WorldWideScience

Sample records for exhaust gas temperature

  1. Effect of EGR on the exhaust gas temperature and exhaust opacity in compression ignition engines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Avinash Kumar Agrawal; Shrawan Kumar Singh; Shailendra Sinha; Mritunjay Kumar Shukla

    2004-06-01

    In diesel engines, NOx formation is a highly temperature-dependent phenomenon and takes place when the temperature in the combustion chamber exceeds 2000 K. Therefore, in order to reduce NOx emissions in the exhaust, it is necessary to keep peak combustion temperatures under control. One simple way of reducing the NOx emission of a diesel engine is by late injection of fuel into the combustion chamber. This technique is effective but increases fuel consumption by 10–15%, which necessitates the use of more effective NOx reduction techniques like exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Re-circulating part of the exhaust gas helps in reducing NOx, but appreciable particulate emissions are observed at high loads, hence there is a trade-off between NOx and smoke emission. To get maximum benefit from this trade-off, a particulate trap may be used to reduce the amount of unburnt particulates in EGR, which in turn reduce the particulate emission also. An experimental investigation was conducted to observe the effect of exhaust gas re-circulation on the exhaust gas temperatures and exhaust opacity. The experimental setup for the proposed experiments was developed on a two-cylinder, direct injection, air-cooled, compression ignition engine. A matrix of experiments was conducted for observing the effect of different quantities of EGR on exhaust gas temperatures and opacity.

  2. Concept study - lower exhaust gas temperature in Scania buses

    OpenAIRE

    Jansson, Birk; Jarster, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    The thesis aims to lower the exhaust gas temperature on the coming EU6 Scania buses D7 and Otto gas and is carried out as a final part of the studies in the mechanical engineering program, KTH Stockholm. Euro 6, a new emission standard requirements for heavy duty trucks and buses, puts new demands on the amount of particulate matter and nitrogen oxides that can be emitted. This led to that Scania has developed and improved their after treatment systems. The new after treatment systems generat...

  3. Effect of Gas Turbine Exhaust Temperature, Stack Temperature and Ambient Temperature on Overall Efficiency of Combine Cycle Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, M.N.; K. P. Tyagi

    2010-01-01

    The gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature play a very important role during the predication of the performance of combine cycle power plant. This paper covers parametric analysis of effects of gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature on the overall efficiency of combine cycle power plant keeping the gas turbine efficiency as well as steam turbine efficiency constant. The results shows that out of three variables i.e. turbi...

  4. Increasing exhaust gas temperature in the diesel engine using a variable valvetrain; Anhebung der Abgastemperatur am Dieselmotor durch variablen Ventiltrieb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diezemann, Matthias; Pohlke, Rene; Brauer, Maximilian [IAV GmbH, Berlin (Germany); Severin, Christopher [IAV GmbH, Gifhorn (Germany). Abt. Systementwicklung und Konzepte Brennverfahren

    2013-04-15

    Efficient use of exhaust gas aftertreatment components in a diesel engine requires active control of the exhaust temperature. IAV has examined the possibilities offered by variable valve timing for managing the exhaust temperature. (orig.)

  5. Thermodynamic control-oriented modeling of cycle-to-cycle exhaust gas temperature in an HCCI engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • First thermodynamic model in the literature to predict exhaust temperature in HCCI engines. • The model can be used for integrated control of HCCI combustion and exhaust temperature. • The model is experimentally validated at over 300 steady state and transient conditions. • Results show a good agreement between predicted and measured exhaust temperatures. • Sensitivity of exhaust gas temperature to variation of engine variables is shown. - Abstract: Model-based control of Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine exhaust temperature is a viable solution to optimize efficiency of both engine and the exhaust aftertreatment system. Low exhaust temperature in HCCI engines can limit the abatement of hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions in an exhaust aftertreatment system. A physical–empirical model is described for control of exhaust temperature in HCCI engines. This model captures cycle-to-cycle dynamics affecting exhaust temperature and is based on thermodynamic relations and semi-empirical correlations. It incorporates intake and exhaust gas flow dynamics, residual gas mixing, and fuel burn rate and is validated with experimental data from a single cylinder engine at over 300 steady state and transient conditions. The validation results indicate a good agreement between predicted and measured exhaust gas temperature

  6. A Mathematical Model for the Exhaust Gas Temperature Profile of a Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, C. H. G.; Maia, C. B.; Sodr, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents a heat transfer model for the exhaust gas of a diesel power generator to determine the gas temperature profile in the exhaust pipe. The numerical methodology to solve the mathematical model was developed using a finite difference method approach for energy equation resolution and determination of temperature profiles considering turbulent fluid flow and variable fluid properties. The simulation was carried out for engine operation under loads from 0 kW to 40 kW. The model was compared with results obtained using the multidimensional Ansys CFX software, which was applied to solve the governor equations of turbulent fluid flow. The results for the temperature profiles in the exhaust pipe show a good proximity between the mathematical model developed and the multidimensional software.

  7. A Fault Diagnosis Approach for Gas Turbine Exhaust Gas Temperature Based on Fuzzy C-Means Clustering and Support Vector Machine

    OpenAIRE

    Zhi-tao Wang; Ning-bo Zhao; Wei-ying Wang; Rui Tang; Shu-ying Li

    2015-01-01

    As an important gas path performance parameter of gas turbine, exhaust gas temperature (EGT) can represent the thermal health condition of gas turbine. In order to monitor and diagnose the EGT effectively, a fusion approach based on fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering algorithm and support vector machine (SVM) classification model is proposed in this paper. Considering the distribution characteristics of gas turbine EGT, FCM clustering algorithm is used to realize clustering analysis and obtain th...

  8. Processing of exhaust gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide is an important component in exhaust gas filters for diesel engines. Norway produces and refines SiC, which is used in fireproof and ceramic industry and as an abrasive. It is also increasingly used in electronic industry. The emission from diesel engines consists of small spherical soot particles with an appendage of fuel, lubricating oil, water and sulphur compounds. These particles are intercepted by silicon carbide filters. There is a world-wide demand for environmentally friendly diesel engines and a growing demand for silicon carbide. From 2002, the EU permits a maximum emission of 0.025 grams per km of driving

  9. Comparison of sound, exhaust gas temperature and smoke opacity characteristics of methyl esters of vegetable oils blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Prabhakar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies were conducted to evaluate the sound, exhaust gas temperature and smoke opacity characteristics of a single cylinder, four stroke engine fuelled with Vegetable oil methyl ester and its blends with standard diesel. Among different vegetable oils which can be used as alternate fuels, five vegetable oils, i.e., Nerium (Nerium oleander, Jatropha (Jatropha curcas, Pongamia (Pongamia pinnata, Mahua (Madhuca indica and Neem (Azadirachta indica oils were selected for analysis. Tests has been conducted using the fuel blends of 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% biodiesel with standard diesel, with an engine speed of 1800 rpm. It has found that the sound, exhaust gas temperature and smoke opacity characteristics of vegetable oil methyl ester and its diesel blends closely followed those of standard diesel.

  10. Gas turbine exhaust system silencing design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas turbines are the preferred prime mover in many applications because of their high efficiency, fuel flexibility, and low environmental impact. A typical mid-size machine might have a power rating of 80 MW, a flow of about 1000 kg/hr, and an exhaust temperature of over 500C. The most powerful single source of noise is generally the exhaust, which may generate over a kilowatt of acoustic energy. This paper reports that there are two important ways in which exhaust systems can radiate noise. The first is through the discharge of the exhaust duct, with the exhaust gas. Because of the large quantity of hot gas, the duct exit is always oriented vertically; it may be fairly high in the air in order to promote dispersion of the exhaust plume. This source is almost always attenuated by means of a silencer located somewhere in the ductwork. The second source of noise is often called breakout; it is the radiation of exhaust noise through the walls of the ducting. Breakout is most important for those sections of the exhaust duct which lie upstream of the silencer, where sound levels inside the ducting are highest. Both exhaust duct exit noise and breakout noise can be calculated from the sound power level of the gas turbine exhaust and the sound transmission loss (TL) of the silencer and ducting

  11. High Temperature Resistant Exhaust Valve Spindle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihlet, Uffe Ditlev

    Transport by ship remains the most economical and environmentally friendly mode of transport with a very low weight specific CO2 footprint. Further increase of the fuel efficiency of large ships will results in a higher internal engine temperature. To allow this without compromising the reliability...... of the engine, new high temperature alloys are required for a specific engine component, the exhaust valve spindle. Two alloys are used for an exhaust valve spindle; one for the bottom of the spindle, and one for the spindle seat. Being placed in the exhaust gas stream, combustion products such as V2......O5 and Na2SO4 condense on the spindle, causing hot corrosion. Current industry standards can withstand service temperatures of up to 500°C for the spindle seat and 700°C for the spindle bottom. This project was tasked with increasing these temperatures 50°C each. Literature review as well as an in...

  12. High temperature sensors for exhaust diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Svenningstorp, Henrik

    2000-07-01

    One of the largest problems that we will have to deal with on this planet this millennium is to stop the pollution of our environment. In many of the ongoing works to reduce toxic emissions, gas sensors capable of enduring rough environments and high temperatures, would be a great tool. The different applications where sensors like this would be useful vary between everything from online measurement in the paper industry and food industry to measurement in the exhaust pipe of a car. In my project we have tested Schottky diodes and MlSiCFET sensor as gas sensors operating at high temperatures. The measurement condition in the exhaust pipe of a car is extremely tough, not only is the temperature high and the different gases quite harmful, there are also a lot of particles that can affect the sensors in an undesirable way. In my project we have been testing Schottky diodes and MlSiCFET sensors based on SiC as high temperature sensors, both in the laboratory with simulated exhaust and after a real engine. In this thesis we conclude that these sensors can work in the hostile environment of an engines exhaust. It is shown that when measuring in a gas mixture with a fixed I below one, where the I-value is controlled by the O{sub 2} concentration, a sensor with a catalytic gate metal as sensitive material respond more to the increased O{sub 2} concentration than the increased HC concentration when varying the two correspondingly. A number of different sensors have been tested in simulated exhaust towards NO{sub x}. It was shown that resistivity changes in the thin gate metal influenced the gas response. Tests have been performed where sensors were a part of a SCR system with promising results concerning NH{sub 3} sensitivity. With a working temperature of 300 deg C there is no contamination of the metal surface.

  13. Thermodynamic optimization of several (heat recovery steam generator) HRSG configurations for a range of exhaust gas temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Design optimization of a (heat recovery steam generator) HRSG is essential due to its direct impact on large power generation combined cycles. This study is aimed at giving a thermodynamic comparison between the optimums of three configurations of HRSG operating at exhaust gas temperature (TOT) from 350 °C to 650 °C. The optimization results, using PSO (Particle Swarm Optimization) method, show that adding another pressure level allows achieving a higher pressure at the inlet of high pressure turbine, producing more steam quantities, destroying less exergy and finally producing more specific work independently of TOT. For a given value of 600 °C representative of TOT of recent gas turbines, an addition of a pressure level is shown to increase the specific work of about 17 kJ/kg, representing a benefit of about 10% for the steam cycle, whereas a third pressure level results in 8 kJ/kg increase in the specific work, corresponding to 4% in the steam cycle. - Highlights: • Three types of HRSG are optimized and compared between them for several TOT values. • Adding a pressure level leads to thermodynamic performance enhancement whatever TOT. • Adding a pressure level permits reaching higher optimal pressures whatever TOT value. • Adding a pressure level permits producing more steam quantities. • Superheater effectiveness tends to its highest possible value except for high TOTs

  14. Development of high temperature SiC based field effect sensors for internal combustion engine exhaust gas monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Wingbrant, Helena

    2003-01-01

    While the car fleet becomes increasingly larger it is important to lower the amounts of pollutants from each individual diesel or gasoline engine to almost zero levels. The pollutants from these engines predominantly originate from high NOx emissions and particulates, in the case when diesel is utilized, and emissions at cold start from gasoline engines. One way of treating the high NOx levels is to introduce ammonia in the diesel exhausts and let it react with the NOx to form nitrogen gas an...

  15. Effects of exhaust temperature on helicopter infrared signature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of exhaust temperature on infrared signature (in 35 ?m band) for a helicopter equipped with integrative infrared suppressor were numerically investigated. The internal flow of exhaust gas and the external downwash flow, as well as the mixing between exhaust gas and downwash were simulated by CFD software to determine the temperature distributions on the helicopter skin and in the exhaust plume. Based on the skin and plume temperature distributions, a forwardbackward ray-tracing method was used to calculate the infrared radiation intensity from the helicopter with a narrow-band model. The results show that for a helicopter with its integrative infrared suppressor embedded inside its rear airframe, the exhaust temperature has significant influence on the plume radiation characteristics, while the helicopter skin radiation intensity has little impact. When the exhaust temperature is raised from 900 K to 1200 K, the plume radiation intensity in 35 ?m band is increased by about 100%, while the skin radiation intensity is increased by only about 5%. In general, the effects of exhaust temperature on helicopter infrared radiation intensity are mainly concentrated on plume, especially obvious for a lower skin emissivity case. -- Highlights: ? The effect of exhaust temperature on infrared signature for a helicopter is numerically investigated. ? The impact of exhaust temperature on helicopter skin temperature is revealed. ? The impact of exhaust temperature on plume radiation characteristics is revealed. ? The impact of exhaust temperature on helicopter skin radiation is revealed. ? The impact of exhaust temperature on helicopter's total infrared radiation intensity is revealed

  16. Emission Characteristics for Single Cylinder DI Diesel Engine with EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) System

    OpenAIRE

    Pratik G.Sapre*

    2014-01-01

    This paper includes experimental investigations of various exhaust gas recirculation rates on engine emission characteristics like NOx, HC, CO, CO2, exhaust gas temperature by AVL gas meter. By passing exhaust gas from venturi meter and regulating it with EGR valve so as to find out its effect on critical NOx emission and other harmful HC,CO & NOx emission parameter. So to reduce such harmful gases exhaust gas recirculation is economical and effective method to control emissio...

  17. Exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2013-05-21

    An exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger having a low pressure turbine outlet in fluid communication with an exhaust gas conduit. The turbocharger also includes a low pressure compressor intake and a high pressure compressor outlet in communication with an intake air conduit. An exhaust gas recirculation conduit fluidly communicates with the exhaust gas conduit to divert a portion of exhaust gas to a low pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extending between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and an engine intake system for delivery of exhaust gas thereto. A high pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extends between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and the compressor intake and delivers exhaust gas to the compressor for mixing with a compressed intake charge for delivery to the intake system.

  18. Exhaust gas assisted reforming of rapeseed methyl ester for reduced exhaust emissions of CI engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions of compression ignition (CI) engines fueled with biodiesel are generally higher compared to conventional diesel fuelling. Previous research work in CI engines has shown that the partial replacement of hydrocarbon fuels by hydrogen combined with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) can reduce NOx and smoke emissions without significant changes to the engine efficiency. In the present study, the production of hydrogen-rich gas by catalytic exhaust gas assisted fuel reforming of rapeseed methyl ester (RME) has been investigated experimentally as a way to provide the required hydrogen for the reduction of biodiesel emissions. For comparison, tests with ultra low sulphur diesel (ULSD) were also performed. The reforming experiments were carried out in a mini reactor supplied with exhaust gas from a single cylinder CI engine. In all cases, the reactor inlet temperature was kept at 290-bar C which was chosen as a typical low exhaust gas temperature of diesel engines operating at part load. The engine operating condition (speed, load) was the same in all the tests and the reactor product gas was examined as a function of the reactor fuel flow rate and the composition of fuel and engine exhaust gas. Up to 17% hydrogen content of the reformer product was achieved and the results indicated that the main reactions in the reformer were the exothermic complete oxidation of part of the fuel and the endothermic steam reforming reaction. Reforming of RME produced more hydrogen with higher fuel conversion efficiency compared to ULSD reforming

  19. Exhaust gas sensor based on tin dioxide for automotive application

    OpenAIRE

    Valleron, Arthur; Pijolat, Christophe; Viricelle, Jean-Paul; Breuil, Philippe; Marchand, Jean-Claude; Ott, Sbastien

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the potentialities of gas sensor based on semi-conductor for exhaust gas automotive application. The sensing element is a tin dioxide layer with gold electrodes. This gas sensor is able to detect both reducing and oxidizing gases in an exhaust pipe with varying selectivity depending on the temperature in the range 250 C-600 C. At low temperature 350-400 C, the sensor detects nitrogen dioxide while it is more sensitive to carbon monoxide at temperatur...

  20. Method of controlling temperature of a thermoelectric generator in an exhaust system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Gregory P; Reynolds, Michael G; Cowgill, Joshua D

    2013-05-21

    A method of controlling the temperature of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) in an exhaust system of an engine is provided. The method includes determining the temperature of the heated side of the TEG, determining exhaust gas flow rate through the TEG, and determining the exhaust gas temperature through the TEG. A rate of change in temperature of the heated side of the TEG is predicted based on the determined temperature, the determined exhaust gas flow rate, and the determined exhaust gas temperature through the TEG. Using the predicted rate of change of temperature of the heated side, exhaust gas flow rate through the TEG is calculated that will result in a maximum temperature of the heated side of the TEG less than a predetermined critical temperature given the predicted rate of change in temperature of the heated side of the TEG. A corresponding apparatus is provided.

  1. Investigation of exhaust gas temperature distribution within a furnace of a stoker fired boiler as a function of its operating parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krawczyk Piotr

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Distribution of the exhaust gas temperature within the furnace of a grate boiler greatly depends on its operating parameters such as output. It has a considerably different character than temperature distributions in other types of boilers (with pulverised or fluidised bed, as it varies considerably across the chamber. Results presented in this paper have been obtained through research of a grate-fired hot water boiler with a nominal rating of some 30 MW. Measurements have been taken by introducing temperature sensors into prearranged openings placed in the boiler side walls. Investigation has been carried out for different output levels. Tests involved thermocouples in ceramic coating and aspirated thermocouples. The latter were used to eliminate influence of radiative heat transfer on measured results. Values obtained with both methods have been cross-checked.

  2. Investigation of exhaust gas temperature distribution within a furnace of a stoker fired boiler as a function of its operating parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Piotr; Badyda, Krzysztof; Szczygieł, Jacek; Młynarz, Szczepan

    2015-09-01

    Distribution of the exhaust gas temperature within the furnace of a grate boiler greatly depends on its operating parameters such as output. It has a considerably different character than temperature distributions in other types of boilers (with pulverised or fluidised bed), as it varies considerably across the chamber. Results presented in this paper have been obtained through research of a grate-fired hot water boiler with a nominal rating of some 30 MW. Measurements have been taken by introducing temperature sensors into prearranged openings placed in the boiler side walls. Investigation has been carried out for different output levels. Tests involved thermocouples in ceramic coating and aspirated thermocouples. The latter were used to eliminate influence of radiative heat transfer on measured results. Values obtained with both methods have been cross-checked.

  3. Coke-free dry reforming of model diesel fuel by a pulsed spark plasma at low temperatures using an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry reforming of diesel fuel, an endothermic reaction, is an attractive process for on-board hydrogen/syngas production to increase energy efficiency. For operating this dry reforming process in a vehicle, we can use the exhaust gas from an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system as a source of carbon dioxide. Catalytic dry reforming of heavy hydrocarbon is a very difficult reaction due to the high accumulation of carbon on the catalyst. Therefore, we attempted to use a non-equilibrium pulsed plasma for the dry reforming of model diesel fuel without a catalyst. We investigated dry reforming of model diesel fuel (n-dodecane) with a low-energy pulsed spark plasma, which is a kind of non-equilibrium plasma at a low temperature of 523 K. Through the reaction, we were able to obtain syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) and a small amount of C2 hydrocarbon without coke formation at a ratio of CO2/Cfuel = 1.5 or higher. The reaction can be conducted at very low temperatures such as 523 K. Therefore, it is anticipated as a novel and effective process for on-board syngas production from diesel fuel using an EGR system.

  4. SST-1 Gas feed and Gas Exhaust system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raval, Dilip C.; Khan, Ziauddin; Thankey, Prashant L.; Dhanani, Kalpesh R.; Pathan, Firozkhan S.; Semwal, Pratibha; George, Siju; Yuvakiran, Paravastu; Manthena, Himabindu; Pradhan, Subrata

    2012-11-01

    SST-1 tokamak is a long pulse tokamak designed for the plasma operation up to 1000 sec duration. Gas feed system and gas exhaust management will play a very crucial role during plasma discharge. During the different type of operations of tokamak like wall conditioning, diverter operation and neutral beam injection, a large amount of gas will be fed into the vacuum chamber at different locations. Also during plasma operations, the gas will be fed both in continues and pulse mode. Gas feed will be carried out mainly using piezo-electric valves controlled by PXI based data acquisition and control system. Such operations will lead to a huge amount gas exhaust by the main system which requires good exhaust facility to searches, great care should be taken in constructing both. Also initial pumping of cryostat and vacuum vessel of SST-1 will release a large amount of gas. Exhausted gases from SST -1 will be Hydrogen, Nitrogen, Mixture gases or some toxic gases. Dedicated exhaust system controlling the different gases are installed. Special treatment of hazardous/explosive gases is done before releasing to the atmosphere. This paper describes design and implementations of the complete gas feed and exhaust system of SST-1.

  5. 40 CFR 89.416 - Raw exhaust gas flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Raw exhaust gas flow. 89.416 Section 89.416 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED... Procedures § 89.416 Raw exhaust gas flow. The exhaust gas flow shall be determined by one of the...

  6. 46 CFR 52.25-20 - Exhaust gas boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exhaust gas boilers. 52.25-20 Section 52.25-20 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING POWER BOILERS Other Boiler Types § 52.25-20 Exhaust gas boilers. Exhaust gas boilers with a maximum allowable working...

  7. Second law analysis of a low temperature combustion diesel engine: Effect of injection timing and exhaust gas recirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For diesel engines, low temperature combustion (LTC) with a high level of EGR and late injection becomes attractive because of its potential of simultaneous reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions. However, detailed thermodynamic evaluations including second law analysis of the LTC are few. The current work employed an engine cycle simulation incorporating the second law of thermodynamics to evaluate the energy and exergy distribution of various processes in a low temperature combustion diesel engine. After validation with experimental data at eight operating conditions including four different EGR levels and two different injection timings, the model was used to evaluate the effect of EGR level and injection timing on the first and second law parameters. As EGR was increased, intake temperature and equivalence ratio increased. Results showed that for the case at 0% EGR level with conventional injection timing, about 30% of the fuel exergy was destructed during combustion processes, and as EGR level increased to 45% (intake temperature and equivalence ratio also increased), the combustion destructed exergy decreased to 20% of the fuel exergy. This was largely due to the related combustion temperature increase. For both conventional (−6.5° aTDC) and late (1.5° aTDC) injection timings, the percentage of exergy transfer through flows increases as EGR increases, which is attributed to the retarded ignition by increasing EGR. Other parameters such as energy and exergy transfer due to heat transfer, blow-by, and unburned fuel also were determined as a function of EGR level and injection timing. -- Highlights: ► Exergy destruction during combustion decreased as intake temperature increased. ► Both conventional and late injection timings (LTC cases) were examined. ► For conventional injection timings, the combustion efficiency remains constant as EGR increases. ► For late injections and high EGR, combustion was incomplete. ► Late injection cases had lower percentage of heat transfer exergy.

  8. Gas sensors based on tin dioxide for exhaust gas application, modeling of response for pure gases and for mixtures

    OpenAIRE

    Viricelle, Jean-Paul; Valleron, Arthur; Pijolat, Christophe; Breuil, Philippe; Ott, Sbastien

    2012-01-01

    This paper concerns tin dioxide gas sensors for automotive exhaust gas application. It consists in elaborating robust sensors on alumina substrate by screen-printing technology. Sensors have been tested on a synthetic gas bench which is able to generate high gas velocity and gases at high temperatures close to real exhaust gas conditions. The responses of the sensors to three gases were modeled, and the classical model of electrical conductivity with one reducing or oxidizing pollutant gas wa...

  9. Boosting devices with integral features for recirculating exhaust gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2015-12-22

    According to one embodiment of the invention, a turbine housing includes a turbine inlet in fluid communication with a turbine volute configured to house a turbine wheel, the turbine inlet configured to direct an exhaust gas flow from an engine to the turbine wheel. The turbine housing also includes a turbine outlet in fluid communication with the turbine volute, the turbine outlet configured to direct the exhaust gas flow to an exhaust gas conduit and a first exhaust gas recirculation supply port located on and in fluid communication with the turbine outlet, the first exhaust gas recirculation supply port being configured to direct a portion of the exhaust gas flow to an exhaust gas recirculation supply conduit.

  10. Design of a high temperature chemical vapor deposition reactor in which the effect of the condensation of exhaust gas in the outlet is minimized using computational modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Ji-Young; Geun Kim, Byeong; Nam, Deok-Hui; Yoo, Chang-Hyoung; Lee, Myung-Hyun; Seo, Won-Seon; Shul, Yong-Gun; Lee, Won-Jae; Jeong, Seong-Min

    2016-02-01

    Tetramethylsilane (TMS) was recently proposed as a safe precursor for SiC single crystal growth through high temperature chemical vapor deposition (HTCVD). Because the C content of TMS is much higher than Si, the exhaust gas from the TMS-based HTCVD contains large amounts of C which is condensed in the outlet. Because the condensed C close to the crystal growth front will influence on the thermodynamic equilibrium in the crystal growth, an optimal reactor design was highly required to exclude the effect of the condensed carbon. In this study, we report on a mass/heat transfer analysis using the finite element method (FEM) in an attempt to design an effective reactor that will minimize the effect of carbon condensation in the outlet. By applying the proposed reactor design to actual growth experiments, single 6H-SiC crystals with diameters of 50 mm were successfully grown from a 6H-SiC seed. This result confirms that the proposed reactor design can be used to effectively grow 6H-SiC crystals using TMS-based HTCVD.

  11. Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kevin P.; Kieser, Andrew J.; Rodman, Anthony; Liechty, Michael P.; Hergart, Carl-Anders; Hardy, William L.

    2008-05-27

    A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

  12. Gas exhaustion system of reactor container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a BWR type reactor, a connection pipe is disposed from a dry well and a wet well to a main steam pipeline, and a reactor container isolation valve is disposed to the pipeline. Excess pressure in the reactor container is released to a turbine condensator, to condensate steams in the condensator and remove water soluble radioactive materials. In addition, radioactive materials are reduced due to decay by temporarily storage in the turbine condensator. Radioactive materials in an incondensible gas are sufficiently removed by a gaseous waste processing system and the gas is released to the atmosphere through a main exhaustion tower. Pressure in the container is reduced by releasing the excess pressure to the turbine condensator, which prevents failure due to excessive pressure. (N.H.)

  13. Using engine exhaust gas as energy source for an absorption refrigeration system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manzela, Andre Aleixo [PETROBRAS, Exploration and Production, Av. Rui Barbosa, 1940 - 3 andar, 27915-012 - Macae - RJ (Brazil); Hanriot, Sergio Morais; Cabezas-Gomez, Luben; Sodre, Jose Ricardo [Pontifical Catholic University of Minas Gerais, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Av. Dom Jose Gaspar, 500, 30535-610 - Belo Horizonte - MG (Brazil)

    2010-04-15

    This work presents an experimental study of an ammonia-water absorption refrigeration system using the exhaust of an internal combustion engine as energy source. The exhaust gas energy availability and the impact of the absorption refrigeration system on engine performance, exhaust emissions, and power economy are evaluated. A production automotive engine was tested in a bench test dynamometer, with the absorption refrigeration system adapted to the exhaust pipe. The engine was tested for 25%, 50%, 75% and wide-open throttle valve. The refrigerator reached a steady state temperature between 4 and 13 C about 3 h after system start up, depending on engine throttle valve opening. The calculated exhaust gas energy availability suggests the cooling capacity can be highly improved for a dedicated system. Exhaust hydrocarbon emissions were higher when the refrigeration system was installed in the engine exhaust, but carbon monoxide emissions were reduced, while carbon dioxide concentration remained practically unaltered. (author)

  14. Investigation of Diesel Exhaust Gas Toxicity on Transient Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivashchenko Nikolay Antonovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the generation of heat engines and their control systems are based on ecological indices such as the toxicity of the fulfilled gases. When designing motors, software packages are widely used. These software packages provide the ability to calculate the workflow of engine at steady-state conditions. The definition of indicators emissions is a difficult task. The distribution statistics of the modes shows that the engines of the transport units work on unsteady modes most of the time. The calculation of toxicity indicators is even less developed. In this article experimental and numeric study of the diesel engine with turbocharger exhaust toxicity was considered. As a result of the experimental study, which was conducted with single-cylinder diesel engine compartment simulated work on the transient state, working process characteristics of a diesel engine were obtained, including carbon and nitrogen oxides concentrations. Functional dependencies of concentrations of toxic exhaust components, such as carbon and nitrogen oxides, on excess air ratio and exhaust temperature were obtained. Diesel engine transient processes were simulated using developed mathematical dynamic model of combined engine in locomotive power plant with a change in control signal (position of locomotive driver’s controller and external influence signal (resistance moment. The analysis of exhaust gas toxicity was conducted.

  15. 30 CFR 7.102 - Exhaust gas cooling efficiency test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust gas cooling efficiency test. 7.102 Section 7.102 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING....102 Exhaust gas cooling efficiency test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Follow the procedures specified...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.127 - Exhaust gas recirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust gas recirculation. 1065.127 Section 1065.127 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.127 Exhaust gas recirculation. Use...

  17. 46 CFR 63.25-7 - Exhaust gas boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... drum type exhaust gas steam boiler must have a feed water control system. The system must automatically.... An auxiliary exhaust gas boiler must meet the applicable construction requirements of part 52 or part... transfer. The system must adequately fill the boiler when cold. (c) Alarms. When a condition arises...

  18. On the thermodynamics of waste heat recovery from internal combustion engine exhaust gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, G. P.

    2013-03-01

    The ideal internal combustion (IC) engine (Otto Cycle) efficiency ?IC = 1-(1/r)(? - 1) is only a function of engine compression ratio r =Vmax/Vmin and exhaust gas specific heat ratio ? = cP/cV. Typically r = 8, ? = 1.4, and ?IC = 56%. Unlike the Carnot Cycle where ?Carnot = 1-(TC/TH) for a heat engine operating between hot and cold heat reservoirs at TH and TC, respectively, ?IC is not a function of the exhaust gas temperature. Instead, the exhaust gas temperature depends only on the intake gas temperature (ambient), r, ?, cV, and the combustion energy. The ejected exhaust gas heat is thermally decoupled from the IC engine and conveyed via the exhaust system (manifold, pipe, muffler, etc.) to ambient, and the exhaust system is simply a heat engine that does no useful work. The maximum fraction of fuel energy that can be extracted from the exhaust gas stream as useful work is (1-?IC) ?Carnot = 32% for TH = 850 K (exhaust) and TC = 370 K (coolant). This waste heat can be recovered using a heat engine such as a thermoelectric generator (TEG) with ?TEG> 0 in the exhaust system. A combined IC engine and TEG system can generate net useful work from the exhaust gas waste heat with efficiency ?WH = (1-?IC) ?Carnot ?TEG , and this will increase the overall fuel efficiency of the total system. Recent improvements in TEGs yield ?TEG values approaching 15% giving a potential total waste heat conversion efficiency of ?WH = 4.6%, which translates into a fuel economy improvement approaching 5%. This work is supported by the US DOE under DE-EE0005432.

  19. New catalysts for exhaust gas cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haerkoenen, M. [Kemira Metalkat Oy, Oulu (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Major challenge for future catalyst systems was to develop thermally more stable washcoats for close coupled operating conditions and for engines operating under high speed and load conditions. To design these future emission systems extensive research and development was undertaken to develop methods to disperse and stabilize the key catalytic materials for operation at much higher temperatures. Second priority was to design catalysts that are more effective under low temperature exhaust conditions and have improved oxygen storage properties in the washcoats. Incorporating new materials and modified preparation technology a new generation of metallic catalyst formulations emerged, those being trimetallic K6 (Pt:Pd:Rh and bimetallic K7) (Pd+Pd:Rh). The target was to combine the best property of Pt:Rh (good NO{sub x} reduction) with that of the good HC oxidation activity of Pd and to ensure that precious metal/support interactions were positively maintained. Both K6 and K7 concepts contain special catalyst structures with optimized washcoat performance which can be brick converter configuration. Improvement in light-off, thermal stability and transient performance with these new catalyst formulations have clearly been shown in both laboratory and vehicle testing. (author) (20 refs.)

  20. Exhaust gas recirculation for advanced diesel combustion cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Analysis of the incremental (cycle-by-cycle) build-up of EGR. • Proposed one-step equations for transient/steady-state gas concentration estimation. • Defined an in-cylinder excess-air ratio to account for the recycled oxygen with EGR. • Demonstrated the use of intake oxygen as a reliable measure of EGR effectiveness. • Demonstrated the impact of engine load and intake pressure on EGR effectiveness. - Abstract: Modern diesel engines tend to utilize significantly large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and high intake pressures across the engine load range to meet NOx targets. At such high EGR rates, the combustion process and exhaust emissions tend to exhibit a marked sensitivity to small changes in the EGR quantity, resulting in unintended deviations from the desired engine performance characteristics (energy efficiency, emissions, stability). An accurate estimation of EGR and its effect on the intake dilution are, therefore, necessary to enable its application during transient engine operation or unstable combustion regimes. In this research, a detailed analysis that includes estimation of the transient (cycle-by-cycle) build-up of EGR and the time (engine cycles) required to reach the steady-state EGR operation has been carried out. One-step global equations to calculate the transient and steady-state gas concentrations in the intake and exhaust are proposed. The effects of engine load and intake pressure on EGR have been examined and explained in terms of intake charge dilution and in-cylinder excess-air ratio. The EGR analysis is validated against a wide range of empirical data that include low temperature combustion cycles, intake pressure and load sweeps. This research intends to not only formulate a clear understanding of EGR application for advanced diesel combustion but also to set forth guidelines for transient analysis of EGR

  1. Automotive exhaust gas flow control for an ammonia–water absorption refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A considerable part of the energy generated by an automotive internal combustion engine is wasted as heat in the exhaust system. This wasted heat could be recovered and applied to power auxiliary systems in a vehicle, contributing to its overall energy efficiency. In the present work, the experimental analysis of an absorption refrigeration system was performed. The exhaust system of an automotive internal combustion engine was connected to the generator element of an absorption refrigeration system. The performance of the absorption refrigerator was evaluated as a function of the supplied heat. The use of a control strategy for the engine exhaust gas mass flow rate was implemented to optimize the system. Exhaust gas flow was controlled by step-motor actuated valves commanded by a microcontroller in which a proportional-integral control scheme was implemented. Information such as engine torque, speed, key temperatures in the absorption cycle, as well as internal temperatures of the refrigerator was measured in a transient regime. The results indicated that the refrigeration system exhibited better performance when the amount of input heat is controlled based on the temperature of the absorption cycle generator. It was possible to conclude that, by dynamically controlling the amount of input heat, the utilisation range of the absorption refrigeration system powered by exhaust gas heat could be expanded in order to incorporate high engine speed operating conditions. - Highlights: •An absorption refrigerator was driven by automotive exhaust gas heat. •A system for controlling the refrigeration system heat input was developed. •Excessive exhaust gas heat leads to ineffective operation of the refrigerator. •Control of refrigerator's generator temperature led to better performance. •The use of exhaust gas was possible for high engine speeds

  2. Remote sensing of temperature and concentration profiles of a gas jet by coupling infrared emission spectroscopy and LIDAR for characterization of aircraft engine exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offret, J.-P.; Lebedinsky, J.; Navello, L.; Pina, V.; Serio, B.; Bailly, Y.; Herv, P.

    2015-05-01

    Temperature data play an important role in the combustion chamber since it determines both the efficiency and the rate of pollutants emission of engines. Air pollution problem concerns the emissions of gases such as CO, CO2, NO, NO2, SO2 and also aerosols, soot and volatile organic compounds. Flame combustion occurs in hostile environments where temperature and concentration profiles are often not easy to measure. In this study, a temperature and CO2 concentration profiles optical measurement method, suitable for combustion analysis, is discussed and presented. The proposed optical metrology method presents numerous advantages when compared to intrusive methods. The experimental setup comprises a passive radiative emission measurement method combined with an active laser-measurement method. The passive method is based on the use of gas emission spectroscopy. The experimental spectrometer device is coupled with an active method. The active method is used to investigate and correct complex flame profiles. This method similar to a LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) device is based on the measurement of Rayleigh scattering of a short laser pulse recorded using a high-speed streak camera. The whole experimental system of this new method is presented. Results obtained on a small-scale turbojet are shown and discussed in order to illustrate the potentials deliver by the sophisticated method. Both temperature and concentration profiles of the gas jet are presented and discussed.

  3. Methane oxidation over noble metal catalysts as related to controlling natural gas vehicle exhaust emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Natural gas has considerable potential as an alternative automotive fuel. This paper reports on methane, the principal hydrocarbon species in natural-gas engine exhaust, which has extremely low photochemical reactivity but is a powerful greenhouse gas. Therefore, exhaust emissions of unburned methane from natural-gas vehicles are of particular concern. This laboratory reactor study evaluates noble metal catalysts for their potential in the catalytic removal of methane from natural-gas vehicle exhaust. Temperature run-up experiments show that the methane oxidation activity decreases in the order Pd/Al2O3 > Rh/Al2O3 > Pt/Al2O3. Also, for all the noble metal catalysts studied, methane conversion can be maximized by controlling the O2 concentration of the feedstream at a point somewhat rich (reducing) of stoichiometry

  4. Low-pressure-ratio regenerative exhaust-heated gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tampe, L.A.; Frenkel, R.G.; Kowalick, D.J.; Nahatis, H.M.; Silverstein, S.M.; Wilson, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    A design study of coal-burning gas-turbine engines using the exhaust-heated cycle and state-of-the-art components has been completed. In addition, some initial experiments on a type of rotary ceramic-matrix regenerator that would be used to transfer heat from the products of coal combustion in the hot turbine exhaust to the cool compressed air have been conducted. Highly favorable results have been obtained on all aspects on which definite conclusions could be drawn.

  5. Method for controlling exhaust gas heat recovery systems in vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spohn, Brian L.; Claypole, George M.; Starr, Richard D

    2013-06-11

    A method of operating a vehicle including an engine, a transmission, an exhaust gas heat recovery (EGHR) heat exchanger, and an oil-to-water heat exchanger providing selective heat-exchange communication between the engine and transmission. The method includes controlling a two-way valve, which is configured to be set to one of an engine position and a transmission position. The engine position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the engine, but does not allow heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the oil-to-water heat exchanger. The transmission position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger, the oil-to-water heat exchanger, and the engine. The method also includes monitoring an ambient air temperature and comparing the monitored ambient air temperature to a predetermined cold ambient temperature. If the monitored ambient air temperature is greater than the predetermined cold ambient temperature, the two-way valve is set to the transmission position.

  6. Simulation of exhaust gas heat recovery from a spray dryer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study explored various alternatives in improving the energy utilization of spray drying process through the exhaust gas heat recovery. Extensible and user-friendly simulation code was written in Visual Basic for Applications within Microsoft Excel for this purpose. The effects of process parameters were analyzed on the energy efficiency and energy saving in the industrial-scale spray drying system with exhaust gas heat recovery in an air-to-air heat exchanger and in the system with partial recirculation of exhaust air. The spray dryer is equipped with an indirect heater for heating the drying air. The maximum gains of 16% in energy efficiency and 50% in energy saving were obtained for spray drying system equipped with heat exchanger for exhaust air heat recovery. In addition, 34% in energy efficiency and 61% in energy saving for system with recirculation of exhaust air in the present range of process parameters. The high energy efficiency was obtained during drying of large amount of dilute slurry. The energy saving was increased using the large amount of hot drying air. - Highlights: • We model industrial-scale spray drying process with the exhaust gas heat recovery. • We develop an Excel VBA computer program to simulate spray dryer with heat recovery. • We examine effects of process parameters on energy efficiency and energy saving. • High energy efficiency is obtained during drying of large amount of dilute slurry. • Energy saving is increased using the large amount of hot drying air

  7. Removing method for iodine in exhaust-gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a method of processing an exhaust gas containing iodine and/or iodine compounds through a layer of an adsorbent carrying noble metals, the exhaust gas is passed through a pretreatment tower filled with metal oxides at from 60 to 250degC. This can remove most of poisonous materials for the absorbent carrying noble metals such as halogen materials other than iodine or a sulfur compounds, then it is passed through the adsorbent carrying noble metals to remove iodine and/or iodine compounds. With such procedures, a relatively small amount of iodine or iodine compounds coexistent with poisonous materials such as other halogen materials in the exhaust gas can be removed at high removing rate, to extend the service life of the catalyst. Further, cost for iodine removing processing is greatly saved. (T.M.)

  8. Organic Rankine cycle for power recovery of exhaust flue gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effects of different working fluids on the performance of organic Rankine cycle (ORC), three working fluids, a mixture that matches with heat source, a mixture that matches with heat sink and a pure working fluid, are selected in this paper. Thermodynamic models were built in Matlab together with REFPROP, with which, the physical properties of the selected working fluids can be acquired. Heat source of the ORC system is the exhaust flue gas of boiler in a 240 MW pulverized coal-fired power plant. Some indicators such as thermal efficiency, inlet temperature of expander, superheat degree, mass flow, volumetric flow, and exergy destruction distribution, as well as the influence of recuperator are studied. The analytical results show that the mixture that matches with heat sink has the greatest efficiency and the mixture that matches with heat source has the lowest superheat degree. The rate of heat exchanged in recuperator to that in evaporator has a maximum value with evaporating pressure. There exists no optimal working fluid for all indicators (thermal efficiency, heat exchanger area, mass flow and volumetric flow etc.). An appropriate working fluid should be chosen by taking both investment cost and power generating benefits into account. The cost-benefit ratio of the proposed ORC plant was evaluated either. - Highlights: • Three types of working fluids are selected for ORC using exhaust flue gas. • The mixture that matches with heat sink has the greatest efficiency. • The mixture that matches with heat source has the lowest superheat degree. • There does not exist a working fluid that satisfies all the indicators

  9. 500 CFM portable exhauster temperature and humidity analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BIELICKI, B.E.

    1999-05-20

    500 cfm portable exhausters will be utilized on single shell tanks involved in saltwell pumping. This will be done, in part, to remove flammable gases from the tank vapor space. The exhaust filter train, fan, stack, and associated instrumentation and equipment are mounted on a portable skid. The design analysis and basis for the skid system design are documented in reference 1. A pumped drainage collection system is being added to the existing portable exhausters. Additional equipment and instrumentation are also being added to the exhausters, including a vacuum pump cabinet and a generic effluent monitoring system (GEMS). The GEMS will provide sampling and monitoring capabilities. The purpose of this analysis is three fold. First, to determine the maximum saltwell tank vapor space temperature. Second, to determine an allowable exhauster inlet air temperature increase to ensure the humidity is less than 70%. Third, to assess potential adverse temperature effects to the continuous air monitor (CAM) sample head. The results of this analysis will be used to ensure that air stream temperatures in the portable exhausters are increased sufficiently to prevent condensation from forming on either the pre or HEPA filters without adversely effecting the CAM.

  10. 500 CFM portable exhauster temperature and humidity analysis; TOPICAL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    500 cfm portable exhausters will be utilized on single shell tanks involved in saltwell pumping. This will be done, in part, to remove flammable gases from the tank vapor space. The exhaust filter train, fan, stack, and associated instrumentation and equipment are mounted on a portable skid. The design analysis and basis for the skid system design are documented in reference 1. A pumped drainage collection system is being added to the existing portable exhausters. Additional equipment and instrumentation are also being added to the exhausters, including a vacuum pump cabinet and a generic effluent monitoring system (GEMS). The GEMS will provide sampling and monitoring capabilities. The purpose of this analysis is three fold. First, to determine the maximum saltwell tank vapor space temperature. Second, to determine an allowable exhauster inlet air temperature increase to ensure the humidity is less than 70%. Third, to assess potential adverse temperature effects to the continuous air monitor (CAM) sample head. The results of this analysis will be used to ensure that air stream temperatures in the portable exhausters are increased sufficiently to prevent condensation from forming on either the pre or HEPA filters without adversely effecting the CAM

  11. Oxygen Smelting of Copper Concentrate With Exhaust SO2 Gas Recycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazawa, Akira; Tozawa, Kazuteru

    1982-03-01

    In the conventional copper smelting process, the concentrate is usually oxidized by air, and heat is supplied by the combustion of fuel. Considerable dust and heat losses, due to the large quantity of exhaust gas, are inevitable. The use of oxygen greatly decreases such losses, but the copper matte grade is limited to around 50% to keep the furnace temperature at an optimum level. An oxygen smelting process, with exhaust SO2 recycling, is proposed based upon material and heat balance calculations. When 60% Cu matte is produced, the participating amounts of heat and gas are around 62% and 28% (14% if final gas is considered) of those of the conventional process. A considerable decrease in capital and operating costs can be expected when considering a new smelter. Because a small volume of high-strength SO2 exhaust gas is produced, this process has large flexibility with respect to sulfur by-products and offers a major advantage in environmentally sensitive locations.

  12. Characteristics of radial inward turbines for exhaust gas turbochargers under unsteady flow conditions. Unsteady turbine performance by high temperature working gas; Kakyuki kudoyo radial haiki turbine no hiteijoryu tokusei ni kansuru kenkyu. Koon sado gas ni yoru turbine hiteijoryu tokusei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Konishi, K.; Okamoto, Y.; Tashiro, S. [Tokyo Metropolitan Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan); Yoshiki, H. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Institute of Industrial Science

    1999-07-25

    This paper describes some important results obtained through experiments on a small inward radial gas turbine driven by high temperature pulsating flows. The temperature ranges from atmospheric temperature to 800 K. The waveforms of pulsation were nearly sinusoidal and had various pressure amplitude but fixed frequency (50 Hz). A newly designed reduction device, which consists of planetary gears, helped the turbine to work as nearly as in realistic circumstances. Main results are as follows. Even under the high temperature conditions, the turbine characteristics, such as the mass flow rate and the power output, are the same as those under the low temperature pulsating flow conditions as far as the estimations are performed by Using ordinary corrected values taking the temperature into consideration. As to the effect of pulsation, the more the amplitude of pressure increase, the less the mass flow rate through the turbine became at the same expansion ratio. Adding these results, the windage states characteristics of the turbine were made clear through experiments. (author)

  13. 40 CFR 86.511-90 - Exhaust gas analytical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust gas analytical system. 86.511-90 Section 86.511-90 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE HIGHWAY VEHICLES AND ENGINES Emission Regulations for 1978 and Later New Motorcycles;...

  14. A method for removal of CO from exhaust gas using pulsed corona discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, X; Yang, L; Lei, Y; Wang, J; Lu, Y

    2000-10-01

    An experimental study of the oxidation of CO in exhaust gas from a motorcycle has been carried out using plasma chemical reactions in a pulsed corona discharge. In the process, some main parameters, such as the initial CO concentration, amplitude and frequency of pulses, residence time, reactor volume, and relative humidity (RH), as well as their effects on CO removal characteristics, were investigated. O3, which is beneficial to reducing CO, was produced during CO removal. When the exhaust gas was at ambient temperature, more than 80% CO removal efficiency was realized at an initial concentration of 288 ppm in a suitable range of the parameters. PMID:11288300

  15. An approach for exhaust gas energy recovery of internal combustion engine: Steam-assisted turbocharging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The calculation method for SAT engine was developed and introduced. • SAT can effectively promote the low-speed performances of IC engine. • At 1500 r/min, intake pressure reaches target value and torque is increased by 25%. • The thermal efficiency of SAT engine only has a slight increase. - Abstract: An approach for IC engine exhaust gas energy recovery, named as steam-assisted turbocharging (SAT), is developed to assist the exhaust turbocharger. A steam generating plant is coupled to the exhaust turbocharged engine’s exhaust pipe, which uses the high-temperature exhaust gas to generate steam. The steam is injected into turbine inlet and used as the supplementary working medium for turbine. By this means, turbine output power and then boosting pressure can be promoted due to the increase of turbine working medium. To reveal the advantages and energy saving potentials of SAT, this concept was applied to an exhaust turbocharging engine, and a parameter analysis was carried out. Research results show that, SAT can effectively promote the low-speed performances of IC engine, and make the peak torque shift to low-speed area. At 1500 r/min, the intake gas pressure can reach the desired value and the torque can be increased by 25.0% over the exhaust turbocharging engine, while the pumping mean effective pressure (PMEP) and thermal efficiency only have a slight increase. At 1000 r/min, the improvement of IC engine performances is very limited due to the low exhaust gas energy

  16. 30 CFR 36.43 - Determination of exhaust-gas composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ..., EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMISSIBLE MOBILE DIESEL-POWERED... of fuel consumption, pressures, temperatures, and other data significant in the safe operation of diesel equipment. (b) Exhaust-gas samples shall be analyzed for carbon dioxide, oxygen, carbon...

  17. Experimental study on exhaust gas after treatment using limestone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakhrieh Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a simple low-cost exhaust gas after-treatment filter using limestone was developed and tested on a four cylinder DI diesel engine coupled with dynamometer under variable engine running conditions. Limestone was placed in cast iron housing through which exhaust gases passes. The concentration of both carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides were measured with and without the filter in place. It was found that both pollutants were decreased significantly when the filter is in place, with no increase in the fuel consumption rate.

  18. Estimating IC engine exhaust gas lambda and oxygen from the response of a universal exhaust gas oxygen sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Universal exhaust gas oxygen sensors (UEGOs) are in widespread use in internal combustion engines where they are used to measure lambda (the non-dimensional air–fuel ratio) and oxygen concentration (XO2). The sensors are used on production engines and for research and development. In a previous paper, a model of the UEGO sensor was presented, based on a solution of the Stefan–Maxwell equations for an axisymmetric geometry, and it was shown that for a known gas composition, predictions of the sensor response agreed well with experiment. In the present paper, the more ‘practical’ problem is addressed: how well can such a model predict λ and XO2 based on the sensor response? For IC engine applications, a chemistry model is required in order to predict λ, and such a model is also desirable for an accurate prediction of XO2. A fast (matrix exponential) method of solving the Stefan–Maxwell equations is also introduced, which offers the possibility of a near real-time computation of λ and XO2, with application, for example, to bench instruments. Extensive results are presented showing how the interpretation of the UEGO response may be compromised by uncertainties. These uncertainties may relate not only to the sensor itself, such as temperature, pressure and mean pore diameter, but also the chemistry model. (paper)

  19. Test Program for High Efficiency Gas Turbine Exhaust Diffuser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Thomas R.

    2009-12-31

    This research relates to improving the efficiency of flow in a turbine exhaust, and thus, that of the turbine and power plant. The Phase I SBIR project demonstrated the technical viability of “strutlets” to control stalls on a model diffuser strut. Strutlets are a novel flow-improving vane concept intended to improve the efficiency of flow in turbine exhausts. Strutlets can help reduce turbine back pressure, and incrementally improve turbine efficiency, increase power, and reduce greenhouse gas emmission. The long-term goal is a 0.5 percent improvement of each item, averaged over the US gas turbine fleet. The strutlets were tested in a physical scale model of a gas turbine exhaust diffuser. The test flow passage is a straight, annular diffuser with three sets of struts. At the end of Phase 1, the ability of strutlets to keep flow attached to struts was demonstrated, but the strutlet drag was too high for a net efficiency advantage. An independently sponsored followup project did develop a highly-modified low-drag strutlet. In combination with other flow improving vanes, complicance to the stated goals was demonstrated for for simple cycle power plants, and to most of the goals for combined cycle power plants using this particular exhaust geometry. Importantly, low frequency diffuser noise was reduced by 5 dB or more, compared to the baseline. Appolicability to other diffuser geometries is yet to be demonstrated.

  20. Exhaust gas treatment in testing nuclear rocket engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the exception of the last test series of the Rover program, Nuclear Furnace 1, test-reactor and rocket engine hydrogen gas exhaust generated during the Rover/NERVA program was released directly to the atmosphere, without removal of the associated fission products and other radioactive debris. Current rules for nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480.6) are far more protective of the general environment; even with the remoteness of the Nevada Test Site, introduction of potentially hazardous quantities of radioactive waste into the atmosphere must be scrupulously avoided. The Rocketdyne treatment concept features a diffuser to provide altitude simulation and pressure recovery, a series of heat exchangers to gradually cool the exhaust gas stream to 100 K, and an activated charcoal bed for adsorption of inert gases. A hydrogen-gas fed ejector provides auxiliary pumping for startup and shutdown of the engine. Supplemental filtration to remove particulates and condensed phases may be added at appropriate locations in the system. The clean hydrogen may be exhausted to the atmosphere and flared, or the gas may be condensed and stored for reuse in testing. The latter approach totally isolates the working gas from the environment

  1. Study of recycling exhaust gas energy of hybrid pneumatic power system with CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hybrid pneumatic power system (HPPS) is integrated by an internal combustion engine (ICE), a high efficiency turbine, an air compressor and an energy merger pipe, which can not only recycle and store exhaust gas energy but also convert it into useful mechanical energy. Moreover, it can make the ICE operate in its optimal state of maximum efficiency; and thus, it can be considered an effective solution to improve greatly the exhaust emissions and increase the overall energy efficiency of the HPPS. However, in this system, the flow energy merger of both high pressure compressed air flow and high temperature exhaust gas flow of the ICE greatly depends on the merging capability of the energy merger pipe. If the compressed air pressure (Pair) at the air inlet is too high, smooth transmission and mixture of the exhaust gas flow are prevented, which will interfere with the operation condition of the ICE. This shortcoming is mostly omitted in the previous studies. The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of the level of Pair and the contraction of cross-section area (CSA) at the merging position on the flow energy merger and determine their optimum adjustments for a better merging process by using computation fluid dynamics (CFD). In addition, the CFD model was validated on the basis of the experimental data, including the temperature and static pressure of the merger flow at the outlet of the energy merger pipe. It was found that the simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental data. The simulation results show that exhaust gas recycling efficiency and merger flow energy are significantly dependent on the optimum adjustment of the CSA for changes in Pair. Under these optimum adjustments, the exhaust gas recycling efficiency can reach about 83%. These results will be valuable bases to research and design the energy merger pipe of the HPPS.

  2. Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

    2014-05-13

    A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

  3. 30 CFR 36.47 - Tests of exhaust-gas cooling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of exhaust-gas cooling system. 36.47... TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT Test Requirements § 36.47 Tests of exhaust-gas cooling system. (a) The adequacy of the exhaust-gas cooling system and its components shall be determined with the engine operating at the...

  4. High exhaust temperature, zoned, electrically-heated particulate matter filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Paratore, Jr., Michael J.; Bhatia, Garima

    2015-09-22

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter, an electric heater, and a control circuit. The electric heater includes multiple zones, which each correspond to longitudinal zones along a length of the PM filter. A first zone includes multiple discontinuous sub-zones. The control circuit determines whether regeneration is needed based on an estimated level of loading of the PM filter and an exhaust flow rate. In response to a determination that regeneration is needed, the control circuit: controls an operating parameter of an engine to increase an exhaust temperature to a first temperature during a first period; after the first period, activates the first zone; deactivates the first zone in response to a minimum filter face temperature being reached; subsequent to deactivating the first zone, activates a second zone; and deactivates the second zone in response to the minimum filter face temperature being reached.

  5. Turbine engine exhaust gas measurements using in-situ FT-IR emission/transmission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marran, David F.; Cosgrove, Joseph E.; Neira, Jorge; Markham, James R.; Rutka, Ronald; Strange, Richard R.

    2001-02-01

    12 An advanced multiple gas analyzer based on in-situ Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy has been used to successfully measure the exhaust plume composition and temperature of an operating gas turbine engine at a jet engine test stand. The sensor, which was optically coupled to the test cell using novel broadband hollow glass waveguides, performed well in this harsh environment (high acoustical noise and vibration, considerable temperature swings in the ambient with engine operation), providing quantitative gas phase information. Measurements were made through the diameter of the engine's one meter exhaust plume, about 0.7 meters downstream of the engine exit plane. The sensor performed near simultaneous infrared transmission and infrared emission measurements through the centerline of the plume. Automated analysis of the emission and transmission spectra provided the temperature and concentration information needed for engine tuning and control that will ensure optimal engine operation and reduced emissions. As a demonstration of the utility and accuracy of the technique, carbon monoxide, nitric oxide, water, and carbon dioxide were quantified in spite of significant variations in the exhaust gas temperature. At some conditions, unburned fuel, particulates (soot/fuel droplets), methane, ethylene and aldehydes were identified, but not yet quantified.

  6. Temperature optimisation of a diesel engine using exhaust gas heat recovery and thermal energy storage (Diesel engine with thermal energy storage)

    OpenAIRE

    Kauranen, Pertti; Elonen, Tuomo; Wikström, Lisa; Heikkinen, Jorma; Laurikko, Juhani

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Modern automotive diesel engines are so energy efficient that they are heating up slowly and tend to run rather cold at subzero temperatures. The problem is especially severe in mail delivery operations where the average speed is low and the drive cycle includes plenty of idling. The problem is typically solved by adding a diesel fuelled additional engine heater which is used for the preheating of the engine during cold start and additional heating of the engine if the coo...

  7. Exhaust gas bypass valve control for thermoelectric generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Michael G; Yang, Jihui; Meisner, Greogry P.; Stabler, Francis R.; De Bock, Hendrik Pieter (Peter) Jacobus; Anderson, Todd Alan

    2012-09-04

    A method of controlling engine exhaust flow through at least one of an exhaust bypass and a thermoelectric device via a bypass valve is provided. The method includes: determining a mass flow of exhaust exiting an engine; determining a desired exhaust pressure based on the mass flow of exhaust; comparing the desired exhaust pressure to a determined exhaust pressure; and determining a bypass valve control value based on the comparing, wherein the bypass valve control value is used to control the bypass valve.

  8. Removal of exhaust gas from spaces heated with gas IR radiators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, J.

    The correlations between the emission of pollutants from the exhaust gas of fan-type or self-ventilated overhead gas heaters and the concentration of pollutants in the atmosphere surrounding the work areas of persons can be determined by computation and measurement. It is proposed to verify the experience gained by further measurements in existing installations. This will include systematic studies into the appropriate distribution of gas overhead radiant heaters over the floor area to ensure uniform heating and optimum removal of the exhaust gas. The question as to the proper arrangement of vent openings to ensure an effective air change and efficient supply of air and removal of exhaust gas also requires study to confirm the gratifying experience gained with gas overhead radiant heaters by appropriate measurements.

  9. High temperature sealings for exhaust systems to achieve global environmental initiatives; Hochtemperaturdichtungen fuer Abgasanlagen zur Erfuellung weltweiter Umweltnormen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zwick, Jim; Groh, Trevor [Federal-Mogul Corporation, Southfield, MI (United States); Tripathy, Bhawani [Federal-Mogul Corporation, Ann Arbhor, MI (United States). Vorentwicklung und Werkstoffentwicklung fuer Dichtungssysteme

    2009-02-15

    Federal-Mogul has developed a special portfolio of High Temperature Alloy (HTA) gaskets, and a corresponding High Temperature Coating (HTC). In the most basic sense, the HTA and HTC innovations work by providing material stability at extreme operating temperatures. They enable manufacturers of exhaust gas systems to meet the challenges for sealing performance up to 1000 C with a highly durable product. (orig.)

  10. Exhaust gas boiler fouling and soot removal investigation in HFO diesel engine plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Domingo, J.; Haekkinen, P.; Kallioniemi, V.; Kaeaeriaeinen, J.

    2002-07-01

    Exhaust gas boilers are generally installed to recover waste heat of large diesel engines. These engines are used sources of propulsion and electric power in ships as well as in land based power plants. Feed water is circulated inside tubes which have often welded-on fins to increase the heat transfer surface. Organic and inorganic particulate in the exhaust gas flow deposits on the heat transfer surfaces. Rate of this fouling depends on many parameters: the engine, fuel oil, boiler design and exhaust gas outlet temperature. Excessive fouling decreases the heat recovery and may lead into soot fires that damage the water tubes and involve the risk of major engine room fires. The results of a systematic boiler fouling and soot removal research are given the report. Practical investigation was made in a test plant including a 1500 kW heavy fuel operated diesel engine and a exhaust gas boiler. The fouling rate was measured in various conditions and several cleaning methods tested. They included injection of steam, air and water, sound cleaning, soot removal powder feeding, increased flow velocity and dry operation. Boiler fouling and cleaning results are given in graphical presentation. The results were compared with theoretical models of particulate in exhaust gas flow and attachment to heat transfer surfaces. Respective tests were also executed in several ships with different engine types, fuel oils and boiler designs. The results show a wide variation and ion and closing of cleaning equipment. Samples of the soot deposits in selected ships and the test plant were analyzed for their chemical composition. Ignition models of soot fires are presented. The initial ignition does not always lead into major soot fire inside the boiler. Even fierce soot fires can be extinguished without fire escaping outside the boiler. The results include instructions for boiler design and the plant operation. Both normal boiler plant operation and fire fighting are included here. (orig.)

  11. Study on direct measurement of diesel exhaust gas flow rate. Development of ultrasonic exhaust gas flowmeter; Diesel hai gas ryuryo no chokusetsu sokuteiho ni kansuru kenkyu. Choonpa hai gas ryuryokeino kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamazaki, A.; Takamoto, M.; Yamzaki, H. [National Research Laboratory of Meteology, Tsukuba (Japan); Hosoi, K. [Japan Automobile Research Institute Inc., Tsukuba (Japan); Arai, S.; Shimizu, K. [Kaijo Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    2000-02-25

    The partial flow dilution method is one of the typical measurement methods for particulate matter emission from diesel engines. In this method, exhaust gas at a transient flow rate should be transferred to a dilution tunnel at a constant ratio of exhaust gas. The present partial flow dilution method is used under steady-state engine operating conditions in lieu of direct flow rate measurement of exhaust gas. A more practical control of exhaust emission is, however, required world widely; therefore development of an exhaust gas flowmeter is indispensable in the partial flow dilution method for transient engine operating conditions. An ultrasonic exhaust gas flowmeter has been developed and been demonstrated to be capable of measuring the exhaust gas flow rate with sufficient accuracy. (author)

  12. Effect of exhaust gas recirculation on diesel engine nitrogen oxide reduction operating with jojoba methyl ester

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saleh, H.E. [Mechanical Power Department, Faculty of Engineering, Mattaria, Helwan University, 9 k Eltaaweniat, Nasr Road, P.O. Box 11718, Cairo (Egypt)

    2009-10-15

    Jojoba methyl ester (JME) has been used as a renewable fuel in numerous studies evaluating its potential use in diesel engines. These studies showed that this fuel is good gas oil substitute but an increase in the nitrogenous oxides emissions was observed at all operating conditions. The aim of this study mainly was to quantify the efficiency of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) when using JME fuel in a fully instrumented, two-cylinder, naturally aspirated, four-stroke direct injection diesel engine. The tests were carried out in three sections. Firstly, the measured performance and exhaust emissions of the diesel engine operating with diesel fuel and JME at various speeds under full load are determined and compared. Secondly, tests were performed at constant speed with two loads to investigate the EGR effect on engine performance and exhaust emissions including nitrogenous oxides (NO{sub x}), carbon monoxide (CO), unburned hydrocarbons (HC) and exhaust gas temperatures. Thirdly, the effect of cooled EGR with high ratio at full load on engine performance and emissions was examined. The results showed that EGR is an effective technique for reducing NO{sub x} emissions with JME fuel especially in light-duty diesel engines. With the application of the EGR method, the CO and HC concentration in the engine-out emissions increased. For all operating conditions, a better trade-off between HC, CO and NO{sub x} emissions can be attained within a limited EGR rate of 5-15% with very little economy penalty. (author)

  13. Parasitic load control system for exhaust temperature control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauser, Aaron D.; Coleman, Gerald N.; Coldren, Dana R.

    2009-04-28

    A parasitic load control system is provided. The system may include an exhaust producing engine and a fuel pumping mechanism configured to pressurize fuel in a pressure chamber. The system may also include an injection valve configured to cause fuel pressure to build within the pressure chamber when in a first position and allow injection of fuel from the pressure chamber into one or more combustion chambers of the engine when in a second position. The system may further include a controller configured to independently regulate the pressure in the pressure chamber and the injection of fuel into the one or more combustion chambers, to increase a load on the fuel pumping mechanism, increasing parasitic load on the engine, thereby increasing a temperature of the exhaust produced by the engine.

  14. Measuring High Gas Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, H. A.

    1984-01-01

    Program provides extrapolation calculations of high gas temperature based on theoretical heating curve of pulsed thermocouples. Program requires as input mach number, wall temperature, and total pressure in addition to thermocouple data. Tests indicate program extrapolates reasonably-accurate gas temperatures from pulsed-thermocouple data.

  15. Measurement of Gas-phase Acids in Diesel Exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzell, J. J.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Lu, G.; Poitras, M.; Chan, T.

    2012-12-01

    Gas-phase acids were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) as part of the Diesel Engine Emission Research Experiment (DEERE). The CIMS technique, utilizing acetate ion (CH3COO-) as a reagent ion, proved to be a rapid (measurements on the order of seconds) and sensitive (several counts/pptv) method of quantifying the acid emissions. Diluted diesel exhaust measurements were made from a Constant Volume Sampling dilution tunnel using a light duty (1.9L turbocharged Volkswagen Jetta TDI) diesel engine equipped with an OEM diesel oxidation catalyst and exhaust gas recirculation, mounted on an engine dynamometer. Acids measured included isocyanic, nitrous, nitric, propionic and sum of lactic and oxalic, as well as other unidentified compounds. Complimentary measurements of CO, CO2, Total Hydrocarbon (THC), and NOx, were also performed. Several engine modes (different engine rpm and torque outputs) at steady state were examined to determine their effect on acid emissions. Emission rates with respect to NOx and fuel based emission factors were determined. Measurements of HONO fuel emission factors agree well with real-world measurements within a traffic tunnel.1 The first estimate of isocyanic acid emission factors from a diesel engine is reported, and suggests that the emission of this highly toxic compound in diesel exhaust should not be ignored. 1. Kurtenbach, R., Becker, K. H., Gomes, J. A. G., Kleffmann, J.,Lorzer, J. C., Spittler, M., Wiesen, P., Ackermann, R., Geyer, A.,and Platt, U.: Investigations of emissions and heterogeneous formation of HONO in a road traffic tunnel, Atmos. Environ., 35, 3385-3394, doi:10.1016/S1352-2310(01)00138-8, 2001.

  16. Evaluation of the necessity of exhaust gas recirculation employment for a methanol/diesel reactivity controlled compression ignition engine operated at medium loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Methanol fraction considerably affected the engine performance. • Exhaust gases had little effect on fuel efficiency at a fixed ignition timing. • Good performance was obtained without exhaust gases at low initial temperature. • The introduction of exhaust gases was essential when initial temperature is high. - Abstract: Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulation was conducted to investigate the improvement of engine performance by managing exhaust gas recirculation rate and methanol fraction in a methanol/diesel reactivity controlled compression ignition engine. By defining fuel efficiency and ringing intensity as the restricted boundaries, the operating ranges of exhaust gas recirculation rate and methanol fraction under various initial temperatures were determined to simultaneously achieve high fuel economy and avoid engine knock. The results indicated that the fuel efficiency and ringing intensity were dominantly affected by the combustion phasing, and they was nearly insensitive to the variations of exhaust gas recirculation rate and initial temperature at a constant combustion phasing. The necessity of exhaust gas recirculation employment at medium loads was dependent on the level of initial temperature. When initial temperature was less than the critical value (380 K in this study), optimal engine performance could be achieved by only adopting high methanol fraction without introducing exhaust gas recirculation. Once initial temperature was beyond the critical value, exhaust gas recirculation was imperative to avoid excessive ringing intensity. Through simultaneously optimizing methanol fraction and exhaust gas recirculation rate, the combined strategy exhibited more advantages in fuel efficiency, nitrogen oxides, and ringing intensity under a wide range of initial temperature

  17. Exhaust Gas Recirculation in Gas Turbines for Reduction of CO2 Emissions; Combustion Testing with Focus on Stability and Emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Røkke, Petter E.; Hustad, Johan E.

    2005-01-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation can be applied with the intention of reducing CO2 emissions. When a fraction of the exhaust gas is injected in the entry of a gas turbine, the amount of CO2 in the exhaust gas not being recirculated will be higher and less complicated to capture. However, with this change in combustion air composition, especially the reduced concentration of oxygen, the combustion process will be affected. The lower oxygen concentration decreases the stability and the increased amoun...

  18. Exhaust Gas Recirculation in Gas Turbines for Reduction of CO2 Emissions; Combustion Testing with Focus on Stability and Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan E. Hustad

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Exhaust gas recirculation can be applied with the intention of reducing CO2 emissions. When a fraction of the exhaust gas is injected in the entry of a gas turbine, the amount of CO2 in the exhaust gas not being recirculated will be higher and less complicated to capture. However, with this change in combustion air composition, especially the reduced concentration of oxygen, the combustion process will be affected. The lower oxygen concentration decreases the stability and the increased amount of CO2, H2O and N2 will decrease the combustion temperature and thus, the NOx emissions. Testing has been performed on a 65 kW gas turbine combustor, to investigate the effect of adding N2, CO2 and O2 in the combustion process, with focus on stability and emissions of NOx. Results show that adding N2 and CO2 decreases the NOx emissions, whereas O2 addition increases the NOx emissions. The tests have been performed both in a diffusion flame (pilot burner and a premixed flame (main burner, and for additives being injected with the fuel or with the air stream. Addition into the fuel stream is proven to affect the NOx emissions the most. The stability limits of the flames are indicated with respect to mass-based additive-to-fuel ratios.

  19. Cytotoxicity of the exhaust gas from a thermal reactor of MSWI baghouse ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Wu-Jang; Shue, Meei-Fang

    2007-10-01

    Baghouse ash from municipal solid waste incineration (MSWI) plant was heated from 25 degrees C to 800 degrees C under nitrogen in a fixed-bed reactor. The exhaust gas was passed sequentially through water, acetone and cyclohexane. The cytotoxicity testing of the three adsorbates was done with the MRC-5 cell line and the percentage cell survival was determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5(3-carboxymethoxyphenol)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium (MTS) analysis. The highest level of toxicity of the exhaust gas was observed at 500 degrees C. The total cytotoxicity of the three adsorbates at any treatment temperature was found to be a function of the sum of organic carbon (TOC), inorganic carbon (IC) and molecular chlorine (Cl(2)), of which, molecular chlorine was quantitatively the greatest. PMID:17585993

  20. An experimental study on the effects of exhaust gas on spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hautala, E.L.; Holopainen, J.; Kaerenlampi, L. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science; Surakka, J.; Ruuskanen, J. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Motor vehicle exhausts are significant contributors to air pollution. Besides fine particles and inorganic gases, like CO, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}, exhaust gas contains a large group of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, many of which are phytotoxic. In field studies, exhausts are found to have both direct and indirect harmful effects on roadside plants. However, only few experimental studies have been made about the effects of exhaust gas emissions on coniferous trees. The aim of this study was to survey the effects of exhausts on spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) in standardized conditions. The concentrations of major exhaust gas components in the chamber atmosphere were detected simultaneously. The effects of exhaust on epistomatal waxes of first-year spruce needles are described. (author)

  1. Steady-state modelling of the universal exhaust gas oxygen (UEGO) sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The universal exhaust gas oxygen (UEGO) sensor is a well-established device which was developed for the measurement of relative air fuel ratio in internal combustion engines. There is, however, little information available which allows for the prediction of the UEGO's behaviour when exposed to arbitrary gas mixtures, pressures and temperatures. Here we present a steady-state model for the sensor, based on a solution of the StefanMaxwell equation, and which includes a momentum balance. The response of the sensor is dominated by a diffusion barrier, which controls the rate of diffusion of gas species between the exhaust and a cavity. Determination of the diffusion barrier characteristics, especially the mean pore size, porosity and tortuosity, is essential for the purposes of modelling, and a measurement technique based on identification of the sensor pressure giving zero temperature sensitivity is shown to be a convenient method of achieving this. The model, suitably calibrated, is shown to make good predictions of sensor behaviour for large variations of pressure, temperature and gas composition. (paper)

  2. Engine exhaust particulate and gas phase contributions to vascular toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campen, Matthew; Robertson, Sarah; Lund, Amie; Lucero, Joann; McDonald, Jacob

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular health effects of near-roadway pollution appear more substantial than other sources of air pollution. The underlying cause of this phenomenon may simply be concentration-related, but the possibility remains that gases and particulate matter (PM) may physically interact and further enhance systemic vascular toxicity. To test this, we utilized a common hypercholesterolemic mouse model (Apolipoprotein E-null) exposed to mixed vehicle emission (MVE; combined gasoline and diesel exhausts) for 6?h/d??50?d, with additional permutations of removing PM by filtration and also removing gaseous species from PM by denudation. Several vascular bioassays, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 protein, 3-nitrotyrosine and plasma-induced vasodilatory impairments, highlighted that the whole emissions, containing both particulate and gaseous components, was collectively more potent than MVE-derived PM or gas mixtures, alone. Thus, we conclude that inhalation of fresh whole emissions induce greater systemic vascular toxicity than either the particulate or gas phase alone. These findings lend credence to the hypothesis that the near-roadway environment may have a more focused public health impact due to gas-particle interactions. PMID:24730681

  3. Effect of Fuel-Air Ratio, Inlet Temperature, and Exhaust Pressure on Detonation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, E S; Leary, W A; Diver, J R

    1940-01-01

    An accurate determination of the end-gas condition was attempted by applying a refined method of analysis to experimental results. The results are compared with those obtained in Technical Report no. 655. The experimental technique employed afforded excellent control over the engine variables and unusual cyclic reproducibility. This, in conjunction with the new analysis, made possible the determination of the state of the end-gas at any instant to a fair degree of precision. Results showed that for any given maximum pressure the maximum permissible end-gas temperature increased as the fuel-air ratio was increased. The tendency to detonate was slightly reduced by an increase in residual gas content resulting from an increase in exhaust backpressure with inlet pressure constant.

  4. Performance of humid air turbine with exhaust gas expanded to below ambient pressure based on microturbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type of HAT cycle comprising HAT and Inverted Brayton cycles, named BAHAT in this paper, is proposed to enhance the microturbine's performance. By adding an exhaust compressor after flue gas condenser, the gas expander expands to a pressure lower than ambient. Simulation and parameter optimization results show that the electricity efficiency and specific work of BAHAT are about 2 percentage points and 20% higher than that of HAT cycle respectively when turbine inlet temperature is 950 deg. C. The working pressure of aftercooler, humidifier and turbine hot section is only about 0.4 MPa though the optimal total pressure ratio is about 9-10. The drops of compression work and outlet water temperature of humidifier are considered the main factors to enhance BAHAT's efficiency. In addition, the exhaust compressor inlet gas temperature affects BAHAT's efficiency and water recovery ratio apparently. It is also shown that it is easy to achieve water self-support for BAHAT, mixing makeup water to the water loop before entering economizer shows the best thermodynamic performance, and air leakage to the bottom cycle influences both efficiency and water recovery ratio of BAHAT.

  5. 76 FR 58288 - International Maritime Organization Guidelines for Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems for Marine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Information on Services for Individuals with Disabilities For information... SECURITY Coast Guard International Maritime Organization Guidelines for Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems for... exhaust gas cleaning systems for marine engines. The purpose of this meeting in Washington, DC, is...

  6. Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2002-01-01

    In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

  7. Temperature monitoring of vehicle engine exhaust gases under vibration condition using optical fibre temperature sensor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two optical approaches, comprising and contracting both the fluorescence decay lifetime and the fibre Bragg grating (FBG) methods, were developed and evaluated for temperature monitoring of exhaust gases for use on a vehicle engine. The FBGs used in the system were written into specially designed Bi-Ge co-doped photosensitive fibres, to enable them to sustain high temperatures to over 8000C, which is far beyond that of FBGs written into most commercial photosensitive fibres. The sensors were subjected to a range of vibration tests, as a part of an optical exhaust monitoring network under development, and results from the test carried out are reported

  8. Influence of active control on exhaust gas emissions in a gas turbine matrix burner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohn, D.; Ohlendorf, N.; Willie, J. [RWTH Aachen University (Germany). Institute of Steam and Gas Turbines

    2009-07-01

    Due to the impact of global warming on the environment, it can be expected that emissions restrictions will get even more stringent in the future. Because the use of gas turbines in combined cycle power plants ensures a high efficiency of around 60% they can play an important role in the future energy market. Because of the restriction on emissions, most stationary gas turbines are being designed to run using lean premixed combustion. However, gas turbines run in this condition are very prone to combustion instabilities. These instabilities are generated when the pressure oscillation and the heat release rate inside the combustor are in phase and if there is not enough damping in the system to damp the acoustic energy. These instabilities affect emissions levels and can lead to noise generation and in the worst case to component failure and catastrophic engine failures. Figure 1 shows how temperature and fuel/air equivalence ratio affects NO{sub x} emissions in land based gas turbines. It also shows that besides the known thermal NO{sub x} formation a distinction between real and perfect fuel air mixture has to be made. It can be seen from this Figure that for rising combustion instabilities NOx emissions are reduced due to the change from ideal to real NO{sub x} formation. As it shall be seen from the results obtained for the matrix burner, NO{sub x} levels increase with increasing instability. The reason for this observation in the matrix burner is that the humming process led to an increase in the unmixedness which in turn led to an increase in NO{sub x}, whereas for real gas turbines, the ideal mixing would lead to a reduce NO{sub x} formation. For one of our measured cases, however, NO{sub x} was reduced with increasing instability, although this case is not shown here. The objective of this work is to investigate the effect of open loop control on exhaust gas emissions in a matrix burner. The burner is suitable for simulating the conditions prevailing in stationary gas turbines. (orig.)

  9. Exhaust bypass flow control for exhaust heat recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Michael G.

    2015-09-22

    An exhaust system for an engine comprises an exhaust heat recovery apparatus configured to receive exhaust gas from the engine and comprises a first flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas and a second flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas. A heat exchanger/energy recovery unit is disposed in the second flow passage and has a working fluid circulating therethrough for exchange of heat from the exhaust gas to the working fluid. A control valve is disposed downstream of the first and the second flow passages in a low temperature region of the exhaust heat recovery apparatus to direct exhaust gas through the first flow passage or the second flow passage.

  10. Neuralfussy multivariable control applied to the control of velocity, power, and exhaust gas temperature of a turbo gas unit; Control neurodifuso multivariable aplicado al control de velocidad, potencia y temperatura de gases de escape de una unidad turbogas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segura Ozuna, Victor Octavio

    2004-11-15

    The electric power demand in Mexico has forced to the electric sector to be in a constant search of methods and systems that, among other objectives, improve the operation of the generating power stations of electric power continually. As part of their mission, the Electrical Research Institute (IIE) has promoted and leaning the applied research and the technological development to improve the indexes of security, readiness, dependability, efficiency and durability of central generating by means of the development and the installation of big digital systems of information and control. At the present time, inside the scheme of electric power generation, the gas turbine (UTG) represent 7% of the generation of the national electric sector [1]. These units have become the dominant way of the new electric generation in the U.S, either in simple cycle or combined. The above-mentioned, is attributable at less installation cost for generated kilowatt, to the shortest construction programs, at first floor levels of emission of pollutants and competitive operation costs. The control system of the gas turbine is based on conventional control algorithms of the type PI [2]. This control scheme is dedicated for regulation tasks and rejection to interferences, and it doesn't stop pursuit of reference points. The controllers act all on a control valve, that which represents a strong interaction among the same ones, for example an adjustment in the parameters of the algorithm of the digital PI of temperature, it can improve their acting but it can also affect the acting of the speed control or that of power. The gas turbine presents a non lineal behavior and variant in the time, mainly in the starting stage where several important disturbances are presented. At the moment, the controllers used in the scheme of control of the turbines are lineal, which are syntonized for a specific operation point and they are conserved this way by indefinite time. In this thesis the formulation of a controller feedback multivariable is presented, designed with the combination of the technologies of fuzzy logic and neural networks with the purpose of improving the control of speed, power and temperature of the UTG. This proposed control is used in conjunction with the scheme of conventional control of the existent UTG, to integrate a strategy of control hybrid feedback. The control feedback is compound for a fuzzy inference system of multiple entrances and a left exit designed with entrance data and exit of the plant. The controller feed forward is compound for conventional controllers type PI in this type of units. With this strategy, the controller feedback provides a bigger contribution in the control sign the effort of the conventional controllers' PI control and the strong interaction that it exists among them diminishing. The controllers PI feed forward contribute a smaller control sign used for fine adjustments in the control sign. [Spanish] La demanda de energia electrica en Mexico ha obligado al sector electrico a estar en una busqueda constante de metodos y sistemas que, entre otros objetivos, mejoren continuamente la operacion de las centrales generadoras de energia electrica. Como parte de su mision, el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) ha promovido y apoyado la investigacion aplicada y el desarrollo tecnologico para mejorar los indices de seguridad, disponibilidad, confiabilidad, eficiencia y durabilidad de centrales generadoras mediante el desarrollo y la implantacion de grandes sistemas digitales de informacion y control. En la actualidad, dentro del esquema de generacion de energia electrica, las unidades turbogas (UTG) representan 7% de la generacion del sector electrico nacional [1]. Estas unidades se han convertido en el modo dominante de la nueva generacion electrica en los EE.UU, ya sea en ciclo simple o combinado. Lo anterior, es atribuible al menor costo de instalacion por kilowatt generado, a los programas de construccion mas cortos, a bajos niveles de emision de contaminantes y costos de operacion competitivos. El sistema de control de las unidades turbogas esta basado en algoritmos de control convencionales del tipo PI [2]. Este esquema de control es destinado para tareas de regulacion y rechazo a perturbaciones, y no para seguimiento de puntos de referencia. Los controladores actuan todos sobre una sola valvula de control, lo cual representa una fuerte interaccion entre los mismos, por ejemplo un ajuste en los parametros del algoritmo del PI digital de temperatura, puede mejorar su desempeno pero tambien puede afectar el desempeno del control de velocidad o el de potencia. La turbina de gas presenta un comportamiento no lineal y variante en el tiempo, principalmente en la etapa de arranque donde se presentan varios disturbios importantes. Actualmente, los controladores utilizados en los esquemas de control de las turbinas son lineales, los cuales son sintonizados para un punto de operacion especifico y son conservados asi por tiempo indefinido. En esta tesis se presenta la formulacion de un controlador prealimentado multivariable, disenado con la combinacion de las tecnologias de logica difusa y redes neuronales con el proposito de mejorar el control de velocidad, potencia y temperatura de la UTG. Este control propuesto es usado en conjuncion con el esquema de control convencional de la UTG existente, para integrar una estrategia de control hibrida prealimentada. El control prealimentado esta compuesto por un sistema de inferencia difuso de multiples entradas y una sola salida disenado con datos de entrada y salida de la planta. El controlador retroalimentado esta compuesto por controladores tipo PI convencionales en este tipo de unidades. Con esta estrategia, el controlador prealimentado provee una mayor contribucion en la senal de control disminuyendo el esfuerzo de control de los controladores PI convencionales y la fuerte interaccion que existe entre ellos. Los controladores PI retroalimentados aportan una menor senal de control utilizada para ajustes finos en la senal de control.

  11. Platform for a Hydrocarbon Exhaust Gas Sensor Utilizing a Pumping Cell and a Conductometric Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Ralf Moos; Kerstin Wiesner; Diana Biskupski; Andrea Geupel; Maximilian Fleischer

    2009-01-01

    Very often, high-temperature operated gas sensors are cross-sensitive to oxygen and/or they cannot be operated in oxygen-deficient (rich) atmospheres. For instance, some metal oxides like Ga2O3 or doped SrTiO3 are excellent materials for conductometric hydrocarbon detection in the rough atmosphere of automotive exhausts, but have to be operated preferably at a constant oxygen concentration. We propose a modular sensor platform that combines a conductometric two-sensor-setup with an electroche...

  12. Analysis of the reusability of the energy of the exhaust gas from the calciner for the production of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calciner is used to produce carbon from anthracite coal. In its working process, a significant amount of energy is lost through its exhaust gas. How much energy can be recovered from the exhaust gas becomes important. To answer this question a method to determine the mass flow rate and the composition of the exhaust gas from a calciner is developed, and a combustion model based on well-stirred reactor is used to obtain the suitable combustor parameters and the amount of the chemical energy which can be released in combustion. As an example to verify the method and the model, the energy utilization ratio of a calciner with power of 1250 kW is investigated. The results show that the method can determine the mass flow rate and the composition of the exhaust gas, and the combustion model is suitable for obtaining reasonable results in determining the volume and the heat duty of the combustor, the air–fuel ratio, and the amount of the chemical energy released. For a calciner with power of 1250 kW, when the temperature of the tail gas after combustion reaches to 135 °C, the energy utilization ratio of the calciner is calculated to be around 77%. - Highlights: • A method obtaining the mass balance of exhaust gas from calciner is reported. • A combustion model obtaining combustion behavior of the exhaust gas is reported. • Determining the energy utilization ratio of a typical calciner is demonstrated. • The energy utilization ratio of a typical calciner is about 77%

  13. Dual-purpose power plants, experiences with exhaust gas purification plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1984 to 1988, the research and development project ''pollutant reduction for exhaust gases from heat production systems'' sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology (BMFT) has been carried out by TUeV in Bavaria. This project was to show the state of exhaust gas technology for small and medium-sized plants (boilers and motoric heat generators). When publishing the final report, no positive balance could be given. Based on the results, the succession project ''Exhaust gas purification plants in field test'' (ARIF) has been started. This project has the following objectives: -Measuring technical investigation of the exhaust gas purification of motoric driven heat generator systems in field test. - Suitability of hand measuring devices for emissions for a discontinuous control of the exhaust gas purification plat by the operator. - Control of new methods regarding pollutant reduction for motoric and conventional heat generators. (orig.)

  14. Test procedures for measuring exhaust emissions from natural gas transmission engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on the measurement of exhaust components from large natural gas transmission engines involves collection of the exhaust sample, transfer of the sample to the analytical instrumentation, measurement of individual component concentrations, and calculations of emission results in terms of mass, fuel specific, and brake specific rates. The major exhaust components measured include nitrogen oxides (NOx), total hydrocarbons (THC), carbon dioxide (CO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and oxygen (O2). Collection of the exhaust sample requires proper probe design and placement in the exhaust system. Transfer of the sample to the analytical instruments must maintain sample integrity from the point where the sample is removed from the exhaust stream to the point at which the sample enters the instrument for analysis. Various analytical techniques are used to measure the exhaust emission concentrations

  15. Laboratory Scale of Liquid Coal Fuel Combustion Process and Exhaust Gas Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartika K. Hendratna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Much research of coal has been already undertaken to ascertain the possibilities of coal being used as substitute for heavy fuel oil in the transportation sector. The effects of using coal as transportation fuel to the environment must also be considered. This study will review several aspects of the coal oil combustion process including combustion behavior, flame stability, some emissions from exhaust gas; CO, NOx and the particulate matter in a well insulated laboratory scale furnace for more stable of combustion. Approach: New way for preparation for liquid coal oil steady combustion on a 2.75 m horizontal boiler with four annular segment tubes, a water jacket system and a system for measurement of water temperature inside was archived. Data was gained by applying liquid coal in the experiment. Detailed preparation and setting for steady combustion of coal oil and formation of the exhaust gas were discussed based on data sampling from four sample points in each centre of the angular tube segments. Results: Preparation for coal oil combustion is an important point in the successful of combustion. Heating coal fuel to than 100°C, heating the fuel line to the same temperature and providing enough air pressure for atomization of coal oil until 0.1 MPa allows coal fuel smoothly atomized in the semi gas phase. There was enough of air combustion via a blower with 4500 L min-1 of flow rate and a 24 L min-1 of water flow rate in the water jacket transforms the energy of the fuel to the heat. Uncolored of the exhaust gas and the physical inspection describes the completion of combustion. This result close-relates with the pollutants formation in the exhaust gas. Conclusion: By conducting a deep research process, there is a chance for the substitute of heavy fuel oil with liquid coal fuel with no special treatment needed in combustion process without ignoring the contribution of the combustion results as an environmental problem.

  16. Real-time exhaust gas modular flowmeter and emissions reporting system for mobile apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breton, Leo Alphonse Gerard (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    A real-time emissions reporting system includes an instrument module adapted to be detachably connected to the exhaust pipe of a combustion engine to provide for flow of exhaust gas therethrough. The instrument module includes a differential pressure probe which allows for determination of flow rate of the exhaust gas and a gas sampling tube for continuously feeding a sample of the exhaust gas to a gas analyzer or a mounting location for a non-sampling gas analyzer. In addition to the module, the emissions reporting system also includes an elastomeric boot for detachably connecting the module to the exhaust pipe of the combustion engine, a gas analyzer for receiving and analyzing gases sampled within the module and a computer for calculating pollutant mass flow rates based on concentrations detected by the gas analyzer and the detected flowrate of the exhaust gas. The system may also include a particulate matter detector with a second gas sampling tube feeding same mounted within the instrument module.

  17. Carbon Dioxide Emission Analysis of Chilled Water Production by Using Gas Turbine Exhaust Heat

    OpenAIRE

    Adzuieen Nordin; Mohd Amin Abd Majid

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide from exhaust heat emission is one of the major contributorsto the environmental pollutant in power generation plants. This problem could be addressed if the emitted exhaust heat is recovered. In cogeneration plant, the exhaust heat from the gas turbine is used to generate steam usingHeat Recovery Steam Generator. The steam from Heat Recovery Steam Generator is then used for chilled water generation in Steam Absorption Chillers by absorption process. This study analyzed the tota...

  18. Design of a DBD System for On-Board Treatment of the Exhaust Gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study is a part of the investigation of the diesel engine exhaust cleaning processes concerning a design of a compact, low power dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) system for on-board treatment of the exhaust gas in combination with a catalyst. The activated gas molecules and reduction agents which are produced by the discharge make the operation of the catalyst more efficient. The effect of the discharge frequency, power and geometry on the gas composition is described in our previous publication

  19. Sensor for measuring the oxygen content in the exhaust gas of combustion engines and method thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozon, A.; Koberstein, E.; Pletka, H.; Voelker, H.

    1982-12-07

    An improved lambda sensor is disclosed for the measurement of the oxygen content in the exhaust gas of internal combustion engines in which the sensor element is provided with a gas permeable wrapping coated with a catalyst. The sensor delivers a clear well defined signal in the so-called rich exhaust gas, which makes possible a more precise adjustment of the fuel-air mixture fed to the internal combustion engine.

  20. Field-effect gas sensors and their application in exhaust treatment systems; Feldeffekt-Gassensoren und ihre Anwendung in Abgasnachbehandlungssystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalwig, Jan

    2002-07-01

    Tightening environmental constraints on exhaust gas emissions of gasoline and Diesel engines led to a growing interest in new and highly sophisticated gas sensors. Such sensors will be required in future exhaust gas aftertreatment systems for the selective real time detection of pollutants such as nitric oxides, hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. Restrictions on cost and device dimensions imposed by the automobile industry make semiconductor gas sensors promising candidates for the realization of cheap and small-size sensor devices. This work deals with semiconductor field effect devices with catalytically active platinum (Pt) electrodes and potential applications of such devices in automotive exhaust gas aftertreatment systems. To allow for continuous operation at high temperatures, silicon carbide (SiC) and group III-nitrides such as GaN and AlGaN were used as semiconductor materials. Different devices have been realized with such materials: SiC based MOS capacitors (MOSiC), GaN Schottky diodes and GaN/AlGaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMT). The principle feasibility of SiC and GaN based field effect gas sensors for automotive applications was tested under laboratory conditions using synthetic gas mixtures. Exhaust gas components such as carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxides (NO and NO{sub 2}), various saturated and unsaturated hydro-carbons as well as water vapor, oxygen (O{sub 2}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) were used as test gases in appropriate concentrations with the sensor devices being operated in a range of temperatures extending from room temperature up to 600{sup o}C. (orig.)

  1. NOVEL GAS SENSORS FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palitha Jayaweera

    2004-05-01

    SRI is developing ceramic-based microsensors for detection of exhaust gases such as NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO in advanced combustion and gasification systems. The sensors detect the electrochemical activity of the exhaust gas species on catalytic electrodes and are designed to operate at high temperatures, elevated pressures, and corrosive environments typical of large power generation exhausts. Under this research project we are developing sensors for multiple gas detection in a single package along with data acquisition and control software and hardware. The sensor package can be easily integrated into online monitoring systems for active emission control. This report details the research activities performed from October 2003 to April 2004.

  2. Implementation of Exhaust Gas Recirculation for Double Stage Waste Heat Recovery System on Large Container Vessel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Morten; Marissal, Matthieu; Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph

    Concerned to push ships to have a lower impact on the environment, the International Maritime Organization are implementing stricter regulation of NOx and SOx emissions, called Tier III, within emission control areas (ECAs). Waste Heat Recovery Systems (WHRS) on container ships consist of...... recovering some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas. This heat is converted into electrical energy used on-board instead of using auxiliary engines. Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) systems, are recirculating a part of the exhaust gas through the engine combustion chamber to reduce emissions. WHRS combined...

  3. Evaluating tractor performance and exhaust gas emissions using biodiesel from cotton seed oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alternative fuels for diesel engines, such as biodiesel, have attracted much attention recently due to increasing fuel prices and the imperative to reduce emissions. The exhaust gas emissions from tractors and other agricultural machinery make a significant contribution to these emissions. The use of biodiesel in internal combustion engines (ICE) has been reported to give comparable performance to conventional diesel (CD), but with generally lower emissions. There is however, contradictory evidence of NO emissions being both higher and lower from the use of biodiesel. In this work, agriculture tractor engine performance and its emission using both CD and biodiesel from cotton seed oil (CSO-B20) mixed at a 20% blend ration has been evaluated and compared. The PTO test results showed comparable exhaust emissions between CD and CSO-B20. However, the use of CSO-B20 led to reductions in the thermal efficiency and exhaust temperature and an increase in the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), when compared to CD.

  4. Evaluating tractor performance and exhaust gas emissions using biodiesel from cotton seed oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-lwayzy, Saddam H.; Yusaf, Talal; Jensen, Troy

    2012-09-01

    Alternative fuels for diesel engines, such as biodiesel, have attracted much attention recently due to increasing fuel prices and the imperative to reduce emissions. The exhaust gas emissions from tractors and other agricultural machinery make a significant contribution to these emissions. The use of biodiesel in internal combustion engines (ICE) has been reported to give comparable performance to conventional diesel (CD), but with generally lower emissions. There is however, contradictory evidence of NO emissions being both higher and lower from the use of biodiesel. In this work, agriculture tractor engine performance and its emission using both CD and biodiesel from cotton seed oil (CSO-B20) mixed at a 20% blend ration has been evaluated and compared. The PTO test results showed comparable exhaust emissions between CD and CSO-B20. However, the use of CSO-B20 led to reductions in the thermal efficiency and exhaust temperature and an increase in the brake specific fuel consumption (BSFC), when compared to CD.

  5. Simulation and evaluation of a CCHP system with exhaust gas deep-recovery and thermoelectric generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: Exhaust gas deep-recovery and thermoelectric generator are applied in CCHP system. Electric output of TEG changes from 0.231 kW to 1.18 kW. Total recoverable waste heat increases by 1316%. ESR, CSR and PEE are improved to 0.304, 0.417, and 0.944, respectively. The total investment increment of system is about 11%. - Abstract: Combined cooling, heating and power (CCHP) systems are thought to be highly efficient in energy utilization. But there are still potentials to further improve system performance. This work proposed a CCHP system based on internal combustion engine (ICE) for power generation, refrigeration and domestic hot water production. Thermoelectric generator (TEG) and condensing heat exchanger are applied to efficiently recover the exhaust gas waste heat of ICE. All the energy flows are designed based on energy cascading utilization principle. Basing on the test results of a 16 kW ICE, CCHP system characteristics are investigated by simulation from idling condition to full load condition. Especially, the part load performance of TEG and absorption chiller are simulated and discussed. The feasible operating zone of ICE and feed water flow rate are figured out to keep the domestic hot water temperature within a certain range. Results show that the primary energy efficiency of system can reach 0.944, thanks to the condensing heat recovery from exhaust gas. The primary energy saving ratio and cost saving ratio can reach 0.304 and 0.417, respectively. Considering some more equipment is incorporated, the total investment increment is about 11.1%

  6. High temperature gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the status of the high temperature helium gas-cooled reactor here in the United States as well as in Europe. The post-operational research program for the prototype Peach Bottom No. 1 reactor is described and results obtained to date are reviewed

  7. Fusion plasma exhaust: the interaction of hot plasma with cold gas and solid surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power fluxes along magnetic field lines in the exhaust of a fusion device based on the tokamak are very high and are made worse by instabilities of the plasma edge region. They would result in the rapid erosion of solid target surfaces by sputtering and evaporation. The use of a gas target to absorb the heat load is potentially an attractive solution to this problem. The interaction zone is an example of a system in steady state but far from thermodynamic equilibrium and has many generic properties in common with sources of low temperature plasma used in industrial applications. Recent work to elucidate the interaction of a hot plasma stream with a cold gas will be described and the problems associated with modelling such processes will be outlined

  8. Implementation of Exhaust Gas Recirculation for Double Stage Waste Heat Recovery System on Large Container Vessel

    OpenAIRE

    Andreasen, Morten; Marissal, Matthieu; Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Concerned to push ships to have a lower impact on the environment, the International Maritime Organization are implementing stricter regulation of NOx and SOx emissions, called Tier III, within emission control areas (ECAs). Waste Heat Recovery Systems (WHRS) on container ships consist of recovering some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas. This heat is converted into electrical energy used on-board instead of using auxiliary engines. Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) systems, are recirculat...

  9. Suicide by carbon monoxide from car exhaust-gas in Denmark 1995-1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Asser H; Gregersen, Markil; Thomsen, Asser Hedegård

    2006-01-01

    In the period 1995-1999 there were 388 car exhaust-gas suicides in Denmark. Of these 343 (88.4%) were men and 45 (11.6%) were women, the average age being 47 years. The car exhaust-gas suicides made up 9.3% of all suicides in Denmark in the period. The corresponding rate was 11.7% for men and 3.7...

  10. In optics humidity compensation in NDIR exhaust gas measurements of NO2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stolberg-Rohr, Thomine Kirstine; Buchner, Rainer; Clausen, Sønnik; Møller Jensen, Jens; Skouboe, Allan; Hawkins, Gary J.; Skov Hansen, Rene

    2015-01-01

    NDIR is proposed for monitoring of air pollutants emitted by ship engines. Careful optical filtering overcomes the challenge of optical detection of NO2 in humid exhaust gas, despite spectroscopic overlap with the water vapour band. © 2014 OSA.......NDIR is proposed for monitoring of air pollutants emitted by ship engines. Careful optical filtering overcomes the challenge of optical detection of NO2 in humid exhaust gas, despite spectroscopic overlap with the water vapour band. © 2014 OSA....

  11. Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijmans Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    2012-05-15

    A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

  12. Exhaust purification with on-board ammonia production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robel, Wade J.; Driscoll, James Joshua; Coleman, Gerald N.

    2010-10-12

    A method of ammonia production for a selective catalytic reduction system is provided. The method includes producing an exhaust gas stream within a cylinder group, wherein the first exhaust gas stream includes NOx. The exhaust gas stream may be supplied to an exhaust passage and cooled to a predetermined temperature range, and at least a portion of the NOx within the exhaust gas stream my be converted into ammonia.

  13. THERMODYNAMIC MODEL OF THE CYCLE OF SPARK IGNITION ENGINE WITH EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Öğüçlü, Özer

    2015-01-01

    A thermodynamic model has been developed and applied to predict the emission levels and performance of a spark ignition engine with using Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) gas. The model simulates the full thermodynamic cycle of the engine and includes heat transfer, combustion, gas exchange process, thermal dissociation of water and carbon dioxide, and chemical equilibrium. 

  14. Exhaust gas recirculation – Zero dimensional modelling and characterization for transient diesel combustion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Zero-dimensional EGR model for transient diesel combustion control. • Detailed analysis of EGR effects on intake, cylinder charge and exhaust properties. • Intake oxygen validated as an operating condition-independent measure of EGR. • Quantified EGR effectiveness in terms of NOx emission reduction. • Twin lambda sensor technique for estimation of EGR/in-cylinder parameters. - Abstract: The application of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) during transient engine operation is a challenging task since small fluctuations in EGR may cause larger than acceptable spikes in NOx/soot emissions or deterioration in the combustion efficiency. Moreover, the intake charge dilution at any EGR ratio is a function of engine load and intake pressure, and typically changes during transient events. Therefore, the management of EGR during transient engine operation or advanced combustion cycles (that are inherently less stable) requires a fundamental understanding of the transient EGR behaviour and its impact on the intake charge development. In this work, a zero-dimensional EGR model is described to estimate the transient (cycle-by-cycle) progression of EGR and the time (engine cycles) required for its stabilization. The model response is tuned to a multi-cylinder engine by using an overall engine system time-constant and shown to effectively track the transient EGR changes. The impact of EGR on the actual air–fuel ratio of the cylinder charge is quantified by defining an in-cylinder excess-air ratio that accounts for the oxygen in the recycled exhaust gas. Furthermore, a twin lambda sensor (TLS) technique is implemented for tracking the intake dilution and in-cylinder excess-air ratio in real-time. The modelling and analysis results are validated against a wide range of engine operations, including transient and steady-state low temperature combustion tests

  15. Exhaust gas purification with sodium bicarbonate. Analysis and evaluation; Abgasreinigung mit Natriumhydrogencarbonat. Analyse und Bewertung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quicker, Peter; Rotheut, Martin; Schulten, Marc [RWTH Aachen Univ. (Germany). Lehr- und Forschungsgebiet Technologie der Energierohstoffe (TEER); Athmann, Uwe [dezentec ingenieurgesellschaft mbH, Essen (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    The dry exhaust gas cleaning uses sodium bicarbonate in order to absorb acid components of exhaust gases such as sulphur dioxide or hydrochloric acid. Recently, sodium and calcium based adsorbents are compared with respect to their economic and ecologic options. None of the investigations performed considered decidedly practical experiences from the system operation such as differences in the management, availability, personnel expenditure and maintenance expenditure. Under this aspect, the authors of the contribution under consideration report on exhaust gas cleaning systems using sodium carbonate as well as lime adsorbents. The operators of these exhaust gas cleaning systems were questioned on their experiences, and all relevant operational data (consumption of additives, consumption of energy, emissions, standstill, maintenance effort) were recorded and evaluated at a very detailed level.

  16. Exhaust gas concentration of CNG fuelled direct injection engine at MBT timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This paper presents an experimental result of exhaust gas concentration of high compression engine fuelled with compressed natural gas (CNG) at maximum brake torque (MBT). The engine uses central direct injection (DI) technique to inject the CNG into the cylinder. The engine geometry bases on gasoline engine with 14:1 compression ratio and called CNGDI engine. The injectors are positioned within a certain degrees of spark plug location. The objective of the experiment is to study the influence and significant of MBT timing in CNGDI engine towards exhaust gases. The experimental tests were carried out using computer-controlled eddy-current dynamometer, which measures the CNGDI engine performance. At MBT region, exhaust gas concentration as such CO, HC, NOx, O2 and CO2, were recorded and analyzed during the test using the Horiba analyzer. A closed loop wide band lambda sensor has been mounted at the exhaust manifold to indicate the oxygen level during the exercise. (author)

  17. Development of filters for exhaust air or off-gas cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the 'Laboratorium fuer Aerosolphysik und Filtertechnik II' of the 'Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe' concentrate on the development of filters to be used for cleaning nuclear and conventional exhaust air and off-gas. Originally, these techniques were intended to be applied in nuclear facilities only. Their application for conventional gas purification, however, has led to a reorientation of research and development projects. By way of example, it is reported about the use of the multi-way sorption filter for radioiodine removal in nuclear power plants and following flue-gas purification in heating power plants as well as for off-gas cleaning in chemical industry. The improvement of HEPA filters and the development of metal fibre filters has led to components which can be used in the range of high humidity and moisture as well as at high temperatures and an increased differential pressure. The experience obtained in the field of high-efficiency filtering of nuclear airborne particles is made use of during the investigations concerning the removal of particles of conventional pollutants in the submicron range. A technique of radioiodine removal and an improved removal of airborne particles has been developed for use in the future reprocessing plant. Thus, a maximum removal efficiency can be achieved and an optimum waste management is made possible. It is reported about the components obtained as a result of these activities and their use for off-gas cleaning in the Wackersdorf reprocessing plant (WAW). (orig.)

  18. Effect of operating and sampling conditions on the exhaust gas composition of small-scale power generators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Marianne; Vanpachtenbeke, Floris; Horemans, Benjamin; De Wael, Karolien; Hauchecorne, Birger; Van Langenhove, Herman; Demeestere, Kristof; Lenaerts, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Small stationary diesel engines, like in generator sets, have limited emission control measures and are therefore responsible for 44% of the particulate matter (PM) emissions in the United States. The diesel exhaust composition depends on operating conditions of the combustion engine. Furthermore, the measurements are influenced by the used sampling method. This study examines the effect of engine loading and exhaust gas dilution on the composition of small-scale power generators. These generators are used in different operating conditions than road-transport vehicles, resulting in different emission characteristics. Experimental data were obtained for gaseous volatile organic compounds (VOC) and PM mass concentration, elemental composition and nitrate content. The exhaust composition depends on load condition because of its effect on fuel consumption, engine wear and combustion temperature. Higher load conditions result in lower PM concentration and sharper edged particles with larger aerodynamic diameters. A positive correlation with load condition was found for K, Ca, Sr, Mn, Cu, Zn and Pb adsorbed on PM, elements that originate from lubricating oil or engine corrosion. The nitrate concentration decreases at higher load conditions, due to enhanced nitrate dissociation to gaseous NO at higher engine temperatures. Dilution on the other hand decreases PM and nitrate concentration and increases gaseous VOC and adsorbed metal content. In conclusion, these data show that operating and sampling conditions have a major effect on the exhaust gas composition of small-scale diesel generators. Therefore, care must be taken when designing new experiments or comparing literature results. PMID:22442670

  19. An analysis of the thermodynamic efficiency for exhaust gas recirculation-condensed water recirculation-waste heat recovery condensing boilers (EGR-CWR-WHR CB)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents fundamental research on the development of a new boiler that is expected to have a higher efficiency and lower emissions than existing boilers. The thermodynamic efficiency of exhaust gas recirculation-condensed water recirculation-waste heat recovery condensing boilers (EGR-CWR-WHR CB) was calculated using thermodynamic analysis and was compared with other boilers. The results show the possibility of obtaining a high efficiency when the temperature of the exhaust gas is controlled within 50–60 °C because water in the exhaust gas is condensed within this temperature range. In addition, the enthalpy emitted by the exhaust gas for the new boiler is smaller because the amount of condensed water is increased by the high dew-point temperature and the low exhaust gas temperature. Thus, the new boiler can obtain a higher efficiency than can older boilers. The efficiency of the EGR-CWR-WHR CB proposed in this study is 93.91%, which is 7.04% higher than that of existing CB that is currently used frequently. - Highlights: • The study presents the development of a new boiler expected to have a high efficiency. • Thermodynamic efficiency of EGR-CWR-WHR condensing boiler was calculated. • Efficiency of EGR-CWR-WHR CB is 93.91%, which is 7.04% higher than existing CB

  20. Studies on exhaust gas recycling and waste heat recovery for the Z12V190 diesel engine

    OpenAIRE

    HOU XUEJUN; H.A. NASR-EI-DIN; LIANG QIMIN; GAO LONGZHU

    2015-01-01

    The Z12V190 diesel engine has high fuel consumption and low thermal efficiency, and releaseslarge amounts of diesel exhaust gas and waste heat into the atmosphere. This causes hugeresource as well as energy waste. In order to protect the environment, save energy, and alsoto solve these problems about exhaust gas recycling and waste heat recovery, the Z12V190diesel engine exhaust emission rate and minimum gas injection rate for gas underbalanceddrilling are calculated and compared with the ded...

  1. Analysis of benefits of using internal exhaust gas recirculation in biogas-fueled HCCI engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The influence of EGR on combustion of biogas fueled HCCI was investigated. • The aim was to reduce intake temperature requirement by internal EGR. • Combustion products caused the delay of combustion in similar conditions. • Internal EGR enabled by negative valve overlap increased cylinder temperature. • This increase was not enough to significantly reduce the intake temperature. - Abstract: This paper describes a numerical study that analyzed the influence of combustion products (CP) concentration on the combustion characteristics (combustion timing and combustion duration) of a biogas fueled homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine and the possibility of reducing the high intake temperature requirement necessary for igniting biogas in a HCCI engine by using internal exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) enabled by negative valve overlap (NVO). An engine model created in AVL Boost, and validated against experimental engine data, was used in this study. The results show, somewhat counter-intuitively, that when CP concentrations are increased the required intake temperature for maintaining the same combustion timing must be increased. When greater NVO is used to increase the in-cylinder CP concentration, the in-cylinder temperature does increase, but the chemical dilution influence of CP almost entirely counteracts this thermal effect. Additionally, it has been observed that with larger fractions of CP some instability of combustion in the calculation was obtained which indicates that the increase of internal EGR might produce some combustion instability

  2. The Purification and Thermal Recovery of Exhaust Gas with the Wet-type Electrostatic Precipitator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umemiya, Hiromichi; Koike, Hiroshi

    The exhaust gas ejected from engine heat pump contain the injurious materials, SOx, NOx and dust. And it also has a good deal of thermal energy, so thermal recovery from the exhaust gas increases the total C.O.P. of the heat pump system. The experimental study for the purpose of the purification of the exhaust gas and the thermal recovery from exhaust gas has been conducted with the wet-type electrostatic precipitator, which has the advantage of high collection efficiency and the gas-liquid direct heat-exchanism. The experimental results showed that: 1. For the dust, the collection efficiency of 96 % was achieved, when applied voltage was 19,000V. 2. The effect of the alkali absorption of Nox and SOx gases was made sure by the experiment. 3. The fundamental equation which is useful for design method was resolved by kinetic model of charged particle. 4. In the phenomenon of coagulation the velocity constant was decided with "Chemical Kinetics" and so that the density of coagulant, Ca(OH)2 was decided. 5. It is shown that mixing coagulant, Ca(OH)2, was a very effective way to remove the dust particles from the waste water. 6. Thermal energy of 5.3 kW was recovered from exhaust gas, so that total C.O.P. of heat pump system increases from 1.83 to 1.97.

  3. Diesel emission reduction using internal exhaust gas recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin; Durrett, Russell P.

    2012-01-24

    A method for controlling combustion in a direct-injection diesel engine includes monitoring a crankshaft rotational position of a cylinder of the engine, monitoring an engine load, determining an intake stroke within the cylinder based upon the crankshaft rotational position, and when the engine load is less than a threshold engine load, opening an exhaust valve for the cylinder during a portion of the intake stroke.

  4. Platform for a Hydrocarbon Exhaust Gas Sensor Utilizing a Pumping Cell and a Conductometric Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Moos

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Very often, high-temperature operated gas sensors are cross-sensitive to oxygen and/or they cannot be operated in oxygen-deficient (rich atmospheres. For instance, some metal oxides like Ga2O3 or doped SrTiO3 are excellent materials for conductometric hydrocarbon detection in the rough atmosphere of automotive exhausts, but have to be operated preferably at a constant oxygen concentration. We propose a modular sensor platform that combines a conductometric two-sensor-setup with an electrochemical pumping cell made of YSZ to establish a constant oxygen concentration in the ambient of the conductometric sensor film. In this paper, the platform is introduced, the two-sensor-setup is integrated into this new design, and sensing performance is characterized. Such a platform can be used for other sensor principles as well.

  5. Platform for a hydrocarbon exhaust gas sensor utilizing a pumping cell and a conductometric sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biskupski, Diana; Geupel, Andrea; Wiesner, Kerstin; Fleischer, Maximilian; Moos, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    Very often, high-temperature operated gas sensors are cross-sensitive to oxygen and/or they cannot be operated in oxygen-deficient (rich) atmospheres. For instance, some metal oxides like Ga(2)O(3) or doped SrTiO(3) are excellent materials for conductometric hydrocarbon detection in the rough atmosphere of automotive exhausts, but have to be operated preferably at a constant oxygen concentration. We propose a modular sensor platform that combines a conductometric two-sensor-setup with an electrochemical pumping cell made of YSZ to establish a constant oxygen concentration in the ambient of the conductometric sensor film. In this paper, the platform is introduced, the two-sensor-setup is integrated into this new design, and sensing performance is characterized. Such a platform can be used for other sensor principles as well. PMID:22423212

  6. Current Techniques of Growing Algae Using Flue Gas from Exhaust Gas Industry: a Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guanhua; Chen, Feng; Kuang, Yali; He, Huan; Qin, An

    2016-03-01

    The soaring increase of flue gas emission had caused global warming, environmental pollution as well as climate change. Widespread concern on reduction of flue gas released from industrial plants had considered the microalgae as excellent biological materials for recycling the carbon dioxide directly emitted from exhaust industries. Microalgae also have the potential to be the valuable feedback for renewable energy production due to their high growth rate and abilities to sequester inorganic carbon through photosynthetic process. In this review article, we will illustrate important relative mechanisms in the metabolic processes of biofixation by microalgae and their recent experimental researches and advances of sequestration of carbon dioxide by microalgae on actual industrial and stimulate flue gases, novel photobioreactor cultivation systems as well as the perspectives and limitations of microalgal cultivation in further development. PMID:26695777

  7. Reaction kinetics and reactor modelling in the design of catalytic reactors for automotive exhaust gas abatement

    OpenAIRE

    Ahola, J. (Juha)

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The tightening environmental legislation and technological development in automotive engineering form a challenge in reactor design of catalytic reactors for automotive exhaust gas abatement. The catalytic reactor is the heart of the exhaust aftertreatment processes, but it can be seen also just as one subsidiary part of vehicles. The aim of this work is to reveal applicable kinetic models to predict behaviour of the particular catalysts and to establish guidelines for modelli...

  8. Low-pressure-ratio regenerative exhaust-heated gas turbine. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tampe, L.A.; Frenkel, R.G.; Kowalick, D.J.; Nahatis, H.M.; Silverstein, S.M.; Wilson, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    A design study of coal-burning gas-turbine engines using the exhaust-heated cycle and state-of-the-art components has been completed. In addition, some initial experiments on a type of rotary ceramic-matrix regenerator that would be used to transfer heat from the products of coal combustion in the hot turbine exhaust to the cool compressed air have been conducted. Highly favorable results have been obtained on all aspects on which definite conclusions could be drawn.

  9. Turbocharger efficiencies in pulsating exhaust gas flow; Turboladerwirkungsgrade in pulsierender Abgasstroemung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aymanns, Richard; Scharf, Johannes; Uhlmann, Tolga [FEV GmbH, Aachen (Germany). Business Unit Gasoline Engines; Pischinger, Stefan [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Verbrennungskraftmaschinen

    2012-07-15

    The exhaust pressure pulse amplitudes in downsizing engines challenge the quasi steady modelling of turbocharger turbines in engine process simulation. An early selection of a well matching turbocharger is the key to time efficiency in the concept development phase of engines with ambitious performance and fuel economy targets. This article from FEV and RWTH Aachen assesses the turbocharger efficiencies in pulsating exhaust gas flow and gives a handling recommendation to minimise matching errors. (orig.)

  10. Temperature dependence of source specific volatility basis sets for motor vehicle exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anirban; Choi, Yunsoo

    2015-10-01

    Recent work on emissions testing has focused on developing source specific volatility distributions which could be used to improve emissions inventories. One problem about these volatility profiles is that they are evaluated only at one temperature which is usually 298K. This study uses a simple statistical model to evaluate the temperature dependence of the source-resolved volatility basis set, considering gasoline and diesel vehicle exhaust. The steps involved (a) fitting a distribution to the emissions data (b) evaluating the goodness of fit using a statistical test (c) updating the volatility bins using the Clausius-Clayperon equation; calculating the heats of vaporization of each volatility class using a regression model (d) assessing how the volatility of different VOC classes-Extremely Low Volatile, Low Volatile, Semi-Volatile, Intermediate Volatile and Volatile Organic Compounds - are affected by temperature. The results indicated that there could be significant changes in gas-particle partitioning of these emissions. For diesel exhaust at 298K, the fractions are 5.4נ10-4 (ELVOC), 0.074 (LVOC), 0.76 (SVOC), 0.17 (IVOC) and 10-5 (VOC) respectively. Looking at a window of ?20K, the partitioning for 278K is 3נ10-3 (ELVOC), 0.26 (LVOC), 0.67 (SVOC), 0.07 (IVOC) with no VOC fraction; while at 318K it is 1.5נ10-7 (ELVOC), 9נ10-3 (LVOC), 0.64 (SVOC), 0.35 (IVOC) and 2נ10-5 (VOC); demonstrating a significant change with temperature. The parameterizations developed in this work could be used to improve motor vehicle emissions inventory models such as MOVES.

  11. Tracer Gas Technique Versus a Control Box Method for Estimating Direct Capture Efficiency of Exhaust Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, U.; Aubertin, G.; Breum, N. O.; Fontaine, J. R.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    Numerical modelling of direct capture efficiency of a local exhaust is used to compare the tracer gas technique of a proposed CEN standard against a more consistent approach based on an imaginary control box. It is concluded that the tracer gas technique is useful for field applications....

  12. Workshop on an Assessment of Gas-Side Fouling in Fossil Fuel Exhaust Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marner, W. J. (Editor); Webb, R. L. (Editor)

    1982-01-01

    The state of the art of gas side fouling in fossil fuel exhaust environments was assessed. Heat recovery applications were emphasized. The deleterious effects of gas side fouling including increased energy consumption, increased material losses, and loss of production were identified.

  13. APPLICATION GUIDE FOR THE SOURCE PM10 EXHAUST GAS RECYCLE SAMPLING SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    The document describes assembly, operation, and maintenance of the Exhaust Gas Recycle (EGR) sampling system. The design of the sampling train allows the operator to maintain a constant flow rate through an inertial sampler while the gas flow rate into the sampling nozzle is adju...

  14. Application of the water gas shift reaction to fusion fuel exhaust streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a Fusion Fuel Clean Up (FCU) system, impurities will be removed from the fusion reactor exhaust and neutral beam line streams. Tritium in this impurity stream will be recovered and recycled to the fuel stream. In one flowsheet configuration of the Tritium Systems Test Assembly (TSTA), tritium is recovered from a simulated impurity stream via uranium hot metal beds and recycled to an isotope separation system. This study has shown, however, that the catalyzed water gas shift reaction, by which (H,D,T)2O and CO are converted to (H,D,T)2 and CO2 is a better method of (H,D,T)2O reduction than the hot metal beds. Catalytic reactors were designed, built and tested to provide data for the design of a prototype reactor to replace the hot metal beds in the FCU system. The prototype reactor contains only 10 g of catalyst and is expected to last at least 5 years. The reactor is small (1.3 cm OD x 13 cm long), operates at low temperatures (approximately 490 K) and will convert water to hydrogen, at a CO/H2O ratio of 1.5, with an efficiency of greater than 98 percent. Results show that the catalytic reactor is very stable even during upset conditions. Wide ranges of flow and a CO/H2O ratio variance from 1.3 upward have little effect on the conversion efficiency. Short term high temperature excursions do not affect the catalyst and lower temperatures will simply decrease the reaction rate resulting in lower conversions. The reactor appears to be unaffected by NO2, CO2, O2 and N2 in the feed stream at concentration levels expected in a fusion reactor exhaust stream

  15. Evaluation of Energy Saving Characteristics of a High-Efficient Cogeneration System Utilizing Gas Engine Exhaust Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Pyong Sik

    A high efficiency cogeneration system (CGS) utilizing high temperature exhaust gas from a gas engine is proposed. In the proposed CGS, saturated steam produced in the gas engine is superheated with a super heater utilizing regenerative burner and used to drive a steam turbine generator. The heat energy is supplied by extracting steam from the steam turbine and turbine outlet low-temperature steam. Both of the energy saving characteristics of the proposed CGS and a CGS constructed by using the original gas engine (GE-CGS) were investigated and compared, by taking a case where energy for office buildings was supplied by the conventional energy systems. It was shown that the proposed CGS has energy saving rate of 24.5%, higher than 1.83 times, compared with that of the original GE-CGS.

  16. Removal of Carbon Dioxide Gas From the Exhaust Gases Generated at the Takoradi Thermal Power Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Charles

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Takoradi Thermal Power Station (TTPS generates electricity by burning fossil-fuel and hence it also generates greenhouse gases especially carbon dioxide, which is vented into the atmosphere. These greenhouse gases are pollutants known to cause global warming. A method for the removal of carbon dioxide gas from the exhaust gases generated at TTPS is proposed in this research. It aims at reducing the plant’s carbon dioxide emission into the atmosphere and hence reducing the plant’s rate of pollution into the atmosphere. The method employed is a modification of a method known as the Fluor Daniel ECONAMINE FG process. This method removes carbon dioxide from exhaust gas by using an amine solution which comes into “contact” with the exhaust gas in a counter-current manner. This method has been applied by 23 companies which produce CO2 on a large scale. However, before TTPS apply this method a cost feasibility study is recommended.

  17. Experimental study on engine gas-path component fault monitoring using exhaust gas electrostatic signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the recent development in engine gas-path components health monitoring using electrostatic sensors in combination with signal-processing techniques. Two ground-based engine electrostatic monitoring experiments are reported and the exhaust gas electrostatic monitoring signal-based fault-detection method is proposed. It is found that the water washing, oil leakage and combustor linear cracking result in an increase in the activity level of the electrostatic monitoring signal, which can be detected by the electrostatic monitoring system. For on-line health monitoring of the gas-path components, a baseline model-based fault-detection method is proposed and the multivariate state estimation technique is used to establish the baseline model for the electrostatic monitoring signal. The method is applied to a data set from a turbo-shaft engine electrostatic monitoring experiment. The results of the case study show that the system with the developed method is capable of detecting the gas-path component fault in an on-line fashion. (paper)

  18. Exhaust Gas Recirculation Control for Large Diesel Engines - Achievable Performance with SISO Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Mahler; Blanke, Mogens; Niemann, Hans Henrik; Vejlgaard-Laursen, Morten

    analysis of the highly non-linear dynamics. Control architectures are investigated and performance in terms of disturbance rejection and reference tracking are investigated under model uncertainty. Classical feed-forward and feedback controller designs are investigated using classical and Quantitative......This paper investigates control possibilities for Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on large diesel engines. The goal is to reduce the amount of NOx in the exhaust gas by reducing the oxygen concentration available for combustion. Control limitations imposed by the system are assessed using linear...... Feedback Theory (QFT) designs. Validation of the controller is made on the model with focus on disturbance reduction ability....

  19. A Framework for Modular Modeling of the Diesel Engine Exhaust Gas Cleaning System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åberg, Andreas; Hansen, Thomas Klint; Linde, Kasper; Nielsen, Anders Krebs; Damborg, Rune; Widd, Anders; Abildskov, Jens; Jensen, Anker Degn; Huusom, Jakob Kjøbsted

    Pollutants from diesel engines have a negative effect on urban air quality. Because of this and new legislation restricting the emission level, it is necessary to develop exhaust gas treatment systems for diesel engines that can reduce the amount of pollutants. A modular model capable of simulati...... modular model. Four different models in the automotive diesel exhaust gas cleaning system are presented briefly. Based on the presented methodology, it is discussed which changes are needed to the models to create a modular model of the whole catalytic system....

  20. HEAT TRANSFER IN EXHAUST SYSTEM OF A COLD START ENGINE AT LOW ENVIRONMENTAL TEMPERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snežana D Petković

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available During the engine cold start, there is a significantly increased emission of harmful engine exhaust gases, particularly at very low environmental temperatures. Therefore, reducing of emission during that period is of great importance for the reduction of entire engine emission. This study was conducted to test the activating speed of the catalyst at low environmental temperatures. The research was conducted by use of mathematical model and developed computer programme for calculation of non-stationary heat transfer in engine exhaust system. During the research, some of constructional parameters of exhaust system were adopted and optimized at environmental temperature of 22 C. The combination of design parameters giving best results at low environmental temperatures was observed. The results showed that the temperature in the environment did not have any significant influence on pre-catalyst light-off time.

  1. Re-entrainment and dispersion of exhausts from indoor radon reduction systems. Analysis of tracer gas data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tracer gas studies were conducted around four model houses in a wind tunnel, and around one house in the field, to quantify re-entrainment and dispersion of exhaust gases released from residential indoor radon reduction systems. Re-entrainment tests in the field suggest that active soil depressurization systems exhausting at grade level can contribute indoor radon concentrations 3 to 9 times greater than systems exhausting at the eave. With a high exhaust concentration of 37,000 Bq/m3, the indoor contribution from eave exhaust re-entrainment may be only 20% to 70% of the national average ambient level in the U.S. (about 14 Bq/m3), while grade-level exhaust may contribute 1.8 times the ambient average. The grade-level contribution would drop to only 0.18 times ambient if the exhaust were 3,700 Bq/m3. Wind tunnel tests of exhaust dispersion outdoors suggest that grade-level exhaust can contribute mean concentrations beside houses averaging 7 times greater than exhaust at the eave, and 25 to 50 times greater than exhaust midway up the roof slope. With 37,000 Bq/m3 in the exhaust, the highest mean concentrations beside the house could be less than or equal to the ambient background level with eave and mid-roof exhausts, and 2 to 7 times greater than ambient with grade exhausts. (au) 9 refs

  2. Relationship between the variations of hydrogen in HCNG fuel and the oxygen in exhausted gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preecha Yaom

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The variation of the mixing ratio between hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG in hydrogen enriched compressed natural gas fuel (HCNG gives different results in terms of engine performances, fuel consumption, and emission characteristics. Therefore, the engine performance using HCNG as fuel can be optimized if the mixing ratio between the two fuels in HCNG can be adjusted in real time while the engine is being operated. In this research, the relationship between the amount of oxygen in the exhausted gas and the mixing composition between the hydrogen and CNG in HCNG is investigated based on the equilibrium equation of combustion. It is found that the main factors affecting the amount of oxygen in exhausted gas when using HCNG as fuel include the error from the air-fuel-ratio (AFR control, the error from the HCNG composition control, and the intended change of the HCNG composition. Theoretically, the amount of the oxygen in the exhaust should increase by 0.78% for every 5% addition of H2 at stoichiometric condition. This value can be higher or lower for lean and rich engine operation, respectively. The experimental results found that at the equivalent ratio around 0.8 the amount of O2 in the exhaust gas increases about 1.23% for every 5% H2 addition, which inclines with the proposed calculations.

  3. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF EXHAUST PARTICLES FROM GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A program was conducted to chemically characterize particulate emissions from a current technology, high population, gas turbine engine. Attention was focused on polynuclear aromatic compounds, phenols, nitrosamines and total organics. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were...

  4. Exhaust gas emission from ships in Norwegian coastal waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the following vessel categories bunker consumption and emission of greenhouse gases and SO2 has been calculated: Norwegian coastal trade, domestic ferries, fishing vessels (Norwegian), Norwegian military vessels, inter-coastal ferries, import and export, ships iron-ore from Narvik and Soviet vessels in transit. The carbon emission (CO2 as carbon) within 12 nautical miles has been calculated to 0.621 MtC (Mega ton carbon) and to 1.0 MtC within the economic zone for these vessel categories. The calculated ''inland waterways'' bunker consumption in this study deviates from the Central Bureau of Statistics of Norway and OECD/IEA figures by up to 25%. This large deviation supports the need for a uniform method to calculate ''inland waterways'' bunker consumption. Scenarios for the emission outlook for the years 1995, 2000 and 2005 are discussed and calculated. With 1988 as present level it is possible, according to these scenarios, to reduce the emission of NOx by close to 40% and SO2 by 85%. Reduction of greenhouse- and SO2 components in the exhaust gases from ships is today technically possible, but the demand for further research and development is significant. Compared with land-based low-emission technologies, the offshore technologies are years behind. 21 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs

  5. Reformulation of engine gasoline to reduce exhaust emissions in Finnish conditions. Effect of gasoline aromatics, olefins and T90 temperature on exhaust emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research work focused on the effects of gasoline composition, i.e. aromatics and olefin contents and 90 % point of distillation, on exhaust emissions. The experimental part comprised exhaust gas measurements for 13 catalyst cars at +22 deg C and for one non-catalyst car at +22 deg C according to FTP75 driving cycle. Regulated emissions (THC, CO and NOx), non-regulated emissions (hydrocarbons and aldehydes), carbon dioxide and fuel consumption were measured. The high aromatics contents of eight test fuels were about 40 vol% and the low ones about 15 vol%, the high olefin contents were about 15 vol% and the low ones about 2 vol%, and the high T90 temperatures about +170 deg C and the low ones +145 deg C. The results were treated in two ways: effects of each single change in characteristics, and those of simultaneous changes in all fuel characteristics studied. The lowest CO and THC emissions for the catalyst cars at +22 deg C were obtained by reducing the aromatics content and the T90 temperature of the fuel, while the reduction of the olefin content increased respective emissions. The NOx emission increased when the aromatics content and T90 temperature were reduced, and decreased slightly when the olefin content was reduced. The CO2 emission and the fuel consumption (kg/100 km) were affected, i.e. reduced, only by a reduction in the aromatics content. However, the fuel consumption in volume units (1/100 kg) increased. The results at -7 deg C for THC and NOx emissions were along the same lines as at +22 deg C, except for the CO emission, which decreased when the olefin content was reduced and increased when the T90 temperature was lowered

  6. HPLC analysis of aldehydes in automobile exhaust gas: Comparison of exhaust odor and irritation in different types of gasoline and diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to identify and measure aldehydes from automobile exhaust gas. Four aldehydes: formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), acrolein (H2C=CHCHO) and propionaldehyde (CH3CH2CHO) and one ketone, acetone (CH3)2CO are separated. The other higher aldehydes in exhaust gas are very small and cannot be separated. A new method of gas sampling, hereafter called bag sampling in HPLC is introduced instead of the trapping gas sampling method. The superiority of the bag sampling method is its transient gas checking capability. In the second part of this study, HPLC results are applied to compare exhaust odor and irritation of exhaust gases in different types of gasoline and diesel engines. Exhaust odor, irritation and aldehydes are found worst in direct injection (DI) diesel engines and best in some good multi-point injection (MPI) gasoline and direct injection gasoline (DIG) engines. Indirect injection (IDI) diesel engines showed odor, irritation and aldehydes in between the levels of MPI gasoline, DIG and DI diesel engines

  7. System acceptance and operability test report for the RMCS exhauster C on flammable gas tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waldo, E.J.

    1998-03-11

    This test report documents the completion of acceptance and operability testing of the rotary mode core sampling (RMCS) exhauster C, as modified for use as a major stack (as defined by the Washington State Department of Health) on flammable gas tanks.

  8. An overview of exhaust emissions regulatory requirements and control technology for stationary natural gas engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a practical overview of stationary natural gas engine exhaust emissions control technology and trends in emissions regulatory requirements is presented. Selective and non-selective catalytic reduction and lean burn technologies are compared. Particular emphasis is focussed on implications of the Clean Air Act of 1990. Recent emissions reduction conversion kit developments and a practical approach to continuous monitoring are discussed

  9. Modelling for Control of Exhaust Gas Recirculation on Large Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Mahler; Zander, Claes-Göran; Pedersen, Nicolai; Blanke, Mogens; Vejlgaard-Laursen, Morten

    models. While literature is rich on four-stroke automotive engines, this paper considers two-stroke engines and develops a non-linear dynamic model of the exhaust gas system. Parameters are determined by system identication. The paper uses black-box nonlinear model identication and modelling from rst...

  10. 30 CFR 36.49 - Tests of exhaust-gas dilution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tests of exhaust-gas dilution system. 36.49 Section 36.49 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TESTING, EVALUATION, AND APPROVAL OF MINING PRODUCTS APPROVAL REQUIREMENTS FOR PERMISSIBLE MOBILE DIESEL-POWERED TRANSPORTATION EQUIPMENT Test Requirements...

  11. Technologies for increasing CO2 concentration in exhaust gas from natural gas-fired power production with post-combustion, amine-based CO2 capture

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hailong; Ditaranto, M; Berstad, D

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced CO2 concentration in exhaust gas is regarded as a potentially effective method to reduce thehigh electrical efficiency penalty caused by CO2 chemical absorption in post-combustion capturesystems. The present work evaluates the effect of increasing CO2 concentration in the exhaust gas of gasturbine based power plant by four different methods: exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), humidification(EvGT), supplementary firing (SFC) and external firing (EFC). Efforts have been focused on the im...

  12. Implementation of an experimental pilot reproducing the fouling of the exhaust gas recirculation system in diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaborieau, Cécile; Sommier, Alain; Toutain, Jean; Anguy, Yannick; Crepeau, Gérald; Gobin, Benoît

    2012-04-01

    The European emission standards EURO 5 and EURO 6 define more stringent acceptable limits for exhaust emissions of new vehicles. The Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) system is a partial but essential solution for lowering the emission of nitrogen oxides and soot particulates. Yet, due to a more intensive use than in the past, the fouling of the EGR system is increased. Ensuring the reliability of the EGR system becomes a main challenge. In partnership with PSA Peugeot Citroën, we designed an experimental setup that mimics an operating EGR system. Its distinctive features are (1) its ability to reproduce precisely the operating conditions and (2) its ability to measure the temperature field on the heat exchanger surface with an Infra Red camera for detecting in real time the evolution of the fooling deposit based on its thermal resistance. Numerical codes are used in conjunction with this experimental setup to determine the evolution of the fouling thickness from its thermal resistance.

  13. 40 CFR 86.111-94 - Exhaust gas analytical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... shall include a heated probe, a heated continuous sampling line, a heated particulate filter and a... gas analytical system for samples from bag sampling systems for analysis of total hydrocarbon (THC..., or indicating silica gel to remove water vapor, and containing ascarite to remove carbon dioxide...

  14. Catalytic treatment of exhaust gas of small-volume, two-stroke internal combustion engines. Katalytische Abgasnachbehandlung an kleinvolumigen Zweitaktottomotoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikulic, L.

    1982-01-01

    Environmental pollution due to exhaust emissions of small-volume, two-stroke internal combustion engines (e.g. in small cars and motorbikes) is a problem that cannot be neglected, especially in view of the high emissions of uncombusted hydrocarbons. Apart from improvements in engine design, oxidation catalysts of noble metal are a means of reducing emissions in these groups of vehicles. After optimisation of a two-bed catalyst system, CO and HC emissions were much lower than the limiting values states in ECE specification No. 47 and lower than the values measured in comparable four-stroke engines. The service life of catalysts in European climate was studied and found to be satisfactory in view of the annual mileage of the vehicle categories investigated. Ae the same time, exhaust gas opacity was found to be improved. The author further attempted to determine the reaction mechanisms of CO and HC oxidation at the given exhaust gas composition and to find out about the temperature conditions inside the catalyst.

  15. Exhaust gas recirculation study on dual-fuel methane combustion

    OpenAIRE

    Murillo Hernández, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Currently, interest in different alternative transport fuels is growing. There are two main reasons for this motivation: the universal environmental concern, caused by the noticeable impact of petroleum fuels on the human health and environment, and the necessity of replacement due to the declining availability of petroleum. Dual-fuel engines could mean a partial solution of these worries, since the primary fuel of this type of engines is natural gas, mostly formed by methane, which can d...

  16. Hydrogen combustion and exhaust emissions in a supercharged gas engine ignited with micro pilot diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hydrogen combustion and exhaust emissions in a supercharged gas engine ignited with micro pilot diesel fuel was discussed in this presentation. A schematic diagram of the experimental study was first presented. The single cylinder, water-cooled, supercharged test engine was illustrated. Results were presented for the following: fuel energy and energy share (hydrogen and diesel fuel); pressure history and rate of heat release; engine performance and exhaust emissions; effect of nitrogen dilution on heat value per cycle; effect of N2 dilution on pressure history and rate of heat release; and engine performance and exhaust emissions. This presentation demonstrated that smooth and knock-free engine operation results from the use of hydrogen in a supercharged dual-fuel engine for leaner fuel-air equivalence ratios maintaining high thermal efficiency. It was possible to attain mor3 than 90 per cent hydrogen-energy substitution to the diesel fuel with zero smoke emissions. figs.

  17. Electron beam degradation of simulated toluene-containing exhaust gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With toluene as an example, experimental investigation on VOCs treatment by electron beam irradiation was carried out. The system uses 0.8 MeV electron beams to irradiate simulated toluene-containing gases to 5kGy-40kGy for investigatiing effects of initial concentration, absorbed dose, humidity on toluene removal rate. The toluene removal rate increased with absorbed dose. With 0.5-l.2Nm3/h of the gas flow at an initial toluene concentration of 1600mg/Nm3, the toluene removal rate was 46.5% at 10kGy and 72.2% at 40kGy. And increasing humidity increased the toluene removal rate, too. Qualitative analysis on by-products of the toluene degradation was made by means of Gas Chromatogram-Mass Spectrometer (GC/MS) and Chromatography of Ions (IC). It was found that the by-products consist of mainly benzaldehyde and formic acid, plus a little benzoic acid, benzyl alcohol, methyl pyridine, nitrotoluene, o-cresol, phenol and benzoin ethyl etherl. Mechanisms of the E-beam toluene removal, i.e. the contributions of OH free radicals and O2 to the oxidation of toluene, were discussed. (authors)

  18. Measurement of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in gasoline vehicle exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are emitted at low levels from most combustion sources including motor vehicles. Extensive studies have been carried out in the past on the identification and quantitation of PAH in particular matter, primarily from diesel vehicles; however, only limited data are available on gas phase emissions from motor vehicles. Gas phase emissions are important from both a health perspective and because of their higher chemical reactivity during atmospheric transport. A method was sought to allow the authors to measure gas phase PAH in diluted vehicle exhaust over the relatively short collection times permitted during the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS) or Federal Test Procedure (FTP). In this paper, the authors describe their results on the development of a method using adsorption/thermal desorption with Tenax solid absorbent for the analysis of PAH and PAH derivatives in dilute vehicle exhaust

  19. Guideline for management of radioisotope concentrations in exhaust gas and waste water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This guideline is written for members of the association to understand the Iyakuhatu No. 188 Report (March 16, 2001) for safety use and management of radioisotopes (RI) at the actual medical working places and consists of three parts. The first part describes the new method of calculation of RI concentrations in air, exhaust gas and waste water. Secondly, the essential observance matters in accordance to the assessment by the new calculation method are described. Here, methods of management with documents are explained concerning grasping of the quantity at use, the time engaged in the works in the radiation therapeutic room, actual measurement of RI concentrations in the exhaust gas and waste water and enforcement of facility examinations. The last part describes the essential items for securing the safety and presented the actual respective document forms. In addition, appendix describes examples for calculation of RI concentration ratios in the gas and water, the manual for measurement of concentrations in the water, detection efficiency of gas and water monitors like NaI(Tl) auto-well-counter and liquid scintillation counter, and examinations of equipments for exhausting gas and wasting water. This guideline is available on http://www.jsnm.org/ and http://www.jrias.or.jp. (K.H.)

  20. Reduction of NOx and PM in marine diesel engine exhaust gas using microwave plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, W.; FInst, P.; Manivannan, N.; Beleca, R.; Abbod, M.

    2015-10-01

    Abatement of NOx and particulate matters (PM) of marine diesel exhaust gas using microwave (MW) non-thermal plasma is presented in this paper. NOx mainly consist of NO and less concentration of NO2 in a typical two stoke marine diesel engine and microwave plasma generation can completely remove NO. MW was generated using two 2kW microwave sources and a saw tooth passive electrode. Passive electrode was used to generate high electric field region within microwave environment where high energetic electrons (1-3eV) are produced for the generation of non-thermal plasma (NTP). 2kW gen-set diesel exhaust gas was used to test our pilot-scale MW plasma reactor. The experimental results show that almost 100% removal of NO is possible for the exhaust gas flow rate of 60l/s. It was also shown that MW can significantly remove soot particles (PM, 10nm to 365nm) entrained in the exhaust gas of 200kW marine diesel engine with 40% engine load and gas flow rate of 130l/s. MW without generating plasma showed reduction up to 50% reduction of PM and with the plasma up to 90% reduction. The major challenge in these experiments was that igniting the desired plasma and sustaining it with passive electrodes for longer period (10s of minutes) as it required fine tuning of electrode position, which was influenced by many factors such as gas flow rate, geometry of reactor and MW power.

  1. The Development of a Hollow Blade for Exhaust Gas Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmann, H

    1950-01-01

    The subject of the development of German hollow turbine blades for use with internal cooling is discussed in detail. The development of a suitable blade profile from cascade theory is described. Also a discussion of the temperature distribution and stresses in a turbine blade is presented. Various methods of manufacturing hollow blades and the methods by which they are mounted in the turbine rotor are presented in detail.

  2. Studies on exhaust gas recycling and waste heat recovery for the Z12V190 diesel engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HOU XUEJUN

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The Z12V190 diesel engine has high fuel consumption and low thermal efficiency, and releaseslarge amounts of diesel exhaust gas and waste heat into the atmosphere. This causes hugeresource as well as energy waste. In order to protect the environment, save energy, and alsoto solve these problems about exhaust gas recycling and waste heat recovery, the Z12V190diesel engine exhaust emission rate and minimum gas injection rate for gas underbalanceddrilling are calculated and compared with the deduced formulas. The critical point pressurerange of different diameter drill pipe has been deduced in the same diameter well, whichproved the application feasibility of the Z12V190 diesel engine exhaust gas underbalanceddrilling. Meanwhile, the waste heat recovery rate has been calculated and proved the economicfeasibility of the Z12V190 diesel engine exhaust gas waste heat recovery. The process flows aredesigned for the Z12V190 diesel engine exhaust gas underbalanced drilling well and its wasteheat recovery. The Z12V190 diesel engine exhaust gas will be recycled to reduce pollution, andits waste heat recovery be used for saving energy resources.

  3. Trigeneration scheme for energy efficiency enhancement in a natural gas processing plant through turbine exhaust gas waste heat utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Efficiency enhancement of Natural Gas (NG) processing plants in hot/humid climates. ► Gas turbine waste heat powered trigeneration scheme using absorption refrigeration. ► Annual NG savings of 1879 MSCM and operating cost savings of US$ 20.9 million realized. ► Trigeneration scheme payback period estimated at approximately 1 year. ► Significant economical and environmental benefits for NG processing plants. - Abstract: The performance of Natural Gas Processing Plants (NGPPs) can be enhanced with the integration of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CCHP) generation schemes. This paper analyzes the integration of a trigeneration scheme within a NGPP, that utilizes waste heat from gas turbine exhaust gases to generate process steam in a Waste Heat Recovery Steam Generator (WHRSG). Part of the steam generated is used to power double-effect water–lithium bromide (H2O–LiBr) absorption chillers that provide gas turbine compressor inlet air-cooling. Another portion of the steam is utilized to meet part furnace heating load, and supplement plant electrical power in a combined regenerative Rankine cycle. A detailed techno-economic analysis of scheme performance is presented based on thermodynamic predictions obtained using Engineering Equation Solver (EES). The results indicate that the trigeneration system could recover 79.7 MW of gas turbine waste heat, 37.1 MW of which could be utilized by three steam-fired H2O–LiBr absorption chillers to provide 45 MW of cooling at 5 °C. This could save approximately 9 MW of electric energy required by a typical compression chiller, while providing the same amount of cooling. In addition, the combined cycle generates 22.6 MW of additional electrical energy for the plant, while process heating reduces furnace oil consumption by 0.23 MSCM per annum. Overall, the trigeneration scheme would result in annual natural gas fuel savings of approximately 1879 MSCM, and annual operating cost savings of approximately US$ 20.9 million, with a payback period of 1 year. This study highlights the significant economical and environmental benefits that could be achieved through implementation of the proposed integrated cogeneration scheme in NGPPs, particularly in elevated ambient temperature and humidity conditions such as encountered in Middle East facilities.

  4. The effect of heat transfer on performance of the Diesel cycle and exergy of the exhaust gas stream in a LHR Diesel engine at the optimum injection timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, a Diesel cycle analysis taking combustion and heat transfer into account on performance has been performed. The effect of heat transfer is analysed in terms of design parameters such as compression ratio and cut-off ratio. The effects of heat transfer from the cylinder on exhaust temperature were also investigated for different heat transfer and combustion modes. It was observed that the work output and exhaust temperature proportionally increase with the decrease of heat transfer for a fixed combustion rate and cut-off ratio. In the experimental study, it was found that the minimum fuel consumption in the LHR engine compared to the standard (STD) engine was obtained with a 4 deg. crank angle (CA) retardation of the injection timing from the 38 deg. (CA). The decrease in specific fuel consumption at this injection timing reached 6%, and the increase in brake thermal efficiency was 2%. The exhaust temperature of the LHR Diesel engine with the injection timing of 38 deg. CA was 10.8% higher than that of the STD engine, whereas, the increase in the temperature reached 22.8% at 34 deg. CA. Thus, as a consequence of its great potential for optimisation of system performance, a comparative exergy analysis has been performed with the purpose of calculating the amount of available energy of the exhaust gas stream at the optimum injection timing (34 CA) for the LHR engine. While the maximum amount of available energy in the LHR engine exhaust gas stream with the injection timing of 38 deg. CA was 13.45%, the increase at the optimum injection timing of 34 deg. CA was found to reach 38%. It was concluded that the exhaust gas stream of a low heat rejection (LHR) Diesel engine is the most important source of available energy, which must be recovered via a secondary heat recovery system

  5. Exhaust gas treatment by electron beam irradiation, (3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the results of the small size system test which were detailed in the previous issue, a pilot plant was installed to treat the heavy oil combustion gas of the flow rate of 1000m3/h(NTP). With this plant the feasibility of dry simultaneous treatment of NOx and SO2 by electron beam irradiation was studied. The main results are as follows. 1) Also at the pilot plant scale, containuous and simultaneous removal of NOx, and SO2 by electron beam irradiation is possible. 2) The relationship between the NOx and SO2 removal efficiency and the amount of irradiation required agrees fairly well with the results of the small system test. 3) Reaction products are unstable in the flue, and it is impossible to collect them as solids using an electro-static precipitator. Accordingly, for industrialization of the process a method to stabilize the reaction products is necessary. 4) The phenomena observed during the operation can be fairly well explained by assuming nitrosyl sulfuric acid as a reaction product. (author)

  6. Experimental research on exhaust gas purifying facilities in incinerating treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the research on the incinerating treatment of combustible low level wastes, three items, that is, combustible low level radioactive wastes and incinerating treatment method, wet type exhaust gas purifying facilities and ceramic filter type dry exhaust gas purifying facilities, were selected, and experimental research was carried out on the main theme of exhaust gas purification in the incineration of low level radioactive wastes. The definition of combustible low level radioactive wastes was decided, and the wastes conforming to this criteria were investigated and classified. The combustible low level wastes generated in the Tokai Research Establishment were classified and weighed, and the results reflected well the state of activities. The change of radioactive wastes to radioactive aerosol, radioactive gas and residue by incineration was investigated. The effect of volume reduction by incineration was studied. The decontamination performance of wet purifying system, the release of tritium steam, the cooling capacity of scrubbers and their corrosion, the construction of the test incinerator using ceramic filters, and the various tests on ceramic filters are reported. (K.I.)

  7. Efficiency of thermoelectric recuperators of the exhaust gas energy of internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anatychuk, L. I.; Kuz, R. V.; Rozver, Yu. Yu.

    2012-06-01

    Results of computer simulation of thermoelectric generators (TEG) using the exhaust heat of internal combustion engines are presented. Sectionalized generator schematics whereby maximum efficiency is achieved for cases of real temperature dependences of the most suitable thermoelectric materials are considered. A model optimized for minimum cost is considered as well. Results of experimental research on generator that employs exhaust heat from heat and electricity cogeneration plant with a diesel engine are presented. Computer simulation is verified by the test results. The outlook for application of such heat recuperators in stationary plants is considered.

  8. 4-Nitrophenol, 1-nitropyrene, and 9-nitroanthracene emissions in exhaust particles from diesel vehicles with different exhaust gas treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Satoshi; Fushimi, Akihiro; Sato, Kei; Fujitani, Yuji; Yamada, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    The dependence of nitro-organic compound emissions in automotive exhaust particles on the type of aftertreatment used was investigated. Three diesel vehicles with different aftertreatment systems (an oxidation catalyst, vehicle-DOC; a particulate matter and NOx reduction system, vehicle-DPNR; and a urea-based selective catalytic reduction system, vehicle-SCR) and a gasoline car with a three-way catalyst were tested. Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) and nitrophenols in the particles emitted were analyzed by thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The secondary production of nitro-organic compounds on the filters used to collect particles and the adsorption of gaseous nitro-organic compounds by the filters were evaluated. Emissions of 1-nitropyrene, 9-nitroanthracene, and 4-nitrophenol in the diesel exhaust particles were then quantified. The NOx reduction process in vehicle-DPNR appeared to remove nitro-hydrocarbons efficiently but not to remove nitro-oxygenated hydrocarbons efficiently. The nitro-PAH emission factors were lower for vehicle-DOC when it was not fitted with a catalyst than when it was fitted with a catalyst. The 4-nitrophenol emission factors were also lower for vehicle-DOC with a catalyst than vehicle-DOC without a catalyst, suggesting that the oxidation catalyst was a source of both nitro-PAHs and 4-nitrophenol. The time-resolved aerosol mass spectrometry data suggested that nitro-organic compounds are mainly produced when an engine is working under load. The presence of 4-nitrophenol in the particles was not confirmed statistically because of interference from gaseous 4-nitrophenol. Systematic errors in the estimated amounts of gaseous 1-nitropyrene and 9-nitroanthracene adsorbed onto the filters and the estimated amounts of volatile nitro-organic compounds that evaporated during sampling and during post-sampling conditioning could not be excluded. An analytical method in which all gaseous compounds are absorbed before particles are collected, and in which the volatile compounds are derivatized, would improve the precision and the accuracy of the data.

  9. Analysis of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat Recovery and Pollution Processing for Z12V190 Diesel Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Hou Xuejun; Gao Deli

    2012-01-01

    With the increasingly prominent problem regarding rapid economy development and the gradually serious environmental pollution, the waste heat recovery and waste gas pollution processing have received significant attention. Z12V190 diesel engine has high fuel consumption and low thermal efficiency and releases large amounts of exhaust gas and waste heat into the atmosphere, causing serious problems of energy waste and environmental pollution. In this work, the diesel engine exhaust gas compone...

  10. Optimization of a thermoelectric generator subsystem for high temperature PEM fuel cell exhaust heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xin, Gao; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    In previous work, a thermoelectric (TE) exhaust heat recovery subsystem for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (HT-PEM) fuel cell stack was developed and modeled. Numerical simulations were conducted and have identified an optimized subsystem configuration and 4 types of compact heat...... modules are now connected into branches. The procedures of designing and optimizing this TE exhaust heat recovery subsystem are drawn out. The contribution of TE exhaust heat recovery to the HT-PEM fuel cell power system is preliminarily concluded. Its feasibility is also discussed....... exchangers with superior performance for further analysis. In this work, the on-design performances of the 4 heat exchangers are more thoroughly assessed on their corresponding optimized subsystem configurations. Afterward, their off-design performances are compared on the whole working range of the fuel...

  11. Study on using acetylene in dual fuel mode with exhaust gas recirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interest in employing gaseous fuels to internal combustion (IC) engines whether for stationary or mobile automotive applications has gained importance because of the economical, sustainable and environmental technical features associated with their usage. However, the incidence of preignition and knock remains a significant barrier in achieving their optimum performance potential. With the advent of latest technologies, the above barriers are eliminated. One such technique is timed manifold injection (TMI) of the gaseous fuel, which is controlled electronically to precisely monitor the induction of fuel to overcome the preignition problem in the intake. In the present investigation, acetylene was injected in the intake manifold in a single cylinder diesel engine, with a gas flow rate of 240 g/h, start of injection time is 10o aTDC and 90o CA (9.9 ms) duration, operated in dual fuel mode. In order to decrease the NOx emissions from acetylene-diesel engine, cooled EGR was employed. The cylinder pressure, brake thermal efficiency and emissions such as NOx, smoke, CO, HC, CO2 and exhaust gas temperature were studied. Dual fuel operation with acetylene induction coupled with cooled EGR results in lowered NOx emissions and improved part load performance. -- Highlights: ? Acetylene was tried in SI engines, but due to backfire further research was hindered as an alternative fuel. ? But it is not tried in CI engine. Timed manifold injection was tried in diesel engine in the present work to combat backfire. ? Author was successful in running the diesel engine in dual fuel mode. ? 21% maximum diesel replacement was achieved. Author is confident that acetylene will be commercialised as a fuel for diesel engine in future.

  12. Experimental Analysis of the Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Engine Performance and Exhaust Emissions on Diesel Engines

    OpenAIRE

    HAŞİMOĞLU, Can

    2002-01-01

    When the temperature of the combustion chamber rises beyond 1800 K in internal combustion engines, the nitrogen and oxygen in the air combine chemically and become a gas called nitrogen oxide, which is harmful to human health and the environment. Nitrogen oxides combine with humidity in the lungs and become nitric acid, which causes breathing illnesses. Diesel engines use excess air for combustion, and this increases nitrogen oxide production potential. In this research, the reduction of ...

  13. Experimental investigation of an improved exhaust recovery system for liquid petroleum gas fueled spark ignition engine

    OpenAIRE

    Gürbüz Habib; Akçay Hüsameddin

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we have investigated the recovery of energy lost as waste heat from exhaust gas and engine coolant, using an improved thermoelectric generator (TEG) in a LPG fueled SI engine. For this purpose, we have designed and manufactured a 5-layer heat exchanger from aluminum sheet. Electrical energy generated by the TEG was then used to produce hydrogen in a PEM water electrolyzer. The experiment was conducted at a stoichiometric mixture ratio, 1/2 th...

  14. Laboratory Scale of Liquid Coal Fuel Combustion Process and Exhaust Gas Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kartika K. Hendratna; Osami Nishida; Hirotsugu Fujita; Wataru Harano

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Much research of coal has been already undertaken to ascertain the possibilities of coal being used as substitute for heavy fuel oil in the transportation sector. The effects of using coal as transportation fuel to the environment must also be considered. This study will review several aspects of the coal oil combustion process including combustion behavior, flame stability, some emissions from exhaust gas; CO, NOx and the particulate matter in a well insulated laboratory s...

  15. PERFORMANCE AND EXHAUST GAS EMISSIONS ANALYSIS OF DIRECT INJECTION CNG-DIESEL DUAL FUEL ENGINE

    OpenAIRE

    RANBIR SINGH; SAGAR MAJI

    2012-01-01

    Existing diesel engines are under stringent emission regulation particularly of smoke and particulate matter in their exhaust. Compressed Natural Gas and Diesel dual fuel operation is regarded as one of the best ways to control emissions from diesel engines and simultaneously saving petroleum based diesel fuel. Dual fuel engineis a conventional diesel engine which burn either gaseous fuel or diesel or both at the same time. In the present paper an experimental research was carried out on a la...

  16. 5th international exhaust gas and particulate emissions forum. Proceedings; 5. Internationales Forum Abgas- und Partikelemissionen. Beitraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-12-11

    The Proceedings of the 5th International Exhaust Gas and Particulate Emissions Forum contains 22 printed contributions as well as a CD-ROM. The titles of them are: (1) Diesel Emissions Control in the United States - 2010 and Beyond; (2) The MBE90 commercial vehicle engine for EPA '07 emissions regulations; (3) Concepts for engines and exhaust-gas cleaning systems for heavy duty trucks of the future; (4) HD Engine Technology for Near-Zero Emissions and Lowest Cost of Ownership; (5) (Partially-) Homogeneous Diesel Combustion; (6) Exhaust gas sensors for NOx storage catalysts and ammonia-SCR systems; (7) Sensors for modern exhaust gas after-treatment systems; (8) New reducing agents for low NOx-SCR Techno-logy; (9) Exhaust gas Aftertreatment on Lean Burn Gasoline Direct Injection Engines: The System of TWC and NOx-Storage Catalyst; (10) New Platinum/Palladium based catalyzed filter technologies for future passenger car applications; (11) Development of a Roadway Hydrocarbon Sorption Model and Characterization of a Novel PM Generator; (12) Requirements for current and future particulate measurement instrumentation from the point of view of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt; (13) Standardized dilution conditions for gravimetric PM sampling - measures to assure results that correlate; (14) Particle Counting according PMP; (15) Future high-confidence measurement of diesel particulate emissions for approval and development; (16) New developments in optical instrumentation for exhaust gas; (17) Simultaneous Detection of Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Components by Photoacoustic Spectroscopy; (18) Boundaries of modern exhaust gas instrumentation; (19) Raising quality and reducing application effort through efficient data input to the particulate filter load model for a EURO5 diesel car; (20) Stop-start operation of diesel engines - modified require-ment for exhaust gas after-treatment?; (21) Particulates emission with Biodiesel B30 impact on CSF management; (22) Diesel engine soot and NOx emission modelling. (orig)

  17. Diesel engine management at a glance inclusive exhaust gas technique; Dieselmotor-Management im Ueberblick einschliesslich Abgastechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reif, Konrad (ed.)

    2010-07-01

    The book under consideration reports on operational areas and fundamentals of diesel engines, fuels, filling control, injection systems including the associated pumps and nozzles, regulation, starting systems, internal engine emission reduction, after-treatment of exhaust gases, emissions legislation, exhaust gas measurement and diagnosis.

  18. Analyzing the effects on the atmosphere of exergy changes due to exhaust-gas emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exergy is a type of useful or available energy and can be used to describe the capabilities of doing work of heat and matter, contained in a system at a specified state. In thermodynamic studies, a system refers to everything to be investigated within a boundary, while the environment adjacent to the system is called the surroundings. During reversible processes, whether matter is contained in a closed system or flows through an open system, the exergy is a function of the system or flow and a reference environment. This paper presented an investigation of the exergy change of the surroundings adjacent to exhaust-gas emitting ports, and the probable effects on the atmosphere. The current stable state changing point of atmosphere was determined. The paper also described the potential of doing work. The effects of the amount of exhaust gas on the atmosphere were studied through an exergy change function, which was a nonlinear dynamic function. This function accounts for the flow direction of the exhaust gas without local wind. The study showed that exergy could be used as a state function to describe the change, the stability and the order of a system. 1 tab., 8 figs

  19. The Measurement of Fuel-Air Ratio by Analysis for the Oxidized Exhaust Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerrish, Harold C.; Meem, J. Lawrence, Jr.

    1943-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine a method of measuring fuel-air ratio that could be used for test purposes in flight and for checking conventional equipment in the laboratory. Two single-cylinder test engines equipped with typical commercial engine cylinders were used. The fuel-air ratio of the mixture delivered to the engines was determined by direct measurement of the quantity of air and of fuel supplied and also by analysis of the oxidized exhaust gas and of the normal exhaust gas. Five fuels were used: gasoline that complied with Army-Navy fuel Specification No. AN-VV-F-781 and four mixtures of this gasoline with toluene, benzene, and xylene. The method of determining the fuel-air ratio described in this report involves the measurement of the carbon-dioxide content of the oxidized exhaust gas and the use of graphs for the presented equation. This method is considered useful in aircraft, in the field, or in the laboratory for a range of fuel-air ratios from 0.047 to 0.124.

  20. The Measurement of Fuel-air Ratio by Analysis of the Oxidized Exhaust Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memm, J. Lawrence, Jr.

    1943-01-01

    An investigation was made to determine a method of measuring fuel-air ratio that could be used for test purposes in flight and for checking conventional equipment in the laboratory. Two single-cylinder test engines equipped with typical commercial engine cylinders were used. The fuel-air ratio of the mixture delivered to the engines was determined by direct measurement of the quantity of air and of fuel supplied and also by analysis of the oxidized exhaust gas and of the normal exhaust gas. Five fuels were used: gasoline that complied with Army-Navy Fuel Specification, No. AN-VV-F-781 and four mixtures of this gasoline with toluene, benzene, and xylene. The method of determining the fuel-air ratio described in this report involves the measurement of the carbon-dioxide content of the oxidized exhaust gas and the use of graphs or the presented equation. This method is considered useful in aircraft, in the field, or in the laboratory for a range of fuel-air ratios from 0.047 to 0.124

  1. Electron beam treatment technology for exhaust gas for preventing acid rain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, accompanying the increase of the use of fossil fuel, the damage due to acid rain such as withering of trees and extinction of fishes and shells has occurred worldwide, and it has become a serious problem. The sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides contained in exhaust gas are oxidized by the action of sunbeam to become sulfuric acid and nitric acid mists, which fall in the form of rain. Acid rain is closely related to the use of the coal containing high sulfur, and it hinders the use of coal which is rich energy source. In order to simplify the processing system for boiler exhaust gas and to reduce waste water and wastes, Ebara Corp. developed the dry simultaneous desulfurizing and denitrating technology utilizing electron beam in cooperation with Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. The flow chart of the system applied to the exhaust gas treatment in a coal-fired thermal power station is shown. The mechanism of desulfurization and denitration, and the features of this system are described. The demonstration plant was constructed in a coal-fired thermal power station in Indianapolis, Indiana, USA, and the trial operation was completed in July, 1987. The test results are reported. (K.I.)

  2. Three-dimensional reconstruction method on the PDE exhaust plume flow flame temperature field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhimin; Wan, Xiong; Luo, Ningning; Li, Shujing

    2010-10-01

    Pulse detonation engine (referred to as PDE) has many advantage about simple structure, high efficiency thermal [1] cycling etc. In the future, it can be widely used in unmanned aircraft, target drone, luring the plane, the imaginary target, target missiles, long-range missiles and other military targets. However, because the exhaust flame of PDE is complicated [2], non-uniform temperature distribution and mutation in real time, its 3-D temperature distribution is difficult to be measured by normal way. As a result, PDE is used in the military project need to face many difficulties and challenges. In order to analyze and improve the working performance of PDE, deep research on the detonation combustion process is necessary. However, its performance characteristic which is in non-steady-state, as well as high temperature, high pressure, transient combustion characteristics put forward high demands about the flow field parameters measurement. In this paper, the PDE exhaust flames temperature field is reconstructed based on the theory of radiation thermometry [3] and Emission Spectral Tomography (referred to as EST) [4~6] which is one branch of Optical CT. It can monitor the detonation wave temperature distribution out of the exhaust flames at different moments, it also provides authentication for the numerical simulation which directs towards PDE work performance, and then it provides the basis for improving the structure of PDE.

  3. Catalytic filter for cleaning exhaust gas of diesel engine. Katalytisches Filter fuer die Dieselabgasreinigung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozon, A.; Koberstein, E.; Pletka, H.D.; Voelker, H.

    1981-07-02

    The invention is concerned with a metallic sieve web, applied as a very effective exhaust gas filter or as catalyst carrier. The sieve metal consists of heat and corrosion resistant material. The corrugated or folded sieve layer is alternatively arranged with a perforated cover. The sheets are arranged as a gas permeable package formed to a helical wound cylinder. The invention is characterized by the sealing of this packet or wounded cylinder. Sealed and opened parts of the filter body front surfaces are arranged piece by piece. The cover layer can consist of flat sheet or metallic sieve web.

  4. Investigation of the Performance of HEMT-Based NO, NO? and NH? Exhaust Gas Sensors for Automotive Antipollution Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfaya, Yacine; Bishop, Chris; Soltani, Ali; Sundaram, Suresh; Aubry, Vincent; Voss, Paul L; Salvestrini, Jean-Paul; Ougazzaden, Abdallah

    2016-01-01

    We report improved sensitivity to NO, NO? and NH? gas with specially-designed AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) that are suitable for operation in the harsh environment of diesel exhaust systems. The gate of the HEMT device is functionalized using a Pt catalyst for gas detection. We found that the performance of the sensors is enhanced at a temperature of 600 C, and the measured sensitivity to 900 ppm-NO, 900 ppm-NO? and 15 ppm-NH? is 24%, 38.5% and 33%, respectively, at 600 C. We also report dynamic response times as fast as 1 s for these three gases. Together, these results indicate that HEMT sensors could be used in a harsh environment with the ability to control an anti-pollution system in real time. PMID:26907298

  5. Process and device for matching the exhaust gas feedback rate (EFR). Verfahren und Vorrichtung zur Anpassung der Abgasrueckfuehrrate (ARF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kniss, H.; Locher, J.

    1984-04-26

    This is a process and device for matching the exhaust gas feedback rate (EFR) on internal combustion engines, particularly Diesel engines. In order to avoid smoke being generated on new engines or if the injection nozzles are replaced, in addition to the usual change of exhaust gas feedback rate, there is an additional adjustment of the exhaust gas feedback rate, preferably in steps and related to the function of length of operation from the changing working conditions having occurred. The number of injection operations are counted and successive memory positions are initiated at time intervals, which match the exhaust gas feedback rate to the final state, where each step of matching is permanently stored. (orig.).

  6. 40 CFR 86.1309-90 - Exhaust gas sampling system; Otto-cycle and non-petroleum-fueled engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-cycle and non-petroleum-fueled engines. 86.1309-90 Section 86.1309-90 Protection of Environment...-cycle and non-petroleum-fueled engines. (a)(1) General. The exhaust gas sampling system described in... gasoline-fueled, natural gas-fueled, liquefied petroleum gas-fueled or methanol-fueled engines. In the...

  7. Improved sensor for measuring the oxygen content in the exhaust gas of internal combustion engines. Verbesserte Sonde zur Messung des Sauerstoffgehalts im Abgas von Verbrennungskraftmaschinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozon, A.; Koberstein, E.; Pletka, H.D.; Voelker, H.

    1987-02-19

    The invention concerns an improved oxygen sensor for measuring the oxygen content in the exhaust gas of internal combustion engines. If the measuring sensor of the oxygen sensor is provided with a catalytically active sheath permeable to gas, a suitable sensor signal is received from a rich flow of exhaust gas. The protective jacket consists of a sieve covered with catalyst material, made of high temperature steel. The sheath can carry a metal-oxide intermediate layer, on which the catalyst can be deposited. This intermediate layer contains aluminium oxide with the addition of the oxides of the elements cerium, zirconium, iron, nickel tin, zinc, molybdenum, calcium, strontium and barium. The catalyst material can be platinum, ruthenium, palladium, iridium and rhodium together with aluminium and nickel. The metal can be applied to the sieve by impregnation or other well-known methods.

  8. Improved sensor for measuring the oxygen content in the exhaust gas of internal combustion engine. Verbesserte Sonde zur Messung des Sauerstoffgehaltes im Abgas von Verbrennungskraftmaschinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozon, A.; Koberstein, E.; Pletka, H.D.; Voelker, H.

    1981-04-09

    The invention concerns an improved oxygen sensor for measuring the oxygen content in the exhaust gas of internal combustion engines. If the measuring sensor of the oxygen sensor is provided with a catalytically active sheath permeable to gas, a suitable sensor signal is received from a rich flow of exhaust gas. The protective jacket consists of a sieve covered with catalyst material, made of high temperature steel. The catalyst material can be aluminium oxide with the addition of the oxides of the elements cerium, zirconium, iron, nickel tin, zinc, molybdenum, calcium, strontium and barium. Platinum, ruthenium, palladium, iridium and rhodium can also be used together with aluminium and nickel. The metal can be applied to the sieve by impregnation or other well-known methods. (EF).

  9. Burner for burning exhaust gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A burner is described for burning exhaust gases, particularly those from nuclear plants, using means of oxidation, which is space-saving, easy to handle and safe to operate, and which supplies little secondary exhaust gas. Mixing chambers are situated in a high temperature part, with tangentially fixed incoming pipes for the means of oxidation. The high temperature part is also heated by two or more separately controlled heating windings. (orig.)

  10. Responses of spruce seedlings (Picea abies) to exhaust gas under laboratory conditions. 1. plant-insect interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Viskari, E.-L.; Koessi, S. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science; Surakka, J.; Pasanen, P.; Ruuskanen, J. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Sciences; Mirme, A. [Tartu Univ. (Estonia). Int. of Environmental Physics; Holopainen, J.K. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science; Agricultural Research Centre, Plant Production research, Jokioinen (Finland)

    2000-07-01

    The effects of motor vehicle exhaust gas on Norway spruce seedlings (Picea abies (L) Karst) and plant-insect interaction of spruce shoot aphid (Cinara pilicornis Hartig) was studied. The exhaust gas concentrations in the fumigation chambers were monitored and controlled by measuring the concentration of nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) with a computer aided feedback system. The concentrations of major exhaust gas components (black carbon (BC), fine particles, VOCs and carbonyl compounds) in the chamber air were also measured. Responses of Norway spruce seedlings to a 2 and 3 week exhaust gas exposure and subsequent performance of spruce shoot aphid were studied using realistic exposure regimes; 50, 100 and 200 ppb NO{sub x}. The feedback control system based on NO{sub x} concentrations proved an adequate and practical means for controlling the concentration of exhaust gases and studying plant responses in controlled environment chambers. The exhaust exposure resulted in increased concentrations of proline, glutamine, threonine, aspartic acid, glycine and phenylalanine and decreased concentration of arginine, serine, alanine and glycine in young needles. No changes in soluble N concentrations were observed. The results are interpreted as a stress response rather than use of NO{sub x} as a nitrogen source. No changes in total phenolics and only transient changes in some individual terpene concentrations were detected. The exhaust gas exposure stressed the exposed seedlings, but had no significant effect on N metabolism or the production of defence chemicals. Aphid performance was not significantly affected. Soluble N, secondary metabolism and aphid performance were not sensitive to exhaust gas exposure during shoot elongation in Norway spruce. (author)

  11. Variable-geometry turbocharger with asymmetric divided volute for engine exhaust gas pulse optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serres, Nicolas

    2010-11-09

    A turbine assembly for a variable-geometry turbocharger includes a turbine housing defining a divided volute having first and second scrolls, wherein the first scroll has a substantially smaller volume than the second scroll. The first scroll feeds exhaust gas to a first portion of a turbine wheel upstream of the throat of the wheel, while the second scroll feeds gas to a second portion of the wheel at least part of which is downstream of the throat. Flow from the second scroll is regulated by a sliding piston. The first scroll can be optimized for low-flow conditions such that the turbocharger can operate effectively like a small fixed-geometry turbocharger when the piston is closed. The turbine housing defines an inlet that is divided by a dividing wall into two portions respectively feeding gas to the two scrolls, a leading edge of the dividing wall being downstream of the inlet mouth.

  12. Multiple Exhaust Nozzle Effects on J-2X Gas Generator Outlet Impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Muss, Jeffrey; Hulka, James R.; Casiano, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    The current test setup of the J-2X gas generator system uses a multiple nozzle configuration to exhaust hot gases to drive the propellant supply turbines. Combustion stability assessment of this gas generator design requires knowledge of the impedance effects the multiple nozzle configuration creates on the combustion chamber acoustic modes. Parallel work between NASA and Sierra Engineering is presented, showing two methods used to calculate the effective end impedance resulting from multiple nozzle configurations. The NASA method is a simple estimate of the effective impedance using the long wavelength approximation. Sierra Engineering has developed a more robust numerical integration method implemented in ROCCID to accommodate for multiple nozzles. Analysis using both methods are compared to J-2X gas generator test data collected over the past year.

  13. Ion beam analyses of particulate matter in exhaust gas of a ship diesel engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuyama, Yuichi; Fujita, Hirotsugu; Taniike, Akira; Kitamura, Akira

    2011-12-01

    There is an urgent need to reduce emission of the particulate matter (PM) in the exhaust gas from ship diesel engines causing various health hazards and serious environmental pollution. Usually the heavy fuel oil (HFO) for ships is of low quality, and contains various kinds of impurities. Therefore, the emission of PM along with exhaust gas from ship diesel engines is one of the most serious environmental issues. However, the PM fundamental properties are not well known. Therefore, it is important to perform elemental analysis of the PM. The HFO contains sulfur with a relatively high concentration of a few percent. It is important to make quantitative measurements of sulfur in the PM, because this element is poisonous for the human body. In the present work, PM samples were collected from exhaust gas of a test engine, and RBS and PIXE analyses were applied successfully to quantitative analysis of the PM samples. The RBS analysis enabled quantitative analysis of sulfur and carbon in the collected PM, while heavier elements such as vanadium and iron were analyzed quantitatively with the PIXE analysis. It has been found that the concentration ratio of sulfur to carbon was between 0.007 and 0.012, and did not strongly depend on the output power of the engine. The S/ C ratio is approximately equal to the original composition of the HFO used in the present work, 0.01. From the known conversion ratio 0.015 of sulfur in the HFO to sulfates, the conversion ratio of carbon in the HFO to the PM is found to be 0.01-0.02 by the RBS measurements. On the other hand, the PIXE analysis revealed a vanadium enrichment of one order of magnitude in the PM.

  14. Ion beam analyses of particulate matter in exhaust gas of a ship diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an urgent need to reduce emission of the particulate matter (PM) in the exhaust gas from ship diesel engines causing various health hazards and serious environmental pollution. Usually the heavy fuel oil (HFO) for ships is of low quality, and contains various kinds of impurities. Therefore, the emission of PM along with exhaust gas from ship diesel engines is one of the most serious environmental issues. However, the PM fundamental properties are not well known. Therefore, it is important to perform elemental analysis of the PM. The HFO contains sulfur with a relatively high concentration of a few percent. It is important to make quantitative measurements of sulfur in the PM, because this element is poisonous for the human body. In the present work, PM samples were collected from exhaust gas of a test engine, and RBS and PIXE analyses were applied successfully to quantitative analysis of the PM samples. The RBS analysis enabled quantitative analysis of sulfur and carbon in the collected PM, while heavier elements such as vanadium and iron were analyzed quantitatively with the PIXE analysis. It has been found that the concentration ratio of sulfur to carbon was between 0.007 and 0.012, and did not strongly depend on the output power of the engine. The S/C ratio is approximately equal to the original composition of the HFO used in the present work, 0.01. From the known conversion ratio 0.015 of sulfur in the HFO to sulfates, the conversion ratio of carbon in the HFO to the PM is found to be 0.01–0.02 by the RBS measurements. On the other hand, the PIXE analysis revealed a vanadium enrichment of one order of magnitude in the PM.

  15. Experimental investigation of an improved exhaust recovery system for liquid petroleum gas fueled spark ignition engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grbz Habib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have investigated the recovery of energy lost as waste heat from exhaust gas and engine coolant, using an improved thermoelectric generator (TEG in a LPG fueled SI engine. For this purpose, we have designed and manufactured a 5-layer heat exchanger from aluminum sheet. Electrical energy generated by the TEG was then used to produce hydrogen in a PEM water electrolyzer. The experiment was conducted at a stoichiometric mixture ratio, 1/2 throttle position and six different engine speeds at 1800-4000 rpm. The results of this study show that the configuration of 5-layer counterflow produce a higher TEG output power than 5-layer parallel flow and 3-layer counterflow. The TEG produced a maximum power of 63.18 W when used in a 5-layer counter flow configuration. This resulted in an improved engine performance, reduced exhaust emission as well as an increased engine speed when LPG fueled SI engine is enriched with hydrogen produced by the PEM electrolyser supported by TEG. Also, the need to use an extra evaporator for the LPG fueled SI engine is eliminated as LPG heat exchangers are added to the fuel line. It can be concluded that an improved exhaust recovery system for automobiles can be developed by incorporating a PEM electrolyser, however at the expense of increasing costs.

  16. Evaluation of an exhaust gas evacuation system during propane-fueled lift truck maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) gas in the workplace can cause health problem. CO gas is colourless and odourless, and exposure to it can cause intoxication, particularly for mechanics working on internal combustion engines fed by propane-fueled lift trucks. Regular procedures for evacuating the gases emitted during routine mechanical repairs involve the use of rigid evacuating pipes attached to the building and hooked to a flexible pipe at the end of the exhaust pipe. With lift trucks, this procedure is limited because of the configuration of these vehicles, and also because this type of work is often done in places without access to permanent mechanical ventilation. The object of this study was to propose a new evacuation method for CO gas fumes that would lower the exposures of fumes for mechanics and for workstations. It identified the criteria that should be considered, such as the configuration of the existing exhaust system of lift trucks, and feasibility of using this system at a variety of on-site locations. The design of the device was described and evaluated. 7 refs., 6 tabs., 8 figs., 3 appendices

  17. Remote gas analysis of aircraft exhausts using FTIR-emission-spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heland, J.; Schaefer, K. [Fraunhofer Inst. for Atmospheric Environmental Research, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    FITR emission spectroscopy as a remote sensing multi-component analyzing technique was investigated to determine the composition of aircraft exhausts at ground level. A multi-layer radiative transfer interpretation software based on a line-by-line computer algorithm using the HITRAN data base was developed. Measurements were carried out with different engine types to determine the traceable gas species and their detection limits. Finally validation measurements were made to compare the results of the system to those of conventional equipment. (author) 8 refs.

  18. Correlation of Exhaust-Valve Temperatures with Engine Operating Conditions and Valve Design in an Air-Cooled Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipkin, M A; Sanders, J C

    1945-01-01

    A semiempirical equation correlating exhaust-valve temperatures with engine operating conditions and exhaust-valve design has been developed. The correlation is based on the theory correlating engine and cooling variables developed in a previous NACA report. In addition to the parameters ordinarily used in the correlating equation, a term is included in the equation that is a measure of the resistance of the complex heat-flow paths between the crown of the exhaust valve and a point on the outside surface of the cylinder head. A means for comparing exhaust valves of different designs with respect to cooling is consequently provided. The necessary empirical constants included in the equation were determined from engine investigations of a large air-cooled cylinder. Tests of several valve designs showed that the calculated and experimentally determined exhaust-valve temperatures were in good agreement.

  19. An Experimental Study of Different Effects of EGR Rates on The Performance And Exhaust Emissions of The Stratified Charge Piston Direct Injection Compressed Natural Gas Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheed O. Wasiu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR is one of the principal techniques used to control spark ignition NOX. A fraction of the exhaust gas is recycled through a control valve from the exhaust to the engine intake system. However, EGR has different effect on performance, combustion and emissions production that are difficult to distinguish such as increase of intake temperature, delay of Rate Of Heat Rrelease (ROHR, decrease of peak heat release, decrease in oxygen concentration etc. Therefore the impact of EGR on the aforementioned engine parameters (i.e., performance, combustion and exhaust emission is not perfectly understood, especially under high EGR rates. An experimental study has been conducted to analyze various effects of EGR rates on the performance and emissions of the stratified charge piston direct injection compressed natural gas engine and to determine the stable operating limit of the engine at different excess air ratios ( = 0.9, 1.0, 1.1 and 1.2 which represents rich, stoichiometric, slightly lean and moderately lean mixture respectively. The results showed that as the EGR is increased, the brake torque, brake specific fuel consumption decreased, while nitric oxide emissions (NO reduced drastically at various fraction of EGR, just as Unburnt Hydro Carbon (UHC increased. EGR has no significant effect on carbon monoxide (CO emission. The addition of EGR also reduces cylinders gas temperature and pressure. It can be concluded that in introducing EGR in DI-CNG engines, there is a tradeoff between the engines performance and NOX emission, while it is difficult to realize stable combustion at high temperature.

  20. Plasma and neutral gas jet interactions in the exhaust of a magnetic confinement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general purpose 2-1/2 dimensional, multifluid, time dependent computer code has been developed. This flexible tool models the dynamic behavior of plasma/neutral gas interactions in the presence of a magnetic field. The simulation has been used to examine the formation of smoke ring structure in the plasma rocket exhaust by injection of an axial jet of neutral gas. Specifically, the code was applied to the special case of attempting to couple the neutral gas momentum to the plasma in such a manner that plasma smoke rings would form, disconnecting the plasma from the magnetic field. For this scenario several cases where run scanning a wide range of neutral gas input parameters. In all the cases it was found that after an initial transient phase, the plasma eroded the neutral gas and after that followed the original magnetic field. From these findings it is concluded that smoke rings do not form with axial injection of neutral gas. Several suggestions for alternative injection schemes are presented

  1. Fuel composition and secondary organic aerosol formation: gas-turbine exhaust and alternative aviation fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miracolo, Marissa A; Drozd, Greg T; Jathar, Shantanu H; Presto, Albert A; Lipsky, Eric M; Corporan, Edwin; Robinson, Allen L

    2012-08-01

    A series of smog chamber experiments were performed to investigate the effects of fuel composition on secondary particulate matter (PM) formation from dilute exhaust from a T63 gas-turbine engine. Tests were performed at idle and cruise loads with the engine fueled on conventional military jet fuel (JP-8), Fischer-Tropsch synthetic jet fuel (FT), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. Emissions were sampled into a portable smog chamber and exposed to sunlight or artificial UV light to initiate photo-oxidation. Similar to previous studies, neat FT fuel and a 50/50 FT/JP-8 blend reduced the primary particulate matter emissions compared to neat JP-8. After only one hour of photo-oxidation at typical atmospheric OH levels, the secondary PM production in dilute exhaust exceeded primary PM emissions, except when operating the engine at high load on FT fuel. Therefore, accounting for secondary PM production should be considered when assessing the contribution of gas-turbine engine emissions to ambient PM levels. FT fuel substantially reduced secondary PM formation in dilute exhaust compared to neat JP-8 at both idle and cruise loads. At idle load, the secondary PM formation was reduced by a factor of 20 with the use of neat FT fuel, and a factor of 2 with the use of the blend fuel. At cruise load, the use of FT fuel resulted in no measured formation of secondary PM. In every experiment, the secondary PM was dominated by organics with minor contributions from sulfate when the engine was operated on JP-8 fuel. At both loads, FT fuel produces less secondary organic aerosol than JP-8 because of differences in the composition of the fuels and the resultant emissions. This work indicates that fuel reformulation may be a viable strategy to reduce the contribution of emissions from combustion systems to secondary organic aerosol production and ultimately ambient PM levels. PMID:22732009

  2. Implementation of an experimental pilot reproducing the fouling of the exhaust gas recirculation system in diesel engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crepeau Gérald

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The European emission standards EURO 5 and EURO 6 define more stringent acceptable limits for exhaust emissions of new vehicles. The Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR system is a partial but essential solution for lowering the emission of nitrogen oxides and soot particulates. Yet, due to a more intensive use than in the past, the fouling of the EGR system is increased. Ensuring the reliability of the EGR system becomes a main challenge. In partnership with PSA Peugeot Citroën, we designed an experimental setup that mimics an operating EGR system. Its distinctive features are (1 its ability to reproduce precisely the operating conditions and (2 its ability to measure the temperature field on the heat exchanger surface with an Infra Red camera for detecting in real time the evolution of the fooling deposit based on its thermal resistance. Numerical codes are used in conjunction with this experimental setup to determine the evolution of the fouling thickness from its thermal resistance.

  3. Study of SI engine fueled with methanol vapor and dissociation gas based on exhaust heat dissociating methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The full load power decreases successively from gasoline engine, methanol vapor engine to dissociated methanol engine. • Both power and thermal efficiency of dissociated methanol engine can be improved by boosting pressure. • The conversion efficiency of recovered exhaust gas energy is largely influenced by the BMEP. • At the same BMEP, dissociated methanol engine has higher thermal efficiency than methanol vapor engine and gasoline engine. - Abstract: To improve the fuel efficiency of internal combustion (IC) engine and also achieve the goal of direct usage of methanol fuel on IC engine, an approach of exhaust heat dissociating methanol was investigated, which is a kind of method for IC engine exhaust heat recovery (EHR). A bottom cycle system is coupled with the IC engine exhaust system, which uses the exhaust heat to evaporate and dissociate methanol in its catalytic cracker. The methanol dissociation gas (including methanol vapor) is used as the fuel for IC engine. This approach was applied to both naturally aspirated (NA) engine and turbocharged engine, and the engine performance parameters were predicted by the software GT-power under various kinds of operating conditions. The improvement to IC engine performance and the conversion efficiency of recovered exhaust gas energy can be evaluated by comparing the performances of IC engine fueled with various kinds of fuels (or their compositions). Results show that, from gasoline engine, methanol vapor engine to dissociated methanol engine, the full load power decreases successively in the entire speed area due to the declining of volumetric efficiency, while it is contrary in the thermal efficiency at the same brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) level because of the improving of fuel heating value. With the increase of BMEP, the conversion efficiency of recovered exhaust gas energy is promoted. All those results indicate that the approach of exhaust heat dissociating methanol has large energy saving potential with great application prospect to IC engines

  4. Effect of Operating and Sampling Conditions on the Exhaust Gas Composition of Small-Scale Power Generators

    OpenAIRE

    Smits, Marianne; Vanpachtenbeke, Floris; Horemans, Benjamin; De Wael, Karolien; Hauchecorne, Birger; Van Langenhove, Herman; Demeestere, Kristof; Lenaerts, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Small stationary diesel engines, like in generator sets, have limited emission control measures and are therefore responsible for 44% of the particulate matter (PM) emissions in the United States. The diesel exhaust composition depends on operating conditions of the combustion engine. Furthermore, the measurements are influenced by the used sampling method. This study examines the effect of engine loading and exhaust gas dilution on the composition of small-scale power generators. These gener...

  5. Analysis of a Temperature-Controlled Exhaust Thermoelectric Generator During a Driving Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, F. P.; Alves, A.; Pires, J. M.; Martins, L. B.; Martins, J.; Oliveira, J.; Teixeira, J.; Goncalves, L. M.; Hall, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    Thermoelectric generators can be used in automotive exhaust energy recovery. As car engines operate under wide variable loads, it is a challenge to design a system for operating efficiently under these variable conditions. This means being able to avoid excessive thermal dilution under low engine loads and being able to operate under high load, high temperature events without the need to deflect the exhaust gases with bypass systems. The authors have previously proposed a thermoelectric generator (TEG) concept with temperature control based on the operating principle of the variable conductance heat pipe/thermosiphon. This strategy allows the TEG modules’ hot face to work under constant, optimized temperature. The variable engine load will only affect the number of modules exposed to the heat source, not the heat transfer temperature. This prevents module overheating under high engine loads and avoids thermal dilution under low engine loads. The present work assesses the merit of the aforementioned approach by analysing the generator output during driving cycles simulated with an energy model of a light vehicle. For the baseline evaporator and condenser configuration, the driving cycle averaged electrical power outputs were approximately 320 W and 550 W for the type-approval Worldwide harmonized light vehicles test procedure Class 3 driving cycle and for a real-world highway driving cycle, respectively.

  6. Analysis of a Temperature-Controlled Exhaust Thermoelectric Generator During a Driving Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, F. P.; Alves, A.; Pires, J. M.; Martins, L. B.; Martins, J.; Oliveira, J.; Teixeira, J.; Goncalves, L. M.; Hall, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Thermoelectric generators can be used in automotive exhaust energy recovery. As car engines operate under wide variable loads, it is a challenge to design a system for operating efficiently under these variable conditions. This means being able to avoid excessive thermal dilution under low engine loads and being able to operate under high load, high temperature events without the need to deflect the exhaust gases with bypass systems. The authors have previously proposed a thermoelectric generator (TEG) concept with temperature control based on the operating principle of the variable conductance heat pipe/thermosiphon. This strategy allows the TEG modules’ hot face to work under constant, optimized temperature. The variable engine load will only affect the number of modules exposed to the heat source, not the heat transfer temperature. This prevents module overheating under high engine loads and avoids thermal dilution under low engine loads. The present work assesses the merit of the aforementioned approach by analysing the generator output during driving cycles simulated with an energy model of a light vehicle. For the baseline evaporator and condenser configuration, the driving cycle averaged electrical power outputs were approximately 320 W and 550 W for the type-approval Worldwide harmonized light vehicles test procedure Class 3 driving cycle and for a real-world highway driving cycle, respectively.

  7. Determination of analytical dependences in order to calculate the exhaust gas boiler with helical belt inserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolyadin Evgeniy Alekseevich

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research is the identification of regularities of heat and aerodynamic processes and determination of analytical dependences in order to calculate heat exchange Nu = (Re, S/d and aerodynamic resistance  = f(Re, S/d of the exhaust gas boiler with helical belt inserts. The experimental research of heat exchange and aerodynamics of all used helical belt inserts was performed in the same conditions, based on one methodology and the same ex-perimental installation. The received dependences help to evaluate the increasein heat exchange and aerodynamic resistance of a gas flow while using helical belt inserts with different geometrical specifications, and to select the best option of the geometry of the insert for a specific construction of a recuperative heat exchanger with multi-phase heat exchange environments.

  8. Oxidation and exhaust gas corrosion resistance of the cobalt base clad layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Smolenska

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Purpose of this work is describing the behaviour of the cobalt base cladding layers after treatment in hot air (750°C, 200 hours and exhaust gases (700°C, two month.Design/methodology/approach: The layers were produced by two cladding, laser and PTA, cladding technique. Cladding was conducted with a high power diode laser HDPL ROFIN SINAR DL 020 and Plasma Transformed Arc method. The layers consisted of three multitracking sublayers. The cobalt base layers were evaluated by microstructure investigations (optical and scanning electron microscope SEM, chemical analysis and micro hardness measurements.Findings: The microstructure of the investigated layers did not change much, neither on the top part nor in the clad/steel interface after treatment in both environments. On the outer surfaces the oxide layers were observed which consisted generally of chromium and iron oxides. The compositions of this scales were reviled by the EDS analyze. The changes in chemical compositions before and after oxidation and after corrosion in exhaust gases in the dendritic regions and micro regions were confirmed by the semi-quantitative chemical analysis (EDS. Neither the oxidation nor exposition for two month in exhaust gases did not influence on the morphology of the clad layers in any region however changes in chemical composition were observed. For both sort of clads the oxide layers were observed on the surface. The proposed layers are resistant for the hot exhausted gases.Research limitations/implications: The future researches should be done on microstructural and kinetic analyze of high temperature corrosion for higher temperature and times of the process.Practical implications: The clad layers, of this composition, were designed as a method to prolong service time for the ship engine exhausted valve and after this investigation the first valve heads with laser clad layer were installed in working ship engine.Originality/value: The chemical composition of the powder was new one. Also using the laser cladding technique for ship engine parts subject of interesting.

  9. Effect of hydroxy (HHO) gas addition on performance and exhaust emissions in compression ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Ali Can; Uludamar, Erinc; Aydin, Kadir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cukurova University, 01330 Adana (Turkey)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, hydroxy gas (HHO) was produced by the electrolysis process of different electrolytes (KOH{sub (aq)}, NaOH{sub (aq)}, NaCl{sub (aq)}) with various electrode designs in a leak proof plexiglass reactor (hydrogen generator). Hydroxy gas was used as a supplementary fuel in a four cylinder, four stroke, compression ignition (CI) engine without any modification and without need for storage tanks. Its effects on exhaust emissions and engine performance characteristics were investigated. Experiments showed that constant HHO flow rate at low engine speeds (under the critical speed of 1750 rpm for this experimental study), turned advantages of HHO system into disadvantages for engine torque, carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC) emissions and specific fuel consumption (SFC). Investigations demonstrated that HHO flow rate had to be diminished in relation to engine speed below 1750 rpm due to the long opening time of intake manifolds at low speeds. This caused excessive volume occupation of hydroxy in cylinders which prevented correct air to be taken into the combustion chambers and consequently, decreased volumetric efficiency was inevitable. Decreased volumetric efficiency influenced combustion efficiency which had negative effects on engine torque and exhaust emissions. Therefore, a hydroxy electronic control unit (HECU) was designed and manufactured to decrease HHO flow rate by decreasing voltage and current automatically by programming the data logger to compensate disadvantages of HHO gas on SFC, engine torque and exhaust emissions under engine speed of 1750 rpm. The flow rate of HHO gas was measured by using various amounts of KOH, NaOH, NaCl (catalysts). These catalysts were added into the water to diminish hydrogen and oxygen bonds and NaOH was specified as the most appropriate catalyst. It was observed that if the molality of NaOH in solution exceeded 1% by mass, electrical current supplied from the battery increased dramatically due to the too much reduction of electrical resistance. HHO system addition to the engine without any modification resulted in increasing engine torque output by an average of 19.1%, reducing CO emissions by an average of 13.5%, HC emissions by an average of 5% and SFC by an average of 14%. (author)

  10. Exhaust circulation into dry gas desulfurization process to prevent carbon deposition in an Oxy-fuel IGCC power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Power plant with semi-closed gas turbine and O2–CO2 coal gasifier was studied. • We adopt dry gas sulfur removal process to establish the system. • The exhaust gas circulation remarkably prevented carbon deposition. • Efficiency loss for exhaust gas circulation is quite small. • Appropriate operating condition of sulfur removal process is revealed. - Abstract: Semi-closed cycle operation of gas turbine fueled by oxygen–CO2 blown coal gasification provides efficient power generation with CO2 separation feature by excluding pre-combustion type CO2 capture that usually brings large efficiency loss. The plant efficiency at transmission end is estimated as 44% at lower heating value (LHV) providing compressed CO2 with concentration of 93 vol%. This power generation system will solve the contradiction between economical resource utilization and reduction of CO2 emission from coal-fired power plant. The system requires appropriate sulfur reduction process to protect gas turbine from corrosion and environment from sulfur emission. We adopt dry gas sulfur removal process to establish the system where apprehension about the detrimental carbon deposition from coal gas. The effect of circulation of a portion of exhaust gas to the process on the retardation of carbon deposition was examined at various gas compositions. The circulation remarkably prevented carbon deposition in the sulfur removal sorbent. The impact of the circulation on the thermal efficiency is smaller than the other auxiliary power consumption. Thus, the circulation is appropriate operation for the power generation

  11. Exhaust gas analysis and formation mechanism of SiC nanowires synthesized by thermal evaporation method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noppasint Jiraborvornpongsa

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Silicon carbide nanowires (SiCNWs are a set of promising reinforcement materials due to their superior properties. However, formation mechanism of the SiCNWs synthesized by the thermal evaporation method without metal catalyst is still unclear. To understand the formation mechanism, SiCNWs were synthesized by the thermal evaporation method at 1350C using a pre-oxidized Si powder and CH4 gas as precursors. SiCNWs obtained by this method were ?-SiC/SiO2 coreshell nanowires with average diameter about 55nm and with a length up to 1mm. The exhaust gases during the SiCNWs synthesis process were examined by gas chromatography and the photographs of growth activity of SiCNWs inside the furnace were captured. CO gas was detected during the active formation of SiCNWs. It was clarified that CO gas was one of the byproducts from SiCNWs synthesis process, and the formation reaction of SiCNWs should be 3SiO(g+3C(s?2SiC(s+SiO2(s+CO(g. The formation of SiCNWs was discussed based on the oxide-assisted-growth mechanism.

  12. A study on exhaust gas emissions from ships in Turkish Straits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Turkish Straits, i.e. Istanbul (Bosphorus) and Canakkale (Dardanellen), which connect Black Sea and Aegean Sea, have a continuously increasing maritime traffic. Especially, the maritime traffic on Bosphorus (Istanbul Strait) that connects the continents of Europe and Asia is too complex due to geographical conditions. The maritime traffic in the Turkish Straits includes the ships, which are in use in domestic transport, the transit passing ships with various aims and fishing, sport or strolling ships. In this paper, fuel consumption and exhaust gas emissions NOx, CO, CO2, VOC, PM exhausted from ships such as transit vessels, which are passing both Bosphorus and Dardanellen, and passenger ships used in domestic transport on the Bosphorus are calculated. In order to do this the general characteristics, the main engine systems, the fuel types, cruising times and speeds of all vessels are taken into consideration. The calculated NOx emissions on the Bosphorus are 2720t from domestic passenger ships and 4357t from transit ships. In this case it is clear that the transit ships cause more than half of the total amount of emissions from ships on the Bosphorus. The amount of nitrogen oxide emissions from domestic passenger ships used for public transport in Istanbul Strait is equal to approx. 4% of nitrogen oxide emissions from motor vehicles in Istanbul. Finally, the future emissions from ships in Turkish Straits are discussed. (Author)

  13. Exhaust gas emissions and mutagenic effects of modern diesel fuels, GTL, biodiesel and biodiesel blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munack, Axel; Ruschel, Yvonne; Schroeder, Olaf [Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and Fisheries, Braunschweig (Germany)], E-mail: axel.munack@vti.bund.de; Krahl, Juergen [Coburg Univ. of Applied Sciences (Germany); Buenger, Juergen [University of Bochum (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Biodiesel can be used alone (B100) or blended with petroleum diesel in any proportion. The most popular biodiesel blend in the U.S.A. is B20 (20% biodiesel, 80% diesel fuel), which can be used for Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) compliance. In the European Union, the use of biofuel blends is recommended and was introduced by federal regulations in several countries. In Germany, biodiesel is currently blended as B5 (5% biodiesel) to common diesel fuel. In 2008, B7 plus three percent hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) as well is intended to become mandatory in Germany. To investigate the influence of blends on the emissions and possible health effects, we performed a series of studies with several engines (Euro 0, III and IV) measuring regulated and non-regulated exhaust compounds and determining their mutagenic effects. Emissions of blends showed an approximate linear dependence on the blend composition, in particular when regulated emissions are considered. However, a negative effect of blends was observed with respect to mutagenicity of the exhaust gas emissions. In detail, a maximum of the mutagenic potency was found in the range of B20. From this point of view, B20 must be considered as a critical blend, in case diesel fuel and biodiesel are used as binary mixtures. (author)

  14. Process and apparatus for separating and recovering krypton-85 from exhaust gas of nuclear reactor or the like

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An apparatus is described for separating and recovering radioactive krypton-85 contained in an exhaust gas of a nuclear reactor or the like, which comprises a plurality of adsorption beds connected in parallel with respect to a passageway for the exhaust gas, each being packed with activated carbon, wherein adsorption and desorption of krypton-85 in each of the beds are alternatively and repeatedly performed by operating valves disposed between each of the beds and means for reducing pressure in the beds to be desorbed in accordance with a predetermined time schedule. The adsorption and concentration efficiencies are markedly increased by combining the above adsorption apparatus and a distillation apparatus

  15. NOx remediation in oxygen-rich exhaust gas using atmospheric pressure non-thermal plasma generated by a pulsed nanosecond dielectric barrier discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is clearly seen that the application of non-thermal plasmas (NTP) to remove NOx from gas mixture containing a large amount of oxygen (O2) is dominated by NO to NO2 oxidation. Experiments have been conducted using a NTP generated by a nanosecond pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in synthetic exhaust gas, prepared from N2, O2, NO, H2O, and C3H6, over a large range of gas temperature (20-300 deg. C). Results show that the NOx removal rate significantly increased with increasing specific energy deposition. For example, at a temperature of 100 deg. C and an energy deposition of 27 J l-1, 92% of the NO molecules have been removed. The W values for NO is dramatically reduced to values scaling from approx. 15 eV at 27 J l-1 down to approx. 4 eV at 7 J l-1. NOx removal efficiency around 43% was obtained at a temperature of 260 deg. C and a space velocity of 60 000 h-1 for a specific input energy of 27 J l-1. W values for NOx were less than approx. 30 eV. Such treatments in exhaust gas with and without the presence of water vapour induced reactions leading to the production of a large variety of by-products such as acetaldehyde, propylene oxide, formic acid, methyl nitrate, and nitromethane. (author)

  16. An investigation of the effects of smoke suppressant fuel additives on engine and test cell exhaust gas opacities

    OpenAIRE

    Thornburg, Donald W; Darnell, Thomas R; Netzer, David Willis

    1982-01-01

    Tests were conducted in a one-eighth scale turbojet test cell with a ramjet type combustor to investigate the effects of fuel additives on smoke reduction. Particle size and mass concentrations were determined at the engine and stack exhausts using three wavelength optical detector systems. Particulate samples were also collected at the engine exhaust and analyzed with a scanning electron microscope. Combustor temperature and fuel additives were found to significantly affect particulate mass ...

  17. Application of Irradiation. Application to polymer processing, exhaust gas treatment, sterilization of medical instruments and food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many fields such as industry, agriculture, medical treatment and environment use radiation. This report explained some examples of irradiation applications. Radiation source is 60Co γ-ray. Polymer industry use radiation for radiation curing (thermally stable polymer), tire, expanded polymer, radiation induced graft copolymerization and electron beam curing. On environmental conservation, radiation is used for elimination of NOx and SOx in exhaust combustion gas. In the medical treatment, radiation is applied to sterilization of medical instruments, that occupied about 50% volume, and blood for transfusion, which is only one method to prevent GVHD after transfusion. On agriculture, irradiation to spice, dry vegetable, frozen kitchen, potato and garlic are carried out in 30 countries. However, potato is only a kind food in Japan. Radiation breeding and pest control are put in practice. (S.Y.)

  18. Method and apparatus for separation and recovery of rare gas from reactor exhaust gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object: To reduce the probability of leakage of radioactive rare gases to thereby enhance safety and reduce the running cost and facilitate operation. Structure: A processed gas having been deprived of water and oxygen is subjected to pressure reduction to 10 to several 100 mm Hg by a vacuum pump and then cooled down through heat exchange with helium, hydrogen, nitrogen and like gases. The resultant gas is passed through an adsorber, which is cooled to 80 to 1200K by a freezer for adsorbing Ar, Kr, Xe and like rare gases and part of nitrogen. The adsorber is then heated to liberate the adsorbed gas, and the liberated gas is led to a condenser which is cooled to 60 to 800K, thus causing condensation of only the rare gases. Thereafter, the condenser is heated to liberate the rare gases from it, these gases then being sealed in a separate recovery tank. (Ikeda, J.)

  19. Analysis of exhaust gas composition of internal combustion engines using liquefied petroleum gas

    OpenAIRE

    Mockus, Saulius; Sapragonas, Jonas; Stonys, Agnius; Pukalskas, Saugirdas

    2006-01-01

    The problems of implementation of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) supply systems are related with the fact that they are alternative systems used in engines constructed and optimized for work with other kinds of fuel. So assemblers of the systems have to evaluate power losses and at the same time ecological requirements. The experiment is devoted to the analysis of gas composition of engines working at different modes in order to specify the particularity of LPG system tuning and to obtain data...

  20. Simplified prediction of soot emissions in the exhaust of gas turbines operated at atmospheric pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In previous works [1, 2], a correlation for the prediction of soot in gas turbine exhaust has been presented. The development of the correlation is based on 300 of experimental data for a total of 19 fuels burned both at atmospheric and high pressure (0.1 to 0.9 MPa) and two scales (1/2 and 1/3) of a Laval type combustion chamber. With the wide range of fuels burned in the experiment giving a smoke number variation from 0 to 100, the accuracy of the correlation (Standard Deviation of 40%) is acceptable for most purposes Later on the correlation has been improved using data from the full scaled combustion chamber as shown in [3]. A detailed analysis of the correlation is undertaken within the present work for the case of the experiments at atmospheric pressure. The result is a simplification of the correlation presented in [3] without a major deterioration of the standard deviation. This result leads to a simplification of the previous proposed soot formation and oxidation model within gas turbine combustors (operated at atmospheric pressure) and limits the analysis of the phenomenon on essential functional parameters as well. Gas turbines are generally used in aircraft, ships, and in stationary production of electricity, heat and vapor. (author)

  1. Novel Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palitha Jayaweera; Francis Tanzella

    2005-03-01

    SRI International (SRI) is developing ceramic-based microsensors to detect exhaust gases such as NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO in advanced combustion and gasification systems under this DOE NETL-sponsored research project. The sensors detect the electrochemical activity of the exhaust gas species on catalytic electrodes attached to a solid state electrolyte and are designed to operate at the high temperatures, elevated pressures, and corrosive environments typical of large power generation exhausts. The sensors can be easily integrated into online monitoring systems for active emission control. The ultimate objective is to develop sensors for multiple gas detection in a single package, along with data acquisition and control software and hardware, so that the information can be used for closed-loop control in novel advanced power generation systems. This report details the Phase I Proof-of-Concept, research activities performed from October 2003 to March 2005. SRI's research work includes synthesis of catalytic materials, sensor design and fabrication, software development, and demonstration of pulse voltammetric analysis of NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO gases on catalytic electrodes.

  2. [Effects of exhaust gas on adrenal cortex activity, general growth and variation of intermediate metabolism in the male rate during a period of growth].

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Feki, A; Sakly, M; Kamoun, A

    1984-10-01

    The exhaust gas induces a stressing action, similar to classical type agression: activation of the pituitary adrenal-axis, with increase of relative adrenal weight, and of the rate of corticosterone production. After chronic exposure, deep metabolic changes appear, which reflect an accentuated state of exhaustion of the organism. Moreover perturbation of spermatogenesis with azoospermia is noted. Thus exhaust gas is to be considered as a very potent toxic agent. PMID:6084481

  3. The Effect of Ambient Temperature and Exercise to the Level of Exhaustion on

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somaye Kasharafifard

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: The increase in the amount of heat shock protein and C-reactive protein occurring as a result of stress was done with the aims of returning cell homeostasis, successful restoration of cell injury and protection of cell against more injuries. Materials and Methods: Fifteen climber and 15 non athlete subjects were chosen. A selected aerobic test was done by the subjects using Monark bicycle under two different conditions. Before starting the test, the subjects were exposed to a normal condition with the temperature of 242C for an hour and a blood sample was taken from all the subjects. Then immediately, the subjects took the selected aerobic test to the level of exhaustion and blood sample was taken again. A week later, these subjects were exposed to a heated environment with the temperature of 382C, followed by blood sample taking. Finally, the test was done by the subjects to the level of exhaustion and the last blood sample was taken. Then, the amount of heat shock protein (HSP and C - reactive protein (CRP in blood samples was measured. Results: A meaningful difference was observed in the changes of heat shock proteins (p=0.012 and C-reactive protein (p=0.02 between athlete and non athlete subjects. There was no meaningful difference in CRP and HSP in normal and hot condition for non athlete subjects before and after the test. But the result of the study demonstrates that There was a meaningful difference for athletes in both conditions before and after the test (p=0.002. Conclusion: Based on the study, it is claimed that while an athlete is exposed to several stressful conditions (e.g. high temperature and physical exercise, compared to a non athlete, the reaction of his body cells is more significant in order to prevent the injury.

  4. RE-ENTRAINMENT AND DISPERSION OF EXHAUSTS FROM INDOOR RADON REDUCTION SYSTEMS: ANALYSIS OF TRACER GAS DATA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tracer gas studies were conducted around four model houses in a wind tunnel, and around one house in the field, to quantify re-entrainment and dispersion of exhaust gases released from residential indoor radon reduction systems. Re-entrainment tests in the field suggest that acti...

  5. Improved design of a tangential entry cyclone separator for separation of particles from exhaust gas of diesel engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, N

    2011-01-01

    An effective design of cyclone separator with tangential inlet is developed applying an equation derived from the correlation of collection efficiency with maximum pressure drop components of the cyclone, which can efficiently remove the particles around 1microm of the exhaust gas of diesel engine. PMID:22324145

  6. PERFORMANCE AND EXHAUST GAS EMISSIONS ANALYSIS OF DIRECT INJECTION CNG-DIESEL DUAL FUEL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RANBIR SINGH

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Existing diesel engines are under stringent emission regulation particularly of smoke and particulate matter in their exhaust. Compressed Natural Gas and Diesel dual fuel operation is regarded as one of the best ways to control emissions from diesel engines and simultaneously saving petroleum based diesel fuel. Dual fuel engineis a conventional diesel engine which burn either gaseous fuel or diesel or both at the same time. In the present paper an experimental research was carried out on a laboratory single cylinder, four-stroke variable compression ratio, direct injection diesel engine converted to CNG-Diesel dual fuel mode to analyze the performance and emission characteristics of pure diesel first and then CNG-Diesel dual fuel mode. The measurements were recorded for the compression ratio of 15 and 17.5 at CNG substitution rates of 30% and 60% and varying theload from idle to rated load of 3.5kW in steps of 1 up to 3kW and then to 3.5kW. The results reveal that brake thermal efficiency of dual fuel engine is in the range of 30%-40% at the rated load of 3.5 kW which is 11%-13% higher than pure diesel engine for 30% and 60% CNG substitution rates. This trend is observed irrespective of the compression ratio of the engine. Brake specific fuel consumption of dual fuel engine is found better than pure diesel engine at all engine loads and for both CNG substitution rates. It is found that there is drastic reduction in CO, CO2, HC, NOx and smoke emissions in the exhaust of dual fuel engine at all loads and for 30% and 60% CNG substitution rates by employing some optimum operating conditions set forth for experimental investigations in this study.

  7. Numerical Simulation of Exhaust Gas Cooling in Channels with Periodic Elbows for Application in Compact Heat Recovery Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniature and Micro devices represent the new frontier for advanced heat and mass transfer technology. Due to the small length scales, the use of CFD is very useful for designing and optimizing microfluidic devices since experimentation and visualization at these scales can be difficult. In this work a high temperature air microfluidic cooling strategy for applications such as compact waste heat recovery, exhaust gas recirculation and fuel cell thermal management is proposed. Initially, the application of a simple straight microchannel is considered. In an effort to partially compensate for the poor thermal properties of air, right-angle bends are introduced in order to induce Dean vortices which periodically restart the thermal boundary layer development, thus improving the heat transfer and fluid mixing. Numerical simulations in the range of 100 ≤ ReDh ≤ 1000 have been carried out for channels of square cross-section. Channel wall lengths of 1.0 mm are investigated for elbow spacings of 5 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm. High temperature air (300°C) at atmospheric inlet pressure is the working fluid. The results indicate that the elbows substantially improve the local and average heat transfer in the channels while increasing the pressure drop. Design considerations are discussed which take into account the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of the channels.

  8. Low-temperature gas from marine shales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mango, Frank D; Jarvie, Daniel M

    2009-01-01

    Thermal cracking of kerogens and bitumens is widely accepted as the major source of natural gas (thermal gas). Decomposition is believed to occur at high temperatures, between 100 and 200 degrees C in the subsurface and generally above 300 degrees C in the laboratory. Although there are examples of gas deposits possibly generated at lower temperatures, and reports of gas generation over long periods of time at 100 degrees C, robust gas generation below 100 degrees C under ordinary laboratory conditions is unprecedented. Here we report gas generation under anoxic helium flow at temperatures 300 degrees below thermal cracking temperatures. Gas is generated discontinuously, in distinct aperiodic episodes of near equal intensity. In one three-hour episode at 50 degrees C, six percent of the hydrocarbons (kerogen & bitumen) in a Mississippian marine shale decomposed to gas (C1-C5). The same shale generated 72% less gas with helium flow containing 10 ppm O2 and the two gases were compositionally distinct. In sequential isothermal heating cycles (approximately 1 hour), nearly five times more gas was generated at 50 degrees C (57.4 microg C1-C5/g rock) than at 350 degrees C by thermal cracking (12 microg C1-C5/g rock). The position that natural gas forms only at high temperatures over geologic time is based largely on pyrolysis experiments under oxic conditions and temperatures where low-temperature gas generation could be suppressed. Our results indicate two paths to gas, a high-temperature thermal path, and a low-temperature catalytic path proceeding 300 degrees below the thermal path. It redefines the time-temperature dimensions of gas habitats and opens the possibility of gas generation at subsurface temperatures previously thought impossible. PMID:19236698

  9. Low-temperature gas from marine shales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarvie Daniel M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thermal cracking of kerogens and bitumens is widely accepted as the major source of natural gas (thermal gas. Decomposition is believed to occur at high temperatures, between 100 and 200°C in the subsurface and generally above 300°C in the laboratory. Although there are examples of gas deposits possibly generated at lower temperatures, and reports of gas generation over long periods of time at 100°C, robust gas generation below 100°C under ordinary laboratory conditions is unprecedented. Here we report gas generation under anoxic helium flow at temperatures 300° below thermal cracking temperatures. Gas is generated discontinuously, in distinct aperiodic episodes of near equal intensity. In one three-hour episode at 50°C, six percent of the hydrocarbons (kerogen & bitumen in a Mississippian marine shale decomposed to gas (C1–C5. The same shale generated 72% less gas with helium flow containing 10 ppm O2 and the two gases were compositionally distinct. In sequential isothermal heating cycles (~1 hour, nearly five times more gas was generated at 50°C (57.4 μg C1–C5/g rock than at 350°C by thermal cracking (12 μg C1–C5/g rock. The position that natural gas forms only at high temperatures over geologic time is based largely on pyrolysis experiments under oxic conditions and temperatures where low-temperature gas generation could be suppressed. Our results indicate two paths to gas, a high-temperature thermal path, and a low-temperature catalytic path proceeding 300° below the thermal path. It redefines the time-temperature dimensions of gas habitats and opens the possibility of gas generation at subsurface temperatures previously thought impossible.

  10. On exhaust emissions from petrol-fuelled passenger cars at low ambient temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurikko, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Use

    1998-11-01

    The study at hand deals with regulated and unregulated exhaust emissions from petrol-fuelled cars at low ambient temperatures with present-day or near-future exhaust after treatment systems. The subject has been investigated at VTT over a decade and this report compiles data from various sub-studies carried out between the years 1993 - 1997. Each one of them viewed different aspects of the phenomenon, like determining the low-temperature response of today`s new cars employing three-way catalytic converters or assessing the long-term durability and the influence of vehicle mileage upon the low-temperature emissions performance. Within these studies, together more than 120 cars of model years from 1990 to 1997 have been tested. Most of them were normal, in-service vehicles with total mileages differing between only a few thousand kilometres for new cars up to 80,000 km or even more for the in-use vehicles. Both the US FTP75 and the European test cycle have been employed, and the ambient temperatures ranged from the baseline (+22 deg C) down to +- O deg C, -7 deg C and in some cases even to -20 deg C. The studies attested that new cars having today`s advanced emissions control systems produced fairly low levels of emissions when tested in conditions designated in the regulations that are the basis of the current new-vehicle certification. However, this performance was not necessarily attained at ambient temperatures that were below the normative range. Fairly widespread response was recorded, and cars having almost equal emissions output at baseline could produce largely deviating outcomes in low-temperature conditions. On average, CO and HC emissions increased by a factor of five to 10, depending on the ambient temperature and vehicle type. However, emissions of NO{sub x} were largely unaffected. Apart from these regulated emissions, many unregulated species were also determined, either by using traditional sampling and chromatography methods or on-line, employing the latest FTIR technology. Overall, the levels of these emissions were also mostly elevated at subnormal temperatures. Total vehicle mileage seemed not to affect cold-start emissions (CO and HC) at low temperatures. Nor did the overall durability of the emission control system appear to be worse in cold-climate conditions typical for Finland. The deterioration of the emissions performance in the tested vehicles either closely followed the average trend defined by the normal, assigned deterioration factors or was even lesser. The conclusions of this report underline the necessity of a separate low-temperature test in order to really effectively curb real-world emissions. Standards at normal temperature are no more effective alone, but need to be accompanied with additional requirements for good performance also in conditions closer to the everyday use, which comprises many cold-starts even in low ambient temperature conditions. (orig.) 75 refs.

  11. Study of an exhaust gas recirculation equipped micro gas turbine supplied with bio-fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors discuss in this paper some aspects related to the employment of liquid and gaseous bio-fuels in a micro-gas turbine. Besides the purpose of checking the effectiveness of methods for supplying the micro-turbine with fuels from renewable sources, the attention is focused on the need of controlling the pollutant emission. To this aim, several solutions are experienced and numerically tested. For the liquid fuel supply, a new shape and location of the main fuel injector is combined with a modified position of the pilot injector. In the case of the biogas fuelling, an external EGR option is considered as activated. Both methods aim at the reduction of the thermal and prompt NO formation by approaching the flameless combustion concept. -- Highlights: • External and internal EGR concepts applied to NOx control from micro gas turbines. • For gaseous fuels: internal EGR is obtained by a proper location of the pilot injector. • For liquid fuels: replacing the original radial injectors with a pressure swirl atomizer. • We apply a CFD based method, after validation with experimental data. • Blends of bio-fuels with fossil fuels promise noticeable benefits

  12. Detection of very large ions in aircraft gas turbine engine combustor exhaust: charged small soot particles?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelm, S.; Haverkamp, H.; Sorokin, A.; Arnold, F.

    Small electrically charged soot particles (CSP) present in the exhaust of a jet aircraft engine combustor have been detected by a Large Ion Mass Spectrometer and quantitatively measured by an Ion Mobility Analyzer. The size and concentration measurements which took place at an aircraft gas-turbine engine combustor test-rig at the ground covered different combustor conditions (fuel flow=FF, fuel sulphur content=FSC). At the high-pressure turbine stage of the engine, CSP-diameters were mostly around 6 nm and CSP-concentrations reached up to 4.8×10 7 cm -3 (positive and negative) corresponding to a CSP-emission index ECSP=2.5×10 15 CSP kg -1 fuel burnt. The ECSP increased with FF but did not increase with FSC. The latter indicates that sulphur was not a major component of the large ions. Possible CSP-sources and CSP-sinks as well as CSP-roles are discussed.

  13. Development of techniques to characterize particulates emitted from gas turbine exhausts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, M. P.; Hilton, M.; Waterman, D. R.; Black, J. D.

    2003-07-01

    Particles emitted from aircraft play a role in the formation of contrails and it is essential to characterize them to understand the physical and chemical processes that are happening. Current methods for measuring aircraft particulate emissions study the reflectance of samples collected in filter papers. A series of experiments to more fully characterize particulates has been performed on a small-scale gas turbine engine. An intrusive sampling system conforming to current ICAO regulations for aircraft emissions was used with a scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS). Non-intrusive measurements were made using laser induced incandescence (LII) and samples were taken from the exhaust to analyse using a transmission electron microscope. Results obtained from different techniques showed good agreement with each other. As engine power conditions increased, both the SMPS and LII indicated that the mass of soot had decreased. Differences were observed between measurements of diluted and undiluted samples. The mean particle size decreased with dilution but the size distribution became bi-modal. The study has shown how significant the sampling environment is for measuring particulates and careful techniques need to be used to ensure that accurate, consistent results can be obtained.

  14. Development and testing of a washing process for exhaust gas of stationary operated internal combustion engines. Final report. Entwicklung und Erprobung eines Verfahrens der Abgaswaesche fuer stationaere Verbrennungsmotoren. Schlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coutelle, R.; Huss, R.; Wimberger, H.J.

    1986-01-01

    An exhaust gas washer for stationary operated diesel engines has been developed and tested in combination with a heat pump. The exhaust gas is washed with its own condensate in a packed column. The condensate circulation is performed by mammoth pumps. The pollutant emissions have been reduced depending on operating conditions (speed, temperature, pH of the condensate) by the following rates: HC by 30-85%, aldehydes by 35-99%, phenols by 50-80%, PAH by 80-95%, soot by 25-70%, SO/sub 2/ by 65-90%, NOsub(x) by 5-20%. It has been possible to reduce the NOsub(x) emissions by 75% at an inconsiderably increased fuel consumption by recycling exhaust gases. But higher soot emissions have to be accepted in this case. The condensate is completely degradable in a septic tank after being mixed with waste water containing phosphate. With 42 refs., 13 tabs., 32 figs.

  15. Predicted exhaust emissions from a methanol and jet fueled gas turbine combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelman, H. G.; Browning, L. H.; Pefley, R. K.

    1975-01-01

    A computer model of a gas turbine combustor has been used to predict the kinetic combustion and pollutant formation processes for methanol and simulated jet fuel. Use of the kinetic reaction mechanisms has also allowed a study of ignition delay and flammability limit of these two fuels. The NOX emissions for methanol were predicted to be from 69 to 92% lower than those for jet fuel at the same equivalence ratio which is in agreement with experimentally observed results. The high heat of vaporization of methanol lowers both the combustor inlet mixture temperatures and the final combustion temperatures. The lower combustion temperatures lead to low NOX emissions while the lower inlet mixture temperatures increase methanol's ignition delay. This increase in ignition delay dictates the lean flammability limit of methanol to be 0.8, while jet fuel is shown to combust at 0.4.

  16. Positional Arrangements of Waste Exhaust Gas Ducts of C-Type Balanced Chimney Heating Devices on Building Faades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan AVLAR

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In Turkey today, with the increase in availability of natural gas,detached heating devices are being preferred over existingheating devices. Due to the lack of chimneys in existing buildingsin Turkey or the presence of chimneys that fail to conformto standards, the use of C-type balanced chimney devices has increased.C-type balanced chimney devices take the combustionair directly from the outside by a specific air duct as detachedheating equipment, with enclosed combustion chambers anda specific waste gas exhaust duct, and they are ventilated independentlyof the field of equipment. Because of their essentiality,the use of a chimney is not required in these devices;the waste gas is exhausted through walls, windows, doors, orbalconies. The natural gas is a clean fossil fuel that requires nostorage in buildings and is easy to use. However, water vapor,carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides are produced by the combustionof natural gas. It is widely known that high concentrationsof these products can have some adverse effects onhumans such as dizziness, headaches and nausea. As a result,the waste products could recoil through wall openings on thefaade to create unhealthy indoor environments that could bedangerous to human health. Therefore, the importance of standardsand regulations about the positional arrangements of thewaste gas exhaust ducts of C-type balanced chimney devices onbuilding faades is increasing. In this research, we analyze thestudies of the Institution of Turkish Standards, Chamber of MechanicalEngineers, gas distribution companies, municipalitiesand authorized firms and compare the criteria to determine thenecessary application method. According to our comparison ofthe references accessed, the criteria are not uniform.

  17. Thermodynamic and economic performances optimization of an organic Rankine cycle system utilizing exhaust gas of a large marine diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A new parameter is proposed for optimizing economic performance of the ORC system. • Maximal thermodynamic and economic performances of an ORC system are presented. • The corresponding operating pressures in turbine of optimum thermodynamic and economic performances are investigated. • An optimal effectiveness of pre-heater is obtained for the ORC system. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to investigate the thermodynamic and economic performances optimization for an ORC system recovering the waste heat of exhaust gas from a large marine diesel engine of the merchant ship. Parameters of net power output index and thermal efficiency are used to represent the economic and thermodynamic performances, respectively. The maximum net power output index and thermal efficiency are obtained and the corresponding turbine inlet pressure, turbine outlet pressure, and effectiveness of pre-heater of the ORC system are also evaluated using R1234ze, R245fa, R600, and R600a. Furthermore, the analyses of the effects of turbine inlet temperature and cooling water temperature on the optimal economic and thermodynamic performances of the ORC system are carried out. The results show that R245fa performs the most satisfactorily followed by R600, R600a, and R1234ze under optimal economic performance. However, in the optimal thermodynamic performance evaluations, R1234ze has the largest thermal efficiency followed by R600a, R245fa, and R600. The payback periods will decrease from 0.5 year for R245fa to 0.65 year for R1234ze respectively as the system is equipped with a pre-heater. In addition, compared with conventional diesel oil feeding, the proposed ORC system can reduce 76% CO2 emission per kilowatt-hour

  18. Investigation of the Performance of HEMT-Based NO, NO2 and NH3 Exhaust Gas Sensors for Automotive Antipollution Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halfaya, Yacine; Bishop, Chris; Soltani, Ali; Sundaram, Suresh; Aubry, Vincent; Voss, Paul L.; Salvestrini, Jean-Paul; Ougazzaden, Abdallah

    2016-01-01

    We report improved sensitivity to NO, NO2 and NH3 gas with specially-designed AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMT) that are suitable for operation in the harsh environment of diesel exhaust systems. The gate of the HEMT device is functionalized using a Pt catalyst for gas detection. We found that the performance of the sensors is enhanced at a temperature of 600 °C, and the measured sensitivity to 900 ppm-NO, 900 ppm-NO2 and 15 ppm-NH3 is 24%, 38.5% and 33%, respectively, at 600 °C. We also report dynamic response times as fast as 1 s for these three gases. Together, these results indicate that HEMT sensors could be used in a harsh environment with the ability to control an anti-pollution system in real time. PMID:26907298

  19. Investigation of the Performance of HEMT-Based NO, NO2 and NH3 Exhaust Gas Sensors for Automotive Antipollution Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yacine Halfaya

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report improved sensitivity to NO, NO2 and NH3 gas with specially-designed AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMT that are suitable for operation in the harsh environment of diesel exhaust systems. The gate of the HEMT device is functionalized using a Pt catalyst for gas detection. We found that the performance of the sensors is enhanced at a temperature of 600 °C, and the measured sensitivity to 900 ppm-NO, 900 ppm-NO 2 and 15 ppm-NH 3 is 24%, 38.5% and 33%, respectively, at 600 °C. We also report dynamic response times as fast as 1 s for these three gases. Together, these results indicate that HEMT sensors could be used in a harsh environment with the ability to control an anti-pollution system in real time.

  20. Palladium based catalysts for exhaust aftertreatment of natural gas powered vehicles and biofuel combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrothermally aged (1000/850C, 12/16h) Pd-Ce-supported alumina catalysts with high and low Ce content were prepared and tested in conversion of gas mixtures simulating the emissions from natural gas (NG) driven vehicles and biofuel combustion. The test procedure contained lean and rich light-off activity tests, stationary and oscillating lambda sweeps, space velocity tests as well as runs with sulphur poisoning. The catalysts exhibited high conversion of the model pollutants. In the oscillating lambda sweep experiments, the Pd-Ce/Al2O3 with high Ce loading showed high activities in conversion of CH4 and CO at lean λ values up to 1.04. Ageing under the reactants flow as well as hydrothermal treatment of the catalysts resulted in improved catalytic activities in terms of light-off temperatures of the model pollutants. This activation was believed to be a result of both Cl-release from the surface as well as restructuring of the Pd-particles. Interaction of Pd-Ce or Al-Ce induced at high temperature was also believed to affect the activation. Addition of 5ppm of SO2 into the gas mixture of simulated emissions from biofuel combustion raised the T50% of CH4 by approximately 100C. SO2-TPD experiments were used to correlate the catalytic activity to S-poisoning. The catalysts were characterised by H2-adsorption, XPS, FTIR, SO2-/NO-/O2-TPD, XRD, XRF and N2-physisorption

  1. The Heat Exchanger Performance of Shell and Multi Tube Helical Coil as a Heater through the Utilization of a Diesel Machine’s Exhaust Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Zainuddin

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A review on reutilization of heat waste from a diesel machine is absolutely important. This is because the exhaust gas potential of a Diesel machine keeps increasing and not much has been utilized by the industry. One of the techniques of reutilizing the heat waste in industry is by using a heat exchanger. The technique is also very useful for the environment because it can reduce air pollution caused by the exhaust gas of the diesel machine. The main purpose of the research is to find out the capability of shell and multi-tube helical coil HE as an air heater by utilizing the exhaust gas of the Diesel machine. The heat exchanger of shell and multi-tube helical coil  utilizes the exhaust thermal gas of the Diesel machine as the air heater already made. The apparatus has the following dimension: the shell length of 1.05 m, diameter 0.1524 m, tube length of 3.25 m with 20 coils, tube diameter of 0.011 m, coil diameter of 0.0508 m with 4 helical coils. The type of Diesel machine to use in the testing is 4FB1 Isuzu Diesel engine. The machine has the maximum machine power and rotation of 54 kW and 3,600 rpm. The performance testing of heat exchanger has been conducted in some variations of Diesel machine rotations of 1,500 rpm, 1,750 rpm, 2,000 rpm, 2,250 rpm and 2,500 rpm. The testing result shows a maximum effectiveness to happen at the machine rotation of 1,500 rpm. The maximum effectiveness to get is 67.8% and then it goes down drastically in accordance with the increase of air mass flow rate. The hot air temperature created is from 47.1°C to 52.3°C so that it can be used for the purpose of drying up the unhulled rice.

  2. Pyrometric Gas and Surface Temperature Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, Gustave; Ng, Daniel

    1999-01-01

    A multiwavelength pyrometer possessing advantages over the one- and two-wavelength designs is described. Results of its application to surface temperature measurements of ceramics is presented. Also described is a probe suitable for gas temperature measurements to temperatures > 2600 K. The design of the probe includes a multiwavelength pyrometer with fiber optic input.

  3. Robust control of speed and temperature in a power plant gas turbine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najimi, Ebrahim; Ramezani, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, an H(?) robust controller has been designed for an identified model of MONTAZER GHAEM power plant gas turbine (GE9001E). In design phase, a linear model (ARX model) which is obtained using real data has been applied. Since the turbine has been used in a combined cycle power plant, its speed and also the exhaust gas temperature should be adjusted simultaneously by controlling fuel signals and compressor inlet guide vane (IGV) position. Considering the limitations on the system inputs, the aim of the control is to maintain the turbine speed and the exhaust gas temperature within desired interval under uncertainties and load demand disturbances. Simulation results of applying the proposed robust controller on the nonlinear model of the system (NARX model), fairly fulfilled the predefined aims. Simulations also show the improvement in the performance compared to MPC and PID controllers for the same conditions. PMID:22062324

  4. Estimation of exhaust gas aerodynamic force on the variable geometry turbocharger actuator: 1D flow model approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Estimation of aerodynamic force on variable turbine geometry vanes and actuator. • Method based on exhaust gas flow modeling. • Simulation tool for integration of aerodynamic force in automotive simulation software. - Abstract: This paper provides a reliable tool for simulating the effects of exhaust gas flow through the variable turbine geometry section of a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT), on flow control mechanism. The main objective is to estimate the resistive aerodynamic force exerted by the flow upon the variable geometry vanes and the controlling actuator, in order to improve the control of vane angles. To achieve this, a 1D model of the exhaust flow is developed using Navier–Stokes equations. As the flow characteristics depend upon the volute geometry, impeller blade force and the existing viscous friction, the related source terms (losses) are also included in the model. In order to guarantee stability, an implicit numerical solver has been developed for the resolution of the Navier–Stokes problem. The resulting simulation tool has been validated through comparison with experimentally obtained values of turbine inlet pressure and the aerodynamic force as measured at the actuator shaft. The simulator shows good compliance with experimental results

  5. Thermally grown oxide films and corrosion performance of ferritic stainless steels under simulated exhaust gas condensate conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Five ferritic stainless steels with dissimilar composition included. • Thermal oxide films and performance under exhaust gas condensate conditions studied. • Oxide films grown at 300 and 600 °C show differences in structure and properties. • Performance of alloys with >11.5 wt.% Cr is related to elements Ti, Si, Nb and Mo. • Compositional optimization requires knowledge on several linked processes. - Abstract: Five ferritic stainless steels are characterized in terms of thermally grown oxide films and corrosion performance under simulated exhaust gas condensate conditions. Oxide films developed at 300 °C show only little variation in microstructure and properties between the alloys, whereas those evolved at 600 °C exhibit clear differences. Especially in alloys with >11.5 wt.% chromium, the presence and distribution of such alloying elements as titanium, silicon, niobium and molybdenum are crucial for the film properties and the overall corrosion performance. The results may be exploited in the compositional optimization of the alloys for the cold-end components of automotive exhaust system

  6. Effect of ejector dilutors on measurements of automotive exhaust gas aerosol size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejector dilutors have long been used for automotive exhaust particle sampling, as they can offer a low-cost option for stable dilution. In an ejector dilutor, pressurized air expanding in the periphery of a nozzle draws in and mixes with an exhaust sample which is then led to analytical equipment. The combination of processes involved may lead to particle losses which can affect the measurement. This study examines the losses of diesel exhaust particles of different characteristics (nucleation mode, non-volatile accumulation mode, internally and externally mixed accumulation mode) when these are sampled through an ejector dilutor. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), an electrical low-pressure impactor and a diffusion charger were used as analytical equipment to characterize losses with different instruments. Particle losses were found negligible for all practical applications of diesel exhaust aerosol sampling. Also, the sampling outlet and the operating pressure of the ejector dilutor were found to have a non-measurable effect on the distribution shape. Some variation of the labile nucleation mode particles was attributed to evaporation within the SMPS rather than an ejector effect, and this was confirmed by sampling solid NaCl particles in the same size range. The study further confirms the usability of ejector dilutors for exhaust particle sampling and dilution

  7. Temperature Modulation of a Catalytic Gas Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Eike Brauns; Eva Morsbach; Sebastian Kunz; Marcus Baeumer; Walter Lang

    2014-01-01

    The use of catalytic gas sensors usually offers low selectivity, only based on their different sensitivities for various gases due to their different heats of reaction. Furthermore, the identification of the gas present is not possible, which leads to possible misinterpretation of the sensor signals. The use of micro-machined catalytic gas sensors offers great advantages regarding the response time, which allows advanced analysis of the sensor response. By using temperature modulation, additi...

  8. Optical Temperature Sensor For Gas Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossey, P. W.

    1987-01-01

    New design promises accuracy even in presence of contamination. Improved sensor developed to measure gas temperatures up to 1,700 degree C in gas-turbine engines. Sensor has conical shape for mechanical strengths and optical configuration insensitive to deposits of foreign matter on sides of cone.

  9. Investigation of ambient temperature on the performance of GE-F5 gas turbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The role of ambient temperature in determining the performance of GE-F5 gas turbine is analysed by investigating the Shirvan gas turbine power plant 10MW, 15MW and 20MW power output. These parameters have been brought as a function of ambient temperature. The results show when ambient temperature increases 1 deg C, The compressor pressure decreases about 20kPa, compressor outlet temperature increases about 1.13 deg C and exhaust temperature increases about 2.5 deg C. It is revealed that variations are due to decreasing the efficiency of compressor and less due to mass flow rate of air reduction as ambient temperature increases at constant power output. The results shows cycle efficiency reduces 3% with increasing 50 of ambient temperature, also the m increases as ambient temperature increase for constant turbine work. These are also because of reducing the compressor efficiency as ambient temperature increases

  10. Oxidation and corrosion fatigue aspects of cast exhaust manifolds

    OpenAIRE

    Ekström, Madeleine

    2015-01-01

    Emission regulations for heavy-duty diesel engines are becoming increasingly restrictive to limit the environmental impacts of exhaust gases and particles. Increasing the specific power output of diesel engines would improve fuel efficiency and greatly reduce emissions, but these changes could lead to increased exhaust gas temperature, increasing demands on the exhaust manifold material. This is currently the ferritic ductile cast iron alloy SiMo51, containing about 4 wt% Si and ~1 wt% Mo, wh...

  11. Effects of Gas Velocity and Temperature on Nitric Oxide Conversion in Simulated Catalytic Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathaporn Chuepeng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Gaseous emissions from gasoline engine such as carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxides were usually reduced in three-way catalytic converter simultaneously around theoretical fuel and air combustion. Engine speed and load and other parameters were varied over a wide range of operating conditions, resulting in different exhaust gas composition and condition intake into catalytic converter. This work was studied the conversion of Nitric Oxide (NO in exhaust gas catalytic converter affected by gas velocity and inlet temperature using numerical modeling. Approach: The simulation was based on a one-dimensional time-dependent model within a single monolith channel of the converter. Upon certain assumptions, the study was considered heterogeneous combustion reaction between gas and solid phases based on lumped kinetic reactions. In this study, constants and variables used for mass and heat transfers were dependent on gas or solid phase temperature and mole fraction. Finite difference scheme incorporated with the generated computer code was established for solving species and energy balances within gas and solid phases. Results: The NO conversion was increased with transient period in initial and reached steady state at different values. The lower inlet gas temperature was resulted in lesser NO conversion at the same inlet NO concentration and gas velocity. The light-off temperatures were up to 520 K and a sudden rise in NO conversion was from 550-605 K and decreasing onwards, generating working temperature window. NO conversion increased throughout the catalyst bed from the inlet and the conversion decreased as the gas velocity increased. Conclusion/Recommendations: Gas space velocity and gas temperature intake to the converter affected the NO conversion over the time and the axial distance from the catalyst bed inlet. The numerical results have summarily demonstrated a good approximation compared to experimental data provided in the literature. Further investigation of such effects on other gaseous components is recommended for future work.

  12. REDUCING DIESEL NOX AND SOOT EMISSIONS VIA PARTICLE-FREE EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION - PHASE I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesel engines play an important role in the United States economy for power generation and transportation. However, NOx and soot emissions from both stationary and mobile diesel engines are a major contributor to air pollution. Many engine modifications and exhaust-after-t...

  13. Optical Sensor Of High Gas Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Arthur J.

    1988-01-01

    Contact pyrometer resists effects of heat, vibration, and moisture. New sensor consists of shielded sapphire rod with sputtered layer of precious metal on end. Metal layer acts as blackbody. Emits radiation having known dependence of spectral distribution with temperature of metal and temperature of hot gas flowing over metal. Fiber-optic cable carries radiation from sapphire rod to remote photodetector.

  14. Noble Gas Temperature Proxy for Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble gases in groundwater appear to offer a practical approach for quantitatively determining past surface air temperatures over recharge areas for any watershed. The noble gas temperature (NGT) proxy should then permit a paleothermometry of a region over time. This terrestria...

  15. Fast spatially resolved exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) distribution measurements in an internal combustion engine using absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P

    2015-09-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in internal combustion engines is an effective method of reducing NOx emissions while improving efficiency. However, insufficient mixing between fresh air and exhaust gas can lead to cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder non-uniform charge gas mixtures of a multi-cylinder engine, which can in turn reduce engine performance and efficiency. A sensor packaged into a compact probe was designed, built and applied to measure spatiotemporal EGR distributions in the intake manifold of an operating engine. The probe promotes the development of more efficient and higher-performance engines by resolving high-speed in situ CO2 concentration at various locations in the intake manifold. The study employed mid-infrared light sources tuned to an absorption band of CO2 near 4.3 μm, an industry standard species for determining EGR fraction. The calibrated probe was used to map spatial EGR distributions in an intake manifold with high accuracy and monitor cycle-resolved cylinder-specific EGR fluctuations at a rate of up to 1 kHz. PMID:26253286

  16. Medium temperature carbon dioxide gas turbine reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) partial pre-cooling and partial condensation gas turbine cycles attain comparable cycle efficiencies of 46 to 48% at medium temperature of 650degC with a typical helium (He) gas turbine cycle of PBMR (45.3%) at 900degC. This higher efficiency is ascribed to: reduced compression work around the critical point of CO2 and in the liquid phase (only available in the partial condensation cycle); and consideration of variation in CO2 specific heat at constant pressure, Cp, with temperature and pressure into cycle configuration. Compared to He cycles, the CO2 cycle gas turbomachinery weight is about one-fifth while recuperator size is comparable. Considering these results, power generation cost per unit electricity is evaluated to be lower for the CO2 cycle than in the He cycle. At medium temperature of 650degC, corrosion resistance of materials and reliability of components in CO2 have been proven during extensive operation in AGRs. Lowering temperature to 650degC provides flexibility in choosing materials and eases maintenance through the lower diffusion leak rate of fission products from coated particle fuel. The proposed medium temperature CO2 gas turbine reactors are expected to be alternative solutions to current high temperature He gas turbine reactors. (author)

  17. Iodine retention from process gas and exhaust air in dissolving aluminium-clad fuel elements in nitric acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the 99Mo Production Facility Rossendorf (AMOR) aluminium-clad fuel elements irradiated for about 200 h in the Rossendorf Research Reactor are chemically reprocessed after a cooling time of 48 h. The iodine isotopes produced together with a number of the other fission products have to be separated from the solution gas because of their radiotoxicity, volatility, and amount. Although iodine is retained in the facility, the existing exhaust air system was completed by a specific filter system in order to prevent any iodine releases

  18. Increasing the Selectivity of Pt-Gate SiC Field Effect Gas Sensors by Dynamic Temperature Modulation

    OpenAIRE

    Bur, Christian; Reimann, Peter; Andersson, Mike; Schuetze, Andreas; Lloyd Spetz, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Based on a diode coupled silicon carbide field effect transistor (FET) with platinum as catalytic gate material, the influence of dynamic temperature modulation on the selectivity of gas analysis sensors FETs has been investigated. This operating mode, studied intensively for semiconductor gas sensors, has only recently been applied to FETs. A suitable temperature cycle for detection of typical exhaust gases (CO, NO, C3H6, H-2, NH3) was developed and combined with appropriate signal processin...

  19. Electrochemical cell with integrated hydrocarbon gas sensor for automobile exhaust gas; Elektrochemische Zelle mit integriertem Kohlenwasserstoff-Gassensor fuer das Automobilabgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biskupski, D.; Moos, R. [Univ. Bayreuth (Germany). Bayreuth Engine Research Center, Lehrstuhl fuer Funktionsmaterialien; Wiesner, K.; Fleischer, M. [Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, CT PS 6, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    In the future sensors will be necessary to control the compliance with hydrocarbon limiting values, allowing a direct detection of the hydrocarbons. Appropriate sensor-active functional materials are metal oxides, which have a hydrocarbon sensitivity but are also dependent on the oxygen partial pressure. It is proposed that the gas-sensing layer should be integrated into an electrochemical cell. The authors show that the integration of a resistive oxygen sensor into a pump cell allows a defined oxygen concentration level at the sensor layer in any exhaust gas.

  20. Atmospheric pressure glow discharge generated in nitrogen-methane gas mixture: PTR-MS analyzes of the exhaust gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torokova, Lucie; Mazankova, Vera; Krcma, Frantisek; Mason, Nigel J.; Matejcik, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the results of an extensive study of with the in situ mass spectrometry analysis of gaseous phase species produced by an atmospheric plasma glow discharge in N2-CH4 gas mixtures (with methane concentrations ranging from 1% to 4%). The products are studied using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). HCN and CH3CN are identified as the main gaseous products. Hydrazine, methanimine, methyldiazene, ethylamine, cyclohexadiene, pyrazineacetylene, ethylene, propyne and propene are identified as minor compounds. All the detected compounds and their relative abundances are determined with respect to the experimental conditions (gas composition and applied power). The same molecules were observed by the Cassini-Huygens probe in Titan's atmosphere (which has same N2-CH4 gas mixtures). Such, experiments show that the formation of such complex organics in atmospheres containing C, N and H, like that of Titan, could be a source of prebiotic molecules. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  1. Effect of ambient temperature on the performance of micro gas turbine with cogeneration system in cold region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small-scale prime mover especially micro gas turbine is a key factor in order to widespread the utilization of biogas. It is well known that a performance of large-scale gas turbine is greatly affected by its inlet air temperature. However, the effect of the inlet air temperature on the performance of small-scale gas turbine (micro gas turbine) is not widely reported. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of the inlet air temperature on the performance of a micro gas turbine (MGT) with cogeneration system (CGS) arrangement. An analysis model of the MGT-CGS was set up on the basis of experimental results obtained in a previous study and a manufacturer standard data, and it was analysed under a various ambient temperature condition in a cold region. The results show that when ambient temperature increased, electrical efficiency ?ele of the MGT decreased but exhaust heat recovery ?ehr increased. It was also found that when ambient temperature increased, exhaust heat to mass flow rate Qexe/me and exhaust heat recovery to mass flow rate Qehr/me increased, with maximum ratios of 259 kJ/kg and 200 kJ/kg, respectively were found in summer peak. Furthermore, it was also found that the exhaust heat to power ratio Qexe/Pe had a similar characteristic with exhaust heat recovery to power ratio Qehr/Pe. Qexe/Pe and Qehr/Pe increased with the increase of ambient temperature. Moreover, although different values of total energy efficiency, fuel energy saving and CO2 reduction for every temperature condition were found comparing with a two conventional system that were considered, the MGT-CGS could annually reduce 30,000-80,000 m3/y of fuel consumption and 35-94 t-CO2/y of CO2 emissions. - Research highlights: ? Micro gas turbine cogeneration system (MGT-CGS) has higher electrical efficiency and lower exhaust heat recovery efficiency under cold condition. ? MGT-CGS has lower exhaust heat and exhaust heat recovery to power ratio under cold condition. ? The performance of MGT-CGS depends on heat and electrical demands of applied facilities, and it can decide the necessity of inlet precooling. ? MGT-CGS is very efficient on total energy efficiency, fuel saving and CO2 reduction.

  2. High-temperature three-way catalyst for treating automotive exhaust gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a three-way catalyst for use in treating automotive exhaust gases. It comprises an alumina support consisting substantially of delta-alumina; effective amounts of the oxides of cerium plus barium deposited on the delta-alumina support; effective amounts of at least one Group VIII metal selected from the group consisting of platinum, palladium, rhodium, ruthenium, and iridium deposited on the support

  3. Gas conduction in a high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hot gas is distributed and mixed by polygonal blocks in the reactor floor. Radial and an annular channel are used for this purpose. This annular channel also carried circular ducts distributed evenly over the circumference, which lead to a heat exchanger. Temperature differences across the crossection of the reactor floor are evened out by multiple deflection, combination and renewed splitting of the gas flows. (DG)

  4. Potassium promoted iron oxide catalysts for simultaneous catalytic removal of nitrogen oxides and soot from diesel exhaust gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the preparation and modification of iron oxide catalysts with different alkali metals. Among the prepared catalysts, Fe1.9K0.1O3 proved to be the most promising catalyst for the simultaneous removal of NOx and soot from diesel engines exhaust and was selected for the rest of investigations. The present study has shown that long-time treatment leads to a decline in the activity, and remains constant after at least 20 TPR experiments. This shows that the used catalysts still possess considerable activity. On the other hand long-time treatment causes a significant enhancement of N2 selectivity, and the formation of by-product N2O was not observed. This alteration of catalytic performance is likely due to agglomeration of the promoter potassium being present at surface. Catalytic performance of the used Fe1.9K0.1O3 catalyst was also carried out in a more realistic diesel exhaust gas with two different types of feed gas compositions. This study confirms that Fe1.9K0.1O3 is a suitable catalyst for simultaneous removal of soot and NOx between 350 and 480C. It is assumed that (CO) intermediates, formed by catalytic reaction of NOx and oxygen with soot surface, play an important role in NOx-soot conversion

  5. Emission characteristics of iso-propanol/gasoline blends in a spark-ignition engine combined with exhaust gas re-circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Jing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out in a spark-ignition engine fueled with iso-propanol/gasoline blends. Emission characteristics of this engine were investigated experimentally, including gaseous emissions (HC, CO, NOx and particulate matter emission in term of number and size distributions. The effects of different iso-propanol percentages, loads and exhaust gas recirculation rates on emissions were analyzed. Results show that the introduction of exhaust gas recirculation reduces the NOx emission and NOx emission gives the highest value at full load condition. HC and CO emissions present inconspicuous variations at all the loads except the load of 10%. Additionally, HC emission shows a sharp increase for pure propanol when the exhaust gas recirculation rate is up to 5%, while little variation is observed at lager exhaust gas recirculation rates. Moreover, the particulate matter number concentration increases monotonically with the increase of load and the decrease of exhaust gas recirculation rate. There exists a critical spark timing that produces the highest particulate matter number concentration at all the blending ratios.

  6. Kinetic plots for programmed temperature gas chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jespers, Sander; Roeleveld, Kevin; Lynen, Frederic; Broeckhoven, Ken; Desmet, Gert

    2016-06-10

    The applicability of the kinetic plot theory to temperature-programmed gas chromatography (GC) has been confirmed experimentally by measuring the efficiency of a temperature gradient separation of a simple test mixture on 15, 30, 60 and 120m long (coupled) columns. It has been shown that the temperature-dependent data needed for the kinetic plot calculation can be obtained from isothermal experiments at the significant temperature, a temperature that characterizes the entire gradient run. Furthermore, optimal flow rates have been calculated for various combinations of column length, diameter, and operating temperature (or significant temperature). The tabulated outcome of these calculations provide good starting points for the optimization of any GC separation. PMID:27179678

  7. Principle Findings from Development of a Recirculated Exhaust Gas Intake Sensor (REGIS) Enabling Cost-Effective Fuel Efficiency Improvement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schnabel, Claus [Robert Bosch LLC, Farmington Hills, MI (United States)

    2016-03-30

    Kick-off of the Bosch scope of work for the REGIS project started in October 2012. The primary work-packages included in the Bosch scope of work were the following: overall project management, development of the EGR sensor (design of sensor element, design of protection tube, and design of mounting orientation), development of EGR system control strategy, build-up of prototype sensors, evaluation of system performance with the new sensor and the new control strategy, long-term durability testing, and development of a 2nd generation sensor concept for continued technology development after the REGIS project. The University of Clemson was a partner with Bosch in the REGIS project. The Clemson scope of work for the REGIS project started in June 2013. The primary work-packages included in the Clemson scope of work were the following: development of EGR system control strategy, and evaluation of system performance with the new sensor and new control strategy. This project was split into phase I, phase II and phase III. Phase I work was completed by the end of June 2014 and included the following primary work packages: development of sensor technical requirements, assembly of engine testbench at Clemson, design concept for sensor housing, connector, and mounting orientation, build-up of EGR flow test benches at Bosch, and build-up of first sensor prototypes. Phase II work was completed by the end of June 2015 and included the following primary work pack ages: development of an optimizing function and demonstration of robustness of sensor, system control strategy implementation and initial validation, completion of engine in the loop testing of developed control algorithm, completion of sensor testing including characteristic line, synthetic gas test stand, and pressure dependency characterization, demonstration of benefits of control w/o sensing via simulation, development of 2nd generation sensor concept. Notable technical achievements from phase II were the following: publication of two new technical papers by Clemson detailing the control strategies used for the EGR system control. The two papers was published in the 2016 SAE World Congress in April 2016. The titles of each paper are, “Physics-Based Exhaust Pressure and Temperature Estimation for Low Pressure EGR Control in Turbocharged Gasoline Engines,” by K. Siokos, and “A Control Algorithm for Low Pressure – EGR Systems using a Smith Predictor with Intake Oxygen Sensor Feedback”, by R. Koli. All phase III work packages have been completed. The primary work packages in phase III were the following: completion of long-term sensor durability testing, final demonstration of benefits of EGR control w/o sensing, final decision of the second generation sensor development path.

  8. METHANOL MEASUREMENT IN AUTO EXHAUST USING A GAS-FILTER CORRELATION SPECTROMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spectroscopic methods offer an alternative to wet chemical methods for analysis of methanol emissions from automobiles. The gas filter correlation infrared optical analysis approach appears very promising. The report describes the gas correlation optical system constructed to ana...

  9. Quantification of diesel exhaust gas phase organics by a thermal desorption proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Erickson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A new approach was developed to measure the total abundance of long chain alkanes (C12 and above in urban air using thermal desorption with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS. These species are emitted in diesel exhaust and may be important precursors to secondary organic aerosol production in urban areas. Long chain alkanes undergo dissociative proton transfer reactions forming a series of fragment ions with formula CnH2n+1. The yield of the fragment ions is a function of drift conditions. At a drift field strength of 80 Townsends, the most abundant ion fragments from C10 to C16 n-alkanes were m/z 57, 71 and 85. The PTR-MS is insensitive to n-alkanes less than C8 but displays an increasing sensitivity for larger alkanes. Higher drift field strengths yield greater normalized sensitivity implying that the proton affinity of the long chain n-alkanes is less than H2O. Analysis of diesel fuel shows the mass spectrum was dominated by alkanes (CnH2n+1, monocyclic aromatics, and an ion group with formula CnH2n−1 (m/z 97, 111, 125, 139. The PTR-MS was deployed in Sacramento, CA during the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study field experiment in June 2010. The ratio of the m/z 97 to 85 ion intensities in ambient air matched that found in diesel fuel. Total diesel exhaust alkane concentrations calculated from the measured abundance of m/z 85 ranged from the method detection limit of ~1 μg m−3 to 100 μg m−3 in several air pollution episodes. The total diesel exhaust alkane concentration determined by this method was on average a factor of 10 greater than the sum of alkylbenzenes associated with spark ignition vehicle exhaust.

  10. Time resolved trace analysis of exhaust gas by means of laser mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large number of components and their very different and rapidly varying concentrations complicates the analysis of exhaust gases of combustion engines. Here, a new analytical technique, based on the combination of resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization, performed by pulsed tunable lasers, and time of flight mass spectrometry is presented. It allows the simultaneous detection of several trace components with concentrations ranging from 1 ppm up to several percent with a quantitative accuracy better than 10%. Time resolution of 10 ms could be achieved with this system. A preliminary list of substances detectable by this technique contains 25 substances; some of them belong to the strongest compounds inducing ozone formation. (orig.)

  11. Design of thermoelectric generators operating on exhaust gas from marine diesel engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalykov Kamil Rafaelevich

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The design of thermoelectric generator (TEG, forming the exhaust system of the vessel, is offered in the paper. Thermal calculation of the TEG for the ves-sel engine, Ro-8 6VDS48/42-AL2, with the capacity of 2 650 kW is given. Values of output parameters of the TEG are comparable with output values of the pa-rameters of existing analogues. The thermoelectric generator with the received parameters can be used on a vessel as an additional source of the direct current electric power.

  12. The pilot plant experiment of electron beam irradiation process for removal of NOx and SOx from sinter plant exhaust gas in the iron and steel industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Air pollution problem has become more important in the progress of industry. Nitrogen oxides (NOx, mostly NO) and sulfur oxides (SOx, mostly SO2) which are contained in a sinter plant exhaust gas, are known as serious air pollutants. In such circumstances, an attempt has been made to simultaneously remove NOx and SOx from the sinter plant exhaust gas by means of a new electron beam irradiation process. The process consists of adding a small amount of NH3 to the exhaust gas, irradiating the gas by electron beam, forming ammonium salts by reactions of NOx and SOx with the NH3 and collecting ammonium salts by dry electrostatic precipitator (E.P.). Basic research on the present process had been performed using heavy oil combustion gas. Based on the results research was launched to study the applicability of the process to the treatment of sinter plant exhaust gas. A pilot plant, capable of treating a gas flow of 3000 Nm3/H was set up, and experiments were performed from July 1977 to June 1978. The plant is described and the results are presented. (author)

  13. Multifunctional potentiometric gas sensor array with an integrated temperature control and temperature sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackburn, Bryan M; Wachsman, Eric D

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the subject invention relate to a gas sensor and method for sensing one or more gases. An embodiment incorporates an array of sensing electrodes maintained at similar or different temperatures, such that the sensitivity and species selectivity of the device can be fine tuned between different pairs of sensing electrodes. A specific embodiment pertains to a gas sensor array for monitoring combustion exhausts and/or chemical reaction byproducts. An embodiment of the subject device related to this invention operates at high temperatures and can withstand harsh chemical environments. Embodiments of the device are made on a single substrate. The devices can also be made on individual substrates and monitored individually as if they were part of an array on a single substrate. The device can incorporate sensing electrodes in the same environment, which allows the electrodes to be coplanar and, thus, keep manufacturing costs low. Embodiments of the device can provide improvements to sensitivity, selectivity, and signal interference via surface temperature control.

  14. Low-temperature gas from marine shales: wet gas to dry gas over experimental time

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvie Daniel M; Mango Frank D

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Marine shales exhibit unusual behavior at low temperatures under anoxic gas flow. They generate catalytic gas 300° below thermal cracking temperatures, discontinuously in aperiodic episodes, and lose these properties on exposure to trace amounts of oxygen. Here we report a surprising reversal in hydrocarbon generation. Heavy hydrocarbons are formed before light hydrocarbons resulting in wet gas at the onset of generation grading to dryer gas over time. The effect is moderate under ga...

  15. Amperometric NOx-sensor for Combustion Exhaust Gas Control. Studies on transport properties and catalytic activity of oxygen permeable ceramic membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the research described in this thesis is the development of a mixed conducting oxide layer, which can be used as an oxygen permselective membrane in an amperometric NOx sensor. The sensor will be used in exhaust gas systems. The exhaust gas-producing engine will run in the lean mix mode. The preparation of this sensor is carried out using screen-printing technology, in which the different layers of the sensor are applied successively. Hereafter, a co-firing step is applied in which all layers are sintered together. This co-firing step imposes several demands on the selection of materials. The design specifications of the sensor further include requirements concerning the operating temperature, measurement range and overall stability. The operating temperature of the sensor varies between 700 and 850C, enabling measurement of NOx concentrations between 50 and 1200 ppm with a measurement accuracy of 10 ppm. Concerning the stability of the sensor, it must withstand the exhaust gas atmosphere containing, amongst others, smoke, acids, abrasive particles and sulphur. Because of the chosen lean-mix engine concept, in which the fuel/air mixture switches continuously between lean (excess oxygen) and fat (excess fuel) mixtures, the sensor must withstand alternately oxidising and reducing atmospheres. Besides, it should be resistant to thermal shock and show no cross-sensitivity of NOx with other exhaust gas constituents like oxygen and hydrocarbons. The response time should be short, typically less than 500 ms. Because of the application in combustion engines of cars, the operational lifetime should be longer than 10 years. Demands on the mixed conducting oxide layer include the following ones. The layer should show minimal catalytic activity towards NOx-reduction. The oxygen permeability must be larger than 6.22 10-8 mol/cm2s at a layer thickness between 3-50 ?m. Since the mixed conducting oxide layer is coated on the YSZ electrolyte embodiment, the two materials must be co-firable and, hence, match in thermal, chemical and mechanical behaviour. A number of studies on different mixed oxygen ion/electron conducting materials is described in this thesis. Emphasis is put on the demands of the targeted sensor application, in which these materials are used as mixed conducting dense ceramic membranes. In Chapter 2, a series of perovskite materials is studied. The general composition is ABO3-? (A = Gd, Pr, Y; B = Mn, Cr, Fe), being partially doped with Ca2+ and Sr2+ on the A-site to create mobile oxygen vacancies. The main focus of the work presented is on the measurement of catalytic activities towards NOx and the ionic conductivities of the selected materials. In Chapter 3, the preparation and characterisation of a material with the overall composition of Gd0.7Ca0.3CoOx is described. Dual phase composite membranes are the subject of investigations presented in Chapters 4-7. The main advantage of these type of materials is that their properties can be tailored to meet the demands imposed by the sensor design. Emphasis is on the preparation of the materials, characterisation by SEM-EDX, XRD, catalytic activity and measurement of ionic/electronic conductivities. In Chapter 4, dual phase composites of composition Gd0.7Ca0.3CoOx/Ce0.8Gd0.2O2- are studied. Composites ZrO2/In2O3 and ZrO2/ITO are subject to the investigations reported in Chapters 5 and 6, respectively. Finally, in Chapter 7, composite Au/YSZ and Au/Ce0.8Gd0.2O2- membranes are studied. Finally, in Chapter 8 a summary of the results is given together with recommendations for future research

  16. Lightweight Exhaust Manifold and Exhaust Pipe Ducting for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved exhaust system for an internal combustion gasoline-and/or diesel-fueled engine includes an engine exhaust manifold which has been fabricated from carbon- carbon composite materials in operative association with an exhaust pipe ducting which has been fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials. When compared to conventional steel. cast iron. or ceramic-lined iron paris. the use of carbon-carbon composite exhaust-gas manifolds and exhaust pipe ducting reduces the overall weight of the engine. which allows for improved acceleration and fuel efficiency: permits operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength: reduces the "through-the wall" heat loss, which increases engine cycle and turbocharger efficiency and ensures faster "light-off" of catalytic converters: and, with an optional thermal reactor, reduces emission of major pollutants, i.e. hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide.

  17. Impact of intake CO 2 addition and exhaust gas recirculation on NO x emissions and soot reactivity in a common rail diesel engine

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Qurashi, Khalid

    2012-10-18

    The impact of intake CO 2 addition and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on engine combustion characteristics, NO x emissions, and soot oxidative reactivity was studied in a common rail diesel engine equipped with a cooled EGR system. The engine test results and the heat release analysis show that the reduced flame temperature, induced by the reduction of the oxygen concentration (dilution effect) is the dominant mechanism via which CO 2 and EGR lower NO x emissions in diesel engines. On the other hand, the collected soot from the engine tests was examined for its oxidative reactivity using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Results show that EGR has a significant effect on soot reactivity and results in higher initial active sites compared to the CO 2 case. We conclude that the reduced flame temperature (thermal effect) which is a consequence of the dilution effect is responsible for the observed increase in soot reactivity. These results confirm observations from our past work on flame soot, which showed that the peak adiabatic flame temperature is the governing factor affecting soot reactivity. These findings imply that driving the combustion concepts toward low temperature is favorable to effectively control engine pollutants, including soot reactivity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  18. Simultaneous high-speed gas property measurements at the exhaust gas recirculation cooler exit and at the turbocharger inlet of a multicylinder diesel engine using diode-laser-absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatana, Gurneesh S; Magee, Mark; Fain, David; Naik, Sameer V; Shaver, Gregory M; Lucht, Robert P

    2015-02-10

    A diode-laser-absorption-spectroscopy-based sensor system was used to perform high-speed (100 Hz to 5 kHz) measurements of gas properties (temperature, pressure, and H(2)O vapor concentration) at the turbocharger inlet and at the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler exit of a diesel engine. An earlier version of this system was previously used for high-speed measurements of gas temperature and H(2)O vapor concentration in the intake manifold of the diesel engine. A 1387.2 N m tunable distributed feedback diode laser was used to scan across multiple H(2)O absorption transitions, and the direct absorption signal was recorded using a high-speed data acquisition system. Compact optical connectors were designed to conduct simultaneous measurements in the intake manifold, the EGR cooler exit, and the turbocharger inlet of the engine. For measurements at the turbocharger inlet, these custom optical connectors survived gas temperatures as high as 800 K using a simple and passive arrangement in which the temperature-sensitive components were protected from high temperatures using ceramic insulators. This arrangement reduced system cost and complexity by eliminating the need for any active water or oil cooling. Diode-laser measurements performed during steady-state engine operation were within 5% of the thermocouple and pressure sensor measurements, and within 10% of the H(2)O concentration values derived from the CO(2) gas analyzer measurements. Measurements were also performed in the engine during transient events. In one such transient event, where a step change in fueling was introduced, the diode-laser sensor was able to capture the 30 ms change in the gas properties; the thermocouple, on the other hand, required 7.4 s to accurately reflect the change in gas conditions, while the gas analyzer required nearly 600 ms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first implementation of such a simple and passive arrangement of high-temperature optical connectors as well as the first documented application of diode-laser absorption for high-speed gas dynamics measurements in the turbocharger inlet and EGR cooler exit of a diesel engine. PMID:25968043

  19. The study of heat transfer for nanofluid with carbon nano particle in an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seongsoo; Chung, Hanshik; Jeong, Hyomin; Lee, Byungho; Ochirkhuyag, Bayanjargal; Lee, Jehyun; Choi, Heekyu

    2013-07-01

    A carbon nanofluid was adapted to examine the characteristics of its cooling performance in an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler, compared with that of the usual working fluid water. After steady state, the heat transfer rate of water became nearly constant; however, that of the nanofluid showed a slight increase, suggesting that something happened to the nanofluid. The result shows that the cooling performance of the carbon nanofluid was a little better than that of water; however, its performance data improved with time while those of water were stable. It shows that assembly of the carbon nanoparticles changed with its circulation through the EGR cooler and the shape of the particle assembly depended on the dispersion method employed.

  20. The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimize Fuel Economy and Minimize Emission in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2011-12-31

    This report summarizes activities conducted for the project “The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimized Fuel Economy and Minimize Emissions in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel” under COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC26-07NT43271, which are as outlined in the STATEMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVES (SOPO) dated March 2007 and in the supplemental SOPO dated October 2010. The project objective was to develop and demonstrate an internal combustion engine that is optimized for E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline) fuel operation to achieve substantially improved fuel economy while operating with E85 fuel and that is also production viable in the near- to medium-term. The key engine technology selected for research and development was turbocharging, which is known to improve fuel economy thru downsizing and is in particular capable of exploiting ethanol fuel’s characteristics of high octane number and high latent heat of vaporization. The engine further integrated synergistic efficiency improving technologies of cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), direct fuel injection and dual continuously variable intake and exhaust cam phasers. On the vehicle level, fuel economy was furthered thru powertrain system optimization by mating a state-of-the-art six-speed automatic transmission to the engine. In order to achieve the project’s objective of near- to medium-term production viability, it was essential to develop the engine to be flex-fuel capable of operating with fuels ranging from E0 (0% ethanol and 100% gasoline) to E85 and to use three-way type of catalyst technology for exhaust aftertreatment. Within these scopes, various technologies were developed through systems approach to focus on ways to help accelerate catalyst light-off. Significant amount of development took place during the course of the project within General Motors, LLC. Many prototype flex-fuel engines were designed, built and developed with various hardware configurations selected to achieve the project goals. Several flex-fuel demonstration vehicles were designed and built for carrying out calibration development and final testing to quantify the technology merits. Based on the extensive test results collected from dynamometer and vehicle testing, the fuel economy benefits of cooled EGR from the intended level of turbocharger technology were quantified. When combined with turbo downsizing, the FE benefits are considered large enough for E0 fuel as well as for E85 fuel to warrant further development of the technology beyond the current proof-of-concept level to a level that can meet production driveability quality and durability requirements in order to meet customers’ expectations. Cold-start cart test results from the emissions segment of the project were positive, confirming the assumption of faster thermal response of turbo exhaust system for emissions reductions for both E0 and E85 fuels. Vehicle emissions test results directionally correlated to the cold-start cart findings. The limited number of test runs did demonstrate the potentials of meeting stringent emission standards, however, they did not comprehend the factors such as hardware variability and long-term durability, 3 which are essential for mass production to satisfy customers’ expectations. It is therefore recommended, moving forward, durability concerns over turbocharger, EGR system and aftertreatment system, which would likely impact production viability, should be addressed. The data moreover suggested that further FE increase is likely with turbocharger technology advancement.

  1. Argon/UF6 plasma exhaust gas reconstitution experiments using preheated fluorine and on-line diagnostics. [fissioning uranium plasma core reactor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of employing a flowing, high-temperature, pure fluorine/UF6 regeneration system to efficiently convert a large fraction of the effluent plasma exhaust back to pure UF6 was demonstrated. The custom built T.O.F. mass spectrometer sampling system permitted on-line measurements of the UF6 concentration at different locations in the exhaust system. Negligible amounts ( 100 ppm) of UF6 were detected in the axial bypass exhaust duct and the exhaust ducts downstream of the cryogenic trap system used to collect the UF6, thus verifying the overall system efficiency over a range of operating conditions. Use of a porous Monel duct as part of the exhaust duct system, including provision for injection of pure fluorine, provided a viable technique to eliminate uranium compound residue on the inside surface of the exhaust ducts. Typical uranium compound mass deposition per unit area of duct was 2 micron g/sq cm. This porous duct technique is directly applicable to future uranium compound transfer exhaust systems. Throughout these experiments, additional basic data on the corrosion aspects of hot, pressurized UF6/fluorine were also accumulated.

  2. Estimation of current density distribution of PAFC by analysis of cell exhaust gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, S.; Seya, A. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Ichihara-shi (Japan); Asano, A. [Fuji Electric Corporate, Ltd., Yokosuka-shi (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    To estimate distributions of Current densities, voltages, gas concentrations, etc., in phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stacks, is very important for getting fuel cells with higher quality. In this work, we leave developed a numerical simulation tool to map out the distribution in a PAFC stack. And especially to Study Current density distribution in the reaction area of the cell, we analyzed gas composition in several positions inside a gas outlet manifold of the PAFC stack. Comparing these measured data with calculated data, the current density distribution in a cell plane calculated by the simulation, was certified.

  3. IAEA high temperature gas cooled reactor activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IAEA activities on high temperature gas cooled reactors are conducted with the review and support of Member States, primarily through the International Working Group on Gas Cooled Reactors (IWGGCR). This paper summarises the results of the IAEA gas cooled reactor project activities in recent years along with ongoing current activities through a review of Co-ordinated Research Projects (CRPs), meetings and other international efforts. A series of three recently completed CRPs have addressed the key areas of reactor physics for LEU fuel, retention of fission products, and removal of post shutdown decay heat through passive heat transport mechanisms. These activities along with other completed and ongoing supporting CRPs and meetings are summarised with reference to detailed documentation of the results. (author)

  4. The modular high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to relatively high operating temperatures, the gas-cooled reactor has the potential to serve a wide variety of energy applications. This paper discusses the energy applications which can be served by the modular HTGR, the magnitude of the potential markets, and the HTGR product cost incentives relative to fossil fuel competition. Advantages of the HTGR modular systems are presented along with a description of the design features and performance characteristics of the current reference HTGR modular systems

  5. Rotational temperature determinations in molecular gas lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The small-signal gain expressions for vibrational-rotational transitions are examined in detail to determine possible methods of extracting the rotational temperature from experimental gain measurements in molecular gas lasers. Approximate values of T/subr/ can be deduced from the rotational quantum numbers for which the P- and R-branch gains are maximum. Quite accurate values of T/subr/ and the population inversion density (n/subv//sub prime/-n/subv//sub double-prime/) can be determined by fitting data to suitably linearized gain relationships, or by performing least-squares fits of the P- and R-branch experimental data to the full gain expressions. Experimental gain measurements for 15 P-branch and 12 R-branch transitions in the 10.4-μm CO2 band have been performed for pulsed uv-preionized laser discharges in CO2 : N2 : He=1 : 2 : 3 mixtures at 600 Torr. These data are subjected to the several gain analyses described herein, yielding a rotational temperature of 401plus-or-minus10 degreeK and an inversion density of (3.77plus-or-minus0.07) times1017 cm-3 for conditions of maximum gain. These techniques provide accurate values of the gas temperature in molecular gas lasers with excellent temporal and spatial resolution, and should be useful in extending the conversion efficiency and arcing limits of high-energy electrically exc

  6. On Developing a Spectroscopic System for Fast Gas Temperature Measurements in Combustion Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evseev, Vadim; Clausen, Sønnik

    2009-01-01

    Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy techniques are known to provide reliable results for gas temperature measurements and can be comparatively easily performed on an industrial scale such as a boiler on a power plant or an exhaust of a ship engine cylinder. However temporal resolution...... is not high enough to trace fast temperature variations which are of great importance for complete combustion diagnostics. To eliminate the above mentioned shortcoming, a new IR spectroscopic-imaging system has been developed at Risø DTU. The schematic of the system is presented. Results on lab and...

  7. Low-temperature gas from marine shales: wet gas to dry gas over experimental time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarvie Daniel M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Marine shales exhibit unusual behavior at low temperatures under anoxic gas flow. They generate catalytic gas 300° below thermal cracking temperatures, discontinuously in aperiodic episodes, and lose these properties on exposure to trace amounts of oxygen. Here we report a surprising reversal in hydrocarbon generation. Heavy hydrocarbons are formed before light hydrocarbons resulting in wet gas at the onset of generation grading to dryer gas over time. The effect is moderate under gas flow and substantial in closed reactions. In sequential closed reactions at 100°C, gas from a Cretaceous Mowry shale progresses from predominately heavy hydrocarbons (66% C5, 2% C1 to predominantly light hydrocarbons (56% C1, 8% C5, the opposite of that expected from desorption of preexisting hydrocarbons. Differences in catalyst substrate composition explain these dynamics. Gas flow should carry heavier hydrocarbons to catalytic sites, in contrast to static conditions where catalytic sites are limited to in-place hydrocarbons. In-place hydrocarbons and their products should become lighter with conversion thus generating lighter hydrocarbon over time, consistent with our experimental results. We recognize the similarities between low-temperature gas generation reported here and the natural progression of wet gas to dry gas over geologic time. There is now substantial evidence for natural catalytic activity in source rocks. Natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium and the results reported here add to that evidence. Natural catalysis provides a plausible and unique explanation for the origin and evolution of gas in sedimentary basins.

  8. Near-explicit Gas-phase Chemistry Coupled with Extensive Aqueous Mechanism: Looking at Ethanol (E85) Exhaust in a Fog

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginnebaugh, D. L.; Jacobson, M. Z.

    2011-12-01

    We combine a near-explicit gas-phase chemical mechanism with an extensive aqueous mechanism in a chemical solver to examine the effects of ethanol (E85) versus gasoline on the fate of pollutants in the presence of a fog. We use the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM, version 3.1, Leeds University) and the Chemical Aqueous Phase Radical Mechanism, CAPRAM 3.0, with the SMVGEAR II chemical ordinary differential solver to provide the speed necessary to simulate complex chemistry. The MCM has over 13, 500 organic reactions and 4,600 species, while CAPRAM treats aqueous chemistry among 390 species and 829 reactions (including 51 gas-to-aqueous phase reactions). We validate a simplified version of the model against results from a comprehensive intercomparison by Barth et al (2003). In previous work on ethanol (E85), we analyzed the temperature-dependence of ethanol and gasoline exhaust chemistry and its impact on urban air pollution considering only gas-phase chemistry. In addition to the air pollution findings, we verified that using the MCM with SMVGEAR is practical in a 3-D model. Here, we extend our study to include aqueous chemistry in the presence of a fog. We investigate the impact aqueous reactions have on unburned ethanol and acetaldehyde mixing ratios in the atmosphere in particular because acetaldehyde is an ozone precursor and carcinogen, and aqueous oxidation has potential to speed the conversion of unburned ethanol to acetaldehyde. Acetaldehyde also forms acetic acid in aqueous solution. Acetic acid vapor is an eye, nose, and lung irritant, so both species contribute negatively to human health. We look at the impact of fog liquid water content and temperature on the degradation of emitted aromatic and other species as well, from both gasoline and E85.

  9. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project

  10. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  11. Modelling diesel engines with a variable-geometry turbocharger and exhaust gas recirculation by optimization of model parameters for capturing non-linear system dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlström, Johan; Eriksson, Lars

    2011-01-01

    A mean-value model of a diesel engine with a variable-geometry turbocharger (VGT) and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is developed, parameterized, and validated. The intended model applications are system analysis, simulation, and development of model-based control systems. The goal is to construct a model that describes the gas flow dynamics including the dynamics in the manifold pressures, turbocharger, EGR, and actuators with few states in order to obtain short simulation times. An investi...

  12. Fuel-air mixing apparatus for reducing gas turbine combustor exhaust emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanc, Frank J. (Inventor); Yankowich, Paul R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A fuel-air mixer for use in a combustion chamber of a gas turbine engine is provided. The fuel air mixing apparatus comprises an annular fuel injector having a plurality of discrete plain jet orifices, a first swirler wherein the first swirler is located upstream from the fuel injector and a second swirler wherein the second swirler is located downstream from the fuel injector. The plurality of discrete plain jet orifices are situated between the highly swirling airstreams generated by the two radial swirlers. The distributed injection of the fuel between two highly swirling airstreams results in rapid and effective mixing to the desired fuel-air ratio and prevents the formation of local hot spots in the combustor primary zone. A combustor and a gas turbine engine comprising the fuel-air mixer of the present invention are also provided as well as a method using the fuel-air mixer of the present invention.

  13. Bimodular high temperature planar oxygen gas sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YuLei

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A bimodular planar O2 sensor was fabricated using NiO nanoparticles (NPs thin film coated yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ substrate. The thin film was prepared by radio frequency (r.f. magnetron sputtering of NiO on YSZ substrate, followed by high temperature sintering. The surface morphology of NiO nanoparticles film was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. X-ray diffraction (XRD patterns of NiO NPs thin film before and after high temperature O2 sensing demonstrated that the sensing material possesses a good chemical and structure stability. The oxygen detection experiments were performed at 500 °C, 600 °C and 800 °C using the as-prepared bimodular O2 sensor under both potentiometric and resistance modules. For the potentiometric module, a linear relationship between electromotive force (EMF output of the sensor and the logarithm of O2 concentration was observed at each operating temperature, following the Nernst law. For the resistance module, the logarithm of electrical conductivity was proportional to the logarithm of oxygen concentration at each operating temperature, in good agreement with literature report. In addition, this bimodular sensor shows sensitive, reproducible and reversible response to oxygen under both sensing modules. Integration of two sensing modules into one sensor could greatly enrich the information output and would open a new venue in the development of high temperature gas sensors.

  14. Bimodular high temperature planar oxygen gas sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiangcheng; Liu, Yixin; Gao, Haiyong; Gao, Puxian; Lei, Yu

    2014-08-01

    A bimodular planar O2 sensor was fabricated using NiO nanoparticles (NPs) thin film coated yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate. The thin film was prepared by radio frequency (r.f.) magnetron sputtering of NiO on YSZ substrate, followed by high temperature sintering. The surface morphology of NiO nanoparticles film was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of NiO NPs thin film before and after high temperature O2 sensing demonstrated that the sensing material possesses a good chemical and structure stability. The oxygen detection experiments were performed at 500 °C, 600 °C and 800 °C using the as-prepared bimodular O2 sensor under both potentiometric and resistance modules. For the potentiometric module, a linear relationship between electromotive force (EMF) output of the sensor and the logarithm of O2 concentration was observed at each operating temperature, following the Nernst law. For the resistance module, the logarithm of electrical conductivity was proportional to the logarithm of oxygen concentration at each operating temperature, in good agreement with literature report. In addition, this bimodular sensor shows sensitive, reproducible and reversible response to oxygen under both sensing modules. Integration of two sensing modules into one sensor could greatly enrich the information output and would open a new venue in the development of high temperature gas sensors.

  15. Experimental Investigation of a Temperature-Controlled Car Seat Powered by an Exhaust Thermoelectric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, H.; Wang, Y. P.; Yuan, X. H.; Deng, Y. D.; Su, C. Q.

    2016-03-01

    To improve the riding comfort and rational utilization of the electrical energy captured by an automotive thermoelectric generator (ATEG), a temperature-controlled car seat was constructed to adjust the temperature of the car seat surface. Powered by the ATEG and the battery, the seat-embedded air conditioner can improve the riding comfort using a thermoelectric device to adjust the surface temperature of the seat, with an air duct to regulate the cold side and hot side of the thermoelectric device. The performance of the thermoelectric cooler (TEC) and theoretical analysis on the optimum state of the TEC device are put forward. To verify the rationality of the air duct design and to ensure sufficient air supply, the velocity field of the air duct system was obtained by means of the finite element method. To validate the reliability of the numerical simulation, the air velocity around the thermoelectric device was measured by a wind speed transmitter. The performance of the temperature-controlled car seat has been validated and is in good agreement with bench tests and real vehicle tests.

  16. Development of High Temperature Gas Sensor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of engine emissions is important for their monitoring and control. However, the ability to measure these emissions in-situ is limited. We are developing a family of high temperature gas sensors which are intended to operate in harsh environments such as those in an engine. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) The development of SiC-based semiconductor technology; and (2) Improvements in micromachining and microfabrication technology. These technologies are being used to develop point-contact sensors to measure gases which are important in emission control especially hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of this point-contact sensor technology. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. Of particular importance is sensor sensitivity, selectivity, and stability in long-term, high temperature operation. An overview is presented of each sensor type with an evaluation of its stage of development. It is concluded that this technology has significant potential for use in engine applications but further development is necessary.

  17. Purex canyon exhaust fan bearing temperature monitoring system doric 245 datalogger programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A micro-processor based datalogger is used to monitor, display, and log seventeen RTD temperature channels. Five bearings are monitored for each of the three electric motor-fan assemblies and two bearings are monitored on the steam turbine unit. Several alarms per data channel (a High alarm at 236 degrees and a High High alarm at 246 degrees F) will alert the operation's staff to increasing abnormal bearing temperatures. This procedure is cross-referenced to the manufacturers manual. All programming steps will have the following footnote: Mpg x-xx. The Mpg refers to the Manual page, with x as the section number and xx as the page number in that section. When more information is needed, such as pictures or details, then the manual section and page number is provided

  18. Optical fiber sensor for temperature measurement from 600 to 1900 C in gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregay, G. W.; Calabrese, P. R.; Kaplin, P. L.; Finney, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    A temperature sensor system has been fabricated specifically for the harsh environment encountered in temperature measurement on gas turbine engines. Four components comprised the system: a thermally emissive source, a high temperature lightguide, a flexible optical cable and an electro-optic signal processor. The emissive source was located inside a sapphire rod so that the sapphire serves as both a lightguide and as a protective shroud. As the probe was heated, the thermal radiation from the emissive source increased with increasing temperature. The flexible optical cable was constructed with 200 micron core fiber and ruggedized for turbine engine applications. The electro-optic signal processor used the ratio of intensity in two wavelength intervals to determine a digital value of the temperature. The probe tip was operated above 1900 C in a low velocity propane flame and above 1500 C at Mach .37. Probe housings, optical cables, and signal processors were constructed and environmentally tested for the temperature and vibration experienced by turbine engine sensors. This technology was used to build an optical exhaust gas sensor for a General Electric Aircraft Engines F404 turbine. The four optical probes and optical cable were a functional replacement for four thermocouple probes. The system was ground tested for 50 hours with an excess of 1000 thermal cycles. This optical temperature sensor system measured gas temperature up to the operational limit of the turbine engine.

  19. An Approach to the Prototyping of an Optimized Limited Stroke Actuator to Drive a Low Pressure Exhaust Gas Recirculation Valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutfrind, Christophe; Dufour, Laurent; Liebart, Vincent; Vannier, Jean-Claude; Vidal, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the design of a limited stroke actuator and the corresponding prototype to drive a Low Pressure (LP) Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) valve for use in Internal Combustion Engines (ICEs). The direct drive actuator topology is an axial flux machine with two air gaps in order to minimize the rotor inertia and a bipolar surface-mounted permanent magnet in order to respect an 80° angular stroke. Firstly, the actuator will be described and optimized under constraints of a 150 ms time response, a 0.363 N·m minimal torque on an angular range from 0° to 80° and prototyping constraints. Secondly, the finite element method (FEM) using the FLUX-3D(®) software (CEDRAT, Meylan, France) will be used to check the actuator performances with consideration of the nonlinear effect of the iron material. Thirdly, a prototype will be made and characterized to compare its measurement results with the analytical model and the FEM model results. With these electromechanical behavior measurements, a numerical model is created with Simulink(®) in order to simulate an EGR system with this direct drive actuator under all operating conditions. Last but not least, the energy consumption of this machine will be estimated to evaluate the efficiency of the proposed EGR electromechanical system. PMID:27213398

  20. Numerical model of a thermoelectric generator with compact plate-fin heat exchanger for high temperature PEM fuel cell exhaust heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xin, Gao; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Chen, Min; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of an exhaust heat recovery system for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HTPEMFC) stack. The system is designed as thermoelectric generators (TEGs) sandwiched in the walls of a compact plate-fin heat exchanger. Its model is based on a...

  1. High-Performance Silicon-Germanium-Based Thermoelectric Modules for Gas Exhaust Energy Scavenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanjek, K.; Vesin, S.; Aixala, L.; Baffie, T.; Bernard-Granger, G.; Dufourcq, J.

    2015-06-01

    Some of the energy used in transportation and industry is lost as heat, often at high-temperatures, during conversion processes. Thermoelectricity enables direct conversion of heat into electricity, and is an alternative to the waste-heat-recovery technology currently used, for example turbines and other types of thermodynamic cycling. The performance of thermoelectric (TE) materials and modules has improved continuously in recent decades. In the high-temperature range ( T hot side > 500°C), silicon-germanium (SiGe) alloys are among the best TE materials reported in the literature. These materials are based on non-toxic elements. The Thermoelectrics Laboratory at CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives) has synthesized n and p-type SiGe pellets, manufactured TE modules, and integrated these into thermoelectric generators (TEG) which were tested on a dedicated bench with hot air as the source of heat. SiGe TE samples of diameter 60 mm were created by spark-plasma sintering. For n-type SiGe doped with phosphorus the peak thermoelectric figure of merit reached ZT = 1.0 at 700°C whereas for p-type SiGe doped with boron the peak was ZT = 0.75 at 700°C. Thus, state-of-the-art conversion efficiency was obtained while also achieving higher production throughput capacity than for competing processes. A standard deviation 3.6 W. An air-water heat exchanger was developed and 30 TE modules were clamped and connected electrically. The TEG was tested under vacuum on a hot-air test bench. The measured output power was 45 W for an air flow of 16 g/s at 750°C. The hot surface of the TE module reached 550°C under these conditions. Silicon-germanium TE modules can survive such temperatures, in contrast with commercial modules based on bismuth telluride, which are limited to 400°C.

  2. Electrochemical high-temperature gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruhan, B.; Stranzenbach, M.; Yce, A.; Gnll, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Combustion produced common air pollutant, NOx associates with greenhouse effects. Its high temperature detection is essential for protection of nature. Component-integration capable high-temperature sensors enable the control of combustion products. The requirements are quantitative detection of total NOx and high selectivity at temperatures above 500C. This study reports various approaches to detect NO and NO2 selectively under lean and humid conditions at temperatures from 300C to 800C. All tested electrochemical sensors were fabricated in planar design to enable componentintegration. We suggest first an impedance-metric gas sensor for total NOx-detection consisting of NiO- or NiCr2O4-SE and PYSZ-electrolyte. The electrolyte-layer is about 200?m thickness and constructed of quasi-single crystalline columns. The sensing-electrode (SE) is magnetron sputtered thin-layers of NiO or NiCr2O4. Sensor sensitivity for detection of total NOx has been measured by applying impedance analysis. The cross-sensitivity to other emission gases such as CO, CO2, CH4 and oxygen (5 vol.%) has been determined under 0-1000ppm NO. Sensor maintains its high sensitivity at temperatures up to 550C and 600C, depending on the sensing-electrode. NiO-SE yields better selectivity to NO in the presence of oxygen and have shorter response times comparing to NiCr2O4-SE. For higher temperature NO2-sensing capability, a resistive DC-sensor having Al-doped TiO2-sensing layers has been employed. Sensor-sensitivity towards NO2 and cross-sensitivity to CO has been determined in the presence of H2O at temperatures 600C and 800C. NO2 concentrations varying from 25 to 100ppm and CO concentrations from 25 to 75ppm can be detected. By nano-tubular structuring of TiO2, NO2 sensitivity of the sensor was increased.

  3. High temperature coatings for gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaoci Maggie

    2003-10-21

    Coating for high temperature gas turbine components that include a MCrAlX phase, and an aluminum-rich phase, significantly increase oxidation and cracking resistance of the components, thereby increasing their useful life and reducing operating costs. The aluminum-rich phase includes aluminum at a higher concentration than aluminum concentration in the MCrAlX alloy, and an aluminum diffusion-retarding composition, which may include cobalt, nickel, yttrium, zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, rhodium, cadmium, indium, cerium, iron, chromium, tantalum, silicon, boron, carbon, titanium, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, and combinations thereof, and particularly nickel and/or rhenium. The aluminum-rich phase may be derived from a particulate aluminum composite that has a core comprising aluminum and a shell comprising the aluminum diffusion-retarding composition.

  4. The Analysis of Exhaust Gas Thermal Energy Recovery Through a TEG Generator in City Traffic Conditions Reproduced on a Dynamic Engine Test Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merkisz, Jerzy; Fuc, Pawel; Lijewski, Piotr; Ziolkowski, Andrzej; Wojciechowski, Krzysztof T.

    2015-06-01

    We present an analysis of thermal energy recovery through a proprietary thermoelectric generator (TEG) in an actual vehicle driving cycle reproduced on a dynamic engine test bed. The tests were performed on a 1.3-L 66-kW diesel engine. The TEG was fitted in the vehicle exhaust system. In order to assess the thermal energy losses in the exhaust system, advanced portable emission measurement system research tools were used, such as Semtech DS by Sensors. Aside from the exhaust emissions, the said analyzer measures the exhaust mass flow and exhaust temperature, vehicle driving parameters and reads and records the engine parameters. The difficulty related to the energy recovery measurements under actual traffic conditions, particularly when passenger vehicles and TEGs are used, spurred the authors to develop a proprietary method of transposing the actual driving cycle as a function V = f( t) onto the engine test bed, opn which the driving profile, previously recorded in the city traffic, was reproduced. The length of the cycle was 12.6 km. Along with the motion parameters, the authors reproduced the parameters of the vehicle and its transmission. The adopted methodology enabled high repeatability of the research trials while still ensuring engine dynamic states occurring in the city traffic.

  5. Development of high temperature metallic melting processes related to detritiation of exhausted control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rather critical problem to be faced in developing a safe strategy for the management of tritiated solid wastes is dealing with the outgassing property of tritium. Releases of tritium under elemental or oxide form may occur from waste items at different temperatures and rates depending upon the nature of tritium bonds into the waste matrix as well as on its 'contamination history'. Apart from the commercial value of tritium, its release from waste packages anyhow represents a risk of tritium exposure that cannot be accepted by skippers, by store and disposal site operators as well as by the general public. Consequently it is mandatory to carry out the detritiation of such wastes before their packaging and storage or disposal. In the boron carbide control rods from the Lingen BWR after about three years of operation, tritium generated by neutron reaction was essentially retained in the B4C matrix. The objectives of the study are to demonstrate the feasibility of two processes aimed at reducing to the maximum practicable extent the level of tritium contamination in such waste management are facilitated

  6. Diesel engines with low-pressure exhaust-gas recirculation. Challenges for the turbocharger; Dieselmotoren mit Niederdruck-Abgasrueckfuehrung. Herausforderungen an den Turbolader

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muenz, S.; Roemuss, C.; Schmidt, P. (Borg-Warner Turbo Systems Engineering GmbH, Kirchheimbolanden); Brune, K.H.; Schiffer, H.P. [Technische Hochschule Darmstadt (Germany). Fachgebiet fuer Gasturbinen, Luft- und Raumfahrtantriebe

    2008-02-15

    Excellent driving performance and low fuel consumption make the diesel engine an attractive power unit for road traffic. It is an essential component for achieving fuel consumption targets demanded in future. The disadvantages of the compression ignition engine are the high, functional-related nitrogen oxide and particulate emissions, in addition to costs. Compliance with future emission standards poses a technological challenge for it. Intensive experimental and numerical work allowed BorgWarner Turbo and Emissions Systems to determine the relevant influencing parameters of low-pressure-circuit exhaust-gas recirculation for the turbocharger and develop measures to protect the aerodynamic components in targeted manner. These measures would lead to anticipate that series use of low-pressure-circuit exhaust-gas recirculation would appear realistic as a contribution to further reducing pollutant emissions of the diesel engine. (orig.)

  7. Radon and Thoron Measured in Petrol and Gas-oil Exhaust Fumes by Using CR-39 and LR-115 II Nuclear Track Detectors: Radiation Doses to the Respiratory Tract of Mechanic Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misdaq, M A; Chaouqi, A; Ouguidi, J; Touti, R; Mortassim, A

    2015-06-01

    Mechanic workers are exposed to exhaust fumes when controlling vehicle engines in motion inside repair shops. To assess radiation doses due to radon short-lived progeny from the inhalation of exhaust fumes by mechanic workers, concentrations of these radionuclides were measured in petrol (gasoline) and gas-oil exhaust fumes by evaluating mean critical angles of etching of the CR-39 and LR-115 type II SSNTDs for alpha particles emitted by the radon and thoron decay series. Committed effective doses due to ?Po and ?Po short-lived radon decay products from the inhalation of petrol and gas-oil exhaust fumes by workers were evaluated. A maximum value of 1.35 mSv y? due to radon short-lived decay products from the inhalation of gas-oil exhaust fumes by mechanic workers was found, which is lower than the (3-10 mSv y?) dose limit interval for workers. PMID:25905520

  8. Tokamak fusion reactor exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a compilation of papers dealing with reactor exhaust which were produced as part of the TIGER Tokamak Installation for Generating Electricity study at Culham. The papers are entitled: (1) Exhaust impurity control and refuelling. (2) Consideration of the physical problems of a self-consistent exhaust and divertor system for a long burn Tokamak. (3) Possible bundle divertors for INTOR and TIGER. (4) Consideration of various magnetic divertor configurations for INTOR and TIGER. (5) A appraisal of divertor experiments. (6) Hybrid divertors on INTOR. (7) Refuelling and the scrape-off layer of INTOR. (8) Simple modelling of the scrape-off layer. (9) Power flow in the scrape-off layer. (10) A model of particle transport within the scrape-off plasma and divertor. (11) Controlled recirculation of exhaust gas from the divertor into the scrape-off plasma. (U.K.)

  9. Determination of benzene in exhaust gas from biofuels. Final report; Bestimmung von Benzol im Abgas von Biokraftstoffen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutz, M.; Buenger, J.; Gnuschke, H.; Halboth, H.; Gruedl, P.; Krahl, J.

    2001-10-01

    With the advance of environmental legislation and practices oriented towards sustainability renewable energy resources are becoming increasingly important. Use of replenishable raw materials helps preserve fossil resources. In the fuel sector the most widely used replenishable materials are rape methyl ester (RME) and ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE). The purpose of the present project on the ''Determination of benzene in exhaust gas from biofuels'' was to generate orienting data on the potential health relevance of mixtures of fossil and renewable fuel intended for use in spark ignition and diesel engines. This included a determination of benzene emissions and the mutagenicity of particles. Beyond the applied-for scope of research measurements were also performed on the test engine's toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene emissions as well as on the smoke spot number and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions of the diesel engine. [German] Regenerative Energien gewinnen durch die Umweltgesetzgebungen und das Streben nach einer nachhaltigen Entwicklung zunehmend an Bedeutung. Durch die Verwendung nachwachsender Rohstoffe koennen die fossilen Ressourcen geschont werden. Im Kraftstoffsektor sind hier hauptsaechlich Rapsoelmethylester (RME) und optional Ethyltertiaerbutylether (ETBE) zu nennen. Um fuer Diesel- und Ottomotoren insbesondere mit Blick auf Kraftstoffgemische aus fossilen und regenerativen Komponenten orientierende Daten ueber eine potenzielle Gesundheitsrelevanz zu generieren, wurde das Projekt 'Bestimmung von Benzol im Abgas von Biokraftstoffen' durchgefuehrt. Neben der Benzolemission wurde die Mutagenitaet der Partikeln ermittelt. Ueber den beantragten Untersuchungsrahmen hinaus wurden die Tuluol-, Ethylbenzol-, und Xylolemissionen der eingesetzten Motoren, sowie die Russzahl (RZ) und die Stickoxid- (NO{sub x}) und Kohlenwasserstoffemissionen (HC) des Dieselmotors bestimmt. (orig.)

  10. Inhalation of Whole Diesel Exhaust but not Gas-Phase Components Affects In Vitro Platelet Aggregation in Hypertensive Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: Intravascular thrombosis and platelet aggregation are enhanced following exposure to diesel exhaust (DE) and other respirable particulate matter; however, the roles of endothelial and circulating mediators on platelet aggregation remain unclear. We hypothesized that ad...

  11. Payload dose rate from direct beam radiation and exhaust gas fission products. [for nuclear engine for rocket vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capo, M. A.; Mickle, R.

    1975-01-01

    A study was made to determine the dose rate at the payload position in the NERVA System (1) due to direct beam radiation and (2) due to the possible effect of fission products contained in the exhaust gases for various amounts of hydrogen propellant in the tank. Results indicate that the gamma radiation is more significant than the neutron flux. Under different assumptions the gamma contribution from the exhaust gases was 10 to 25 percent of total gamma flux.

  12. Mean gas opacity for circumstellar environments and equilibrium temperature degeneracy

    CERN Document Server

    Malygin, M G; Klahr, H; Dullemond, C P; Henning, Th

    2014-01-01

    In a molecular cloud dust opacity typically dominates over gas opacity, yet in the vicinities of forming stars dust is depleted, and gas is the sole provider of opacity. In the optically thin circumstellar environments the radiation temperature cannot be assumed to be equal to the gas temperature, hence the two-temperature Planck means are necessary to calculate the radiative equilibrium. By using the two-temperature mean opacity one does obtain the proper equilibrium gas temperature in a circumstellar environment, which is in a chemical equilibrium. A careful consideration of a radiative transfer problem reveals that the equilibrium temperature solution can be degenerate in an optically thin gaseous environment. We compute mean gas opacities based on the publicly available code DFSYNTHE by Kurucz and Castelli. We performed the calculations assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium and an ideal gas equation of state. The values were derived by direct integration of the high-resolution opacity spectrum. We prod...

  13. Exhaust Emission Characteristics of Diesel Engine Operating on Biodiesel and its Blends at Elevated Temperature of Air

    OpenAIRE

    Sureshkumar, K; *, K.Muralidharan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, performance and exhaust emission characteristics of Pongamia Pinnata oil blends (B10,B20,B30 and B50) with mineral diesel were investigated in preheated intake air conditions in a single cylinder 4-Stroke direct injection CI engine at 75 % maximum load and its rated engine speed 1500 rpm. Two types of heat exchanger designed to preheat the suction air and the heating is accomplished by both engine cooling water and exhaust gases. Two types of heat exchanger incl...

  14. Neutral gas temperature measurements within transformer coupled toroidal argon plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spatially resolved neutral gas temperature of Ar plasmas within a new type of transformer-coupled toroidal plasma source was measured by fitting unresolved rovibrational bands of trace gas N2 (C 3Πu→B 3Πg). With power density as high as 4.8 W/cm3, the maximum neutral gas temperature inside Ar plasmas was found to be 2000 K. The position with maximum neutral gas temperature was off the center of the cross section and close to the ferrite core, where higher electric field contributes to higher heating power. The dependence of neutral gas temperature on pressure was measured and can be empirically fitted by proportionality between gas temperature and logarithm of the pressure, as found by other researchers. A simple physical model gives the dependence of pressure as the sixth order of neutral gas temperature, which fits the experimental data as well. It was also found that added N2 gas perturbed Ar plasmas obviously, and therefore we recommend adding less than 1% N2 as trace gas. There is no dependence of fitted neutral gas temperature on the optical resolution of monochromator, as would be expected

  15. Hydrogen production from biomass pyrolysis gas via high temperature steam reforming process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this work has been undertaken as part of the design of continuous hydrogen production using the high temperature steam reforming process. The steady-state test condition was carried out using syngas from biomass pyrolysis, whilst operating at high temperatures between 600 and 1200 degree Celsius. The main reformer operating parameters (e.g. temperature, resident time and steam to biomass ratio (S/B)) have been examined in order to optimize the performance of the reformer. The operating temperature is a key factor in determining the extent to which hydrogen production is increased at higher temperatures (900 -1200 degree Celsius) whilst maintaining the same as resident time and S/B ratio. The effects of exhaust gas composition on heating value were also investigated. The steam reforming process produced methane (CH4) and ethylene (C2H4) between 600 to 800 degree Celsius and enhanced production ethane (C2H6) at 700 degree Celsius. However carbon monoxide (CO) emission was slightly increased for higher temperatures all conditions. The results show that the use of biomass pyrolysis gas can produce higher hydrogen production from high temperature steam reforming. In addition the increasing reformer efficiency needs to be optimized for different operating conditions. (author)

  16. Deactivation of Pd Catalysts by Water during Low Temperature Methane Oxidation Relevant to Natural Gas Vehicle Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Gholami

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Effects of H2O on the activity and deactivation of Pd catalysts used for the oxidation of unburned CH4 present in the exhaust gas of natural-gas vehicles (NGVs are reviewed. CH4 oxidation in a catalytic converter is limited by low exhaust gas temperatures (500550 C and low concentrations of CH4 (4001500 ppmv that must be reacted in the presence of large quantities of H2O (1015% and CO2 (15%, under transient exhaust gas flows, temperatures, and compositions. Although Pd catalysts have the highest known activity for CH4 oxidation, water-induced sintering and reaction inhibition by H2O deactivate these catalysts. Recent studies have shown the reversible inhibition by H2O adsorption causes a significant drop in catalyst activity at lower reaction temperatures (below 450 C, but its effect decreases (water adsorption becomes more reversible with increasing reaction temperature. Thus above 500 C H2O inhibition is negligible, while Pd sintering and occlusion by support species become more important. H2O inhibition is postulated to occur by either formation of relatively stable Pd(OH2 and/or partial blocking by OH groups of the O exchange between the support and Pd active sites thereby suppressing catalytic activity. Evidence from FTIR and isotopic labeling favors the latter route. Pd catalyst design, including incorporation of a second noble metal (Rh or Pt and supports high O mobility (e.g., CeO2 are known to improve catalyst activity and stability. Kinetic studies of CH4 oxidation at conditions relevant to natural gas vehicles have quantified the thermodynamics and kinetics of competitive H2O adsorption and Pd(OH2 formation, but none have addressed effects of H2O on O mobility.

  17. On the influence of solid rocket propellant exhaust gas on the stratospheric chemistry: Investigations using a three-dimensional photochemical circulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work investigated in how far large orbital rockets (e.g., space shuttle, Titan IV or, in the future, Ariane V), which emit their exhaust gas directly into the atmosphere, are cumbersome to the global atmosphere and especially the stratosphere. In particular, it investigated in how far existing chemical steady-states are influenced entailing damage to the ozone layer. With the aid of a photochemical 3-D model which comprises the most important ozone-relevant reactions and calculates the distribution of 20 trace gases for any time-step, precise statements regarding the global effect could be made. Besides the horizontal distribution of the exhaust gases, particular attention was paid to their vertical distribution and to the impact on O3 concentration and individual groups of trace substances. (orig./KW)

  18. Photochemical transformation of aircraft exhausts at their transition from the plume to the large scale dispersion in the Northern temperature belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karol, I.L.; Kiselev, A.A. [Main Geophysical Observatory, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The 2-D diurnally varying photochemical model of the Northern temperate zonal tropospheric belt with fixed (off line) temperature and air transport is used for the description of the formation of aircraft exhaust concentration distribution in the North Atlantic commercial flight corridor, based on actual flights in summer and winter. A strong diurnal and seasonal variation of emitted NO{sub x} oxidation rate is revealed and evaluated. (author) 11 refs.

  19. High-Speed Multiplexed Spatiotemporally Resolved Measurements of Exhaust Gas Recirculation Dynamics in a Multi-Cylinder Engine Using Laser Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P

    2016-04-01

    The need for more environmentally friendly and efficient energy conversion is of paramount importance in developing and designing next-generation internal combustion (IC) engines for transportation applications. One effective solution to reducing emissions of mono-nitrogen oxides (NOx) is exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), which has been widely implemented in modern vehicles. However, cylinder-to-cylinder and cycle-to-cycle variations in the charge-gas uniformity can be a major barrier to optimum EGR implementation on multi-cylinder engines, and can limit performance, stability, and efficiency. Precise knowledge and fine control over the EGR system is therefore crucial, particularly for optimizing advanced engine concepts such as reactivity controlled compression ignition (RCCI). An absorption-based laser diagnostic was developed to study spatiotemporal charge-gas distributions in an IC engine intake manifold in real-time. The laser was tuned to an absorption band of carbon dioxide (CO2), a standard exhaust-gas marker, near 2.7 µm. The sensor was capable of probing four separate measurement locations simultaneously, and independently analyzing EGR fraction at speeds of 5 kHz (1.2 crank-angle degree (CAD) at 1 k RPM) or faster with high accuracy. The probes were used to study spatiotemporal EGR non-uniformities in the intake manifold and ultimately promote the development of more efficient and higher performance engines. PMID:27091946

  20. The effect of ambient temperature and humidity on the carbon monoxide emissions of an idling gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, C. W.; Subramaniam, A. K.

    1977-01-01

    Changes in ambient temperature and humidity affect the exhaust emissions of a gas turbine engine. The results of a test program employing a JT8D combustor are presented which quantize the effect of these changes on carbon monoxide emissions at simulated idle operating conditions. Analytical results generated by a kinetic model of the combustion process and reflecting changing ambient conditions are given. It is shown that for a complete range of possible ambient variations, significant changes do occur in the amount of carbon monoxide emitted by a gas turbine engine.

  1. Black carbon from ships: a review of the effects of ship speed, fuel quality and exhaust gas scrubbing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. A. Lack

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The International Maritime Organization (IMO has moved to address the health and climate impact of the emissions from the combustion of low-quality residual fuels within the commercial shipping industry. Fuel sulfur content (FS limits and an efficiency design index for future ships are examples of such IMO actions. The impacts of black carbon (BC emissions from shipping are now under review by the IMO, with a particular focus on the potential impacts of future Arctic shipping.

    Recognizing that associating impacts with BC emissions requires both ambient and onboard observations, we provide recommendations for the measurement of BC. We also evaluate current insights regarding the effect of ship speed (engine load, fuel quality and exhaust gas scrubbing on BC emissions from ships. Observations demonstrate that BC emission factors (EFBC increases 3 to 6 times at very low engine loads (<25% compared to EFBC at 85–100% load; absolute BC emissions (per nautical mile of travel also increase up to 100% depending on engine load, even with reduced load fuel savings. If fleets were required to operate at lower maximum engine loads, presumably associated with reduced speeds, then engines could be re-tuned, which would reduce BC emissions.

    Ships operating in the Arctic are likely running at highly variable engine loads (25–100% depending on ice conditions and ice breaking requirements. The ships operating at low load may be emitting up to 50% more BC than they would at their rated load. Such variable load conditions make it difficult to assess the likely emissions rate of BC.

    Current fuel sulfur regulations have the effect of reducing EFBC by an average of 30% and potentially up to 80% regardless of engine load; a removal rate similar to that of scrubbers.

    Uncertainties among current observations demonstrate there is a need for more information on (a the impact of fuel quality on EFBC using robust measurement methods and (b the efficacy of scrubbers for the removal of particulate matter by size and composition.

  2. Superfluid critical temperature in 3D Fermi gas with repulsion

    OpenAIRE

    Efremov, D.V.; Mar'enko, M. S.; M. A. Baranov; Kagan, M.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    The critical temperature of a superfluid phase transition in a Fermi gas with repulsive interaction is found. The influence of a magnetic field on the transition is analyzed. The estimates for the critical temperature for a trapped gas of $^6$Li atoms and $^3$He--$^4$He mixtures are presented.

  3. In situ gas temperature measurements by UV-absorption spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fateev, Alexander; Clausen, Sønnik

    2009-01-01

    range from 23 degrees C to 1,500 degrees C. The gas temperature was evaluated (1) from the analysis of the structure of selected NO high-resolution gamma-absorption bands and (2) from the analysis of vibrational distribution in the NO gamma-absorption system in the (211-238) nm spectral range. The......The absorption spectrum of the NO A(2)Sigma(+) <- X(2)Pi gamma-system can be used for in situ evaluation of gas temperature. Experiments were performed with a newly developed atmospheric-pressure high-temperature flow gas cell at highly uniform and stable gas temperatures over a 0.533 m path in the...... accuracy of both methods is discussed. Validation of the classical Lambert-Beer law has been demonstrated at NO concentrations up to 500 ppm and gas temperatures up to 1,500 degrees C over an optical absorption path length of 0.533 m....

  4. Swirl and blade wakes in the interaction between gas turbines and exhaust diffusers investigated by endoscopic particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opilat, Victor

    2011-10-21

    Exhaust diffusers studied in this thesis are installed behind the last turbine stage of gas turbines, including those used in combined cycle power plants. Extensive research made in recent years proved that effects caused by an upstream turbine need to be taken into account when designing efficient diffusers. Under certain conditions these effects can stabilize the boundary layer in diffusers and prevent separation. In this research the impact of multiple parameters, such as tip leakage flow, swirl, and rotating blade wakes, on the performance of a diffuser is studied. Experiments were conducted using a diffuser test rig with a rotating bladed wheel as a turbine effect generator and with an additional tip leakage flow insert. The major advantages of this test rig are modularity and easy variation of the main parameters. To capture the complexity and understand the physics of diffuser flow, and to clarify the phenomenon of the flow stabilisation, the 2D endoscopic laser optical measurement technique Partide Image Velocimetry (PIV) was adopted to the closed ''rotating'' diffuser test rig. Intensity and distribution of vortices in the blade tip area are decisive for diffuser performance. Large vortices in the annular diffuser inlet behind the blade tips interact with the boundary layer in diffusers. At design point these vortices are very early suppressed by the main flow. For the operating point with a low value of the flow coefficient (negative swirl), vortices are ab out two tim es stronger than for design point and the boundary layer is destabilized. V mtices develop in the direction contrary to swirl in the main flow and just cause flow destabilization. Coherent back flow zones are induced and reduction of diffuser performance occurs. For the operating point with positive swirl (for a high flow coefficient value), these vortices are also strong but do not counteract the main flow because they develop in the same direction with the swirl in the main flow. Pressure recovery in the annular diffuser is even high er than for design point because vortices energize the boundary layer and the turbulence level in the core flow is very high. Turbulent energy is better transported to the peripheral zones of the channel by the swirled flow. A small positive swirl angle in the inlet flow (behind the rotating bladed wheel in experiments) has a stabilizing effect on the diffuser, while negative swirl decreases its performance. This occurs due to change in the development of vertical structures downstream of the rotor blade tip area. The tip leakage flow from the last turbine stage positively affects pressure recovery in the diffuser energizing the boundary layer. Comparison of results for different diffuser test rig configurations with results from a more gas turbine-like test rig with a similar diffuser and a scaled turbine stage model and for higher Mach numbers showed similar pressure recovery trends, verifying the results.

  5. Tailoring the structural and microstructural properties of nanosized tantalum oxide for high temperature electrochemical gas sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonavita, Anna; Di Bartolomeo, Elisabetta; Chevallier, Laure; D'Ottavi, Cadia; Licoccia, Silvia; Traversa, Enrico

    2009-07-01

    Ta2O5 nanopowders to be used as sensing electrodes in high temperature electrochemical gas sensors for hydrocarbons detection were synthesized using a sol-gel method and their structural and microstructural properties were investigated. The as-synthesized powders were heated at different temperatures in the range 250-1000 degrees C and characterized by TG-DTA, XRD, SEM, TEM and FT-IR. This investigation allowed to identify the correct thermal treatments to achieve the microstructural, textural and functional stability of materials working at high temperature, preserving their nano-metric grain size. Planar sensors fabricated by using Ta2O5 powders treated at 750 degrees C showed promising results for the selective detection of propylene at high temperature (700 degrees C). The good stability of the sensing response after gas exposure at high temperature was correlated to the stable microstructure the electrodes. Thus, Ta2O5 powders seems good candidate as sensing electrode for sensors for automotive exhausts monitoring. PMID:19916469

  6. Novel silica membranes for high temperature gas separations

    KAUST Repository

    Bighane, Neha

    2011-04-01

    This article describes fabrication of novel silica membranes derived via controlled oxidative thermolysis of polydimethylsiloxane and their gas separation performance. The optimized protocol for fabrication of the silica membranes is described and pure gas separation performance in the temperature range 35-80°C is presented. It is observed that the membranes exhibit activated transport for small gas penetrants such as He, H 2 and CO 2. The membranes can withstand temperatures up to 350°C in air and may ultimately find use in H 2/CO 2 separations to improve efficiency in the water-gas shift reactor process. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  7. Method for high temperature mercury capture from gas streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granite, Evan J. (Wexford, PA); Pennline, Henry W. (Bethel Park, PA)

    2006-04-25

    A process to facilitate mercury extraction from high temperature flue/fuel gas via the use of metal sorbents which capture mercury at ambient and high temperatures. The spent sorbents can be regenerated after exposure to mercury. The metal sorbents can be used as pure metals (or combinations of metals) or dispersed on an inert support to increase surface area per gram of metal sorbent. Iridium and ruthenium are effective for mercury removal from flue and smelter gases. Palladium and platinum are effective for mercury removal from fuel gas (syngas). An iridium-platinum alloy is suitable for metal capture in many industrial effluent gas streams including highly corrosive gas streams.

  8. Apparatus using radioactive particles for measuring gas temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparatus for producing a signal indicative of the temperature of a heated gas is described comprising a beta particle source; a beta particle detector which intercepts particles emitted from said source; circuitry for converting the detector output to a signal indicative of the density of the gas; a pressure transducer for generating a signal indicative of the pressure on the gas; and circuitry for dividing the pressure signal by the density signal to produce a signal indicative of the average temperature of the gas along the path between the beta particle source and the beta particle detector. (auth)

  9. Temperature detection in a gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Benjamin; Kraemer, Gilbert; Stevenson, Christian

    2012-12-18

    A temperature detector includes a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal. The first metal includes a plurality of wires and the second metal includes a wire. The plurality of wires of the first metal are connected to the wire of the second metal in parallel junctions. Another temperature detector includes a plurality of resistance temperature detectors. The plurality of resistance temperature detectors are connected at a plurality of junctions. A method of detecting a temperature change of a component of a turbine includes providing a temperature detector include ing a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal connected to each other at a plurality of junctions in contact with the component; and detecting any voltage change at any junction.

  10. Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation on the Dual Fuel Combustion of Gasoline and CNG by Compression Ignition

    OpenAIRE

    A. Rashid A. Aziz; Raja Shahzad; Noraz Al-Khairi; P. Naveenchandran

    2011-01-01

    Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) is a combustion process that promises the combination of diesel like efficiencies and very low NOx emissions. The major issues with HCCI are high heat release rates, lack of combustion control and high CO and HC emissions. Operating HCCI with two fuels of different properties and recirculation of exhaust gases are effective strategies of promoting and controlling autoignition. This study discusses the effects of EGR on the combustion characterist...

  11. Industrial low-temperature gas plasma sterilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, G S; Mielnik, T J

    1997-01-01

    The search continues for alternative low-temperature sterilization technologies that do not exhibit adverse toxicological or environmental effects. Low-temperature plasma sterilization is one technology that is under investigation as an alternative to ethylene oxide and formaldehyde. This article examines the process and reports on the current status of the technology. PMID:10169626

  12. Application of modern online instrumentation for chemical analysis of gas and particulate phases of exhaust at the European Commission heavy-duty vehicle emission laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, T W; Chirico, R; Clairotte, M; Elsasser, M; Manfredi, U; Martini, G; Sklorz, M; Streibel, T; Heringa, M F; Decarlo, P F; Baltensperger, U; De Santi, G; Krasenbrink, A; Zimmermann, R; Prevot, A S H; Astorga, C

    2011-01-01

    The European Commission recently established a novel test facility for heavy-duty vehicles to enhance more sustainable transport. The facility enables the study of energy efficiency of various fuels/scenarios as well as the chemical composition of evolved exhaust emissions. Sophisticated instrumentation for real-time analysis of the gas and particulate phases of exhaust has been implemented. Thereby, gas-phase characterization was carried out by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR; carbonyls, nitrogen-containing species, small hydrocarbons) and a resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (REMPI-TOFMS; monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). For analysis of the particulate phase, a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS; organic matter, chloride, nitrate), a condensation particle counter (CPC; particle number), and a multiangle absorption photometer (MAAP; black carbon) were applied. In this paper, the first application of the new facility in combination with the described instruments is presented, whereby a medium-size truck was investigated by applying different driving cycles. The goal was simultaneous chemical characterization of a great variety of gaseous compounds and particulate matter in exhaust on a real-time basis. The time-resolved data allowed new approaches to view the results; for example, emission factors were normalized to time-resolved consumption of fuel and were related to emission factors evolved during high speeds. Compounds could be identified that followed the fuel consumption, others showed very different behavior. In particular, engine cold start, engine ignition (unburned fuel), and high-speed events resulted in unique emission patterns. PMID:21126058

  13. Controlling automotive exhaust emissions: successes and underlying science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twigg, Martyn V

    2005-04-15

    Photochemical reactions of vehicle exhaust pollutants were responsible for photochemical smog in many cities during the 1960s and 1970s. Engine improvements helped, but additional measures were needed to achieve legislated emissions levels. First oxidation catalysts lowered hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide, and later nitrogen oxides were reduced to nitrogen in a two-stage process. By the 1980s, exhaust gas could be kept stoichiometric and hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides were simultaneously converted over a single 'three-way catalyst'. Today, advanced three-way catalyst systems emissions are exceptionally low. NOx control from lean-burn engines demands an additional approach because NO cannot be dissociated under lean conditions. Current lean-burn gasoline engine NOx control involves forming a nitrate phase and periodically enriching the exhaust to reduce it to nitrogen, and this is being modified for use on diesel engines. Selective catalytic reduction with ammonia is an alternative that can be very efficient, but it requires ammonia or a compound from which it can be obtained. Diesel engines produce particulate matter, and, because of health concerns, filtration processes are being introduced to control these emissions. On heavy duty diesel engines the exhaust gas temperature is high enough for NO in the exhaust to be oxidised over a catalyst to NO2 that smoothly oxidises particulate material (PM) in the filter. Passenger cars operate at lower temperatures, and it is necessary to periodically burn the PM in air at high temperatures. PMID:15901550

  14. New processes for the reduction and capture of mercury emissions in the exhaust gas treatment; Neue Verfahren zur Minderung und Erfassung von Quecksilber-Emissionen in der Abgasbehandlung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boness, Michael [Sick Maihak GmbH, Meersburg (Germany); Kanefke, Rico [Currenta GmbH und Co. OHG, Leverkusen (Germany). Sonderabfallverbrennung Leverkusen; Vosteen, Bernhard W. [Vosteen Consulting GmbH, Koeln (Germany)

    2013-03-01

    The highly volatile heavy metal mercury is deemed to be very toxic. There exist a lot of natural as well as anthropogenic sources for the pollution of the environment with mercury such as the coal-fired power generation, the electrolytic production of chlorine, the cement burning including the release of mercury from the cement raw meal, the waste incineration and the artisanal production of gold by amalgamation with liquid mercury. The authors of the contribution under consideration report on new procedures for the reduction and capture of mercury emissions in the exhaust gas treatment. The bromine supported precipitation of mercury in the exhaust gas treatment is an efficient and economic process which takes account of the future requirements of lower limit values for mercury. Simultaneously, a new measurement technique for a continuous capture of mercury with new standards on detection sensitivity, accuracy and reliability in connection with a more simple and cost-effective maintenance is developed. The bromine supported precipitation as well as the continuous capture of mercury are trendsetters and are actually the best available technologies for the reduction of mercury emissions.

  15. Reflection error correction of gas turbine blade temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipngetich, Ketui Daniel; Feng, Chi; Gao, Shan

    2016-03-01

    Accurate measurement of gas turbine blades' temperature is one of the greatest challenges encountered in gas turbine temperature measurements. Within an enclosed gas turbine environment with surfaces of varying temperature and low emissivities, a new challenge is introduced into the use of radiation thermometers due to the problem of reflection error. A method for correcting this error has been proposed and demonstrated in this work through computer simulation and experiment. The method assumed that emissivities of all surfaces exchanging thermal radiation are known. Simulations were carried out considering targets with low and high emissivities of 0.3 and 0.8 respectively while experimental measurements were carried out on blades with emissivity of 0.76. Simulated results showed possibility of achieving error less than 1% while experimental result corrected the error to 1.1%. It was thus concluded that the method is appropriate for correcting reflection error commonly encountered in temperature measurement of gas turbine blades.

  16. Not adiabatic temperature of combustion gas-air mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iovleva, O. V.

    2015-06-01

    In the present work was carried out thermodynamic analysis, the purpose of which was to determine the formula for calculating the temperature of combustion gas-air mixture in non-adiabatic conditions.

  17. Seismic stability of VGM type high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main principles of the design provision of high temperature gas cooled VGM reactors seismic stability and the results of calculations, performed by linear-spectral method are presented. (author). 1 ref., 10 figs

  18. Probe For Measuring Dynamic Gas Temperature In Reversing Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fralick, Gustave C.

    1993-01-01

    In proposed technique for determining time-varying temperature of flowing gas, raw measurements of three thermocouples of different sizes processed by relatively simple data-reduction software. Three-thermocouple technique overcomes limitation of single-thermocouple technique.

  19. Fuel arrangement for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a fuel arrangement for a high temperature gas cooled reactor including fuel assemblies with separate directly cooled fissile and fertile fuel elements removably inserted in an elongated moderator block also having a passageway for control elements

  20. Effect of cooling the recirculated exhaust gases on diesel engine emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abu-Hamdeh, Nidal H. [Jordan Univ. of Science and Technology, Irbid (Jordan)

    2003-11-01

    Although combustion is essential in most energy generation processes, it is one of the major causes of air pollution. Spiral fin exhaust pipes were designed to study the effect of cooling the recirculated exhaust gases (EGR) of Diesel engines on the chemical composition of the exhaust gases and the reduction in the percentages of pollutant emissions. The gases examined in this study were oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO). In addition, O{sub 2} concentration in the exhaust was measured. The two designs adopted in this study were exhaust pipes with solid and hollow fins around them. The first type uses air flow around the fins to cool the exhaust gases. The second type consists of hollow fins around the exhaust pipe to allow cooling water to flow in the hollow passage. Different combinations and arrangements of the solid and hollow fins exhaust pipes were used. It was found that decreasing the temperature of the EGR resulted in reductions in the oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) but increased the carbon monoxide (CO) in the exhaust gases. In addition, the oxygen (O{sub 2}) concentration in the exhaust was decreased. As a general trend, the percentages of reduction in the NO{sub x} gas concentrations were lower than the percentages of increase in the CO emissions as a result of cooling the EGR of a Diesel engine by a heat exchanger. Using water as a cooling medium decreased the exhaust gases temperature and the amount of pollutants more than did air as a cooling medium. In a separate series of tests, increasing the cooled EGR ratios decreased the exhaust NO{sub x} but increased the particulate matter concentrations in the exhaust gases. (Author)

  1. Effect of cooling the recirculated exhaust gases on diesel engine emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although combustion is essential in most energy generation processes, it is one of the major causes of air pollution. Spiral fin exhaust pipes were designed to study the effect of cooling the recirculated exhaust gases (EGR) of Diesel engines on the chemical composition of the exhaust gases and the reduction in the percentages of pollutant emissions. The gases examined in this study were oxides of nitrogen (NOx), carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon monoxide (CO). In addition, O2 concentration in the exhaust was measured. The two designs adopted in this study were exhaust pipes with solid and hollow fins around them. The first type uses air flow around the fins to cool the exhaust gases. The second type consists of hollow fins around the exhaust pipe to allow cooling water to flow in the hollow passage. Different combinations and arrangements of the solid and hollow fins exhaust pipes were used. It was found that decreasing the temperature of the EGR resulted in reductions in the oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and carbon dioxide (CO2) but increased the carbon monoxide (CO) in the exhaust gases. In addition, the oxygen (O2) concentration in the exhaust was decreased. As a general trend, the percentages of reduction in the NOx gas concentrations were lower than the percentages of increase in the CO emissions as a result of cooling the EGR of a Diesel engine by a heat exchanger. Using water as a cooling medium decreased the exhaust gases temperature and the amount of pollutants more than did air as a cooling medium. In a separate series of tests, increasing the cooled EGR ratios decreased the exhaust NOx but increased the particulate matter concentrations in the exhaust gases

  2. The temperature distribution in a gas core fission reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model is proposed for the heat transport in a nuclear reactor with gaseous fuel at high temperatures taking into account radiative and kinetic heat transfer. A derivation is given of the equation determining the temperature distribution in a gas core reactor and different numerical solution methods are discussed in detail. Results are presented of the temperature distribution. The influence of the kinetic heat transport and of dissociation of the gas molecules is shown. Also discussed is the importance of the temperature gradient at the reactor wall and its dependence on system parameters. (author)

  3. The temperature distribution in a gas core fission reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoogenboom, J.E.; Dam, H. van; Kuijper, J.C. (Interuniversitair Reactor Inst., Delft (Netherlands)); Kistemaker, J.; Boersma-Klein, W.; Vitalis, F. (FOM-Instituut voor Atoom-en Molecuulfysica, Amsterdam (Netherlands))

    1991-01-01

    A model is proposed for the heat transport in a nuclear reactor with gaseous fuel at high temperatures taking into account radiative and kinetic heat transfer. A derivation is given of the equation determining the temperature distribution in a gas core reactor and different numerical solution methods are discussed in detail. Results are presented of the temperature distribution. The influence of the kinetic heat transport and of dissociation of the gas molecules is shown. Also discussed is the importance of the temperature gradient at the reactor wall and its dependence on system parameters. (author).

  4. Analysis and improvement of gas turbine blade temperature measurement error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi; Daniel, Ketui

    2015-10-01

    Gas turbine blade components are easily damaged; they also operate in harsh high-temperature, high-pressure environments over extended durations. Therefore, ensuring that the blade temperature remains within the design limits is very important. In this study, measurement errors in turbine blade temperatures were analyzed, taking into account detector lens contamination, the reflection of environmental energy from the target surface, the effects of the combustion gas, and the emissivity of the blade surface. In this paper, each of the above sources of measurement error is discussed, and an iterative computing method for calculating blade temperature is proposed.

  5. Isolating Gas Sensor From Pressure And Temperature Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Chen, Tony T. D.; Chaturvedi, Sushi K.

    1994-01-01

    Two-stage flow system enables oxygen sensor in system to measure oxygen content of low-pressure, possibly-high-temperature atmosphere in test environment while protecting sensor against possibly high temperature and fluctuations in pressure of atmosphere. Sensor for which flow system designed is zirconium oxide oxygen sensor sampling atmospheres in high-temperature wind tunnels. Also adapted to other gas-analysis instruments that must be isolated from pressure and temperature effects of test environments.

  6. Effects of inlet distortion on gas turbine combustion chamber exit temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqsood, Omar Shahzada

    Damage to a nozzle guide vane or blade, caused by non-uniform temperature distributions at the combustion chamber exit, is deleterious to turbine performance and can lead to expensive and time consuming overhaul and repair. A test rig was designed and constructed for the Allison 250-C20B combustion chamber to investigate the effects of inlet air distortion on the combustion chamber's exit temperature fields. The rig made use of the engine's diffuser tubes, combustion case, combustion liner, and first stage nozzle guide vane shield. Rig operating conditions simulated engine cruise conditions, matching the quasi-non-dimensional Mach number, equivalence ratio and Sauter mean diameter. The combustion chamber was tested with an even distribution of inlet air and a 4% difference in airflow at either side. An even distribution of inlet air to the combustion chamber did not create a uniform temperature profile and varying the inlet distribution of air exacerbated the profile's non-uniformity. The design of the combustion liner promoted the formation of an oval-shaped toroidal vortex inside the chamber, creating localized hot and cool sections separated by 90° that appeared in the exhaust. Uneven inlet air distributions skewed the oval vortex, increasing the temperature of the hot section nearest the side with the most mass flow rate and decreasing the temperature of the hot section on the opposite side. Keywords: Allison 250, Combustion, Dual-Entry, Exit Temperature Profile, Gas Turbine, Pattern Factor, Reverse Flow.

  7. Thermoelectric generators incorporating phase-change materials for waste heat recovery from engine exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Gregory P; Yang, Jihui

    2014-02-11

    Thermoelectric devices, intended for placement in the exhaust of a hydrocarbon fuelled combustion device and particularly suited for use in the exhaust gas stream of an internal combustion engine propelling a vehicle, are described. Exhaust gas passing through the device is in thermal communication with one side of a thermoelectric module while the other side of the thermoelectric module is in thermal communication with a lower temperature environment. The heat extracted from the exhaust gasses is converted to electrical energy by the thermoelectric module. The performance of the generator is enhanced by thermally coupling the hot and cold junctions of the thermoelectric modules to phase-change materials which transform at a temperature compatible with the preferred operating temperatures of the thermoelectric modules. In a second embodiment, a plurality of thermoelectric modules, each with a preferred operating temperature and each with a uniquely-matched phase-change material may be used to compensate for the progressive lowering of the exhaust gas temperature as it traverses the length of the exhaust pipe.

  8. Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation on the Dual Fuel Combustion of Gasoline and CNG by Compression Ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rashid A. Aziz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI is a combustion process that promises the combination of diesel like efficiencies and very low NOx emissions. The major issues with HCCI are high heat release rates, lack of combustion control and high CO and HC emissions. Operating HCCI with two fuels of different properties and recirculation of exhaust gases are effective strategies of promoting and controlling autoignition. This study discusses the effects of EGR on the combustion characteristics of dual fuel HCCI of gasoline and CNG. The results show that EGR retards ignition timing, affects thermal efficiency and reduces heat release rates.

  9. Development history of the gas turbine modular high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of the high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) as an environmentally agreeable and efficient power source to support the generation of electricity and achieve a broad range of high temperature industrial applications has been an evolutionary process spanning over four decades. This process has included ongoing major development in both the HTGR as a nuclear energy source and associated power conversion systems from the steam cycle to the gas turbine. This paper follows the development process progressively through individual plant designs from early research of the 1950s to the present focus on the gas turbine modular HTGR. (author)

  10. GC/MS Gas Separator Operates At Lower Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Gutnikov, George

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show palladium/silver tube used to separate hydrogen carrier gas from gases being analyzed in gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry (GC/MS) system functions satisfactorily at temperatures as low as 70 to 100 degrees C. Less power consumed, and catalytic hydrogenation of compounds being analyzed diminished. Because separation efficiency high even at lower temperatures, gas load on vacuum pump of mass spectrometer kept low, permitting use of smaller pump. These features facilitate development of relatively small, lightweight, portable GC/MS system for such uses as measuring concentrations of pollutants in field.

  11. Effects of Gas Velocity and Temperature on Nitric Oxide Conversion in Simulated Catalytic Converter

    OpenAIRE

    Sathaporn Chuepeng

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: Gaseous emissions from gasoline engine such as carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxides were usually reduced in three-way catalytic converter simultaneously around theoretical fuel and air combustion. Engine speed and load and other parameters were varied over a wide range of operating conditions, resulting in different exhaust gas composition and condition intake into catalytic converter. This work was studied the conversion of Nitric Oxide (NO) in exhaust...

  12. Measured gas and particle temperatures in VTT's entrained flow reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Sønnik; Sørensen, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    Particle and gas temperature measurements were carried out in experiments on VTTs entrained flow reactor with 5% and 10% oxygen using Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy (FTIR). Particle temperature measurements were performed on polish coal,bark, wood, straw particles, and bark and...

  13. Modern gas-based temperature and pressure measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Pavese, Franco

    2013-01-01

    This 2nd edition volume of Modern Gas-Based Temperature and Pressure Measurements follows the first publication in 1992. It collects a much larger set of information, reference data, and bibliography in temperature and pressure metrology of gaseous substances, including the physical-chemical issues related to gaseous substances. The book provides solutions to practical applications where gases are used in different thermodynamic conditions. Modern Gas-Based Temperature and Pressure Measurements, 2nd edition is the only comprehensive survey of methods for pressure measurement in gaseous media used in the medium-to-low pressure range closely connected with thermometry. It assembles current information on thermometry and manometry that involve the use of gaseous substances which are likely to be valid methods for the future. As such, it is an important resource for the researcher. This edition is updated through the very latest scientific and technical developments of gas-based temperature and pressure measurem...

  14. Bimodular high temperature planar oxygen gas sensor

    OpenAIRE

    YuLei; HaiyongGao; PuxianGao

    2014-01-01

    A bimodular planar O2 sensor was fabricated using NiO nanoparticles (NPs) thin film coated yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate. The thin film was prepared by radio frequency (r.f.) magnetron sputtering of NiO on YSZ substrate, followed by high temperature sintering. The surface morphology of NiO nanoparticles film was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of NiO NPs thin film before and after high tempera...

  15. Design and development of gas turbine high temperature reactor 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) has been designing a Japan's original gas turbine high temperature reactor, GTHTR300 (Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300). The greatly simplified design based on salient features of the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled reactor) with a closed helium gas turbine enables the GTHTR300 a high efficient and economically competitive reactor to be deployed in early 2010s. Also, the GTHTR300 fully taking advantage of various experiences accumulated in design, construction and operation of the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) and fossil gas turbine systems reduces technological development concerning a reactor system and electric generation system. Original features of this system are core design with two-year refueling interval, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel, innovative plant flow scheme and horizontally installed gas turbine unit. Due to these salient features, the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200 thousands Yen/kWe, and the electric generation cost is close to a target cost of 4 Yen/kWh. This paper describes the original design features focusing on reactor core design, fuel design, in-core structure design and reactor pressure vessel design except PCU design. Also, R and D for developing the power conversion unit is briefly described. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  16. Determination of gas temperature in the plasmatron channel according to the known distribution of electronic temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimov Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical method to calculate the temperature distribution of heavy particles in the channel of the plasma torch on the known distribution of the electronic temperature has been proposed. The results can be useful for a number of model calculations in determining the most effective conditions of gas blowing through the plasma torch with the purpose of heating the heavy component. This approach allows us to understand full details about the heating of cold gas, inpouring the plasma, and to estimate correctly the distribution of the gas temperature inside the channel.

  17. Utilisation of CO2, fixation of nitrogen and exhaust gas cleaning in electric discharge with electrode catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method reported here provides a contribution to CO2 utilisation, nitrogen fixation and combustion exhaust cleaning using synergetic effect of electric discharge with heterogeneous catalysis on electrodes. The efficiency of CO2 removal is about 40-65%. The process of CO2 removal is always accompanied by NOx, VOC, SX and other component removal and is connected with O2 formation. The final product of process is powder with fractal microstructure, low specific weight, water insoluble suitable for use as nitrogen containing fertilizer. The main component (95%) of solid product is amorphous condensate of amino acids with about 5% of metal organic compound with catalytic properties. The condensate has character of statistical proteinoid. Its creation seems to play important role during formation of life in pre-biotic Earth

  18. A laser-based sensor for measurement of off-gas composition and temperature in basic oxygen steelmaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing an optical sensor for process control in basic oxygen steelmaking. The sensor measures gas temperature and relative CO/CO2 concentration ratios in the furnace off-gas by transmitting the laser probe beam directly above the furnace lip and below the exhaust hood during oxygen blowing. Dynamic off-gas information is being evaluated for optimizing variables such as lance height, oxygen flow, post-combustion control, and prediction of final melt-carbon content. The non-invasive nature of the optical sensor renders it robust and relatively maintenance-free. Additional potential applications of the method are process control for electric arc furnace and bottom-blown oxygen steelmaking processes. (author)

  19. Recovery of Exhaust Waste Heat for ICE Using the Beta Type Stirling Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Wail Aladayleh; Ali Alahmer

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the potential of utilizing the exhaust waste heat using an integrated mechanical device with internal combustion engine for the automobiles to increase the fuel economy, the useful power, and the environment safety. One of the ways of utilizing waste heat is to use a Stirling engine. A Stirling engine requires only an external heat source as wasted heat for its operation. Because the exhaust gas temperature may reach 200 to 700°C, Stirling engine will work effectively....

  20. Multi-spectral temperature measurement method for gas turbine blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Feng, Chi; Wang, Lixin; Li, Dong

    2016-02-01

    One of the basic methods to improve both the thermal efficiency and power output of a gas turbine is to increase the firing temperature. However, gas turbine blades are easily damaged in harsh high-temperature and high-pressure environments. Therefore, ensuring that the blade temperature remains within the design limits is very important. There are unsolved problems in blade temperature measurement, relating to the emissivity of the blade surface, influences of the combustion gases, and reflections of radiant energy from the surroundings. In this study, the emissivity of blade surfaces has been measured, with errors reduced by a fitting method, influences of the combustion gases have been calculated for different operational conditions, and a reflection model has been built. An iterative computing method is proposed for calculating blade temperatures, and the experimental results show that this method has high precision.

  1. High temperature gas dynamics an introduction for physicists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Tarit K

    2014-01-01

    High Temperature Gas Dynamics is a primer for scientists, engineers, and students who would like to have a basic understanding of the physics and the behavior of high-temperature gases. It is a valuable tool for astrophysicists as well. The first chapters treat the basic principles of quantum and statistical mechanics and how to derive thermophysical properties from them. Special topics are included that are rarely found in other textbooks, such as the thermophysical and transport properties of multi-temperature gases and a novel method to compute radiative transfer. Furthermore, collision processes between different particles are discussed. Separate chapters deal with the production of high-temperature gases and with electrical emission in plasmas, as well as related diagnostic techniques.This new edition adds over 100 pages and includes the following updates: several sections on radiative properties of high temperature gases and various radiation models, a section on shocks in magneto-gas-dynamics, a sectio...

  2. NOx abatement in the exhaust of lean-burn natural gas engines over Ag-supported γ-Al2O3 catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azizi, Y.; Kambolis, A.; Boréave, A.; Giroir-Fendler, A.; Retailleau-Mevel, L.; Guiot, B.; Marchand, O.; Walter, M.; Desse, M.-L.; Marchin, L.; Vernoux, P.

    2016-04-01

    A series of Ag catalysts supported on γ-Al2O3, including two different γ-Al2O3 supports and various Ag loadings (2-8 wt.%), was prepared, characterized (SEM, TEM, BET, physisorption, TPR, NH3-TPD) and tested for the selective catalytic reduction of NOx by CH4 for lean-burn natural gas engines exhausts. The catalysts containing 2 wt.% Ag supported on γ-Al2O3 were found to be most efficient for the NOx reduction into N2 with a maximal conversion of 23% at 650 °C. This activity was clearly linked with the ability of the catalyst to concomitantly produce CO, via the methane steam reforming, and NO2. The presence of small AgOx nanoparticles seems to be crucial for the methane activation and NOx reduction.

  3. Quantification of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene in internal combustion engine exhaust with time-weighted average solid phase microextraction and gas chromatography mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baimatova, Nassiba; Koziel, Jacek A; Kenessov, Bulat

    2015-05-11

    A new and simple method for benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and o-xylene (BTEX) quantification in vehicle exhaust was developed based on diffusion-controlled extraction onto a retracted solid-phase microextraction (SPME) fiber coating. The rationale was to develop a method based on existing and proven SPME technology that is feasible for field adaptation in developing countries. Passive sampling with SPME fiber retracted into the needle extracted nearly two orders of magnitude less mass (n) compared with exposed fiber (outside of needle) and sampling was in a time weighted-averaging (TWA) mode. Both the sampling time (t) and fiber retraction depth (Z) were adjusted to quantify a wider range of Cgas. Extraction and quantification is conducted in a non-equilibrium mode. Effects of Cgas, t, Z and T were tested. In addition, contribution of n extracted by metallic surfaces of needle assembly without SPME coating was studied. Effects of sample storage time on n loss was studied. Retracted TWA-SPME extractions followed the theoretical model. Extracted n of BTEX was proportional to Cgas, t, Dg, T and inversely proportional to Z. Method detection limits were 1.8, 2.7, 2.1 and 5.2 mg m(-3) (0.51, 0.83, 0.66 and 1.62 ppm) for BTEX, respectively. The contribution of extraction onto metallic surfaces was reproducible and influenced by Cgas and t and less so by T and by the Z. The new method was applied to measure BTEX in the exhaust gas of a Ford Crown Victoria 1995 and compared with a whole gas and direct injection method. PMID:25911428

  4. Coolant purification system of high-temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Systems for purifying the coolant of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors are discussed. In the Dragon reactor helium is purified from radioactive isotopes of inert gases by adsorbing them on activated carbon at -1960C. Krypton and xenon are retained in a system consisting of five identical adsorbers. The use of four adsorbers (the fifth is in reserve) ensures retention of xenon for 200 hr and of krypton for 15 hr. The Peach Bottom reactor also has cryogenic purification system with helium blown through the fuel elements. The gas temperature at the activated carbon outlet is 210C and the operating temperature is 16 to 420C. The full heat load of the adsorbers is 1.7 kW; the calculated temperature is 1960C. A purification system for a high-temperature thorium reactor with 300 MW (el) power is also described. The basic parameters used in designing a coolant purification system are given. In the Fulton reactor, with 1160 MW (el), there is an additional regeneration system for radioactive gas. The total operating time of the system is several months per year. Analysis of the purification system loops of the high-temperature gas-cooled reactors shows that fission product escape is prevented by three barriers, which ensure protection of personnel and the environment from the hazard of radioactive gases. These are the fuel particle coatings, the first loop, and the shielding within which the facility is located. The advantages of the cryogenic system of purification - high efficiency, small dimensions, and reliability in operation - have been demonstrated in operation on producing high-temperature gas reactors. The data obtained are widely used in designing similar systems for higher power high-temperature reactors. (H.E.)

  5. Gravitational collapse of a magnetized fermion gas with finite temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado Gaspar, I. [Instituto de Geofisica y Astronomia (IGA), La Habana (Cuba); Perez Martinez, A. [Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica (ICIMAF), La Habana (Cuba); Sussman, Roberto A. [Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM), Mexico (Mexico); Ulacia Rey, A. [Instituto de Cibernetica, Matematica y Fisica (ICIMAF), La Habana (Cuba); Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico (ICN-UNAM), Mexico (Mexico)

    2013-07-15

    We examine the dynamics of a self-gravitating magnetized fermion gas at finite temperature near the collapsing singularity of a Bianchi-I spacetime. Considering a general set of appropriate and physically motivated initial conditions, we transform Einstein-Maxwell field equations into a complete and self-consistent dynamical system amenable for numerical work. The resulting numerical solutions reveal the gas collapsing into both, isotropic (''point-like'') and anisotropic (''cigar-like''), singularities, depending on the initial intensity of the magnetic field. We provide a thorough study of the near collapse behavior and interplay of all relevant state and kinematic variables: temperature, expansion scalar, shear scalar, magnetic field, magnetization, and energy density. A significant qualitative difference in the behavior of the gas emerges in the temperature range T/m{sub f} {proportional_to} 10{sup -6} and T/m{sub f} {proportional_to} 10{sup -3}. (orig.)

  6. Gravitational collapse of a magnetized fermion gas with finite temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We examine the dynamics of a self-gravitating magnetized fermion gas at finite temperature near the collapsing singularity of a Bianchi-I spacetime. Considering a general set of appropriate and physically motivated initial conditions, we transform Einstein-Maxwell field equations into a complete and self-consistent dynamical system amenable for numerical work. The resulting numerical solutions reveal the gas collapsing into both, isotropic (''point-like'') and anisotropic (''cigar-like''), singularities, depending on the initial intensity of the magnetic field. We provide a thorough study of the near collapse behavior and interplay of all relevant state and kinematic variables: temperature, expansion scalar, shear scalar, magnetic field, magnetization, and energy density. A significant qualitative difference in the behavior of the gas emerges in the temperature range T/mf ∝ 10-6 and T/mf ∝ 10-3. (orig.)

  7. High-temperature oxidation of graphite rods with temperature control by combustion gas recycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combustion of graphite (fuel blocks) is of fundamental importance in the fuel reprocessing scheme for the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR). A study was made to evaluate a chunk-type burner for possible application in this reprocessing step. The combustion gases were recycled to allow operation at higher burn rates without an increase in graphite temperature. Graphite rods of two diameters were oxidized with makeup oxygen and recycled stack gases at various gas flow rates in an insulated reactor. Results of this study indicate a strong dependence of oxygen transfer on gas flow rate with little effect resulting from changes in graphite temperature. High carbon monoxide concentrations in the exit gas were not a problem except at oxygen concentrations below approx. 5%. Stable operation of a recycle controlled burner was achieved, avoiding the temperature excursions common in previous graphite burners

  8. Gas turbine high temperature reactor 300 (GTHTR300)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, the development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) technology has been conducted for over 20 years. The High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) with outlet gas temperatures of 950 deg. C and a thermal power of 30 MW was constructed at Oarai Research Centre in the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI). First criticality was attained in 1998 and full power operation with outlet gas temperatures of 850 deg. C was completed on December 7, 2001. Since then, a safety demonstration test has been conducted and operational data to establish and upgrade the HTGR technology base will be accumulated over the next several years. In parallel to the development and successful operation of the HTTR, since 1997 JAERI had undertaken a feasibility study on various types of HTGRs with Gas Turbines (HTGR-GT). As a result of this study, JAERI selected a block-fuel-type HTGR with a direct cycle gas turbine system as the best candidate for a future commercial reactor purely from an economic and technological point of view. Since 2001, JAERI has been designing an original Japan gas turbine high temperature reactor, Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300 (GTHTR300). The greatly simplified design is based on salient features of the HTGR with a closed helium gas turbine and enables the GTHTR300, a highly efficient and economically competitive reactor, to be deployed in the early 2010s. Also, the GTHTR300 takes full advantage of experience accumulated in the design, construction and operation of the HTTR and fossil gas turbine systems to reduce technological development necessary to complete a reactor and electric generation system. The original features of this system are: a reactor core design based on a newly proposed refuelling scheme named sandwich shuffling; use of conventional steel material for a reactor pressure vessel; an innovative plant flow scheme and a horizontally-installed gas turbine unit. The GTHTR300 can be continuously operated without the refuelling for two years. The principal stakeholder in the GTHTR300 is Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI)

  9. Acoustic disturbances in a gas with an axial temperature gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lariononv, V. M.

    2016-01-01

    Linear analysis acoustic disturbances in one-dimensional gas flow with a longitudinal gradient of the sound speed provided. Known wave equation for the acoustic velocity is used. In the case of linear distribution of the sound speed in the hot part of the flow equation has an exact analytic solution. This allows to define the expression describing the propagation acoustic disturbances in a gas with varying mean temperature and density. The results can be used to calculate the resonance frequencies of the gas oscillations in the laboratory and industrial combustors.

  10. Denuder for measuring emissions of gaseous organic exhaust gas constituents; Denuder zur Emissionsmessung von gasfoermigen organischen Abgasinhaltsstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerchel, B.; Jockel, W.; Kallinger, G.; Niessner, R.

    1997-05-01

    Industrial plants which emit carcinogenic or other noxious substances should be given top priority in any policy to ward off harmful environmental effects. This also applies to many volatile and semi-volatile air constituents such as volatile aliphatic carbonyls or amines. To date there are no satisfactory methods for determining trace organic components of exhaust gases. It is true that aldehydes are considered in the VDI Guideline 3862, but the measuring methods given there are based on absorption in liquids and are accordingly difficult to use and show a high cross-sensitivity for other substances. No VDI Guideline exists to date on amine emissions. In view of the complexity of exhaust gases a selective enrichment of certain families of substances would appear indicated. Sampling trouble could be reduced if it was possible only to accumulate the gaseous phase, or even just one family of gaseous constituents. A particularly suitable air sampling method is that of diffusion separation. These diffusion separators (denuders) are well known as a powerful measuring system which is able to accumulate trace pollutants in the outside air. The purpose of the present study was to find out whether the concept of diffusion separation is also applicable to emission monitoring, and in particular whether it is suitable for detecting volatile aliphatic aldehydes and amines (primary and secondary) at extremely low concentrations (<10 ppb). (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Fuer Anlagen mit Emissionen von krebserzeugenden und gesundheitsgefaehrdenden Stoffen ergibt sich ein besonderer Handlungsbedarf zum Schutz vor schaedlichen Umwelteinwirkungen. Zu diesen Stoffen gehoeren auch viele leicht- und mittelfluechtigen Luftinhaltsstoffe, wie z.B. die leichtfluechtigen aliphatischen Carbonyle oder Amine. Fuer organische Komponenten, die nur in geringen Konzentrationen im Abgas vorkommen, existieren bisher keine zufriedenstellenden Messverfahren. Fuer die Aldehyde liegt zwar die VDI-Richtlinie 3862 vor, diese Messverfahren beruhen aber auf dem Absorptionsprinzip in Fluessigkeiten, das umstaendlich zu handhaben ist und eine grosse Querempfindlichkeit zu anderen Stoffen besitzt. Fuer die Emissionsmessung von Aminen gibt es derzeit noch keine VDI-Richtlinie. Aufgrund der Komplexitaet des Mediums Abgas ist eine selektive Anreicherung bestimmter Substanzklassen wuenschenswert. So koennen Stoerungen bei der Probenahme verringert werden, indem nur die Gasphase, und hier moeglichst nur eine Substanzklasse, selektiv angereichert wird. Dazu eignet sich besonders die Luftprobenahme auf dem Prinzip der Diffusionsabscheidung. Diese Diffusionsabscheider (Denuder) sind ein bekanntes Messsystem zur nachweisstarken und selektiven Anreicherung von Spurenschadstoffen in der Aussenluft. In diesem Vorhaben soll nun dieses Konzept der Diffusionsabscheidung auf die Anwendbarkeit im Emissionsbereich ueberprueft werden, speziell zur Erfassung der leichtfluechtigen aliphatischen Aldehyde und Amine (primaere und sekundaere) mit extrem niedrigen Nachweisgrenzen (<10 ppb). (orig./SR)

  11. Simulation of Wake Vortex Radiometric Detection via Jet Exhaust Proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Taumi S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of the potential of an airborne hyperspectral imaging IR instrument to infer wake vortices via turbine jet exhaust as a proxy. The goal was to determine the requirements for an imaging spectrometer or radiometer to effectively detect the exhaust plume, and by inference, the location of the wake vortices. The effort examines the gas spectroscopy of the various major constituents of turbine jet exhaust and their contributions to the modeled detectable radiance. Initially, a theoretical analysis of wake vortex proxy detection by thermal radiation was realized in a series of simulations. The first stage used the SLAB plume model to simulate turbine jet exhaust plume characteristics, including exhaust gas transport dynamics and concentrations. The second stage used these plume characteristics as input to the Line By Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) to simulate responses from both an imaging IR hyperspectral spectrometer or radiometer. These numerical simulations generated thermal imagery that was compared with previously reported wake vortex temperature data. This research is a continuation of an effort to specify the requirements for an imaging IR spectrometer or radiometer to make wake vortex measurements. Results of the two-stage simulation will be reported, including instrument specifications for wake vortex thermal detection. These results will be compared with previously reported results for IR imaging spectrometer performance.

  12. Simulation of wake vortex radiometric detection via jet exhaust proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Taumi S.

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an analysis of the potential of an airborne hyperspectral imaging IR instrument to infer wake vortices via turbine jet exhaust as a proxy. The goal was to determine the requirements for an imaging spectrometer or radiometer to effectively detect the exhaust plume, and by inference, the location of the wake vortices. The effort examines the gas spectroscopy of the various major constituents of turbine jet exhaust and their contributions to the modeled detectable radiance. Initially, a theoretical analysis of wake vortex proxy detection by thermal radiation was realized in a series of simulations. The first stage used the SLAB plume model to simulate turbine jet exhaust plume characteristics, including exhaust gas transport dynamics and concentrations. The second stage used these plume characteristics as input to the Line By Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) to simulate responses from both an imaging IR hyperspectral spectrometer or radiometer. These numerical simulations generated thermal imagery that was compared with previously reported wake vortex temperature data. This research is a continuation of an effort to specify the requirements for an imaging IR spectrometer or radiometer to make wake vortex measurements. Results of the two-stage simulation will be reported, including instrument specifications for wake vortex thermal detection. These results will be compared with previously reported results for IR imaging spectrometer performance.

  13. Shear Viscosity of a Superfluid Dipolar Gas at Low Temperatures

    OpenAIRE

    M. Khademi Dehkordi

    2014-01-01

    We compute the shear viscosity of superfluid Bose and Fermi gases on the base of Boltzmann equation and relaxation times. We show that, in the low temperature limit, the shear viscosities of Bose and Fermi gases are proportional to T-1evp0/T and T-4, respectively. For the superfluid Bose gas at low temperature limit, only splitting processes contribute to the shear viscosity.

  14. Microstructural Characterization of Low Temperature Gas Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    The present work presents microstructural investigations of the surface zone of low temperature gas nitrided precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel AISI 630. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the present phases after successive removal of very thin sections...... of the sample surface. The development of epsilon nitride, expanded austenite and expanded martensite resulted from the low temperature nitriding treatments. The microstructural features, hardness and phase composition are discussed with emphasis on the influence of nitriding duration and nitriding...

  15. Factors affecting low temperature performance of zirconia gas sensors.

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Julian

    2001-01-01

    A reduction in the operation temperature of zirconia ceramic gas sensors is highly desirable for a number of practical reasons. This work seeks to investigate the factors that prevent a reduction in operation temperature and propose methods by which these may be resolved. A novel approach to sensor fabrication has been developed and employed with the advantage of reduced device complexity that should lead to subsequent cost and reliability benefits. Leakage rates in these devices have bee...

  16. Temperatures of dust and gas in S~140

    CERN Document Server

    Koumpia, E; Ossenkopf, V; van der Tak, F F S; Mookerjea, B; Fuente, A; Kramer, C

    2015-01-01

    In dense parts of interstellar clouds (> 10^5 cm^-3), dust & gas are expected to be in thermal equilibrium, being coupled via collisions. However, previous studies have shown that the temperatures of the dust & gas may remain decoupled even at higher densities. We study in detail the temperatures of dust & gas in the photon-dominated region S 140, especially around the deeply embedded infrared sources IRS 1-3 and at the ionization front. We derive the dust temperature and column density by combining Herschel PACS continuum observations with SOFIA observations at 37 $\\mu$m and SCUBA at 450 $\\mu$m. We model these observations using greybody fits and the DUSTY radiative transfer code. For the gas part we use RADEX to model the CO 1-0, CO 2-1, 13CO 1-0 and C18O 1-0 emission lines mapped with the IRAM-30m over a 4' field. Around IRS 1-3, we use HIFI observations of single-points and cuts in CO 9-8, 13CO 10-9 and C18O 9-8 to constrain the amount of warm gas, using the best fitting dust model derived wit...

  17. 40 CFR 86.109-94 - Exhaust gas sampling system; Otto-cycle vehicles not requiring particulate emission measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... be limited to ±10 °F (±5.6 °C) during the entire test. The temperature measuring system shall have an... substantiates the need for this closer tolerance.) (2) The temperature measuring system shall have an accuracy... change (as measured in hot silicone oil). (3) The pressure measuring system shall have an accuracy...

  18. Pengaruh Variasi Temperatur Sintesa, Temperatur Operasi dan Konsentrasi gas CO terhadap sensitivitas Sensor Gas Co dari Material ZnO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endah Lutfiana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Karbon monoksida ( CO merupakan gas yang tidak berwarna dan tidak berbau yang dihasilkan dari proses pembakaran yang tidak sempurna. Gas ini sangat beracun bagi tubuh manusia karena sifat biologinya yang mampu berikatan dengan hemoglobin yang mana bertugas membawa oksigen dalam darah, sehingga kadar oksigen dapat menurun drastis dan menyebabkan keracunan bahkan kematian. Sehingga dibutuhkan suatu alat pendeteksi atau sensor untuk mendeteksi adanya gas tersebut.Oksida metal seringkali digunakan untuk material sensor. ZnO merupakan suatu material semikonduktor yang telah digunakan untuk aplikasi sensor. Dalam penelitian ini pembuatan sensor ZnO dilakukan dengan mengoksidasi serbuk Zn pada variasi temperatur 800, 850, 900 oC selama 40 menit. Selanjutnya dibuat pelet sensor dengan mengkompaksi serbuk ZnO hasil Oksidasi dengan tekanan 200 Bar. Pelet kemudian disinter dengan temperatur 500oC. Setelah itu dilakukan pengujian SEM, XRD, dan uji Sensitivitas dengan variasi temperatur operasi 30, 50, 100 oC dan variasi konsentrasi 10 ppm, 50 ppm, 100 ppm, 250 ppm, 500 ppm. Dari hasil pengujian didapatkan nilai sensitivitas tertinggi pada temperatur sintesa 800oC dengan konsentrasi gas CO 500 ppm pada temperatur operasi sensor 100oC yaitu sebesar 0,52.

  19. Anisotropic ordering in a two-temperature lattice gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Szabó, György; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1997-01-01

    We consider a two-dimensional lattice gas model with repulsive nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions that evolves in time according to anisotropic Kawasaki dynamics. The hopping of particles along the principal directions is governed by two heat baths at different temperatures T-x and T-y...

  20. THE FLUIDIZED BED DRYING AT OSCILLATING GAS TEMPERATURE

    OpenAIRE

    Maria G?owacka; Jerzy Malczewski

    1985-01-01

    The fluidized bed drying of granular materials at oscillating gas temperature have been investigated theoretically and experimentally. The model of the diffusion in the sphere was solved analitically and proved experimentally. The parameters ? and ? were proven to have essential influence on thermal energy saving. The energy saving of the oscillating system is up to a few per cent.

  1. Reactor core design of Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) has been designing Japan's original gas turbine high temperature reactor, Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300 (GTHTR300). The greatly simplified design based on salient features of the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) with a closed helium gas turbine enables the GTHTR300 a highly efficient and economically competitive reactor to be deployed in early 2010s. Also, the GTHTR300 fully taking advantage of various experiences accumulated in design, construction and operation of the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) and existing fossil fired gas turbine systems reduces technological development concerning a reactor system and electric generation system. Original design features of this system are the reactor core design based on a newly proposed refueling scheme named sandwich shuffling, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel (RPV), an innovative coolant flow scheme and a horizontally installed gas turbine unit. The GTHTR300 can be continuously operated without the refueling for 2 years. Due to these salient features, the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200,000 yen (1667 US$)/kW e, and the electric generation cost is close to a target cost of 4 yen (3.3 US cents)/kW h. This paper describes the original design features focusing on the reactor core design and the in-core structure design, including the innovative coolant flow scheme for cooling the RPV. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan

  2. Low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newson, E.; Roth, F. von; Hottinger, P.; Truong, T.B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - air mixtures would allow the development of no-NO{sub x} burners for heating and power applications. Using commercially available catalysts, the room temperature ignition of methane-propane-air mixtures has been shown in laboratory reactors with combustion efficiencies over 95% and maximum temperatures less than 700{sup o}C. After a 500 hour stability test, severe deactivation of both methane and propane oxidation functions was observed. In cooperation with industrial partners, scaleup to 3 kW is being investigated together with startup dynamics and catalyst stability. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  3. Generating usable and safe CO{sub 2} for enrichment of greenhouses from the exhaust gas of a biomass heating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dion, L.M.; Lefsrud, M. [McGill Univ., Macdonald Campus, Ste-Anne-deBellevue, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Bioresource Engineering

    2010-07-01

    This study demonstrated the use of biomass as a renewable fuel to enrich a greenhouse with carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). CO{sub 2} enrichment of greenhouses has been shown to improve crop production whether it occurs from liquid CO{sub 2} or combustion of fossil fuels. Biomass, in the form of wood chips or pellets, has received much interest as a sustainable and economically viable alternative to heat greenhouses. As such, the opportunity exists to convert exhaust gases from a greenhouse wood heating system into a useful resource. CO{sub 2} can be extracted from flue gas via membrane separation instead of electrostatic precipitators. This technique has shown potential for large industries trying to reduce and isolate CO{sub 2} emissions for sequestration and may be applicable to the greenhouse industry. Some research has also been done with wet scrubbers using catalysts to obtain plant fertilizers. Sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen (NO) emissions can be stripped from flue gas to form ammonium sulphate as a valuable byproduct for fertilizer markets. This study will review the potential of these techniques in the summer of 2010 when experiments will be conducted at the Macdonald Campus of McGill University.

  4. Simulation of fission gas release during temperature transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper discusses the release of fission gases Xe and Kr as a diffusion process. It takes into account gas generation due to fission, gas precipitation in bubbles within the grains, diffusion of gas towards the grain boundaries, formation of grain boundary bubbles, its saturation and subsequent gas release, resolution of the gas contained into both types of bubbles and grain growth. Temperature profile calculations have allowed to evaluate the gas distribution in fuel pellet and in each grain. Analytical and numerical methods are used. Several experiments are simulated with the code and a good agreement between the measured Paper discusses the release of fission gases Xe and Kr as a diffusion process. It takes into and calculated results has been obtained. The influence of the initial grain size and density on fission gas release has been evaluated. It has been found that larger grain size and lower density both yield lower release, but density variation has a minor effect on the release. (author). 10 refs, 4 figs

  5. Temperatures of dust and gas in S 140

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koumpia, E.; Harvey, P. M.; Ossenkopf, V.; van der Tak, F. F. S.; Mookerjea, B.; Fuente, A.; Kramer, C.

    2015-08-01

    Context. In dense parts of interstellar clouds (≥105 cm-3), dust and gas are expected to be in thermal equilibrium, being coupled via collisions. However, previous studies have shown that in the presence of intense radiation fields, the temperatures of the dust and gas may remain decoupled even at higher densities. Aims: The objective of this work is to study in detail the temperatures of dust and gas in the photon-dominated region S 140, especially around the deeply embedded infrared sources IRS 1-3 and at the ionization front. Methods: We derive the dust temperature and column density by combining Herschel-PACS continuum observations with SOFIA observations at 37 μm and SCUBA data at 450 μm. We model these observations using simple greybody fits and the DUSTY radiative transfer code. For the gas analysis we use RADEX to model the CO 1-0, CO 2-1, 13CO 1-0 and C18O 1-0 emission lines mapped with the IRAM-30 m telescope over a 4' field. Around IRS 1-3, we use HIFI observations of single-points and cuts in CO 9-8, 13CO 10-9 and C18O 9-8 to constrain the amount of warm gas, using the best fitting dust model derived with DUSTY as input to the non-local radiative transfer model RATRAN. The velocity information in the lines allows us to separate the quiescent component from outflows when deriving the gas temperature and column density. Results: We find that the gas temperature around the infrared sources varies between ~35 and ~55 K. In contrast to expectation, the gas is systematically warmer than the dust by ~5-15 K despite the high gas density. In addition we observe an increase of the gas temperature from 30-35 K in the surrounding up to 40-45 K towards the ionization front, most likely due to the UV radiation from the external star. Furthermore, detailed models of the temperature structure close to IRS 1 which take the known density gradient into account show that the gas is warmer and/or denser than what we model. Finally, modelling of the dust emission from the sub-mm peak SMM 1 constrains its luminosity to a few ×102L⊙. Conclusions: We conclude that the gas heating in the S 140 region is very efficient even at high densities. The most likely explanation is deep UV penetration from the embedded sources in a clumpy medium and/or oblique shocks. Based on Herschel observations. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.Final Herschel and IRAM data (cube) as FITS files are only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (ftp://130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr/viz-bin/qcat?J/A+A/580/A68

  6. Gaseous SO3 and H2SO4 in the Exhaust of an Aircraft Gas Turbine Engine: Measurements by CIMS and Implications for Fuel Sulfur Conversion to Sulfur (VI) and Conversion of SO3 to H2SO4

    OpenAIRE

    Sorokin, A.; Katragkou, E.; Arnold, F.; R. Busen; Schumann, U.

    2004-01-01

    An estimation of the conversion efficiency (ε) of fuel sulfur to SO3 and H2SO4, where ε=([SO3]+[H2SO4])/[ST] and [ST] is the total sulfur atom concentration in the exhaust at the exit of an aircraft gas-turbine combustor, was derived from measurements by comparison with model results. The major results of the presented CIMS experiments and their interpretation with a model simulation are: (i) The efficiency is ε=2.3±1% at an exhaust age of about 5 ms from the combustor exit; (ii) The SO3 mole...

  7. Temperature and distortion transients in gas tungsten-arc weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis and test program to develop a fundamental understanding of the gas tungsten-arc welding process has been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to develop techniques to determine and control the various welding parameters and weldment conditions so as to result in optimum weld response characteristics. These response characteristics include depth of penetration, weld bead configuration, weld bead sink and roll, distortion, and cracking sensitivity. The results are documented of that part of the program devoted to analytical and experimental investigations of temperatures, weld bead dimensions, and distortions for moving gas tungsten-arc welds applied to Alloy 600 plates

  8. Nanostructured Materials for Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Xianghong; Neri, Giovanni; Pinna, Nicola

    2016-02-01

    Sensor technology has an important effect on many aspects in our society, and has gained much progress, propelled by the development of nanoscience and nanotechnology. Current research efforts are directed toward developing high-performance gas sensors with low operating temperature at low fabrication costs. A gas sensor working at room temperature is very appealing as it provides very low power consumption and does not require a heater for high-temperature operation, and hence simplifies the fabrication of sensor devices and reduces the operating cost. Nanostructured materials are at the core of the development of any room-temperature sensing platform. The most important advances with regard to fundamental research, sensing mechanisms, and application of nanostructured materials for room-temperature conductometric sensor devices are reviewed here. Particular emphasis is given to the relation between the nanostructure and sensor properties in an attempt to address structure-property correlations. Finally, some future research perspectives and new challenges that the field of room-temperature sensors will have to address are also discussed. PMID:26662346

  9. Comment on 'Experimental observation of carbon dioxide reduction in exhaust gas from hydrocarbon fuel burning' [Phys. Plasmas 16, 114502 (2009)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following comments are intended to clarify whether it is possible to convert CO2 into C+O2 by supplying just one-twentieth of energy required thermodynamically, only under the condition that the negative high voltage of dc is applied to the gas stream perpendicularly, in a recent article by Uhm and Kim [H. S. Uhm and C. H. Kim, Phys. Plasmas 16, 114502 (2009)]. Of particular concern is the disobedience of the first and second laws of thermodynamics together with the indistinct measurement of experimental data.

  10. Technical assessment of gas turbine cycle for high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gas turbine cycle appears to be the best near-term power conversion method for the high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). The author extensively investigates the gas turbine cycle including direct cycle, open indirect cycle and closed indirect cycle with medium of helium, nitrogen and air. Each cycle is analyzed and optimized from the thermodynamic standpoint and its turbo-machine is aerodynamically designed. As a result, the direct cycle with helium is an ideal option for the HTGR gas turbine cycle; however it is not easy to be realized based on current technology. The closed indirect cycle with helium or nitrogen is a practical one at present time, which can get the gas turbine cycle and lay technical bases for the future direct cycle

  11. Discussion of the effects of recirculating exhaust air on performance and efficiency of a typical microturbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a specific phenomenon, noticed during steam injection experiments on a microturbine. During the considered experiments, measurements indicated an unsteady inlet air temperature of the compressor, resulting in unstable operation of the microturbine. Non-continuous exhaust air recirculation was a possible explanation for the observed behaviour of the microturbine. The aim of this paper is to investigate and demonstrate the effects of exhaust recirculation on a microgasturbine. Depending on wind direction, exhaust air re-entered the engine, resulting in changing inlet conditions which affects the operating regime of the microturbine. For this paper, a series of experiments were performed in the wind tunnel. These series of experiments allowed investigation of the effect of the wind direction on flue gasses flow. Next to the experiments, steady-state simulations of exhaust recirculation were performed in order to study the effect of exhaust recirculation on thermodynamic performance of the microturbine. Dynamic simulations of the non-continuous recirculation revealed the effects of frequency and amplitude on average performance and stability. Results from simulations supported the important impact of exhaust recirculation. Wind tunnel tests demonstrated the influence of the wind direction on recirculation and revealed the necessity to heighten the stack, thus preventing exhaust recirculation. -- Highlights: ? Unstable operation of a T100 microturbine during steam injection tests was noticed, caused by exhaust gas recirculation. ? Wind tunnel tests were performed to study the effect of the wind direction on the recirculation process. ? Steady-state simulations to investigate the effect of exhaust gas recirculation on thermodynamic performance. ? Dynamic simulations to reveal effects of frequency and amplitude on average performance and stability. ? Wind tunnel tests revealed the necessity to heighten the stack to prevent exhaust recirculation.

  12. High temperature gas cleaning for pressurized gasification. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alden, H.; Hagstroem, P.; Hallgren, A.; Waldheim, L. [TPS Termiska Processer AB, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    2000-04-01

    The purpose of the project was to build an apparatus to study pressurized, high temperature gas cleaning of raw gasification gas generated from biomass. A flexible and easy to operate pressurized apparatus was designed and installed for the investigations in high temperature gas cleaning by means of thermal, catalytic or chemical procedures. A semi continuos fuel feeding concept, at a maximum rate of 700 g/h, allowed a very constant formation of a gas product at 700 deg C. The gas product was subsequently introduced into a fixed bed secondary reactor where the actual gas cleanup or reformation was fulfilled. The installation work was divided into four work periods and apart from a few delays the work was carried out according to the time plan. During the first work period (January - June 1994) the technical design, drawings etc. of the reactor and additional parts were completed. All material for the construction was ordered and the installation work was started. The second work period (July - December 1994) was dedicated to the construction and the installation of the different components. Initial tests with the electrical heating elements, control system and gas supply were assigned to the third work period (January - June 1995). After the commissioning and the resulting modifications, initial pyrolysis and tar decomposition experiments were performed. During the fourth and final work period, (June - December 1995) encouraging results from first tests allowed the experimental part of the project work to commence, however in a slightly reduced program. The experimental part of the project work comparatively studied tar decomposition as a function of the process conditions as well as of the choice of catalyst. Two different catalysts, dolomite and a commercial Ni-based catalyst, were evaluated in the unit. Their tar cracking ability in the pressure interval 1 - 20 bar and at cracker bed temperatures between 800 - 900 deg C was compared. Long term tests to study possible poisoning and the durability of the catalyst were not performed because of practical reasons and due to the limited time left for such investigations. The outcome of the survey, including novel technical solutions made, proved the installed test rig to be an advanced and diversified platform for thermochemical conversion studies at high temperatures and at enhanced pressures. The unit will be used in other projects, some of which are already initiated within the EU framework, and others to come.

  13. Gas temperature measurement in combustors by use of suction pyrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce new measurement techniques and configurations in gas suction pyrometry. A detailed description of three types of mini-pyrometers for the study of burning and heat transfer processes is presented. A suction pyrometer whose inner cavity is insulated by ceramic wool was developed for use in high velocity and high temperature jets of combustion products. A second type of pyrometer was developed for measuring oscillating gas temperatures, based on a micron-size sensitive head located in a spherical piece of fibrous material, through which the hot gases are aspirated. A third pyrometer was developed with an electrically-heated thermocouple and pulsed suction for use in low velocity 'dirty' gaseous media

  14. Room temperature hydrogen gas sensitivity of nanocrystalline pure tin oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, S; Seal, S

    2004-01-01

    Nanocrystalline (6-8 nm) tin oxide (SnO2) thin film (100-150 nm) sensor is synthesized via sol-gel dip-coating process. The thin film is characterized using focused ion-beam microscopy (FIB) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) techniques to determine the film thickness and the nanocrystallite size. The utilization of nanocrystalline pure-SnO2 thin film to sense a typical reducing gas such as hydrogen, at room temperature, is demonstrated in this investigation. The grain growth behavior of nanocrystalline pure-SnO2 is analyzed, which shows very low activation energy (9 kJ/mol) for the grain growth within the nanocrystallite size range of 3-20 nm. This low activation energy value is correlated, via excess oxygen-ion vacancy concentration, with the room temperature hydrogen gas sensitivity of the nanocrystalline pure-SnO2 thin film sensor. PMID:15112557

  15. High temperature gas cooled reactor steam-methane reformer design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The concept of the long distance transportation of process heat energy from a High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTGR) heat source, based on the steam-methane reforming reaction, is being evaluated by the Department of Energy as an energy source/application for use early in the 21st century. This paper summaries the design of a helium heated steam reformer utilized in conjunction with an intermediate loop, 850/degree/C reactor outlet temperature, HTGR process heat plant concept. This paper also discusses various design considerations leading to the mechanical design features, the thermochemical performance, the materials selection and the structural design analysis. 12 refs

  16. Properties of super alloys for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existing data on the properties at high temperature in helium gas of iron base super alloys. Incoloy-800, -802 and -807, nickel base super alloys, Hastelloy-X, Inconel-600, -617 and -625, and a casting alloy HK-40 were collectively evaluated from the viewpoint of the selection of material for HTGRs. These properties include corrosion resistance, strength and toughness, weldability, tube making, formability, radioactivation, etc. Creep strength was specially studied, taking into consideration the data on the creep characteristics in the actual helium gas atmosphere. The necessity of further long run creep data is suggested. Hastelloy-X has completely stable corrosion resistance at high temperature in helium gas. Incoloy 800 and 807 and Inconel 617 are not preferable in view of corrosion resistance. The creep strength of Inconel 617 extraporated to 1,000 deg C for 100,000 hours in air was the greatest rupture strength of 0.6 kg/mm2 in all above alloys. However, its strength in helium gas began to fall during a relatively short time, so that its creep strength must be re-evaluated in the use for long time. The radioactivation and separation of oxide film in primary construction materials came into question, Inconel 617 and Incoloy 807 showed high induced radioactivity intensity. Generally speaking, in case of nickel base alloys such as Hastelloy-X, oxide film is difficult to break away. (Iwakiri, K.)

  17. Fuel for high temperature gas-cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fuel for high temperature gas-cooled reactors is composed of heat resistant materials such as carbon, graphite and ceramics without using metals, therefore, the safety is very high, high burnup is easily attained, and it is economically attractive in view of the utilization of thorium. The fuel is basically the minute fuel spheres of smaller than 1 mm diameter with four layers of carbon and carbide ceramic coatings. The coating layers are innermost buffer pyrolytic carbon (PyC) layer, high density PyC layer, SiC layer and outermost high density PyC layer. The buffer PyC layer protects the outer high density PyC layer from the damage due to nuclear fission recoil, and becomes the space for FP gas and CO gas. The other layers hold FP, and the SiC layer maintains the strength of a whole coated particle. A coated particle is formed into pellet, compact or ball shape by being mixed with graphite powder and phenol resin or pitch binder. The coated particle can hold FP inside even at 2000 deg C in a short time. The trend of development of the fuel for high temperature gas-cooled reactors in various countries, the behavior of the fuel, the improvement of the fuel and the disposal of spent fuel is reported. (K.I.)

  18. High temperature reformation of aluminum and chlorine compounds behind the Mach disk of a solid-fuel rocket exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, C.

    1976-01-01

    Chemical reactions expected to occur among the constituents of solid-fuel rocket engine effluents in the hot region behind a Mach disk are analyzed theoretically. With the use of a rocket plume model that assumes the flow to be separated in the base region, and a chemical reaction scheme that includes evaporation of alumina and the associated reactions of 17 gas species, the reformation of the effluent is calculated. It is shown that AlClO and AlOH are produced in exchange for a corresponding reduction in the amounts of HCl and Al2O3. For the case of the space shuttle booster engines, up to 2% of the original mass of the rocket fuel can possibly be converted to these two new species and deposited in the atmosphere between the altitudes of 10 and 40 km. No adverse effects on the atmospheric environment are anticipated with the addition of these two new species.

  19. Experimental study of gas turbine combustion with elevated fuel temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiest, Heather K.

    Many thermal management challenges have developed as advancements in gas turbine engine designs are made. As the thermal demands on gas turbine engines continue to increase, the heat sink available in the combustor fuel flow becomes more attractive. Increasing the temperature of fuel by using it as a heat sink can lead to higher combustion efficiency due to the increase in flow enthalpy and improved vaporization of the heated fuel. Emissions levels can also be affected by using heated fuels with the levels of carbon monoxide and unburned hydrocarbons tending to decrease while the amount of the oxides of nitrogen tends to increase. Although there are several benefits associated with using heated fuels in gas turbine engines, some problems can arise from their use including combustion instabilities, flashing within the fuel injector, and fuel coking or deposit formation within the fuel system. Various deoxygenation methods have been created to address the coking problem seen when using heated fuels. In the Gas Turbine Test Cell of the High Pressure Laboratory at Purdue University's Maurice J. Zucrow Laboratories, a 5 MW combustion rig was developed to complete combustion test with heated fuels. The facility's supply systems including heated air, jet fuel, cooling water, and nitrogen were designed and integrated to produce simulated engine conditions within the combustion rig. Heating capabilities produced fuel temperatures ranging up to 600 deg F. Testing was completed with two fuel deoxygenation methods: nitrogen sparging and catalytic deoxygenation. Results from the testing campaign included conventional pressure, temperature, and fuel property measurements; however, the most important measurements were the emissions samples that were analyzed for each test condition. Levels of carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbons, and oxides of nitrogen were determined as well as the combustion efficiency calculated from these emissions measurements. The trends in emissions and performance from the increase in fuel temperature will be discussed. In addition, high frequency pressure data were recorded during testing to monitor combustion instabilities. Fuel samples were also taken and analyzed to document the changes in the volatile composition of the fuel from the two deoxygenation methods. The testing campaign was extremely successful. All project objectives were met with the heated fuel testing campaign. The combustion rig was run safely with fuel temperature up to 600 deg F, allowing the effects of elevated fuel temperatures on the performance and emissions of a gas turbine combustor to be evaluated as planned.

  20. Design and instrumentation of an automotive heat pump system using ambient air, engine coolant and exhaust gas as a heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because the amount of waste heat used for comfort heating of the passenger compartment in motor vehicles decreases continuously as a result of the increasing engine efficiencies originating from recent developments in internal combustion engine technology, it is estimated that heat requirement of the passenger compartment in vehicles using future generation diesel engines will not be met by the waste heat taken from the engine coolant. The automotive heat pump (AHP) system can heat the passenger compartment individually, or it can support the present heating system of the vehicle. The AHP system can also be employed in electric vehicles, which do not have waste heat, as well as vehicles driven by a fuel cell. The authors of this paper observed that such an AHP system using ambient air as a heat source could not meet the heat requirement of the compartment when ambient temperature was extremely low. The reason is the decrease in the amount of heat taken from the ambient air as a result of low evaporating temperatures. Furthermore, the moisture condensed from air freezed on the evaporator surface, thus blocking the air flow through it. This problem can be solved by using the heat of engine coolant or exhaust gases. In this case, the AHP system can have a higher heating capacity and reuse waste heat. (author)

  1. Automobile Exhaust Pollution and Purification Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Dawei

    2014-01-01

    As we all know, the automobile gas exhaust pollution has become more and more severe at recent years. It influences both to the human beings health and to quality of environment. The purpose of this thesis is to find out what are the main components of the exhaust gases, and give a basic and effective way to solve the problem. In this thesis, first the danger of exhaust pollution and its components will be presented. Then the writer will give the general mechanism of automobile exhaust ...

  2. Effect of nozzle hole size coupling with exhaust gas re-circulation on the engine emission perfomance based on KH-ACT spray model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Liang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available To research an effective measure of reducing the Soot and NOx in engine at the same time, different nozzle hole diameters coupled with exhaust gas recirculation (EGR were adopted in this study based on KH-ACT spray breakup model, which takes the aerodynamic-induced ,cavitation-induced and turbulence-induced breakup into account. The SAGE detailed chemistry combustion and the new atomization model used in the simulation have been verified with the experiment data from a YN4100QBZL engine. Different diesel nozzles was adopted in the study combined with different EGR rates ranging from 0% to 40%. The simulation results show that the NOx emission could be reduced effectively for both small(0.1mm and large(0.15mm diesel nozzle when increasing EGR ratio. The soot emission increases for the small nozzle hole size as the EGR increasing. However, when it comes to the large diesel nozzle, the emission increases slightly first and decrease quickly when the EGR rate above 20%.

  3. La catalyse d'épuration des gaz d'échappement automobiles. Situation actuelle et nouvelles orientations Catalytic Automotive Exhaust Gas Depollution. Present Status and New Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prigent M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cet article passe en revue les différents systèmes catalytiques de post-traitement utilisés actuellement sur la plupart des automobiles pour limiter leurs rejets de polluants. Les systèmes sont différenciés par leur mode de fonctionnement, le type de moteur à dépolluer (deux-temps, quatre-temps, diesel ou essence ou par leur mode de réalisation. Les nouvelles orientations, prévues pour respecter les futures réglementations antipollution, sont également décrites. On montre que certains véhicules prototypes, équipés de moteurs à combustion interne, sont capables d'avoir des émissions très proches de zéro tout comme les véhicules électriques. A review is made of the various types of exhaust gas aftertreatment systems presently used on most vehicles to reduce pollutant emissions. The systems are differentiated by their mode of action, according to the engine type to be depolluted (two-stroke, four-stroke, diesel or spark-ignition, and by their type of make-up. The major developments foreseen in the future, in view of compliance with the new legislations, are described. It is shown that some prototype vehicles with internal combustion engines are able to emit pollutant quantities really close to zero, such as electric cars.

  4. CO{sub 2}-fertilization via exhaust gas treatment of reciprocating gas engines: developments and experiences; Fertilisation au CO{sub 2} par traitement des gaz provenant de moteurs a gaz alternatifs: developpement et experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekker, M.; Hoving, K.; Klimstra, J.; Top, H. [N.V. Nederlandse Gasunie (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    The Dutch climate is such that greenhouses are used to produce vegetables, flowers and other plants. To heat the greenhouse, boilers and combined heat and power systems (CHP) are used. CHP has a better fuel utilisation than a boiler because of the simultaneously production of heat and power. In a greenhouse, CO{sub 2} has to be added to compensate the CO{sub 2} consumed by the plants to grow. Higher CO{sub 2} concentration than ambient are being used to increase plant growth and yield. The use of 'clean' flue gas from boilers was common practice but nowadays flue gas of engines can be used after cleaning. Exhaust gas cleaning systems (EGC) based on a Selective Reduction Catalyst and an Oxidation Catalyst make this possible. This paper describes the principle of these EGCs, gives insight into the important parameters which determine the required cleanliness and discusses the research results of Gasunie Research on this topic. It is found that different catalyst makes have their own specific behaviour depending on the monolith and active material and the how the catalyst is manufactured, mechanical mixed or impregnated. The use of CHP gives a high fuel utilisation and, in combination with EGC, increased crop yields. This results in an even more efficient use of the primary fuel, natural gas. (authors)

  5. Exhaust gas emissions from various automotive fuels for light-duty vehicles. Effects on health, environment and energy utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of the investigation has been to assess the effects on health and environment from various alternative fuels for light-duty vehicles. Effects that can be identified and quantified, such as acidification, ozone formation, cancer risk and climate change, have been of primary interest but other effects, such as respiratory diseases, have also been investigated. Data have been collected through literature surveys for subsequent calculation of the mentioned effects in different time-frames. Corrections have been used to take into consideration the influence of climate, ageing and driving pattern. Emissions generated in fuel production have also been accounted for. The most significant and important differences between the fuels have been found for effects as ozone formation cancer risk and particulate emissions. Alternative fuels, such as methanol and methane (natural gas and biogas), significantly decrease the ozone formation in comparison to petrol, while ethanol, methanol and methane are advantageous concerning cancer risk. The particulate emissions are considerably higher for diesel engines fuelled by diesel oil and RME in comparison to the other fuels. In the future, the importance of acid emissions in the fuel production will increase since the NOx and SOx emissions will decrease from the vehicles. The emissions of climate gases could be significantly reduced by using non-fossil fuels but the efficiency of the drive train is also of importance. The technical development potential for further emission reductions is considerable for all fuels but the advantage for the best fuel options will remain in the future

  6. Chemical analysis and ozone formation potential of exhaust from dual-fuel (liquefied petroleum gas/gasoline) light duty vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, T. W.; Astorga, C.; Clairotte, M.; Duane, M.; Elsasser, M.; Krasenbrink, A.; Larsen, B. R.; Manfredi, U.; Martini, G.; Montero, L.; Sklorz, M.; Zimmermann, R.; Perujo, A.

    2011-06-01

    Measures must be undertaken to lower the transport sector's contribution to anthropogenic emissions. Vehicles powered by liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are an option due to their reduced emissions of air pollutants compared to engines with conventional fuels. In the present study, ten different dual-fuel LPG/gasoline light duty vehicles were tested, which all complied with European emission level legislation EURO-4. Tests with LPG and gasoline were performed on a chassis dynamometer by applying the New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) and emission factors and ozone formation potentials of both kinds of fuels were compared. The components investigated comprised regulated compounds, CO 2, volatile hydrocarbons and carbonyls. On-line analysis of aromatic species was carried out by resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (REMPI-TOFMS). We demonstrate that utilization of LPG can entail some environmental benefits by reducing emissions. However, for dual-fuel LPG/gasoline vehicles running on LPG the benefits are less than expected. The main reason is that dual-fuel vehicles usually start the engine up on gasoline even when LPG is selected as fuel. This cold-start phase is crucial for the quality of the emissions. Moreover, we demonstrate an influence on the chemical composition of emissions of vehicle performance, fuel and the evaporative emission system of the vehicles.

  7. Optimum Reactor Outlet Temperatures for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Integrated with Industrial Processes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the results of a temperature sensitivity study conducted to identify the optimum reactor operating temperatures for producing the heat and hydrogen required for industrial processes associated with the proposed new high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This study assumed that primary steam outputs of the reactor were delivered at 17 MPa and 540 C and the helium coolant was delivered at 7 MPa at 625-925 C. The secondary outputs of were electricity and hydrogen. For the power generation analysis, it was assumed that the power cycle efficiency was 66% of the maximum theoretical efficiency of the Carnot thermodynamic cycle. Hydrogen was generated via the high temperature steam electrolysis or the steam methane reforming process. The study indicates that optimum or a range of reactor outlet temperatures could be identified to further refine the process evaluations that were developed for high temperature gas-cooled reactor-integrated production of synthetic transportation fuels, ammonia, and ammonia derivatives, oil from unconventional sources, and substitute natural gas from coal.

  8. Feasibility study on different gas turbine cycles for high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is growing global interest in modular High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR), due to its attractive features of enhanced safety. Meanwhile, the gas turbine cycle (Brayton cycle) appears to be the best near-term power conversion method for maximizing the economic potential of modular HTGR. Therefore the modular HTGR coupled with the gas turbine cycle is considered as one of the leading candidate concepts for future nuclear power deployment. In this paper, several typical gas turbine cycles for modular HTGRs are investigated theoretically, including close direct cycle (using helium as the working fluid), closed indirect cycle (using helium or nitrogen) and open indirect cycle (using air). Key factors affecting the efficiency of a cycle include the turbine inlet temperature, compressor and turbine adiabatic efficiencies, recuperator effectiveness and cycle fractional pressure loss. These parameters and their effects on the cycle performance are examined in detail. Each cycle is analyzed and optimized from the thermodynamic point of view and its turbocompressor, one of the most important components for the cycle, is aerodynamically designed. As a result, the closed direct cycle using helium as the working fluid is an ideal cycle for the modular HTGR gas turbine cycle; however it is not easy to be realized based on current technology. And the closed indirect cycle using helium or nitrogen is a practical one now; it can realize the gas turbine cycle method and make the technical bases for the future direct cycle. (author)

  9. Utilizing the response patterns of a temperature modulated chemoresistive gas sensor for gas diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The observed features in the temporal response patterns of a temperature-modulated chemoresistive gas sensor were used for gas diagnosis. The patterns were recorded for clean air and air contaminated with different levels of some volatile organic compounds while a staircase heating voltage waveform had been applied to the microheater of a tin oxide gas sensor that modulated its operating temperature. Combining the steady-state and transient parameters of the recorded responses in the 50-400 deg. C range resulted in discriminatory feature vectors which were utilized for contaminant classification. The information content of these feature vectors was proved sufficient for discrimination of methanol, ethanol, 1-butanol, and acetone contaminations in a wide concentration range.

  10. Corrosion of Alloy 617 in high-temperature gas environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, Tsung-Kuang [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chang, Hao-Ping [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Wang, Mei-Ya, E-mail: meywang@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Nuclear Science and Technology Development Center, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Yuan, Trai [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Kai, Ji-Jung [Institute of Nuclear Engineering and Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Department of Engineering and System Science, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-01

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with helium gas as the primary coolant have been considered as one type of the Generation IV nuclear power reactor systems. Several nickel-based superalloys, including Alloy 617, are potential structural materials to serve as pressure boundary components, such as the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) in an HTGR. Impurities in a helium coolant, such as H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}, can interact with structural materials at working temperatures of >900 C, leading to serious degradation on these materials. In addition, defects in IHX surface coatings would allow these species to reach and interact with the external surfaces of these components, leading to similar or even more serious degradation. In this study we investigated the oxidation behavior of Alloy 617 in high-temperature, gaseous environments with various levels of O{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O. A series of general corrosion tests were conducted at test temperatures of 650 C, 750 C, 850 C and 950 C under various coolant compositions of dry air, 1% O{sub 2}, 10% relative humidity (RH), and 50% RH. Preliminary results showed that the surface morphologies of the Alloy 617 samples exhibited distinct evidence of intergranular corrosion. Compact chromium oxide layers were observed on the sample surfaces. The oxidation mechanisms of this alloy in the designated environments are discussed.

  11. Corrosion of Alloy 617 in high-temperature gas environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) with helium gas as the primary coolant have been considered as one type of the Generation IV nuclear power reactor systems. Several nickel-based superalloys, including Alloy 617, are potential structural materials to serve as pressure boundary components, such as the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) in an HTGR. Impurities in a helium coolant, such as H2O and O2, can interact with structural materials at working temperatures of >900 °C, leading to serious degradation on these materials. In addition, defects in IHX surface coatings would allow these species to reach and interact with the external surfaces of these components, leading to similar or even more serious degradation. In this study we investigated the oxidation behavior of Alloy 617 in high-temperature, gaseous environments with various levels of O2 and H2O. A series of general corrosion tests were conducted at test temperatures of 650 °C, 750 °C, 850 °C and 950 °C under various coolant compositions of dry air, 1% O2, 10% relative humidity (RH), and 50% RH. Preliminary results showed that the surface morphologies of the Alloy 617 samples exhibited distinct evidence of intergranular corrosion. Compact chromium oxide layers were observed on the sample surfaces. The oxidation mechanisms of this alloy in the designated environments are discussed

  12. Combustion Noise and Pollutants Prediction for Injection Pattern and Exhaust Gas Recirculation Tuning in an Automotive Common-Rail Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsie Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, emissions standards for internal combustion engines are becoming more and more restrictive, particularly for NOx and soot emissions from Diesel engines. In order to comply with these requirements, OEMs have to face with innovative combustion concepts and/or sophisticate after-treatment devices. In both cases, the role of the Engine Management System (EMS is increasingly essential, following the large number of actuators and sensors introduced and the need to meet customer expectations on performance and comfort. On the other hand, the large number of control variables to be tuned imposes a massive recourse to the experimental testing which is poorly sustainable in terms of time and money. In order to reduce the experimental effort and the time to market, the application of simulation models for EMS calibration has become fundamental. Predictive models, validated against a limited amount of experimental data, allow performing detailed analysis on the influence of engine control variables on pollutants, comfort and performance. In this paper, a simulation analysis on the impact of injection pattern and Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR rate on fuel consumption, combustion noise, NO and soot emissions is presented for an automotive Common-Rail Diesel engine. Simulations are accomplished by means of a quasi-dimensional multi-zone model of in-cylinder processes. Furthermore a methodology for in-cylinder pressure processing is presented to estimate combustion noise contribution to radiated noise. Model validation is carried out by comparing simulated in-cylinder pressure traces and exhaust emissions with experimental data measured at the test bench in steady-state conditions. Effects of control variables on engine performance, noise and pollutants are analyzed by imposing significant deviation of EGR rate and injection pattern (i.e. rail pressure, start-of-injection, number of injections. The results evidence that quasi-dimensional in-cylinder models can be effective in supporting the engine control design toward the optimal tuning of EMS with significant saving of time and money.

  13. Simulation and experimental study on thermal optimization of the heat exchanger for automotive exhaust-based thermoelectric generators

    OpenAIRE

    C.Q. Su; Wang, W. S.; Liu, X; Y.D. Deng

    2014-01-01

    Thermoelectric technology has revealed the potential for automotive exhaust-based thermoelectric generator (TEG), which contributes to the improvement of the fuel economy of the engine-powered vehicle. As a major factor, thermal capacity and heat transfer of the heat exchanger affect the performance of TEG effectively. With the thermal energy of exhaust gas harvested by thermoelectric modules, a temperature gradient appears on the heat exchanger surface, so as the interior flow distribution o...

  14. Design of indirect gas turbine cycle for a modular high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a design of the indirect gas turbine cycle for the 200MWt pebble bed MHTGR. In the design, the helium out of the Intermediate Heat eXchanger (IHX) is extracted to a small RPV cooling system. The gas flows through a small RPV recuperator and is cooled down, then it is used to cool the RPV. The whole primary circuit is integrated in a pressure vessel. The core inlet/outlet temperatures are 550 deg. C/900 deg. C, which can supply a gas heat source of 500 deg. C/850 deg. C in the secondary side. The heat source could be used to drive a nitrogen gas turbine cycle and a plant busbar electricity generation efficiency of about 48% is estimated. The thermodynamic calculation, preliminary design of the system components, and the important accident analysis are described in this paper. (author). 5 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  15. Monitoring temperature for gas turbine blade: correction of reflection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi; Xiao, Yihan; Daniel, Ketui

    2015-06-01

    For a gas turbine blade working in a narrow space, the accuracy of blade temperature measurements is greatly impacted by environmental irradiation. A reflection model is established by using discrete irregular surfaces to calculate the angle factor between the blade surface and the hot adjacent parts. The model is based on the rotational angles and positions of the blades, and can correct for measurement error caused by background radiation when the blade is located at different rotational positions. This method reduces the impact of reflected radiation on the basis of the turbine's known geometry and the physical properties of the material. The experimental results show that when the blade temperature is 911.2±5 K and the vane temperature ranges from 1011.3 to 1065.8 K, the error decreases from 4.21 to 0.75%.

  16. High-Temperature Gas Sensor Array (Electronic Nose) Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to measure emissions from aeronautic engines and in commercial applications such as automotive emission control and chemical process monitoring is a necessary first step if one is going to actively control those emissions. One single sensor will not give all the information necessary to determine the chemical composition of a high-temperature, harsh environment. Rather, an array of gas sensor arrays--in effect, a high-temperature electronic "nose"--is necessary to characterize the chemical constituents of a diverse, high-temperature environment, such as an emissions stream. The signals produced by this nose could be analyzed to determine the constituents of the emission stream. Although commercial electronic noses for near-room temperature applications exist, they often depend significantly on lower temperature materials or only one sensor type. A separate development effort necessary for a high-temperature electronic nose is being undertaken by the NASA Glenn Research Center, Case Western Reserve University, Ohio State University, and Makel Engineering, Inc. The sensors are specially designed for hightemperature environments. A first-generation high-temperature electronic nose has been demonstrated on a modified automotive engine. This nose sensor array was composed of sensors designed for hightemperature environments fabricated using microelectromechanical-systems- (MEMS-) based technology. The array included a tin-oxide-based sensor doped for nitrogen oxide (NOx) sensitivity, a SiC-based hydrocarbon (CxHy) sensor, and an oxygen sensor (O2). These sensors operate on different principles--resistor, diode, and electrochemical cell, respectively--and each sensor has very different responses to the individual gases in the environment. A picture showing the sensor head for the array is shown in the photograph on the left and the sensors installed in the engine are shown in the photograph on the right. Electronics are interfaced with the sensors for temperature control and signal conditioning, and packaging designed for high temperatures is necessary for the array to survive the engine environment.

  17. Circum-Protostellar Environments. III. Gas Densities and Kinetic Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriarty-Schieven, G. H.; Wannier, P. G.; Mangum, J. G.; Tamura, M.; Olmsted, V. K.

    1995-12-01

    We have surveyed a complete, flux-limited, IRAS-selected sample of protostars in Taurus whose infrared through millimeter-wave properties indicate them to be younger than T Tauri stars. We have observed CS J = 3-2, 5-4, and 7-6, and H2CO JK-1K+1 = 303-202 and 322-221, toward the central positions of all 25 objects. CS traces the dense gas in the circumstellar envelope, while H2CO probes the kinetic temperature of the dense gas. Only three of the sources were detected in both transitions of H2CO, making it of limited use as a temperature probe of these objects. Combining the CS- and H2CO-derived properties with those previously derived from dust continuum emission, we have placed limits on the temperatures of the envelopes, typically 20 K ? TK ? 50 K. Derived envelope gas densities and CS column densities were typically a few 106 cm-3 and a few 1012 cm-2, respectively. Where CS 5-4 was detected (roughly half of the observed sources), the derived envelope masses were consistent with those derived from dust emission (assuming a CS/H2 abundance of 10-8). Since most of the embedded (i.e., not optically visible) sources were detected in CS 5-4, and most of the visible sources were not, this may mean either that the CS-emitting envelope has dissipated in the more evolved objects (confirming Ohashi et al. 1991), or CS has become depleted. L1551NE may have an asymmetric, double-peaked line profile like that of B335, suggestive of a collapsing envelope. L1551NE may be in transition from the much younger "class 0" protostar stage to the somewhat more evolved "class I" protostar stage. Several of the sources have broad CS line wings probably originating from dense gas in a molecular outflow. In at least one case, the kinetic temperature of the outflowing gas may be greater than that in the envelope.

  18. The effects of strong temperature anisotropy on the kinetic structure of collisionless slow shocks and reconnection exhausts. Part II: Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Yi-Hsin; Swisdak, Marc

    2011-01-01

    Simulations of collisionless oblique propagating slow shocks have revealed the existence of a transition associated with a critical temperature anisotropy epsilon=1-mu_0(P_parallel-P_perpendicular)/ B^2 = 0.25 (Liu, Drake and Swisdak (2011)). An explanation for this phenomenon is proposed here based on anisotropic fluid theory, in particular the Anisotropic Derivative Nonlinear-Schrodinger-Burgers equation, with an intuitive model of the energy closure for the downstream counter-streaming ions. The anisotropy value of 0.25 is significant because it is closely related to the degeneracy point of the slow and intermediate modes, and corresponds to the lower bound of the coplanar to non-coplanar transition that occurs inside a compound slow shock (SS)/rotational discontinuity (RD) wave. This work implies that it is a pair of compound SS/RD waves that bound the outflows in magnetic reconnection, instead of a pair of switch-off slow shocks as in Petschek's model. This fact might explain the rareness of in-situ obse...

  19. Development of Fuel Temperature Calculation File for High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Japan Atomic Energy Agency has performed the conceptual designs of small-sized High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) systems, aiming for the deployment of the systems to overseas such as developing countries. The small-sized HTGR systems can provide power generation by steam turbine, high temperature steam for industry process and/or low temperature steam for district heating. In the core thermal and hydraulic designs of HTGRs, it is important to evaluate the maximum fuel temperature so that the thermal integrity of the fuel is ensured. In order to calculate and evaluate the fuel temperature on personal computers (PCs) in a convenient manner, the calculation file based on the Microsoft Excel were developed. In this report, the basic equations used in the calculation file, the calculation method and procedure, and the results of the validation calculation are described. (author)

  20. New high temperature gas flow cell developed at ISIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A flow-through quartz gas cell, together with a gas flow control and monitoring system, has been designed and constructed at ISIS. This equipment allows neutron powder diffraction data to be collected on samples at temperatures up to around 1300 K when exposed to user chosen mixtures of O2, Ar, CO2, and CO. By exploiting the sensitivity of neutrons to the presence of light atoms such as oxygen, it is possible to probe the crystal structure of oxide materials as a function of oxygen partial pressures down to log10p(O2) of about -20. The resultant structural information can then be correlated with the bulk properties of the materials, whose research and technological interests lie in fields such as energy production, storage materials, catalysis, and earth science.

  1. High temperature friction and seizure in gas cooled nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most delicate problems encountered in the gas cooled nuclear reactors is the friction without lubrication in a dry and hot (8000C /14720F) helium atmosphere even at very small velocity. The research and development programs are described together with special tribometers that operate at mode than 10000C (18320F) in dry helium. The most interesting test conditions and results are given for gas nitrited steels and for strongly alloyed Ni-Cr steels coated with chromium carbide by plasma sprayed. The effects of parameters live velocity, travelled distance, contact pressure, roughness, temperature and prolonged stops under charge are described together with the effects of negative phenomena like attachment and chattering

  2. Gas sensing properties of nanocrystalline diamond at room temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Davydova

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes an integrated NH3 sensor based on a hydrogenated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD-sensitive layer coated on an interdigitated electrode structure. The gas sensing properties of the sensor structure were examined using a reducing gas (NH3 at room temperature and were found to be dependent on the electrode arrangement. A pronounced response of the sensor, which was comprised of dense electrode arrays (of 50 m separation distance, was observed. The sensor functionality was explained by the surface transfer doping effect. Moreover, the three-dimensional model of the current density distribution of the hydrogenated NCD describes the transient flow of electrons between interdigitated electrodes and the hydrogenated NCD surface, that is, the formation of a closed current loop.

  3. Gas sensing properties of nanocrystalline diamond at room temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davydova, Marina; Kulha, Pavel; Laposa, Alexandr; Hruska, Karel; Demo, Pavel; Kromka, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This study describes an integrated NH3 sensor based on a hydrogenated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD)-sensitive layer coated on an interdigitated electrode structure. The gas sensing properties of the sensor structure were examined using a reducing gas (NH3) at room temperature and were found to be dependent on the electrode arrangement. A pronounced response of the sensor, which was comprised of dense electrode arrays (of 50 m separation distance), was observed. The sensor functionality was explained by the surface transfer doping effect. Moreover, the three-dimensional model of the current density distribution of the hydrogenated NCD describes the transient flow of electrons between interdigitated electrodes and the hydrogenated NCD surface, that is, the formation of a closed current loop. PMID:25551062

  4. Startup analysis for a high temperature gas loaded heat pipe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sockol, P. M.

    1973-01-01

    A model for the rapid startup of a high-temperature gas-loaded heat pipe is presented. A two-dimensional diffusion analysis is used to determine the rate of energy transport by the vapor between the hot and cold zones of the pipe. The vapor transport rate is then incorporated in a simple thermal model of the startup of a radiation-cooled heat pipe. Numerical results for an argon-lithium system show that radial diffusion to the cold wall can produce large vapor flow rates during a rapid startup. The results also show that startup is not initiated until the vapor pressure p sub v in the hot zone reaches a precise value proportional to the initial gas pressure p sub i. Through proper choice of p sub i, startup can be delayed until p sub v is large enough to support a heat-transfer rate sufficient to overcome a thermal load on the heat pipe.

  5. Temperature programmed desorption of a binary gas mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuniga-Hansen, Nayeli; Calbi, M. Mercedes

    2014-03-01

    Temperature programmed desorption (TPD) is an experimental technique that is widely used to determine the adsorption properties of a surface. Many existing theoretical studies have focused on the desorption of a single gas species, but the desorption of binary mixtures is a subject that has been relatively less explored. We perform computer simulations of the thermal desorption of binary gas mixtures using a kinetic Monte Carlo scheme. We start with a simple structure formed by a single line of adsorption sites and two species of adsorbates which bind to the surface with different energies. By varying the initial surface coverage, the particle-particle interactions and the concentration of the different adsorbates, we study the kinetics of desorption of the mixture and compare our results to available experimental data.

  6. The effect of high temperatures on tropical forest gas exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, C. E.; Goulden, M.; Miller, S.; Da Rocha, H.

    2006-12-01

    Further research is required to understand the sensitivity of tropical forest to climate warming. Previous research has shown that tropical forest photosynthesis decreases and respiration increases at high leaf temperatures and that tree growth is reduced in years with higher average air temperatures (Clark et al 2003). Models indicate that the climate related destruction of the Amazon forest will amplify global warming by 1.5¢ª C, resulting in a mean temperature increase of 5.5¢ª C, as compared with 4¢ª C without this carbon cycle feedback (Cox et al 2000). These studies demonstrate the importance of temperature on tropical forest gas exchange. At the LBA Tapajos km 83 site we determined what controls tropical leaf temperature and how temperature affects photosynthesis and respiration. Sunlit leaves were substantially warmer than air temperatures and this had a negative effect on photosynthesis and stomatal conductance. We used eddy flux data to compare intervals of 10 minute cloudy periods followed by 20 minute sunny periods to see if similar trends could be seen at both the leaf and canopy level. The longer the sunny interval the warmer the canopy became and canopy conductance and CO2 exchange declined correspondingly. As the canopy warmed u* increased which increased turbulence and kept the canopy temperature from rising more. Long light intervals can cause heat stress in tropical forests but due to the very cloudy nature of the tropics such intervals are rare. However, if the tropics become both warmer and less cloudy such heat stress will increase.

  7. Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Modular High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (MHTGR) is an advanced power plant concept which has been under development since 1984. The design utilizes basic high temperature gas-cooled reactor features of refractory coated fuel, helium coolant and a graphite moderator which are supported by design studies and experience of over 30 years. The design is being developed based on selections made in response to well defined requirements for safe, reliable and economic power. The geometric arrangement of the reactor and steam generator vessels, the core and the heat removal components has been selected to exploit the inherent characteristics associated with high-temperature materials. The design utilizes passively safe features which provide a higher margin of safety and investment protection than current generation reactors. Design features include an arrangement of four identical 350 MW(t) modular reactor units located in underground silos covered by a single reactor building. This Nuclear Island (NI) with the reactors and associated equipment is coupled to an Energy Conversion Area (ECA) with two turbine generators producing a combined total of approximately 540 MW(e). Nuclear heat is normally removed by a steam generation system featuring a once-through design. A shutdown cooling system utilizing water and a reactor cavity cooling system utilizing air driven by natural convection provide alternate heat removal paths. The design and development program, now in the preliminary design stage, is a cooperative effort by the U.S. government, the utilities and the nuclear industry. (author)

  8. Brayton Cycle for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes research on improving the Brayton cycle efficiency for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). In this study, we are investigating the efficiency of an indirect helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion side of an HTGR power plant. A reference case based on a 250-MW(thermal) pebble bed HTGR was developed using helium gas as a working fluid in both the primary and power conversion sides. The commercial computer code HYSYS was used for process optimization. A numerical model using the Visual-Basic (V-B) computer language was also developed to assist in the evaluation of the Brayton cycle efficiency. Results from both the HYSYS simulation and the V-B model were compared with Japanese calculations based on the 300-MW(electric) Gas Turbine High-Temperature Reactor (GTHTR) that was developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. After benchmarking our models, parametric investigations were performed to see the effect of important parameters on the cycle efficiency. We also investigated single-shaft versus multiple-shaft arrangements for the turbomachinery. The results from this study are applicable to other reactor concepts such as fast gas-cooled reactors, supercritical water reactors, and others. The ultimate goal of this study is to use other fluids such as supercritical carbon dioxide for the HTGR power conversion loop in order to improve the cycle efficiency over that of the helium Brayton cycle. This study is in progress, and the results will be published in a subsequent paper

  9. Brayton Cycle for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes research on improving the Brayton cycle efficiency for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). In this study, we are investigating the efficiency of an indirect helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion side of an HTGR power plant. A reference case based on a 250-MW(thermal) pebble bed HTGR was developed using helium gas as a working fluid in both the primary and power conversion sides. The commercial computer code HYSYS was used for process optimization. A numerical model using the Visual-Basic (V-B) computer language was also developed to assist in the evaluation of the Brayton cycle efficiency. Results from both the HYSYS simulation and the V-B model were compared with Japanese calculations based on the 300-MW(electric) Gas Turbine High-Temperature Reactor (GTHTR) that was developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. After benchmarking our models, parametric investigations were performed to see the effect of important parameters on the cycle efficiency. We also investigated single-shaft versus multiple-shaft arrangements for the turbomachinery. The results from this study are applicable to other reactor concepts such as fast gas-cooled reactors, supercritical water reactors, and others.The ultimate goal of this study is to use other fluids such as supercritical carbon dioxide for the HTGR power conversion loop in order to improve the cycle efficiency over that of the helium Brayton cycle. This study is in progress, and the results will be published in a subsequent paper

  10. Roles of catalytic oxidation in control of vehicle exhaust emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic oxidation was initially associated with the early development of catalysis and it subsequently became a part of many industrial processes, so it is not surprising it was used to remove hydrocarbons and CO when it became necessary to control these emissions from cars. Later NOx was reduced in a process involving reduction over a Pt/Rh catalyst followed by air injection in front of a Pt-based oxidation catalyst. If over-reduction of NO to NH3 took place, or if H2S was produced, it was important these undesirable species were converted to NOx and SOx in the catalytic oxidation stage. When exhaust gas composition could be kept stoichiometric hydrocarbons, CO and NOx were simultaneously converted over a single Pt/Rh three-way catalyst (TWC). With modern TWCs car tailpipe emissions can be exceptionally low. NO is not catalytically dissociated to O2 and N2 in the presence of O2, it can only be reduced to N2. Its control from lean-burn gasoline engines involves catalytic oxidation to NO2 and thence nitrate that is stored and periodically reduced to N2 by exhaust gas enrichment. This method is being modified for diesel engines. These engines produce soot, and filtration is being introduced to remove it. The exhaust temperature of heavy-duty diesels is sufficient (250-400oC) for NO to be catalytically oxidised to NO2 over an upstream platinum catalyst that smoothly oxidises soot in the filter. The exhaust gas temperature of passenger car diesels is too low for this to take place all of the time, so trapped soot is periodically burnt in O2 above 550oC. Catalytic oxidation of higher than normal amounts of hydrocarbon and CO over an upstream catalyst is used to give sufficient temperature for soot combustion with O2 to take place. (author)

  11. A highly efficient six-stroke internal combustion engine cycle with water injection for in-cylinder exhaust heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept adding two strokes to the Otto or Diesel engine cycle to increase fuel efficiency is presented here. It can be thought of as a four-stroke Otto or Diesel cycle followed by a two-stroke heat recovery steam cycle. A partial exhaust event coupled with water injection adds an additional power stroke. Waste heat from two sources is effectively converted into usable work: engine coolant and exhaust gas. An ideal thermodynamics model of the exhaust gas compression, water injection and expansion was used to investigate this modification. By changing the exhaust valve closing timing during the exhaust stroke, the optimum amount of exhaust can be recompressed, maximizing the net mean effective pressure of the steam expansion stroke (MEPsteam). The valve closing timing for maximum MEPsteam is limited by either 1 bar or the dew point temperature of the expansion gas/moisture mixture when the exhaust valve opens. The range of MEPsteam calculated for the geometry of a conventional gasoline engine and is from 0.75 to 2.5 bars. Typical combustion mean effective pressures (MEPcombustion) of naturally aspirated gasoline engines are up to 10 bar, thus this concept has the potential to significantly increase the engine efficiency and fuel economy.

  12. Thorium fueled high temperature gas cooled reactors. An assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of thorium as a fertile fuel for the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR) instead of uranium has been reviewed. It has been concluded that the use of thorium might be beneficial to reduce the actinide waste production. To achieve a real advancement, the uranium of the spent fuel has to be recycled and the requested make-up fissile material for the fresh fuel has to be used in the form of highly-enriched uranium. A self-sustaining fuel cycle may be possible in the HTR of large core size, but this could reduce the inherent safety features of the design. (orig.)

  13. Gas-cooled high temperature reactor with bottom shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas-cooled high temperature reactor with a ground plate which is arranged horizontally below the reactor core and above the bottom of the prestressed concrete vessel and which serves as bottom shield. The bottom shield consists of at least two coaxial plates, one on top of the other, which consist of several parts that are partly connected to one another. The lower plate is axially or vertically spaced to the ground liner of the prestressed concrete vessel as well as to the upper plate. (orig.)

  14. Neutralino Annihilations and the Gas Temperature in the Dark Ages

    OpenAIRE

    Myers, Zac; Nusser, Adi

    2007-01-01

    Assuming the dark matter is made entirely from neutralinos, we re-visit the role of their annihilation on the temperature of diffuse gas in the high redshift universe. We consider neutralinos of particle mass 36 GeV and 100 GeV, respectively. The former is able to produce ~7 electron/positron particles per annihilation through the fremionic channel, and the latter ~53 particles assuming a purely bosonic channel. High energy electron/positron particles up-scatter the Cosmic Microwave Backgroun...

  15. Commercial-vehicle engines and exhaust-gas aftertreatment in the conflict between customer benefits and emission legislation; Nutzfahrzeugmotoren und Abgasnachbehandlung im Zielkonflikt zwischen Kundennutzen und Emissionsgesetzgebung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laemmermann, R.; Held, W. [MAN Nutzfahrzeuge Gruppe, Geschaeftseinheit Motoren, Nuernberg (Germany)

    2006-07-01

    From October 2006 onwards all commercial vehicles > 7.5 t newly registered in Europe must comply with the Euro 4 emission limits. At the same time vehicles > 12 t which already comply with the next emission step (Euro 5) can in Germany expect to qualify for a discount of 2 ct/km on the motorway toll. These incentives can also be expected to apply at the introduction of the next emission limit step in 2009, provided that premature compliance with the Euro 6 limits is guaranteed. Both the Euro 6 emission limits themselves and the testing procedures have, however, not yet been agreed in Europe. In USA the EPA has decided on very low limits for 2007, and these will, with regard to NOx emissions, be made even stricter in 2010. Despite the reduction in NO{sub x} emissions it will be very important to ensure minimum fuel consumption. Higher consumption, which is normally a consequence of any reduction in NOx emissions, results in higher CO{sub 2} emission, but also means higher costs for hauliers. In future, therefore, everything possible must be done to keep the level of CO{sub 2} emission, which is not subject to limitation, as low as possible. The commercial-vehicle industry is currently making great efforts to develop suitable technical solutions in the shortest possible time. The following paper describes the changes in emission limits and emission cycles currently under discussion. It also explains the very elaborate technical measures necessary for complying with the future statutory regulations on emissions from commercial vehicles. Only with a clever combination of internal modifications to the engine which reduce the emissions and suitable but expensive exhaust-gas aftertreatment systems will it be possible to provide environmentally compatible and economical commercial vehicles for the still rising volume of road goods transport. (orig.)

  16. Extraction of Mg(OH)2 from Mg silicate minerals with NaOH assisted with H2O: implications for CO2 capture from exhaust flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Silvia; Priestnall, Michael; Godoy, Erik; Kumar, R Vasant; Raymahasay, Sugat; Evans, Michael; Wang, Ruofan; Manenye, Seabelo; Kinoshita, Hajime

    2015-01-01

    The utilisation of Mg(OH)2 to capture exhaust CO2 has been hindered by the limited availability of brucite, the Mg(OH)2 mineral in natural deposits. Our previous study demonstrated that Mg(OH)2 can be obtained from dunite, an ultramafic rock composed of Mg silicate minerals, in highly concentrated NaOH aqueous systems. However, the large quantity of NaOH consumed was considered an obstacle for the implementation of the technology. In the present study, Mg(OH)2 was extracted from dunite reacted in solid systems with NaOH assisted with H2O. The consumption of NaOH was reduced by 97% with respect to the NaOH aqueous systems, maintaining a comparable yield of Mg(OH)2 extraction, i.e. 64.8-66%. The capture of CO2 from a CO2-N2 gas mixture was tested at ambient conditions using a Mg(OH)2 aqueous slurry. Mg(OH)2 almost fully dissolved and reacted with dissolved CO2 by forming Mg(HCO3)2 which remained in equilibrium storing the CO2 in the aqueous solution. The CO2 balance of the process was assessed from the emissions derived from the power consumption for NaOH production and Mg(OH)2 extraction together with the CO2 captured by Mg(OH)2 derived from dunite. The process resulted as carbon neutral when dunite is reacted at 250 °C for durations of 1 and 3 hours and CO2 is captured as Mg(HCO3)2. PMID:26391815

  17. Fort St. Vrain high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction, testing, and preliminary operating experience of the Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station are described. This station utilizes the advanced high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) concept and is the first nuclear reactor system in the United States to use a prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV). Helium is used as the primary coolant, and a nitrogen system provides refrigeration for the low temperature equipment of the helium purification system and for the moisture monitors in the primary coolant system. Design, construction and testing to date at this station have made a significant contribution to the HTGR concept for central station electric generating plants to supply the increasing demands for electrical energy. (U.S.)

  18. Fission gas release from uranium dioxide in high temperature transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiments described in this thesis investigate the kinetics and mechanisms for release of inert fission gases from irradiated fuel (uranium dioxide) during temperature transients, occuring in AGR type and PWR type reactors. A description is given of the fundamental physical properties of uranium dioxide with particular emphasis placed on the effects of irradiation damage and the build-up of fission product concentrations. A brief review is given of the principle mechanisms by which gases are thought to be released, covering both thermal and irradiation induced processes. The main design features of the Civil Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (CAGR) and Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) systems, concentrating on the specifications and normal operating conditions of the uranium dioxide fuel. This is followed by a brief description of the conditions anticipated during postulated reactor malfunctions. Two classes of fault are considered, in which the fuel temperature increases through loss of coolant efficiency or a rise in heat generation rate. (author)

  19. Power Conversion Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh; Richard Moore; Robert Barner

    2005-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating a Brayton cycle efficiency improvement on a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of Generation-IV nuclear engineering research initiative. There are some technical issues to be resolved before the selection of the final design of the high temperature gascooled reactor, called as a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is supposed to be built at the INEEL by year 2017. The technical issues are the selection of the working fluid, direct vs. indirect cycle, power cycle type, the optimized design in terms of a number of intercoolers, and others. In this paper, we investigated a number of working fluids for the power conversion loop, direct versus indirect cycle, the effect of intercoolers, and other thermal hydraulics issues. However, in this paper, we present part of the results we have obtained. HYSYS computer code was used along with a computer model developed using Visual Basic computer language.

  20. High temperature phase equilibria in a solar-composition gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using recent additions to thermochemical data on minerals and information on their solid solution behavior, new equilibrium phase diagrams have been computed in a system of solar gas composition (Si, Al, Mg, Ca, Fe, Ni, Ti, Na, K, C, H, O, S, N) in the pressure and temperature ranges of 1 to 10-6 bar and 1153 to 1773 K respectively. These calculations show that Fe-Ni alloy condenses before all silicates included here (except melilite) down to a pressure of 2 x 10-4 bar below which plagioclase and clinopyroxene condense first. Orthopyroxene condenses next followed by ilmenite. Pressure-temperature variation of the chemical composition of melilite, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, metal alloy and plagioclase may be used for cosmothermometry and cosmobarometry for equilibrium assemblages. The major transition from the refractory oxides and melilite (the meteorite 'inclusion assemblage') to an assemblage of Fe-Ni alloy, olivine, plagioclase and pyroxenes ('planet-forming') takes place within a narrow interval of pressure and temperature. Small fluctuations of either pressure or temperature across this narrow region result in drastic changes in types and modes of minerals, which may explain the wide mineralogical varieties of meteorites. (author)

  1. Radioactivity evaluation code system for high temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A code system for the evaluation of the behavior of radioactive fission products (FP) in high temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) is described. The first half of this report is devoted to the description of the conceivable behavior of FPs in the experimental very high temperature gas-cooled reactor being designed at JAERI. The transfer of FPs from the fuel to the primary coolant is considered in three steps; the release of FPs from the coated fuel particles; the diffusion of FPs within graphite sleeves; and the transfer of FPs from the sleeve surface to the coolant. As for the FP behavior within the primary coolant system, the deposition of FPs on various walls of the system is considered. As for the secondary and the thermal utilization systems, the transfer of tritium is specially considered. The calculation model for the transfer and deposition of fission products within the whole plant system is presented by a chart. The second half of this report describes the evaluation code system. The physical and mathematical models treated in each component code are presented and discussed. (Aoki, K.)

  2. Catalytic removal of methane and NO{sub x} in lean-burn natural-gas engine exhaust; Elimination par catalyse du methane et des NO{sub x} dans les echappements de moteur au gaz naturel a basse combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, H.; Satokawa, S.; Yahagi, M.; Yamaseki, K.; Hoshi, F.; Uchida, H.; Yokota, H. [Tokyo Gas Co., Ltd. (Japan)

    2000-07-01

    We have developed a new catalytic system to reduce the emissions of hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide (CO), and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) contained in the exhaust gases from a lean-burn natural-gas engine. Catalytic oxidation of unburned hydrocarbons and CO in the exhaust has been studied for noble metals supported on alumina. (1) A low-loading catalyst comprising platinum supported on alumina (Pt/alumina) was efficient for the oxidation of CO and hydrocarbons without methane. The CO conversions were maintained at more than 98 % for 20,000 hours over the Pt/alumina. (2) A catalyst comprising platinum and palladium supported on alumina (Pt-Pd/alumina) exhibited higher levels of oxidation of hydrocarbons (including methane) than a catalyst comprising only palladium supported on alumina (Pd/alumina). Its oxidation also lasted longer. The combined effects of the platinum and palladium metals achieved high sulfur dioxide resistance. Increasing the palladium content in the Pt-Pd/alumina catalyst increased the level of oxidation and extended the lifetime of the catalyst. (3) A catalyst comprising silver supported on alumina (Ag/alumina) was effective at reducing the amount of NO{sub X} by using the unburned hydrocarbons in the exhaust gas. The NO{sub x} conversions over Ag/alumina were maintained at more than 30 % for 3,500 hours. We describe a total clean-up system consisting of a Ag/alumina catalyst and a Pt-Pd/alumina catalyst in series on the exhaust gas stream. (authors)

  3. High temperature gas-cooled reactor and its applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contribution of nuclear power will become much greater to the protection of terrestrial environment as well as in the energy supply, if nuclear power is used not only for electricity production but also for non-electricity production such as process heat in the chemical industry. Great attention is paid to High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR), since it can produce high temperature heat of nearly 1,000degC and also it has very high inherent safety. The high temperature heat produced by the HTGR can be supplied as process heat to the various industries such as crude oil recovery, oil refinery, petroleum chemistry, coal chemistry, iron manufacture, hydrogen production by thermo-chemical process and aluminium oxide production from bauxite. Furthermore, the heat can be used for co-generation of electric power and heat and also for various purposes, from high temperature region to low temperature region in the cascade system, since temperature of the heat produced by HTGR is very high. It is possible to attain total heat utilization efficiency of 80% in the cascade system. The technical problems to be solved in the nuclear heat application to chemical industry are existing limitations in operation and licensing rules in relation to connecting the nuclear reactor with chemical plants, while the process, itself, is technically feasible. The most advantageous applications at present are in crude oil recovery, oil refinery and aluminium oxide production, and nuclear heat application will become economically competitive with conventional oil-fired heat in various industries by around 2020. (author)

  4. Temperature profile and producer gas composition of high temperature air gasification of oil palm fronds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guangul, F. M.; Sulaiman, S. A.; Ramli, A.

    2013-06-01

    Environmental pollution and scarcity of reliable energy source are the current pressing global problems which need a sustainable solution. Conversion of biomass to a producer gas through gasification process is one option to alleviate the aforementioned problems. In the current research the temperature profile and composition of the producer gas obtained from the gasification of oil palm fronds by using high temperature air were investigated and compared with unheated air. By preheating the gasifying air at 500°C the process temperature were improved and as a result the concentration of combustible gases and performance of the process were improved. The volumetric percentage of CO, CH4 and H2 were improved from 22.49, 1.98, and 9.67% to 24.98, to 2.48% and 13.58%, respectively. In addition, HHV, carbon conversion efficiency and cold gas efficiency were improver from 4.88 MJ/Nm3, 83.8% and 56.1% to 5.90 MJ/Nm3, 87.3% and 62.4%, respectively.

  5. Temperature profile and producer gas composition of high temperature air gasification of oil palm fronds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental pollution and scarcity of reliable energy source are the current pressing global problems which need a sustainable solution. Conversion of biomass to a producer gas through gasification process is one option to alleviate the aforementioned problems. In the current research the temperature profile and composition of the producer gas obtained from the gasification of oil palm fronds by using high temperature air were investigated and compared with unheated air. By preheating the gasifying air at 500°C the process temperature were improved and as a result the concentration of combustible gases and performance of the process were improved. The volumetric percentage of CO, CH4 and H2 were improved from 22.49, 1.98, and 9.67% to 24.98, to 2.48% and 13.58%, respectively. In addition, HHV, carbon conversion efficiency and cold gas efficiency were improver from 4.88 MJ/Nm3, 83.8% and 56.1% to 5.90 MJ/Nm3, 87.3% and 62.4%, respectively.

  6. High-Temperature Seal for Sliding-Gate Valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonard, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    Sliding-gate valve originally developed for rocket exhaust-gas ducts is sealed by a Belleville spring. It is simple, compact, and operates over a wider range of temperatures than conventional O-ring sealed valves.

  7. Exhaust emission control and diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur, Christopher John; Upadhyay, Devesh

    2006-11-14

    A diesel engine emission control system uses an upstream oxidation catalyst and a downstream SCR catalyst to reduce NOx in a lean exhaust gas environment. The engine and upstream oxidation catalyst are configured to provide approximately a 1:1 ratio of NO to NO2 entering the downstream catalyst. In this way, the downstream catalyst is insensitive to sulfur contamination, and also has improved overall catalyst NOx conversion efficiency. Degradation of the system is determined when the ratio provided is no longer near the desired 1:1 ratio. This condition is detected using measurements of engine operating conditions such as from a NOx sensor located downstream of the catalysts. Finally, control action to adjust an injected amount of reductant in the exhaust gas based on the actual NO to NO2 ratio upstream of the SCR catalyst and downstream of the oxidation catalyst.

  8. Metathesis in the generation of low-temperature gas in marine shales

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvie Daniel M; Mango Frank D

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The recent report of low-temperature catalytic gas from marine shales took on additional significance with the subsequent disclosure of natural gas and low-temperature gas at or near thermodynamic equilibrium in methane, ethane, and propane. It is important because thermal cracking, the presumed source of natural gas, cannot generate these hydrocarbons at equilibrium nor can it bring them to equilibrium over geologic time. The source of equilibrium and the source of natural gas are e...

  9. Time-dependent temperature field under conditions of filtration of gas-liquid mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One solved the problem of temperature fields at filtration of gas containing liquid with regard to phase transitions and imperfection of a gas phase. One determined regularities of formation of time-dependent temperature fields at filtration of those mixtures. At rather long times and at not very high values of coefficient of gas solubility the temperature effect of filtrating liquid with dissolved gas changes the sign

  10. Metaphysics methods development for high temperature gas cooled reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas cooled reactors have been characterized as one of the most promising nuclear reactor concepts in the Generation-IV technology road map. Considerable research has been performed on the design and safety analysis of these reactors. However, the calculational tools being used to perform these analyses are not state-of-the-art and are not capable of performing detailed three-dimensional analyses. This paper presents the results of an effort to develop an improved thermal-hydraulic solver for the pebble bed type high temperature gas cooled reactors. The solution method is based on the porous medium approach and the momentum equation including the modified Ergun's resistance model for pebble bed is solved in three-dimensional geometry. The heat transfer in the pebble bed is modeled considering the local thermal non-equilibrium between the solid and gas, which results in two separate energy equations for each medium. The effective thermal conductivity of the pebble-bed can be calculated both from Zehner-Schluender and Robold correlations. Both the fluid flow and the heat transfer are modeled in three dimensional cylindrical coordinates and can be solved in steady-state and time dependent. The spatial discretization is performed using the finite volume method and the theta-method is used in the temporal discretization. A preliminary verification was performed by comparing the results with the experiments conducted at the SANA test facility. This facility is located at the Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology (ISR), Julich, Germany. Various experimental cases are modeled and good agreement in the gas and solid temperatures is observed. An on-going effort is to model the control rod ejection scenarios as described in the OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR-400 benchmark problem. In order to perform these analyses PARCS reactor simulator code will be coupled with the new thermal-hydraulic solver. Furthermore, some of the other anticipated accident scenarios in the benchmark require full three dimensional modeling and will be analyzed to include the malfunctioning of one of the de-fueling chutes and blockage of the helium flow channels in the side reflector at the PBMR-400 model

  11. New deployment of high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) is now under a condition difficult to know it well, because of considering not only power generation, but also diverse applications of its nuclear heat, of having extremely different safe principle from that of conventional reactors, of having two types of pebble-bed and block which are extremely different types, of promoting its construction plan in South Africa, of including its application to disposition of Russian surplus weapons plutonium of less reporting HTTR in Japan in spite of its full operation, and so on. However, HTGR is expected for an extremely important nuclear reactor aiming at the next coming one of LWR. HTGR which is late started and developed under complete private leading, is strongly conscious at environmental problem since its beginning. Before 30 years when large scale HTGR was expected to operate, it advertised a merit to reduce wasted heat because of its high temperature. As ratio occupied by electricity expands among application of energies, ratio occupied by the other energies are larger. When considering applications except electric power, high temperature thermal energy from HTGR can be thought wider applications than that from LWR and so on. (G.K.)

  12. Reduced graphene oxide for room-temperature gas sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We demonstrated high-performance gas sensors based on graphene oxide (GO) sheets partially reduced via low-temperature thermal treatments. Hydrophilic graphene oxide sheets uniformly suspended in water were first dispersed onto gold interdigitated electrodes. The partial reduction of the GO sheets was then achieved through low-temperature, multi-step annealing (100, 200, and 300 0C) or one-step heating (200 0C) of the device in argon flow at atmospheric pressure. The electrical conductance of GO was measured after each heating cycle to interpret the level of reduction. The thermally-reduced GO showed p-type semiconducting behavior in ambient conditions and was responsive to low-concentration NO2 and NH3 gases diluted in air at room temperature. The sensitivity can be attributed mainly to the electron transfer between the reduced GO and adsorbed gaseous molecules (NO2/NH3). Additionally, the contact between GO and the Au electrode is likely to contribute to the overall sensing response because of the adsorbates-induced Schottky barrier variation. A simplified model is used to explain the experimental observations.

  13. Processing device for nuclear reactor exhaust gase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To efficiently recover hydrogen injected for the suppression of stress corrosion cracks from reactor exhaust gases. Constitution: Nuclear reactor exhaust gases from a condensator contain hydrogen, oxygen, radioactive rare gases, in-leak airs, etc. Among them, oxygen is at first removed by an oxygen-hydrogen recombiner. Water formed in the recombiner is removed in a exhaust gas system condensator and, subsequently, they are further dehumidified in a dehumidifier for removing water content. The thus dehumidified exhaust gases are then introduced into a hydrogen recovery tower, in which hydrogen in the exhaust gases is selectively absorbed to a hydrogen storing alloy. The adsorbed hydrogen is easily released and recovered by heating the hydrogen storing alloy by means of an external heat source. The recovered hydrogen can be reutilized for the suppression of the stress corrosion crack. (Takahashi, M.)

  14. Plutonium burning with high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents a preliminary study on nuclear characteristics of plutonium burning with High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTR). The following information is obtained from comparison of features of HTR and cell burn-up calculations with the use of HTR fuel: (1) HTR has good potential for plutonium utilization. (2) Core property changes at around the same quantity of plutonium as fissile uranium. (3) In the case of small size HTR, plutonium loading of 0.5% in fuel volume is feasible without any serious influence on basic characteristics. Plutonium loading of 0.1% causes no problems, and improves burn-up characteristics. (4) The quality of plutonium becomes poor in the discharged fuel. (author)

  15. Advances in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication reports on the results of a coordinated research project on advances in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel technology and describes the findings of research activities on coated particle developments. These comprise two specific benchmark exercises with the application of HTGR fuel performance and fission product release codes, which helped compare the quality and validity of the computer models against experimental data. The project participants also examined techniques for fuel characterization and advanced quality assessment/quality control. The key exercise included a round-robin experimental study on the measurements of fuel kernel and particle coating properties of recent Korean, South African and US coated particle productions applying the respective qualification measures of each participating Member State. The summary report documents the results and conclusions achieved by the project and underlines the added value to contemporary knowledge on HTGR fuel.

  16. Medium-size high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinado, C. O.; Koutz, S. L.

    1980-08-01

    This report summarizes high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) experience for the 40 MW(e) Peach Bottom Nuclear Generating Station of Philadelphia Electric Company and the 330 MW(e) Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station of the Public Service Company of Colorado. Both reactors are graphite moderated and helium cooled, operating at about 760 C and using the uranium/thorium fuel cycle. The plants have demonstrated the inherent safety characteristics, the low activation of components, and the high efficiency associated with the HTGR concept. This experience was translated into the conceptual design of a medium sized 1170 MW(t) HTGR for generation of 450MW of electric power. The concept incorporates inherent HTGR safety characteristics and engineered safety features.

  17. Medium-size high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) experience for the 40-MW(e) Peach Bottom Nuclear Generating Station of Philadelphia Electric Company and the 330-MW(e) Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station of the Public Service Company of Colorado. Both reactors are graphite moderated and helium cooled, operating at approx. 7600C (14000F) and using the uranium/thorium fuel cycle. The plants have demonstrated the inherent safety characteristics, the low activation of components, and the high efficiency associated with the HTGR concept. This experience has been translated into the conceptual design of a medium-sized 1170-MW(t) HTGR for generation of 450 MW of electric power. The concept incorporates inherent HTGR safety characteristics [a multiply redundant prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), a graphite core, and an inert single-phase coolant] and engineered safety features

  18. Hybrid simulation of high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hybrid simulator was made to calculate the dynamics of high temperature gas cooled reactor(VHTR). The continuous space-discrete time (CSDT) method is applied to solve the partial differential equations of the heat transfer in the hybrid computation. By this method the error of the heat balance is decreased to less than one percent in the steady state. Though the mini computer is used for this simulator, it operates about five times faster than real time. The dynamics of VHTR are characterized by the large heat capacity of the reactor core and the long time constant. The values of these parameters are reported as the results of this calculation. The control system of the reactivity and the coolant flow rate is required to operate the reactor. The nonlinearity of VHTR which occurs in the change of flow rate are also understood quantitatively by this simulator. (author)

  19. High-Temperature Water-Gas Shift Membrane Reactor Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciocco, M.V.; Iyoha, O.; Enick, R.M.; Killmeyer, R.P.

    2007-06-01

    NETL’s Office of Research and Development is exploring the integration of membrane reactors into coal gasification plants as a way of increasing efficiency and reducing costs. Water-Gas Shift Reaction experiments were conducted in membrane reactors at conditions similar to those encountered at the outlet of a coal gasifier. The changes in reactant conversion and product selectivity due to the removal of hydrogen via the membrane reactor were quantified. Research was conducted to determine the influence of residence time and H2S on CO conversion in both Pd and Pd80wt%Cu membrane reactors. Effects of the hydrogen sulfide-to-hydrogen ratio on palladium and a palladium-copper alloy at high-temperature were also investigated. These results were compared to thermodynamic calculations for the stability of palladium sulfides.

  20. Seismic study on high temperature gas-cooled reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The resistance against earthquakes of a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) core with block-type fuel is not yet fully ascertained. Seismic studies must be made if such a reactor plant is to be installed in the areas with frequent earthquakes. The experimental and analytical studies for the seismic response of the HTGR core were carried out. First, the fundamental behavior, such as the softening characteristic of a single stacked column (which is piled up with blocks) and the hardening characteristic with the block impact were clarified from the seismic experiments. Second, the displacement and the impact characteristics of the two-dimensional vertical core and the two-dimensional horizontal core were studied from the seismic experiments. Finally, analytical methods and computer programs for the seismic response of HTGR cores were developed. (author) 57 refs

  1. Critical power concept adapted for the specific table tennis test: comparisons between exhaustion criteria, mathematical modeling, and correlation with gas exchange parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagatto, A; Miranda, M F; Gobatto, C A

    2011-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine and to compare the critical power concept adapted for the specific table tennis test (critical frequency - C F ) estimated from 5 mathematical models and using 2 different exhaustion criteria (voluntary and technical exhaustions). Also, it was an aim to assess the relationship between C F estimated from mathematical models and respiratory compensation point (RCP), peak oxygen uptake ( V˙O (2PEAK)) and minimal intensity at which V˙O (2PEAK) ( F V˙O (2PEAK)) appears. 9 male table tennis players [18(1) years; 62.3(4.4) kg] performed the maximal incremental test and 3-4 exhaustive exercise bouts to estimate C F s (balls · min (-1)). The exhaustion time and C F obtained were independent of the exhaustion criteria. The C F from 3-parameter model [45.2(7.0)-voluntary, 43.2(5.6)-technical] was lower than C F estimated by linear 2-parameter models, frequency-time (-1) [53.5(3.6)-voluntary, 53.5(3.5)-technical] and total ball thrown-time [52.2(3.5)-voluntary, 52.2(3.5)-technical] but significantly correlated. C F values from 2 linear models were significantly correlated with RCP [47.4(3.4) balls · min (-1)], and C F values of the linear and nonlinear models were correlated with F V˙O (2PEAK) [56.7(3.4) balls · min (-1)]. However, there were no significant correlations between C F values and V˙O (2PEAK) [49.8(1.1)ml · kg (-1) · min (-1)]. The results were not modified by exhaustion criteria. The 2 linear and non-linear 2-parameter models can be used to estimate aerobic endurance in specific table tennis tests. PMID:21563021

  2. Exergy analysis of gas turbine combined 100 MW high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the design of 100 MW High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor coupled with gas turbine, the energy and Exergy analysis were carried out for each part of the cycle, and inlet and outlet Exergies of those parts were calculated. The Exergy loss distribution and Exergy loss ratio of each sub-process were quantified and compared with the results of energy analysis. The results show that more than a half of the Exergy loss takes place inside the reactor core, while the compress system composed of low and high pressure compressors as well as the intercooler play a much smaller role in the contribution of Exergy losses than the results in the energy analysis. The Exergy loss of the cycle is mainly due to the energy conversion and irreversible heat exchange. The total energy efficiency of the cycle is quite high, and the Exergy efficiency is higher. (authors)

  3. Helium chemistry for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (Thesis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemistry control is important for the helium coolant of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) because impurities cause oxidation of the graphite applied to the core structure and corrosion of high-temperature materials utilized at the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). This thesis describes the helium chemistry which should be maintained adequately during reactor operations not only for the safety and stability of operations, but also for the increase of economic competitiveness by reducing replacing times of IHXs and simplifying helium purification systems. In this paper the chemical impurity behaviour was clarified by the obtained chemistry data by the Japan's HTTR and the criteria of chemical impurities for the GTHTR300C, which can supply both of electricity and hydrogen for the future hydrogen society, was proposed with its control technologies. In this R and D, the chemical impurity behavior, purification abilities, emitted impurities from graphite and thermal insulator, and hydrogen permeation at the heat transfer tubes of the IHX during the 950degC operation of the HTTR were evaluated. Utilizing these results, radical reactions at the core were identified. Also, chemical impurity criteria were proposed to avoid structural degradation of the Hastelloy XR and thermophysical properties deterioration at the heat transfer tubes. As a result, active chemistry control technologies where the necessary chemistry impurity will be injected in response to the chemical balance at the core are proposed for the GTHTR300C. The proposing technology is expected to contribute economically to the purification systems of the future HTGRs. (author)

  4. Very-high-temperature gas reactor environmental impacts assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), a slightly modified General Atomic type High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) with 1600 F primary coolant, as a source of process heat for the 14000F steam-methanation reformer step in a hydrogen producing plant (via hydrogasification of coal liquids) was examined. It was found that: (a) from the viewpoint of product contamination by fission and activation products, an Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) is probably not necessary; and (b) long term steam corrosion of the core support posts may require increasing their diameter (a relatively minor design adjustment). However, the hydrogen contaminant in the primary coolant which permeates the reformer may reduce steam corrosion but may produce other problems which have not as yet been resolved. An IHX in parallel with both the reformer and steam generator would solve these problems, but probably at greater cost than that of increasing the size of the core support posts. It is recommended that this corrosion problem be examined in more detail, especially by investigating the performance of current fossil fuel heated reformers in industry. Detailed safety analysis of the VHTR would be required to establish definitely whether the IHX can be eliminated. Water and hydrogen ingress into the reactor system are potential problems which can be alleviated by an IHX. These problems will require analysis, research and development within the program required for development of the VHTR

  5. Thermal Hydraulics of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh; Eung Kim; Richard Schultz; Mike Patterson; Davie Petti

    2009-10-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core will be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during reactor core-accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, perform research and development (R&D) that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior High temperature materials qualification Design methods development and validation Hydrogen production technologies Energy conversion. This paper presents current R&D work that addresses fundamental thermal hydraulics issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs.

  6. I. Textural/Structural tuning and nanoparticle stabilization of copper-containing nanocomposite materials. II. Generation of reducing agents for automotive exhaust gas purification via the processing of hydrocarbons in a PACT (plasma and catalysis integrated technologies) reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yu

    This research consists of two parts. The first part deals with the preparation and properties of copper-containing nanocomposite materials. For studies of textural tuning, structural tuning, or material sintering, copper/aluminum and copper/zinc nanocomposites were prepared via various inorganic synthesis methods including conventional coprecipitation methods and a novel urea-gelation/thermal-modification method that produces narrow distributions of pore sizes, high surface areas, and significantly higher specific metal loadings. Solid-solid reaction analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis were developed for the determination of the mixing homogeneities of the copper/aluminum nanocomposites. A sintering experiment at 250-600C for 350 h under methanol-steam reforming conditions was carried out to compare the stability of supported Cu0 nanoparticles. The mixing homogeneities of CuO/Al2O3 nanocomposites significantly affected the thermal stability of their reduced Cu0 crystallites. Creation of relatively narrow distributions of pore sizes with relatively small major pore diameters (e.g., 3.5 nm) can also be used for the stabilization of supported Cu0 nanoparticles. The supported nanoparticles with a relatively small initial size cannot ensure good thermal stability. A "hereditary" character on the homogeneity of copper/aluminum nanocomposites was revealed. Stepwise reduction and reoxidation were studied for the structural tuning and purification of Cu-Al-O spinels with isotropic and gradual unit-cell contractions. The second part of the research deals with the processing of hydrocarbons. Conversion of a model hydrocarbon (n-hexane or n-octane) in an AC discharge PACT (plasma and catalysis integrated technologies) reactor was verified to be an effective method to instantly produce reducing agents (e.g., hydrogen or/and light alkanes and alkenes), at room temperature and atmospheric pressure for automotive exhaust gas purification. Effects of electrode composition, hydrocarbon feedstock, electrode diameter, applied voltage, flow rate of carrier gas, gap size, and residence time of hydrocarbon molecules, were investigated systematically. Catalytic dehydrogenation, catalytic addition, and noncatalytic cracking reactions were discussed. Compared with space velocity, applied voltage has dominant effects on power consumption. Energy efficiency will increase as the residence time of feed molecules decreases, and decrease as applied voltage increases.

  7. Process to improve the aging behaviour of catalysts for the oxidizing purification of exhaust gases from combustion engines when using leaded fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozon, A.; Koberstein, E.; Pletka, H.D.; Voelker, H.

    1982-05-06

    In the catalytic oxidizing purification of exhaust gases from combustion engines using leaded fuels the aging behaviour of the catalyst is improved by the operation of the combustion engine with an essentially stoichiometric air-to-fuel ratio. By this means the catalyst can be operated in the most favourable range of temperature of preferably 500 to 700/sup 0/C. The device for the secondary air supply in the exhaust gas system may be discarded by the use of this process.

  8. Analysis and description of the long-term creep behaviour of high-temperature gas turbine materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On a series of standard high-temperature gas turbine materials, creep tests were accomplished with the aim to obtain improved data on the long-term creep behaviour. The tests were carried out in the range of the main application temperatures of the materials and in the range of low stresses and elongations similar to operation conditions. They lasted about 5000 to 16000 h at maximum. At all important temperatures additional annealing tests lasting up to about 10000 h were carried out for the determination of a material-induced structure contraction. Thermal tension tests were effected for the description of elastoplastic short-time behaviour. As typical selection of materials the nickel investment casting alloys IN-738 LC, IN-939 and Udimet 500 for industrial turbine blades, IN-100 for aviation turbine blades and IN-713 C for integrally cast wheels of exhaust gas turbochargers were investigated, and also the nickel forge alloy Inconel 718 for industrial and aviation turbine disks and Nimonic 101 for industrial turbine blades and finally the cobalt alloy FSC 414 for guide blades and heat accumulation segments of industrial gas turbines. The creep tests were started on long-period individual creep testing machines with high strain measuring accuracy and economically continued on long-period multispecimen creep testing machines with long duration of test. The test results of this mixed test method were first subjected to a conventional evaluation in logarithmic time yield and creep diagrams which besides creep strength curves provided creep stress limit curves down to 0.2% residual strain. (orig./MM)

  9. High-Temperature Magnetic Bearings for Gas Turbine Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    Magnetic bearings are the subject of a new NASA Lewis Research Center and U.S. Army thrust with significant industry participation, and coordination with other Government agencies. The NASA/Army emphasis is on high-temperature applications for future gas turbine engines. Magnetic bearings could increase the reliability and reduce the weight of these engines by eliminating the lubrication system. They could also increase the DN (diameter of the bearing times rpm) limit on engine speed and allow active vibration cancellation systems to be used--resulting in a more efficient, "more electric" engine. Finally, the Integrated High-Performance Turbine Engine Technology (IHPTET) Program, a joint Department of Defense/industry program, identified a need for a hightemperature (as high as 1200 F) magnetic bearing that could be demonstrated in a phase III engine. This magnetic bearing is similar to an electric motor. It has a laminated rotor and stator made of cobalt steel. Wound around the stator are a series of electrical wire coils that form a series of electric magnets around the circumference. The magnets exert a force on the rotor. A probe senses the position of the rotor, and a feedback controller keeps it in the center of the cavity. The engine rotor, bearings, and case form a flexible structure that contains a large number of modes. The bearing feedback controller, which could cause some of these modes to become unstable, could be adapted to varying flight conditions to minimize seal clearances and monitor the health of the system. Cobalt steel has a curie point greater than 1700 F, and copper wire has a melting point beyond that. Therefore, practical limitations associated with the maximum magnetic field strength in the cobalt steel and the stress in the rotating components limit the temperature to about 1200 F. The objective of this effort is to determine the limits in temperature and speed of a magnetic bearing operating in an engine. Our approach is to use our in-house experience in magnets, mechanical components, high-temperature materials, and surface lubrication to build and test a magnetic bearing in both a rig and an engine. Testing will be done at Lewis or through cooperative programs in industrial facilities.

  10. Effect of air temperature and relative humidity at various fuel-air ratios on exhaust emissions on a per-mode basis of an Avco Lycoming 0-320 DIAD light aircraft engine. Volume 2: Individual data points

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorobatckyi, M.; Cosgrove, D. V.; Meng, P. R.; Kempke, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    A carbureted four cylinder air cooled 0-320 DIAD Lycoming aircraft engine was tested to establish the effects of air temperature and humidity at various fuel-air ratios on the exhaust emissions on a per-mode basis. The test conditions included carburetor lean-out at air temperatures of 50, 59, 80, and 100 F at relative humidities of 0, 30, 60, and 80 percent. Temperature-humidity effects at the higher values of air temperature and relative humidity tested indicated that the HC and CO emissions increased significantly, while the NOx emissions decreased. Even at a fixed fuel-air ratio, the HC emissions increase and the NOx emissions decrease at the higher values of air temperature and humidity. Volume II contains the data taken at each of the individual test points.

  11. Effect of Air Temperature and Relative Humidity at Various Fuel-Air Ratios on Exhaust Emissions on a Per-Mode Basis of an AVCO Lycoming 0-320 Diad Light Aircraft Engine: Volume 1: Results and Plotted Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorobatckyi, M.; Cosgrove, D. V.; Meng, P. R.; Kempe, E. E., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    A carbureted four cylinder air cooled 0-320 DIAD Lycoming aircraft engine was tested to establish the effects of air temperature and humidity at various fuel-air ratios on the exhaust emissions on a per-mode basis. The test conditions include carburetor lean out at air temperatures of 50, 59, 80, and 100 F at relative humidities of 0, 30, 60, and 80 percent. Temperature humidity effects at the higher values of air temperature and relative humidity tested indicated that the HC and CO emissions increased significantly, while the NOx emissions decreased. Even at a fixed fuel air ratio, the HC emissions increase and the NOx emissions decrease at the higher values of air temperature and humidity.

  12. The gas corrosion of the cobalt base clad layer at elevated temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Smolenska

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Purpose of this paper is to evaluate the microstructural and mechanical properties evolution of thelaser and PTA clad layers made of the powder containing cobalt after oxidation in air (750°C, 200 hours andcorrosion in exhaust gases (700°C, two month.Design/methodology/approach: The layers were made by cladding technique. Cladding was conducted witha high power diode laser HDPL ROFIN SINAR DL 020 and Plasma Transformed Arc method. The subsequenttracks were overlapped by 30÷40%. The performance of the hardfaced materials were evaluated by microstructure(optical and scanning electron microscope SEM, chemical analysis and micro hardness measurements.Findings: After heat treatment the microstructure of the clad layers did not change much, neither on the top partnor in the clad/steel interface. However the oxide layer on the surface is observed. The EDS analyze revile thecomposition of this scale which consisted generally of chromium and iron oxides. The semi-quantitative chemicalanalysis (EDS of the dendritic regions and micro regions confirms changes in chemical contents before and afteroxidation and after corrosion in exhaust gases. The oxidation at temperature 750°C for 200 hours in air and fortwo month in exhaust gases did not influence on the morphology of the clad layers neither on the top part nor inthe clad/steel interface. However changes in chemical composition were observed. On the surface of both sort ofclads the oxide layers were observed. These sorts of layers are resistant for the hot exhausted gases.Research limitations/implications: During the future research kinetic analyze of high temperature corrosionshould be done also for different temperature and times of the process.Practical implications: The layers were designed as a method to prolong service time for the ship engineexhausted valve.Originality/value: The chemical composition of the powder was new one. Also using the laser claddingtechnique for ship engine parts is a subject of interest.

  13. High temperature strain gage technology for gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fichtel, Edward J.; Mcdaniel, Amos D.

    1994-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a six month study that addressed specific issues to transfer the Pd-13Cr static strain sensor to a gas turbine engine environment. The application issues that were addressed include: (1) evaluation of a miniature, variable potentiometer for use as the ballast resistor, in conjunction with a conventional strain gage signal conditioning unit; (2) evaluation of a metal sheathed, platinum conductor leadwire assembly for use with the three-wire sensor; and (3) subjecting the sensor to dynamic strain cyclic testing to determine fatigue characteristics. Results indicate a useful static strain gage system at all temperature levels up to 1350 F. The fatigue characteristics also appear to be very promising, indicating a potential use in dynamic strain measurement applications. The procedure, set-up, and data for all tests are presented in this report. This report also discusses the specific strain gage installation technique for the Pd-13Cr gage because of its potential impact on the quality of the output data.

  14. Effect of hydrogen-diesel fuel co-combustion on exhaust emissions with verification using an in-cylinder gas sampling technique

    OpenAIRE

    Talibi, M.; P. Hellier; Balachandran, R; Ladommatos, N.

    2014-01-01

    The paper presents an experimental investigation of hydrogen-diesel fuel co-combustion carried out on a naturally aspirated, direct injection diesel engine. The engine was supplied with a range of hydrogen-diesel fuel mixture proportions to study the effect of hydrogen addition (aspirated with the intake air) on combustion and exhaust emissions. The tests were performed at fixed diesel injection periods, with hydrogen added to vary the engine load between 0 and 6 bar IMEP. In addition, a nove...

  15. Improvement of emissions and performance by using of air jet, exhaust gas re-circulation and insulation methods in a direct injection diesel engine

    OpenAIRE

    Jafarmadara S.; Hosenzadeh M.B.

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the improvement of operation characteristics and emissions reduction by means of creating an air-cell inside the piston body, exhaust gases recirculating and insulating combustion chamber in a direct injection diesel engine simultaneously. The engine considered is a caterpillar 3401 which was modeled with an air-cell included as part of the piston geometry. This air-cell demonstrates that air injection in late combustion period can be effective in a significant...

  16. Local Exhaust Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ulla; Breum, N. O.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    Capture efficiency of a local exhaust system, e.g. a kitchen hood, should include only contaminants being direct captured. In this study basic concepts of local exhaust capture efficiency are given, based on the idea of a control box. A validated numerical model is used for estimation of the...

  17. The effect of metal salts on quantification of elemental and organic carbon in diesel exhaust particles using thermal-optical evolved gas analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Wang

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Thermal-optical evolved gas analysis (TOEGA is a conventional method for classifying carbonaceous aerosols as organic carbon (OC and elemental carbon (EC. Its main source of uncertainty arises from accounting for pyrolyzed OC (char, which has similar behavior to the EC originally present on the filter. Sample composition can also cause error, at least partly by complicating the charred carbon correction. In this study, lab generated metal salt particles, including alkali (NaCl, KCl, Na2SO4, alkaline-earth (MgCl2, CaCl2 and transition metal salts (CuCl2, FeCl2, FeCl3, CuCl, ZnCl2, MnCl2, CuSO4, Fe2(SO43, were deposited on a layer of diesel particles to investigate their effect on EC and OC quantification with TOEGA. Measurements show that metals reduce the oxidation temperature of EC and enhance the charring of OC. The split point used to determine classification of EC vs. OC is more dependent on changes in EC oxidation temperature than it was on charring. The resulting EC/OC ratio is reduced by 0–80% in the presence of most of the salts, although some metal salts increased reported EC/OC at low metal to carbon ratios. In general, transition metals are more active than alkali and alkaline-earth metals; copper is the most active. Copper and iron chlorides are more active than sulfates. The melting point of metal salts is strongly correlated with the increase of OC charring, but not with the reduction of EC oxidation temperature. Other chemistry, such as redox reactions, may affect the EC oxidation. A brief discussion of possible catalytic mechanisms for the metals is provided.

  18. An Annular Mechanical Temperature Compensation Structure for Gas-Sealed Capacitive Pressure Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Kohei Higuchi; Yonggang Jiang; Kazusuke Maenaka; Hidekuni Takao; Xiuchun Hao

    2012-01-01

    A novel gas-sealed capacitive pressure sensor with a temperature compensation structure is reported. The pressure sensor is sealed by Au-Au diffusion bonding under a nitrogen ambient with a pressure of 100 kPa and integrated with a platinum resistor-based temperature sensor for human activity monitoring applications. The capacitance-pressure and capacitance-temperature characteristics of the gas-sealed capacitive pressure sensor without temperature compensation structure are calculated. It is...

  19. On the second-order temperature jump coefficient of a dilute gas

    CERN Document Server

    Radtke, Gregg A; Takata, Shigeru; Aoki, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    We use LVDSMC simulations to calculate the second-order temperature jump coefficient for a dilute gas whose temperature is governed by the Poisson equation with a constant forcing term. Both the hard sphere gas and the BGK model of the Boltzmann equation are considered. Our results show that the temperature jump coefficient is different from the well known linear and steady case where the temperature is governed by the homogeneous heat conduction (Laplace) equation.

  20. Capture efficiency measurement of pollutants over a workbench with the reinforced slot exhaust system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavelek M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the measurement of the capture efficiency of pollutants by the slot reinforced exhaust system situated in two positions over the workbench. The slot reinforced exhaust system, which is known as REEXS, is the traditional slot exhaust hood equipped with an air supply inlet that intensifies exhausting along the axis of the exhaust hood. It can operate in traditional or reinforced exhaust modes. Measurements were made for the same air velocity in the suction slot and with the different momentum flux ratio of supplied and exhausted air flow. The tracer gas method was used for the capture efficiency measurement of the system. As the tracer gas the carbon dioxide was chosen. The knowledge of the shape and range of the effective exhaust area for various configurations in front of the exhaust hood is important for the exhaust hood setting according to a source of pollutants.

  1. Organic acids emissions from natural-gas-fed engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zervas, Efthimios; Tazerout, Mohand

    A natural-gas-fed spark-ignition engine, operating under lean conditions, is used for the study of the organic acids exhaust emissions. These pollutants are collected by passing a sample of exhaust gas into deionised water. The final solution is directly analysed by HPLC/UV at 204 nm. Only formic acid is emitted in detectable concentration under the experimental conditions used. Its concentration decreases with the three engine operating parameters studied: spark advance, volumetric efficiency and fuel/air equivalence ratio. Exhaust formic acid concentration is also linked with exhaust oxygen concentration and exhaust temperature. A comparison with other engines (SI engines fed with gasoline and compression ignition engines) from bibliographic data proves that natural-gas-fed engines emit less organic acids than the other two types of engines.

  2. Heat exchanger performance in main cooling system on high temperature test operation at high temperature gas-cooled reactor 'HTTR'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of high temperature gas-cooled reactor at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute achieved the reactor outlet coolant temperature of 950degC for the first time in the world at Apr.19, 2004. To remove generated heat at reactor core and to hold reactor inlet coolant temperature as specified temperature, heat exchangers in HTTR main cooling system should have designed heat exchange performance. In this report, heat exchanger performance is evaluated based on measurement data in high temperature test operation. And it is confirmed the adequacy of heat exchanger designing method by comparison of evaluated value with designed value. (author)

  3. High temperature heat exchanger studies for applications to gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, June Kee; Jeong, Ji Hwan; Ha, Man Yeong; Kim, Kui Soon

    2009-12-01

    Growing demand for environmentally friendly aero gas-turbine engines with lower emissions and improved specific fuel consumption can be met by incorporating heat exchangers into gas turbines. Relevant researches in such areas as the design of a heat exchanger matrix, materials selection, manufacturing technology, and optimization by a variety of researchers have been reviewed in this paper. Based on results reported in previous studies, potential heat exchanger designs for an aero gas turbine recuperator, intercooler, and cooling-air cooler are suggested.

  4. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  5. Advanced fuel cycle scenarios for High Temperature Gas Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? Fuel cycle analyses of LWR-ARR, LWR-HTGR-ARR, and HTGR recycling scenarios. ? A 30% reduction in the natural uranium consumption over the once-through cycle. ? A great reduction of TRU waste generation over the once-through cycle. ? The electricity generation costs of 39, 35 and 26 USD/MW h(e) for three scenarios. ? Economic benefits of an HTGR owing to its high fuel burnup. - Abstract: This study evaluates nuclear fuel cycle scenarios which are based on recycling spent nuclear fuel for the sustainability of nuclear energy. Three fuel cycle scenarios, the Light Water Reactor (LWR)-Advanced Recycling Reactor (ARR) recycle, the LWR-High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR)-ARR recycle, and the HTGR partial recycling fuel cycle, are assessed for their mass flow and electricity generation costs and the results are compared to those of the LWR once-through fuel cycle. The spent fuels are recycled in both the Consolidated Fuel Treatment Center and the Actinide Management Island, which are capable of reprocessing spent fuels by Uranium Extraction and Pyrochemical processes, respectively. The mass flow calculations show that the Transuranics (TRU) which have a long-term radiation effect can be completely burned in the recycling fuel cycles, resulting in 350, 450 and 6 times reduction of TRU inventory for the LWR-ARR, LWR-HTGR-ARR and HTGR partial recycling fuel cycles, respectively, when compared to the once-through fuel cycle. The electricity generation costs of these fuel cycle scenarios were estimated to be 39.1, 34.9 and 25.7 USD/MW h(e), which are comparable to or smaller than that of the once-through fuel cycle. Although the candidate fuel cycles adopt reprocessing options which raise fuel cycle cost, increase in uranium cost and the advanced design of the HTGR can further reduce the advanced fuel cycle costs of the HTGR.

  6. Seismic analysis of the modular high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the seismic analysis performed for the modular high-temperature gas cooled reactor (MHTGR). The four unit MHTGR nuclear island consists of four separate underground concrete silo structures embedded to a depth of 160 feet. The major NSSS components, including the reactor vessel, and steam generator are housed in the silos. A three-dimensional (3-D) soil-structure interaction (SSI) analysis was performed using the computer program SASSI to develop the seismic loads, acceleration time histories, and response spectra which are to be used in determining the seismic capabilities of the reactor building and its ''safety-related''internal systems and components. The analysed 3-D model included the below grade structures, the reactor and steam generator vessels, the reactor core and other internal structures. A 3-D analysis was performed to take full advantage of embedment in reducing seismic response. The computer program SASSI was selected because it can model 3-D multiple embedded flexible foundations with arbitrary shapes. In the MHTGR design, it is important to model the silo flexibility. The MHTGR is being developed as a standardized plant with a design which envelopes the seismic conditions at 85 percent of U.S. nuclear sites. The maximum Safe Shutdown Earthquake (SSE) acceleration is 0.3g. The paper will review the following subjects: Seismic criteria, and site conditions; Method of analysis; Silo and NSSS models used; Results of the analysis including maximum accelerations and response spectra in the silo and critical equipment supports. The advantages of embedment have been clearly demonstrated in this analysis and will be reviewed in the conclusions of this paper. Furthermore, the results of a separate analysis to assess the effects of silo-soil-silo interaction effects will be discussed. (author). 8 refs, 10 figs, 1 tab

  7. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikamatsu N, M. A. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Santa Fe, Av. Carlos Lazo No. 100, Santa Fe, 01389 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Puente E, F., E-mail: midori.chika@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  8. Impact of gas in sodium flow on the temperature variation of an LMFBR rod bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The impact of gas in sodium flow on the temperature variation of an LMFBR rod bundle was studied in two types of experiments: The gas fraction of the subchannels as well as the gas bubble spectra across the outlet of an unheated 61-rod bundle with wire spacers were measured in water/air flow. For uniform and non-uniform gas distribution at the bundle inlet, the determined averaged gas fractions across the subchannels at the bundle outlet were uniform and non-uniform, respectively. The measured bubble spectra show a dependency between the bubble frequencies, the contact times and the gas fractions of a subchannel. A model to compute the transient temperature distributions within a heated rod was supported by experiments in a sodium/argon slug flow. The measurements show that the fluid and the rod temperature variations increase with increasing heat flux, gas fraction and contact time of a single bubble at the wall. (orig.)

  9. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  10. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  11. High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Coupled with High Temperature Steam Electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) to produce electricity and hydrogen. Although the hydrogen production processes using the nuclear energy are in an early stage of development, coupling hydrogen plant to HTGR requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear plant. In anticipation of the design, development and procurement of an advanced power conversion system for HTGR, this study was initiated to identify the major design and technology options and their tradeoffs in the evaluation of power conversion unit (PCU) coupled to the hydrogen plant. In this study, we investigated a number of design configurations and performed thermal hydraulic analyses using various working fluids and various conditions. Also using the high temperature steam electrolysis process (HTSE), we calculated the energy requirement for the operation of the HTSE. The balance of the plant of the HTSE was developed and the HTGR was modeled to be coupled with the HTSE. This paper presents a portion of results obtained from this study. (authors)

  12. Evaluation of loss coefficient at exhaust junction for turbocharger matching calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suitability of the analysis for an unsteady compressible gas flow through an exhaust junction plays an important role in developing a computer program for the matching of a diesel engine to an exhaust turbocharger. The maximum momentary temperature differences between the lateral flow and the main flow at the junction is about 300 degrees C in an actual engine under operation. It is important to adopt boundary conditions compatible with the flow phenomena in order to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the exhaust energy. In previous works, the incompressible joining flow loss coefficients were employed in the computer program for the convenience of the calculation. In this study, the joining flow model of different kinds of gases has been assumed, and the flow loss coefficients are compared with incompressible ones. In this paper it is shown that the present results gives the precise boundary conditions for the computer program

  13. Method of removing oxides of sulfur and oxides of nitrogen from exhaust gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Richard J.

    1986-01-01

    A continuous method is presented for removing both oxides of sulfur and oxides of nitrogen from combustion or exhaust gases with the regeneration of the absorbent. Exhaust gas is cleaned of particulates and HCl by a water scrub prior to contact with a liquid absorbent that includes an aqueous solution of bisulfite and sulfite ions along with a metal chelate, such as, an iron or zinc aminopolycarboxylic acid. Following contact with the combustion gases the spent absorbent is subjected to electrodialysis to transfer bisulfite ions into a sulfuric acid solution while splitting water with hydroxide and hydrogen ion migration to equalize electrical charge. The electrodialysis stack includes alternate layers of anion selective and bipolar membranes. Oxides of nitrogen are removed from the liquid absorbent by air stripping at an elevated temperature and the regenerated liquid absorbent is returned to contact with exhaust gases for removal of sulfur oxides and nitrogen oxides.

  14. The Efficiency Analysis of the Exhaust Air Heat Pump System

    OpenAIRE

    Alo Mikola; Teet-Andrus Kiv

    2014-01-01

    This paper is based on long term parameter measurements of the exhaust air heat pumps (EAHP) system in a new built apartment building. The building was equipped with an exhaust air ventilation system and exhaust air heat pump for ventilation heat recover. The results of the measurements show that the COP of the EAHP is mainly related to the temperature graph of the heating system and the supply temperature of domestic hot water (DWH). During the measurement period some other impact factors, s...

  15. Identification of the dynamic properties of temperature-sensors in natural and petroleum gas

    OpenAIRE

    Cimerman, Franc; Blagojević, Bogdan; Bajsič, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical and experimental investigation of the dynamic properties of contact temperature-sensors in air as well as in natural and petroleum gas. Particularly with gas-supply systems, which can operate either with natural or petroleum gas, a knowledge of a sensor's dynamic properties and sensitivity to different pressure and velocity conditions can be a crucial factor in the regulation and control of the system. The frequency characteristics of contact temperature-sens...

  16. Modeling of Aerobrake Ballute Stagnation Point Temperature and Heat Transfer to Inflation Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.

    2012-01-01

    A trailing Ballute drag device concept for spacecraft aerocapture is considered. A thermal model for calculation of the Ballute membrane temperature and the inflation gas temperature is developed. An algorithm capturing the most salient features of the concept is implemented. In conjunction with the thermal model, trajectory calculations for two candidate missions, Titan Explorer and Neptune Orbiter missions, are used to estimate the stagnation point temperature and the inflation gas temperature. Radiation from both sides of the membrane at the stagnation point and conduction to the inflating gas is included. The results showed that the radiation from the membrane and to a much lesser extent conduction to the inflating gas, are likely to be the controlling heat transfer mechanisms and that the increase in gas temperature due to aerodynamic heating is of secondary importance.

  17. The trapping system for the recirculated gases at different locations of the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) pipe of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays, in diesel engines, it is typical to recycle exhaust gases (EGR) in order to decrease pollutant emissions. However, few studies report the precisely measured composition of the recycled gases. Indeed, in order to know precisely the composition of the EGR gases, they have to be sampled hot and not diluted, in contrast to the usual practice. Thus, a new system to collect such samples was developed. With this new trapping system, it is possible to measure the concentrations of NOx, CO, CO2, O2, hydrocarbons (HCs) in the range C1C9, aldehydes, ketones and PAHs. The trapping system and the analytical protocol used are described in this paper

  18. The trapping system for the recirculated gases at different locations of the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) pipe of a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piperel, A.; Montagne, X.; Dagaut, P.

    2008-10-01

    Nowadays, in diesel engines, it is typical to recycle exhaust gases (EGR) in order to decrease pollutant emissions. However, few studies report the precisely measured composition of the recycled gases. Indeed, in order to know precisely the composition of the EGR gases, they have to be sampled hot and not diluted, in contrast to the usual practice. Thus, a new system to collect such samples was developed. With this new trapping system, it is possible to measure the concentrations of NOx, CO, CO2, O2, hydrocarbons (HCs) in the range C1-C9, aldehydes, ketones and PAHs. The trapping system and the analytical protocol used are described in this paper.

  19. Investigation and Optimization of the Acoustic Performance of Exhaust Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Elsaadany, Sara

    2012-01-01

    There is a strong competition among automotive manufacturers to reduce the radiated noise levels. One important source is the engine exhaust where the main noise control strategy is by using efficient mufflers. Stricter vehicle noise regulations combined with various exhaust gas cleaning devices, removing space for traditional mufflers, are also creating new challenges. Thus, it is crucial to have efficient models and tools to design vehicle exhaust systems. In addition the need to reduce CO2...

  20. Ammonia Gas Detection by Tannic Acid Functionalized and Reduced Graphene Oxide at Room Temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Sweejiang Yoo; Xin Li; Yuan Wu; Weihua Liu; Xiaoli Wang; Wenhui Yi

    2014-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) based chemiresistor gas sensor has received much attention in gas sensing for high sensitivity, room temperature operation, and reversible. Here, for the first time, we present a promising chemiresistor for ammonia gas detection based on tannic acid (TA) functionalized and reduced graphene oxide (rGOTA functionalized). Green reductant of TA plays a major role in both reducing process and enhancing the gas sensing properties of rGOTA functionalized. Our results sho...