July 1997 and September 2000. Of the total 15 patients, nine were males and six were females. Eleven patients received venous grafts, three received polytetraflouroethyline (PTFE) grafts while one patient underwent angioplasty and stenting. All were followed-up for a period of nine months (median) with the range from 2 to 84 months. A total of 33.3% of the study patients were completely cured, as they became normotensive without anti-hypertensive therapy after operation, while 27% showed marked improvement in blood pressure control post-operatively. Thus, extended cure or improvement of renovascular hypertension was achieved in 60% of patients. Normal pre-operative serum creatinine level, high pre-operative unstimulated peripheral renin levels and renal vein renin ratio of at least 1.75:1 were the most significant predictive factors for favorable outcome (p < 0.012). The pre-operative severity and duration of hypertension as well as degree of disparity in kidney sizes did not predict the post-operative improvement in renal function and blood pressure control. PMID:17657118

Rabbani, Malik Anas; Zaidi, Alia; Ali, Syed Sohail; Anas, Bushra; Younus, Asmooni; Shah, Syed Mansoor Ahmad

2003-01-01

197

Factors affecting outdoor exposure in winter: population-based study  

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The extent of outdoor exposure during winter and factors affecting it were examined in a cross-sectional population study in Finland. Men and women aged 25-74 years from the National FINRISK 2002 sub-study ( n=6,591) were queried about their average weekly occupational, leisure-time and total cold exposure during the past winter. The effects of gender, age, area of residence, occupation, ambient temperature, self-rated health, physical activity and education on cold exposure were analysed. The self-reported median total cold exposure time was 7 h/week (8 h men, 6 h women),employed in agriculture, forestry and industry/mining/construction or related occupations, being less educated and being aged 55-64 years. Factors associated with increased leisure-time cold exposure among men were: employment in industry/mining/construction or related occupations, being a pensioner or unemployed, reporting at least average health, being physically active and having college or vocational education. Among women, being a housewife, pensioner or unemployed and engaged in physical activity increased leisure-time cold exposure, and young women were more exposed than older ones. Self-rated health was positively associated with leisure time cold exposure in men and only to a minor extent in women. In conclusion, the subjects reported spending 4% of their total time under cold exposure, most of it (71%) during leisure time. Both occupational and leisure-time cold exposure is greater among men than women.

Mäkinen, Tiina M.; Raatikka, Veli-Pekka; Rytkönen, Mika; Jokelainen, Jari; Rintamäki, Hannu; Ruuhela, Reija; Näyhä, Simo; Hassi, Juhani

2006-09-01

198

Identifying the Factors Affecting the Participation of Agricultural Cooperatives' Members  

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Full Text Available Problem statement: 40-year history of agricultural production cooperatives in the country shows that this type of exploitation system has faced many ups and downs during this period. First, despite the help and support by the government, the cooperative sector has not been able to play a major role in the development of the country and its share has not exceeded 3% of development program. The main aim of this study is identifying the factors affecting the participation of Shirvan-Chardavol township?s agricultural cooperatives? members. Approach: This casual comparative applied research which uses survey method for data accumulation, is of Quasi-experimental research type because of impossibility of controlling the research variables. A researcher-made questionnair was used as the main tool for gathering data. The face and content validity of the questionnaire were confirmed by a group of university professors and cooperative experts; also the reliability of the questionnaire was confirmed through calculating the Kronbach alfa coefficient (a = 0.80. Results: The statistical society of the research included 751 active members of Shirvan-Chardavol township?s agricultural cooperatives, among which 260 people were selected for the study using classified proportional random sampling method and with the aid of Morgan sample-volume table. Data processing was performed using SPSS estatistial software, as well as descriptive estatistics (central and inferential indexes and analytical estatistics (correlation coefficients and stepwise multiple regression analysis. Conclusion: The correlation coefficient results show that there is significant relationship between the variables like age, background history of membership in cooperatives, the members? agricultural land areas, annual income of the members, socio-cultural features, economical features, educational-extensional features, managerial factors, psychological features, political factors and communicational-informational factors from the one hand and the dependent variable of agricultural cooperatives? members? level of participation from the other. The multiple regression analysis results showed that variables like political, economic, managerial and social factors have positive effect on the dependent variable of agricultural cooperatives? members? participation, describing 65% of the changes of the mentioned dependent variable.

Bagher Arayesh

2011-01-01

199

Factors Affecting in-Hospital Mortality of Acute Myocardial Infarction  

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Full Text Available "nBackground: Acute myocardial infarction (AMI is one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality. Considering immense socioeconomic damages of growing AMI in developing countries we estimated prognostic value of major risk factors of AMI to predict probable In-hospital AMI mortality."nMethods: In a cohort survey from June 2004 to March 2006, 1798 patients hospitalized with proven AMI entered into two groups: Survived (patients discharged alive and Expired (patients expired during hospitalization due to AMI. We evaluated relationship of 17 risk factors including age, sex, smoking, opium usage, hypertension, diabetes mellitus (DM, dyslipidemia, Killip class, existence of Q wave, St segment elevation, bundle branch blocks (BBB, involved surface of heart, mean left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF, mitral valve regurgitation (MR, and serum level of Troponin I and CKMB, with patients' survival and expiry by using chi square test, T test and multivariate logistic regression analysis. P value ? 0.05 was considered significant."nResults: There were 1629 (90.6% survived and 169 (9.4% expired patients. Factors significantly affected in-hospital mortality of AMI include: age (P< 0.001, femaleness (P< 0.001, smoking (P< 0.001, Killip class>II (P< 0.001, hy­per­tension (P= 0.036, DM (P< 0.001, bundle branch block (P< 0.001, Moderate to severe mitral regurgitation (P< 0.001, lower Mean LVEF (P< 0.001, and lower mean serum concentration of CKMB and Troponin I (P< 0.001. Mortality was significantly higher in anterolateral infarction."nConclusion: Mean age> 69.01 yr, femaleness, Killip class III & V, hypertension, DM, moderate to severe MR, anterolateral AMI, bundle branch block and higher serum concentration of CKMB & Troponin I are associated with higher In-hospital post-AMI mortality.

M Salarifar

2009-09-01

200

COMMUNICATION FACTORS AFFECTING THE ADOPTION OF INNOVATION AT THE GRASSROOTS LEVEL IN OGUN STATE, NIGERIA  

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Full Text Available The study investigates communication factors affecting the adoption of innovation at the grassroots level in Ogun State. Two hundred farmers and twenty-five extension agents were selected using a multi – stage sampling technique, and were interviewed for the purpose of the study. Data collected were analyzed using both descriptive and inferential statistical tools. The study revealed that the majority of the farmers are male (58.0% while 12.0% were below 30 years, 36.0% are married while 20.0% had no formal education. However, 49.8% strongly agreed that noise, waning attention, feedback, incorrect message content affects the adoption of innovation. Also, among the agents enumerated, 56.0% were male while 20.0% were below 30 years, and 88.0% were married, 56.0% had B.Sc. / M.Sc. degree, 62.9% agreed with the method used in delivering innovation (radio, television, audiotapes, posters, group discussion, shows and exhibitions while 57.0% strongly agreed that the factors considered by the farmers do affects adoption of innovation. Finally, at P – value ? 0.05, significant relationships were found to exist between communication factors and (i age (?2 = 46.48, (ii marital status (?2 = 56.32, (iii the problem of transportation (r = -0.023 and (iv financial problems (r = 0.013. Also the uses of posters (r = -0.194 and group discussion (r = -0.135 as channels through which innovations are disseminated to the farmers have a significant relationship with communication factors. Thus, the study recommends an effective communication linkage between change agents and the farmers as well as the improvement of the road network and provision of transportation facilities to the change agents for easy accessibility to the farmers.

A Onasanya

2007-07-01

 
 
 
 
201

Studies and Research on Friction, Friction Factor and Affecting Factors : A Review  

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Full Text Available The friction and friction factors are very significant factors in flow through pipes, channels, heat exchangers . From the pumping cost point of view, minimum friction is desirable as it will decrease the energy loss. In the rotating components like axle-shaft arrangements, the friction and slip are important factors. In case of heat exchanger, the friction factor is important as the heat transfer depends on it. The research was also reported on effect of submerged vegetation on friction for river. The friction coefficient was a function of flow depth and velocity. Also various models were suggested by investigators to predict friction coefficient based on their research related to factors affecting the friction coefficient and the nature and gravity of their effect on friction.

Sunil J. Kulkarni

2014-10-01

202

Undergraduate nursing students' perceptions regarding factors that affect math abilities  

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A review of the nursing literature reveals many undergraduate nursing students lack proficiency with basic mathematical skills, those necessary for safe medication preparation and administration. Few studies exploring the phenomenon from the undergraduate nursing student perspective are reported in the nursing literature. The purpose of this study was to explore undergraduate nursing students’ perceptions of math abilities, factors that affect math abilities, the use of math in nursing, and the extent to which specific math skills were addressed throughout a nursing curriculum. Polya’s Model for Problem Solving and the Bloom’s Taxonomy of Educational Objectives, Affective Domain served as the theoretical background for the study. Qualitative and quantitative methods were utilized to obtain data from a purposive sample of undergraduate nursing students from a private university in western Pennsylvania. Participants were selected based on the proficiency level with math skills, as determined by a score on the Elsevier’s HESI™ Admission Assessment (A2) Exam, Math Portion. Ten students from the “Excellent” benchmark group and eleven students from the “Needing Additional Assistance or Improvement” benchmark group participated in one-on-one, semi-structured interviews, and completed a 25-item, 4-point Likert scale survey that rated confidence levels with specific math skills and the extent to which these skills were perceived to be addressed in the nursing curriculum. Responses from the two benchmark groups were compared and contrasted. Eight themes emerged from the qualitative data. Findings related to mathematical approach and confidence levels with specific math skills were determined to be statistically significant.

Pyo, Katrina A.

203

Factors Affecting Bone Mineral Density in Multiple Sclerosis Patients  

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Full Text Available Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a demyelinating disease which can cause many disabilities for the patient. Recent data suggests that MS patients have higher risk for osteoporosis. This study was performed to investigate if the osteoporosis prevalence is higher in MS patients and to determine the possible factors affecting bone mineral density (BMD.Methods: 51 definite relapsing-remitting MS patients according to McDonald's criteria (45 females, 6 males aged between 20 and 50 years participated in this study. The control group included 407 females aged from 20 to 49 years; they were healthy and had no history of the diseases affecting bone metabolism. Femoral and lumbar BMD were measured by Dual Energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA. The disability of MS patients was evaluated by Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS. The patient’s quality of life was evaluated by the validated Persian version of multiple sclerosis impact scale (MSIS-29.Results: Patients’ mean age was 36 ± 3.3 years and their mean disease duration was 8.7 ± 1.7 years. The mean EDSS score and the mean body mass index (BMI of the patients were 3 ± 0.9 and 23.5 ± 2.3 kg/m2, respectively. 29% of the patients had never been treated by ß-interferon and 6% of them had not received glucocorticoids (GCs pulses since their MS had been diagnosed. 26% of the patients had a history of fracture.18% of our patients were osteoporotic and 43% of them were osteopenic. Femoral BMD was significantly lower among MS patients than age matched controls (P < 0.001, but lumbar BMD showed no difference. There was no correlation between administration of GCs pulses, interferon and BMD; however, we found a significant correlation between EDSS score, quality of life (QoL, disease duration and BMD of both site.Conclusion: As a result of this study, bone loss inevitably occurs in MS patients. The major factor of BMD loss is immobility. Osteoporosis should be managed as part of MS patients’ treatment protocols.

Azin Ayatollahi

2013-01-01

204

Factors affecting on the particle deposition in the respiratory tract  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The deposition pattern of inhaled particles in the respiratory tracts is affected by anatomical structure of the respiratory tracts and respiratory pattern of animals, which are modified by many factors as animal species, physiological and psychological conditions, age, sex, smoking drug, lung diseases, etc. In human, studies have been focused on the initial lung deposition of particles and have made it clear that the respiratory pattern, gender, and diseases may have influence on the deposition pattern. On the other hand, there was little knowledge on the initial lung deposition of particles in laboratory animals. Recently, Raabe et al. have reported the initial lung deposition of 169Yb-aluminosilicate particles in mice, rats, hamsters, guinea pigs and rabbits. The authors have also investigated the lung deposition of latex particles with different sizes and 198Au-colloid in rats whose respiratory volumes during the inhalation were monitored by body plethysmography. These experiments indicated that the deposition of inhaled particles in distal lung e.g. small bronchiolar and alveolar region, was much lower in laboratory animals than that of human. This species difference may be due to smaller diameter of respiratory tract and/or shallower breathing and higher respiratory rate of laboratory animals. The experimental animals in which respiratory diseases were induced artificially have been used to investigate the modification factors on the deposition pattern of inhaled particles. As respiratory diseases, emphysema was induced in rats, hamsters, beagle dogs in some laboratories and pulmonary delayed type hypersensitivity reaction in rats was in our laboratory. The initial lung deposition of particles in these animals was consistently decreased in comparison with normals, regardless of the animal species and the type of disease. (author)

205

Factors affecting the estimate of primary production from space  

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Remote sensing of primary production in the euphotic zone has been based mostly on visible-band and water-leaving radiance measured with the coastal zone color scanner. There are some robust, simple relationships for calculating integral production based on surface measurements, but they also require knowledge for photoadaptive parameters such as maximum photosynthesis which currently cannot be obtained from spave. A 17,000-station data set is used to show that space-based estimates of maximum photosynthesis could improve predictions of psi, the water column light utiliztion index, which is an important term in many primary productivity models. Temperature is also examined as a factor for predicting hydrographic structure and primary production. A simple model is used to relate temperature and maximum photosynthesis; the model incorporates (1) the positive relationship between maximum photosynthesis and temperature and (2) the strongly negative relationship between temperature and nitrate in the ocean (which directly affects maximum growth rates via nitrogen limitation). Since these two factors relate to carbon and nitrogen, 'balanced carbon/nitrogen assimilation' was calculated using the Redfield ratio, It is expected that the relationship between maximum balanced carbon assimilation versus temperature is concave-down, with the peak dependent on nitrate uptake kinetics, temperature-nitrate relationships,a nd the carbon chlorophyll ration. These predictions were compared with the sea truth data. The minimum turnover time for nitrate was also calculated using this approach. Lastly, sea surface temperature gradients were used to predict the slope of isotherms (a proxy for the slope of isopycnals in many waters). Sea truth data show that at size scales of several hundred kilometers, surface temperature gradients can provide information on the slope of isotherms in the top 200 m of the water column. This is directly relevant to the supply of nutrients into the surface mixed layer, which is useful for predicting integral biomass and primary production.

Balch, W. M.; Byrne, C. F.

1994-01-01

206

Factors affecting mortality and morbidity in the abdominal operations  

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Full Text Available Objective: Postoperative complications after abdominal operations is affected by many factors. The aim of this study was to identify factors that predict complications in abdominal operations. Material and Methods: 461 patients who had undergone abdominal operations at our clinic were prospectively researched. In this study age, gender, American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA grade of the patients and timing of surgery (elective or emergency, concomittant disease, type of operation, hospital stay and the mortality were examined. Results: The overall complication rate was 23%. Significantly higher complication occurred in male patients than female patients (30% vs 17.1% (p<0.05. While the complication rate of the patients undergone emergent operation was 35.2%, the complication rate of the patients undergone elective operation was 18%(p<0.05. Significant differences between the age groups were observed for general postoperative complications (16.8% for 0-59 years 33.1% for 60-74 years, and 35.7% for over 75 years. The concomittant disease and timing of operation had a significant effect on complication (p<0.05. The median ASA score of the complication group was 3, the other group was 2 (p<0.05. Hospital stay was 19.6±12 in the complication group and the other group’s hospital stay was 7.1±6 (p<0.05. The mortality rate of our patients was 6.7%. Conclusion: Age older than 60 years old, ASA grade, concomittant disease, timing of operation, severity of operation are associated with the progressing of the complications after abdominal operations. Male gender is also associated with the incerasing complication rate.

Bar?? Saylam

2009-01-01

207

The antiepileptic drug carbamazepine affects sodium transport in toad epithelium.  

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The present work investigates the effects of the antiepileptic drug carbamazepine (CBZ) on sodium transport in the isolated skin of the toad Pleurodema thaul. A submaximal concentration of the drug (0.2 mM) applied to the outer surface of the epithelium increased the electrical parameters short-circuit current (Isc) and potential difference (PD) by over 28%, whereas only a higher concentration (1 mM) induced over a 45% decrease in these parameters when applied to the inner surface. The amiloride test showed that the outer surface stimulatory effect was accompanied by an increase and the inner surface inhibitory effect by a decrease in the sodium electromotive force (ENa). Exploration of these effects of CBZ on the outer surface showed that 0.2 mM increased net Na+ (22Na) influx by 20% and 0.6 mM CBZ decreased Na+ mucosa-serosa flux by 19%, a result in agreement with the finding that higher concentrations of CBZ applied to the inner surface not only decreased ENa but also sodium conductance (GNa). PMID:16542818

Suwalsky, Mario; Mennickent, Sigrid; Norris, Beryl; Cardenas, Hernán

2006-09-01

208

Factors that differentially affect daytime and nighttime sleep in Drosophila  

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Full Text Available Rest in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster has key characteristics of mammalian sleep and is thus considered as a fly version of sleep. Drosophila sleep has been studied extensively, with the aim of gaining fundamental insights into the evolutionarily conserved functions of sleep as well as the mechanisms that regulate it. An interesting question that has not yet been addressed is whether fly sleep can be classified into distinct sleep types, each having particular biological roles—like REM and non-REM sleep in birds and mammals. Typically, Drosophila sleep displays a bimodal pattern, consisting of distinct daytime and nighttime components. Notably, daytime and nighttime sleep differ with respect to a number of qualities, such as sleep bout lengths and arousal thresholds. In this short review, we describe several genetic and environmental factors that differentially affect daytime and nighttime sleep, highlighting the observations suggesting the notion that these temporally distinct components of Drosophila sleep may have unique biological functions and be regulated by different homeostatic regulatory mechanisms.

ToshihiroKitamoto

2012-02-01

209

Factors Affecting Internet Banking Usage in India: An Empirical Analysis  

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Full Text Available This study aims at identifying the factors affecting the customers demand for Internet banking usage by analyzing sample of 450 consumers’ responses who have been interviewed personally through structured survey in 3 districts of Uttar Pradesh India. The study was conducted on the private, public and foreign banks which included ICICI Bank Ltd., HDFC Bank Ltd. and AXIS Bank, Standard Chartered Bank and Yes Bank. Among public sector banks the respondents were from Bank of Baroda, Punjab National Bank and State Bank of India and Canara Bank. The sample size of 450 has been taken from among the urban population of above 18 years of age. The result indicates that the educated respondents use the service of internet banking. Based on occupation we can say that the service class and the business class is the one who use internet banking service to nearly 2 times as other occupation. The high income respondents having more than 1 lack income prefer to use this service. The private sector bank account holders use this service as compared to public sector banks. The banking attributes i.e. convenience and security do have very attentive influence on the use of Internet banking.

Shariq Mohammed

2013-10-01

210

Factors Affecting the Disposition Effect in Tehran Stock Market  

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Full Text Available Given the significance and perceived inevitability of disposition effect and its impact on investment decisions, we investigate factors affecting the disposition effect in the Tehran Stock Exchange. Four hypotheses were developed and the data used in the study were collected through availability sampling. One-sample t-test, two-sample t-test and one-way ANOVA were run to analyze the data while Pearson correlation test and multiple regressions were used to assess relationships among variables in question. The results of the analyses indicate that overconfidence and mental accounting were not significantly correlated with disposition effect. Regret aversion had a positive relationship with disposition effect while self control was negatively associated. It was also observed that there was a negative relationship between participants’ level of education and their disposition effect indicating that the higher the level of education, the less the rate of disposition effect. Furthermore, the results of the study show that males enjoy a higher level of overconfidence than females, and 20 to 30 year-old age groups displayed much overconfidence than other age groups.

Reza Tehrani

2012-02-01

211

Factors affecting the whiteness of optically brightened material.  

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The whiteness of fluorescent white materials is in part due to the absorption of ultraviolet (UV) light and subsequent emission of visible blue light. The UV content of light sources in viewing booths and in spectrophotometers can thus significantly affect the perceived whiteness (PW) and measured sum of reflected and emitted light of fluorescent materials. The effect of UV content on the spectral radiance factor of fluorescent white materials containing different amounts of a fluorescent brightening agent and the subsequent assessment of their PW were evaluated. The UV content of sources in two calibrated viewing booths that simulated D65 and D75 illuminants, separately, was changed by selectively blocking UV emission of the source by approximately 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100%. The radiance spectra of a series of white fabrics were also obtained using a reflectance spectrophotometer at 0%, 25%, 50%, 75%, and 100% UV transmittance. The CIE and Uchida whiteness indices (WIs) were calculated for white samples and compared to perceptual results under varying illumination and UV conditions. Results indicate relatively modest agreement between perceptual assessments of fluorescent samples and whiteness metrics examined. Results also show that when the UV content of sources used in the viewing booths is adjusted to be similar to that used in measurements, improved correlations between perceptual and calculated results are obtained. The CIE WI was found to outperform the Uchida index under both sources. PMID:23201789

Lin, Juan; Shamey, Renzo; Hinks, David

2012-11-01

212

Factors affecting daughters distribution among progeny testing Holstein bulls  

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Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate factors influencing the number of daughters of Holstein bulls during the progeny testing using data provided by the Italian Holstein Friesian Cattle Breeders Association. The hypothesis is that there are no differences among artificial insemination studs (AIS on the daughters distribution among progeny testing bulls. For each bull and beginning from 21 months of age, the distribution of daughters over the progeny testing period was calculated. Data were available on 1973 bulls born between 1986 and 2004, progeny tested in Italy and with at least 4 paternal half-sibs. On average, bulls exited the genetic centre at 11.3±1.1 months and reached their first official genetic proof at 58.0±3.1 months of age. An analysis of variance was performed on the cumulative frequency of daughters at 24, 36, 48, and 60 months. The generalized linear model included the fixed effects of year of birth of the bull (18 levels, artificial insemination stud (4 levels and sire of bull (137 levels. All effects significantly affected the variability of studied traits. Artificial insemination stud was the most important source of variation, followed by year of birth and sire of bull. Significant differences among AI studs exist, probably reflecting different strategies adopted during progeny testing.

Martino Cassandro

2012-01-01

213

Factors affecting benthic impacts at Scottish fish farms.  

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The factors affecting patterns of benthic [seabed] biology and chemistry around 50 Scottish fish farms were investigated using linear mixed-effects models that account for inherent correlations between observations from the same farm. The abundance of benthic macrofauna and sediment concentrations of organic carbon were both influenced by a significant, albeit weak, interaction between farm size, defined as the maximum weight of fish permitted on site at any one time, and current speed. Above a farm size threshold of between 800 and 1000 t, the magnitude of effects at farms located in areas of elevated current speeds were greater than at equivalent farms located in more quiescent waters. Sediment concentrations of total organic matter were influenced by an interaction between distance and depth, indicating that wind-driven resuspension events may help reduce the accumulation of organic waste at farms located in shallow waters. The analyses presented here demonstrate that the production and subsequent fate of organic waste at fish farms is more complex than is often assumed; in isolation, current speed, water depth, and farr size are not necessarily good predictors of benthic impact. PMID:20178333

Mayor, Daniel J; Zuur, Alain F; Solan, Martin; Paton, Graeme I; Killham, Ken

2010-03-15

214

Chordoma: review of clinico radiological features and factors affecting survival  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This study reviews the clinico radiological features of cranial and sacrospinal chordomas and identifies factors affecting survival. Nineteen patients seen between January 1980 and December 2000 with histopathological diagnosis of chordomas were retrospectively reviewed with reference to clinical presentation, imaging features, treatment modalities and post-therapy status. Eight had tumours in the skull base while 11 patients had spinal and sacro-coccygeal lesions. Surgical resection was performed in 16 patients whose subsequent natural history was used to identify clinical indicators that may influence survival. Completeness of resection, age, gender and postoperative irradiation were subjected to analysis using the Cox proportional hazard models. Kaplan-Meir survival curves illustrate the survival distributions. Diplopia and facial pain are prime clinical presentations in cranial lesions, while extremity weakness and a sacrogluteal mass are common complaints in the sacrospinal group. Lesional calcifications are present in 40% while an osteolytic soft tissue mass is detectable by CT in all cases. Heterogeneous signals and internal septations on T2-weighted MRI are predominant features. In sacrospinal tumours, complete excision with adjuvant radiotherapy achieves the best results with a disease-free survival of more than 5 years. The clinical and imaging findings in this study are in accordance with those of other series. Except for complete surgical excision followed by radiotherapy in the subset of patients with sacrospinal tumours, none of the other clinical indicators show a statistical significant influence on survival. Copyright (2001) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

215

Factors affecting the ion beam implantation in silicon  

CERN Document Server

The factors affecting the ion beam implantation in silicon have been studied using boron, phosphorus, oxygen, and argon ions having energy range 0.5 ke V-200 ke V. It was found that the range of the ions in silicon increases with the increase of their energy and decreases with the increase of their masses. The ionization process is found to be the main process for causing damage in the silicon matrix whether it is produced by the accelerated ions or by the recoiled silicon atoms. The magnitude of ionization in silicon is found to be inversely proportional to the mass of ions. Ionization produced by ions or recoils shows different contributions to the damage depending on the mass of ions where the ions energy loss to ionization decreases from 70% to 23% as the mass is increased from 11 for boron (B) to 40 for argon (Ar). Its magnitude, as produced by ions, is found to decrease with the increase of their masses. Its value is observed to increase in a complementary way with the mass increase. Ions energy loss to...

El-Shanshoury, A I

2003-01-01

216

Factors affecting visual inference in single-case designs.  

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Visual inspection remains the most frequently applied method for detecting treatment effects in single-case designs. The advantages and limitations of visual inference are here discussed in relation to other procedures for assessing intervention effectiveness. The first part of the paper reviews previous research on visual analysis, paying special attention to the validation of visual analysts' decisions, inter-judge agreement, and false alarm and omission rates. The most relevant factors affecting visual inspection (i.e., effect size, autocorrelation, data variability, and analysts' expertise) are highlighted and incorporated into an empirical simulation study with the aim of providing further evidence about the reliability of visual analysis. Our results concur with previous studies that have reported the relationship between serial dependence and increased Type I rates. Participants with greater experience appeared to be more conservative and used more consistent criteria when assessing graphed data. Nonetheless, the decisions made by both professionals and students did not match sufficiently the simulated data features, and we also found low intra-judge agreement, thus suggesting that visual inspection should be complemented by other methods when assessing treatment effectiveness. PMID:19899683

Ximenes, Verônica M; Manolov, Rumen; Solanas, Antonio; Quera, Vicenç

2009-11-01

217

Factors Affecting the Radii of Close-in Transiting Exoplanets  

CERN Document Server

The radius of an exoplanet may be affected by various factors, including irradiation, planet mass and heavy element content. A significant number of transiting exoplanets have now been discovered for which the mass, radius, semi-major axis, host star metallicity and stellar effective temperature are known. We use multivariate regression models to determine the dependence of planetary radius on planetary equilibrium temperature T_eq, planetary mass M_p, stellar metallicity [Fe/H], orbital semi-major axis a, and tidal heating rate H_tidal, for 119 transiting planets in three distinct mass regimes. We determine that heating leads to larger planet radii, as expected, increasing mass leads to increased or decreased radii of low-mass (2.0R_J) planets, respectively (with no mass effect on Jupiter-mass planets), and increased host-star metallicity leads to smaller planetary radii, indicating a relationship between host-star metallicity and planet heavy element content. For Saturn-mass planets, a good fit to the radii...

Enoch, B; Horne, K

2012-01-01

218

Factors affecting the vaporisation of silica during coal combustion  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

This study has quantified the amount of silica vaporised during the combustion of five Australian bituminous coals in a drop tube furnace at two oxygen partial pressures. The coals have been analysed extensively using a wide range of analytical techniques including QEMSCAN, quantitative XRD analysis, and ICP-AES. These analyses provided the modes of occurrence of the silica in these coals. The amounts vaporised were compared with the modes of occurrence of the silica, to determine the factors contributing to its vaporisation. Three main conclusions were drawn from these experiments: Increasing the char combustion temperature by elevating the oxygen partial pressure from 0.21 to 0.50 atm during combustion increases the extent of silica vaporisation significantly. This is consistent with previous findings. The size distribution of the included quartz minerals greater than 2 {mu}m does not affect the extent of silica vaporisation significantly, qualitative measurements indicate that finely dispersed silicon-bearing minerals of a size less than 2 {mu}m could play an important role on the vaporisation of silica. An analytical procedure to quantify these minerals is necessary to establish this relationship. (author)

Buhre, Bart; Hinkley, Jim; Gupta, Rajender; Wall, Terry [Cooperative Research Centre for Coal in Sustainable Development, University of Newcastle, Chemical Engineering, NSW 2308 (Australia); Nelson, Peter [Cooperative Research Centre for Coal in Sustainable Development, Macquarie University, Graduate School of the Environment, NSW 2109 (Australia)

2007-02-15

219

Factors affecting hospital mortality in acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This retrospective analysis studied the records of 564 consecutive patients admitted to Gastrointestinal Bleeding Unit of Riyadh Medical Complex with acute upper gastrointestinal bleeding over a 2-year period (May 1996-April 1998. The purpose of the study was to analyze the mortality with an aim to identify the risk factors affecting mortality in these patients. Majority of patients were men (82% and Saudis (54%. Their mean age was 52.46 + 17.8 years. Esophageal varices (45% were the main causes of bleeding followed by duodenal ulcers (24%. Overall mortality in this series was 15.8% (89 patients. Comorbid diseases were responsible for death in 68 (76% patients, whereas, bleeding was considered to be directly responsible for death in 21 (24% patients. On analysis of data from this study, old age (>60 years, systolic pressure < 90 mm Hg on admission, comorbid disease, variceal bleeding and Child?s grade C in patients with chronic liver disease were associated with adverse outcome.

Alam Mohammed

2000-01-01

220

Factors affecting development of a motion imagery quality metric  

Science.gov (United States)

The motion imagery community would benefit from the availability of standard measures for assessing image interpretability. The National Imagery Interpretability Rating Scale (NIIRS) has served as a community standard for still imagery, but no comparable scale exists for motion imagery. Several considerations unique to motion imagery indicate that the standard methodology employed in the past for NIIRS development may not be applicable or, at a minimum, require modifications. Traditional methods for NIIRS development rely on a close linkage between perceived image quality, as captured by specific image interpretation tasks, and the sensor parameters associated with image acquisition. The dynamic nature of motion imagery suggests that this type of linkage may not exist or may be modulated by other factors. An initial study was conducted to understand the effects target motion, camera motion, and scene complexity have on perceived image interpretability for motion imagery. This paper summarizes the findings from this evaluation. In addition, several issues emerged that require further investigation: - The effect of frame rate on the perceived interpretability of motion imagery - Interactions between color and target motion which could affect perceived interpretability - The relationships among resolution, viewing geometry, and image interpretability - The ability of an analyst to satisfy specific image exploitation tasks relative to different types of motion imagery clips Plans are being developed to address each of these issues through direct evaluations. This paper discusses each of these concerns, presents the plans for evaluations, and explores the implications for development of a motion imagery quality metric.

Irvine, John M.; Fenimore, Charles; Cannon, David; Roberts, John; Israel, Steven A.; Simon, Larry; Watts, Charles; Miller, James D.; Aviles, Ana I.; Tighe, Paul F.; Behrens, Richard J.; Haverkamp, Donna

2005-05-01

 
 
 
 
221

[Factors affecting young mothers' social and family relations after pregnancy].  

Science.gov (United States)

This study aimed to analyze factors affecting social and family relations of young mothers in the two-year postpartum period. This was a cross-sectional study of 464 young mothers in Teresina, Piauí State, Brazil, who gave birth during the first four months of 2006 in six maternity hospitals. Data were collected from May to December 2008 after identifying the young women in the maternity hospital records. Multivariate analysis used multinomial logistic regression. Married young women (including those in common-law marriages) were 80% less likely to have negative relations with their partners. Participants 20 to 22 years of age related 2.4 times better with their mothers than those 17 to 19 years of age. Young women not attending school showed 97% higher odds of negative changes in relations with friends, and Catholics were 50% less likely to have worse relations with friends following childbirth. Measures are needed to orient individuals living with young mothers (especially their partners and mothers) concerning the importance of support in this phase of life, particularly encouraging them to stay in school. PMID:24936816

Maranhão, Thatiana Araújo; Gomes, Keila Rejane Oliveira; Silva, José Mário Nunes da

2014-05-01

222

Some factors affecting the in vitro culture of banana  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Factors affecting in vitro regeneration of shoots in shoot tip explant cultures of banana cultivar 'Basrai', such as solid and liquid media, growth regulators, vitamins, and antioxidants were studied. Three-quarters strength of MS liquid medium supplemented with 17.75 micro m 6-benzyladenine (BA), 11.42 micro M indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and 205 micro M adenine sulphate induced the formation of mean number of 12.3 shoots, with the mean length of 3.0 cm, after three weeks of culture. Maximum shoot multiplication (14.33) occurred in liquid medium containing 22.19 micro M BA. Addition of 2.0% activated charcoal (AC) to the liquid medium improved quality of the regenerated plants with expanded and glossy leaves, though the number of shoots was reduced (13.66). Profuse formation of roots was characteristically induced by AC. Addition of citric acid (CA) to the medium caused decline in morphogenetic expression of the cultures. (author)

223

Factors Affecting Fiber Design and Selection for Advanced Ceramic Composites  

Science.gov (United States)

Structural Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) have the potential for application in the hot sections of a variety of advanced propulsion and power systems. It is therefore necessary to have a general understanding of the key properties of CMC and Reinforcing Fibers. This need is complicated by the wide variety of application conditions and structural requirements for which CMC's will be used, and the proprietary concerns of the design engineers. CMC's, to be successful, must display properties which are competitive with the currently used high temperature structural materials: (i.e., Iron and Nickel based superalloys, tough monolithic ceramics, and carbon/carbon composites.) Structural CMC offers several areas of competition: (1) performance, (i.e., strength and strength retention, creep resistance, and thermal conductivity), (2) reliability (i.e., environmental durability, and damage tolerance) and (3) processing (i.e., capability for varying sizes and shapes, and cost effective fabrication). The presentation further discusses, and illustrates with fiber and CMC data the key fiber properties and processes which strongly affect each CMC area of competition. The presentation further discusses the current knowledge of the important factors which control the key fiber properties. A design guidelines for the optimum fiber characteristics is developed, and the currently available fibers are compared against those guidelines.

DiCarlo, James A.

1998-01-01

224

THEORIES AND FACTORS AFFECTING MUCOADHESIVE DRUG DELIVERY SYSTEMS: A REVIEW  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Bioadhesion is an interfacial phenomenon in which two materials, at least one of which is biological, are held together by means of interfacial forces. When the associated biological system is mucous, it is called mucoadhesion. This property of certain polymeric systems have got place in the drug delivery research in order to prolong contact time in the various mucosal route of drug administration, as the ability to maintain a delivery system at a particular location for an extended period of time has a great appeal for both local action as well as systemic drug bioavailability. A complete and comprehensive theory that can predict adhesion based on the chemical and/or physical nature of a polymer is not yet available. Several theories have been proposed to explain the fundamental mechanisms of adhesion such as glues, adhesives, and paints, have been adopted to study the mucoadhesion. Mucoadhesion is a complex process and numerous theories have been presented to explain the mechanisms involved. These theories include mechanical-interlocking, electrostatic, diffusion–interpenetration, adsorption and fracture processes. They are Electronic theory, Adsorption theory, Wetting theory, Diffusion theory, Fracture theory. The objective of the study is to explain the different mechanisms involved in mucoadhesion and various factors affecting mucoadhesion.

Alexander Amit

2011-04-01

225

Some factors affecting the cost of irradiation services in thailand  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The future of food irradiation in developing countries depends to a large extent on cost considerations. Although food irradiation technology itself is widely known and appears to offer many advantages, concrete evidence on the economic viability of a multi-product irradiation plant is presently not readily available to the private sector in developing countries. It is doubtful whether such evidence exists in a form which is comprehensible to industrialists outside the radiation technology circle. With respect to the economic aspects of food irradiation, information available from the literature appears to be based largely on a summing-up of studies of single products on a case-by-case basis. In an agricultural country, the main inputs to an irradiation service facility are likely to be agricultural produce which vary in kind and quantity with cropping seasons. Moreover, in most developing countries, uncontrollable factors play an important role in the production of annual crops and their transportation. Thus, it is hardly possible to make a credible long term forecast on the throughput required for the multi-product service plant, let alone determine with confidence the return on investment. Accordingly, as far as the private sector is concerned, investment decisions regarding the establishment of a commercial food irradiation service plant have to be considered as 'decision making under risk'. This paper attempts to raise questions to which the author cannot yet find clear and practical answers from the available literature. It is intended to stimulate a more thorough and objective discussion on the subject of economic viability of a multi-product food irradiation plant under the prevailing environment in ASEAN

226

Natural gas transportation opportunities and competitive factors  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The outlook for western Canadian natural gas supply was the topic of discussion at this conference. Fourteen guest speakers from the industrial sector gave presentations on various aspects of the three principal topics, i.e., the US Midwest transportation opportunities, the deregulation of the electric power industry and its impact on natural gas; and the Alberta Nymex contract. Overall, the outlook for the Canadian gas producing industry was considered to be good from a supply development standpoint, and confidence was expressed in the ability of Canadian gas producers to meet any foreseeable growth in demand. A surplus connected supply capacity of three billion cubic feet per day was predicted for the year 2000, even after serving possible aggressive growth in demand from traditional markets. tabs., figs

227

Factors affecting student performance in an undergraduate genetics course.  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective of this study was to determine some of the factors that affect student success in a genetics course. Genetics for the Kansas State University College of Agriculture is taught in the Department of Animal Sciences and Industry and covers Mendelian inheritance, molecular genetics, and quantitative/population genetics. Data collected from 1,516 students over 7 yr included year and semester of the course; age; gender; state of residence; population of hometown; Kansas City metro resident or not; instructor of course; American College Testing Program (ACT) scores; number of transfer credits; major; college; preveterinary student or not; freshman, sophomore, junior, and senior grade point average (GPA); semester credits when taking genetics; class standing when enrolled in genetics; cumulative GPA before and after taking genetics; semester GPA in semester taking genetics, number of semesters between the biology prerequisite and genetics; grade in biology; location of biology course; and final percentage in genetics. Final percentage in genetics did not differ due to instructor, gender, state of residence, major, or college (P > 0.16). Transfer students tended to perform better than nontransfer students (P = 0.09), and students from the Kansas City metro outscored students from other areas (P = 0.03). Preveterinary option students scored higher in genetics than non-preveterinary students (P students with higher grades in biology to perform better in genetics (P = 0.06). Students who took biology at Kansas State University performed better in genetics than students who transferred the credit (P students should take biology from Kansas State, perform well in biology, and wait until at least sophomore standing to enroll in genetics. PMID:23408825

Bormann, J Minick; Moser, D W; Bates, K E

2013-05-01

228

Factors affecting performance of Nili-Ravi buffaloes in Pakistan.  

Science.gov (United States)

Effects of herd, year, age, season, and lactation length on milk yield and reproductive efficiency for the Nili-Ravi breed of buffalo were determined by analysis of variance of 5,716 lactation records from two herds in Pakistan. Herds differed in all traits. Herd average milk yields were 1,702 and 2,064 kg. Year, season, herd, parity number, days in milk, days open, age, and sire all influenced milk yield. Herd, year, season, and parity number also had significant effects on days open and calving interval. Month of calving was important for time until return to estrus. Percentages of variance in milk yield attributed to herd, year, sire, cow, and residual were 20.3, 11.4, 4.3, 17.0, and 47.0. Classification of lactation length (greater than 60, greater than 250, or at least 305 days) markedly influenced the sire component of variance suggesting some interdependence of milk yield and lactation length. Total variance for milk yield was 466,911 kg2. Within herd heritability for milk yield was .25, and repeatability was low (.31). Predicted breeding values for sires for 250 to 305-day milk ranged from -172 kg to +260. Cows in Herd 1 completed 5.58 lactations with an average herd life of 12.3 yr; Herd 2 cows completed 4.52 lactations with culling at 10.6 yr. Frequency of termination of lactations because of mastitis, reproductive problems, or health was similar to frequencies for cattle. Factors affecting milk yield in buffaloes are similar to those of cattle. PMID:6841754

Cady, R A; Shah, S K; Schermerhorn, E C; McDowell, R E

1983-03-01

229

A spectroscopic study of factors affecting charge transfer at organo-metallic interfaces  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The properties of organic films produced by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique have become more widely known in the last few decades, as the variety of organic molecules suitable for this method of production has increased. One class of LB molecule receiving particular attention has been that of conjugated polymers. These organic materials exhibit an anisotropic semi-conductor like behavior along the polymer chain, making them suitable candidate materials for use in molecular electronic devices. However, the exact nature of multiple charge transport mechanisms is still an area worthy of investigation. Through the development in this work of a dosimetric device, suitable for the study of a number of different radiation types, several difficulties associated with the charge extraction from organic materials, by means of metallic electrodes, were clearly illustrated. Some of these problems were likely to have been caused by charge trapping within the film itself. However, it is the trapping at the boundary between the LB film and metallic electrode, where there is a mismatch in electronic energy levels, which has been the main investigation of this work. To that end a number of different spectroscopic investigations were undertaken in order to pinpoint various factors affecting the efficiency in the transport of charge across the interface region. Extensive low energy Positron Doppler Broadened Annihilation Spectroscopy (DBARS) measurements were made on 12-8 polydiacet measurements were made on 12-8 polydiacetylene and ?-tricosenoic acid LB films. The resulting analyses have allowed comparison of charge trapping within the different bulk films and also at the film to substrate interface. In addition to DBARS, Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopies have been used to investigate the factors affecting the carboxylic acid group at the head of the LB molecule and the role this plays in charge transport across the organo-metallic boundary. (author)

230

The transport and distribution of 3H-ABA affected by al sress on soybean seedig  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A hydroponic experiment combining radioisotope techniques was carried out to understand the effect of Al stress on the transport and the distribution of 3H-ABA by using Jilin70, a soybean variety of Al resistance. The transport and distribution of ABA affected by Al stress on soybean seedling were studied with radioisotope technique. The results showed that ABA could be transported up or down in soybean seedling. The stress of Al accelerated the transport of ABA and enhanced the distribution of ABA in the roots by Al stress. The paper present the foundation for the mechanisms of ABA under Al stress in plant. (authors)

231

Characterization of protein factor(s) in rat bronchoalveolar lavage fluid that enhance insulin transport via transcytosis across primary rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study was to characterize factor(s) in rat bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) that enhance(s) insulin transport across primary rat alveolar epithelial cell monolayers (RAECM) in primary culture. BALF was concentrated 7.5-fold using the Centricon device and the retentate was used to characterize the factor(s) involved in enhancing apical-to-basolateral transport of intact 125I-insulin across various epithelial cell monolayers. These factor(s) enhanced transport of intact insulin across type II cell-like RAECM (3-fold increase) and type I cell-like RAECM (2-fold increase), but not across Caco-2 or MDCK cell monolayers. The insulin transport-enhancing factor(s) were temperature- and trypsin-sensitive. The mechanism of enhancement did not seem to involve paracellular transport or fluid-phase endocytosis, since fluxes of sodium fluorescein and FITC-dextran (70 kDa) were not affected by the factor(s) in the apical bathing fluid. BALF enhancement of intact 125I-insulin transport was abolished at 4 degrees C and in the presence of monensin, suggesting involvement of transcellular pathways. Sephacryl S-200 purification of BALF retentate, followed by LC-MS/MS, indicated that the high molecular weight (>100 kDa) fractions (which show some homology to alpha-1-inhibitor III, murinoglobulin gamma 2, and pregnancy-zone protein) appear to facilitate transcellular transport of insulin across RAECM. PMID:18406118

Bahhady, Rana; Kim, Kwang-Jin; Borok, Zea; Crandall, Edward D; Shen, Wei-Chiang

2008-08-01

232

Nerve growth factor reduces amiloride-sensitive Na+ transport in human airway epithelial cells.  

Science.gov (United States)

Nerve growth factor (NGF) is overexpressed in patients with inflammatory lung diseases, including virus infections. Airway surface liquid (ASL), which is regulated by epithelial cell ion transport, is essential for normal lung function. No information is available regarding the effect of NGF on ion transport of airway epithelium. To investigate whether NGF can affect ion transport, human primary air-interface cultured epithelial cells were placed in Ussing chambers to obtain transepithelial voltage (-7.1 ± 3.4 mV), short-circuit current (Isc, 5.9 ± 1.0 ?A), and transepithelial resistance (750 ?·cm(2)), and to measure responses to ion transport inhibitors. Amiloride (apical, 3.5 × 10(-5) mol/L) decreased Isc by 55.3%. Apically applied NGF (1 ng/mL) reduced Isc by 5.3% in 5 min; basolaterally applied NGF had no effect. The response to amiloride was reduced (41.6%) in the presence of NGF. K-252a (10 nmol/L, apical) did not itself affect Na(+) transport, but it attenuated the NGF-induced reduction in Na(+) transport, indicating the participation of the trkA receptor in the NGF-induced reduction in Na(+) transport. PD-98059 (30 ?mol/L, apical and basolateral) did not itself affect Na(+) transport, but attenuated the NGF-induced reduction in Na(+) transport, indicating that trkA activated the Erk 1/2 signaling cascade. NGF stimulated phosphorylation of Erk 1/2 and the ?-subunit of ENaC. K-252a and PD-98059 inhibited these responses. NGF had no effect on Isc in the presence of apical nystatin (50 ?mol/L). These results indicate that NGF inhibits Na(+) transport through a trkA-Erk 1/2-activated signaling pathway linked to ENaC phosphorylation. PMID:25347857

Shimko, Michael J; Zaccone, Eric J; Thompson, Janet A; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Kashon, Michael L; Fedan, Jeffrey S

2014-01-01

233

Factors affecting the absorption of hydrogen by zircaloys  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A proton model has been employed to calculate how the elements Sn, Fe, Cr and Ni in Zircaloy affect the absorption of hydrogen compared with in zirconium. It is found that Fe, Cr and Ni reduce the absorption of hydrogen by almost equal amounts per atom added, whereas Sn has little or no affect on the absorption. (orig.)

234

To Invest Or Not Invest? : Factors affecting IT investment decisions  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

  Introduction Many studies indicate that there are numerous factors that promote or hamper the adoption of IT applications and are a prime concern for many researchers and practitioners (Abrahamson, 1991). Two main factors which need to be examined closely when making decisions about IT investments are the internal and external factors. Since these factors play a great role in decision making of IT investments, it is imperative to study their impact on the strategic planning because this fo...

Tarabay, Raymond; Eigbire, Raphael

2009-01-01

235

El transporte internacional como factor de competitividad en el comercio exterior / International transport as a competitive factor in foreign trade  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Peru | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Actualmente casi todos los envíos internacionales necesitan emplear más de un tipo de transporte desde su punto de origen hasta su destino final. Cada uno de los tipos mundiales de transporte de carga y pasajeros ha desempeñado un papel esencial en la facilitación de la diversificación geográfica de [...] l comercio. En este trabajo se evalúa, a través del método de Análisis de Componentes Principales, la competitividad del transporte internacional considerando, a su vez, las variables más importantes que inciden en este sector y el desempeño de las economías respecto de dichas variables. Se analiza la estructura del sistema de transporte internacional para veintinueve países, entre ellos siete de América Latina. Los resultados mostrados en el índice de competitividad del transporte internacional señalan que los países más competitivos en materia de transporte internacional son, en orden descendente, Hong Kong, Estados Unidos, Singapur, China, Suecia, España, Japón, Bélgica, Dinamarca y Canadá. El estudio destaca también que los países de América Latina con mayores puntuaciones en este rubro son Brasil, seguido de Panamá, Chile y Costa Rica. Abstract in english Currently most of international shipments need to use more than one type of transportation from its point of origin to final destination. Each one of the types of global transport has played an essential role in facilitating geographic diversification. In this paper we evaluate, through Principal Co [...] mponent Analysis methodology, the international transport competitiveness considering the most important variables that affect this sector and the economic performance of these variables on transportation, analyzing the structure of the international transport system of twenty-nine countries, including seven Latin American countries. The results shown in the competitiveness index of international transportation indicate that the most competitive countries in this field are: USA, Hong Kong, Singapore, China, Sweden, Spain, Japan, Belgium, Denmark and Canada. Highlighting that, the countries of Latin America with the highest scores in this category are Brazil, followed by Panama, Chile and Costa Rica.

América Ivonne, Zamora Torres; Oscar H., Pedraza Rendón.

236

El transporte internacional como factor de competitividad en el comercio exterior / International transport as a competitive factor in foreign trade  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Peru | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Actualmente casi todos los envíos internacionales necesitan emplear más de un tipo de transporte desde su punto de origen hasta su destino final. Cada uno de los tipos mundiales de transporte de carga y pasajeros ha desempeñado un papel esencial en la facilitación de la diversificación geográfica de [...] l comercio. En este trabajo se evalúa, a través del método de Análisis de Componentes Principales, la competitividad del transporte internacional considerando, a su vez, las variables más importantes que inciden en este sector y el desempeño de las economías respecto de dichas variables. Se analiza la estructura del sistema de transporte internacional para veintinueve países, entre ellos siete de América Latina. Los resultados mostrados en el índice de competitividad del transporte internacional señalan que los países más competitivos en materia de transporte internacional son, en orden descendente, Hong Kong, Estados Unidos, Singapur, China, Suecia, España, Japón, Bélgica, Dinamarca y Canadá. El estudio destaca también que los países de América Latina con mayores puntuaciones en este rubro son Brasil, seguido de Panamá, Chile y Costa Rica. Abstract in english Currently most of international shipments need to use more than one type of transportation from its point of origin to final destination. Each one of the types of global transport has played an essential role in facilitating geographic diversification. In this paper we evaluate, through Principal Co [...] mponent Analysis methodology, the international transport competitiveness considering the most important variables that affect this sector and the economic performance of these variables on transportation, analyzing the structure of the international transport system of twenty-nine countries, including seven Latin American countries. The results shown in the competitiveness index of international transportation indicate that the most competitive countries in this field are: USA, Hong Kong, Singapore, China, Sweden, Spain, Japan, Belgium, Denmark and Canada. Highlighting that, the countries of Latin America with the highest scores in this category are Brazil, followed by Panama, Chile and Costa Rica.

América Ivonne, Zamora Torres; Oscar H., Pedraza Rendón.

2013-12-01

237

Factors Affecting Teachers' Student-Centered Classroom Computer Use  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study aims at investigating which factors are relevant to induce teachers' student-centered classroom computer use. Survey data were collected from 361 teachers at comprehensive schools. Based on a systemic view of technology use in schools, different individual teacher characteristics and school contextual factors were examined.…

Friedrich, Helmut Felix; Hron, Aemilian

2011-01-01

238

Coupling of hydrologic transport and chemical reactions in a stream affected by acid mine drainage  

Science.gov (United States)

Experiments in St. Kevin Gulch, an acid mine drainage stream, examined the coupling of hydrologic transport to chemical reactions affecting metal concentrations. Injection of LiCl as a conservative tracer was used to determine discharge and residence time along a 1497-m reach. Transport of metals downstream from inflows of acidic, metal-rich water was evaluated based on synoptic samples of metal concentrations and the hydrologic characteristics of the stream. Transport of SO4 and Mn was generally conservative, but in the subreaches most affected by acidic inflows, transport was reactive. Both 0.1-??m filtered and particulate Fe were reactive over most of the stream reach. Filtered Al partitioned to the particulate phase in response to high instream concentrations. Simulations that accounted for the removal of SO4, Mn, Fe, and Al with first-order reactions reproduced the steady-state profiles. The calculated rate constants for net removal used in the simulations embody several processes that occur on a stream-reach scale. The comparison between rates of hydrologie transport and chemical reactions indicates that reactions are only important over short distances in the stream near the acidic inflows, where reactions occur on a comparable time scale with hydrologic transport and thus affect metal concentrations.

Kimball, B. A.; Broshears, R. E.; Bencala, K. E.; McKnight, D. M.

1994-01-01

239

A spectroscopic study of factors affecting charge transfer at organo-metallic interfaces  

CERN Document Server

polydiacetylene and omega-tricosenoic acid LB films. The resulting analyses have allowed comparison of charge trapping within the different bulk films and also at the film to substrate interface. In addition to DBARS, Fourier Transform Infra-red (FTIR) and Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectroscopies have been used to investigate the factors affecting the carboxylic acid group at the head of the LB molecule and the role this plays in charge transport across the organo-metallic boundary. The properties of organic films produced by the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique have become more widely known in the last few decades, as the variety of organic molecules suitable for this method of production has increased. One class of LB molecule receiving particular attention has been that of conjugated polymers. These organic materials exhibit an anisotropic semi-conductor like behavior along the polymer chain, making them suitable candidate materials for use in molecular electronic devices. However,...

Tucker, C E

2001-01-01

240

Bioclimatic factors affecting daily Cupressaceae flowering in southwest Spain  

Science.gov (United States)

Daily variations in Cupressaceae pollen counts were analysed, together with climatic variables in the southwest of Spain, in order to understand the bioclimatic variables affecting Cupressaceae flowering in a Mediterranean climate. The study was carried out using the Spanish Aerobiology Network recommendations, using a Burkard Hirst-type spore trap. Regression analyses were applied to the pollen counts of the winter months of 13 consecutive years. The regression analysis applied to each year indicated that temperature is the most important variable to include in the model. Temperature affected the pollen counts differently according to the yearly climatic trend. During the coldest years, pollen counts depended on the minimum temperature, while in the warmest ones they were affected by higher temperatures. However, during the driest years, pollen counts depended more on the humidity level, while in the wettest years they depended more on the hours of sunshine.

Galán, C.; Fuillerat, M. Jose; Comtois, Paul; Dominguez-Vilches, Eugenio

 
 
 
 
241

Environmental factors affecting inflammatory bowel disease: have we made progress?  

Science.gov (United States)

The pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is only partially understood; various environmental and host (e.g. genetic, epithelial, immune, and nonimmune) factors are involved. The critical role for environmental factors is strongly supported by recent worldwide trends in IBD epidemiology. One important environmental factor is smoking. A meta-analysis partially confirms previous findings that smoking was found to be protective against ulcerative colitis and, after the onset of the disease, might improve its course, decreasing the need for colectomy. In contrast, smoking increases the risk of developing Crohn's disease and aggravates its course. The history of IBD is dotted by cyclic reports on the isolation of specific infectious agents responsible for Crohn's disease or ulcerative colitis. The more recently published cold chain hypothesis is providing an even broader platform by linking dietary factors and microbial agents. An additional, recent theory has suggested a breakdown in the balance between putative species of 'protective' versus 'harmful' intestinal bacteria - this concept has been termed dysbiosis resulting in decreased bacterial diversity. Other factors such as oral contraceptive use, appendectomy, dietary factors (e.g. refined sugar, fat, and fast food), perinatal events, and childhood infections have also been associated with both diseases, but their role is more controversial. Nonetheless, there is no doubt that economic development, leading to improved hygiene and other changes in lifestyle ('westernized lifestyle') may play a role in the increase in IBD. This review article focuses on the role of environmental factors in the pathogenesis and progression of IBDs. PMID:19786744

Lakatos, Peter Laszlo

2009-01-01

242

Factors That Affect Academic Performance Among Pharmacy Students  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective The objective of this study was to examine factors such as academic competence, test competence, time management, strategic studying, and test anxiety, and identify whether these factors could distinguish differences among students, based on academic performance and enrollment in the experiential program. Methods A cross-sectional study design utilizing questionnaires measuring previously validated constructs was used to evaluate the effect of these factors on students with low and high cumulative grade point averages (GPAs). Pharmacy students (N = 198) enrolled at the University of Houston participated in the study. Results Academic performance was significantly associated with factors such as academic competence and test competence. Students with a cumulative GPA of 3.0 or greater significantly differed in their level of test competence than those with a GPA of less than 3.0. Students enrolled in their experiential year differed from students enrolled in their second year of curriculum on factors such as test anxiety, academic competence, test competence, and time management skills. Conclusion Test competence was an important factor to distinguish students with low vs. high academic performance. Factors such as academic competence, test competence, test anxiety and time management improve as students' progress in their experiential year. PMID:17149433

Sansgiry, Sujit S.; Bhosle, Monali; Sail, Kavita

2006-01-01

243

Looking under the Bonnet: Factors Affecting Student Adoption of E-Learning Systems in Jordan  

Science.gov (United States)

The primary questions addressed in this paper are the following: what are the factors that affect students' adoption of an e-learning system and what are the relationships among these factors? This paper investigates and identifies some of the major factors affecting students' adoption of an e-learning system in a university in Jordan. E-learning…

Abbad, Muneer Mahmood; Morris, David; de Nahlik, Carmel

2009-01-01

244

Factors That Affect Feed Intake of Meat Birds: A Review  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Feed intake is the major factor that influences both the body weight gain and feed efficiency in meat-type poultry. Because so many factors can influence feed intake, it is often difficult to correct a problem of poor feed intake unless a complete review of feed and management practices is made. Management and flock health issues are usually more likely to reduce feed intake than dietary factors. Dietary factors that influence feed intake would be common among all flocks in a complex rather than on individual flocks. In contrast, environmental or immunological stresses have the most profound effects on flock variation in feed intake. Any management protocol that would alleviate these stressors will improve feed intake. To improve flock feed intake, initially investigate the source of greatest stress or disease challenge.

Peter R. Ferket

2006-01-01

245

Institutional Factors Affecting Biophysical Outcomes in Forest Management  

Science.gov (United States)

Although there is considerable interest in the impact of diverse policies affecting the biophysical outcomes in forests, gaining a substantial sample over time of forests under different institutional arrangements has been difficult. This article analyzes data from 46 forests located in six countries over time. In forests where policies have been…

Coleman, Eric A.

2009-01-01

246

Factors and pharmaceuticals that affect the radiopharmaceuticals bio distributions  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The pattern of biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals may be affected by various agents and therapeutical procedures, chemotherapy agents, thyroid hormones, metals, radiotherapy, surgery, anesthetic agents, dialysis other radiopharmaceutical interactions. Recommendations for the detection of altered biodistribution in patients by causes not directly related with the pathology itself was given. pathology itself was given

247

Factors Affecting Students' Self-Efficacy in Higher Education  

Science.gov (United States)

Researchers working in educational settings are increasingly paying attention to the role students' thoughts and beliefs play in the learning process. Self-efficacy, a key element of social cognitive theory, appears to be an important variable because it affects students' motivation and learning. This article investigates empirical literature…

van Dinther, Mart; Dochy, Filip; Segers, Mien

2011-01-01

248

External Factors Affecting Gifted Girls' Academic and Career Achievements.  

Science.gov (United States)

This article discusses the unique position that teachers have for observing the environmental influences affecting the career choices of gifted girls. It suggests ways for teachers to educate parents on the family's role in education and career achievement and to create an educational environment that promotes the development of talent. (Contains…

Nelson, Mary Ann; Smith, Stephen W.

2001-01-01

249

Factors Affecting Entrepreneurial Intention among UniSZA Students  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Graduates contributions to entrepreneurship would stimulate the country’s economic growth. The aim of this study is to determine and investigate factors influence on students’ perception of the entrepreneurial intention, in order to present the most contemporary future generation of entrepreneurs that can shape the future of the economy and the country. The area of this study covers demographic profiles, attitudinal and behavioral factors, and how these influence the intentions of student...

Zaharah Ghazali; Nor Asmahani Ibrahim; Fakhrul Anwar Zainol

2012-01-01

250

Factors that affect the fatigue strength of power transmission shafting  

Science.gov (United States)

A long standing objective in the design of power transmission shafting is to eliminate excess shaft material without compromising operational reliability. A shaft design method is presented which accounts for variable amplitude loading histories and their influence on limited life designs. The effects of combined bending and torsional loading are considered along with a number of application factors known to influence the fatigue strength of shafting materials. Among the factors examined are surface condition, size, stress concentration, residual stress and corrosion fatigue.

Loewenthal, S. H.

1984-01-01

251

ACCURACY OF PESTICIDE REFERENCE STANDARD SOLUTIONS. PART I. FACTORS AFFECTING ORGANIC SOLVENT EVAPORATION  

Science.gov (United States)

A gravimetric experiment was undertaken to identify the factors affecting solvent evaporation from analytical reference standard solutions and to establish the magnitude of the resultant solvent evaporation. The evaporation of organic solvent from standard solutions is affected b...

252

Transport and sorting of the solanum tuberosum sucrose transporter SUT1 is affected by posttranslational modification  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The plant sucrose transporter SUT1 from Solanum tuberosum revealed a dramatic redox-dependent increase in sucrose transport activity when heterologously expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Plant plasma membrane vesicles do not show any change in proton flux across the plasma membrane in the presence of redox reagents, indicating a SUT1-specific effect of redox reagents. Redox-dependent sucrose transport activity was confirmed electrophysiologically in Xenopus laevis oocytes with SUT1 from maize (Zea mays). Localization studies of green fluorescent protein fusion constructs showed that an oxidative environment increased the targeting of SUT1 to the plasma membrane where the protein concentrates in 200- to 300-nm raft-like microdomains. Using plant plasma membranes, St SUT1 can be detected in the detergent-resistant membrane fraction. Importantly, in yeast and in plants, oxidative reagents induced a shift in the monomer to dimer equilibrium of the St SUT1 protein and increased the fraction of dimer. Biochemical methods confirmed the capacity of SUT1 to form a dimer in plants and yeast cells in a redox-dependent manner. Blue native PAGE, chemical cross-linking, and immunoprecipitation, as well as the analysis of transgenic plants with reduced expression of St SUT1, confirmed the dimerization of St SUT1 and Sl SUT1 (from Solanum lycopersicum) in planta. The ability to form homodimers in plant cells was analyzed by the split yellow fluorescent protein technique in transiently transformed tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) leaves and protoplasts. Oligomerization seems to be cell type specific since under native-like conditions, a phloem-specific reduction of the dimeric form of the St SUT1 protein was detectable in SUT1 antisense plants, whereas constitutively inhibited antisense plants showed reduction only of the monomeric form. The role of redox control of sucrose transport in plants is discussed.

Krügel, Undine; Veenhoff, Liesbeth M

2008-01-01

253

Multiscale Factors Affecting Human Attitudes toward Snow Leopards and Wolves.  

Science.gov (United States)

The threat posed by large carnivores to livestock and humans makes peaceful coexistence between them difficult. Effective implementation of conservation laws and policies depends on the attitudes of local residents toward the target species. There are many known correlates of human attitudes toward carnivores, but they have only been assessed at the scale of the individual. Because human societies are organized hierarchically, attitudes are presumably influenced by different factors at different scales of social organization, but this scale dependence has not been examined. We used structured interview surveys to quantitatively assess the attitudes of a Buddhist pastoral community toward snow leopards (Panthera uncia) and wolves (Canis lupus). We interviewed 381 individuals from 24 villages within 6 study sites across the high-elevation Spiti Valley in the Indian Trans-Himalaya. We gathered information on key explanatory variables that together captured variation in individual and village-level socioeconomic factors. We used hierarchical linear models to examine how the effect of these factors on human attitudes changed with the scale of analysis from the individual to the community. Factors significant at the individual level were gender, education, and age of the respondent (for wolves and snow leopards), number of income sources in the family (wolves), agricultural production, and large-bodied livestock holdings (snow leopards). At the community level, the significant factors included the number of smaller-bodied herded livestock killed by wolves and mean agricultural production (wolves) and village size and large livestock holdings (snow leopards). Our results show that scaling up from the individual to higher levels of social organization can highlight important factors that influence attitudes of people toward wildlife and toward formal conservation efforts in general. Such scale-specific information can help managers apply conservation measures at appropriate scales. Our results reiterate the need for conflict management programs to be multipronged. Factores Multi-Escala que Afectan las Actitudes Humanas hacia Leopardos de las Nieves y Lobos. PMID:25039397

Suryawanshi, Kulbhushansingh R; Bhatia, Saloni; Bhatnagar, Yash Veer; Redpath, Stephen; Mishra, Charudutt

2014-12-01

254

Factors affecting survival of Clavibacter michiganesis subsp. sepedonicus in water  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The survival of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus (Cms), the causal organism of bacterial ring rot in potato, was studied in water, to assess the risks for dissemination of Cms via surface water and infection of potato crops by irrigation. Cms was able to survive for a maximum period of 7 days in non-sterile surface water at 10°C, a period during which Cms can be transported over long distances, but will also be strongly diluted. It is concluded that contamination of surface water...

Wolf, J. M.; Beckhoven, J. R. C. M.

2004-01-01

255

Gibberellins inhibit adventitious rooting in hybrid aspen and Arabidopsis by affecting auxin transport.  

Science.gov (United States)

Knowledge of processes involved in adventitious rooting is important to improve both fundamental understanding of plant physiology and the propagation of numerous plants. Hybrid aspen (Populus tremula × tremuloïdes) plants overexpressing a key gibberellin (GA) biosynthesis gene (AtGA20ox1) grow rapidly but have poor rooting efficiency, which restricts their clonal propagation. Therefore, we investigated the molecular basis of adventitious rooting in Populus and the model plant Arabidopsis. The production of adventitious roots (ARs) in tree cuttings is initiated from the basal stem region, and involves the interplay of several endogenous and exogenous factors. The roles of several hormones in this process have been characterized, but the effects of GAs have not been fully investigated. Here, we show that a GA treatment negatively affects the numbers of ARs produced by wild-type hybrid aspen cuttings. Furthermore, both hybrid aspen plants and intact Arabidopsis seedlings overexpressing AtGA20ox1, PttGID1.1 or PttGID1.3 genes (with a 35S promoter) produce few ARs, although ARs develop from the basal stem region of hybrid aspen and the hypocotyl of Arabidopsis. In Arabidopsis, auxin and strigolactones are known to affect AR formation. Our data show that the inhibitory effect of GA treatment on adventitious rooting is not mediated by perturbation of the auxin signalling pathway, or of the strigolactone biosynthetic and signalling pathways. Instead, GAs appear to act by perturbing polar auxin transport, in particular auxin efflux in hybrid aspen, and both efflux and influx in Arabidopsis. PMID:24547703

Mauriat, Mélanie; Petterle, Anna; Bellini, Catherine; Moritz, Thomas

2014-05-01

256

Factors Affecting the Wheel Rutting on Rural Roads  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In this study, the wheel ruts frequency and dimensions were investigated according to geographical aspects, longitudinal gradient and surfacing layer of rural roads in Denji Kola village, Mazandaran Province, Iran. Ruts were divided into shallow and deep wheel ruts. Results showed that the ruts length and area were significantly affected by longitudinal gradient of rural roads (p<0.0001). Ruts length in longitudinal gradient class 8-12% was significantly more than other classes (p<...

Parsakhoo, A.; Hosseini, S. A.

2009-01-01

257

In vitro investigation of the factors affecting pulse oximetry.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The effect of a number of physiological parameters on pulse oximetry accuracy has been investigated in an in vitro model. We have found that above 50% saturation, pulse oximeters will not be affected by variations in haematocrit, blood flow rate, tissue blood content and pulse amplitude. At low saturations, however, it is known that the accuracy of pulse oximeters decreases and our in vitro results suggest how this may be corrected.

Kock, Jp; Tarassenko, L.

1991-01-01

258

Factors affecting the spontaneous mutational spectra in somatic mammalian cells  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available  In our survey of references we are discussed the influence of factors biological origin on the spontaneous mutation specters in mammalian. Seasonal and age components influence on the frequence of cytogenetic anomalies. The immune and endocrinous systems are take part in control of the alteration of the spontaneous mutation specters. Genetical difference of sensibility in animal and human at the alteration of factors enviroment as and  genetical differences of repair systems activity are may influence on individual variation of spontaneous destabilization characters of chromosomal apparatus.

?.?. ?????????

2006-04-01

259

Critical design factors for sector transport maintenance in DEMO  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper mainly focuses on a sector transport maintenance scheme from the aspects of high plant availability. In this study, three different maintenance schemes are considered based on (1) the number of maintenance ports and (2) the insertion direction. The design study clarifies critical design factors and key engineering issues on the maintenance scheme: (1) how to support an enormous overturning force of the toroidal field coils in the large open port for sector transport and (2) define the transferring mechanism of sectors in the vacuum vessel. On reviewing these assessment factors, the sector transport using a limited number of horizontal maintenance ports is found to be a more realistic maintenance scheme. In addition, evaluating maintenance scenarios under high decay heat is proposed for the first time. The key design factors are the cool-down time in the reactor and the cooling method in the maintenance scheme to keep components under operational temperature. Based on one-dimensional heat conduction analysis, after one month cool-down time, each sector of SlimCS could be transported to the hot cell facility by gas cooling.

Utoh, Hiroyasu; Someya, Youji; Tobita, Kenji; Asakura, Nobuyuki; Hoshino, Kazuo; Nakamura, Makoto

2013-12-01

260

Factors that Affect Nontraditional Vocational Enrollment among Women.  

Science.gov (United States)

Vocational training program females (N=470) completed a questionnaire assessing the role of personality and social support factors in nontraditional training enrollment. Results revealed differences in the amount of support and encouragement received from others, with nontraditional students receiving more support from female friends, family…

Houser, Betsy Bosak; Garvey, Chris

1985-01-01

 
 
 
 
261

Factors Affecting Case Management Services for the Chronically Mentally Ill.  

Science.gov (United States)

Synthesizes the results of studies of case management with case management literature to summarize factors influencing case management services. Discusses characteristics of individuals providing case management, the clients they serve, the design of their jobs, and the services network in which they work. (Author/BH)

Intagliata, James; Baker, Frank

1983-01-01

262

Factors Affecting the Misperception of Friendliness Cues in Initial Interactions.  

Science.gov (United States)

Some researchers have found men to attribute more sexual meaning to heterosexual interactions than do women. This study was conducted to examine factors which may enhance or diminish this gender difference on perceptions of sexual intent by considering the three variables of physical attractiveness of target, similarity of target's personality to…

Harnish, Richard J.; And Others

263

Factors Affecting Social Workers' Inclusion of Animals in Practice  

Science.gov (United States)

Experts suggest that social work practitioners can improve their client service with a more thorough understanding of the impact of other animals on individuals and families. Studies indicate that some social work practitioners are including animals in their practices through assessment and interventions. Little is known about what factors

Risley-Curtiss, Christina; Rogge, Mary E.; Kawam, Elisa

2013-01-01

264

Factors Affecting the Success of Hmong College Students in America  

Science.gov (United States)

This study explores barriers and success factors of Hmong students in American colleges by interviewing five Hmong graduate students from refugee families in the US. Emerging themes revolve around academic, cultural and financial barriers. Professors, advisors, classmates, academic support programmes, family, financial aid and their own…

Xiong, Soua; Lam, Sarah K. Y.

2013-01-01

265

Guiding Teacher Development towards STL Teaching: Identifying Factors Affecting Change.  

Science.gov (United States)

Describes the effectiveness of an intervention training and draws attention to the most important factors to be considered in developing inservice programs for the promotion of Science and Technological Literacy (STL) teaching skills. Concludes that teachers who acknowledged the need for teaching social skills in conjunction with science concepts…

Ranniknae, Miia

2001-01-01

266

A Quantitative Assessment of Factors Affecting College Sports' Team Unity  

Science.gov (United States)

The competitiveness of National Collegiate Association (NCAA) schools increases in intensity each year. With the increased pressure on college sport staffs to be undefeated season after season, coaches have to find ways to keep players happy; to do this, they have to find factors that contribute to unify the players. It is nearly impossible to…

Aghazadeh, Seyed-Mahmoud; Kyei, Kwasi

2009-01-01

267

Factors Affecting University Teaching Team Effectiveness in Detached Working Environments  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper presents the outcomes of a study of the factors that contribute to teaching team effectiveness in situations where team members rarely meet face to face. Academic faculty within a university Business School were asked to report the degrees to which they believed that the module teaching teams to which they belonged contained members who…

Bennett, Roger; Kane, Suzanne

2014-01-01

268

Factors Affecting Location Decisions of Food Processing Plants  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The main aim of this study is to examine the determinants of location choices for food processing plants using the results of 59 personal surveys. The 61.3% of the food processing plants that were interviewed are small scale plants, 9.1% are large scale plants and 29.6% are medium scale plants. Sixteen of the firms process vegetables, 12 process poultry, 12 process dairy and 9 process seafood products. Business climate factors are divided into six categories (market, infrastructure, raw material, labor, personal and environmental and 17 specific location factors are considered. The survey responses are analyzed by types of raw materials processed and by plant size. 43.7, 55.3 and 42.2% of the respondents cited categories of Market, Raw Material and Infrastructure respectively as important, while 44.3, 50.7 and 74.4% of the respondents cited, labor, personal and environmental regulation categories of as not important. Thus survey findings indicate that plant location choices are mainly driven by market, raw material and infra structural factors. Environmental factors such as environmental regulations and permissions are relatively insignificant.

Sule Turhan

2007-01-01

269

Sociological Factors Affecting Agricultural Price Risk Management in Australia  

Science.gov (United States)

The highly volatile auction system in Australia accounts for 85 percent of ex-farm wool sales, with the remainder sold by forward contract, futures, and other hedging methods. In this article, against the background of an extensive literature on price risk strategies, we investigate the behavioral factors associated with producers' adoption of…

Jackson, Elizabeth; Quaddus, Mohammed; Islam, Nazrul; Stanton, John

2009-01-01

270

Students' Perceptions of Factors that Affect College Funding Decisions  

Science.gov (United States)

This exploratory study examines the factors that college students perceive are important in helping them make good financial decisions about paying for a college education. The study categorizes and summarizes students' self-reported responses to an open-ended survey question about recommendations for changes in financial aid counseling practices.…

Porter, Julia Y.; Fossey, W. Richard; Davis, William E.; Burnett, Michael F.; Stuhlmann, Janice; Suchy, Patricia A.

2006-01-01

271

Factors Affecting Recreation Preferences and Expectations of Disabled Adult Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

Generalizing recreation services, one of the essential well-being sources of disabled persons who experience deprivation in many dimensions of life and which fulfill their learning needs, is a social responsibility. The present study aims to determine factors effective on recreation preferences and expectations of the disabled individuals who…

Arslan, Sibel

2014-01-01

272

Glucocorticoid hormone (cortisol) affects axonal transport in human cortex neurons but shows resistance in Alzheimer's disease  

Science.gov (United States)

The changes of tissue sensitivity to glucocorticoids are associated with many pathological states including neurological diseases. In the present study, using a novel in vitro post-mortem tracing method on human brain slices, we demonstrated that cortisol, a major glucocorticoid hormone in humans, affected axonal transport both in the cortex neurons in four Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and four nondemented controls. Cortisol appeared to affect axonal transport of prefrontal cortex (PFC) and temporal cortex (TC) neurons in AD patients and controls in a dose-dependent way at concentrations of 30, 60, 120 and 240 ?g dl?1. Higher doses of cortisol were needed for TC neurons to achieve a similar axonal transport effect as obtained in PFC neurons in AD patients. The maximum effect (Emax) on axonal transport was achieved in PFC slices at relatively low contraction (30–120 ?g dl?1), while in TC slices, a maximum effect was only reached at relatively high concentrations (120–240 ?g dl?1). For PFC and TC slices from nondemented aging subjects, lower doses of cortisol (30–60 ?g dl?1) on axonal transport were sufficient to achieve the maximum effect as compared to those used in AD brain slices, while levels of more than 60 ?g dl?1 of cortisol mostly depressed axonal transport. These results suggest that glucocorticoid resistance, which is thought to contribute to the pathogenesis of a number of common human disorders, may exist in AD brains and play an important role in neuropathological mechanisms and dementia. PMID:15466441

Dai, Jiapei; Buijs, Ruud; Swaab, Dick

2004-01-01

273

Analysis on the Main Factors Affecting the Reliability of Test Papers  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Reliability is an important factor to evaluate test papers. This paper analyzes the factors which affect the reliability of test papers and discusses the methods to increase the reliability of test papers.

Jiang Zhu

2011-01-01

274

FACTORS AFFECTING SENSITIVITY OF CHEMICAL AND ECOLOGICAL RESPONSES OF MARINE EMBAYMEMTS TO NITROGEN LOADING  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper summarizes an ongoing examination of the primary factors that affect sensitivity of marine embayment responses to nitrogen loading. Included is a discussion of two methods for using these factors: classification of embayments into discrete sensitivity classes and norma...

275

Gene Risk Factors for Age-Related Brain Disorders May Affect Immune System Function  

Science.gov (United States)

Gene risk factors for age-related brain disorders may affect immune system function June 17, 2014 Scientists have discovered gene ... many of these same gene variants are known risk factors for diseases that occur later in life, including ...

276

Factors affecting sensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus 196E to polyphosphates.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The effect of polyphosphates (eight compounds) on growth of Staphylococcus aureus 196E in brain heart infusion broth was studied. The organism was sensitive (in decreasing order) to chain polyphosphates with 21, 3, 13, and 15 PO4 groups, and bactericidal effects were observed with 0.5% of these compounds. No inhibition was effected by PPi or a metaphosphate. The inhibitory effects were pH dependent, and bacterial sensitivity was highest at pH greater than 7.4. Initial populations affected the...

Jen, C. M.; Shelef, L. A.

1986-01-01

277

Factors affecting visualization of posterior rib fractures in abused infants  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Rib fractures in abused infants commonly occur in the posterior rib arcs. Fractures occurring near the costovertebral articulations are usually identified radiographically only once callus has formed. To assess the factors influencing the visibility of fractures near the costovertical articulations, the authors studied 103 posterior rib fractures occurring in 16 abused infants. Radiologic findings were correlated with CT findings and pathologic material from nine ribs in four patients. The limited visibility of fractures relates to (1) the frequent superimposition of the transverse process over the rib fracture site, (2) a fracture line that crosses at an obliquity to the x-ray beam, and (3) nondisplacement of rib fragments due to preservation of the posterior periosteum. Fresh rib fractures invisible on a frontal projection may be clearly defined on axial CT scans, or on postmortem radiographs. A knowledge of the factors influencing the visibility of these important injuries is useful in planning an appropriate diagnostic evaluation of suspected infant abuse

278

Animal factors affecting the meat quality of Australian lamb meat.  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper integrates the key industry findings from the twelve preceding papers in this special edition of Meat science. In so doing, various animal factors important for the quality of Australian lamb meat are highlighted for sensory, visual appeal and human health attributes. Intramuscular fat concentration (IMF) was found to be a key element of eating quality that interacts both positively and negatively with a range of other factors. Shear force, IMF, colour stability and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) will likely respond to genetic selection whilst other omega-3 fatty acids require nutritional intervention. Australian lamb meat can generally be regarded as a good source of the minerals iron and zinc; and a source of omega 3 fatty acids when finished on green pasture. Breeding priorities for meat quality will likely depend on breed type with improvement of meat colour stability more important for the wool focused Merino breed and improvement of sensory quality for the terminal sire breeds. PMID:24268675

Jacob, R H; Pethick, D W

2014-02-01

279

Somatic cell and factors which affect their count in milk  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Milk quality is determined by chemical composition, physical characteristics and hygienic parameters. The main indicators of hygienic quality of milk are total number of microorganisms and somatic cell count (SCC. Environmental factors have the greatest influence on increasing SCC. The most important environmental parameters are status of udder infection, age of cow, stage of lactation, number of lactation, breed, housing, geographicalarea and seasons, herd size, stress, heavy physical activity and, milking. A farmer (milk producer himself can control a great number of environmental factors using good management practise and permanent education. Since SCC participate in creating the price of milk, it is necessary to inform milk producers how to organise their production so that they would produce maximum quantity of good hygienic quality milk.

Zrinka ?a?i?

2003-01-01

280

Factors Affecting the Real Estate Prices in Pakistan  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The current study examines the effect of factors influencing the prices of real estate inQuetta city. Hypothetically, this study is based upon five observed factors(urbanization, refugees’ influx, monetary, lack of investment alternatives and inflow offoreign remittances in relation to the prices of real estate. Questionnaire developed onthe basis of above variables were administered to a heterogeneous sample of 50property dealers and Quetta Development Authority. Descriptive statistics (percentage,percentile and frequency distribution were used to identify the level of influence andthe relation of above mentioned attributes towards the prices of real estate. The resultsrevealed that the prices of real estate in the region have been on an increasing trendand strong influence of all variables especially of government’s monetary and fiscalpolices and urbanization was found significant on the prices of real estate in Quetta.

Mehmood khan kakar

2011-06-01

 
 
 
 
281

Socioeconomic, cultural, and behavioral factors affecting Hispanic health outcomes.  

Science.gov (United States)

Evidence suggests that social and economic factors are important determinants of health. Yet, despite higher porverty rates, less education, and worse access to health care, health outcomes of many Hispanics living in the United States today are equal to, or better than, those of non-Hispanic whites. This paradox is described in the literature as the epidemiological paradox or Hispanic health paradox. In this paper, the authors selectively review data and research supporting the existence of the epidemiological paradox. They find substantial support for the existence of the epidemiological paradox, particularly among Mexican Americans. Census undercounts of Hispanics, misclassification of Hispanic deaths, and emigration of Hispanics do not fully account for the epidemiological paradox. Identifying protective factors underlying the epidemiological paradox, while improving access to care and the economic conditions among Hispanics, are important research and policy implications of this review. PMID:12407964

Morales, Leo S; Lara, Marielena; Kington, Raynard S; Valdez, Robert O; Escarce, José J

2002-11-01

282

Factors affecting the solubility of Bacillus halmapalus alpha-amylase  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

A detailed study of the solubility of recombinant Bacillus halmapalus alpha-amylase has been conducted. A semi-purified preparation from a bulk crystallisation was chos en that contained six isoforms with pI-values of between 5.5 and 6.1. The solubility was strongly affected by pH and could be reduced approximately 200-fold at pH 6 as compared to pH 10, leaving only 0.1 mg/mL in solution. Solubility could also be dramatically manipulated using salts. The choice of anions was found to be more important than of the cations, and the lowest solubility was found using sodium sulphate. For the anions, solubility followed the order expected from the Hofmeister series, however, a more complex behaviour was seen for the cations. With the exception of lithium, their efficiency to influence the solubility was reversed to what was expected. The polydispersity of the solution was reduced by salt addition and zeta potential measurements indicated a shift in pI caused by lithium. Possible explanations for the observations are discussed, extending our present understanding of how salts affect the solubility of proteins, one that to date is primarily based on experiments with lysozyme. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Faber, Cornelius; Hobley, Timothy John

2008-01-01

283

Factors affecting somatic cell count in dairy goats: a review  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Somatic cell count (SCC) in monitoring udder health has been described in numerous studies as a useful method for the diagnosis of intramammary infection (IMI), and it is considered in standards of quality and hygiene of cows milk in many countries. However, several authors have questioned the validity of SCC as a reliable IMI diagnosis tool in dairy goats. This review attempts to reflect the importance of different infectious and non-infectious factors that can modify SCC values in goat milk, and must, therefore, be taken into account when using the SCC as a tool in the improvement of udder health and the quality of milk in this species. In dairy goats, some investigations have shown that mammary bacterial infections are a major cause of increased SCC and loss of production. In goats however, the relationship between bacterial infections and SCC values is not as simple as in dairy cattle, since non-infectious factors also have a big impact on SCC. Intrinsic factors are those that depend directly on the animal: time and number of lactation (higher SCC late in lactation and in aged goats), prolificity (higher SCC in multiple births), milking time (higher SCC in evening compared to morning milking) and number of milkings per day, among others. Extrinsic factors include: milking routine (lower SCC in machine than in manual milking), seasonality and food. In addition, milk secretion in goats is mostly apocrine and therefore characterized by the presence of epithelial debris or cytoplasmic particles, which makes the use of DNA specific counters mandatory. All this information is of interest in order to correctly interpret the SCC in goat milk and to establish differential SCC standards. (Author)

Jimenez-Granda, R.; Sanchez-Rodriguez, M.; Arce, C.; Rodriguez-Estevez, V.

2014-06-01

284

Factors affecting the supply of minority physicians in 2000.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

There was a substantial increase in the number of black and Hispanic physicians between 1970 and 1985. During the next 15 years, 1985 to 2000, the increase is projected to continue. The factors that will determine the size of the increase and the changes in physician to population ratios include black and Hispanic population increases, medical school costs, availability of student support, minority enrollment in undergraduate schools and the pool of these students who will be applicants to me...

Simpson, C. E.; Aronoff, R.

1988-01-01

285

Analysis on some factors affecting MIMO in tunnel  

Science.gov (United States)

Based on the 3D-GBSB (three-dimensional Geometrically Based Single-Bounce) model and MIMO channel capacity function, by geometric analysis, it is analyzed that transceiver antenna arrays, antenna spacing, antenna array angle, SNR and Rician K-factor and so on impact on the frequency-nonselective fading MIMO channel capacity. Monte Carlo method can be applied to stimulate the wireless fading channel and demonstrate Cumulative Distribution Function of above.

Zheng, Hong-dang; Nie, Xiao-Yan; Xu, Zhao

2009-07-01

286

Specialty Preference Among Medical Students and Factors Affecting It  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Introduction: Medical education is one of the core part of educational system of any country. Medical education requires undergraduate students to study a wide range of medical specialties. It is often assumed that students do not make their career preferences until after they have graduated from medical school. So the reasons and factors responsible for preferences need to be found out among medical students. Material and Methods: It was a Cross sectional study on 180 medical students to assess preference for specialty and factors responsible. Results: Out of total 190 medical students more or less everyone (97.89% wanted to pursue specialization and majority of them (96.84% wanted to pursue the same in Medical Field(p>0.05. majority of male students were interested to pursue their specialization in the field of medicine (37.63%, surgery (23.65% and pediatrics (13.97%. On the other hand female students were more interested in medicine (24.17%, pediatrics (32.96% and obstetrics & gynecology (24.17%(p<0.05. Interest, by far was found to be most common factor (76.63% responsible for the preference of particular medical specialty among all four groups of students (1st professional-25.27%, 2nd professional-75.92%, final professional-89.47%, interns-68.42%.Conclusion: It is thus concluded there are many factors playing role in the specialty selection and preference among the medical students and should be equally justified and addressed.

Neeraj Gour

2011-07-01

287

A Content Analysis of Factors Affecting New Product Development Process  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The objective of this study is to review the international marketing literature on new product development process and compare the changes in the important factors in the process with the changes in the management approaches. For this purpose, the articles in three international marketing journals were selected and “new product development” and “new product performance” were searched for in the abstracts. After grouping the variables in the process, they were compared with the perspec...

Eda Atilgan-Inan; Aslihan Buyukkupcu; Serkan Akinci

2010-01-01

288

Detection of key factors affecting lycopene in vitro accessibility.  

Science.gov (United States)

On the basis of a Plackett-Burman experimental design for a resolution IV level obtained via a foldover strategy, the effect of 11 factors on lycopene in vitro accessibility was investigated. The selected factors were thermal treatment (X1), olive oil addition (X2), gastric pH (X3), gastric digestion time (X4), pepsin concentration (X5), intestinal pH (X6), pancreatin concentration (X7), bile salts concentration (X8), colipase addition (X9), intestinal digestion time (X10), and intestinal digestion speed (X11). Tomato passata was used as a natural source of lycopene. Samples were collected after gastric and intestinal digestion, and from the micellar phase, to quantify the (all-E)-lycopene and its (Z)-isomers by HPLC. Except for X3, X6, X7, and X11, the other factors studied explained lycopene in vitro accessibility, mainly regarding intestinal digestion, with R(2) values ? 0.60. Our results showed that the accessibility of lycopene is influenced by the conditions applied during in vitro intestinal digestion. PMID:23547942

Periago, M J; Bravo, S; García-Alonso, F J; Rincón, F

2013-04-24

289

Factors affecting the retention of nurses. A survival analysis  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Objectives: To identify and explore factors that mostly influence nurses’ turnover and retention, and to estimate the length of employment for nurses in the hospital. Methods: This is a retrospective cohort study examining the standard Exit Questionnaires completed by all the female pediatric nurses who joined and left the hospital during the period between January 2006 and October 2010. The Developed Questionnaires where completed by nurses who were still employees in October 2010. The nurses who left the job will be considered as events and the nurses who are still working will be considered as censored.The study took place at the Pediatric Department, Prince Sultan Military Medical City (PSMMC, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. Results: A total of 254 nurses were included in the study. Most of the nurses left their jobs due to family reasons (39.7% followed by other reasons (37.3%. Seventy five percent of all the pediatric nurses remained in their jobs, on average, for 2.2 years. Both simple and multivariate analysis indicated a strong positive correlation between length of employment (turnover and the demographic and organization factors. Conclusion: This study has identified several factors that played a key role in staff retention, which can help in predicting nursing turnover at  PSMMC. The findings of this study could help PSMMC and its Nursing Administration, in particular, to understand the seriousness of the high turnover rates, to develop and implement strategies to reduce this problem, and improve the retention of nursing staff. 

Noufa A. Alonazi

2013-03-01

290

A Study on Students’ Affective Factors in Junior High School English Teaching  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Affect is considered as aspects of emotion, feeling, mood or attitude which condition behaviors in second language acquisition. Positive affect is good for studying while negative affect will inevitably hinder learners’ learning process. As we know, students in junior high school are special groups as they are experiencing great changes both in physiology and psychology. Their affect can be easily influenced by external and internal factors. Therefore, it is of vital importance to pay close attention to students’ affective factors in English learning process, particularly to the negative ones. Based on the results of the previous research about affects in second language acquisition, the study finds that junior high school students have the following negative affective factors such as boredom, anxiety, hopelessness, inhibition and low self-confidence in their English learning. Then some suggestions for cultivating and improving students’ affect are put forward in the hope of improving junior high school English teaching and learning.

Biyi Zhu

2012-06-01

291

Mutations in the white gene of Drosophila melanogaster affecting ABC transporters that determine eye colouration.  

Science.gov (United States)

The white, brown and scarlet genes of Drosophila melanogaster encode proteins which transport guanine or tryptophan (precursors of the red and brown eye colour pigments) and belong to the ABC transporter superfamily. Current models envisage that the white and brown gene products interact to form a guanine specific transporter, while white and scarlet gene products interact to form a tryptophan transporter. In this study, we report the nucleotide sequence of the coding regions of five white alleles isolated from flies with partially pigmented eyes. In all cases, single amino acid changes were identified, highlighting residues with roles in structure and/or function of the transporters. Mutations in w(cf) (G589E) and w(sat) (F590G) occur at the extracellular end of predicted transmembrane helix 5 and correlate with a major decrease in red pigments in the eyes, while brown pigments are near wild-type levels. Therefore, those residues have a more significant role in the guanine transporter than the tryptophan transporter. Mutations identified in w(crr) (H298N) and w(101) (G243S) affect amino acids which are highly conserved among the ABC transporter superfamily within the nucleotide binding domain. Both cause substantial and similar decreases of red and brown pigments indicating that both tryptophan and guanine transport are impaired. The mutation identified in w(Et87) alters an amino acid within an intracellular loop between transmembrane helices 2 and 3 of the predicted structure. Red and brown pigments are reduced to very low levels by this mutation indicating this loop region is important for the function of both guanine and tryptophan transporters. PMID:10407069

Mackenzie, S M; Brooker, M R; Gill, T R; Cox, G B; Howells, A J; Ewart, G D

1999-07-15

292

Nitrogen affects cluster root formation and expression of putative peptide transporters.  

Science.gov (United States)

Non-mycorrhizal Hakea actites (Proteaceae) grows in heathland where organic nitrogen (ON) dominates the soil nitrogen (N) pool. Hakea actites uses ON for growth, but the role of cluster roots in ON acquisition is unknown. The aim of the present study was to ascertain how N form and concentration affect cluster root formation and expression of peptide transporters. Hydroponically grown plants produced most biomass with low molecular weight ON>inorganic N>high molecular weight ON, while cluster roots were formed in the order no-N>ON>inorganic N. Intact dipeptide was transported into roots and metabolized, suggesting a role for the peptide transporter (PTR) for uptake and transport of peptides. HaPTR4, a member of subgroup II of the NRT1/PTR transporter family, which contains most characterized di- and tripeptide transporters in plants, facilitated transport of di- and tripeptides when expressed in yeast. No transport activity was demonstrated for HaPTR5 and HaPTR12, most similar to less well characterized transporters in subgroup III. The results provide further evidence that subgroup II of the NRT1/PTR family contains functional di- and tripeptide transporters. Green fluorescent protein fusion proteins of HaPTR4 and HaPTR12 localized to tonoplast, and plasma- and endomembranes, respectively, while HaPTR5 localized to vesicles of unknown identity. Grown in heathland or hydroponic culture with limiting N supply or starved of nutrients, HaPTR genes had the highest expression in cluster roots and non-cluster roots, and leaf expression increased upon re-supply of ON. It is concluded that formation of cluster roots and expression of PTR are regulated in response to N supply. PMID:19380419

Paungfoo-Lonhienne, Chanyarat; Schenk, Peer M; Lonhienne, Thierry G A; Brackin, Richard; Meier, Stefan; Rentsch, Doris; Schmidt, Susanne

2009-01-01

293

Factores que pueden afectar la seguridad del paciente / Factors that may affect patient's safety  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Cuba | Language: Spanish Abstract in spanish Fundamento: la seguridad del paciente es la garantía de las personas de estar libres de sufrir cualquier tipo de daño cuando interactúan con alguno de los servicios de salud. Objetivo: determinar factores que podrían afectar la seguridad del paciente a través de una investigación realizada en el Hos [...] pital Provincial y en el Hospital Pediátrico. Método: se realizó un estudio descriptivo, mediante la búsqueda de información bibliográfica sobre la temática de la seguridad del paciente, en las bases de datos disponibles en INFOMED. Para la primera etapa se diseña e implementa una encuesta de 49 preguntas que se les realiza en el año 2009 a trabajadores vinculados a la atención de salud. Para la segunda etapa se implementa una encuesta de 23 preguntas derivadas de las preguntas más relevantes de la primera etapa que se implementó en el Hospital Pediátrico y se va a realizar en el Hospital Provincial Univerrsitario Manuel Ascunce Domenech. El método analítico utilizado para ambas encuestas fue la técnica de componentes principales que permitió valorar la coincidencia de cada pregunta en relación a las posibles afectaciones a la seguridad del paciente. Resultados: la encuesta aplicada, para evaluar factores que afectan la seguridad del paciente fue adecuada. La técnica de componentes principales permitió valorar la importancia de cada pregunta en relación a las posibles afectaciones a la seguridad del paciente, las variables de respuesta se agruparon en seis constructos con un 62,1 % de varianza explicada. Las encuestas arrojaron que las afectaciones del ambiente laboral, el nivel general de interconexión y comunicación, el nivel de gestión del conocimiento, la capacidad de enfrentar imprevistos, la capacidad técnica, el cansancio y la pérdida de concentración podrían afectar la seguridad del paciente. Conclusiones: es posible obtener información in situ a partir del instrumento final obtenido en la última etapa que permita corregir de forma precoz algunas fallas que pudieran afectar la seguridad del paciente y corregirlas. La técnica de componentes principales resultó adecuada para evaluar estas respuestas en conjunto. Abstract in english ABSTRACT Background: patient's safety is the guarantee of people to be free of suffering any kind of damage when interacting any of the health services. Objective: to determine factors that may affect patient's safety. Method: a descriptive study through a bibliographic review on patient's safety wa [...] s conducted. The study was divided into two stages, in which surveys according to the technique of main components were implemented; this allowed value the coincidence of each question in relation to the possible impact to the patient´s safety. Results: the applied survey was appraised of adequate; response variables were grouped into six, with a 62.1 % of explained variance. The survey showed that affectations on labor atmosphere, general level of interconnection and communication, level on knowledge management, the capacity to face accidental facts, technical capacity, fatigue and loss of concentration could affect patient's safety. Conclusions: the information was obtained from the final instrument in the last stage. Some failures that could affect patient´s safety may be corrected early. The technique of main components was adequate to evaluate the answers as a whole.

José A, Betancourt Betancourt; Raúl J, Cepero Morales; Clara Mirella, Gallo Borrero.

2011-12-01

294

Feasibility Analysis of Critical Factors Affecting Cloud Computing in Nigeria  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Cloud computing is an evolving and new way of delivering computing services and resources over the internet which are managed by third parties at remote sites. Cloud computing is based on existing technologies like web services, Service Oriented Architecture (SOA, web3.0, grid computing and virtualization, etc. Computing services includes data storage, processing and software. Cloud computing is enjoying a lot of buzz in Nigeria due to its perceived economic and operational benefits and stakeholders believe that it will transform the IT industry in Nigeria. Despite all its promises there still exist so many challenges before Cloud computing see the light of the day in Nigeria. This paper delivers an overview of Cloud computing together with its advantages and disadvantages. Thereafter, the challenges and drivers affecting the adoption of Cloud computing in Nigeria are outlined. Finally, recommendations for the adoption of Cloud computing is discussed with Nigeria as a case study.

Eustace Manayi Dogo

2013-10-01

295

Statistical Study on Principal Factors Affecting Employment of Chinese Undergraduates  

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Full Text Available Due to the heavy employment pressure in china, the employment of the undergraduates attracts much attention in recent years. Accordingly, this study proposes a SPSS-based statistical method to study the employment issue, where thirteen parameters are carefully chosen to construct the employment database. The proposed method first performs the quantitative and the standardized operations and then calculates the correlated matrix of parameters. Moreover, after proving that the correlated matrix satisfies Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin (KMO condition, we perform eigenvalue decomposition and compute the variance contribution rate through Principal Component Analysis (PCA techniques. Both the eigenvalue and the variance contribution rate are used to study the importance of each parameter and finally lead to an importance sort. Therefore, we can quantificationally study the influence of each parameter thrown on the undergraduate employment and find three most important parameters affecting undergraduate employment: university, major and family location.

L. Meng

2010-01-01

296

Factors affecting intellectual outcome in pediatric brain tumor patients  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A prospective study utilizing repeated intellectual testing was undertaken in 73 children with brain tumors consecutively admitted to Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles over a 3-year period to determine the effect of tumor location, extent of surgical resection, hydrocephalus, age of the child, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy on cognitive outcome. Forty-three patients were followed for at least two sequential intellectual assessments and provide the data for this study. Children with hemispheric tumors had the most general cognitive impairment. The degree of tumor resection, adequately treated hydrocephalus, and chemotherapy had no bearing on intellectual outcome. Age of the child affected outcome mainly as it related to radiation. Whole brain radiation therapy was associated with cognitive decline. This was especially true in children below 7 years of age, who experienced a very significant loss of function after whole brain radiation therapy

297

Factors affecting the morphology of benzoyl peroxide microsponges.  

Science.gov (United States)

Benzoyl peroxide (BPO) is primarily used in the treatment of mild to moderate acne. However, its application is associated with skin irritation. It has been shown that encapsulation and controlled release of BPO could reduce the side effect while also reducing percutaneous absorption when administered to the skin. The aim of the present investigation was to design and formulate an appropriate encapsulated form of BPO, using microsponge technology, and explore the parameters affecting the morphology and other characteristics of the resultant products employing scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Benzoyl peroxide particles were prepared using an emulsion solvent diffusion method by adding an organic internal phase containing benzoyl peroxide, ethyl cellulose and dichloromethane into a stirred aqueous phase containing polyvinyl alcohol (PVA). Different concentrations of BPO microsponges were incorporated in lotion formulations and the drug release from these formulations were studied. The SEM micrographs of the BPO microsponges enabled measurement of their size and showed that they were spherical and porous. Results showed that the morphology and particle size of microsponges were affected by drug:polymer ratio, stirring rate and the amount of emulsifier used. The results obtained also showed that an increase in the ratio of drug:polymer resulted in a reduction in the release rate of BPO from the microsponges. The release data showed that the highest and the lowest release rates were obtained from lotions containing plain BPO particles and BPO microsponges with the drug:polymer ratio of 13:1, respectively. The kinetics of release study showed that the release data followed Peppas model and the main mechanism of drug release from BPO microsponges was diffusion. PMID:17692528

Nokhodchi, Ali; Jelvehgari, Mitra; Siahi, M Reza; Mozafari, M Reza

2007-01-01

298

Risk of Postpartum Depression and Affecting Factors in Konya Center  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available AIM: This study is proposed to determine the incidence of postpartum depression and the risk factors that may play role in arising of it in Konya because there is not any constructed study previously. METHODS: This cross-sectional study is constructed among 242 mothers in the postpartum period between 2-6 months who applied two village clinics of Meram County, Konya between 1 December 2005- 31 January 2006. Two forms were used to collect necessary data. First form was ?mother introduction form? that was prepared by us to determine the sociodemographic properties of mothers, and the second form was Edinburgh Posnatal Depression Scale (EPDS to diagnose the risk of postpartum depression. RESULTS: While the cut-off point of EPDS was taken as 13 and over, the probability of experiencing postpartum depression was detected as 19.4%. The probability of experiencing postpartum depression according to EPDS was high in statistical sense among the mothers who had lower monthly income, psychological problems after the preceding pregnancy, 4 and lower prenatal controls, experienced attitude changes among their husbands and/or husbands? families after learning gender of baby, and medical problems during these pregnancies. CONCLUSION: The modifiable risk factors are determined as the number of prenatal controls, changing the preconceptions and obsessions related gender of baby of husbands and families via healthy education, and well-qualified prenatal care. The long-term improvable risk factors are detected as improving monthly incomes of the families. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(5.000: 391-398

Saniye Ozdemir

2008-10-01

299

Factors affecting results of treatment of Hypopharyngeal Carcinoma  

Science.gov (United States)

Objective: A retrospective review of patients with malignant neoplasms of the hypopharynx treated with combined surgery and radiotherapy is presented to highlight the results of treatment and the factors of treatment success for this malignant disease. Patients and Methods: Between 1995 and 2004 at the University ORL Clinic Nis 89 patients with malignant neoplasms of hypopharynx (85 males, 4 females, and age ranging from 44 to 77 years) were treated. In the 89 patients (stage I, n = 4; stage II, n = 3; stage III, n = 34; stage IV, n = 48), the sites of origin were pyriform sinus (n = 75), postcrycoid (n = 8), posterior pharyngeal wall (n = 3) and superior hypopharynx (n = 3). Results: Laryngeal preservation surgery was achieved in 11.2% of patients, while 88.8% had laryngectomy with partial or total pharyngectomy. Pyriform sinus was the most common site of origin of hypopharyngeal carcinoma in 84.3%. Totally 93% of patients had neck metastases, and tumors extended beyond the hypopharynx in 41.6% of patients. TNM stage was highly significant parameter of outcome. Five year survival was 100% for stage I, 66.6% for stage II, 53.9% for stage III, and 33.3% for stage IV. Residual disease (5.6%) and recurrent disease (2.2%) were low. Postoperative fistula developed in 16.8% of patients, and in 60% it was closed successfully using local flaps, while in 40% pectoralis flap was needed. Localization of disease was also an important factor of survival. Retrocrycoid carcinoma resulted in very poor survival rate (12.5%), high residual disease, lymph node metastasis, and pharyngocutaneous fistula formation. Conclusion: Localization and TNM stage are highly significant factors for clinical course, treatment, and outcome of hypopharyngeal carcinoma. PMID:19918303

Milisavljevic, D; Stankovic, M; Zivic, M; Popovic, M; Radovanovic, Z

2009-01-01

300

Prioritizing the Factor Weights Affecting Tourism Performance by FAHP  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

determine the relative weights of the factors and subfactors in contributing to tourism performance. An application case related to the Vietnamese context is used to illustrate the proposed framework. The results of this study consolidated the tourism theory and suggested recommendations and solutions for the Vietnamese tourism industry. The proposed framework could be used by a group of decision-makers to achieve a consensus, as well as deal with uncertainty in the decision-making process. The findings of the study may serve as a tool for assistance for planners in improving the efficiency of tourism performance.

Quang Hung Do

2013-10-01

 
 
 
 
301

Factors affecting the in vitro dissolution of cobalt oxide.  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In a recent interspecies comparison of the lung clearance of cobalt oxide (57Co3O4), differences of up to 4-fold were found in the translocation rates of 57Co to blood between seven different animal species, including man. This study investigated some factors that could influence the dissolution of this material in vitro. The effect of bicarbonate and citrate concentrations (over physiological ranges) and medium pH on in vitro dissolution of 57Co from 57Co3O4 particles was measured in a simpl...

Collier, C. G.; Pearce, M. J.; Hodgson, A.; Ball, A.

1992-01-01

302

Factors affecting potential market penetration of laser fusion power plants  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A mini-model has been constructed to estimate the optimal size of laser fusion power plants and to estimate the allowable cost of the first such plant in relation to the next best alternative. In estimating the costs of laser fusion, the mini-model incorporates such factors as market penetration, learning, economies of scale, system size, transmission costs, reserve requirements, development and licensing costs and site costs. The results of the mini-model simulations indicate that the optimal laser fusion plant size is approximately 3 GWe; risk considerations unincorporated in the mini-model suggest an optimal size closer to 2.5 GWe

303

Affecting the Choice Factors of Fishery Products Consumption in Turkey  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study examines fish consumption behavior patterns. The aim of this study was to evaluate the importance of choosing factors in determining food pattern of Turkish people. A total of 666 surveys in all around Turkey responded to a self-administered questionnaire about seafood consumption habits, past frequency of seafood consumption, attitude towards and intention to eat seafood. In this research some prompts were used such as health, taste, availability, versatility, the components of a good family meal, value for money and alternatives to red meat.

Hekimoglu Muge Aliye

2011-01-01

304

Factors controlling transport of graphene oxide nanoparticles in saturated sand columns.  

Science.gov (United States)

The authors conducted column experiments and a modeling study to understand the effects of several environmental factors on the aggregation and transport of graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) in saturated quartz sand. The GONPs were negatively charged and stable under the test conditions (0-50?mM NaCl; pH 4.8-9.0), and the Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) calculation indicated that deposition of GONPs was under unfavorable attachment conditions. The GONPs exhibited high mobility even at an ionic strength of 25?mM NaCl. The transport of GONPs was insensitive to the changes of pH (from 5.1 to 9.0), but the presence of 10?mg/L Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) considerably enhanced transport at high ionic strength (35?mM NaCl), likely via enhanced steric repulsion and significantly inhibited stacking of GO flakes. Varying flow velocity also enhanced transport at high ionic strength. In general, GONPs exhibit greater mobility compared with other carbon nanoparticles because the aggregation and transport of GONPs are more resilient to changes in solution chemistry and hydrodynamic forces that favor aggregation and deposition of nanoparticles. A 2-site transport model incorporating both the blocking-affected attachment process and straining effects can effectively model the transport of GONPs. The high mobility of GONPs should be given full consideration in assessing their environmental risks. PMID:24453090

Qi, Zhichong; Zhang, Lunliang; Wang, Fang; Hou, Lei; Chen, Wei

2014-05-01

305

Factors Affecting Entrepreneurial Intention among UniSZA Students  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Graduates contributions to entrepreneurship would stimulate the country’s economic growth. The aim of this study is to determine and investigate factors influence on students’ perception of the entrepreneurial intention, in order to present the most contemporary future generation of entrepreneurs that can shape the future of the economy and the country. The area of this study covers demographic profiles, attitudinal and behavioral factors, and how these influence the intentions of students to become entrepreneurs. The finding suggests that the female students had significantly higher attitude and social skill and desire to succeed as compared to the male students. There was no significant difference with regards to race, age, parental working background, family and relative engaged in business, and heard about entrepreneurship ensuring that entrepreneurs are not clustered in any of these variables. Another major finding indicates that those who attended entrepreneurship course/training had significantly higher attitude and social skill. Most importantly, marketing skill, desire to success, leadership skill, and innovation and creativity inspire graduates in choosing entrepreneurship. Thus, examining the selected key unemployment of graduates’ issues from an entrepreneurship perspective can help to establish harmony and meaningful cooperation between entrepreneurs and learning institutions.

Zaharah Ghazali

2012-12-01

306

Radiographic factors affecting the management of impacted upper permanent canines.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of the investigation was to evaluate which radiographic factors influenced the orthodontists' decision whether to expose or remove an impacted upper permanent canine and was a retrospective, cross-sectional design. The sample consisted of all radiographic records of patients referred to the Orthodontic Department at Manchester University Dental Hospital with impacted upper permanent canines between 1994-1998 (n = 44). The following canine position measurements were made from the OPG: angulation to the midline, vertical height, antero-posterior position of the root, overlap of the adjacent incisor, and presence of root resorption of adjacent incisor(s). The labio-palatal position of the impacted canine was assessed from the lateral skull radiograph. Whether the impacted canine had been exposed and orthodontically aligned or removed was also recorded. Stepwise logistic regression analysis showed that the labio-palatal position of the crown influenced the treatment decision, with palatally positioned impacted canines more likely to be surgically exposed and those in the line of the arch, or labially situated, removed (P guided by two factors: labio-palatal crown position and angulation to the midline. PMID:10867073

Stivaros, N; Mandall, N A

2000-06-01

307

Factors Affecting Holstein Cattle Fertility Traits in the Slovak Republic  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available We investigated the influence of the factors herd-year, breed-type, sire, and milk production and lactation length on the fertility traits of Holstein cattle (age at first calving, calving interval, days open, non return rate at 56, 72, and 90 day. The data were received from 87 230 Holstein cows first time calved in period 2000 and 2008 with three fullterm lactations. Average age at first calving was 875 days and average milk production on first, second and third lactation was 6816 kg, 7524 kg and 6536 kg, respectively. Coefficient of determination estimated by linear model with factors as join herd-year effect and sire was 0.1164 (P<0,001 and 0.1145 (P<0,001 for variation of calving interval after 1st lactation and 2nd lactation, respectively. When the quadratic effect of milk production and lactation length was included to the linear model, coefficient of determination for calving interval variation increased significantly to 0.7049 (P<0,001 after 1st lactation and to 0.6297 (P<0,001 after 2nd lactation. Basically on these results including milk production and lactation length to the fertility genetic evaluation is needed.

Zuzana Riecka

2010-10-01

308

Factors Affecting Detection Probability of Acoustic Tags in Coral Reefs  

Acoustic telemetry is an important tool for studying the movement patterns, behaviour, and site fidelity of marine organisms; however, its application is challenged in coral reef environments where complex topography and intense environmental noise interferes with acoustic signals, and there has been less study. Therefore, it is particularly critical in coral reef telemetry studies to first conduct a long-term range test, a tool that provides informa- tion on the variability and periodicity of the transmitter detection range and the detection probability. A one-month range test of a coded telemetric system was conducted prior to a large-scale tagging project investigating the movement of approximately 400 fishes from 30 species on offshore coral reefs in the central Red Sea. During this range test we determined the effect of the following factors on transmitter detection efficiency: distance from receiver, time of day, depth, wind, current, moon-phase and temperature. The experiment showed that biological noise is likely to be responsible for a diel pattern of -on average- twice as many detections during the day as during the night. Biological noise appears to be the most important noise source in coral reefs overwhelming the effect of wind-driven noise, which is important in other studies. Detection probability is also heavily influenced by the location of the acoustic sensor within the reef structure. Understanding the effect of environmental factors on transmitter detection probability allowed us to design a more effective receiver array for the large-scale tagging study.

Bermudez, Edgar F.

2012-05-01

309

Factors Affecting Crack Initiation in Low Porosity Crystalline Rocks  

Science.gov (United States)

Crack initiation in uniaxial compressive loading of rocks occurs well before the peak strength is reached. The factors that may influence the onset of cracking and possible initiating mechanisms were explored using a discrete element numerical approach. The numerical approach was based on grain-based model that utilized the Voronoi tessellation scheme to represent low porosity crystalline rocks such as granite. The effect of grain size distribution (sorting coefficient ranging from 1.5 to 1.03), grain size (average grain size ranging from 0.75 to 2.25 mm), and the heterogeneities of different mineral grains (quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase) on the onset of cracking were examined. The modelling revealed that crack initiation appears to be a tensile mechanism in low porosity rocks, and that shear cracking along grain boundaries is only a prominent mechanism near the peak strength. It was also shown that the heterogeneity introduced by the grain size distribution had the most significant effect on peak strength and crack initiation stress. The peak strength ranges from 140 to 208 MPa as the grain size distribution varies from heterogeneous to uniform, respectively. However, the ratio of crack initiation to peak stress showed only minor variation, as the heterogeneity decreases. The other factors investigated had only minor effects on crack initiation and peak strength, and crack initiation ratio.

Nicksiar, Mohsen; Martin, C. D.

2014-07-01

310

Factors affecting formation and rupture of intracranial saccular aneurysms.  

Science.gov (United States)

Unruptured intracranial aneurysms represent a decisional challenge. Treatment risks have to be balanced against an unknown probability of rupture. A better understanding of the physiopathology is the basis for a better prediction of the natural history of an individual patient. Knowledge about the possible determining factors arises from a careful comparison between ruptured versus unruptured aneurysms and from the prospective observation and analysis of unbiased series with untreated, unruptured aneurysms. The key point is the correct identification of the determining variables for the fate of a specific aneurysm in a given individual. Thus, the increased knowledge of mechanisms of formation and eventual rupture of aneurysms should provide significant clues to the identification of rupture-prone aneurysms. Factors like structural vessel wall defects, local hemodynamic stress determined also by peculiar geometric configurations, and inflammation as trigger of a wall remodeling are crucial. In this sense the study of genetic modifiers of inflammatory responses together with the computational study of the vessel tree might contribute to identify aneurysms prone to rupture. The aim of this article is to underline the value of a unifying hypothesis that merges the role of geometry, with that of hemodynamics and of genetics as concerns vessel wall structure and inflammatory pathways. PMID:24306170

Bacigaluppi, S; Piccinelli, M; Antiga, L; Veneziani, A; Passerini, T; Rampini, P; Zavanone, M; Severi, P; Tredici, G; Zona, G; Krings, T; Boccardi, E; Penco, S; Fontanella, M

2014-01-01

311

Proliferative diabetic retinopathy after vitrectomy early factors affect IOP  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available AIM:To explore possible causes of early postoperative elevated intraocular pressure caused by proliferative diabetic retinopathy(PDRvitrectomy. METHODS:Totally 72 cases(100 eyeswhich have performed vitrectomy for proliferative diabetic retinopathy were retrospectively analyzed to observe the incidence of postoperative ocular hypertension, and the relevant factors that caused postoperative high intraocular pressure were statistically analyzed. Early postoperative ocular hypertension diagnostic criteria: any time after 2 weeks of non-contact tonometer measured IOP> 25mmHg(1mmHg=0.133kPa. RESULTS:High intraocular pressure after vitrectomy occurred in 27 eyes(27%, the incidence of male and female were 27.27%, 26.79%, the difference was not statistically significant(P>0.05. Eyes filled with balanced liquid filling incidence rate of 30.95%, 6.25%, and the difference was statistically significant(P0.05. Incidences of intraoperative panretinal photocoagulation and additional retinal photocoagulation group were 41%, 20%, and the difference was statistically significant(P<0.05. Preoperative retinopathy of four, five, six groups of incidence were 9.52%, 23.81%, 40.56%, and the groups were statistically significant(P<0.05. Unconsolidated preoperative retinal detachment and retinal detachment incidence rate of 19%, 41%, and the difference was statistically significant(P<0.05. Surgery in the united lens resection with intraoperative unfederated lens the resection group's incidence rate of 34%, 15%, the difference was statistically significant(P<0.05. Logistic regression analysis showed that retinal detachment preoperative and intraoperative intraocular filling were independent risk factors that caused early postoperative ocular hypertension after vitrectomy. CONCLUSION:Post-operative ocular hypertension after PDR vitrectomy is related to preoperative retinal detachment, intraoperative lensectomy, intraoperative intraocular filling, and intraoperative panretinal photocoagulation. Retinal detachment preoperative and intraoperative intraocular filling are independent risk factors that caused early postoperative ocular hypertension after vitrectomy. Incidence of postoperative ocular hypertension after PDR vitrectomy is high, harmful. Early detection and individualized treatment can improve the success rate of vitrectomy and the patient's vision.

Shi-Bo Liu

2013-05-01

312

Factors Affecting the Production of Vietnamese Tones: A Study of American Learners  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigates factors that affect the accuracy of tone production by American students of Vietnamese as a second language (L2). Nine hypotheses are examined, each of which isolates a factor expected to affect production accuracy: (a) task type, (b) the position of a tone in a clause, (c) discourse distance between a model provided by a…

Nguyen, Hanh thi; Macken, Marlys A.

2008-01-01

313

Examining the Factors Affecting Student Dropout in an Online Learning Environment  

Science.gov (United States)

This study examined the factors affecting student dropouts in an online certificate program. In this research, a combination of quantitative and qualitative methods was used. Online Course Dropout Survey was developed and used to determine which factors affect student attrition from the program. The dropout survey was sent by e-mail to 98 students…

Yukselturk, Erman; Inan, Fethi Ahmet

2006-01-01

314

Factors affecting pregnancy rates in infertile women performed abdominal myomectomy  

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Patients and Methods:This retrospective study included 76 infertile women underwent abdominal myomectomy. The cases were divided into two groups according to postoperative pregnancy (Group 1, n=22, and cases with no postoperative pregnancy (Group 2, n=54. Risk factors recorded were; age, parity, size of the fibroids, body mass index (BMI, tumor markers and serum blood values. Results:A total of 76 infertile women underwent abdominal myomectomy during the study period. Of all cases 22 (28.94 % became pregnant. There was statically significant difference between the groups in terms of age, BMI, diameter of the fibroids (p5 cm the treatment modality should be abdominal myomectomy to increase the chance of postoperative pregnancy. [Cukurova Med J 2014; 39(4.000: 801-806

Ali irfan Guzel

2014-08-01

315

Which factors affect reported headache incidences after lumbar myelography?  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Nineteen publications were reviewed and subjected to a combined statistical analysis (meta-analysis) regarding the influence of study design factors upon reported headache and total symptom incidences after lumbar iohexol myelography. A significant association was found between reported side effects on one hand and needle diameter, follow-up time and the method of questioning respectively on the other. The combination of long follow-up time and specific questioning and the combination between larger diameter (20G) needles and long follow-up time, both seemed to be strong predictors for reporting high side effect incidences. Nine studies were similarly analyzed regarding the influence of early ambulation and contrast type upon reported headache incidences. Early ambulation significantly increased headache after iohexol or iopamidol lumbar myelography as opposed to metrizamide myelography. (orig.)

316

Factors affecting heavy metal uptake in plant selection for phytoremediation  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The heavy metal uptake of ten plant species was studied under different soil and climatic conditions. Effects of soil pH, temperature, plant species and phenophase on the heavy metal content of stems and leaves were determined in pot experiments. Plants and soil samples were collected from a lead/zinc mine ore (Gyoengyoesoroszi, Hungary) and characterised by high contents of Pb, Zn, As, Cd, Cu. The possibility of an adapted phytoremediation technology was indicated by different bioconcentration factors (BCF). The BCF depended markedly (10- to 100-fold) on plant species and environmental conditions. Based on our results a ''season-adapted'' phytoextraction technology with different plant species (utilising their different temperature requirements and/or harvest time) is suggested. (orig.)

Anton, A.; Mathe-Gaspar, G. [Research Inst. for Soil Science and Agricultural Chemistry of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Budapest (Hungary)

2005-04-01

317

Factors affecting plasma aluminum concentrations in nonexposed workers  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

In this study, the distribution and determinants of plasma aluminum concentrations were examined in 71 office employees not occupationally exposed to aluminum. The samples were analyzed by Zeeman graphite furnace atomic absorption spectroscopy and were found to be log normally distributed. After using the International Federation of Clinical Chemistry (IFCC) recommended procedure for removal of likely aberrant values, the 95th percentile value was 198 nmol/L (90% CI:165-238); when those using antacids were also excluded, the 95th percentile value fell to 175 nmol/L (90% CI:147-208). Multiple regression analysis indicated that the factors most predictive of log plasma aluminum were the batch in which the sample was analyzed and the use of antacids containing aluminum. The statistical significance of the batch variable likely indicates the well-recognized problem of contamination in sampling and analyzing aluminum.35 references.

House, R.A. (Department of Occupational and Environmental Health, St Michael' s Hospital, University of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

1992-10-01

318

Factors affecting the formulation of sustained release potassium chloride tablets.  

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In this study, influence of several formulation factors on the release kinetics of potassium chloride from directly compressed matrices are investigated. Formulations containing hydrophilic (methylcellulose, carbomer), plastic (polyvinyl chloride), and wax (glycerol palmitostearate) matrix materials at concentrations of 10, 15 and 20%, incorporated with potassium chloride as active ingredient and insoluble excipients were prepared and studied in vitro using the USP XXI/NF XVI rotating paddle method. Hardness had no markedly effect on the release characteristics of formulations except for wax matrix material formulation. Results of goodness of fit analysis applied to release data had shown that the release mechanism was described by the Higuchi diffusion controlled model. Positive deviations from Higuchi equation might be due to the erosion of gel layer. Analysis of in vitro release mechanisms indicated that the most suitable results were obtained by methylcellulose and glycerol palmitostearate. PMID:1811230

Senel, S; Capan, Y; Hincal, A A

1991-11-01

319

Factors that affect women's attitudes toward domestic violence in Turkey.  

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This article examines the attitudes of Turkish women toward justification of intimate partner violence. The data were gathered from the 2003 Turkey Demographic and Health Survey. A random sample of 8,075, aged 15-49, participated in the survey. The findings underline the importance of patriarchal beliefs and the associated practice of brides-money in addition to rural residence, large household, illiteracy, lack of wealth, and younger age at marriage as the sources of acceptance of violence among women. The study provides a theoretical explanation for how patriarchal ideology is translated into an accepting attitude toward violence and also discusses the factors that serve as mechanisms that help women resist patriarchal hegemony and not justify domestic violence against women. The final section of the article addresses policy implications. PMID:20514820

Marshall, Gul Aldikacti; Furr, L Allen

2010-01-01

320

Factors affecting aromatic VOC removal by electron beam treatment  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A study has been conducted to investigate the effects of dose, humidity, and temperature on the decomposition of representative volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by electron beam irradiation. For this study, toluene--a commonly used VOC in the various industrial coating processes, was selected as a representative VOC. The degradation characteristics under different concentrations and irradiation doses were extensively investigated to determine and improve VOC removal efficiencies. In general, this study illustrates that the removal efficiencies of aromatic VOCs increase as their concentrations decrease and the irradiation doses increase. Addition of water vapor and/or aerosol moisture into the reactor of a flow system results in 10-20% increase in VOC removal efficiencies compared to the experiments run without moisture added, presumably due to OH radical formation leading to additional degradation pathways. The level of decomposition was higher with the addition of water vapor compared to those observed with added aerosol moisture. The temperature variations from 30 deg. C to 130 deg. C did not significantly affect the decomposition rates of the toluene compound at 160 ppm C. However, there was a significant decrease in toluene decomposition rate at a higher temperature of 170 deg. C

 
 
 
 
321

Factors affecting floral herbivory in a limestone grassland  

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The amount of herbivore damage to the petals of 41 species of herbaceous plant was surveyed from April to September in a limestone grassland in central England. Damage was recorded as the percentage of the petal area removed. Most damage was caused by invertebrates, particularly slugs. The amount of invertebrate damage differed significantly between plant species and with time of year. The mean damage across all species was only 2 %, ranging from an average of 0 % in Galium sterneri to 8 % in Primula vulgaris. In most species, less than a quarter of flowers received any damage, so those that were damaged were often severely affected. Species flowering early or late in the season received more damage, possibly because of greater slug activity. Hypotheses to explain the inter-specific variation in the amount of herbivory were examined by testing for correlations with a range of plant variables. No correlations with flower-stem length, flower-stem thickness or the longevity of flowers were apparent. The amount of petal damage correlated strongly with flower size and petal thickness. This appeared to result from the prevalence of large-flowered species early and late in the season rather than from a preference for flower size and petal thickness per se. The evolutionary significance of floral herbivory is discussed.

Breadmore, Karen N.; Kirk, William D. J.

1998-12-01

322

Natural and anthropogenic factors affecting the groundwater quality in Serbia.  

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Various chemometric techniques were used to analyze the quality of groundwater data sets. Seventeen water quality parameters: the cations Na, K, Ca, Mg, the anions Cl, SO4, NO3, HCO3 and nine trace elements Pb, As, Mn, Ni, Cu, Cd, Fe, Zn and Cr were measured at 66 different key sampling sites in ten representative areas (low land-Northern Autonomous Province of Serbia, Vojvodina and central Serbia) for the summer period of 2009. HCA grouped the sample sites into four clusters based on the similarities of the characteristics of the groundwater quality. DA showed two parameters, HCO3 and Zn, affording more than 90% correct assignments in the spatial analysis of four/three different regions in Serbia. Factor analysis was applied on the log-transformed data sets and allowed the identification of a reduced number of factors with hydrochemical meaning. The results showed severe pollution with Mn, As, NO3, Ni, Pb whereby anthropogenic origin of these contaminants was indicated. The pollution comes from both scattered point sources (industrial and urban effluent) and diffuse source agricultural activity. These samples may not be suitable for human consumption; the water quality belongs to class III/IV (contaminated). The Fe anomalies (7.1mg/L) in the water from the Vetrnica site can be attributed to natural sources, such as the dissolution of rock masses and rock fragments. The serious groundwater contamination with As (25.7-137.8 ?g/L) in the area of Banat (Northern Autonomous Province of Serbia, Vojvodina) and a sample No. 9 at the Great Morava River requires urgent attention. PMID:24080418

Devic, Gordana; Djordjevic, Dragana; Sakan, Sanja

2014-01-15

323

Elucidating key factors affecting radionuclide aging in soils  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Mechanistic studies allow at present to describe the processes governing the short-term interaction of radiostrontium and radiocaesium in soils. The initial sorption step can be described through the estimation of the soil-soil solution distribution coefficient from soil parameters, as cationic exchange capacity, radiocaesium interception potential and concentration of competing ions in the soil solution. After the initial soil-radionuclide interaction, a fraction of radionuclide is no longer available for exchange with the solution, and it remains fixed in the solid fraction. At present, the initial fixed fraction of a radionuclide in a given soil cannot be predicted from soil properties. Besides, little is known about soil and environmental factors (e.g., temperature; hydric regime) provoking the increase in the fixed fraction with time, the so-called aging process. This process is considered to control the reduction of food contamination with time at contaminated scenarios. Therefore, it is crucial to be able to predict the radionuclide aging in the medium and long term for a better risk assessment, especially when a decision has to be made between relying on natural attenuation versus implementing intervention actions. Here we study radiostrontium and radiocaesium aging in a set of soils, covering a wide range of soil types of contrasting properties (e.g., loamy calcareous; podzol; chernozem, organic). Three factors are separately and simultaneously tested: time elapsed since contamination, temperature and hydric regime. Changes in the radionuclide fixed fraction are estimated with a leaching test based on the use of a mild extractant solution. In addition to this, secondary effects on the radiocaesium interception potential in various soils are also considered. (author)

324

Elucidating key factors affecting radionuclide aging in soils  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

Mechanistic studies allow at present to describe the processes governing the short-term interaction of radiostrontium and radiocaesium in soils. The initial sorption step can be described through the estimation of the soil-soil solution distribution coefficient from soil parameters, as cationic exchange capacity, radiocaesium interception potential and concentration of competing ions in the soil solution. After the initial soil-radionuclide interaction, a fraction of radionuclide is no longer available for exchange with the solution, and it remains fixed in the solid fraction. At present, the initial fixed fraction of a radionuclide in a given soil cannot be predicted from soil properties. Besides, little is known about soil and environmental factors (e.g., temperature; hydric regime) provoking the increase in the fixed fraction with time, the so-called aging process. This process is considered to control the reduction of food contamination with time at contaminated scenarios. Therefore, it is crucial to be able to predict the radionuclide aging in the medium and long term for a better risk assessment, especially when a decision has to be made between relying on natural attenuation versus implementing intervention actions. Here we study radiostrontium and radiocaesium aging in a set of soils, covering a wide range of soil types of contrasting properties (e.g., loamy calcareous; podzol; chernozem, organic). Three factors are separately and simultaneously tested: time elapsed since contamination, temperature and hydric regime. Changes in the radionuclide fixed fraction are estimated with a leaching test based on the use of a mild extractant solution. In addition to this, secondary effects on the radiocaesium interception potential in various soils are also considered. (author)

Roig, M. [Universitat Politecnica Catalunya, Institut de Tecniques Energetiques, Barcelona (Spain); Rigola, A.; Vidal, M.; Rauret, G. [Barcelona Univ., Dept. de Quimica Analitica (Spain)

2004-07-01

325

Socioeconomic Factors Affecting Household Energy Consumption in Qom, Iran  

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Full Text Available Petrol is heavily subsidized in Iran which has led both to very high consumption levels and a big smuggling problem as petrol is transported out of Iran's border areas for re-sale in neighboring countries, where petrol prices are much higher. Also, a shortage of refineries combined with wasteful consumption means that Iran regularly imports petrol despite being one of the world's biggest oil producers. To look at the different variables contributing to wasteful consumption of fuel in Iran and the effect of governmental gradual increase of fuel prices, this study questioned 600 family warden views in Qom, Iran. The results showed that more than two third of samples have heard or read at least one news about energy saving and quoted TV as main source of their information while 55% mentioned all fossils resources would be finish in near future and urged optimum energy consumption as the best way to tackle energy crisis (82%, with 85% asked for more media propagation to change wrong cultural behaviors in Qom. Nearly half of the people said that governmental plan to increase domestic price of high octane and regular gasoline annually had little or no effect on fuel consumption and majority of them mentioned cultural changes as the best tools and nearly the same rate were worried about air pollution as the immediate result of uncontrolled fuel consumption in Qom. The results also showed that with increase in each year education of family warden, decreases fuel expenses 11.2% in hot seasons and 1240000 Iranian Rials (IR-R in cold seasons while increase in family members’ size adds 288660 (IR-R per member to base family size (2 and for each member of family which works outside the house, family energy expenses increase 234470 IR-R. And finally the results showed fuel (or energy expenses in cold months in Qom is higher than other months and family warden education showed more effect to reduce those expenses during mild months but less during hot months. Therefore it is recommended that urgent actions should be done to change society behavior and teach more about new methods of energy saving while current actions such as increase in fuel price should be revised completely.

Ebrahimi Mehrzad

2007-01-01

326

[Factors affecting bone regeneration in Ilizarov callus distraction].  

Science.gov (United States)

We evaluated the X-rays of 36 patients who underwent 50 callus distractions. With the aid of a computerized digitalisation system for analogue films, the relative X-ray density of the distraction area was calculated for each X-ray. These relative X-ray densities were figured graphically for the duration of treatment for each patient. In the consolidation phase, the graph of each patient had a logarithmic relationship. The gradients of the logarithmic density curves were considered an indicator of the quantity of new bone formation. These gradients were correlated to the following clinical parameters: age of the patient, beginning of distraction after corticotomy, average speed of distraction, average weight bearing during the distraction and consolidation phase, location of corticotomy (distal femur versus proximal tibia) and diclofenac medication. Except for the location of the corticotomy and diclofenac, all parameters had an influence on osteoneogenesis by callus distraction. The parameters affecting new bone formation the most were the age of the patient and weight bearing. Patients aged under 18 years (p = 0.005), beginning of distraction later than 8 days (p = 0.109), an average distraction speed below 1 mm/day (p = 0.079), and average weight bearing of more than 30 kg (p = 0.068 for the distraction phase and p = 0.089 for the consolidation phase) showed a quantitatively higher rate of new bone formation by callus distraction than the patients in the other groups. Patients with a shorter leg due to poliomyelitis and one patient with an amniotic leg tie showed a slower increase in X-ray density graphs than the other patients. PMID:8584945

Fink, B; Krieger, M; Schneider, T; Menkhaus, S; Fischer, J; Rüther, W

1995-12-01

327

Factors affecting job satisfaction and anxiety levels in the nurses  

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Full Text Available Purpose: This investigation was carried out in order to determine job satisfaction levels of nurses and the relationship between job satisfaction and “state & trait anxiety” levels.Material and Methods: This investigation was carried out in the provincial centre of Kayseri in 2004. All 837 nurses working at various institutions, except military hospitals, in the provincial centre of Kayseri were included. The nurses were visited at work and a questionnaire including 29 questions related to socio-demographic characteristics, and working and health conditions was administered. Additionally, trait & state anxiety inventory (STAI and a job satisfaction questionnaire were administered. Among 837 nurses, 23 were not available and 192 refused to answer the questionnaires; hence, a total of 622 nurses were included in the study.Results: It has been determined that the mean job satisfaction score was 43.7 ± 12.5, state anxiety score 45.0 ± 7.2 and trait anxiety score 40.0 ± 9.4. Job satisfaction level was higher in nurses working at private hospitals and those working more willingly than the others. However, job satisfaction level is low in nurses who worked for longer hours per week, worked during weekends and whose health perception was poor. A weak correlations in negative direction were found between job satisfaction and “state & trait” anxiety scores.Conclusion: It has been concluded that job satisfaction levels of nurses were low and anxiety levels were medium. The type of the institution, working hours per week, working weekends, willingness and their general health perception affected job satisfaction levels. There was a negative weak correlation between job satisfaction and anxiety levels.

Selma Durmu?

2007-04-01

328

Case Study of Factors Affecting Chinese Students’ English Communication Performance  

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Full Text Available For ESL teaching in China’s universities, not enough emphasis is put on verbal communication as a yardstick of language mastery and methodological success. Developing student’s communication competence is not only concerned with the nature of language learning from linguistic perspectives, but also could be influenced by such exogenous factors as learning environment, learning psychology, and learning strategies. It is necessary to investigate whether these factors have an impact on Chinese university students’ English communication performance. This paper tries to examine the relationships among social needs, system inefficiencies, learning objectives, learning strategies, and effort, according to a constructed model. The model’s hypotheses are drawn from theories as diverse as person-environment (PE fit (Caplan, 1987, intrinsic motivation (Ryan and Deci, 2000, conceptions about learning approach (Entwistle, 1990, and “learning strategy” (Biggs, Kember, & Leung, 2001. The sample was collected from one of the Chinese universities in Southeast for a case study to shed light on how to improve English teaching and learning in TESL of China. The quantitative research method is used with SPSS system in this essay to report the statistical analyses of the model. Among the eight hypotheses tested, six were confirmed to be true, and two could not be validated.
Key words: communication performance; 5-factor model; person-environment (PE fit; intrinsic motivation; learning strategies

Résumé: Dans les universités chinoises où l’anglais est enseigné comme la deuxième langue, l'accent n'est pas suffisamment mis sur la communication verbale en tant qu’un critère de maîtrise de la langue et du succès méthodologique. Le développement de la compétence communicative des élèves n'est pas seulement concerné par la nature de l'apprentissage des langues du point de vue linguistique, mais pourrait aussi être influencé par des facteurs exogènes comme l'environnement d'apprentissage, la psychologie de l'apprentissage et les stratégies d'apprentissage. Il est nécessaire d'examiner si ces facteurs ont une influence sur la performance de communication en anglais des étudiants chinois. Le présent document tente d'étudier les relations entre les besoins sociaux, l'inefficacité du système, les objectifs d'apprentissage, les stratégies d'apprentissage et des efforts, selon un modèle construit. L’hypothèse du modèle vient de diverses théories, telles que la théorie de l’adaptation peronne-environnement-(PE (Caplan, 1987, la motivation intrinsèque (Ryan et Deci, 2000, les conceptions sur l''approche de l’apprentissage ( Entwistle, 1990, et les stratégies d'apprentissage (Biggs, Kember, & Leung, 2001. Les sujets d’études viennent de l'une des universités chinoises situées dans le Sud-est pour montrer la façon d'améliorer l'enseignement et l'apprentissage de l'anglais en tant que la deuxième langue en Chine. La méthode de recherche quantitative est utilisée avec le système de SPSS dans cet essai pour montrer des analyses statistiques du modèle. Parmi les huit hypothèses testées, six ont été confirmées d’être vraies et deux n'ont pas pu être validées.
Mots-Clés: performance de communication; modèle de 5-facteurs; le modèle de l’adaptation personne-environment(PE; motivation intrinsèque; stratégies d’apprentissage

Ping LIU

2009-10-01

329

FACTORS AFFECTING GERMINATION AND PREGERMINATIVE TREATMENTS OF Lupinus montanus SEEDS  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Venezuela | Language: English Abstract in portuguese Estudou-se a germinação da semente de Lupinus montanus, tomando em conta os seguintes fatores: regime de temperaturas dia/noite, luz e tratamento pré-germinativo. Para a germinação, resultou significativa a interação entre os fatores temperatura, luz e tratamento pré-germinativo. Os maiores valores [...] de germinação se acharam no regime de temperatura 20/15ºC, com escarificação química (ácido sulfúrico) durante 15 minutos, tanto com luz (100% de germinação) como sem luz (98% de germinação). A interação entre temperatura e luz também foi significativa. Neste último caso, a maior germinação se alcançou no regime de temperatura 20/15ºC, tanto com luz como sem luz (72,5% e 73,8%, respectivamente). A maiores temperaturas sem luz, a germinação foi maior (41,2% a 25/20ºC, e 33,4% a 30/25ºC), que com luz (17,4% a 25/20ºC e 12,8% a 30/25ºC); o qual indica que os microsítios com sombra podem beneficiar a germinação da semente da espécie a temperaturas altas. Abstract in spanish Se estudió la germinación de la semilla de Lupinus montanus, tomando en cuenta los siguientes factores: régimen de temperaturas día/noche, luz y tratamiento pregerminativo. Para la germinación, resultó significativa la interacción entre los factores temperatura, luz y tratamiento pregerminativo. Los [...] mayores valores de germinación se hallaron en el régimen de temperatura 20/15ºC, con escarificación química (ácido sulfúrico) durante 15 minutos, tanto con luz (100% de germinación) como sin luz (98% de germinación). La interacción entre temperatura y luz también fue significativa. En este último caso, la mayor germinación se alcanzó en el régimen de temperatura 20/15ºC, tanto con luz como sin luz (72,5 y 73,8%, respectivamente). A mayores temperaturas sin luz, la germinación fue mayor (41,2% a 25/20ºC, y 33,4% a 30/25ºC), que con luz (17,4% a 25/20ºC y 12,8% a 30/25ºC); lo cual indica que los micrositios con sombra pudieran beneficiar la germinación de la semilla de la especie a temperaturas altas. Abstract in english The germinative characteristics of Lupinus montanus seeds were studied, taking into account the following factors: day/night temperature regime, light, and pregerminative treatment. The interaction between temperature, light and pregerminative treatment was significant for germination. The best germ [...] inations were found in the 20/15ºC temperature regime, with chemical scarification (sulfuric acid) during 15min, both under light (100% germination) and in darkness (98%). The interaction between temperature and light was also significant, with the best germination results in the 20/15ºC temperature regime, both with and without light (72.5 and 73.8%, respectively). At higher temperatures, the germination in absence of light was greater (41.2 and 33.4% at 25/20ºC and 30/25ºC, respectively) than under light (17.4 and 12.8% at 25/20ºC and 30/25ºC, respectively). This indicates that shady microsites can benefit germination of the species at higher temperatures.

Jeanette, Acosta-Percástegui; Dante Arturo, Rodríguez-Trejo.

330

FACTORS AFFECTING GERMINATION AND PREGERMINATIVE TREATMENTS OF Lupinus montanus SEEDS  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Venezuela | Language: English Abstract in portuguese Estudou-se a germinação da semente de Lupinus montanus, tomando em conta os seguintes fatores: regime de temperaturas dia/noite, luz e tratamento pré-germinativo. Para a germinação, resultou significativa a interação entre os fatores temperatura, luz e tratamento pré-germinativo. Os maiores valores [...] de germinação se acharam no regime de temperatura 20/15ºC, com escarificação química (ácido sulfúrico) durante 15 minutos, tanto com luz (100% de germinação) como sem luz (98% de germinação). A interação entre temperatura e luz também foi significativa. Neste último caso, a maior germinação se alcançou no regime de temperatura 20/15ºC, tanto com luz como sem luz (72,5% e 73,8%, respectivamente). A maiores temperaturas sem luz, a germinação foi maior (41,2% a 25/20ºC, e 33,4% a 30/25ºC), que com luz (17,4% a 25/20ºC e 12,8% a 30/25ºC); o qual indica que os microsítios com sombra podem beneficiar a germinação da semente da espécie a temperaturas altas. Abstract in spanish Se estudió la germinación de la semilla de Lupinus montanus, tomando en cuenta los siguientes factores: régimen de temperaturas día/noche, luz y tratamiento pregerminativo. Para la germinación, resultó significativa la interacción entre los factores temperatura, luz y tratamiento pregerminativo. Los [...] mayores valores de germinación se hallaron en el régimen de temperatura 20/15ºC, con escarificación química (ácido sulfúrico) durante 15 minutos, tanto con luz (100% de germinación) como sin luz (98% de germinación). La interacción entre temperatura y luz también fue significativa. En este último caso, la mayor germinación se alcanzó en el régimen de temperatura 20/15ºC, tanto con luz como sin luz (72,5 y 73,8%, respectivamente). A mayores temperaturas sin luz, la germinación fue mayor (41,2% a 25/20ºC, y 33,4% a 30/25ºC), que con luz (17,4% a 25/20ºC y 12,8% a 30/25ºC); lo cual indica que los micrositios con sombra pudieran beneficiar la germinación de la semilla de la especie a temperaturas altas. Abstract in english The germinative characteristics of Lupinus montanus seeds were studied, taking into account the following factors: day/night temperature regime, light, and pregerminative treatment. The interaction between temperature, light and pregerminative treatment was significant for germination. The best germ [...] inations were found in the 20/15ºC temperature regime, with chemical scarification (sulfuric acid) during 15min, both under light (100% germination) and in darkness (98%). The interaction between temperature and light was also significant, with the best germination results in the 20/15ºC temperature regime, both with and without light (72.5 and 73.8%, respectively). At higher temperatures, the germination in absence of light was greater (41.2 and 33.4% at 25/20ºC and 30/25ºC, respectively) than under light (17.4 and 12.8% at 25/20ºC and 30/25ºC, respectively). This indicates that shady microsites can benefit germination of the species at higher temperatures.

Jeanette, Acosta-Percástegui; Dante Arturo, Rodríguez-Trejo.

2005-09-01

331

Factors Affecting Stream Nutrient Loads: A Synthesis of Regional SPARROW Model Results for the Continental United States.  

Science.gov (United States)

We compared the results of 12 recently calibrated regional SPARROW (SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes) models covering most of the continental United States to evaluate the consistency and regional differences in factors affecting stream nutrient loads. The models - 6 for total nitrogen and 6 for total phosphorus - all provide similar levels of prediction accuracy, but those for major river basins in the eastern half of the country were somewhat more accurate. The models simulate long-term mean annual stream nutrient loads as a function of a wide range of known sources and climatic (precipitation, temperature), landscape (e.g., soils, geology), and aquatic factors affecting nutrient fate and transport. The results confirm the dominant effects of urban and agricultural sources on stream nutrient loads nationally and regionally, but reveal considerable spatial variability in the specific types of sources that control water quality. These include regional differences in the relative importance of different types of urban (municipal and industrial point vs. diffuse urban runoff) and agriculture (crop cultivation vs. animal waste) sources, as well as the effects of atmospheric deposition, mining, and background (e.g., soil phosphorus) sources on stream nutrients. Overall, we found that the SPARROW model results provide a consistent set of information for identifying the major sources and environmental factors affecting nutrient fate and transport in United States watersheds at regional and subregional scales. PMID:22457574

Preston, Stephen D; Alexander, Richard B; Schwarz, Gregory E; Crawford, Charles G

2011-10-01

332

Factors affecting the regulation of pacing: current perspectives  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Alexis R Mauger Endurance Research Group, School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Kent, Chatham, UK Abstract: During prolonged dynamic and rhythmic exercise, muscular pain and discomfort arises as a result of an increased concentration of deleterious metabolites. Sensed by peripheral nociceptors and transmitted via afferent feedback to the brain, this provides important information regarding the physiological state of the muscle. These sensations ultimately contribute to what is termed "exercise-induced pain". Despite being well recognized by athletes and coaches, and suggested to be integral to exercise performance, this construct has largely escaped attention in experimental work. This perspective article highlights the current understanding of pacing in endurance performance, and the causes of exercise-induced pain. A new perspective is described, which proposes how exercise-induced pain may be a contributing factor in helping individuals to regulate their work rate during exercise and thus provides an important construct in pacing. Keywords: pain, exercise-induced pain, discomfort, exercise performance, self-paced

Mauger AR

2014-09-01

333

The examination of factors affecting e-learning effectiveness  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Technology information has increased dramatically in the last years and has contributed to the growth in technology delivered instruction as an important learning and education method. In this perspective, many academic researches considered the importance of e-learning effectiveness.Although the existing models of e-learning effectiveness has improved our understanding of how online training can support and enhance learning, most of published models do not take into account the importance of the relationship between social presence and interaction. Thus, this study develops preceding investigation by extending a model of e-learning effectiveness which adds social presence to other studied variables including computer self efficacy, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, interaction between trainer and trainees, and e-learning effectiveness. Moreover, the model includes the possible relationships between independent factors. In this case, the present research seek to identify the influence of computer self efficacy, ease of use, perceived usefulness, interaction, and social presence on e- learning effectiveness. Furthermore, this study considers the possible influences between individual characteristics, perceptual characteristics and environmental characteristics.Using data from 410 employees, the conceptual model was validated through a Tunisian context. Results indicate the importance of interaction, perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, and social presence on e-learning achievement. E-learning achievement, in turn, influences e-learning transfer.

Rabeb Mbarek

2013-04-01

334

Factors affecting urinary calculi treatment by extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Extracorporeal Shock Wave Lithotripsy (ESWL is still the treatment of choice for most renal and upper ureteric stones; however the outcome depends on multiple factors. The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of stone density, as measured by Hounsfield Units (H.U by non-contrast Computerized Tomography (CT, stone size and stone location on ESWL treatment outcome of urinary calculi in Jordanian patients. 65 patients underwent clinical, biochemical and radiological assessments followed by ESWL treatment. Statistical analyses including chi-square, analysis of variance (ANOVA, correlation, regression were performed for statistical significance between ESWL treatment, stone fragmentation and stone density, size and location in the renal pelvis. ESWL success rate was high (94% for low density stones (< 500 Hounsfield units. In general CT densities of 750 Hounsfield units or less were almost always successfully treated by ESWL. An inverse association between ESWL treatment outcome and stone size was also documented. CT stone density and stone size combined account for nearly 73% of the variation in the number of shock waves required to attain fragmentation. Stones located in lower calyceal area had less success rates. In conclusion, stones with higher density, large size and lower location may better be managed by percutaneous nephrolithotomy.

Tarawneh Emad

2010-01-01

335

Factors Affecting the Determination of Secondary Sex Ratio  

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Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Secondary sex ratio (SSR, i.e. the gender ratio of fetuses reaching viability has faced a declining trend in most societies in recent years. The aim of this study was to determine the contributing factors such as season of conception, type of pregnancy, housing conditions, monthly income and financial stress on SSR in Iran. .Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 202 couples with children under one year old were studied. They were selected using two stage random sampling method from two healthcare centers in Tehran. Financial stress of parents was assessed based on a valid questionnaire. Data regarding other variables were gathered through a checklist. Uni-and multi-variate logistic regression tests were used to analyze the data (p<0.05.Results: Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses showed a significant relationship between financial stress test score {OR=1.056, p=0.024} and rental housing (OR=1.89, p=0.029 and female newborns. Conclusion: Financial stress not only has physical and moral consequences, but also might play a major role in determining the sex ratio of future generations. Therefore, it is highly important that more effective guidelines be considered for improving welfare conditions and solving the housing problem.

Alinaghi M

2011-03-01

336

Factors affecting nuclear research reactor utilization across countries  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

In view of the worldwide declining trend of research reactor utilization and the fact that many reactors in developing countries are under-utilised, a question naturally arises as to whether the investment in a research reactor is justifiable. Statistical analyses were applied to reveal relationships between the status of reactor utilization and socio-economic conditions among countries, that may provide a guidance for reactor planning and cost benefit assessment. The reactor power has significant regression relationships with size indicators such as GNP, electricity consumption and R and D expenditure. Concerning the effectiveness of investment in research reactors, the number of reactor operation days per year only weakly correlates with electricity consumption and R and D expenditure, implying that there are controlling factors specific of each group of countries. In the case of less developed countries, the low customer demands on reactor operation may be associated with the failure in achieving quality assurance for the reactor products and services, inadequate investment in the infrastructure for reactor exploitation, the shortage of R and D funding and well trained manpower and the lack of measures to get the scientific community involved in the application of nuclear techniques. (author)

337

Factors affecting in-reactor creep of zirconium alloy tubes  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

To summarise major factors, that influence in-reactor creep of zirconium alloy pressure tubes, the available information on the problem has been reviewed. The information on in-reactor creep and growth of zirconium alloys has been analyzed in two ways. Empirical relations of the type epsilon=Axf1(sigma)xf2(phi)xf3(T) have been established, where epsilon - steady state deformation rate, A - material constant determined by metallurgical structure and mode of stressing, f1(sigma), f2(phi) and f3(T) are functions of stress, neutron flux and temperature, respectively. The long term deformation is also analyzed as the sum of three independent components: thermal creep, irradiation creep and irradiation growth. Thermal creep, which at 560 K is significant only during primary creep in reactor, becomes the dominant term above about 630 K. At a given neutron flux, the magnitude and sign of irradiation creep and growth depend on crystallographic texture and dislocation density (cold-work) which in turn depend on method and fabrication. Increasing the neutron flux and amount of cold-work increases both creep and growth

338

Factors affecting surgical results of Wassel type IV thumb duplications.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this study is to review the outcomes of Wassel type IV thumb duplications with a minimum of one year follow-up, and to identify any factors that may compromise the quality of results. Forty one patients (42 thumbs) returned for assessment of thumb alignment, metacarpophalangeal joint and interphalangeal joint stability and motion; carpometacarpal joint motion; pinch and grip strengths; and thumb size. The subjective assessment considered thumb shape and contour, scarring, nail deformity and examiner and patient/parent satisfaction. The mean age at surgery was 16 months and the mean follow-up time was 79 months. Metacarpophalangeal joint and interphalangeal joint mal-alignment was present in 56% and 38% of cases, respectively. Interphalangeal ulnar collateral ligament laxity was significant. Metacarpophalangeal joint and interphalangeal joint motion was significantly decreased. Pinch and grip strength measurements were normal. A novel and comprehensive assessment scale is introduced, which revealed results of one (2.5%) excellent, 23 (59%) good, 14 (36%) fair and one (2.5%) poor. We consider that greater attention should be directed to the avoidance of mal-alignment and instability to improve these results. PMID:24309550

Patel, A U C; Tonkin, M A; Smith, B J; Alshehri, A H; Lawson, R D

2014-11-01

339

Factors Affecting Quality of Life after Menopause in Women,  

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Full Text Available Introduction: Most women experience significant changes in quality of life(QOL during and after menopausal and few researchers have quantified these changes. The aim of the present research was to assess quality of life(QOL and determine factors related to its impairment among postmenopausal Iranian women. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted by cluster sampling method among 300 post-menopausal women in Yazd, Islamic Republic of Iran in 2008. Data was collected using the menopause quality of life questionnaire(MENQOL by interview. Content validity and Cronbach's alpha were used respectively to ensure the validity and reliability of the questionnaires. Inferential and descriptive statistics via SPSS.15 software were used for data analysis. Results: The mean scores for quality of life in various dimensions were as follows: vasomotor dimension 12.34±4.71, psychological dimension 18.15±8.89, physical dimension 41.09±16.37 and in sexual dimension it was 10.97±6.52. There were significant relationships between psychological , physical and sexual dimensions and education level, economic level ,health level (p < 0.05 regardless of Spearman’s correlation, There were significant relationships between ,physical and sexual dimensions and number of pregnancies and age(p < 0.05. Conclusion: Menopause causes a decrease in quality of life that is dependent on work and other sociodemographic variables. It is therefore necessary to develop effective interventional programs to improve quality of life after menopause.

H Fallahzade

2011-02-01

340

Organisational factors affecting the quality of hospital clinical coding.  

Science.gov (United States)

The influence of organisational factors on the quality of hospital coding using the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Health Related Problems, 10th Revision, Australian Modification (ICD-10-AM) was investigated using a mixed quantitative-qualitative approach. The organisational variables studied were: hospital specialty; geographical locality; structural characteristics of the coding unit; education, training and resource supports for Clinical Coders; and quality control mechanisms. Baseline data on the hospitals' coding quality, measured by the Performance Indicators for Coding Quality tool, were used as an independent index measure. No differences were found in error rates between rural and metropolitan hospitals, or general and specialist hospitals. Clinical Coder allocation to "general" rather than "specialist" unit coding resulted in fewer errors. Coding Managers reported that coding quality can be improved by: Coders engaging in a variety of role behaviours; improved Coder career opportunities; higher staffing levels; reduced throughput; fewer time constraints on coding outputs and associated work; and increased Coder interactions with medical staff. PMID:18245862

Santos, Suong; Murphy, Gregory; Baxter, Kathryn; Robinson, Kerin M

2008-01-01

 
 
 
 
341

Worker safety for occupations affected by the use, transportation and storage of radioactive and hazardous materials  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

A study group under the auspices of the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) Labor Committee and the High-level Radioactive Waste/Hazardous Materials Transportation Task Force examined worker protection and safety programs for occupations affected by the use, transportation and storage of radioactive and hazardous materials. Concern about the risks posed to people who live along spent nuclear fuel transportation routes has led to demands for redundant inspections of the transported spent fuel. It would also be prudent to examine the radiological risk to the inspectors themselves before state of federal regulations are promulgated which require redundant inspections. Other workers may also come close to a spent fuel cask during normal operations. The dose rate to which these inspectors and handlers are exposed is higher than the dose rate to which any other group is exposed during incident-free truck transportation and higher than the dose rate to the drivers when they are in the truck cab. This report consists of miscellaneous papers covering topics related to determining radiation doses to workers involved in the transport of radioactive materials

342

Factors that affect print quality in thermal dye transfer imaging  

Science.gov (United States)

Thermal dye transfer (TDT) imaging has established itself as the state- of-the-art process for high quality, continuous tone, nonimpact printing. Imaging quality from this process rivals conventional silver halide photography and exceeds other nonimpact printing technologies. Because this output appears to be virtually indistinguishable from photographic prints, there has been an expectation that all the quality attributes of silver halide photography are embodied in a TDT print. However, there are many significant differences that affect output quality between these two technologies. These differences are primarily in color gamut, print artifacts, Dmin, grain/sharpness, and image stability. The range of colors reproducible by a color, hard copy device, known as its color gamut, is dictated primarily by the image- forming dyes used by the device. The size and shape of a device's gamut is controlled by the spectral density distributions of these image forming dyes, the Dmin of the receiver base, the Dmax of each dye, the amount of light scatter, and the spectral distribution of the viewing illuminant. The spectral density distributions of dyes also have an impact on illuminant sensitivity, which is a predictor of how much the color balance of a print will change with a change in illuminant. By determining and then using characteristic curves for various image- forming dyes, we have been able to calculate and compare the color gamuts and illuminant sensitivity of TDT imaging with other technologies (color monitor and silver halide photography, for example). The differences we have found can have a significant impact on output quality, depending upon the application. Compared to conventional photography, thermal dye transfer prints have traditionally had inferior light stability and resistance to damage from fingerprints. In addition, thermal dye transfer prints have been aggressively attacked by plasticized polyvinyl chloride sheets and folders commonly found in office and home environments. We will describe a major advance in thermal dye transfer imaging technology that greatly improves the image stability position of thermal dye transfer images. This advance is derived from the addition of a thin protective layer onto the final print. To add to customer convenience, the protective layer is integrated into the dye donor ribbon as a 4th patch. The protective layer is laminated to the final print using the thermal print head. TDT print artifacts may also influence the quality of TDT output. These defects can include print head streaks, dust and dirt spots, printer banding, and donor ribbon wrinkling. The origin of these defects will be described.

Harrison, Daniel J. P.; McInerney, Elizabeth

1995-04-01

343

A study of signalling events regulating the retrograde axonal transport of neurotrophic factors in vivo  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Full text: Soluble neurotrophic factors such as NGF promote the survival of sympathetic and sensory neuronal populations by binding to receptors present on the nerve terminal and transported to the cell body. This study aimed to establish the molecular mechanisms regulating this process by identifying potential signalling molecules that may be involved using specific pharmacological inhibitors. Adult Balb/c or CBA mice were anaesthetized using 88 ?g/g ketamine and 16 ?g/g rompun (i.p.) and 1 ?l containing 4 ?Ci of 125I-labelled NT-3 (37 ng) or pNGF (22 ng) was co-injected with inhibitors into the anterior eye chamber. After 20 hours the accumulated radioactivity was measured in the superior cervical and trigeminal ganglia. The PI3-kinase inhibitor Wortmannin inhibited 125I-NT-3 transport in the range of 0.1-1 nmol/eye as previously shown with 125I-?OeGF. The cPLA2 inhibitor AACOCF3 did not significantly affect the retrograde transport of either 125I-NT-3 or 125I-?NGF suggesting that Wortmannin is not influencing the transport of these neurotrophins by inhibiting cPLA2 activity. The dynein ATPase inhibitor erythro-9-[3-(2-hydroxynonyl)]adenine (1 mM) also selectively reduced 125I-?NGF transport. Non-specific tyrosine kinase inhibitors did not have a significant effect. These results further suggest that PI3-kinase might regulate the intracellular transport of neurotrophic faclular transport of neurotrophic factors, and that retrograde axonal transport of these proteins relies on the dynein motor protein in vivo. Copyright (1998) Australian Neuroscience Society

344

Factors affecting unmet need for family planning in Eastern Sudan  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background In the developing countries millions of women in the reproductive age who don’t use contraceptives prefer to postpone or limit their birth. This indicates their failure to take necessary decision to prevent and avoid unwanted pregnancy. Methods A community-based cross sectional household survey was conducted to investigate unmet need for family planning and associated factors and total demand for family planning in Kassala, Eastern Sudan between 1st May and 31st July 2012. Results A total of 812 married women were enrolled in this study. Their mean age and parity was 31.8 (7.3 and 3.4 (1.8 respectively. Ever use of contraception was 25.4% (206/812 and 26.2% (213/812 were currently using contraception. Unmet need for spacing was 15.1% while unmet need for limiting was 0.7%. The pregnant and amenorrheic women whose the pregnancy or birth was unwanted and mistimed were 105 (13% and 130 (16% respectively. Using Westoff model the total unmet need was estimated as 44.8%. The total demand for family planning was 71%. In logistic regression model, while age, age at marriage, parity, residence and experience of child death were not associated with total unmet need for family planning, women education P=0.00, husband education P = 0.00 and woman’s occupation; housewife (OR=4.3; CI=2.5-7.2; P=0.00 were associated with the total unmet need. Conclusions Unmet need for family planning in Eastern Sudan was significantly higher among women with less than secondary education. Also; it is influenced by couple’s educational status and woman’s occupation. The results of this study necessitate the need for the programme managers to take into account the concept of reproductive health education.

Ali Abdel Aziem A

2013-02-01

345

Factors affecting organic acid production by sourdough (San Francisco) bacteria.  

Science.gov (United States)

Previous workers from this laboratory observed considerable variation in the proportions of acetic and lactic acids produced in pure broth culture as compared to consistently high proportions of acetic acid produced in the sourdough and flour suspension systems. In the latter the proportion of acetic acid was always in the range of 20 to 35% of the total, whereas in pure broth culture frequently less than 5% acetic acid was produced. In the natural environment, the sourdough bacteria, tentatively identified as lactobacilli, coexist with a yeast, Saccharomyces exiguus, and this study was undertaken to determine whether this yeast or flour ingredients including glucose or other factors were involved in this variable production of acetic acid. The proportion of acetic acid produced in broth culture on maltose, the preferred carbohydrate source, was found to depend almost entirely on the degree of aeration. Essentially anaerobic conditions, as obtained by thorough evacuation and flushing with CO(2) or N(2), resulted in very low (5% or less) proportions of acetic acid. Aerobic conditions, achieved by continuous shaking in cotton-plugged flasks, yielded high levels (23 to 39% of the total) of acetic acid. Similar effects of aeration were observed with glucose as the substrate, although growth was considerably slower, or in nonsterile flour suspension systems. It is theorized that, under aerobic conditions, the reduced pyridine nucleotides generated in the dissimilation of carbohydrate are oxidized directly by molecular oxygen, thereby becoming unavailable for the reduction of the acetyl phosphate intermediate to ethyl alcohol, the usual product of anaerobic dissimilation of glucose by heterofermentative lactic acid bacteria. Comparative studies with known strains of homo- and heterofermentative lactobacilli showed similar effects of aeration only on the heterofermentative strains, lending additional support to the tentative grouping by previous workers from this laboratory of the sourdough bacteria with the heterofermentative lactobacilli. PMID:5042265

Ng, H

1972-06-01

346

Factors affecting insulin adherence to type I glass bottles  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Some physicochemical factors that could account for insulin adherence to type I glass bottles from admixtures of insulin with 5% dextrose (D5W) and 0.9% sodium chloride (NS) injections were studied. Samples of three volumes of NS or D5W containing insulin 125I were mixed in three sizes of bottles to test the effect of surface area and volume. Appropriate volumes of insulin were combined with insulin 125I and D5W or NS to yield solutions containing nine concentrations of insulin to test the effect of insulin concentration. Appropriate volumes of KCl injection to yield six concentrations were combined with insulin 125I and NS or D5W to test the effect of KCl concentration. All samples were assayed by gamma scintillation. In general, there was a direct relationship between the percentage of insulin adhering and the container surface area. In D5W admixtures, as the fill volume at constant insulin 125I concentration was doubled and quadrupled, the adherence of insulin decreased in all three bottle sizes (200, 250, and 500 ml). In NS admixtures, however, this effect was seen only with the 250-ml bottle. Increasing insulin concentrations over the range of 50-300 units/liter in D5W and 0-50 units/liter in NS resulted in decreased adherence. The addition of 1-60 meq/liter of KCl resulted in a significant decrease of insulin adhering from D5W and an insignificant decrease from NS admixtures. The percentage of insulin adhering to type he percentage of insulin adhering to type I glass surfaces may be reduced to 25% or less by preparing i.v. admixtures in full bottles of D5W or NS at insulin concentrations of 25 to 300 units/liter. The addition of KCl, when therapeutically appropriate, will further decrease the extent of insulin adherence

347

Probabilities of adverse weather affecting transport in Europe: climatology and scenarios up to the 2050s  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper provides the first comprehensive climatology of the adverse and extreme weather events affecting the European transport system by estimating the frequency (or probability) of phenomena for the present climate (1971-2000) and an overview of the projected changes in some of these extremes in the future climate until the 2050s. The research was carried out within the framework of the EWENT Project that addresses the European Union (EU) policies and strategies related to climate change, with a particular focus on extreme weather impacts on the EU transportation system. This project is funded by the Seventh Framework Programme (Transports, call ID FPT7-TPT-2008-RTD-1). The analyzed phenomena are wind, snow, blizzards, heavy precipitation, cold spells and heat waves. In addition, reduced visibility conditions determined by fog and dust events, small-scale phenomena affecting the transport system, such as thunderstorms, lightning, large hail and tornadoes and events damaging infrastructure of the transport system, have been considered. Frequency and probability analysis of past and present ex¬tremes were performed using observational and atmospheric reanalysis data. Future changes in the probability of severe events were assessed based on six regional climate model simulations produced in the FP6 ENSEMBLES project (http://www.ensembles-eu.org/). To facilitate the assessment of impacts and consequences of extreme phenomena on a continental level, the WP2 Deliverable introduces a regionalization of the European extreme phenomena, defining the climate zones with similarities in extreme phenomena. The projected changes as well as large natural variability in weather extremes on the transportation network will have impacts of both signs. The decline of extreme cold and snowfall over most of the continent implies a positive impact on road, rail, inland water and air transportation, e.g., by reducing snow removal. However, even with a general decreasing trend in winter extremes, due to inter-annual variability winter extremes are still expected to have an impact on transportation, and would still need to be considered in maintenance and investment in preparedness for many European countries. During summer, especially in those countries which already experience high tempera¬tures, further warming implies needs for improvements in the heat tolerance of the transport system. Similarly, increases in heavy precipitation (including heavy snowfall in the North) events and/or wind extremes need to be taken into account in the planning of future transport systems.

Vajda, A.; Tuomenvirta, H.; Jokinen, P.; Luomaranta, A.; Makkonen, L.; Tikanmäki, M.; Groenemeijer, P.; Saarikivi, P.; Michaelides, S.; Papadakis, M.; Tymvios, F.; Athanasatos, S.

2012-04-01

348

Environmental processes affecting plant root uptake of radioactive trace elements and variability of transfer factor data: a review  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Soil-to-plant transfer factors are commonly used to estimate the food chain transfer of radionuclides. Their definition assumes that the concentration of a radionuclide in a plant relates linearly solely to its average concentration in the rooting zone of the soil. However, the large range of transfer factors reported in the literature shows that the concentration of a radionuclide in a soil is not the only factor influencing its uptake by a plant. With emphasis on radiocesium and -strontium, this paper reviews the effects of competition with major ions present in the soil-plant system, the effects of rhizosphere processes and soil micro-organisms on bioavailability, the factors influencing transport to and uptake by roots and the processes affecting long-term uptake rates. Attention is given to summarizing the results of recent novel electrophysiological and genetic techniques which provide a physiologically based understanding of the processes involved in the uptake and translocation of radiocesium and -strontium by plants

349

Alpha radiolysis and other factors affecting hydrolysis of tributyl phosphate  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The primary purpose of this study was to identify the principal degradation products produced by Pu(IV) loading in 30% tributyl phosphate/dodecane (TBP-DD) solutions and to determine the formation rates of these species as a function of temperature. Experiments were also conducted to evaluate HNO3 hydrolysis of TBP as a function of temperature and to compare the effects resulting from plutonium solvent loading with effects due to loading with uranium and zirconium. The results indicate that four factors are of particular significance: (1) dibutyl phosphate (DBP) is the principal plutonium-complexing species formed at temperatures of 500C or lower, while significant concentrations of monobutyl phosphate (MBP) are also formed at higher temperatures; (2) the TBP degradation rate due to alpha radiolysis or chemical hydrolysis is strongly dependent on temperature; (3) plutonium promotes TBP hydrolysis by two mechanisms, alpha radiolysis and metal-ion-induced hydrolysis, and, of these, metal-ion-induced hydrolysis can be the major effect; and (4) small amounts of an unidentified plutonium-complexing species are formed in experiments using plutonium of high specific activity [about 4 x 108 counts per minute per milligram (c/min dot mg)]. This species cannot be removed from 30% TBP-DD by Na2CO3 washing or other solvent cleanup procedures. The TBP degradation rates (determined as grams of plutonium complexed by degradation products) increased from 0.125 mg Pu/L dot h at 250C to 47.9 mg Pu/L dot h at 800C in 30% TBP-DD solutions that contained only 0.68 M HNO3. In solutions that additionally contained approx.20 g/L of plutonium (specific activity = 9 x 107 c/min dot mg) TBP degradation rates increased from 2.46 mg Pu/L dot h at 250C to 127.1 mg Pu/L dot h at 800C. 10 refs., 8 figs., 4 tabs

350

Factors affecting the catalytic oligomerization of methane via microwave heating  

Science.gov (United States)

Catalytic microwave heating has been used as a method for the oligomerization of methane to higher hydrocarbons. Many catalysts were tested in this reaction. Nickel powder, raney nickel, iron powder and activated carbon were the most active and efficient catalysts for the production of higher hydrocarbons. When helium was used as a diluent gas and the applied power was optimized, the selectivities were controlled to the most desired products. In general, the most abundant products for all the experiments were C2s. Iron powder was active only at high power (1130 W). At these conditions acetylene was avoided and ethylene and ethane were produced in the same proportion. Activated carbon catalysts with helium as diluent led to a selectivity towards benzene up to 33%. Some manganese oxides such as OMS-1, OMS-2 and MnO2 (dielectric constant, epsilon ? 104) were not active in these reactions. These data suggest that the dielectric constant is not the most important factor in the oligomerization of methane via microwave heating. Conversion and activities of these materials are not proportionally related to the surface area of the catalysts. Higher catalytic activity was observed for Raney nickel than for regular nickel powder. The maximum conversion obtained was 24% at 400 W and 10 min of irradiation time. For regular nickel powder that conversion can be achieved only after 700 W of power and more than 20 min of reaction. BET surface area, Scanning Electron Microscopy, X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Temperature-Programmed Desorption and Reduction analysis were performed to characterize the catalyst before and after reaction. Deactivation of Raney nickel by fouling and sintering was observed after 500 W and/or 15 min of reaction. The effect of microwave radiation frequency on activity and product distribution for methane oligomerization has been studied. Nickel, iron, and activated carbon catalysts were used in these studies. Experiments were done with pure methane and using He as diluent. Changes in product distribution due to changes in frequency have been observed, and might be related to different transverse magnetic modes at different frequencies. Different transient heating may occur at different values of frequency.

Conde, Luis Daniel

351

Factors affecting the toxicity of methylmercury injected into eggs.  

Science.gov (United States)

We developed a standardized protocol for comparing the sensitivities of the embryos of different bird species to methylmercury when methylmercury was injected into their eggs. During the course of developing this protocol, we investigated the effects of various factors on the toxicity of the injected methylmercury. Most of our experiments were done with chicken (Gallus domesticus), mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), and ring-necked pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) eggs, all of which were purchased in large numbers from game farms. A smaller amount of work was done with double-crested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus) eggs collected from the wild. Several solvents were tested, and corn oil at a rate of 1 microl/g egg contents was selected for the final standardized protocol because it had minimal toxicity to embryos and because methylmercury dissolved in corn oil yielded a dose-response curve in a range of egg concentrations that was similar to the range that causes reproductive impairment when the mother deposits methylmercury into her own eggs. The embryonic stage at which eggs were injected with corn oil altered mercury toxicity; at early stages, the corn oil itself was toxic. Therefore, in the final protocol we standardized the time of injection to occur when each species reached the morphologic equivalent of a 3-day-old chicken embryo. Although solvents can be injected directly into the albumen of an egg, high embryo mortality can occur in the solvent controls because of the formation of air bubbles in the albumen. Our final protocol used corn oil injections into the air cell, which are easier and safer than albumen injections. Most of the methylmercury, when dissolved in corn oil, injected into the air cell passes through the inner shell membrane and into the egg albumen. Most commercial incubators incubate eggs in trays with the air cell end of the egg pointing upward, but we discovered that mercury-induced mortality was too great when eggs were held in this orientation. In addition, some species of bird eggs require incubation on their sides with the eggs being rolled 180 degrees for them to develop normally. Therefore, we adopted a procedure of incubating the eggs of all species on their sides and rolling them 180 degrees every hour. Little has been published about the conditions of temperature, humidity, and the movements to which eggs of wild birds need to be subjected for them to hatch optimally under artificial incubation. Not unexpectedly, hatching success in an artificial incubator is generally less than what natural incubation by the parents can achieve. However, the survival of control embryos of most wild bird species was good (generally > or = 80%) up to within 1 or 2 days of hatching when we incubated the eggs at 37.5 degrees C (or 37.6 degrees C for gallinaceous species) at a relative humidity that resulted in an approximate 15% to 16% loss in egg weight by the end of incubation and by incubating the eggs on their sides and rolling them 180 degrees /h. To improve statistical comparisons, we used survival through 90% of incubation as our measurement to compare survival of controls with survival of eggs injected with graded concentrations of mercury. PMID:16307214

Heinz, G H; Hoffman, D J; Kondrad, S L; Erwin, C A

2006-02-01

352

Importance Degree Evaluation of the Affecting Factors on Exhibition Security Accidents  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The occurrence of exhibition security accidents is the result of the mutual coupling factors of "man-machine-environment-management". This study is going to elaborate 11 influencing factors of exhibition security accidents from four aspects, i.e., man, mechanical equipment, environment and management. With the help of grey relational analysis, this study evaluates the importance degree of the affecting factors in exhibitions. The result shows that affecting factors of facilities and equipments failure is of the greatest importance degree and site maintenance personnel, site design, building material quality are the secondary important factors; another important factors are safety management body, social environment, activity organization management, safety management system, natural environment and event participant behavior which are considered as the third important ones. Evaluation of the importance degree of affecting factors on exhibition security incidents will provide a theoretical basis for exhibition security control.

Lin Wei-Ling

2013-01-01

353

Recognition of Factors Affecting the Successful Implementation of Electronic-Banking in Iran  

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Full Text Available This research examines the factors that can speed up the successful implementation of electronic banking innovations in the Iran’s country. Through the literature review, the factors affecting the successful implementation of e-banking in Iran have been detected and classified into a tri-radiate model of co-structural, content and context factors. After collecting the questionnaires which were distributed randomly among experts and IT managers of 90 banks, the data analysis revealed that there is a meaningful and significant relationship between these three factors and the successful implementation of e-banking in Iran. Using Friedman analysis of variance test, the co-structural factors got first rank, context factors as second and the content factors the third rank, respectively. Mean while, the influencing factors on implementing e-banking were classified and ranked. Finally, some recommendations have been proposed to develop and reinforce the affecting factors bound up with implementing e-banking.

M.A. Sarlak

2009-01-01

354

Elucidating Sources and Factors Affecting Delivery of Nitrogen to Surface Waters of New York State  

Science.gov (United States)

Rapid changes in power generation, transportation, and agriculture have appreciably altered nitrogen (N) cycling at regional scales, increasing N inputs to landscapes and surface waters. Numerous studies have linked this surplus N to a host of concerns, including eutrophication and violations in drinking water standards. Inputs of N nation-wide have increased during recent decades, primarily from the production and use of fertilizers, the planting of N-fixing crops, and the combustion of fossil fuels. The role of atmospheric N sources is of particular concern in New York, as rates of atmospheric N deposition in the northeast are among the highest in the nation. Our work aims to quantify nitrogen sources and fate in watersheds throughout the state. Further, we intend to elucidate factors controlling the retention and release of N to surface waters. We quantify nitrogen inputs through both measurement data (e.g., from wet and dry atmospheric deposition, precipitation, streamflow, water quality, and isotopic tracers) and from synoptic spatial databases (e.g., of terrain, land use, and fertilizer inputs). We present preliminary results from large catchments in contrasting spatial settings across the state (different land use configurations and atmospheric deposition gradients), illustrating the contribution of nitrogen sources to each region and factors affecting delivery to surface waters. Further, we present 30 years of temporal data from a large watershed (Fall Creek) in the Finger Lakes region of the state to demonstrate how hydrological and biogeochemical factors, over seasons and under varying hydrological regimes, combine to control N dynamics in surface waters. Our collective work provides information that is necessary to develop sound strategies for understanding and managing nutrients at regional scales.

Golden, H. E.; Boyer, E. W.; Burns, D. A.; Elliott, E.; Kendall, C.; Butler, T.

2005-12-01

355

Research on Application of Matlab Uniform Design in Psychological Experiment of Factors Affecting Reading Comprehension  

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Full Text Available Experimental psychology is an essential primary discipline for psychological teaching and research, with the continuous development of science and technology, measurement techniques and computer data simulating techniques have a great power to implement the experimental design and the design method of experiment is also very important. In this study, the uniform design experiment is adopted to study the factors affecting reading comprehension in psychology, this study first gives four factors affecting reading comprehension, the level of the four factors is technically divided into five grades, the uniform design of psychological experiments is then analyzed, finally carry out regression analysis on the factors affecting reading comprehension by using the uniform design’s experimental data of five testers, thus the effect of factors affecting reading comprehension is obtained, which provides a theoretical basis for the experimental design and data analysis of psychology, expecting a more distant development of experimental psychology.

Wenjun Cong

2013-01-01

356

Personal Factors that Affect the Satisfaction of Female Patients Undergoing Esthetic Suture after Typical Thyroidectomy  

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Full Text Available Background In esthetic surgery, understanding the factors that influence patient satisfaction is important for successful practice. We hypothesize that the factors that influence patient satisfaction include not only aesthetic and functional outcomes, but also personal factors such as the level of familiarity with factors affecting wound healing and expectations regarding aesthetic outcome.Methods One hundred patients who underwent esthetic closure after thyroidectomy were included in this study. In order to evaluate the individual characteristics of the patients, a preoperative survey was administered to the patients. We estimated the patient satisfaction six months postoperatively and assessed the aesthetic and functional outcomes using the Patient and Observer Scar Assessment Scale.Results According to the results of correlation analysis, level of familiarity with wound healing factors had a positive correlation with satisfaction. High expectations, pain, itching, and high observer scale score had negative correlations with satisfaction. The factors that were correlated with satisfaction were included in the multiple regression analysis. Level of familiarity with wound healing factors was found to have a positive relationship with satisfaction, while itching and observer scale were found to have a negative relationship with satisfaction. After excluding 10 patients who had hypertrophic scars, only level of familiarity with wound healing factors and expectations affected satisfaction. Conclusions The level of familiarity with factors affecting wound healing and expectations were found to independently affect satisfaction. Improving patients’ level of familiarity with wound healing factors and reducing their expectations by providing suitable preoperative education has the potential to improve patient satisfaction.

Hyo Young Kim

2013-07-01

357

Comparative Analysis of Factors Affecting the Career Orientation of Naval Officers and Federal Civilian Engineers.  

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This thesis examines factors that affect the career orientation of United States Navy Surface Warfare and Submarine designated officers and federally employed civilian engineers and scientists at the Naval Avionics Center. Biodemographic, tenure, satisfac...

M. E. Davis, T. E. Lindner

1989-01-01

358

Analysis of the Factors Affecting the Career Orientation of Federal Civilian Engineers.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was conducted to analyze the factors that affect the career orientation of federal civilian engineers at the Naval Avionics Center in Indianapolis, Indiana. One hundred and sixty-seven scientists and engineers from several engineering divisions...

B. J. Roberts, K. W. Thomas, M. E. Davis

1990-01-01

359

Disposition of naringenin via glucuronidation pathway is affected by compensating efflux transporters of hydrophilic glucuronides.  

Science.gov (United States)

The purposes of this study were to investigate how efflux transporters and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases (UGT) affect the disposition of naringenin. A rat intestinal perfusion model with bile duct cannulation was used along with rat intestinal and liver microsomes. In the intestinal perfusion model, both absorption and subsequent excretion of naringenin metabolites were rapid and site-dependent (p Naringenin was absorbed the most in colon, and its glucuronides were excreted the most in duodenum. In metabolism studies, the intrinsic clearance value of naringenin glucuronidation was the highest in jejunum microsomes, followed by liver, ileal and colonic microsomes. The rapid metabolism in microsomes did not always translate into more efficient excretion in the rat perfusion model, however, because of presence of rate-limiting efflux transporters. When used separately, MK-571 (an inhibitor of multidrug resistance-related protein 2 or Mrp2) or dipyridamole (an inhibitor of breast cancer resistance protein or Bcrp1) did not affect excretion of naringenin glucuronides, but when used together, they significantly (p naringenin glucuronides. In conclusion, efflux transporters Mrp2 and Bcrp1 are shown to compensate for each other and enable the intestinal excretion of flavonoid (i.e., naringenin) glucuronides. PMID:19736994

Xu, Haiyan; Kulkarni, Kaustubh H; Singh, Rashim; Yang, Zhen; Wang, Stephen W J; Tam, Vincent H; Hu, Ming

2009-01-01

360

[An analysis for affecting factors to dosage of Chinese medicine during Jin and Yuan dynasty].  

Science.gov (United States)

For studying medical works during the Jin and Yuan dynasty, author discussed the factors affect the dosage of medicine that doctors in that period believed to affect the dosage of medicine. Author found that doctors in that period developed the dosage theory in terms of compatibility of medicines, onset time, and onset region of a disease. PMID:19685758

Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Ruixian; Han, Yao

2009-05-01

 
 
 
 
361

Human factors engineering applications in the testing of the legal weight truck cask transportation system  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The Department of Energy's Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) will collect performance data to be used in limited human factors engineering analysis of the light weight tractor as a component of the legal weight truck cask transport system. The Management and Operating contractor will provide an analysis and comparison of limited data on driver behavior and subjective driver evaluations of the light weight tractor performance versus that of a heavier baseline tractor. A significant difference in performance data would suggest that given tractor configurations affect driver behavior differently

362

Exploring health professionals' perspectives on factors affecting Iranian hospital efficiency and suggestions for improvement.  

Science.gov (United States)

While numerous studies have been undertaken in many developed countries and in a few developing countries, there has so far been no systematic attempt to identify factors affecting efficiency in the Iranian hospitals. This study was designed to elicit the perspectives of a group of health professionals and managers so as to analyse factors affecting the efficiency of hospitals owned by the Iranian Social Security Organization (SSO), which is the second largest institutional source of hospital care in that country. This study also aimed to identify actions that would improve efficiency. Using purposive sampling (to identify key informants), interviews with seventeen health professionals and hospital managers involved in the SSO health system were conducted. The respondents identified a number of organizational factors affecting efficiency, particularly the hospital budgeting and payment system used to fund physicians, and the lack of the managerial skills needed to manage complex facilities such as hospitals. The interviewees stressed the necessity for reforms of the regulatory framework to improve efficiency. A few participants recommended the concept of a funder-provider split. The results of this exploratory study have provided meaningful insight into Iranian health professionals views of factors affecting efficiency, and of possible remedial actions. It is expected that the findings will provide guidance for health policy makers and hospital managers in the Iranian SSO to analyse factors affecting efficiency and to identify remedial actions to improve efficiency. Hospitals in other developing countries may be affected by similar factors. PMID:20603856

Afzali, Hossein Haji Ali; Moss, John R; Mahmood, Mohammad Afzal

2011-01-01

363

Multi-walled carbon nanotubes affect drug transport across cell membrane in rat astrocytes  

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The impact of carbon nanotubes on the cell membrane is an aspect of particular importance and interest in the study of carbon nanotubes' interactions with living systems. One of the many functions of the cell membrane is to execute substance transport into and out of the cell. We investigated the influence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the transport of several compounds across in the cell membrane of rat astrocytes using flow cytometry. These compounds are fluorescein diacetate, carboxyfluorescein diacetate, rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin, which are prosubstrate/substrates of multidrug transporter proteins. Results showed that MWCNTs significantly inhibited cellular uptake of doxorubicin but not the other drugs and the mode of loading made a significant difference in doxorubicin uptake. Retention of fluorescein, carboxyfluorescein and rhodamine 123 was remarkably higher in MWCNT-exposed cells after an efflux period. A kinetics study also demonstrated slower efflux of intracellular fluorescein and rhodamine 123. Data presented in this paper suggest that MWCNTs could affect drug transport across cell membranes. The implications of the findings are discussed.

Chen, Xiao; Schluesener, Hermann J.

2010-03-01

364

Multi-walled carbon nanotubes affect drug transport across cell membrane in rat astrocytes  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The impact of carbon nanotubes on the cell membrane is an aspect of particular importance and interest in the study of carbon nanotubes' interactions with living systems. One of the many functions of the cell membrane is to execute substance transport into and out of the cell. We investigated the influence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the transport of several compounds across in the cell membrane of rat astrocytes using flow cytometry. These compounds are fluorescein diacetate, carboxyfluorescein diacetate, rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin, which are prosubstrate/substrates of multidrug transporter proteins. Results showed that MWCNTs significantly inhibited cellular uptake of doxorubicin but not the other drugs and the mode of loading made a significant difference in doxorubicin uptake. Retention of fluorescein, carboxyfluorescein and rhodamine 123 was remarkably higher in MWCNT-exposed cells after an efflux period. A kinetics study also demonstrated slower efflux of intracellular fluorescein and rhodamine 123. Data presented in this paper suggest that MWCNTs could affect drug transport across cell membranes. The implications of the findings are discussed.

365

Multi-walled carbon nanotubes affect drug transport across cell membrane in rat astrocytes  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The impact of carbon nanotubes on the cell membrane is an aspect of particular importance and interest in the study of carbon nanotubes' interactions with living systems. One of the many functions of the cell membrane is to execute substance transport into and out of the cell. We investigated the influence of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on the transport of several compounds across in the cell membrane of rat astrocytes using flow cytometry. These compounds are fluorescein diacetate, carboxyfluorescein diacetate, rhodamine 123 and doxorubicin, which are prosubstrate/substrates of multidrug transporter proteins. Results showed that MWCNTs significantly inhibited cellular uptake of doxorubicin but not the other drugs and the mode of loading made a significant difference in doxorubicin uptake. Retention of fluorescein, carboxyfluorescein and rhodamine 123 was remarkably higher in MWCNT-exposed cells after an efflux period. A kinetics study also demonstrated slower efflux of intracellular fluorescein and rhodamine 123. Data presented in this paper suggest that MWCNTs could affect drug transport across cell membranes. The implications of the findings are discussed.

Chen Xiao [School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Hangkong Road 13, 430030, Wuhan (China); Schluesener, Hermann J, E-mail: mornsmile@yahoo.com [Institute of Brain Research, University of Tuebingen, Calwerstrasse 3, D-72076, Tuebingen (Germany)

2010-03-12

366

Modeling solute transport affected by heterogeneous sorption kinetics using single-rate nonequilibrium approaches.  

Science.gov (United States)

Single-rate transport models are commonly used for interpreting sorption-related mass transfer in porous media, often with the intention of approximating the kinetics of the sorption process. Among the most commonly used single-rate models are the two-site first-order (TSFO) and the two-site radial diffusion (TSRD) models. We fitted the parameters of the TSFO and TSRD models to simulated breakthrough data of hypothetical column experiments in which sorption rates were described by a ?-distributed sorption sites (GS) model. Our objective was to determine the conditions under which the assumption of a single-rate sorption parameter will be applicable to systems with heterogeneous sorption rates. We were further interested in knowing in what manner the fitted single-rate nonequilibrium model parameters depend upon the conditions under which the data were obtained. The considered hypothetical cases covered a range of experimental conditions and involved compounds with different sorption characteristics. The study revealed that the goodness of fit of the single rate models in simulating the transport of solutes exhibiting heterogeneous sorption rates is affected by solute residence time and pulse injection duration. Compared to the TSFO model, the TSRD model generally results in better prediction of solute transport affected by heterogeneous sorption kinetics. In addition, for such systems, the nonequilibrium parameters fitted using the TSFO model and their counterparts in the TSRD model are highly correlated. Moreover, an increase in the fitted mass transfer timescale of each of the single-rate models is coupled with an increase in the associated fraction of instantaneous sorption sites. A strong correlation was found between the time of the experiment and the product of the fitted characteristic time for mass transfer, pulse duration, and solute residence time. The correlation explains many of the variations in the mass transfer timescale encountered when single-rate sorption approaches were utilized to model solute transport in previous miscible displacement studies. PMID:24365395

Maraqa, Munjed A; Khashan, Saud A

2014-02-01

367

The Importance of Affective Factors in Self-Access Language Learning courses  

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Full Text Available In this short summary, we investigate the importance of learners’ emotional involvement in self-directed learning. We begin by briefly examining the literature related to affective factors in self-access language learning. We then describe two examples of institutions with self-access centres that place particular importance on affective factors in courses of self-directed study. The first example is in a university in Japan, where affective strategies are introduced through self-directed learning modules. The second example is in a university in Mexico, where educators are investigating how feelings about self-access language learning can change over time.

Sergio Valdivia

2011-06-01

368

Motivating Factors that Affect Enrolment and Student Performance in an ODL Engineering Program  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study was carried out to determine the motivating factors for enrolling in an engineering study programme in open and distance learning (ODL) and the factors that affect the students' performance. The study was conducted with two convenient samples of students following distance learning courses in engineering technology, conducted by…

Dadigamuwa, P. R.; Senanayake, Samans

2012-01-01

369

Factors Affecting the Full Use of Library and Information Management Systems by Library Personnel  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose: To provide a general list of factors that affects and determines the full use of library information management systems (LIMS) by library staff. Design/methodology/approach: The factors, which were identified mainly during participation in the implementation of automation projects in Greece, are listed and briefly analysed in categories…

Skretas, Georgios

2005-01-01

370

Factors Affecting the Supply of Recent College Graduates in New England. Policy Brief 09-1  

Science.gov (United States)

This policy brief investigates factors affecting New England's supply of recent college graduates and how those factors have changed over time, and suggests steps that states might take to expand this source of skilled labor. (Contains 3 figures.) [This brief summarizes analysis in NEPPC research report 08-1: "The Future of the Skilled Labor Force…

Sasser, Alicia

2009-01-01

371

Factors affecting satisfaction of patients after orthognathic surgery at a University Hospital.  

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Although patients' report high satisfaction levels, several factors such as the temporomandibular joint function could affect patients' psychosocial adjustment after treatment. Sufficient information for patients on the treatment course is required to improve satisfaction. Controlling these factors could improve patients' quality of life.

Hazem T. Al-Ahmad

2008-07-01

372

A Review of Foreign Researches on Influential Factors Affecting Students' Engagement in English Classroom  

Science.gov (United States)

Students' active engagement constitutes the core of the process of learning and teaching in the student-oriented classroom. The paper centers on a review of foreign researches on influential factors affecting students' engagement in English classroom. It is expected to figure out the relevant factors in order to promote students' active engagement.

Zhou, Chun-hong

2010-01-01

373

RNA Sequencing Analysis Reveals Transcriptomic Variations in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum Leaves Affected by Climate, Soil, and Tillage Factors  

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Full Text Available The growth and development of plants are sensitive to their surroundings. Although numerous studies have analyzed plant transcriptomic variation, few have quantified the effect of combinations of factors or identified factor-specific effects. In this study, we performed RNA sequencing (RNA-seq analysis on tobacco leaves derived from 10 treatment combinations of three groups of ecological factors, i.e., climate factors (CFs, soil factors (SFs, and tillage factors (TFs. We detected 4980, 2916, and 1605 differentially expressed genes (DEGs that were affected by CFs, SFs, and TFs, which included 2703, 768, and 507 specific and 703 common DEGs (simultaneously regulated by CFs, SFs, and TFs, respectively. GO and KEGG enrichment analyses showed that genes involved in abiotic stress responses and secondary metabolic pathways were overrepresented in the common and CF-specific DEGs. In addition, we noted enrichment in CF-specific DEGs related to the circadian rhythm, SF-specific DEGs involved in mineral nutrient absorption and transport, and SF- and TF-specific DEGs associated with photosynthesis. Based on these results, we propose a model that explains how plants adapt to various ecological factors at the transcriptomic level. Additionally, the identified DEGs lay the foundation for future investigations of stress resistance, circadian rhythm and photosynthesis in tobacco.

Bo Lei

2014-04-01

374

An Analysis of Factors Affecting on Online Shopping Behavior of Consumers  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The purpose of this study is to analyze factors affecting on online shopping behavior of consumers that might be one of the most important issues of e-commerce and marketing field. However, there is very limited knowledge about online consumer behavior because it is a complicated socio-technical phenomenon and involves too many factors. One of the objectives of this study is covering the shortcomings of previous studies that didn't examine main factors that influence on online shopping beh...

Mohammad Hossein Moshrefjavadi; Hossein Rezaie Dolatabadi; Mojtaba Nourbakhsh; Amir Poursaeedi; Ahmadreza Asadollahi

2012-01-01

375

Anticoagulant factor V: factors affecting the integration of novel scientific discoveries into the broader framework.  

Science.gov (United States)

Since its initial discovery in the 1940s, factor V has long been viewed as an important procoagulant protein in the coagulation cascade. However, in the later part of the 20th century, two different scientists proposed novel anticoagulant roles for factor V. Philip Majerus proposed the first anticoagulant function for factor V in 1983, yet ultimately it was not widely accepted by the broader scientific community. In contrast, Björn Dahlbäck proposed a different anticoagulant role for factor V in 1994. While this role was initially contested, it was ultimately accepted and integrated into the scientific framework. In this paper, I present a detailed historical account of these two anticoagulant discoveries and propose three key reasons why Dahlbäck's anticoagulant role for factor V was accepted whereas Majerus' proposed role was largely overlooked. Perhaps most importantly, Dahlbäck's proposed anticoagulant role was of great clinical interest because the discovery involved the study of an important subset of patients with thrombophilia. Soon after Dahlbäck's 1994 work, this patient population was shown to possess the factor V Leiden mutation. Also key in the ultimate acceptance of the second proposed anticoagulant role was the persistence of the scientist who made the discovery and the interest in and ability of others to replicate and reinforce this work. This analysis of two different yet similar discoveries sheds light on factors that play an important role in how new discoveries are incorporated into the existing scientific framework. PMID:24853975

LaBonte, Michelle L

2014-09-01

376

Human Factors Research in Anesthesia Patient Safety: Techniques to Elucidate Factors Affecting Clinical Task Performance and Decision Making  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Patient safety has become a major public concern. Human factors research in other high-risk fields has demonstrated how rigorous study of factors that affect job performance can lead to improved outcome and reduced errors after evidence-based redesign of tasks or systems. These techniques have increasingly been applied to the anesthesia work environment. This paper describes data obtained recently using task analysis and workload assessment during actual patient care and the use of cognitive ...

Weinger, Matthew B.; Slagle, Jason

2002-01-01

377

ASSESMENT OF FACTORS AFFECTING THE PRODUCTIVITY OF AMBER CHARKHA AND ERGONOMIC EVALUATION OF WORKERS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Increasing demands of the cotton fabrics, now a day has made it necessary to increase the production of cotton fabrics. To increase the production it is necessary to study the factors affecting the performance of the women workers working on Amber charkha. Most of the Amber charkha in rural areas are hand operated (i.e. they runwith the help of human energy input. There are various medical, technical and environmental factors which affect the productivity of women workers working on Amber charkha. This paper discusses some of those factors which are responsible for this. The various factors that are affecting the productivity are health factors,sitting posture, working environment, raw material properties, and man machine system. Each of these factors plays an important role in the overall performance of the women workers. Analysis is carried out by comparing the actual readings with the standard norms available in the literature. The detailed project work is carried out to study the different factors affecting the productivity of Amber charkha. The basic necessity of this study is to provide comfortable sitting arrangement and good working environment which would help the workers for achieving better productivity with work satisfaction.

G. V. THAKRE

2011-11-01

378

Environmental Factors Affecting Human Resources Management Activities of Turkish Large Firms  

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Full Text Available The basic aim of this study is to present and examine environmental factors affecting human resource activities,which based upon a research conducted on Turkish large firms. Factors that affect human resource management(HRM activities were divided into two, as internal and external elements. The data for the research weregathered with a survey, and analyzed with various statistical methods. Accordingly, it was achieved that,companies take these internal and external elements into consideration in a high or at least moderate level ingeneral. Moreover, it was found that, “priorities of top management”, “legislations/regulations”, “changes innational economy”, and “qualities of employees” are the top factors affecting HRM activities. It was also seenthat, there is no statistically significant relation between industries, the year of foundation, city of headquarters,ownership type, size and the means of internal or external environmental factors affecting HRM activities. Theresults demonstrate the fit for internal factors and fit for external factors. Also, it was found that, internal andexternal environmental factors are significantly associated. Thus, HRM activities are closely integrated withenvironmental elements, which, should always be considered.

Kurtulus Yilmaz Genc

2014-10-01

379

Ranking factors affecting the productivity of human resources using MADM techniques  

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Full Text Available For improving and efficient uses of various resources such as labor, capital, materials, energy and information, productivity is the purpose of all economic and industrial organizations and service enterprises. The human factor is the main strategic resource and the realization axis of productivity for each type of organization. Therefore the factors affecting the productivity, depends on suitable conditions for labor. This study is performed to identification and prioritization the factors affecting the productivity of human resources in Khorasan Razavi Gas Company. The objective of this research is an applied and the data collection methods and conclusions are descriptive - survey. Statistical sample size by using Cochran's formula is considered equal to 120. To perform this study with the Delphi method, we identify the factors affecting the productivity of human resources in Khorasan Razavi Gas Company and by using MADM techniques, prioritization of these factors has been done. Also Team Expert Choice2000 software have used for analysis. Research results show that factors affecting the productivity of human resources in Khorasan Razavi Gas Company in order of importance are: Health aspects, leadership style, motivational factors, organizational commitment, work experience, general and applied education, demographic characteristics, physical environment within the organization, external environment and competitive spirit.

G. A. Shekari

2012-12-01

380

How historical copper contamination affects soil structure and mobilization and transport of colloids  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Copper is accumulated in soils due to human activities such as mining industry, agriculture practises, or waste deposals. High concentrations of copper can affect plants and soil organisms, and subsequently the soil structure and its inner space architecture. In this work we investigated the effect of copper concentration on the movement of an inert tracer, tritium, and the mobilization and transport of colloid particles in undisturbed soil cores (10 cm diameter and 8 cm height). The cores were sampled along a copper gradient of 21 to 3837 mg Cu kg-1 soil on an abandoned arable soil polluted by copper 90 years ago. Leaching experiments were carried out for 48 hrs at an irrigation rate of 10 mm hr-1. The accumulated amount of colloids released from the columns increased with the copper concentration. A sharp increase was observed when the copper concentration increased from 466 to 2228 mg kg-1. All columns showed similar behaviour with a high particle concentration associated with the first flush followed by alower, more constant particle concentration. The tritium breakthrough curves suggested preferential flow through larger pores. Arrival time of the first 5% of the tritium mass was ranged between 0.01 to 0.43 pore volumes, with longer times for the most contaminated point, likely related with its higher soil density and lower air permeability. The copper pollution affected colloid and tracer transport in the soil columns. The release of colloids especially in the most contaminated points and the occurrence of preferential flow can lead to colloid facilitated transport of copper deeper into the soil profile.

Paradelo, Marcos; MØldrup, Per

 
 
 
 
381

Factors affecting the chemistry of precipitation and river water in an upland catchment  

Science.gov (United States)

The chemistry of precipitation and river water was studied for one year in Glendye, a 41 km 2 moorland catchment in northeast Scotland. The precipitation was very dilute, weakly acidic, and highly variable in composition. River water was much less dilute, neutral, and less variable. Factor analysis was used to investigate the controls on water chemistry. This suggested three main processes affecting precipitation: aerosols of oceanic spray, which affected sodium, magnesium, chloride and total organic carbon (TOC) concentrations; emission of gaseous sulphur and nitrogen oxides from industrial processes and the burning of fossil fuels, which affected pH; wind-blown terrestrial dust. The factors affecting river water are quite different. The first factor represents cation-exchange and weathering reactions in the soil and affects calcium, magnesium, sodium, bicarbonate and silicon concentrations. The second factor affects the concentrations of iron, TOC, manganese and aluminium and represents the translocation of these elements down the soil profile and into the river at times of high discharge. The third factor affects the concentrations of ammonium and nitrate and reflects nitrogen demand and mineralisation in the soil. Phosphate, sulphate, potassium and chloride appear to vary independently, but all show low variability in river water compared with precipitation. The chemistry of river water from the catchment was also investigated during two storm events, and the results support the grouping of variables produced by factor analysis. The chemistry of the river water is thus controlled by processes in the soil, suggesting that nearly all the river water originates within the soil, and that direct surface runoff is of minor importance.

Reid, J. M.; MacLeod, D. A.; Cresser, M. S.

382

Looking under the Bonnet: Factors Affecting Student Adoption of E-Learning Systems in Jordan  

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Full Text Available The primary questions addressed in this paper are the following: what are the factors that affect students’ adoption of an e-learning system and what are the relationships among these factors?This paper investigates and identifies some of the major factors affecting students’ adoption of an e-learning system in a university in Jordan. E-learning adoption is approached from the information systems acceptance point of view. This suggests that a prior condition for learning effectively using e-learning systems is that students must actually use them. Thus, a greater knowledge of the factors that affect IT adoption and their interrelationships is a pre-cursor to a better understanding of student acceptance of e-learning systems. In turn, this will help and guide those who develop, implement, and deliver e-learning systems.In this study, an extended version of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM was developed to investigate the underlying factors that influence students’ decisions to use an e-learning system. The TAM was populated using data gathered from a survey of 486 undergraduate students using the Moodle based e-learning system at the Arab Open University. The model was estimated using Structural Equation Modelling (SEM. A path model was developed to analyze the relationships between the factors to explain students’ adoption of the e-learning system. Whilst findings support existing literature about prior experience affecting perceptions, they also point to surprising group effects, which may merit future exploration.

Muneer Mahmood Abbad, David Morris, Carmel de Nahlik

2009-04-01

383

A transportable hemispherical illumination system for making reflectance factor measurements  

Science.gov (United States)

An artificial source of stable, hemispherical illumination has been developed to facilitate the collection of reflectance factor measurements of targets of interest in a laboratory environment. The light source consists of a 76 cm (30 in.) aluminum hemisphere which has been coated internally with barium sulfate paint. Illumination is provided by two banks of lamps, each consisting of eight 62-W quartz halogen bulbs which have tungsten filaments. An internal baffle precludes the viewing of any direct beam of light. A simple metal structure has been developed to hold the hemisphere and all peripheral equipment, such as spectrometers, radiometers, and cameras, in place during data collection. The entire setup can be easily disassembled and packed in airline approved shipping cases to facilitate transportation to remote laboratory facilities. This illumination system has been used during the past three years to collect spectral reflectance factor data of tree branch samples and seedlings in support of an on-going study to investigate the effect of acidic deposition on forest vegetation.

Williams, Darrel L.; Wood, Frank M., Jr.

1987-01-01

384

A conceptual model for factors affecting the relationship between supply chain integration and customer delivery performance  

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Full Text Available Supply chain is a widely used concept around the world. Nowadays, companies need to integrate their production processes, from the raw materials to the end-user. Supply chain management is a phenomenon that achieves this in a way that ensures customers get reliable and fast service and high quality products at the lowest possible cost. There is very limited and sporadic research on supply chain integration and how it affects supply chain performance. Therefore there is no real understanding of the concept of supply chain integration and how it affects supply chain performance nor is there a holistic model. This paper thus aims to present a model that identifies factors affecting the relationship between supply chain integration and customer delivery performance. After analyzing the collected data on supply chain integration and customer delivery performance, the preliminary model was proposed and completed, and using expert opinion in the Imam Khomeini Oil Refinery the final model and for factors affecting the relationship between supply chain integration and customer delivery performance were presented. To determine how these factors interrelate with each other, the DEMATEL method was then used. The statistical population included the staff at Imam Khomeini Oil Refinery in Shazand. The data, collected through the standard DEMATEL questionnaire, were analyzed using the DEMATEL method and a MATLAB program. The DEMATEL results indicate that intra-organizational factors, institutional norms, technological certainties are causal factors which influence other factors that affect the relationship between supply chain integration and customer delivery performance. Intra-organizational factor have a greater influence also among effect factors, substructures have the greatest influence.

Peyman Ghafari Ashtiani

2013-09-01

385

Implications for Ecosystem Services of Watershed Processes that affect the Transport and Transformations of Mercury in an Adirondack Stream Basin  

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Mercury (Hg) is a potent neurotoxin that can affect the health of humans and wildlife through the ingestion of methyl Hg. Mercury contamination of ecosystems originates from human activities such as mining, coal burning and other industrial emissions, and the use of Hg-containing products. Natural sources such as volcanic and geothermal emissions and the weathering of Hg-bearing minerals also contribute to Hg contamination, but are believed to be minor sources in most ecosystems. Various ecosystem disturbances including fires, forest harvesting, and the submergence of land by impoundment may also contribute to Hg ecosystem contamination by mobilizing stores that have previously originated from the sources described above. Mercury from a mix of regional and global emissions sources is transported in the atmosphere to remote landscapes that are distant from local emissions sources. The Adirondacks of New York State is a forested, mountainous region characterized by abundant lakes and streams, and is distant from local emissions sources. Recreational fishing, wildlife viewing, hiking, and hunting are valued ecosystem services in this region. Here, we report on the relevance to ecosystem services of findings based on five years of Hg data collection of stream water, groundwater, invertebrates, and fish in the upper Hudson River basin in the central part of the Adirondack region. The New York State Dept. of Health has issued fish consumption advisories for the entire Adirondacks based on elevated levels previously measured in lakes and rivers of this region. Our work seeks improved understanding and models of the landscape sources and watershed processes that control the transformation of Hg to its methyl form (MeHg), the transport of MeHg to streams, and bioaccumulation of MeHg in aquatic food webs. Mean annual atmospheric Hg deposition was 6.3 ?g/m2/yr during 2007-09, compared to mean annual filtered total Hg stream yields of 1.66 ?g/m2/yr and filtered MeHg stream yields of 0.095 ?g/m2/yr in a sub-basin of the upper Hudson during this same period. Our work shows that Hg in stream biota, which is largely in the methyl form, is strongly related to MeHg measured in the water column; food web factors that affect Hg bioaccumulation also play a role. In brook trout, the top aquatic predator in the food web of the upper Hudson, Hg concentrations average about 0.1 ?g/g, a level believed to affect fish behavior, and a few values were greater than 0.3 ?g/g, a level at which human fish consumption advisories are issued. Landscape-based regression models that account for about 80% of the variation in stream MeHg concentrations at 25 sites across the upper Hudson basin include metrics of riparian area and open water indicating the importance of these landscape types in affecting methylation rates, losses of MeHg (through demethylation and other processes), and the transport of MeHg to surface waters. These and other study results indicate that factors such as watershed geomorphology, seasonal variations in discharge and air temperature, and the location and connection of riparian wetlands to streams are the strongest factors that affect stream MeHg concentrations and therefore, the potential ecosystem services provided by fish and other wildlife in the Adirondack region.

Burns, D. A.; Riva-Murray, K.; Bradley, P. M.

2012-12-01

386

Predictive factors for pregnancy after intrauterine insemination: A prospective study of factors affecting outcome  

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Full Text Available Objective : To determine the predictive factors for pregnancy after controlled ovarian hyperstimulation (COH/intrauterine insemination (IUI. Design : Prospective observational study. Setting : University-level tertiary care center. Patients and Methods : 366 patients undergoing 480 stimulated IUI cycles between November 2007 and December 2008. Interventions : Ovarian stimulation with gonadotrophins was initiated and a single IUI was performed 36 h after triggering ovulation. Main Outcome Measures : The primary outcome measures were clinical pregnancy and live birth rates. Predictive factors evaluated were female age, duration of infertility, indication for IUI, number of preovulatory follicles, luteinizing hormone level on day of trigger and postwash total motile fraction (TMF. Results : The overall clinical pregnancy rate and live birth rate were 8.75% and 5.83%, respectively. Among the predictive factors evaluated, the duration of infertility (5.36 vs. 6.71 years, P = 0.032 and the TMF (between 10 and 20 million, P = 0.002 significantly influenced the clinical pregnancy rate. Conclusion : Our results indicate that COH/IUI is not an effective option in couples with infertility due to a male factor. Prolonged duration of infertility is also associated with decreased success, and should be considered when planning treatment.

Kamath Mohan

2010-01-01

387

Factors Affecting the Provision of Quality Service in Real Estate Agency in Lagos Metropolis, Nigeria  

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Full Text Available Real estate firms attempting to increase and retain their customers need to know the factors contributing to customers’ satisfaction and retention. This study investigate into real estate agency market with the purposes of identifying factors that affect quality in service provision and possible factors contributing to customers’ satisfaction and retention in real estate agency. This study uses survey questionnaires to obtain information from real estate consumers. This sample size consisted of two hundred and three (203 real estate consumers in Lagos metropolis. A survey of 203 real estate consumers revealed the important items that affect quality in service delivery in real estate agency in the study area. The study found that the most important thing affecting quality in real estate agent is the agent’s reputation. The study concluded that a reputable real estate agent will have more satisfied clients and attract repeat businesses.

Funmilayo Moyinola Araloyin

2011-02-01

388

Factors affecting orientation and satisfaction of women entrepreneurs in rural India  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

In the present era, the women-owned businesses in the form of women entrepreneurs are one of the fastest growing entrepreneurial populations in the India. The objective of the paper is to study the factors that affect women entrepreneurial orientation and their satisfaction. In this regard, the paper explores the affecting variables and their impact on orientation and satisfaction. The proposed model and hypotheses were tested by using the data collected from boutiques, beauty parlors, carpet...

Jeevan Jyoti; Jyoti Sharma; Anita Kumari

2011-01-01

389

Catchment factors affecting particle and phosphorus retention in constructed wetlands receiving agricultural runoff  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Eight agricultural catchments in south Sweden were investigated for factors that may affect phosphorus (P) load and retention in the downstream situated wetlands (WL). P load is known to affect retention, and is determined by hydrological and geographical catchment characteristics. The wetlands were small (0.02-0.88%) in relation to their catchments (CA) and varied in design. Net sedimentation and P retention was determined with sedimentation plates during one year. The variables that best ex...

Senior, Anna

2012-01-01

390

Factors affecting the choice of a cosmetic brand : a case study of Skinfood Ltd  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Consumers are becoming more and more careful in selecting the cosmetic brands they use today. Women are fond of a cosmetic brand and trust it, because they believe in its superiority. How a brand is perceived affects customers’ choices and the success of the brand. Companies attempting to enter cosmetic markets should be aware of what the key factors affecting the consumer’s choice of a cosmetic brand are, and then develop a corresponding brand strategy, which can create brand equity for ...

Liu, Jingxuan

2014-01-01

391

Factors affecting the quality of problem-based learning in a hybrid medical curriculum.  

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For medical schools that wish to implement or are involved in problem-based learning (PBL) as part of their medical curriculum, there are many factors which can affect its quality. This paper discusses four critical issues--the need for sufficient protected time for PBL; the structure of the PBL case and its alignment with learning outside the tutorial room; the role of tutors and assessment in PBL--which can affect tutor and students' performance. PMID:19502146

Chan, Li-Chong

2009-05-01

392

POST-ACTIVATION POTENTIATION: FACTORS AFFECTING IT AND THE EFFECT ON PERFORMANCE  

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Full Text Available This review focuses on the factors effecting Post-Activation Potentiation (PAP and its application in complextraining. It was shown that the training level, the type of muscle fiber, the type of contraction, the duration of contraction, and the volume of contraction are factors which effect the duration and magnitude of PAP. It has also reported that PAP affects explosive activities such as jumping, sprint and upper body performance. Basedon PAP complex training protocols were designed including in the same training session high resistance training and explosive movements which positively affected strength, jumping and running speed velocity.

Xenofondos A.,

2010-08-01

393

Human factors with nonhumans - Factors that affect computer-task performance  

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There are two general strategies that may be employed for 'doing human factors research with nonhuman animals'. First, one may use t