WorldWideScience

Sample records for exhaust gas temperature

  1. Effect of EGR on the exhaust gas temperature and exhaust opacity in compression ignition engines

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Avinash Kumar Agrawal; Shrawan Kumar Singh; Shailendra Sinha; Mritunjay Kumar Shukla

    2004-06-01

    In diesel engines, NOx formation is a highly temperature-dependent phenomenon and takes place when the temperature in the combustion chamber exceeds 2000 K. Therefore, in order to reduce NOx emissions in the exhaust, it is necessary to keep peak combustion temperatures under control. One simple way of reducing the NOx emission of a diesel engine is by late injection of fuel into the combustion chamber. This technique is effective but increases fuel consumption by 10–15%, which necessitates the use of more effective NOx reduction techniques like exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Re-circulating part of the exhaust gas helps in reducing NOx, but appreciable particulate emissions are observed at high loads, hence there is a trade-off between NOx and smoke emission. To get maximum bene?t from this trade-off, a particulate trap may be used to reduce the amount of unburnt particulates in EGR, which in turn reduce the particulate emission also. An experimental investigation was conducted to observe the effect of exhaust gas re-circulation on the exhaust gas temperatures and exhaust opacity. The experimental setup for the proposed experiments was developed on a two-cylinder, direct injection, air-cooled, compression ignition engine. A matrix of experiments was conducted for observing the effect of different quantities of EGR on exhaust gas temperatures and opacity.

  2. Effect of Gas Turbine Exhaust Temperature, Stack Temperature and Ambient Temperature on Overall Efficiency of Combine Cycle Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Khan, M N; K. P. Tyagi

    2010-01-01

    The gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature play a very important role during the predication of the performance of combine cycle power plant. This paper covers parametric analysis of effects of gas turbine exhaust temperature, stack temperature and ambient temperature on the overall efficiency of combine cycle power plant keeping the gas turbine efficiency as well as steam turbine efficiency constant. The results shows that out of three variables i.e. turbi...

  3. Mean Value Model of the Gas Temperature at the Exhaust Valve

    OpenAIRE

    Ainouz, Filip; Vedholm, Jonas

    2009-01-01

    Over the years many investigations of the gas temperature at the exhaust valve have been made. Nevertheless the modeling of the gas temperature still remains an unsolved problem. This master thesis approaches the problem by attempting to model the exhaust gas temperature by using the standard sensors equipped in SI engines, together with an in-cylinder pressure sensor which is needed in order to develop certain models. The concept in the master thesis is based upon a parameterization of the i...

  4. Exhaust Gas Temperature Measurements in Diagnostics of Turbocharged Marine Internal Combustion Engines Part I Standard Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korczewski Zbigniew

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the problem of diagnostic informativeness of exhaust gas temperature measurements in turbocharged marine internal combustion engines. Theoretical principles of the process of exhaust gas flow in turbocharger inlet channels are analysed in its dynamic and energetic aspects. Diagnostic parameters are defined which enable to formulate general evaluation of technical condition of the engine based on standard online measurements of the exhaust gas temperature. A proposal is made to extend the parametric methods of diagnosing workspaces in turbocharged marine engines by analysing time-histories of enthalpy changes of the exhaust gas flowing to the turbocompressor turbine. Such a time-history can be worked out based on dynamic measurements of the exhaust gas temperature, performed using a specially designed sheathed thermocouple.

  5. Thermodynamic control-oriented modeling of cycle-to-cycle exhaust gas temperature in an HCCI engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • First thermodynamic model in the literature to predict exhaust temperature in HCCI engines. • The model can be used for integrated control of HCCI combustion and exhaust temperature. • The model is experimentally validated at over 300 steady state and transient conditions. • Results show a good agreement between predicted and measured exhaust temperatures. • Sensitivity of exhaust gas temperature to variation of engine variables is shown. - Abstract: Model-based control of Homogenous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine exhaust temperature is a viable solution to optimize efficiency of both engine and the exhaust aftertreatment system. Low exhaust temperature in HCCI engines can limit the abatement of hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions in an exhaust aftertreatment system. A physical–empirical model is described for control of exhaust temperature in HCCI engines. This model captures cycle-to-cycle dynamics affecting exhaust temperature and is based on thermodynamic relations and semi-empirical correlations. It incorporates intake and exhaust gas flow dynamics, residual gas mixing, and fuel burn rate and is validated with experimental data from a single cylinder engine at over 300 steady state and transient conditions. The validation results indicate a good agreement between predicted and measured exhaust gas temperature

  6. A Mathematical Model for the Exhaust Gas Temperature Profile of a Diesel Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, C. H. G.; Maia, C. B.; Sodré, J. R.

    2015-09-01

    This work presents a heat transfer model for the exhaust gas of a diesel power generator to determine the gas temperature profile in the exhaust pipe. The numerical methodology to solve the mathematical model was developed using a finite difference method approach for energy equation resolution and determination of temperature profiles considering turbulent fluid flow and variable fluid properties. The simulation was carried out for engine operation under loads from 0 kW to 40 kW. The model was compared with results obtained using the multidimensional Ansys CFX software, which was applied to solve the governor equations of turbulent fluid flow. The results for the temperature profiles in the exhaust pipe show a good proximity between the mathematical model developed and the multidimensional software.

  7. Exhaust gas treat equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object: To permit efficient removal of radioactive gas from exhaust gas, which is produced in a great quantity in a short period of time, under a low liquifaction factor. Structure: In a equipment comprising a device for pre-cooling exhaust gas containing radioactive exhaust gases such as xenon and krypton, a liquifying chamber connected to the pre-cooling chamber and having a plurality of liquifying tubes, a purified gas duct line and a liquified exhaust gas recovery gas duct line, these lines being connected to the liquifying chamber, the liquifying tubes are filled with an adsorption substance (for instance, active carbon and molecular sieve) and (or) a thermally conductive substance (for instance, copper, iron and aluminum). (Nakamura, S.)

  8. High temperature-resistant materials for car exhaust gas catalysts; Hochtemperaturfeste Werkstoffe fuer Autoabgaskatalysatoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Einenkel, A.

    1996-06-30

    The aim of the work consisted of the development of a material for car exhaust gas catalysts which can be used in catalysts situated near the engine. Because of the occurrence of temperatures up to 1000 C in use, there are considerably higher requirements for this material than for previous materials. Titanium in the form of foil and metal mesh and nickel in the form of metal mesh was tested as substrate materials. Ti-hybrid, Ni and Cu were tested as diffusion blockers, and Pt noble metal coating as galvanic layer and as product of the thermal decomposition of a Pt complex salt free of chloride. It was found that Ti is not stable at a temperature of 1000 C and neither are the diffusion blockers. Ni with platinum plating does not change at 1000 C. The examination of the application technique of the Ni metal mesh gave no satisfactory conversion rates for Co, HC and NO{sub x}. Information was obtained in what conditions and in which geometrical shape metal mesh is suitable as the substrate geometry for exhaust gas catalysts. (orig.) [Deutsch] Das Ziel der Arbeiten bestand in der Entwicklung eines Werkstoffes fuer Autoabgaskatalysatoren, der in motornah angeordneten Katalysatoren eingesetzt werden kann. An diesen Werkstoff werden wegen der im Einsatz auftretenden Temperaturen bis 1000 C wesentlich hoehere Anforderugen als an die bisherigen Werkstoffe gestellt. Es wurden Ti in Form von Folie und Streckmetall sowie Ni in Form von Streckmetal als Substratwerkstoffe getestet. Als Diffusionssperren wurden Ti-Hybrid, Ni und Cu und als Edelmetallbeschichtung Pt als galvanische Schicht und als Produkt der thermischen Zersetzung eines chloridfreien Pt-Komplexsalzes getestet. Es zeigte sich, dass Ti bei der Temperaturbelastung von 1000 C nicht stabil ist, auch nicht die Diffusionssperren. Ni, platiniert, erfaehrt bei 1000 C keine Veraenderungen. Die anwendungstechnische Untersuchung des platinierten Ni-Streckmetalles ergab keine zufriedenstellenden Konvertierungsraten fuer CO, HC und NO{sub x}. Es wurden Erkenntnisse gewonnen, unter welchen Bedingungen und in welcher geometrischer Form sich Streckmetall als Substratgeometrie in Abgaskatalysatoren eignet. (orig.)

  9. Exhaust gas filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A filter material formed by joining glass clothes to both surfaces of a glass fiber non-woven fabric is used. The filter material is disposed at the inside of a square filter material support frame made of stainless steel. The filter material is attached in a zig-zag manner in the flowing direction of the exhaust gases so as to increase the filtration area. Separators, for example, made of stainless steel are inserted between the filter materials. The separator is corrugated so as to sandwich and support the filter materials from both sides by the ridged crests. The longitudinal bottom of the separator formed by corrugating it defines a flow channel of the exhaustion gases. The longitudinal bottom is also used as a channel for back blowing air. With such a constitution, combustion gases of radioactive miscellaneous solid wastes can be completely filtered. In addition, a back wash can be conducted under high temperature. (I.N.)

  10. Comparison of sound, exhaust gas temperature and smoke opacity characteristics of methyl esters of vegetable oils blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Prabhakar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Experimental studies were conducted to evaluate the sound, exhaust gas temperature and smoke opacity characteristics of a single cylinder, four stroke engine fuelled with Vegetable oil methyl ester and its blends with standard diesel. Among different vegetable oils which can be used as alternate fuels, five vegetable oils, i.e., Nerium (Nerium oleander, Jatropha (Jatropha curcas, Pongamia (Pongamia pinnata, Mahua (Madhuca indica and Neem (Azadirachta indica oils were selected for analysis. Tests has been conducted using the fuel blends of 20%, 40%, 60% and 80% biodiesel with standard diesel, with an engine speed of 1800 rpm. It has found that the sound, exhaust gas temperature and smoke opacity characteristics of vegetable oil methyl ester and its diesel blends closely followed those of standard diesel.

  11. Comparison of sound, exhaust gas temperature and smoke opacity characteristics of methyl esters of vegetable oils blends

    OpenAIRE

    S. Prabhakar; Annamalai, K.

    2011-01-01

    Experimental studies were conducted to evaluate the sound, exhaust gas temperature and smoke opacity characteristics of a single cylinder, four stroke engine fuelled with Vegetable oil methyl ester and its blends with standard diesel. Among different vegetable oils which can be used as alternate fuels, five vegetable oils, i.e., Nerium (Nerium oleander), Jatropha (Jatropha curcas), Pongamia (Pongamia pinnata), Mahua (Madhuca indica) and Neem (Azadirachta indica) oils were selected for analysi...

  12. Processing of exhaust gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon carbide is an important component in exhaust gas filters for diesel engines. Norway produces and refines SiC, which is used in fireproof and ceramic industry and as an abrasive. It is also increasingly used in electronic industry. The emission from diesel engines consists of small spherical soot particles with an appendage of fuel, lubricating oil, water and sulphur compounds. These particles are intercepted by silicon carbide filters. There is a world-wide demand for environmentally friendly diesel engines and a growing demand for silicon carbide. From 2002, the EU permits a maximum emission of 0.025 grams per km of driving

  13. 30 CFR 7.102 - Exhaust gas cooling efficiency test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust gas cooling efficiency test. 7.102....102 Exhaust gas cooling efficiency test. (a) Test procedures. (1) Follow the procedures specified in § 7.101(a). (2) Install a temperature measuring device to measure the exhaust gas temperature...

  14. Device for purifying exhaust gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To ensure the reliability in collection of krypton even on accident in liquidizing distillation tower. Constitution: Exhaust gas flows through active carbon adsorption tower where short half-life rare gas in exhaust gas is separated by adsorption, then through heat exchanger, then continuous distillation tower where krypton 85 is separated, then through batch distillation tower where krypton 85 is condensed, and then flows into storing cylinder. On accident in liquidizing distillation tower, at the first period exhaust gas flows through series connected active carbon adsorption tower, krypton 85 adsorbed in adsorption tower being transferred to cooling type adsorption tower, at the next period exhaust gas flows through tower, krypton 85 adsorbed in adsorption tower being transferred to tower. (M. K.)

  15. The effects of inlet temperature and turbulence characteristics on the flow development inside a gas turbine exhaust diffuser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomela, Christian Loangola

    The overall industrial gas turbine efficiency is known to be influenced by the pressure recovery in the exhaust system. The design and, subsequently, the performance of an industrial gas turbine exhaust diffuser largely depend on its inflow conditions dictated by the turbine last stage exit flow state and the restraints of the diffuser internal geometry. Recent advances in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) tools and the availability of computer hardware at an affordable cost made the virtual tool a very attractive one for the analysis of fluid flow through devices like a diffuser. In this backdrop, CFD analyses of a typical industrial gas turbine hybrid exhaust diffuser, consisting of an annular diffuser followed by a conical portion, have been carried out with the purpose of improving the performance of these thermal devices using an open-source CFD code "OpenFOAM". The first phase in the research involved the validation of the CFD approach using OpenFOAM by comparing CFD results against published benchmark experimental data. The numerical results closely captured the flow reversal and the separated boundary layer at the shroud wall where a steep velocity gradient has been observed. The standard k --epsilon turbulence model slightly over-predicted the mean velocity profile in the casing boundary layer while slightly under-predicted it in the reversed flow region. A reliable prediction of flow characteristics in this region is very important as the presence of the annular diffuser inclined wall has the most dominant effect on the downstream flow development. The core flow region and the presence of the hub wall have only a minor influence as reported by earlier experimental studies. Additional simulations were carried out in the second phase to test the veracity of other turbulence models; these include RNG k--epsilon, the SST k--o, and the Spalart-Allmaras turbulence models. It was found that a high resolution case with 47.5 million cells using the SST k--o turbulence model produced a mean flow velocity profile at the middle of the annular diffuser portion that had the best overall match with the experiment. The RNG k --epsilon, however, better predicted the diffuser performance along the exhaust diffuser length by means of the pressure recovery coefficient. These results were obtained using uniform inflow conditions and steady-state simulations. As such, the last phase of our investigations involved varying the inflow parameters like the turbulence intensity, the inlet flow temperature, and the flow angularity, which constitute important characteristics of the turbine blade wake, to investigate their impact on the diffuser design and performance. These isothermal CFD simulations revealed that by changing the flow temperature from 15 to 427°C, the pressure recovery coefficient significantly increased. However, it has been shown that the increase of temperature had no effects on the size of the reversed flow region and the thickness of the separated casing boundary layer, although the flow appears to be more turbulent. Furthermore, it has been established that an optimum turbulence intensity of about 4% produced comparable diffuser performance as the experiment. We also found that a velocity angle of about 2.5° at the last turbine stage will ensure a better exhaust diffuser performance.

  16. Elevated exhaust temperature, zoned, electrically-heated particulate matter filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Eugene V [Pinckney, MI; Bhatia, Garima [Bangalore, IN

    2012-04-17

    A system includes an electrical heater and a particulate matter (PM) filter that is arranged one of adjacent to and in contact with the electrical heater. A control module selectively increases an exhaust gas temperature of an engine to a first temperature and that initiates regeneration of the PM filter using the electrical heater while the exhaust gas temperature is above the first temperature. The first temperature is greater than a maximum exhaust gas temperature at the PM filter during non-regeneration operation and is less than an oxidation temperature of the PM.

  17. Development of efficiency-enhanced cogeneration system utilizing high-temperature exhaust-gas from a regenerative thermal oxidizer for waste volatile-organic-compound gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bannai, Masaaki [Distributed Energy Systems Department, Energy Solution Service Division, Hitachi, Ltd., Akihabara Daibiru Building, 18-13, Sotokanda 1-chome, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-8608 (Japan); Houkabe, Akira; Furukawa, Masahiko [Industrial Technology Division, R and D Control Headquarters, Fuji Photo Film Co., Ltd., 12-1, Ohgi-cho 2-chome, Odawara-shi, Kanagawa Pref. 250-0001 (Japan); Kashiwagi, Takao; Akisawa, Atsushi [Department of Biosystem Applied Science Education, Graduate School in Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology, 24-16, Nakamachi 1-chome, Koganei-shi, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan); Yoshida, Takuya [Plant Analysis Group, Coal Science Project, Power and Industrial Systems R and D Laboratory, Power Systems, Hitachi, Ltd., 832-2, Horiguchi, Hitachinaka-shi, Ibaraki Pref. 312-8507 (Japan); Yamada, Hiroyuki [Gasturbine Group, Power Source Engineering Department, Energy Solution Division, Hitachi Engineering and Service Co., Ltd., 15-1, Higashiohnuma-cho 1-chome, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki Pref. 316-0023 (Japan)

    2006-09-15

    We have developed a gas-turbine cogeneration system that makes effective use of the calorific value of the volatile organic compound (VOC) gases exhausted during production processes at a manufacturing plant. The system utilizes the high-temperature exhaust-gas from the regenerative thermal oxidizer (RTO) which is used for incinerating VOC gases. The high-temperature exhaust gas is employed to resuperheat the steam injected into the gas turbine. The steam-injection temperature raised in this way increases the heat input, resulting in the improved efficiency of the gas-turbine. Based on the actual operation of the system, we obtained the following results: Operation with the steam-injection temperature at 300{sup o}C (45{sup o}C resuperheated from 255{sup o}C) increased the efficiency of the gas turbine by 0.7%. The system can enhance the efficiency by 1.3% when the steam-injection temperature is elevated to 340{sup o}C (85{sup o}C resuperheated). In this case, up to 6.6 million yen of the total energy cost and 400 tons of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions can be reduced annually. A gas-turbine cogeneration and RTO system can reduce energy consumption by 23% and CO{sub 2} emission by 30.1% at the plant. (author)

  18. Simultaneous temperature and exhaust-gas recirculation-measurements in a homogeneous charge-compression ignition engine by use of pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weikl, Markus C.; Beyrau, Frank; Leipertz, Alfred

    2006-05-01

    Pure rotational coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy was used for the simultaneous determination of temperature and exhaust-gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge-compression ignition engine. Measurements were performed in a production-line four-cylinder gasoline engine operated with standard gasoline fuel through small optical line-of-sight accesses. The homogenization process of fresh intake air with recirculated exhaust gas was observed during the compression stroke, and the effect of charge temperature on combustion timing is shown. Single-pulse coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy spectra could not only be taken in the compression stroke but also during the gas-exchange cycle and after combustion. Consequently, the used method has been shown to be suitable for the investigation of two of the key parameters for self-ignition, namely temperature and charge composition.

  19. System using electric furnace exhaust gas to preheat scrap for steelmaking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takai, K.; Iwasaki, K.

    1987-09-08

    A method is described for clean preheating of scrap contaminated with oil and organic matter, for steelmaking, using heat from exhaust gas flow from an electric furnace. It consists of: burning any combustibles present in the exhaust gas flow and simultanously separating out dust particles from the exhaust gas flow; heating a predetermined amount of the scrap by heat exchange with a predetermined portion of the exhaust gas flow; removing and collecting dust from the exhaust gas flow after preheating of scrap thereby; sensing the temperature of the exhaust flow; scrubbing the exhaust gas flow with an aqueous solution of a deodorant solvent flowing at a rate regulated to be in a predetermined relationship related to the exhaust gas temperature sensed prior to scrubbing, thereby generating saturated vapor and reducing the temperature of the exhaust gas flow by a predetermined amount; and electrostatically precipitating out oil mist attached to saturated water vapor and liquid droplets in the exhaust gas flow.

  20. Method of controlling temperature of a thermoelectric generator in an exhaust system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, Gregory P; Reynolds, Michael G; Cowgill, Joshua D

    2013-05-21

    A method of controlling the temperature of a thermoelectric generator (TEG) in an exhaust system of an engine is provided. The method includes determining the temperature of the heated side of the TEG, determining exhaust gas flow rate through the TEG, and determining the exhaust gas temperature through the TEG. A rate of change in temperature of the heated side of the TEG is predicted based on the determined temperature, the determined exhaust gas flow rate, and the determined exhaust gas temperature through the TEG. Using the predicted rate of change of temperature of the heated side, exhaust gas flow rate through the TEG is calculated that will result in a maximum temperature of the heated side of the TEG less than a predetermined critical temperature given the predicted rate of change in temperature of the heated side of the TEG. A corresponding apparatus is provided.

  1. Higashi-Niigata thermal power station the 3rd list thermal efficiency improvement by changing exhaust gas boiler feed water temperature. Higashiniigata karyoku hatsudensho 3 go keiretsu hai gas boiler kyusui ondo henko ni yoru netsukoritsu kojo ni tsuite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakamizu, A. (The Tohoku Electric Power Co. Inc., Sendai (Japan))

    1991-02-04

    The third system of the Higashi Niigata thermal power station employs combined cycle power generation system, and it consumes liquefied natural gas. The combined cycle power generation system is a combination of gas turbine power system and steam turbine power system which utilizes the steam from exhaust gas boiler. The exhaust gas boiler which equips economizer and feed water pre-heater for the purpose of improving thermal efficiency, was investigated in the setting value of the feed water temperature. By changing the control valve setting value of the feed water temperature at the exit of economizer, output was increased. Also, the power reduction of the high pressure feed water pump and the condensate pump was accomplished. The driving power of each feed water pump was reduced by reducing the amount of recirculating feed water in the economizer and by lowering the loss of exhuast gas, so that the energy-saving was realized. 5 figs.

  2. Emission Characteristics for Single Cylinder DI Diesel Engine with EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) System

    OpenAIRE

    Pratik G. Sapre

    2014-01-01

    This paper includes experimental investigations of various exhaust gas recirculation rates on engine emission characteristics like NOx, HC, CO, CO2, exhaust gas temperature by AVL gas meter. By passing exhaust gas from venturi meter and regulating it with EGR valve so as to find out its effect on critical NOx emission and other harmful HC,CO & NOx emission parameter. So to reduce such harmful gases exhaust gas recirculation is economical and effective method to control emissio...

  3. 40 CFR 1065.127 - Exhaust gas recirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Exhaust gas recirculation. 1065.127 Section...AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS...Specifications § 1065.127 Exhaust gas recirculation. Use the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system...

  4. Exhaust gas sensor based on tin dioxide for automotive application

    OpenAIRE

    Valleron, Arthur; Pijolat, Christophe; Viricelle, Jean-Paul; Breuil, Philippe; Marchand, Jean-Claude; Ott, Sébastien

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to investigate the potentialities of gas sensor based on semi-conductor for exhaust gas automotive application. The sensing element is a tin dioxide layer with gold electrodes. This gas sensor is able to detect both reducing and oxidizing gases in an exhaust pipe with varying selectivity depending on the temperature in the range 250° C-600° C. At low temperature 350-400° C, the sensor detects nitrogen dioxide while it is more sensitive to carbon monoxide at temperatur...

  5. Low exhaust temperature electrically heated particulate matter filter system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Eugene V. (Pinckney, MI); Paratore, Jr., Michael J. (Howell, MI); Bhatia, Garima (Bangalore, IN)

    2012-02-14

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter, a sensor, a heating element, and a control module. The PM filter includes with an upstream end that receives exhaust gas, a downstream end and multiple zones. The sensor detects a temperature of the exhaust gas. The control module controls current to the heating element to convection heat one of the zones and initiate a regeneration process. The control module selectively increases current to the heating element relative to a reference regeneration current level when the temperature is less than a predetermined temperature.

  6. Exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2013-05-21

    An exhaust gas recirculation system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger having a low pressure turbine outlet in fluid communication with an exhaust gas conduit. The turbocharger also includes a low pressure compressor intake and a high pressure compressor outlet in communication with an intake air conduit. An exhaust gas recirculation conduit fluidly communicates with the exhaust gas conduit to divert a portion of exhaust gas to a low pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extending between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and an engine intake system for delivery of exhaust gas thereto. A high pressure exhaust gas recirculation branch extends between the exhaust gas recirculation conduit and the compressor intake and delivers exhaust gas to the compressor for mixing with a compressed intake charge for delivery to the intake system.

  7. High Temperature Resistant Exhaust Valve Spindle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihlet, Uffe Ditlev

    2014-01-01

    Transport by ship remains the most economical and environmentally friendly mode of transport with a very low weight specific CO2 footprint. Further increase of the fuel efficiency of large ships will results in a higher internal engine temperature. To allow this without compromising the reliability of the engine, new high temperature alloys are required for a specific engine component, the exhaust valve spindle. Two alloys are used for an exhaust valve spindle; one for the bottom of the spindle,...

  8. High Temperature Resistant Exhaust Valve Spindle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bihlet, Uffe Ditlev

    2014-01-01

    Transport by ship remains the most economical and environmentally friendly mode of transport with a very low weight specific CO2 footprint. Further increase of the fuel efficiency of large ships will results in a higher internal engine temperature. To allow this without compromising the reliability of the engine, new high temperature alloys are required for a specific engine component, the exhaust valve spindle. Two alloys are used for an exhaust valve spindle; one for the bottom of the spindle, and one for the spindle seat. Being placed in the exhaust gas stream, combustion products such as V2O5 and Na2SO4 condense on the spindle, causing hot corrosion. Current industry standards can withstand service temperatures of up to 500°C for the spindle seat and 700°C for the spindle bottom. This project was tasked with increasing these temperatures 50°C each. Literature review as well as an in-situ corrosion test revealed that the most resistant alloy in such an environment is Alloy 657 (Ni-based, 49 wt% Cr, 1.5 wt% Nb). This alloy is suitable for the spindle bottom, but not for the spindle seat, as it is too weak. Thermodynamic calculations suggested that it was possible to modify the chemistry of the current valve seat alloy, Alloy 718 (Ni-based, 19 wt% Cr, 18 wt% Fe, 5.1 wt% Nb, 3 wt% Mo, 1 wt% Ti and 0.6 wt% Al), and thereby to obtain a more hot corrosion resistant alloy. To validate these calculations, 16 Ni-based alloys, containing 40 wt% Cr and Nb, Ta and Ti in varying levels, were produced by experimental laser cladding. Heat treatments proved that these alloys were precipitation hardenable, and that some of them reached high levels of hardness. Based on these results, five Ni-based alloys containing 35-45 wt% Cr and 4-6 wt% Nb were ordered, to narrow down the feasible alloy compositions. During the alloy development work, extensive microstructure quantification was performed, the results of which validated the predictive thermodynamical calculations. The heat treatment results showed that a relation exists between the solution treated microstructure and the mechanical properties. This lead to the design of the alloy Ni40Cr3.5Nb (Ni-based, 3.5 wt% Nb and 0.5 wt% Ti). This alloy is precipitation hardenable to the same level of hardness as Alloy 718, and laboratory testing suggests that it is suitable for application at service temperatures of 550°C.

  9. Coke-free dry reforming of model diesel fuel by a pulsed spark plasma at low temperatures using an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Yasushi; Furukawa, Naotsugu; Matsukata, Masahiko; Kikuchi, Eiichi

    2011-07-01

    Dry reforming of diesel fuel, an endothermic reaction, is an attractive process for on-board hydrogen/syngas production to increase energy efficiency. For operating this dry reforming process in a vehicle, we can use the exhaust gas from an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system as a source of carbon dioxide. Catalytic dry reforming of heavy hydrocarbon is a very difficult reaction due to the high accumulation of carbon on the catalyst. Therefore, we attempted to use a non-equilibrium pulsed plasma for the dry reforming of model diesel fuel without a catalyst. We investigated dry reforming of model diesel fuel (n-dodecane) with a low-energy pulsed spark plasma, which is a kind of non-equilibrium plasma at a low temperature of 523 K. Through the reaction, we were able to obtain syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) and a small amount of C2 hydrocarbon without coke formation at a ratio of CO2/Cfuel = 1.5 or higher. The reaction can be conducted at very low temperatures such as 523 K. Therefore, it is anticipated as a novel and effective process for on-board syngas production from diesel fuel using an EGR system.

  10. Coke-free dry reforming of model diesel fuel by a pulsed spark plasma at low temperatures using an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dry reforming of diesel fuel, an endothermic reaction, is an attractive process for on-board hydrogen/syngas production to increase energy efficiency. For operating this dry reforming process in a vehicle, we can use the exhaust gas from an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system as a source of carbon dioxide. Catalytic dry reforming of heavy hydrocarbon is a very difficult reaction due to the high accumulation of carbon on the catalyst. Therefore, we attempted to use a non-equilibrium pulsed plasma for the dry reforming of model diesel fuel without a catalyst. We investigated dry reforming of model diesel fuel (n-dodecane) with a low-energy pulsed spark plasma, which is a kind of non-equilibrium plasma at a low temperature of 523 K. Through the reaction, we were able to obtain syngas (hydrogen and carbon monoxide) and a small amount of C2 hydrocarbon without coke formation at a ratio of CO2/Cfuel = 1.5 or higher. The reaction can be conducted at very low temperatures such as 523 K. Therefore, it is anticipated as a novel and effective process for on-board syngas production from diesel fuel using an EGR system.

  11. Development of Exhaust Gas Driven Absorption Chiller-Heater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Naoyuki; Endou, Tetsuya; Saito, Kiyoshi; Kawai, Sunao

    Micro gas turbines are expected as engines for the distributed co-generation systems, performing power generation and heat recovery. Waste heat from micro gas turbines are discharged in the form of exhaust gas, and it is simple that exhaust gas is directly supplied to an absorption refrigerator. In this paper, we evaluated various single-double effect absorption cycles for exhaust gas driven absorption refrigerators, and clarified that the difference of performance among these cycles are little. We adopted one of these cycles for the prototype machine, and experimented with it to get the partial load characteristics and the effect of cooling water temperature on the performance. Based on the experimental data, we developed as imulation model of the static characteristics, and studied the direction of improvement.

  12. Ion Temperature Anisotropy across Reconnection Exhaust Jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hietala, H.; Drake, J. F.; Phan, T. D.; Eastwood, J. P.; McFadden, J. P.

    2014-12-01

    Magnetic reconnection redistributes energy by releasing magnetic energy into plasma kinetic energy - high speed bulk flows, heating, and particle acceleration. In the magnetotail, most of the released energy appears to go into ion heating. However, previous observations and simulations show that this heating is anisotropic with the plasma temperature parallel to the magnetic field generally increasing more than the perpendicular temperature. Simulations and theory indicate that this temperature anisotropy can balance part of the magnetic tension force that accelerates the jet, and may even exceed it leading to firehose instability.Here we report the results of a new study of ion temperature anisotropy in reconnection exhausts generated by anti-parallel reconnection. We have examined ARTEMIS dual-spacecraft observations of long-duration magnetotail exhausts at lunar distances in conjunction with Particle-In-Cell simulations. In particular, we have studied spatial variations in the ion temperature anisotropy across the outflows far away (>100 ion inertial lengths) from the X-line. A consistent pattern is found in both the spacecraft data and the simulations: whilst the total temperature profile across the exhaust is flat, near the exhaust boundaries the parallel temperature dominates. A consequence of this is that firehose threshold is greatly exceeded in a significant fraction of the exhaust. In contrast, the perpendicular temperature dominates at the neutral plane (|BX| < 0.1 B0), indicating that, despite the turbulence and the large distance to the X-line, particles undergo Speiser-like motion (rather than isotropization by scattering). We also analyse the characteristics of the particle distributions leading to these anisotropies at different distances from the mid-plane.

  13. Inverted Fuel Cell: Room-Temperature Hydrogen Separation from an Exhaust Gas by Using a Commercial Short-Circuited PEM Fuel Cell without Applying any Electrical Voltage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friebe, Sebastian; Geppert, Benjamin; Caro, Jürgen

    2015-06-26

    A short-circuited PEM fuel cell with a Nafion membrane has been evaluated in the room-temperature separation of hydrogen from exhaust gas streams. The separated hydrogen can be recovered or consumed in an in situ olefin hydrogenation when the fuel cell is operated as catalytic membrane reactor. Without applying an outer electrical voltage, there is a continuous hydrogen flux from the higher to the lower hydrogen partial pressure side through the Nafion membrane. On the feed side of the Nafion membrane, hydrogen is catalytically split into protons and electrons by the Pt/C electrocatalyst. The protons diffuse through the Nafion membrane, the electrons follow the short-circuit between the two brass current collectors. On the cathode side, protons and electrons recombine, and hydrogen is released. PMID:26013958

  14. 40 CFR 89.416 - Raw exhaust gas flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Raw exhaust gas flow. 89.416 Section...) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM NEW AND IN-USE NONROAD COMPRESSION-IGNITION ENGINES Exhaust Emission Test Procedures § 89.416 Raw exhaust gas flow. The exhaust gas flow shall be determined by one of the...

  15. High speed exhaust gas recirculation valve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fensom, Rod (Peterborough, GB); Kidder, David J. (Peterborough, GB)

    2005-01-18

    In order to minimize pollutants such as Nox, internal combustion engines typically include an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) valve that can be used to redirect a portion of exhaust gases to an intake conduit, such as an intake manifold, so that the redirected exhaust gases will be recycled. It is desirable to have an EGR valve with fast-acting capabilities, and it is also desirable to have the EGR valve take up as little space as possible. An exhaust gas recirculation valve is provided that includes an exhaust passage tube, a valve element pivotally mounted within the exhaust passage tube, a linear actuator; and a gear train. The gear train includes a rack gear operatively connected to the linear actuator, and at least one rotatable gear meshing with the rack gear and operatively connected to the valve element to cause rotation of the valve element upon actuation of the linear actuator. The apparatus provides a highly compact package having a high-speed valve actuation capability.

  16. Integrated exhaust gas recirculation and charge cooling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2013-12-10

    An intake system for an internal combustion engine comprises an exhaust driven turbocharger configured to deliver compressed intake charge, comprising exhaust gas from the exhaust system and ambient air, through an intake charge conduit and to cylinders of the internal combustion engine. An intake charge cooler is in fluid communication with the intake charge conduit. A cooling system, independent of the cooling system for the internal combustion engine, is in fluid communication with the intake charge cooler through a cooling system conduit. A coolant pump delivers a low temperature cooling medium from the cooling system to and through the intake charge cooler for the transfer of heat from the compressed intake charge thereto. A low temperature cooler receives the heated cooling medium through the cooling system conduit for the transfer or heat therefrom.

  17. 46 CFR 63.25-7 - Exhaust gas boilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Exhaust gas boilers. 63.25-7 Section 63.25-7 Shipping... Requirements for Specific Types of Automatic Auxiliary Boilers § 63.25-7 Exhaust gas boilers. (a) Construction. An auxiliary exhaust gas boiler must meet the applicable construction requirements of part 52 or...

  18. Second law analysis of a low temperature combustion diesel engine: Effect of injection timing and exhaust gas recirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For diesel engines, low temperature combustion (LTC) with a high level of EGR and late injection becomes attractive because of its potential of simultaneous reduction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions. However, detailed thermodynamic evaluations including second law analysis of the LTC are few. The current work employed an engine cycle simulation incorporating the second law of thermodynamics to evaluate the energy and exergy distribution of various processes in a low temperature combustion diesel engine. After validation with experimental data at eight operating conditions including four different EGR levels and two different injection timings, the model was used to evaluate the effect of EGR level and injection timing on the first and second law parameters. As EGR was increased, intake temperature and equivalence ratio increased. Results showed that for the case at 0% EGR level with conventional injection timing, about 30% of the fuel exergy was destructed during combustion processes, and as EGR level increased to 45% (intake temperature and equivalence ratio also increased), the combustion destructed exergy decreased to 20% of the fuel exergy. This was largely due to the related combustion temperature increase. For both conventional (?6.5° aTDC) and late (1.5° aTDC) injection timings, the percentage of exergy transfer through flows increases as EGR increases, which is attributed to the retarded ignition by increasing EGR. Other parameters such as energy and exergy transfer due to heat transfer, blow-by, and unburned fuel also were determined as a function of EGR level and injection timing. -- Highlights: ? Exergy destruction during combustion decreased as intake temperature increased. ? Both conventional and late injection timings (LTC cases) were examined. ? For conventional injection timings, the combustion efficiency remains constant as EGR increases. ? For late injections and high EGR, combustion was incomplete. ? Late injection cases had lower percentage of heat transfer exergy.

  19. Technique for radiation treatment of exhaust gas due to combustion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As the Japanese unique research in the field of preservation of environment, the technique to remove simultaneously sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides in exhaust gas using electron beam irradiation is noteworthy. This research was started by the experiment in the central research laboratory of Ebara Manufacturing Co., Ltd., in which it was found that the sulphur dioxide of initial concentration of 1,000 ppm was almost completely vanished when the exhaust gas of heavy oil combustion in a batch type vessel was irradiated for 9 minutes by electron beam. Based on this experiment, JAERI installed a continuous irradiation equipment with a large accelerator, and has investigated the effect of various parameters such as dose rate, irradiation temperature, total dose and agitation. This resulted in the remarkable finding that nitrogen oxides were also completely removed as well as sulphur dioxide when the exhaust gas containing both sulphur dioxide and nitrogen oxides was irradiated for a few seconds. In this case, if water of about 0.3% is added, removal rate of sulphur dioxide is greatly increased. The research group of University of Tokyo obtained other findings concerning removal rates. Then, after the pilot plant stage in Ebara Manufacturing Co., Ltd. from 1974, the test plant of exhaust gas treatment for a sintering machine, having the capacity of 3,000 Nm3/hr, has been constructed in Yawata Works of Nippon Steel Corp. This is now operating properly. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  20. Temperature controlled exhaust heat thermoelectric generation

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, F. P.; Martins, Jorge; Gon??alves, L. M.; Sousa, R.

    2012-01-01

    The amount of energy wasted through the exhaust of an Internal Combustion Engine (ICE) vehicle is roughly the same as the mechanical power output of the engine. The high temperature of these gases (up to 1000??C) makes them intrinsically apt for energy recovery. The gains in efficiency for the vehicle could be relevant, even if a small percentage of this waste energy could be regenerated into electric power and used to charge the battery pack of a Hybrid or Extended Range Electric Vehic...

  1. Boosting devices with integral features for recirculating exhaust gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2015-12-22

    According to one embodiment of the invention, a turbine housing includes a turbine inlet in fluid communication with a turbine volute configured to house a turbine wheel, the turbine inlet configured to direct an exhaust gas flow from an engine to the turbine wheel. The turbine housing also includes a turbine outlet in fluid communication with the turbine volute, the turbine outlet configured to direct the exhaust gas flow to an exhaust gas conduit and a first exhaust gas recirculation supply port located on and in fluid communication with the turbine outlet, the first exhaust gas recirculation supply port being configured to direct a portion of the exhaust gas flow to an exhaust gas recirculation supply conduit.

  2. Exhaust gas treatment by electrical discharge techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exhaust gases have been treated by two kinds of electrical discharge, surface discharge and DC positive streamer corona, in order to remove NOx. For the former case, the exhaust gas containing 20 ppm and 45 ppm NO, respectively was used. Treatment efficiency depended on a power supply frequency and applied voltage. The highest NO removal rate of 100 % was achieved, however, in a dry mode almost all NO was oxidized into NO2. Using the DC and DC with series gap, the treatment efficiency strongly depended on a corona discharge mode; a desired streamer was ignited in a wire-plate reactor, using wire pre-treatment or series gap, respectively. For DC power supply, the high voltage electrode material was investigated in order to obtain the highest treatment efficiency. Among the studied materials, tungsten turned out be the best for igniting the most stable streamer mode according to tungsten trioxide identified on the wire surface. (Authors)

  3. PIXE analysis of exhaust gas from diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The variation of elemental concentrations in exhaust gas of a Diesel engine with the outputs was studied. Particulates in high temperature gas were collected on silica fiber filters and analyzed by PIXE method. Concentrations of S and V were nearly proportional to particulate masses and fuel consumption rates per discharging rates of exhaust gas respectively. While, concentrations of Fe and Mn were markedly increased together with engine outputs, and Mn/Fe ratios were nearly equal to those of the material of piston rings and the cylinder liner. Concentrations of the elements contained in lubricant, such as Ca and Mo, were also conspicuously increased with the outputs. It was shown that PIXE analysis is a useful tool for engine diagonostics owing to its high sensitive multi-elemental availability without chemical treatments. (author)

  4. Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, Kevin P. (Metamora, IL); Kieser, Andrew J. (Morton, IL); Rodman, Anthony (Chillicothe, IL); Liechty, Michael P. (Chillicothe, IL); Hergart, Carl-Anders (Peoria, IL); Hardy, William L. (Peoria, IL)

    2008-05-27

    A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

  5. Exhaust gas emissions of a vortex breakdown stabilized combustor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yetter, R. A.; Gouldin, F. C.

    1976-01-01

    Exhaust gas emission data are described for a swirl stabilized continuous combustor. The combustor consists of confined concentric jets with premixed fuel and air in the inner jet and air in the outer jet. Swirl may be induced in both inner and outer jets with the sense of rotation in the same or opposite directions (co-swirl and counter-swirl). The combustor limits NO emissions by lean operation without sacrificing CO and unburned hydrocarbon emission performance, when commercial-grade methane and air fired at one atmosphere without preheat are used. Relative swirl direction and magnitude are found to have significant effects on exhaust gas concentrations, exit temperatures, and combustor efficiencies. Counter-swirl gives a large recirculation zone, a short luminous combustion zone, and large slip velocities in the interjet shear layer. For maximum counter-swirl conditions, the efficiency is low.

  6. Study on exhaust gas treatment by electron beam irradiation, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was already shown in principle and by experiment that exhaust gas from the combustion of heavy oil can be desulfurized by electron beam irradiation with a batch type apparatus. The study on a continuous irradiation system was performed this time. The reaction chamber is a stainless steel box type of 500 x 50 x 500(h) mm. The electron accelerator used is Cockcroft-Walton type. In the present study, wide variety of experiments have been carried out on the effects of various conditions on reaction, such as dose-rate (1 x 105 to 6 x 106 rad/s), electron energy (1 to 3 MeV), reaction temperature (75 to 2450C), staying time of exhaust gas in the chamber (0.1 to 9 sec) and the composition of the gas (SO2:180 to 930 ppm, NOx:80 to 1300 ppm), and others. The results indicate that exhaust gas can be treated continuously. Nitrogen oxides were removed by almost 100% at 2 Mrad, and sulfur dioxide was removed by 80% at 4 Mrad. Remaining future problems are scaling up to practical plants, disposal or application of a large amount of solids produced by this process, development of a low cost, high output accelerator, and advanced examination on the economy. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  7. Characterization of Jt-60u exhaust gas during experimental operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Characterization of Tokamak exhaust gas, gas species and their concentrations, is important for the design of the tritium fuel processing system. The exhaust gas from Jt-60u during the experimental campaign has been investigated with micro gas chromatography (M GC). Gas species, such as hydrogen isotopes, CH4, C2H2+C2H4, C2H6 and CO2, in the exhaust gas from a plasma discharge could be identified successfully. In this campaign, the total ratio of hydrogen isotopes and impurity species in exhaust gas was estimated to be 39 to 1. From the comparison between both amount of gas species and some plasma parameters, there was a tendency observed indicating that the amount of hydrogen isotopes and carbon compounds increased with maximum electron density. This relation suggests that the amount of hydrogen isotopes and carbon compounds in the exhaust gas is increases with the extension of plasma performance

  8. 40 CFR 86.209-94 - Exhaust gas sampling system; gasoline-fueled vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust gas sampling system; gasoline-fueled vehicles. 86.209-94 Section 86.209-94 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Trucks and New Medium-Duty Passenger Vehicles; Cold Temperature Test Procedures § 86.209-94 Exhaust...

  9. Investigation of Diesel Exhaust Gas Toxicity on Transient Modes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivashchenko Nikolay Antonovich

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Currently, the generation of heat engines and their control systems are based on ecological indices such as the toxicity of the fulfilled gases. When designing motors, software packages are widely used. These software packages provide the ability to calculate the workflow of engine at steady-state conditions. The definition of indicators emissions is a difficult task. The distribution statistics of the modes shows that the engines of the transport units work on unsteady modes most of the time. The calculation of toxicity indicators is even less developed. In this article experimental and numeric study of the diesel engine with turbocharger exhaust toxicity was considered. As a result of the experimental study, which was conducted with single-cylinder diesel engine compartment simulated work on the transient state, working process characteristics of a diesel engine were obtained, including carbon and nitrogen oxides concentrations. Functional dependencies of concentrations of toxic exhaust components, such as carbon and nitrogen oxides, on excess air ratio and exhaust temperature were obtained. Diesel engine transient processes were simulated using developed mathematical dynamic model of combined engine in locomotive power plant with a change in control signal (position of locomotive driver’s controller and external influence signal (resistance moment. The analysis of exhaust gas toxicity was conducted.

  10. 30 CFR 36.26 - Composition of exhaust gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Composition of exhaust gas. 36.26 Section 36.26... EQUIPMENT Construction and Design Requirements § 36.26 Composition of exhaust gas. (a) Preliminary engine... immediately at full load and speed. The preliminary liquid-fuel-injection rate shall be such that the...

  11. 40 CFR 1065.127 - Exhaust gas recirculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust gas recirculation. 1065.127 Section 1065.127 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Equipment Specifications § 1065.127 Exhaust gas recirculation. Use...

  12. New catalysts for exhaust gas cleaning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haerkoenen, M. [Kemira Metalkat Oy, Oulu (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    Major challenge for future catalyst systems was to develop thermally more stable washcoats for close coupled operating conditions and for engines operating under high speed and load conditions. To design these future emission systems extensive research and development was undertaken to develop methods to disperse and stabilize the key catalytic materials for operation at much higher temperatures. Second priority was to design catalysts that are more effective under low temperature exhaust conditions and have improved oxygen storage properties in the washcoats. Incorporating new materials and modified preparation technology a new generation of metallic catalyst formulations emerged, those being trimetallic K6 (Pt:Pd:Rh and bimetallic K7) (Pd+Pd:Rh). The target was to combine the best property of Pt:Rh (good NO{sub x} reduction) with that of the good HC oxidation activity of Pd and to ensure that precious metal/support interactions were positively maintained. Both K6 and K7 concepts contain special catalyst structures with optimized washcoat performance which can be brick converter configuration. Improvement in light-off, thermal stability and transient performance with these new catalyst formulations have clearly been shown in both laboratory and vehicle testing. (author) (20 refs.)

  13. Boosting devices with integral features for recirculating exhaust gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ko -Jen

    2015-09-15

    According to one embodiment of the invention, a compressor housing includes a compressor inlet in fluid communication with a compressor volute configured to house a compressor wheel, the compressor inlet configured to provide a first air flow to the compressor wheel and a compressor outlet in fluid communication with the compressor volute, the compressor outlet configured to direct a compressed gas to an intake manifold. The compressor housing further includes an exhaust gas recirculation inlet port in fluid communication with the compressor volute, the exhaust gas recirculation inlet port being configured to combine an exhaust gas flow with the air flow to the compressor wheel.

  14. An approach for exhaust gas energy recovery of internal combustion engine: Steam-assisted turbocharging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The calculation method for SAT engine was developed and introduced. • SAT can effectively promote the low-speed performances of IC engine. • At 1500 r/min, intake pressure reaches target value and torque is increased by 25%. • The thermal efficiency of SAT engine only has a slight increase. - Abstract: An approach for IC engine exhaust gas energy recovery, named as steam-assisted turbocharging (SAT), is developed to assist the exhaust turbocharger. A steam generating plant is coupled to the exhaust turbocharged engine’s exhaust pipe, which uses the high-temperature exhaust gas to generate steam. The steam is injected into turbine inlet and used as the supplementary working medium for turbine. By this means, turbine output power and then boosting pressure can be promoted due to the increase of turbine working medium. To reveal the advantages and energy saving potentials of SAT, this concept was applied to an exhaust turbocharging engine, and a parameter analysis was carried out. Research results show that, SAT can effectively promote the low-speed performances of IC engine, and make the peak torque shift to low-speed area. At 1500 r/min, the intake gas pressure can reach the desired value and the torque can be increased by 25.0% over the exhaust turbocharging engine, while the pumping mean effective pressure (PMEP) and thermal efficiency only have a slight increase. At 1000 r/min, the improvement of IC engine performances is very limited due to the low exhaust gas energy

  15. Exhaust gas recirculation for advanced diesel combustion cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Analysis of the incremental (cycle-by-cycle) build-up of EGR. • Proposed one-step equations for transient/steady-state gas concentration estimation. • Defined an in-cylinder excess-air ratio to account for the recycled oxygen with EGR. • Demonstrated the use of intake oxygen as a reliable measure of EGR effectiveness. • Demonstrated the impact of engine load and intake pressure on EGR effectiveness. - Abstract: Modern diesel engines tend to utilize significantly large quantities of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and high intake pressures across the engine load range to meet NOx targets. At such high EGR rates, the combustion process and exhaust emissions tend to exhibit a marked sensitivity to small changes in the EGR quantity, resulting in unintended deviations from the desired engine performance characteristics (energy efficiency, emissions, stability). An accurate estimation of EGR and its effect on the intake dilution are, therefore, necessary to enable its application during transient engine operation or unstable combustion regimes. In this research, a detailed analysis that includes estimation of the transient (cycle-by-cycle) build-up of EGR and the time (engine cycles) required to reach the steady-state EGR operation has been carried out. One-step global equations to calculate the transient and steady-state gas concentrations in the intake and exhaust are proposed. The effects of engine load and intake pressure on EGR have been examined and explained in terms of intake charge dilution and in-cylinder excess-air ratio. The EGR analysis is validated against a wide range of empirical data that include low temperature combustion cycles, intake pressure and load sweeps. This research intends to not only formulate a clear understanding of EGR application for advanced diesel combustion but also to set forth guidelines for transient analysis of EGR

  16. Automotive exhaust gas flow control for an ammonia–water absorption refrigeration system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A considerable part of the energy generated by an automotive internal combustion engine is wasted as heat in the exhaust system. This wasted heat could be recovered and applied to power auxiliary systems in a vehicle, contributing to its overall energy efficiency. In the present work, the experimental analysis of an absorption refrigeration system was performed. The exhaust system of an automotive internal combustion engine was connected to the generator element of an absorption refrigeration system. The performance of the absorption refrigerator was evaluated as a function of the supplied heat. The use of a control strategy for the engine exhaust gas mass flow rate was implemented to optimize the system. Exhaust gas flow was controlled by step-motor actuated valves commanded by a microcontroller in which a proportional-integral control scheme was implemented. Information such as engine torque, speed, key temperatures in the absorption cycle, as well as internal temperatures of the refrigerator was measured in a transient regime. The results indicated that the refrigeration system exhibited better performance when the amount of input heat is controlled based on the temperature of the absorption cycle generator. It was possible to conclude that, by dynamically controlling the amount of input heat, the utilisation range of the absorption refrigeration system powered by exhaust gas heat could be expanded in order to incorporate high engine speed operating conditions. - Highlights: •An absorption refrigerator was driven by automotive exhaust gas heat. •A system for controlling the refrigeration system heat input was developed. •Excessive exhaust gas heat leads to ineffective operation of the refrigerator. •Control of refrigerator's generator temperature led to better performance. •The use of exhaust gas was possible for high engine speeds

  17. IC ENGINE SUPERCHARGING AND EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION USING JET COMPRESSOR

    OpenAIRE

    Adhimoulame Kalaisselvane; Natarajan Alagumurthy; Krishnaraj Palaniradja; G Selvaraj Gunasegarane

    2010-01-01

    Supercharging is a process which is used to improve the performance of an engine by increasing the specific power output whereas exhaust gas recirculation reduces the NOx produced by engine because of supercharging. In a conventional engine, supercharger functions as a compressor for the forced induction of the charge taking mechanical power from the engine crankshaft. In this study, supercharging is achieved using a jet compressor. In the jet compressor, the exhaust gas is used as the motive...

  18. Gas flow means for improving efficiency of exhaust hoods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Apparatus is described for inhibiting the flow of contaminants in an exhaust enclosure toward an individual located adjacent an opening into the exhaust enclosure by providing a gas flow toward a source of contaminants from a position in front of an individual to urge said contaminants away from the individual toward a gas exit port. The apparatus comprises a gas manifold which may be worn by a person as a vest. The manifold has a series of gas outlets on a front face thereof facing away from the individual and toward the contaminants to thereby provide a flow of gas from the front of the individual toward the contaminants. 15 figures

  19. Characterization of Jt-60u exhaust gas during experimental operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Isobe, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan)]. E-mail: isobe.kanetsugu@jaea.go.jp; Nakamura, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Kaminaga, A. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-0193 (Japan); Tsuzuki, K. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-0193 (Japan); Higashijima, S. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka-shi, Ibaraki-ken 319-0193 (Japan); Nishi, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki-ken 319-1195 (Japan); Kobayashi, Y. [Kyoto University, Uji-si, Kyoto-fu 611-0011 (Japan); Konishi, S. [Kyoto University, Uji-si, Kyoto-fu 611-0011 (Japan)

    2006-02-15

    Characterization of Tokamak exhaust gas, gas species and their concentrations, is important for the design of the tritium fuel processing system. The exhaust gas from Jt-60u during the experimental campaign has been investigated with micro gas chromatography (M GC). Gas species, such as hydrogen isotopes, CH{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 2}+C{sub 2}H{sub 4}, C{sub 2}H{sub 6} and CO{sub 2}, in the exhaust gas from a plasma discharge could be identified successfully. In this campaign, the total ratio of hydrogen isotopes and impurity species in exhaust gas was estimated to be 39 to 1. From the comparison between both amount of gas species and some plasma parameters, there was a tendency observed indicating that the amount of hydrogen isotopes and carbon compounds increased with maximum electron density. This relation suggests that the amount of hydrogen isotopes and carbon compounds in the exhaust gas is increases with the extension of plasma performance.

  20. Remote sensing of temperature and concentration profiles of a gas jet by coupling infrared emission spectroscopy and LIDAR for characterization of aircraft engine exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Offret, J.-P.; Lebedinsky, J.; Navello, L.; Pina, V.; Serio, B.; Bailly, Y.; Hervé, P.

    2015-05-01

    Temperature data play an important role in the combustion chamber since it determines both the efficiency and the rate of pollutants emission of engines. Air pollution problem concerns the emissions of gases such as CO, CO2, NO, NO2, SO2 and also aerosols, soot and volatile organic compounds. Flame combustion occurs in hostile environments where temperature and concentration profiles are often not easy to measure. In this study, a temperature and CO2 concentration profiles optical measurement method, suitable for combustion analysis, is discussed and presented. The proposed optical metrology method presents numerous advantages when compared to intrusive methods. The experimental setup comprises a passive radiative emission measurement method combined with an active laser-measurement method. The passive method is based on the use of gas emission spectroscopy. The experimental spectrometer device is coupled with an active method. The active method is used to investigate and correct complex flame profiles. This method similar to a LIDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) device is based on the measurement of Rayleigh scattering of a short laser pulse recorded using a high-speed streak camera. The whole experimental system of this new method is presented. Results obtained on a small-scale turbojet are shown and discussed in order to illustrate the potentials deliver by the sophisticated method. Both temperature and concentration profiles of the gas jet are presented and discussed.

  1. Method for controlling exhaust gas heat recovery systems in vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spohn, Brian L.; Claypole, George M.; Starr, Richard D

    2013-06-11

    A method of operating a vehicle including an engine, a transmission, an exhaust gas heat recovery (EGHR) heat exchanger, and an oil-to-water heat exchanger providing selective heat-exchange communication between the engine and transmission. The method includes controlling a two-way valve, which is configured to be set to one of an engine position and a transmission position. The engine position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the engine, but does not allow heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger and the oil-to-water heat exchanger. The transmission position allows heat-exchange communication between the EGHR heat exchanger, the oil-to-water heat exchanger, and the engine. The method also includes monitoring an ambient air temperature and comparing the monitored ambient air temperature to a predetermined cold ambient temperature. If the monitored ambient air temperature is greater than the predetermined cold ambient temperature, the two-way valve is set to the transmission position.

  2. Low-pressure-ratio regenerative exhaust-heated gas turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tampe, L.A.; Frenkel, R.G.; Kowalick, D.J.; Nahatis, H.M.; Silverstein, S.M.; Wilson, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    A design study of coal-burning gas-turbine engines using the exhaust-heated cycle and state-of-the-art components has been completed. In addition, some initial experiments on a type of rotary ceramic-matrix regenerator that would be used to transfer heat from the products of coal combustion in the hot turbine exhaust to the cool compressed air have been conducted. Highly favorable results have been obtained on all aspects on which definite conclusions could be drawn.

  3. Simulation of exhaust gas heat recovery from a spray dryer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study explored various alternatives in improving the energy utilization of spray drying process through the exhaust gas heat recovery. Extensible and user-friendly simulation code was written in Visual Basic for Applications within Microsoft Excel for this purpose. The effects of process parameters were analyzed on the energy efficiency and energy saving in the industrial-scale spray drying system with exhaust gas heat recovery in an air-to-air heat exchanger and in the system with partial recirculation of exhaust air. The spray dryer is equipped with an indirect heater for heating the drying air. The maximum gains of 16% in energy efficiency and 50% in energy saving were obtained for spray drying system equipped with heat exchanger for exhaust air heat recovery. In addition, 34% in energy efficiency and 61% in energy saving for system with recirculation of exhaust air in the present range of process parameters. The high energy efficiency was obtained during drying of large amount of dilute slurry. The energy saving was increased using the large amount of hot drying air. - Highlights: • We model industrial-scale spray drying process with the exhaust gas heat recovery. • We develop an Excel VBA computer program to simulate spray dryer with heat recovery. • We examine effects of process parameters on energy efficiency and energy saving. • High energy efficiency is obtained during drying of large amount of dilute slurry. • Energy saving is increased using the large amount of hot drying air

  4. 40 CFR 86.1311-94 - Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS bag sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS bag... Exhaust Test Procedures § 86.1311-94 Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS bag sample. (a) Schematic drawings. Figure N94-1 is a schematic drawing of the exhaust gas analytical system used for analyzing CVS...

  5. Organic Rankine cycle for power recovery of exhaust flue gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effects of different working fluids on the performance of organic Rankine cycle (ORC), three working fluids, a mixture that matches with heat source, a mixture that matches with heat sink and a pure working fluid, are selected in this paper. Thermodynamic models were built in Matlab together with REFPROP, with which, the physical properties of the selected working fluids can be acquired. Heat source of the ORC system is the exhaust flue gas of boiler in a 240 MW pulverized coal-fired power plant. Some indicators such as thermal efficiency, inlet temperature of expander, superheat degree, mass flow, volumetric flow, and exergy destruction distribution, as well as the influence of recuperator are studied. The analytical results show that the mixture that matches with heat sink has the greatest efficiency and the mixture that matches with heat source has the lowest superheat degree. The rate of heat exchanged in recuperator to that in evaporator has a maximum value with evaporating pressure. There exists no optimal working fluid for all indicators (thermal efficiency, heat exchanger area, mass flow and volumetric flow etc.). An appropriate working fluid should be chosen by taking both investment cost and power generating benefits into account. The cost-benefit ratio of the proposed ORC plant was evaluated either. - Highlights: • Three types of working fluids are selected for ORC using exhaust flue gas. • The mixture that matches with heat sink has the greatest efficiency. • The mixture that matches with heat source has the lowest superheat degree. • There does not exist a working fluid that satisfies all the indicators

  6. High exhaust temperature, zoned, electrically-heated particulate matter filter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonze, Eugene V.; Paratore, Jr., Michael J.; Bhatia, Garima

    2015-09-22

    A system includes a particulate matter (PM) filter, an electric heater, and a control circuit. The electric heater includes multiple zones, which each correspond to longitudinal zones along a length of the PM filter. A first zone includes multiple discontinuous sub-zones. The control circuit determines whether regeneration is needed based on an estimated level of loading of the PM filter and an exhaust flow rate. In response to a determination that regeneration is needed, the control circuit: controls an operating parameter of an engine to increase an exhaust temperature to a first temperature during a first period; after the first period, activates the first zone; deactivates the first zone in response to a minimum filter face temperature being reached; subsequent to deactivating the first zone, activates a second zone; and deactivates the second zone in response to the minimum filter face temperature being reached.

  7. Emission Characteristics for Single Cylinder DI Diesel Engine with EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pratik G. Sapre

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper includes experimental investigations of various exhaust gas recirculation rates on engine emission characteristics like NOx, HC, CO, CO2, exhaust gas temperature by AVL gas meter. By passing exhaust gas from venturi meter and regulating it with EGR valve so as to find out its effect on critical NOx emission and other harmful HC,CO & NOx emission parameter. So to reduce such harmful gases exhaust gas recirculation is economical and effective method to control emission. We cant reduced it 100% but up to little bit extent we can reduce it from CI as well as in SI type of CI engine. Some external coupling technology like EGR of cold type installed with turbo intercooler, hydrogen, oxygen enriched air to displace fresh intake air volume and so reduced amount of oxygen in combustion chamber to control peak temperature of cylinder. in this paper we have also look toward some coal trapping method installed with dampener cause to break bond between NO at high temperature.

  8. 40 CFR 90.423 - Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS... KILOWATTS Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 90.423 Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample. (a) Schematic drawings. Figure 4 in Appendix B of this subpart is a schematic drawing of the exhaust...

  9. 40 CFR 86.1511 - Exhaust gas analysis system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... following specifications: (1) The analyzer used shall conform to the accuracy provisions of 40 CFR part 1065... flow. (b) The inclusion of a raw CO2 analyzer as specified in 40 CFR part 1065 is required in order to... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust gas analysis system....

  10. IC ENGINE SUPERCHARGING AND EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION USING JET COMPRESSOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhimoulame Kalaisselvane

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Supercharging is a process which is used to improve the performance of an engine by increasing the specific power output whereas exhaust gas recirculation reduces the NOx produced by engine because of supercharging. In a conventional engine, supercharger functions as a compressor for the forced induction of the charge taking mechanical power from the engine crankshaft. In this study, supercharging is achieved using a jet compressor. In the jet compressor, the exhaust gas is used as the motive stream and the atmospheric air as the propelled stream. When high pressure motive stream from the engine exhaust is expanded in the nozzle, a low pressure is created at the nozzle exit. Due to this low pressure, atmospheric air is sucked into the expansion chamber of the compressor, where it is mixed and pressurized with the motive stream. The pressure of the mixed stream is further increased in the diverging section of the jet compressor. A percentage volume of the pressurized air mixture is then inducted back into the engine as supercharged air and the balance is let out as exhaust. This process not only saves the mechanical power required for supercharging but also dilutes the constituents of the engine exhaust gas thereby reducing the emission and the noise level generated from the engine exhaust. The geometrical design parameters of the jet compressor were obtained by solving the governing equations using the method of constant rate of momentum change. Using the theoretical design parameters of the jet compressor, a computational fluid dinamics analysis using FLUENT software was made to evaluate the performance of the jet compressor for the application of supercharging an IC engine. This evaluation turned out to be an efficient diagnostic tool for determining performance optimization and design of the jet compressor. A jet compressor was also fabricated for the application of supercharging and its performance was studied.

  11. Experimental study on exhaust gas after treatment using limestone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakhrieh Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study a simple low-cost exhaust gas after-treatment filter using limestone was developed and tested on a four cylinder DI diesel engine coupled with dynamometer under variable engine running conditions. Limestone was placed in cast iron housing through which exhaust gases passes. The concentration of both carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides were measured with and without the filter in place. It was found that both pollutants were decreased significantly when the filter is in place, with no increase in the fuel consumption rate.

  12. Estimating IC engine exhaust gas lambda and oxygen from the response of a universal exhaust gas oxygen sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Universal exhaust gas oxygen sensors (UEGOs) are in widespread use in internal combustion engines where they are used to measure lambda (the non-dimensional air–fuel ratio) and oxygen concentration (XO2). The sensors are used on production engines and for research and development. In a previous paper, a model of the UEGO sensor was presented, based on a solution of the Stefan–Maxwell equations for an axisymmetric geometry, and it was shown that for a known gas composition, predictions of the sensor response agreed well with experiment. In the present paper, the more ‘practical’ problem is addressed: how well can such a model predict ? and XO2 based on the sensor response? For IC engine applications, a chemistry model is required in order to predict ?, and such a model is also desirable for an accurate prediction of XO2. A fast (matrix exponential) method of solving the Stefan–Maxwell equations is also introduced, which offers the possibility of a near real-time computation of ? and XO2, with application, for example, to bench instruments. Extensive results are presented showing how the interpretation of the UEGO response may be compromised by uncertainties. These uncertainties may relate not only to the sensor itself, such as temperature, pressure and mean pore diameter, but also the chemistry model. (paper)

  13. Method and apparatus for the treatment of diesel exhaust gas:

    OpenAIRE

    Hardeveld, R. van; Makkee, M; Moulijn, J.A.; Jelles, S.J.

    2001-01-01

    The invention relates to a method for the oxidation of carbon- and/or hydrocarbon- and/or combustable organic compounds containing liquid or solid particulate contaminants in gas streams, more in particular soot in exhaust gasses of diesel engines, comprising the treatment of said gas streams in a turbulent flow precipitator, of which at least part of the surface shows catalytic activity for non-selective oxidation

  14. Study of recycling exhaust gas energy of hybrid pneumatic power system with CFD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hybrid pneumatic power system (HPPS) is integrated by an internal combustion engine (ICE), a high efficiency turbine, an air compressor and an energy merger pipe, which can not only recycle and store exhaust gas energy but also convert it into useful mechanical energy. Moreover, it can make the ICE operate in its optimal state of maximum efficiency; and thus, it can be considered an effective solution to improve greatly the exhaust emissions and increase the overall energy efficiency of the HPPS. However, in this system, the flow energy merger of both high pressure compressed air flow and high temperature exhaust gas flow of the ICE greatly depends on the merging capability of the energy merger pipe. If the compressed air pressure (Pair) at the air inlet is too high, smooth transmission and mixture of the exhaust gas flow are prevented, which will interfere with the operation condition of the ICE. This shortcoming is mostly omitted in the previous studies. The purpose of this paper is to study the effect of the level of Pair and the contraction of cross-section area (CSA) at the merging position on the flow energy merger and determine their optimum adjustments for a better merging process by using computation fluid dynamics (CFD). In addition, the CFD model was validated on the basis of the experimental data, including the temperature and static pressure of the merger flow at the outlet of the energy merger pipe. It was found that the simulation results were in good agreement with the experimental data. The simulation results show that exhaust gas recycling efficiency and merger flow energy are significantly dependent on the optimum adjustment of the CSA for changes in Pair. Under these optimum adjustments, the exhaust gas recycling efficiency can reach about 83%. These results will be valuable bases to research and design the energy merger pipe of the HPPS.

  15. Test Program for High Efficiency Gas Turbine Exhaust Diffuser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norris, Thomas R.

    2009-12-31

    This research relates to improving the efficiency of flow in a turbine exhaust, and thus, that of the turbine and power plant. The Phase I SBIR project demonstrated the technical viability of “strutlets” to control stalls on a model diffuser strut. Strutlets are a novel flow-improving vane concept intended to improve the efficiency of flow in turbine exhausts. Strutlets can help reduce turbine back pressure, and incrementally improve turbine efficiency, increase power, and reduce greenhouse gas emmission. The long-term goal is a 0.5 percent improvement of each item, averaged over the US gas turbine fleet. The strutlets were tested in a physical scale model of a gas turbine exhaust diffuser. The test flow passage is a straight, annular diffuser with three sets of struts. At the end of Phase 1, the ability of strutlets to keep flow attached to struts was demonstrated, but the strutlet drag was too high for a net efficiency advantage. An independently sponsored followup project did develop a highly-modified low-drag strutlet. In combination with other flow improving vanes, complicance to the stated goals was demonstrated for for simple cycle power plants, and to most of the goals for combined cycle power plants using this particular exhaust geometry. Importantly, low frequency diffuser noise was reduced by 5 dB or more, compared to the baseline. Appolicability to other diffuser geometries is yet to be demonstrated.

  16. Exhaust gas treatment in testing nuclear rocket engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweig, Herbert R.; Fischler, Stanley; Wagner, William R.

    1993-01-01

    With the exception of the last test series of the Rover program, Nuclear Furnace 1, test-reactor and rocket engine hydrogen gas exhaust generated during the Rover/NERVA program was released directly to the atmosphere, without removal of the associated fission products and other radioactive debris. Current rules for nuclear facilities (DOE Order 5480.6) are far more protective of the general environment; even with the remoteness of the Nevada Test Site, introduction of potentially hazardous quantities of radioactive waste into the atmosphere must be scrupulously avoided. The Rocketdyne treatment concept features a diffuser to provide altitude simulation and pressure recovery, a series of heat exchangers to gradually cool the exhaust gas stream to 100 K, and an activated charcoal bed for adsorption of inert gases. A hydrogen-gas fed ejector provides auxiliary pumping for startup and shutdown of the engine. Supplemental filtration to remove particulates and condensed phases may be added at appropriate locations in the system. The clean hydrogen may be exhausted to the atmosphere and flared, or the gas may be condensed and stored for reuse in testing. The latter approach totally isolates the working gas from the environment.

  17. Emission &Performance characteristics of single cylinder CI engine using cold EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avinash M.Wankhade

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we studied the effect of exhaust gas recirculation for reduction of harmful gases like NOx,CO2 etc. at a same time effects of cold EGR on performance of engine such as brake thermal efficiency, cylinder pressure, cylinder temperature exhaust temperature.etc Above parameter studied for stationary water cooled DI Diesel single cylinder engine by looking towards running(2014 and upcoming emission Norms. Also to incorporate technology to study effects of EGR on combustion temperature and so to reduce NOx by surveying emissions papers to have outlook of EGR Route system and important equipment that need to be furnished in further study in same project to have smooth and positive effects from performance side under study. Professor Avinash M.Wankhade et al found that while re-circulating exhaust gas it reduced about 65.26% of NOx which is improved results of Avinash Wankhade et al and Pratik Sapre et al under guidance of Dr.S.B.Thakare et al[ ].Use of EGR significantly reduced NO emissions at normal condition when passing 20% of EGR. The Particulate emissions increased as EGR rate is increased but we don’t deserve it so to vanish this effets further experiments can be done with blending diesel with fish methyl oil ester, sun flower oil methyl ester[14]. This reduces NOx as well HC.So Exhaust gas was recalculated in intake stroke and cooled by intercooler of partially cooled type via venturi meter.

  18. 75 FR 82040 - Notice of Public Meeting on the International Maritime Organization Guidelines for Exhaust Gas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-29

    ... Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems for Marine Engines To Comply with Annex VI to MARPOL 73/78 AGENCY: Coast... meeting on the International Maritime Organization guidelines for exhaust gas cleaning systems for marine...-543 policy letter 09-01 that provide guidance for exhaust gas cleaning systems under MARPOL Annex...

  19. 76 FR 58288 - International Maritime Organization Guidelines for Exhaust Gas Cleaning Systems for Marine...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-20

    ...guidelines for exhaust gas cleaning systems for...how to evaluate exhaust gas cleaning systems to determine...Southwest-SEU Metro Station. You may submit comments...Organization (IMO) for exhaust gas cleaning systems for...A copy of IMO Marine Environment Protection...

  20. Power plant including an exhaust gas recirculation system for injecting recirculated exhaust gases in the fuel and compressed air of a gas turbine engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Nagarjuna Reddy, Thirumala Reddy; Shaffer, Jason Brian; York, William David

    2014-05-13

    A power plant is provided and includes a gas turbine engine having a combustor in which compressed gas and fuel are mixed and combusted, first and second supply lines respectively coupled to the combustor and respectively configured to supply the compressed gas and the fuel to the combustor and an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system to re-circulate exhaust gas produced by the gas turbine engine toward the combustor. The EGR system is coupled to the first and second supply lines and configured to combine first and second portions of the re-circulated exhaust gas with the compressed gas and the fuel at the first and second supply lines, respectively.

  1. Studies on fuel savings and NO{sub x} reduction in oxygen enriched air combustion (2). Effect of initial temperature and exhaust gas entrainment on NO{sub x} emission; Sanso fuka kuki ni yoru shoenerugi to tei NO{sub x} nensho ni kansuru kenkyu (2). Shoki ondo to nensho haigasu makikomi ni yoru NO{sub x} eno eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, M.; Suyari, M.; Suzuki, T. [Kobe Steel, Ltd., Hyogo (Japan). Mechanical Engineering research Laboratory; Takagi, T. [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2000-04-20

    The combustion with oxygen enriched air has a potential of the fuel savings and the consequent reduction of carbon dioxide emission. The fuel savings were examined by the enthalpy of equilibrium state in case of oxygen enriched combustion. The fuel consumption in case of 30-40 % oxygen enriched air is reduced by 5.9-9.1 % as compared with the case of 21 % oxygen air at exhaust temperature 773 k after which sensible heat of exhaust gas exchange the sensible heat of combustion air. However, NO emission increases with the enrichment of oxygen in the air and the increase of initial temperature. The effect of oxygen enriched air and initial temperature on NO emissions in the methane premix flame was numerically analyzed with detailed chemistry for the equivalent ratio of 0.5-2.0. The results revealed that the low NO{sub x} combustion with 30 % oxygen enriched air can be achieved in case of the fuel rich ({phi} > 2.0) condition. Furthermore, the effect of oxygen enriched air and entrainment of exhaust ga was analyzed numerically. The low NO{sub x} combustion with 30 % oxygen enriched air and initial temperature 798 K can be achieved in case of the fuel lean ({phi} < 0.5) or fuel rich ({phi} > 1.5) condition and mixing ratio 0.5 which is expressed that the ratio mole of exhaust gas against the mole of fuel and oxygen enriched air. (author)

  2. Temperature optimisation of a diesel engine using exhaust gas heat recovery and thermal energy storage (Diesel engine with thermal energy storage)

    OpenAIRE

    Kauranen, Pertti; Elonen, Tuomo; Wikström, Lisa; Heikkinen, Jorma; Laurikko, Juhani

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Modern automotive diesel engines are so energy efficient that they are heating up slowly and tend to run rather cold at subzero temperatures. The problem is especially severe in mail delivery operations where the average speed is low and the drive cycle includes plenty of idling. The problem is typically solved by adding a diesel fuelled additional engine heater which is used for the preheating of the engine during cold start and additional heating of the engine if the coo...

  3. Exhaust-gas reforming using precious metal catalysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rh-only and Rh bimetallic catalysts have been screened for exhaust-gas reforming, under conditions that mimic the output of an autoignition gasoline engine. Propane has been used as a model fuel, with simulated exhaust-gas providing the co-reactants (O2 and H2O) needed to generate hydrogen. Based on oxygen-conversion as a measure of light-off, Pt-Rh on ceria-zirconia shows the highest activity. In the presence of SO2, adsorbed sulphur species do not inhibit the oxidation reactions that induce light-off, but suppress the major pathway to hydrogen (steam reforming). By excluding platinum and using silica-enriched alumina as the underlying support, light-off is delayed, but the steam reforming reaction becomes much more insensitive to the presence of sulphur. The Pt-Rh catalyst is most suited to exhaust-gas reforming systems in which the engine runs on a sulphur-free fuel, whereas the Rh-only catalyst is the better choice when the fuel is conventional gasoline. (author)

  4. Exhaust gas bypass valve control for thermoelectric generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Michael G; Yang, Jihui; Meisner, Greogry P.; Stabler, Francis R.; De Bock, Hendrik Pieter (Peter) Jacobus; Anderson, Todd Alan

    2012-09-04

    A method of controlling engine exhaust flow through at least one of an exhaust bypass and a thermoelectric device via a bypass valve is provided. The method includes: determining a mass flow of exhaust exiting an engine; determining a desired exhaust pressure based on the mass flow of exhaust; comparing the desired exhaust pressure to a determined exhaust pressure; and determining a bypass valve control value based on the comparing, wherein the bypass valve control value is used to control the bypass valve.

  5. Process and device for cleaning furnace exhaust gas in a vitrification plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The furnace exhaust gas produced during vitrification is cleaned of carried over dust particles in an exhaust gas cleaning stage using a washing liquid. In order to achieve a simplified process for dosing and exhaust gas cleaning, radioactive fission product solution is taken from the feed container as the washing liquid and is transported to the head of the exhaust gas cleaning stage. The fission product solution noting as washing liquid is returned to the feed container after passing through the exhaust gas cleaning stage. The furnace exhaust gas of the vitrification plant is taken through the exhaust gas cleaning stage in counterflow. The invention also concerns a device to carry out this process. (orig./HP)

  6. An Experimental Study of Different Effects of EGR Rates on The Performance And Exhaust Emissions of The Stratified Charge Piston Direct Injection Compressed Natural Gas Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Saheed O. Wasiu; A Rashid A Aziz; Shaharin A. Sulaiman

    2011-01-01

    Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) is one of the principal techniques used to control spark ignition NOX. A fraction of the exhaust gas is recycled through a control valve from the exhaust to the engine intake system. However, EGR has different effect on performance, combustion and emissions production that are difficult to distinguish such as increase of intake temperature, delay of Rate Of Heat Rrelease (ROHR), decrease of peak heat release, decrease in oxygen concentration etc. Therefor...

  7. Analysis of the reusability of the energy of the exhaust gas from the calciner for the production of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calciner is used to produce carbon from anthracite coal. In its working process, a significant amount of energy is lost through its exhaust gas. How much energy can be recovered from the exhaust gas becomes important. To answer this question a method to determine the mass flow rate and the composition of the exhaust gas from a calciner is developed, and a combustion model based on well-stirred reactor is used to obtain the suitable combustor parameters and the amount of the chemical energy which can be released in combustion. As an example to verify the method and the model, the energy utilization ratio of a calciner with power of 1250 kW is investigated. The results show that the method can determine the mass flow rate and the composition of the exhaust gas, and the combustion model is suitable for obtaining reasonable results in determining the volume and the heat duty of the combustor, the air–fuel ratio, and the amount of the chemical energy released. For a calciner with power of 1250 kW, when the temperature of the tail gas after combustion reaches to 135 °C, the energy utilization ratio of the calciner is calculated to be around 77%. - Highlights: • A method obtaining the mass balance of exhaust gas from calciner is reported. • A combustion model obtaining combustion behavior of the exhaust gas is reported. • Determining the energy utilization ratio of a typical calciner is demonstrated. • The energy utilization ratio of a typical calciner is about 77%

  8. 40 CFR 91.423 - Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS...) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Gaseous Exhaust Test Procedures § 91.423 Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS grab sample. (a) Schematic drawings. Figure 4...

  9. An experimental study on the effects of the thermal barrier plating over engine fuel consumption exhaust temperature and emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Gürbüz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study, the combustion chamber elements of a one-cylinder diesel engine which is air-cooled, single-cylinder, direct injection, 4-stroke and starter motor were plated with thermal barrier plating and tested with diesel fuel between the speeds of 1600 1/min to 3200 1/min and determined the effects of the thermal barrier plating on the engine exhaust gas temperature, emissions and fuel consumption. Increase in the temperature of the exhaust gas, decrease in HC and CO emissions that are harmful to the environment and living things and improvement in fuel consumption were observed.

  10. Intensity of corrosion processes in exhaust gas boilers at burning water-fuel emulsion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goryachkin Vladimir Yurievich

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Approximation dependences of specific rates of low-temperature sulfur corrosion and pollution intensity under the influence of the main parameters characterizing these processes are presented. Statistical processing of the research results that displayed the primary influence on decrease in metal sulfur and water content of water fuel emulsion is conducted. The dependences of low-temperature sulfur corrosion rate on the wall temperature for 100 and 1000 hours at burning standard fuel and water-fuel emulsion are received. Reliability of data transfer obtained at experimental facility on consideration of these processes in real exhaust gas boilers installed after internal-combustion engine is confirmed.

  11. Laboratory Scale of Liquid Coal Fuel Combustion Process and Exhaust Gas Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kartika K. Hendratna

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Much research of coal has been already undertaken to ascertain the possibilities of coal being used as substitute for heavy fuel oil in the transportation sector. The effects of using coal as transportation fuel to the environment must also be considered. This study will review several aspects of the coal oil combustion process including combustion behavior, flame stability, some emissions from exhaust gas; CO, NOx and the particulate matter in a well insulated laboratory scale furnace for more stable of combustion. Approach: New way for preparation for liquid coal oil steady combustion on a 2.75 m horizontal boiler with four annular segment tubes, a water jacket system and a system for measurement of water temperature inside was archived. Data was gained by applying liquid coal in the experiment. Detailed preparation and setting for steady combustion of coal oil and formation of the exhaust gas were discussed based on data sampling from four sample points in each centre of the angular tube segments. Results: Preparation for coal oil combustion is an important point in the successful of combustion. Heating coal fuel to than 100°C, heating the fuel line to the same temperature and providing enough air pressure for atomization of coal oil until 0.1 MPa allows coal fuel smoothly atomized in the semi gas phase. There was enough of air combustion via a blower with 4500 L min-1 of flow rate and a 24 L min-1 of water flow rate in the water jacket transforms the energy of the fuel to the heat. Uncolored of the exhaust gas and the physical inspection describes the completion of combustion. This result close-relates with the pollutants formation in the exhaust gas. Conclusion: By conducting a deep research process, there is a chance for the substitute of heavy fuel oil with liquid coal fuel with no special treatment needed in combustion process without ignoring the contribution of the combustion results as an environmental problem.

  12. Measurement of Gas-phase Acids in Diesel Exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzell, J. J.; Liggio, J.; Li, S.; Vlasenko, A. L.; Staebler, R. M.; Brook, J.; Lu, G.; Poitras, M.; Chan, T.

    2012-12-01

    Gas-phase acids were measured using chemical ionization mass spectrometry (CIMS) as part of the Diesel Engine Emission Research Experiment (DEERE). The CIMS technique, utilizing acetate ion (CH3COO-) as a reagent ion, proved to be a rapid (measurements on the order of seconds) and sensitive (several counts/pptv) method of quantifying the acid emissions. Diluted diesel exhaust measurements were made from a Constant Volume Sampling dilution tunnel using a light duty (1.9L turbocharged Volkswagen Jetta TDI) diesel engine equipped with an OEM diesel oxidation catalyst and exhaust gas recirculation, mounted on an engine dynamometer. Acids measured included isocyanic, nitrous, nitric, propionic and sum of lactic and oxalic, as well as other unidentified compounds. Complimentary measurements of CO, CO2, Total Hydrocarbon (THC), and NOx, were also performed. Several engine modes (different engine rpm and torque outputs) at steady state were examined to determine their effect on acid emissions. Emission rates with respect to NOx and fuel based emission factors were determined. Measurements of HONO fuel emission factors agree well with real-world measurements within a traffic tunnel.1 The first estimate of isocyanic acid emission factors from a diesel engine is reported, and suggests that the emission of this highly toxic compound in diesel exhaust should not be ignored. 1. Kurtenbach, R., Becker, K. H., Gomes, J. A. G., Kleffmann, J.,Lorzer, J. C., Spittler, M., Wiesen, P., Ackermann, R., Geyer, A.,and Platt, U.: Investigations of emissions and heterogeneous formation of HONO in a road traffic tunnel, Atmos. Environ., 35, 3385-3394, doi:10.1016/S1352-2310(01)00138-8, 2001.

  13. Temperature monitoring of vehicle engine exhaust gases under vibration condition using optical fibre temperature sensor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two optical approaches, comprising and contracting both the fluorescence decay lifetime and the fibre Bragg grating (FBG) methods, were developed and evaluated for temperature monitoring of exhaust gases for use on a vehicle engine. The FBGs used in the system were written into specially designed Bi-Ge co-doped photosensitive fibres, to enable them to sustain high temperatures to over 8000C, which is far beyond that of FBGs written into most commercial photosensitive fibres. The sensors were subjected to a range of vibration tests, as a part of an optical exhaust monitoring network under development, and results from the test carried out are reported

  14. Exhaust Gas Recirculation in Gas Turbines for Reduction of CO2 Emissions; Combustion Testing with Focus on Stability and Emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan E. Hustad

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Exhaust gas recirculation can be applied with the intention of reducing CO2 emissions. When a fraction of the exhaust gas is injected in the entry of a gas turbine, the amount of CO2 in the exhaust gas not being recirculated will be higher and less complicated to capture. However, with this change in combustion air composition, especially the reduced concentration of oxygen, the combustion process will be affected. The lower oxygen concentration decreases the stability and the increased amount of CO2, H2O and N2 will decrease the combustion temperature and thus, the NOx emissions. Testing has been performed on a 65 kW gas turbine combustor, to investigate the effect of adding N2, CO2 and O2 in the combustion process, with focus on stability and emissions of NOx. Results show that adding N2 and CO2 decreases the NOx emissions, whereas O2 addition increases the NOx emissions. The tests have been performed both in a diffusion flame (pilot burner and a premixed flame (main burner, and for additives being injected with the fuel or with the air stream. Addition into the fuel stream is proven to affect the NOx emissions the most. The stability limits of the flames are indicated with respect to mass-based additive-to-fuel ratios.

  15. Exhaust Gas Recirculation in Gas Turbines for Reduction of CO2 Emissions; Combustion Testing with Focus on Stability and Emissions

    OpenAIRE

    Røkke, Petter E.; Hustad, Johan E.

    2005-01-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation can be applied with the intention of reducing CO2 emissions. When a fraction of the exhaust gas is injected in the entry of a gas turbine, the amount of CO2 in the exhaust gas not being recirculated will be higher and less complicated to capture. However, with this change in combustion air composition, especially the reduced concentration of oxygen, the combustion process will be affected. The lower oxygen concentration decreases the stability and the increased amoun...

  16. [Tracer gas evaluations of local exhaust hood performance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Jun

    2007-09-01

    A local exhaust hood is one of the most commonly used controls for harmful contaminants in the working environment. In Japan, the performance of a hood is evaluated by hood velocity measurements, and administrative performance requirements for hoods are provided as control velocities by the Japanese Industrial Safety and Health Law. However, it is doubtful whether the control velocity would be the most suitable velocity for any industrial hood since the control velocity is not substantiated by actual measurements of the containment ability of each hood. In order to examine the suitability of the control velocity as a performance requirement, a hood performance test by the tracer gas method, using carbon dioxide (CO(2)), was conducted with an exterior type hood in a laboratory. In this study, as an index of the hood performance, capture efficiency defined as the ratio of contaminant quantity captured by the hood to the total generated contaminant quantity, was determined by measuring the CO(2) concentrations. When the assumptive capture point of the contaminant was located at a point 30 cm from the hood opening, a capture efficiency of >90% could be achieved with a suction velocity of less than the current control velocity. Without cross draft, a capture efficiency of >90% could be achieved with a suction velocity of 0.2 m/s (corresponding to 40% of the control velocity) at the capture point. Reduction of the suction velocity to 0.2 m/s caused an 80% decrease in exhaust flow rate. The effect of cross draft, set at 0.3 m/s, on the capture efficiency differed according to its direction. When the direction of the cross draft was normal to the hood centerline, the effect was not recognized and a capture efficiency of >90% could be achieved with a suction velocity of 0.2 m/s. A cross draft from a worker's back (at an angle of 45 degrees to the hood centerline) did not affect the capture efficiency, either. When the cross draft blew at an angle of 135 degrees to the hood centerline, a capture efficiency of >90% could be achieved with a suction velocity of 0.4 m/s. The reduction of suction velocity would beneficially reduce running costs of local exhaust hoods and air conditioning. Effective and economical exhaustion would be achieved if the minimum velocity obtained by the tracer gas method were to be substituted for the excessive control velocity. PMID:17938560

  17. 78 FR 63015 - Exhaust Emissions Standards for New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines and Identification Plate for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ...Emissions Standards for New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines and Identification Plate...EPA also proposed adopting the gas turbine engine test procedures of the...Exhaust Emissions (New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) 0 3. Amend Sec....

  18. An experimental study on the effects of exhaust gas on spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hautala, E.L.; Holopainen, J.; Kaerenlampi, L. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Ecology and Environmental Science; Surakka, J.; Ruuskanen, J. [Kuopio Univ. (Finland). Dept. of Environmental Sciences

    1995-12-31

    Motor vehicle exhausts are significant contributors to air pollution. Besides fine particles and inorganic gases, like CO, SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x}, exhaust gas contains a large group of aromatic hydrocarbon compounds, many of which are phytotoxic. In field studies, exhausts are found to have both direct and indirect harmful effects on roadside plants. However, only few experimental studies have been made about the effects of exhaust gas emissions on coniferous trees. The aim of this study was to survey the effects of exhausts on spruce (Picea abies L. Karst.) in standardized conditions. The concentrations of major exhaust gas components in the chamber atmosphere were detected simultaneously. The effects of exhaust on epistomatal waxes of first-year spruce needles are described. (author)

  19. Steady-state modelling of the universal exhaust gas oxygen (UEGO) sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The universal exhaust gas oxygen (UEGO) sensor is a well-established device which was developed for the measurement of relative air fuel ratio in internal combustion engines. There is, however, little information available which allows for the prediction of the UEGO's behaviour when exposed to arbitrary gas mixtures, pressures and temperatures. Here we present a steady-state model for the sensor, based on a solution of the Stefan–Maxwell equation, and which includes a momentum balance. The response of the sensor is dominated by a diffusion barrier, which controls the rate of diffusion of gas species between the exhaust and a cavity. Determination of the diffusion barrier characteristics, especially the mean pore size, porosity and tortuosity, is essential for the purposes of modelling, and a measurement technique based on identification of the sensor pressure giving zero temperature sensitivity is shown to be a convenient method of achieving this. The model, suitably calibrated, is shown to make good predictions of sensor behaviour for large variations of pressure, temperature and gas composition. (paper)

  20. Exhaust bypass flow control for exhaust heat recovery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, Michael G.

    2015-09-22

    An exhaust system for an engine comprises an exhaust heat recovery apparatus configured to receive exhaust gas from the engine and comprises a first flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas and a second flow passage in fluid communication with the exhaust gas. A heat exchanger/energy recovery unit is disposed in the second flow passage and has a working fluid circulating therethrough for exchange of heat from the exhaust gas to the working fluid. A control valve is disposed downstream of the first and the second flow passages in a low temperature region of the exhaust heat recovery apparatus to direct exhaust gas through the first flow passage or the second flow passage.

  1. Apparatus and methods of reheating gas turbine cooling steam and high pressure steam turbine exhaust in a combined cycle power generating system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Leroy Omar (Niskayuna, NY); Smith, Raub Warfield (Ballston Lake, NY)

    2002-01-01

    In a combined cycle system having a multi-pressure heat recovery steam generator, a gas turbine and steam turbine, steam for cooling gas turbine components is supplied from the intermediate pressure section of the heat recovery steam generator supplemented by a portion of the steam exhausting from the HP section of the steam turbine, steam from the gas turbine cooling cycle and the exhaust from the HP section of the steam turbine are combined for flow through a reheat section of the HRSG. The reheated steam is supplied to the IP section inlet of the steam turbine. Thus, where gas turbine cooling steam temperature is lower than optimum, a net improvement in performance is achieved by flowing the cooling steam exhausting from the gas turbine and the exhaust steam from the high pressure section of the steam turbine in series through the reheater of the HRSG for applying steam at optimum temperature to the IP section of the steam turbine.

  2. Neuralfussy multivariable control applied to the control of velocity, power, and exhaust gas temperature of a turbo gas unit; Control neurodifuso multivariable aplicado al control de velocidad, potencia y temperatura de gases de escape de una unidad turbogas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Segura Ozuna, Victor Octavio

    2004-11-15

    The electric power demand in Mexico has forced to the electric sector to be in a constant search of methods and systems that, among other objectives, improve the operation of the generating power stations of electric power continually. As part of their mission, the Electrical Research Institute (IIE) has promoted and leaning the applied research and the technological development to improve the indexes of security, readiness, dependability, efficiency and durability of central generating by means of the development and the installation of big digital systems of information and control. At the present time, inside the scheme of electric power generation, the gas turbine (UTG) represent 7% of the generation of the national electric sector [1]. These units have become the dominant way of the new electric generation in the U.S, either in simple cycle or combined. The above-mentioned, is attributable at less installation cost for generated kilowatt, to the shortest construction programs, at first floor levels of emission of pollutants and competitive operation costs. The control system of the gas turbine is based on conventional control algorithms of the type PI [2]. This control scheme is dedicated for regulation tasks and rejection to interferences, and it doesn't stop pursuit of reference points. The controllers act all on a control valve, that which represents a strong interaction among the same ones, for example an adjustment in the parameters of the algorithm of the digital PI of temperature, it can improve their acting but it can also affect the acting of the speed control or that of power. The gas turbine presents a non lineal behavior and variant in the time, mainly in the starting stage where several important disturbances are presented. At the moment, the controllers used in the scheme of control of the turbines are lineal, which are syntonized for a specific operation point and they are conserved this way by indefinite time. In this thesis the formulation of a controller feedback multivariable is presented, designed with the combination of the technologies of fuzzy logic and neural networks with the purpose of improving the control of speed, power and temperature of the UTG. This proposed control is used in conjunction with the scheme of conventional control of the existent UTG, to integrate a strategy of control hybrid feedback. The control feedback is compound for a fuzzy inference system of multiple entrances and a left exit designed with entrance data and exit of the plant. The controller feed forward is compound for conventional controllers type PI in this type of units. With this strategy, the controller feedback provides a bigger contribution in the control sign the effort of the conventional controllers' PI control and the strong interaction that it exists among them diminishing. The controllers PI feed forward contribute a smaller control sign used for fine adjustments in the control sign. [Spanish] La demanda de energia electrica en Mexico ha obligado al sector electrico a estar en una busqueda constante de metodos y sistemas que, entre otros objetivos, mejoren continuamente la operacion de las centrales generadoras de energia electrica. Como parte de su mision, el Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas (IIE) ha promovido y apoyado la investigacion aplicada y el desarrollo tecnologico para mejorar los indices de seguridad, disponibilidad, confiabilidad, eficiencia y durabilidad de centrales generadoras mediante el desarrollo y la implantacion de grandes sistemas digitales de informacion y control. En la actualidad, dentro del esquema de generacion de energia electrica, las unidades turbogas (UTG) representan 7% de la generacion del sector electrico nacional [1]. Estas unidades se han convertido en el modo dominante de la nueva generacion electrica en los EE.UU, ya sea en ciclo simple o combinado. Lo anterior, es atribuible al menor costo de instalacion por kilowatt generado, a los programas de construccion mas cortos, a bajos niveles de emision de contaminantes y costos de operacion competitivo

  3. Engine exhaust particulate and gas phase contributions to vascular toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campen, Matthew; Robertson, Sarah; Lund, Amie; Lucero, Joann; McDonald, Jacob

    2014-05-01

    Cardiovascular health effects of near-roadway pollution appear more substantial than other sources of air pollution. The underlying cause of this phenomenon may simply be concentration-related, but the possibility remains that gases and particulate matter (PM) may physically interact and further enhance systemic vascular toxicity. To test this, we utilized a common hypercholesterolemic mouse model (Apolipoprotein E-null) exposed to mixed vehicle emission (MVE; combined gasoline and diesel exhausts) for 6?h/d?×?50?d, with additional permutations of removing PM by filtration and also removing gaseous species from PM by denudation. Several vascular bioassays, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 protein, 3-nitrotyrosine and plasma-induced vasodilatory impairments, highlighted that the whole emissions, containing both particulate and gaseous components, was collectively more potent than MVE-derived PM or gas mixtures, alone. Thus, we conclude that inhalation of fresh whole emissions induce greater systemic vascular toxicity than either the particulate or gas phase alone. These findings lend credence to the hypothesis that the near-roadway environment may have a more focused public health impact due to gas-particle interactions. PMID:24730681

  4. Effects of Exhaust Gas Recirculation on SI Engines at Wide Open Throttle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronson, Sydney; Puzinauskas, Paulius

    2011-11-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation, a charge dilution technique, has proven to be an effective method of reducing NOx emissions and fuel consumption of spark ignition engines. Wide open throttle operation also increases overall engine efficiency by reducing the pumping losses caused by throttling. In this study, the emissions and fuel economy benefits of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) at wide open throttle conditions were quantified using a 2.4L port-injected engine. Engine performance and emissions data were recorded as the percentage of EGR in the intake charge was increased from zero to just above thirty percent (the EGR limit). This EGR percentage, in-cylinder pressure measurements, and the temperatures and pressures of the intake and exhaust were all recorded to ensure stable operating conditions. These tests were performed with a stoichiometric air-fuel ratio at a constant speed of 2000 rpm at wide open throttle. The variation of brake specific fuel consumption and emissions (in particular NOx) with increasing EGR percentages was analyzed.

  5. Mutagenicity of diesel exhaust particle extracts: influence of driving cycle and environmental temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, C R; Dutcher, J S; Brooks, A L; McClellan, R O; Marshall, W F; Naman, T M

    1982-01-01

    General Motors and Volkswagen diesel passenger cars (1980 and 1981 model year) were operated on a climate controlled chassis dynomometer and the particulate portion of the exhaust was collected on high volume filters. Dichloromethane extracts of the exhaust particles (soot) collected while the cars were operated under simulated highway, urban and congested urban driving cycles were assayed for mutagenicity in Salmonella strains TA-98 and TA-100. Driving pattern did not significantly influence the mutagenic potency of the exhaust particle extracts or estimates of the amount of mutagenicity emitted from the exhaust despite large differences in particle emission rates and extractable fraction of the particles. Mutagenicity of extracts of exhaust particles collected while the vehicles were operated at test chamber temperatures of 25, 50, 75 and 100 degrees F were also very similar. The results suggest that driving pattern and environmental temperature do not significantly alter the emission of genotoxic combustion products from the exhaust. PMID:6193022

  6. Platform for a Hydrocarbon Exhaust Gas Sensor Utilizing a Pumping Cell and a Conductometric Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Ralf Moos; Kerstin Wiesner; Diana Biskupski; Andrea Geupel; Maximilian Fleischer

    2009-01-01

    Very often, high-temperature operated gas sensors are cross-sensitive to oxygen and/or they cannot be operated in oxygen-deficient (rich) atmospheres. For instance, some metal oxides like Ga2O3 or doped SrTiO3 are excellent materials for conductometric hydrocarbon detection in the rough atmosphere of automotive exhausts, but have to be operated preferably at a constant oxygen concentration. We propose a modular sensor platform that combines a conductometric two-sensor-setup with an electroche...

  7. NOVEL GAS SENSORS FOR HIGH-TEMPERATURE FOSSIL FUEL APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palitha Jayaweera

    2004-05-01

    SRI is developing ceramic-based microsensors for detection of exhaust gases such as NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO in advanced combustion and gasification systems. The sensors detect the electrochemical activity of the exhaust gas species on catalytic electrodes and are designed to operate at high temperatures, elevated pressures, and corrosive environments typical of large power generation exhausts. Under this research project we are developing sensors for multiple gas detection in a single package along with data acquisition and control software and hardware. The sensor package can be easily integrated into online monitoring systems for active emission control. This report details the research activities performed from October 2003 to April 2004.

  8. Removal of methane from compressed natural gas fueled vehicle exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the modes of methane (CH4) removal from simulated compressed natural gas (CNG) fueled vehicle exhaust under net oxidizing, net reducing, and stoichiometric conditions. Model reaction studies were conducted. The results suggest that the oxidation of methane with oxygen contributes to the removal of methane under net oxidizing conditions. In contrast, the oxidation of methane with oxygen as well as nitric oxide contributes to its removal under net reducing conditions. The steam reforming reaction does not significantly contribute to the removal of methane. The methane conversions under net reducing conditions are higher than those observed under net oxidizing conditions. The study shows that the presence of carbon monoxide in the feed gas leads to a gradual decrease in the methane conversion with increasing redox ratio, under net oxidizing conditions. a minimum in methane conversion is observed at a redox ratio of 0. 8. The higher activity for the methane-oxygen reaction resulting from a lowering in the overall oxidation state of palladium and the contribution of the methane-nitric oxide reaction toward the removal of CH4 appear to account for the higher CH4 conversions observed under net reducing conditions

  9. Implementation of Exhaust Gas Recirculation for Double Stage Waste Heat Recovery System on Large Container Vessel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Morten; Marissal, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    Concerned to push ships to have a lower impact on the environment, the International Maritime Organization are implementing stricter regulation of NOx and SOx emissions, called Tier III, within emission control areas (ECAs). Waste Heat Recovery Systems (WHRS) on container ships consist of recovering some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas. This heat is converted into electrical energy used on-board instead of using auxiliary engines. Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) systems, are recirculating a part of the exhaust gas through the engine combustion chamber to reduce emissions. WHRS combined with EGR is a potential way to improve system efficiency while reducing emissions. This paper investigates the feasibility of combining the two systems. EGR dilutes the fuel, lowering the combustion temperature and thereby the formation of NOx, to reach Tier III limitation. A double stage WHRS is set up to reach the highest possible combination of pressure and temperature, and adapted to Tier III by introducing two alternative superheaters. The system design is optimized and found capable of producing from 400 to 1900 kW, with a weighted average power of 958 kW. The consumption profile is found to significantly impact the weighted average power, while the operation distribution between Tier III and Tier II (outside ECAs) has a much smaller influence. Furthermore, it is found that the low pressure should be kept near minimum, while the optimum high pressure increases from 7 to 12 bar with the load. By increasing the efficiency of the overall system, the CO2 emissions can be reduced. The addition of a third cycle, used only in Tier III, is investigated. While increasing the total heat exchanger areas by approximately 40%, the cycle is found to increase the power production in Tier III operation by an average of 15%, and up to 50% at full load.

  10. Dual-purpose power plants, experiences with exhaust gas purification plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From 1984 to 1988, the research and development project ''pollutant reduction for exhaust gases from heat production systems'' sponsored by the Federal Ministry of Research and Technology (BMFT) has been carried out by TUeV in Bavaria. This project was to show the state of exhaust gas technology for small and medium-sized plants (boilers and motoric heat generators). When publishing the final report, no positive balance could be given. Based on the results, the succession project ''Exhaust gas purification plants in field test'' (ARIF) has been started. This project has the following objectives: -Measuring technical investigation of the exhaust gas purification of motoric driven heat generator systems in field test. - Suitability of hand measuring devices for emissions for a discontinuous control of the exhaust gas purification plat by the operator. - Control of new methods regarding pollutant reduction for motoric and conventional heat generators. (orig.)

  11. Carbon Dioxide Emission Analysis of Chilled Water Production by Using Gas Turbine Exhaust Heat

    OpenAIRE

    Adzuieen Nordin; Mohd Amin Abd Majid

    2013-01-01

    Carbon dioxide from exhaust heat emission is one of the major contributorsto the environmental pollutant in power generation plants. This problem could be addressed if the emitted exhaust heat is recovered. In cogeneration plant, the exhaust heat from the gas turbine is used to generate steam usingHeat Recovery Steam Generator. The steam from Heat Recovery Steam Generator is then used for chilled water generation in Steam Absorption Chillers by absorption process. This study analyzed the tota...

  12. Field-effect gas sensors and their application in exhaust treatment systems; Feldeffekt-Gassensoren und ihre Anwendung in Abgasnachbehandlungssystemen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schalwig, Jan

    2002-07-01

    Tightening environmental constraints on exhaust gas emissions of gasoline and Diesel engines led to a growing interest in new and highly sophisticated gas sensors. Such sensors will be required in future exhaust gas aftertreatment systems for the selective real time detection of pollutants such as nitric oxides, hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide. Restrictions on cost and device dimensions imposed by the automobile industry make semiconductor gas sensors promising candidates for the realization of cheap and small-size sensor devices. This work deals with semiconductor field effect devices with catalytically active platinum (Pt) electrodes and potential applications of such devices in automotive exhaust gas aftertreatment systems. To allow for continuous operation at high temperatures, silicon carbide (SiC) and group III-nitrides such as GaN and AlGaN were used as semiconductor materials. Different devices have been realized with such materials: SiC based MOS capacitors (MOSiC), GaN Schottky diodes and GaN/AlGaN high electron mobility transistors (HEMT). The principle feasibility of SiC and GaN based field effect gas sensors for automotive applications was tested under laboratory conditions using synthetic gas mixtures. Exhaust gas components such as carbon monoxide (CO), nitric oxides (NO and NO{sub 2}), various saturated and unsaturated hydro-carbons as well as water vapor, oxygen (O{sub 2}) and hydrogen (H{sub 2}) were used as test gases in appropriate concentrations with the sensor devices being operated in a range of temperatures extending from room temperature up to 600{sup o}C. (orig.)

  13. Development of exhaust gas treatment technologies for environment protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The emission of carbon dioxide (CO2) and other pollutants which result from burning fossil fuels has been identified as the major contributor to global warming and climate change. However, for the immediate term over the next 10 - 20 years at least, the world will continue to rely on fossil fuels as the source of primary energy. The challenge for the fossil fuel industry is to find cost-effective solutions that will reduce the release of CO2 and other pollutants into the atmosphere. The focus of this paper is on the ability to treat the exhaust gas from fossil fuel power plants in order to capture and store the CO2 and remove other pollutants such as SOx and NOx which are released in the atmosphere. In summary, capture/separation costs represent the largest financial impediment for this types of plants. Hence, efficient, cost-effective capture/separation technologies will need to be developed in order to allow their large-scale use. (authors)

  14. Exhaust purification with on-board ammonia production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robel, Wade J. (Peoria, IL); Driscoll, James Joshua (Dunlap, IL); Coleman, Gerald N. (Helpston, GB)

    2010-10-12

    A method of ammonia production for a selective catalytic reduction system is provided. The method includes producing an exhaust gas stream within a cylinder group, wherein the first exhaust gas stream includes NOx. The exhaust gas stream may be supplied to an exhaust passage and cooled to a predetermined temperature range, and at least a portion of the NOx within the exhaust gas stream my be converted into ammonia.

  15. Suicide by carbon monoxide from car exhaust-gas in Denmark 1995-1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Asser H; Gregersen, Markil; Thomsen, Asser Hedegård

    2006-01-01

    In the period 1995-1999 there were 388 car exhaust-gas suicides in Denmark. Of these 343 (88.4%) were men and 45 (11.6%) were women, the average age being 47 years. The car exhaust-gas suicides made up 9.3% of all suicides in Denmark in the period. The corresponding rate was 11.7% for men and 3.7% for women. In rural areas a larger part of all suicides were committed with car exhaust-gas compared to the more densely populated areas. Mental disease was diagnosed in 124 (32.0%) cases. A suicide no...

  16. Exhaust Gas Heat Recovery for C.I Engine-A Review

    OpenAIRE

    Baleshwar Kumar Singh,; Dr. Nitin Shrivastava

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the study is to review the modern changes and technologies on waste heat recovery of exhaust gas from internal combustion engine. These include the thermoelectric generator, turbocharger, exhaust gas through I.C engine. Due to the total heat supplied to the engine in the form of fuel around 30-40%, heat is converting in to the use full mechanical work and residual parts of the wastage heat 60-70% as friction, exhaust gas and engine cooling system. Waste heat relea...

  17. Simulation and evaluation of a CCHP system with exhaust gas deep-recovery and thermoelectric generator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Exhaust gas deep-recovery and thermoelectric generator are applied in CCHP system. • Electric output of TEG changes from 0.231 kW to 1.18 kW. • Total recoverable waste heat increases by 13–16%. • ESR, CSR and PEE are improved to 0.304, 0.417, and 0.944, respectively. • The total investment increment of system is about 11%. - Abstract: Combined cooling, heating and power (CCHP) systems are thought to be highly efficient in energy utilization. But there are still potentials to further improve system performance. This work proposed a CCHP system based on internal combustion engine (ICE) for power generation, refrigeration and domestic hot water production. Thermoelectric generator (TEG) and condensing heat exchanger are applied to efficiently recover the exhaust gas waste heat of ICE. All the energy flows are designed based on energy cascading utilization principle. Basing on the test results of a 16 kW ICE, CCHP system characteristics are investigated by simulation from idling condition to full load condition. Especially, the part load performance of TEG and absorption chiller are simulated and discussed. The feasible operating zone of ICE and feed water flow rate are figured out to keep the domestic hot water temperature within a certain range. Results show that the primary energy efficiency of system can reach 0.944, thanks to the condensing heat recovery from exhaust gas. The primary energy saving ratio and cost saving ratio can reach 0.304 and 0.417, respectively. Considering some more equipment is incorporated, the total investment increment is about 11.1%

  18. Measurement of exhaust gas recirculation rate by laser-induced fluorescence in engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morin, C.; Modica, V.; Guibert, P.

    2008-10-01

    The objective of this study is to measure by planar laser-induced fluorescence the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate in the combustion chamber of an optical engine to quantify the stratification phenomena used in the new combustion strategy. From the results obtained in a high pressure-high temperature (HP-HT) facility, the tracer chosen for this aim is 3-pentanone. This paper presents a quantitative measurement of the EGR rate in the engine and a post-processing model with a correction and calibration procedure by considering the influence of temperature and pressure on the absorption cross-section and the 3-pentanone fluorescence quantum yield from the results established in the HP-HT facility. The stratification phenomena are quantified by using 3-pentanone fluorescence for two different configurations of EGR introduction in the engine. The local fluorescence measurements in the HP-HT facility are also compared with planar fluorescence measurements in the optical engine.

  19. Measurement of exhaust gas recirculation rate by laser-induced fluorescence in engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to measure by planar laser-induced fluorescence the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) rate in the combustion chamber of an optical engine to quantify the stratification phenomena used in the new combustion strategy. From the results obtained in a high pressure–high temperature (HP–HT) facility, the tracer chosen for this aim is 3-pentanone. This paper presents a quantitative measurement of the EGR rate in the engine and a post-processing model with a correction and calibration procedure by considering the influence of temperature and pressure on the absorption cross-section and the 3-pentanone fluorescence quantum yield from the results established in the HP–HT facility. The stratification phenomena are quantified by using 3-pentanone fluorescence for two different configurations of EGR introduction in the engine. The local fluorescence measurements in the HP–HT facility are also compared with planar fluorescence measurements in the optical engine

  20. Exhaust gas recirculation – Zero dimensional modelling and characterization for transient diesel combustion control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Zero-dimensional EGR model for transient diesel combustion control. • Detailed analysis of EGR effects on intake, cylinder charge and exhaust properties. • Intake oxygen validated as an operating condition-independent measure of EGR. • Quantified EGR effectiveness in terms of NOx emission reduction. • Twin lambda sensor technique for estimation of EGR/in-cylinder parameters. - Abstract: The application of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) during transient engine operation is a challenging task since small fluctuations in EGR may cause larger than acceptable spikes in NOx/soot emissions or deterioration in the combustion efficiency. Moreover, the intake charge dilution at any EGR ratio is a function of engine load and intake pressure, and typically changes during transient events. Therefore, the management of EGR during transient engine operation or advanced combustion cycles (that are inherently less stable) requires a fundamental understanding of the transient EGR behaviour and its impact on the intake charge development. In this work, a zero-dimensional EGR model is described to estimate the transient (cycle-by-cycle) progression of EGR and the time (engine cycles) required for its stabilization. The model response is tuned to a multi-cylinder engine by using an overall engine system time-constant and shown to effectively track the transient EGR changes. The impact of EGR on the actual air–fuel ratio of the cylinder charge is quantified by defining an in-cylinder excess-air ratio that accounts for the oxygen in the recycled exhaust gas. Furthermore, a twin lambda sensor (TLS) technique is implemented for tracking the intake dilution and in-cylinder excess-air ratio in real-time. The modelling and analysis results are validated against a wide range of engine operations, including transient and steady-state low temperature combustion tests

  1. Exhaust Gas Recirculation Control for Large Diesel Engines - Achievable Performance with SISO Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Mahler; Blanke, Mogens; Niemann, Hans Henrik; Vejlgaard-Laursen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates control possibilities for Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on large diesel engines. The goal is to reduce the amount of NOx in the exhaust gas by reducing the oxygen concentration available for combustion. Control limitations imposed by the system are assessed using linear analysis of the highly non-linear dynamics. Control architectures are investigated and performance in terms of disturbance rejection and reference tracking are investigated under model uncertainty. Class...

  2. Modelling for Control of Exhaust Gas Recirculation on Large Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Mahler; Zander, Claes-Göran; Pedersen, Nicolai; Blanke, Mogens; Vejlgaard-Laursen, Morten

    2013-01-01

    Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) reduces NOx emissions by reducing O2 concentration for the combustion and is a preferred way to obtain emission regulations that will take effect from 2016. If not properly controlled, reduction of O2 has adverse side eects and proper control requires proper dynamic models. While literature is rich on four-stroke automotive engines, this paper considers two-stroke engines and develops a non-linear dynamic model of the exhaust gas system. Parameters are determined ...

  3. Implementation of Exhaust Gas Recirculation for Double Stage Waste Heat Recovery System on Large Container Vessel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Morten; Marissal, Matthieu; Sørensen, Kim; Condra, Thomas Joseph

    2014-01-01

    Concerned to push ships to have a lower impact on the environment, the International Maritime Organization are implementing stricter regulation of NOx and SOx emissions, called Tier III, within emission control areas (ECAs). Waste Heat Recovery Systems (WHRS) on container ships consist of recovering some of the waste heat from the exhaust gas. This heat is converted into electrical energy used on-board instead of using auxiliary engines. Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) systems, are recirculating...

  4. Nonlinear Adaptive Control of Exhaust Gas Recirculation for Large Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kræn Vodder; Blanke, Mogens; Vejlgaard-Laursen, Morten

    2015-01-01

    A nonlinear adaptive controller is proposed for the exhaust gas recirculation systemon large two-stroke diesel engines. The control design is based on a control oriented model ofthe nonlinear dynamics at hand that incorporates load and engine speed changes as knowndisturbances to the exhaust gas recirculation. The paper provides proof of exponential stabilityfor closed loop control of the model given. Difficulties in the system include that certaindisturbance levels will make a desired setpoint ...

  5. Gas separation process using membranes with permeate sweep to remove CO.sub.2 from gaseous fuel combustion exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijmans Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Merkel, Timothy C. (Menlo Park, CA); Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA)

    2012-05-15

    A gas separation process for treating exhaust gases from the combustion of gaseous fuels, and gaseous fuel combustion processes including such gas separation. The invention involves routing a first portion of the exhaust stream to a carbon dioxide capture step, while simultaneously flowing a second portion of the exhaust gas stream across the feed side of a membrane, flowing a sweep gas stream, usually air, across the permeate side, then passing the permeate/sweep gas back to the combustor.

  6. Control method for turbocharged diesel engines having exhaust gas recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolmanovsky, Ilya V. (Ypsilanti, MI); Jankovic, Mrdjan J (Birmingham, MI); Jankovic, Miroslava (Birmingham, MI)

    2000-03-14

    A method of controlling the airflow into a compression ignition engine having an EGR and a VGT. The control strategy includes the steps of generating desired EGR and VGT turbine mass flow rates as a function of the desired and measured compressor mass airflow values and exhaust manifold pressure values. The desired compressor mass airflow and exhaust manifold pressure values are generated as a function of the operator-requested fueling rate and engine speed. The EGR and VGT turbine mass flow rates are then inverted to corresponding EGR and VGT actuator positions to achieve the desired compressor mass airflow rate and exhaust manifold pressure. The control strategy also includes a method of estimating the intake manifold pressure used in generating the EGR valve and VGT turbine positions.

  7. Turbine exhaust diffuser with region of reduced flow area and outer boundary gas flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosa, John

    2014-03-11

    An exhaust diffuser system and method for a turbine engine. The outer boundary may include a region in which the outer boundary extends radially inwardly toward the hub structure and may direct at least a portion of an exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the hub structure. At least one gas jet is provided including a jet exit located on the outer boundary. The jet exit may discharge a flow of gas downstream substantially parallel to an inner surface of the outer boundary to direct a portion of the exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the outer boundary to effect a radially outward flow of at least a portion of the exhaust gas flow toward the outer boundary to balance an aerodynamic load between the outer and inner boundaries.

  8. Exhaust gas concentration of CNG fuelled direct injection engine at MBT timing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: This paper presents an experimental result of exhaust gas concentration of high compression engine fuelled with compressed natural gas (CNG) at maximum brake torque (MBT). The engine uses central direct injection (DI) technique to inject the CNG into the cylinder. The engine geometry bases on gasoline engine with 14:1 compression ratio and called CNGDI engine. The injectors are positioned within a certain degrees of spark plug location. The objective of the experiment is to study the influence and significant of MBT timing in CNGDI engine towards exhaust gases. The experimental tests were carried out using computer-controlled eddy-current dynamometer, which measures the CNGDI engine performance. At MBT region, exhaust gas concentration as such CO, HC, NOx, O2 and CO2, were recorded and analyzed during the test using the Horiba analyzer. A closed loop wide band lambda sensor has been mounted at the exhaust manifold to indicate the oxygen level during the exercise. (author)

  9. Use of exhaust gas as sweep flow to enhance air separation membrane performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutart, Charles H. (Washington, IL); Choi, Cathy Y. (Morton, IL)

    2003-01-01

    An intake air separation system for an internal combustion engine is provided with purge gas or sweep flow on the permeate side of separation membranes in the air separation device. Exhaust gas from the engine is used as a purge gas flow, to increase oxygen flux in the separation device without increasing the nitrogen flux.

  10. Analysis of benefits of using internal exhaust gas recirculation in biogas-fueled HCCI engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The influence of EGR on combustion of biogas fueled HCCI was investigated. • The aim was to reduce intake temperature requirement by internal EGR. • Combustion products caused the delay of combustion in similar conditions. • Internal EGR enabled by negative valve overlap increased cylinder temperature. • This increase was not enough to significantly reduce the intake temperature. - Abstract: This paper describes a numerical study that analyzed the influence of combustion products (CP) concentration on the combustion characteristics (combustion timing and combustion duration) of a biogas fueled homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine and the possibility of reducing the high intake temperature requirement necessary for igniting biogas in a HCCI engine by using internal exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) enabled by negative valve overlap (NVO). An engine model created in AVL Boost, and validated against experimental engine data, was used in this study. The results show, somewhat counter-intuitively, that when CP concentrations are increased the required intake temperature for maintaining the same combustion timing must be increased. When greater NVO is used to increase the in-cylinder CP concentration, the in-cylinder temperature does increase, but the chemical dilution influence of CP almost entirely counteracts this thermal effect. Additionally, it has been observed that with larger fractions of CP some instability of combustion in the calculation was obtained which indicates that the increase of internal EGR might produce some combustion instability

  11. Thermoelectric exhaust energy recovery with temperature control through heat pipes

    OpenAIRE

    Martins, Jorge; Brito, F. P.; Gonçalves, L. M.; Antunes, Joaquim

    2011-01-01

    Currently, a great deal of the automotive industry’s R&D effort is focused on improving overall vehicle environmental and energy efficiency. For instance, one of the things that Electric Vehicles (EVs) and Hybrid cars (HEV) have in common is the recovery of waste energy, namely during braking. But, when an I.C. engine is operating (e. g. as a range extender in an EV), a large amount of energy is also wasted within the exhaust gases and with engine cooling, energy that could otherwise be recov...

  12. Development of filters for exhaust air or off-gas cleaning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The activities of the 'Laboratorium fuer Aerosolphysik und Filtertechnik II' of the 'Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe' concentrate on the development of filters to be used for cleaning nuclear and conventional exhaust air and off-gas. Originally, these techniques were intended to be applied in nuclear facilities only. Their application for conventional gas purification, however, has led to a reorientation of research and development projects. By way of example, it is reported about the use of the multi-way sorption filter for radioiodine removal in nuclear power plants and following flue-gas purification in heating power plants as well as for off-gas cleaning in chemical industry. The improvement of HEPA filters and the development of metal fibre filters has led to components which can be used in the range of high humidity and moisture as well as at high temperatures and an increased differential pressure. The experience obtained in the field of high-efficiency filtering of nuclear airborne particles is made use of during the investigations concerning the removal of particles of conventional pollutants in the submicron range. A technique of radioiodine removal and an improved removal of airborne particles has been developed for use in the future reprocessing plant. Thus, a maximum removal efficiency can be achieved and an optimum waste management is made possible. It is reported about the components obtained as a result of these activities and their use for off-gas cleaning in the Wackersdorf reprocessing plant (WAW). (orig.)

  13. Study on the combustion characteristics of a premixed combustion system with exhaust gas recirculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The boiler of a premixed combustion system with EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) is investigated to explore the potential for increasing thermal efficiency and lowering pollutant emissions. To achieve this purpose, a thermodynamic analysis is performed to predict the effect of EGR on the thermodynamic efficiency for various equivalence ratios. Experiments of a preheated air condensing boiler with EGR were conducted to measure the changes in the thermal efficiency and the characteristics of the pollutant emission. Finally, a 1-D premixed code was calculated to understand the effect of the EGR method on the NO reduction mechanism. The results of the thermodynamic analysis show that the thermodynamic efficiency is not changed because the temperature and the amount of the exhaust gas are unchanged, even though the EGR method is implemented in the system. However, when the EGR method is used with an equivalence ratio near 1.00, it is experimentally verified that the thermal efficiency increases and the NOx concentration decreases. Based on the results from numerical calculations, it is shown that the NO production rates of N + O2 ? NO + O and N + OH ? NO + H are remarkably changed due to the decrease in the flame temperature and the NO mole fraction is decreased. - Highlights: • Premixed combustion system with EGR is studied for a high efficiency and low NOx. • All research is performed with various EGR and equivalence ratios. • It verified that efficiency increases and the NOx emission decreases with EGR method. • NO production rates are remarkably changed by N + O2 ? NO + O and N + OH ? NO + H with EGR

  14. Suicide by carbon monoxide from car exhaust-gas in Denmark 1995-1999

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Asser H; Gregersen, Markil

    2006-01-01

    In the period 1995-1999 there were 388 car exhaust-gas suicides in Denmark. Of these 343 (88.4%) were men and 45 (11.6%) were women, the average age being 47 years. The car exhaust-gas suicides made up 9.3% of all suicides in Denmark in the period. The corresponding rate was 11.7% for men and 3.7% for women. In rural areas a larger part of all suicides were committed with car exhaust-gas compared to the more densely populated areas. Mental disease was diagnosed in 124 (32.0%) cases. A suicide note was found in 165 (42.5%) cases. A hose was fitted to the exhaust pipe in 334 (86.1%) cases. Of these the 234 (60.3%) occurred outside, typically in a forest area, while 76 (19.6%) occurred in a closed garage. All the 54 (13.9%) cases with no hose fitted to the exhaust pipe occurred in a garage. Seven (1.8%) victims were found in a burning or burnt-out car, where the following investigation revealed that it was actually a car exhaust-gas suicide. Carboxyhemoglobin was measured in 26 (6.7%) victims. In two of these victims no carboxyhemoglobin was found, as they had survived for some time after the poisoning. The average saturation of the remaining victims was 67%, the lowest saturation being 20% and the highest being 84%. In the period 1969-1987 the number of car exhaust-gas suicides in Denmark increased from 50 to approximately 190 per year and the rate of car exhaust-gas suicides compared to all suicides increased from approximately 5% to approximately 13%. In 1987-1999 these figures decreased from approximately 190 to 63 per year and from 13% to approximately 8%. During these 30 years the number of passenger cars in Denmark doubled, which explains the increase in car exhaust-gas suicides during 1969-1987. A possible explanation for the decrease in 1987-1999 is the introduction of the catalytic converter, which was made mandatory in 1990. We anticipate that car exhaust-gas suicides will continue to decrease in numbers, as more cars are equipped with catalytic converters.

  15. Carbon Dioxide Emission Analysis of Chilled Water Production by Using Gas Turbine Exhaust Heat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adzuieen Nordin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Carbon dioxide from exhaust heat emission is one of the major contributorsto the environmental pollutant in power generation plants. This problem could be addressed if the emitted exhaust heat is recovered. In cogeneration plant, the exhaust heat from the gas turbine is used to generate steam usingHeat Recovery Steam Generator. The steam from Heat Recovery Steam Generator is then used for chilled water generation in Steam Absorption Chillers by absorption process. This study analyzed the total estimated amount of CO2 released to the environment due to chilled water production by using gas turbine exhaust heat. University Teknologi PetronasMalaysia cogeneration system is used as a case study. The energy balance principlewas adopted for the analysis. Results indicate that approximately 44% of CO2is avoided from being released to the environment by this process.

  16. MgO--Y2O3-stabilized ZrO2 ceramics in exhaust gas sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ZrO2 electrolyte exhaust gas sensor was developed as the feedback signal device for control of engine air : fuel ratio at the stoichiometric ratio. The exhaust gas sensor electrolyte is ZrO2, typically stabilized with CaO or Y2O3. Because of various operating advantages, the Y2O3-ZrO2 ceramic is preferred; however, its cost is significantly greater than the CaO body. Data are presented on a series of MgO-Y2O3-stabilized zirconias that can be used in place of the Y2O3 fully stabilized material. The sintered MgO-Y2O3-ZrO2 ceramic was fully stabilized and remained so after extended exposure in an engine durability test. The ceramic displayed some segregation of MgO throughout the matrix and a resistivity at typical exhaust temperatures (approximately equal to 6000C) four to nine times higher than that of the MgO-Y2O3-ZrO2 compositions. However, the ternary compositions appeared to be less expensive, reliable substitutes for the standard 8 mol percent Y2O3-ZrO2 ceramic in the exhaust sensor application

  17. An Experimental Investigation of Rectangular Exhaust-Gas Ejectors Applicable for Engine Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manganiello, Eugene J; Bogatsky, Donald

    1945-01-01

    An experimental investigation of rectangular exhaust-gas ejector pumps was conducted to provide data that would serve as a guide to the design of ejector applications for aircraft engines with marginal cooling. The pumping characteristics of rectangular ejectors actuated by the exhaust of a single-cylinder aircraft engine were determined for a range of ejector mixing-section area from 20 to 50 square inches, over-all length from 12 to 42 inches, aspect ratio from 1 to 5, diffusing exit area from 20 to 81 square inches, and exhaust-nozzle aspect ratio from 1 to 42.

  18. Method for generating a highly reactive plasma for exhaust gas aftertreatment and enhanced catalyst reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whealton, John H. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hanson, Gregory R. (Clinton, TN); Storey, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Raridon, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Armfield, Jeffrey S. (Ypsilanti, MI); Bigelow, Timothy S. (Knoxville, TN); Graves, Ronald L. (Knoxville, TN)

    2002-01-01

    A method for non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gases the method comprising the steps of providing short risetime, high frequency, high power bursts of low-duty factor microwaves sufficient to generate a plasma discharge and passing a gas to be treated through the discharge so as to cause dissociative reduction of the exhaust gases and enhanced catalyst reactivity through application of the pulsed microwave fields directly to the catalyst material sufficient to cause a polarizability catastrophe and enhanced heating of the metal crystallite particles of the catalyst, and in the presence or absence of the plasma. The invention also includes a reactor for aftertreatment of exhaust gases.

  19. Chemical gas sensors for car exhaust and cabin air monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kalman, E.-L.; Winquist, F. [Department of Physics and Measurement Technology, Laboratory of Applied Physics, Linkoeping University, Gothenburg (Sweden); Rudell, B. [Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Centre of Public Health Sciences, Linkoeping, Gothenburg (Sweden); Loefvendahl, A. [Volvo Car Corporation, Gothenburg (Sweden); Wass, U. [Volvo Technological Development Corporation, Gothenburg (Sweden)

    2002-07-01

    A combination of charcoal and particle filters has previously been shown to reduce effectively the smell of diesel exhaust. In this paper it is shown that the smell of diesel exhaust can successfully be predicted by the concentration of total volatile organic compounds and the concentration of certain carbonyl compounds. Projection to latent structures was utilised for model building. An electronic nose consisting of MOFSET and MOS sensors could less successfully predict the smell, but identified the same filter combination as being most efficient. The car cabin during urban driving was also monitored, both by the means of MOFSET sensors and by chemiluminescence. The pollution level inside the car is shown to be elevated by about 30% compared to outside the car. A combination filter together with an air inlet sensor switch is shown to reduce the NO{sub x} levels inside te car by 30% compared to outside, with the ability to significantly decrease the peak levels. (author)

  20. Heat-pipe assisted thermoelectric generators for exhaust gas applications

    OpenAIRE

    Gonçalves, L. M.; Martins, Jorge; Antunes, Joaquim; Rocha, Romeu; Brito, F. P.

    2010-01-01

    Millions of hybrid cars are already running on our roads with the purpose of reducing fossil fuel dependence. One of their main advantages is the recovery of wasted energy, namely by brake recovery. However, there are other sources of wasted energy in a car powered by an internal combustion engine, such as the heat lost through the cooling system, lubrication system (oil coolers) and in the exhaust system. These energies can be recuperated by the use of thermoelectric generators (TEG) based o...

  1. Diesel emission reduction using internal exhaust gas recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xin (Denver, CO); Durrett, Russell P. (Bloomfield Hills, MI)

    2012-01-24

    A method for controlling combustion in a direct-injection diesel engine includes monitoring a crankshaft rotational position of a cylinder of the engine, monitoring an engine load, determining an intake stroke within the cylinder based upon the crankshaft rotational position, and when the engine load is less than a threshold engine load, opening an exhaust valve for the cylinder during a portion of the intake stroke.

  2. Turbocharger efficiencies in pulsating exhaust gas flow; Turboladerwirkungsgrade in pulsierender Abgasstroemung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aymanns, Richard; Scharf, Johannes; Uhlmann, Tolga [FEV GmbH, Aachen (Germany). Business Unit Gasoline Engines; Pischinger, Stefan [RWTH Aachen (Germany). Lehrstuhl fuer Verbrennungskraftmaschinen

    2012-07-15

    The exhaust pressure pulse amplitudes in downsizing engines challenge the quasi steady modelling of turbocharger turbines in engine process simulation. An early selection of a well matching turbocharger is the key to time efficiency in the concept development phase of engines with ambitious performance and fuel economy targets. This article from FEV and RWTH Aachen assesses the turbocharger efficiencies in pulsating exhaust gas flow and gives a handling recommendation to minimise matching errors. (orig.)

  3. Catalytic study of SOFC electrode materials in engine exhaust gas atmosphere

    OpenAIRE

    Briault, Pauline; Rieu, Mathilde; Laucournet, Richard; Morel, Bertrand; Viricelle, Jean-Paul

    2013-01-01

    A single chamber solid oxide fuel cell (SC-SOFC) is a device able to produce electricity from a mixture of hydrocarbons and oxidant. An innovative application of this system would be to recover energy from exhaust gas of a thermal engine. This paper presents a study of stability and catalytic behaviour of electrode materials composing the cell in a mixture of hydrocarbons (propane, propene), oxygen, carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, hydrogen and water corresponding to a composition of exhaust ...

  4. Low-pressure-ratio regenerative exhaust-heated gas turbine. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tampe, L.A.; Frenkel, R.G.; Kowalick, D.J.; Nahatis, H.M.; Silverstein, S.M.; Wilson, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    A design study of coal-burning gas-turbine engines using the exhaust-heated cycle and state-of-the-art components has been completed. In addition, some initial experiments on a type of rotary ceramic-matrix regenerator that would be used to transfer heat from the products of coal combustion in the hot turbine exhaust to the cool compressed air have been conducted. Highly favorable results have been obtained on all aspects on which definite conclusions could be drawn.

  5. Reformulation of engine gasoline to reduce exhaust emissions in Finnish conditions. Effect of gasoline aromatics, olefins and T90 temperature on exhaust emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The research work focused on the effects of gasoline composition, i.e. aromatics and olefin contents and 90 % point of distillation, on exhaust emissions. The experimental part comprised exhaust gas measurements for 13 catalyst cars at +22 deg C and for one non-catalyst car at +22 deg C according to FTP75 driving cycle. Regulated emissions (THC, CO and NOx), non-regulated emissions (hydrocarbons and aldehydes), carbon dioxide and fuel consumption were measured. The high aromatics contents of eight test fuels were about 40 vol% and the low ones about 15 vol%, the high olefin contents were about 15 vol% and the low ones about 2 vol%, and the high T90 temperatures about +170 deg C and the low ones +145 deg C. The results were treated in two ways: effects of each single change in characteristics, and those of simultaneous changes in all fuel characteristics studied. The lowest CO and THC emissions for the catalyst cars at +22 deg C were obtained by reducing the aromatics content and the T90 temperature of the fuel, while the reduction of the olefin content increased respective emissions. The NOx emission increased when the aromatics content and T90 temperature were reduced, and decreased slightly when the olefin content was reduced. The CO2 emission and the fuel consumption (kg/100 km) were affected, i.e. reduced, only by a reduction in the aromatics content. However, the fuel consumption in volume units (1/100 kg) increased. The results at -7 deg C for THC and NOx emissions were along the same lines as at +22 deg C, except for the CO emission, which decreased when the olefin content was reduced and increased when the T90 temperature was lowered

  6. Workshop on an Assessment of Gas-Side Fouling in Fossil Fuel Exhaust Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marner, W. J. (editor); Webb, R. L. (editor)

    1982-01-01

    The state of the art of gas side fouling in fossil fuel exhaust environments was assessed. Heat recovery applications were emphasized. The deleterious effects of gas side fouling including increased energy consumption, increased material losses, and loss of production were identified.

  7. Evaluation of Energy Saving Characteristics of a High-Efficient Cogeneration System Utilizing Gas Engine Exhaust Heat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pak, Pyong Sik

    A high efficiency cogeneration system (CGS) utilizing high temperature exhaust gas from a gas engine is proposed. In the proposed CGS, saturated steam produced in the gas engine is superheated with a super heater utilizing regenerative burner and used to drive a steam turbine generator. The heat energy is supplied by extracting steam from the steam turbine and turbine outlet low-temperature steam. Both of the energy saving characteristics of the proposed CGS and a CGS constructed by using the original gas engine (GE-CGS) were investigated and compared, by taking a case where energy for office buildings was supplied by the conventional energy systems. It was shown that the proposed CGS has energy saving rate of 24.5%, higher than 1.83 times, compared with that of the original GE-CGS.

  8. Evaluation of industrial local exhaust hood efficiency by a tracer gas technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampl, V

    1984-07-01

    Efficiency of industrial local exhaust ventilation is defined as the ratio of air contaminant quantity captured by the system per unit time to the total contaminant quantity produced by the process per unit time. To date, no direct method exists for this evaluation. This paper describes a tracer gas technique, using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), which has been developed for the evaluation of local exhaust system efficiency. SF6 was discharged at a known rate into the industrial process generation area. Then, by comparing this quantity to that captured by the exhaust system, as measured in the exhaust duct, hood efficiency is determined. Major advantages of this technique are: The tracer gas technique is able to evaluate directly the hood efficiency. The tracer gas technique is not affected by cross-contamination from nearby industrial processes. The tracer gas technique can be conducted "on site" with minimal interruption of industrial process or interference with workers' duties. The tracer gas, using SF6 is non-toxic. Since SF6 is a gas, this technique may be limited to efficiency evaluation of hoods associated with gases, fumes, vapors, or fine particles. PMID:6464994

  9. Exhaust Gas Recirculation Control for Large Diesel Engines - Achievable Performance with SISO Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Mahler; Blanke, Mogens

    2013-01-01

    This paper investigates control possibilities for Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on large diesel engines. The goal is to reduce the amount of NOx in the exhaust gas by reducing the oxygen concentration available for combustion. Control limitations imposed by the system are assessed using linear analysis of the highly non-linear dynamics. Control architectures are investigated and performance in terms of disturbance rejection and reference tracking are investigated under model uncertainty. Classical feed-forward and feedback controller designs are investigated using classical and Quantitative Feedback Theory (QFT) designs. Validation of the controller is made on the model with focus on disturbance reduction ability.

  10. Experimental study on engine gas-path component fault monitoring using exhaust gas electrostatic signal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the recent development in engine gas-path components health monitoring using electrostatic sensors in combination with signal-processing techniques. Two ground-based engine electrostatic monitoring experiments are reported and the exhaust gas electrostatic monitoring signal-based fault-detection method is proposed. It is found that the water washing, oil leakage and combustor linear cracking result in an increase in the activity level of the electrostatic monitoring signal, which can be detected by the electrostatic monitoring system. For on-line health monitoring of the gas-path components, a baseline model-based fault-detection method is proposed and the multivariate state estimation technique is used to establish the baseline model for the electrostatic monitoring signal. The method is applied to a data set from a turbo-shaft engine electrostatic monitoring experiment. The results of the case study show that the system with the developed method is capable of detecting the gas-path component fault in an on-line fashion. (paper)

  11. 40 CFR 1039.101 - What exhaust emission standards must my engines meet after the 2014 model year?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...Not-to-exceed standards. Exhaust emissions from your...Where: T = ambient air temperature in degrees...engines equipped with exhaust-gas recirculation, the NTE standards...Fuel types. The exhaust emission...

  12. Relationship between the variations of hydrogen in HCNG fuel and the oxygen in exhausted gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preecha Yaom

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The variation of the mixing ratio between hydrogen and compressed natural gas (CNG in hydrogen enriched compressed natural gas fuel (HCNG gives different results in terms of engine performances, fuel consumption, and emission characteristics. Therefore, the engine performance using HCNG as fuel can be optimized if the mixing ratio between the two fuels in HCNG can be adjusted in real time while the engine is being operated. In this research, the relationship between the amount of oxygen in the exhausted gas and the mixing composition between the hydrogen and CNG in HCNG is investigated based on the equilibrium equation of combustion. It is found that the main factors affecting the amount of oxygen in exhausted gas when using HCNG as fuel include the error from the air-fuel-ratio (AFR control, the error from the HCNG composition control, and the intended change of the HCNG composition. Theoretically, the amount of the oxygen in the exhaust should increase by 0.78% for every 5% addition of H2 at stoichiometric condition. This value can be higher or lower for lean and rich engine operation, respectively. The experimental results found that at the equivalent ratio around 0.8 the amount of O2 in the exhaust gas increases about 1.23% for every 5% H2 addition, which inclines with the proposed calculations.

  13. A Framework for Modular Modeling of the Diesel Engine Exhaust Gas Cleaning System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Åberg, Andreas; Hansen, Thomas Klint

    2015-01-01

    Pollutants from diesel engines have a negative effect on urban air quality. Because of this and new legislation restricting the emission level, it is necessary to develop exhaust gas treatment systems for diesel engines that can reduce the amount of pollutants. A modular model capable of simulating the whole catalytic exhaust system would be beneficial towards this goal. A methodology for developing a modular model capable of simulating a system consisting of several sub systems is presented. The methodology describes the steps the user should take to go from problem formulation to the final modular model. Four different models in the automotive diesel exhaust gas cleaning system are presented briefly. Based on the presented methodology, it is discussed which changes are needed to the models to create a modular model of the whole catalytic system.

  14. Amounts, cleaning, measurement and limits of exhaust gas emissions from petrol cars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nylund, N.-O.; Kytoe, M.; Koponen, P.; Leppaemaeki, E.

    1985-06-15

    The present level of exhaust gas emissions, available means for their reduction, current measuring techniques, the comparability of measuring results and trends of development in the field of regulations and technology in Europe are reviewed. Catalytic cleaning is today the most effective method of purification. A so-called three-way catalyst, where both oxidation and reduction reaction take place represents the latest technology. This catalyst with auxiliary equipment is relatively expensive and increases fuel consumption by 10-15%. The use of leadfree petrol makes the use of catalytic exhaust gas purification possible and reduces the amount of nitric compounds in the exhaust gases. According to these present knowledge the leadfree petrol will be brought into use in the EEC countries in 1989.

  15. Completion of 50kW-class pulsed corona discharge type exhaust gas treatment system; Pulse korona hoden hai gas shori system no kansei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-03-01

    A pulsed corona discharge type exhaust gas treatment system is completed, capable of decomposing and removing toxic substances such as dioxins and nitrogen oxides contained in exhaust gas emitted by urban refuse incinerators and the like. The system comprises a semiconductor high-voltage pulsed power source for generating short-pulse corona discharges and a reactor for purifying exhaust gas using the said discharges. Active radicals generated during discharges act directly on dioxins, etc., in exhaust gas, and accomplish toxic substance decomposition and exhaust gas purification through oxidation. No secondary waste is produced by the treatment. Fluctuations in exhaust gas volume are dealt with, and incinerator startup and stoppage executed, by merely controlling electric power. (translated by NEDO)

  16. HPLC analysis of aldehydes in automobile exhaust gas: Comparison of exhaust odor and irritation in different types of gasoline and diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Murari Mohon [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Rajshahi University of Engineering and Technology (RUET), Rajshahi 6204 (Bangladesh)], E-mail: mmroy5767@yahoo.com

    2008-05-15

    This study investigated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to identify and measure aldehydes from automobile exhaust gas. Four aldehydes: formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CHO), acrolein (H{sub 2}C=CHCHO) and propionaldehyde (CH{sub 3}CH{sub 2}CHO) and one ketone, acetone (CH{sub 3}){sub 2}CO are separated. The other higher aldehydes in exhaust gas are very small and cannot be separated. A new method of gas sampling, hereafter called bag sampling in HPLC is introduced instead of the trapping gas sampling method. The superiority of the bag sampling method is its transient gas checking capability. In the second part of this study, HPLC results are applied to compare exhaust odor and irritation of exhaust gases in different types of gasoline and diesel engines. Exhaust odor, irritation and aldehydes are found worst in direct injection (DI) diesel engines and best in some good multi-point injection (MPI) gasoline and direct injection gasoline (DIG) engines. Indirect injection (IDI) diesel engines showed odor, irritation and aldehydes in between the levels of MPI gasoline, DIG and DI diesel engines.

  17. HPLC analysis of aldehydes in automobile exhaust gas: Comparison of exhaust odor and irritation in different types of gasoline and diesel engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study investigated high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to identify and measure aldehydes from automobile exhaust gas. Four aldehydes: formaldehyde (HCHO), acetaldehyde (CH3CHO), acrolein (H2C=CHCHO) and propionaldehyde (CH3CH2CHO) and one ketone, acetone (CH3)2CO are separated. The other higher aldehydes in exhaust gas are very small and cannot be separated. A new method of gas sampling, hereafter called bag sampling in HPLC is introduced instead of the trapping gas sampling method. The superiority of the bag sampling method is its transient gas checking capability. In the second part of this study, HPLC results are applied to compare exhaust odor and irritation of exhaust gases in different types of gasoline and diesel engines. Exhaust odor, irritation and aldehydes are found worst in direct injection (DI) diesel engines and best in some good multi-point injection (MPI) gasoline and direct injection gasoline (DIG) engines. Indirect injection (IDI) diesel engines showed odor, irritation and aldehydes in between the levels of MPI gasoline, DIG and DI diesel engines

  18. 30 CFR 36.47 - Tests of exhaust-gas cooling system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...All parts of the engine and exhaust-gas cooling system shall be at their...circulated over the engine or components in the cooling system during the test...possible to start the engine. Note: If the cooling system includes a...

  19. An overview of exhaust emissions regulatory requirements and control technology for stationary natural gas engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper a practical overview of stationary natural gas engine exhaust emissions control technology and trends in emissions regulatory requirements is presented. Selective and non-selective catalytic reduction and lean burn technologies are compared. Particular emphasis is focussed on implications of the Clean Air Act of 1990. Recent emissions reduction conversion kit developments and a practical approach to continuous monitoring are discussed

  20. DESIGN AND CHARACTERIZATION OF AN ISOKINETIC SAMPLING TRAIN FOR PARTICLE SIZE MEASUREMENTS USING EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    A particulate sampling train has been constructed which satisfies the conflicting requirements of isokinetic sample extraction and constant flowrate through an inertial sizing device. Its design allows a variable fraction of the filtered exhaust gas to be added to the sample upst...

  1. 40 CFR 86.1310-90 - Exhaust gas sampling and analytical system; diesel engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... shall conform to the specifications of 40 CFR part 86, subpart D, with the following exceptions and.... (a) General. The exhaust gas sampling system described in this paragraph is designed to measure the... good engineering judgement. The wire should be inserted up to the HFID inlet. Stabilize the...

  2. 40 CFR 86.111-94 - Exhaust gas analytical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...formaldehyde is performed using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine...Measurement Using Gas Chromatography,” December 1991, 1994...formaldehyde is performed using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of...

  3. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF EXHAUST PARTICLES FROM GAS TURBINE ENGINES

    Science.gov (United States)

    A program was conducted to chemically characterize particulate emissions from a current technology, high population, gas turbine engine. Attention was focused on polynuclear aromatic compounds, phenols, nitrosamines and total organics. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) were...

  4. Report on result in fiscal 1998 of 'Studies to aid practical application of recycling technologies (4)'. Research and development of enhancement of automobile fuel consumption and exhaust gas technologies; 1998 nendo recycle gijutsu nado jitsuyoka shien kenkyu. 4. Jidosha nenpi hai gas gijutsu kodoka kenkyu kaihatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-03-01

    In research and development intended of enhancing automobile fuel consumption and reducing exhaust gas, fiscal 1998 has performed investigations on effect of environmental temperatures on exhaust gas and evaporation gas, studies on methods for analyzing harmful substances, and research aiding investigations. In the investigations on effect of environmental temperatures on exhaust gas, actual status of exhaust gas was identified and exhaust gas was measured by varying the environmental temperature. As a result, it was discovered that CO and THC decrease as the environmental temperature rises in the mode 11, while NOx increases as the environmental temperature rises. It was made clear that exhaust gas is affected similarly by the environmental temperature also in the modes 10 and 15. The result of measuring the evaporation gas revealed that the evaporation gas increases as the average atmospheric temperature rises. It was made clear that the analytical method using a 1,3 butadiene measuring device developed from the present research is a highly reliable method with the analysis cycle as short as four minutes, and with less effect of aging in collecting bags. (NEDO)

  5. FTIR spectroscopy for the analysis of selected exhaust gas flows in silicon technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guber, A. E.; Köhler, U.

    1995-03-01

    Fabrication of highly integrated circuits or microstructures is presently accomplished above all by means of dry chemical etching processes with mostly halogen containing etching gases being used. As a result of the decomposition of these gases in a plasma reactive radicals are formed. They react with solid silicon compounds to gaseous SiF 4. Furthermore, partly highly toxic substances are generated in the exhaust gas flow by the recombination of other molecule fragments. For this reason, selected exhaust gases of RIE and PECVD facilities have been investigated by FTIR spectroscopy and evaluated with regard to their hazard potential and possible HF emission rate.

  6. Application of a power recovery system to gas turbine exhaust gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the application of a power recovery system to recover waste heat from the exhaust gases of gas turbines and convert this energy into shaft horsepower. Also discussed are power cycles, selection of power fluid, equipment selection, and application of the power recovery system to various gas turbines. Several charts and tables are included: process flow diagram, cycle efficiencies, curve for estimating recoverable horsepower

  7. Exhaust Gas Heat Recovery for C.I Engine-A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baleshwar Kumar Singh,

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The focus of the study is to review the modern changes and technologies on waste heat recovery of exhaust gas from internal combustion engine. These include the thermoelectric generator, turbocharger, exhaust gas through I.C engine. Due to the total heat supplied to the engine in the form of fuel around 30-40%, heat is converting in to the use full mechanical work and residual parts of the wastage heat 60-70% as friction, exhaust gas and engine cooling system. Waste heat release in the form of fumes in environment through I.C engine, which also includes the exhaust gases. The side effects are global warming, greenhouse effects and entropy increases etc. Therefore, it is required to use the waste heat in to useful work. The recovery of waste heat not only conserves fossil fuel but also control the environment pollution. Therefore, main objective of this paper is to evaluate (waste heat recovery system technology based on the total waste heat converted into the useful mechanical work and possible methods to recovery of the waste heat from I.C engine. As a result, waste heat recovery from the I.C engines and utilization shall be remain best technique in future automobile application save the fuel and protect the environment.

  8. Turbine exhaust diffuser with a gas jet producing a coanda effect flow control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orosa, John; Montgomery, Matthew

    2014-02-11

    An exhaust diffuser system and method for a turbine engine includes an inner boundary and an outer boundary with a flow path defined therebetween. The inner boundary is defined at least in part by a hub structure that has an upstream end and a downstream end. The outer boundary may include a region in which the outer boundary extends radially inward toward the hub structure and may direct at least a portion of an exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the hub structure. The hub structure includes at least one jet exit located on the hub structure adjacent to the upstream end of the tail cone. The jet exit discharges a flow of gas substantially tangential to an outer surface of the tail cone to produce a Coanda effect and direct a portion of the exhaust flow in the diffuser toward the inner boundary.

  9. Hydrogen combustion and exhaust emissions in a supercharged gas engine ignited with micro pilot diesel fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hydrogen combustion and exhaust emissions in a supercharged gas engine ignited with micro pilot diesel fuel was discussed in this presentation. A schematic diagram of the experimental study was first presented. The single cylinder, water-cooled, supercharged test engine was illustrated. Results were presented for the following: fuel energy and energy share (hydrogen and diesel fuel); pressure history and rate of heat release; engine performance and exhaust emissions; effect of nitrogen dilution on heat value per cycle; effect of N2 dilution on pressure history and rate of heat release; and engine performance and exhaust emissions. This presentation demonstrated that smooth and knock-free engine operation results from the use of hydrogen in a supercharged dual-fuel engine for leaner fuel-air equivalence ratios maintaining high thermal efficiency. It was possible to attain mor3 than 90 per cent hydrogen-energy substitution to the diesel fuel with zero smoke emissions. figs.

  10. Measurement of gas-phase polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) in gasoline vehicle exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are emitted at low levels from most combustion sources including motor vehicles. Extensive studies have been carried out in the past on the identification and quantitation of PAH in particular matter, primarily from diesel vehicles; however, only limited data are available on gas phase emissions from motor vehicles. Gas phase emissions are important from both a health perspective and because of their higher chemical reactivity during atmospheric transport. A method was sought to allow the authors to measure gas phase PAH in diluted vehicle exhaust over the relatively short collection times permitted during the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Urban Dynamometer Driving Schedule (UDDS) or Federal Test Procedure (FTP). In this paper, the authors describe their results on the development of a method using adsorption/thermal desorption with Tenax solid absorbent for the analysis of PAH and PAH derivatives in dilute vehicle exhaust

  11. Analysis of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat Recovery and Pollution Processing for Z12V190 Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hou Xuejun

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available With the increasingly prominent problem regarding rapid economy development and the gradually serious environmental pollution, the waste heat recovery and waste gas pollution processing have received significant attention. Z12V190 diesel engine has high fuel consumption and low thermal efficiency and releases large amounts of exhaust gas and waste heat into the atmosphere, causing serious problems of energy waste and environmental pollution. In this work, the diesel engine exhaust gas components are analysed and the diesel engine exhaust emission rates and exhaust gas waste heat rates are calculated. The calculating results proved the economic feasibility of waste heat recovery from Z12V190 diesel engine exhaust gas. Then, the mainly harmful components are analysed and the corresponding methods of purification and processing about Z12V190 diesel engine exhaust gas pollution discussed. In order to achieve full recovery of waste heat, save energy, purify treatment pollution and ultimate to lay the foundation for waste gas recovery and pollution treatment, the comprehensive process flows of Z12V190 diesel engine exhaust gas pollution processing and waste heat recovery are preliminary designed.

  12. Reduction of NOx and PM in marine diesel engine exhaust gas using microwave plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balachandran, W.; FInst, P.; Manivannan, N.; Beleca, R.; Abbod, M.

    2015-10-01

    Abatement of NOx and particulate matters (PM) of marine diesel exhaust gas using microwave (MW) non-thermal plasma is presented in this paper. NOx mainly consist of NO and less concentration of NO2 in a typical two stoke marine diesel engine and microwave plasma generation can completely remove NO. MW was generated using two 2kW microwave sources and a saw tooth passive electrode. Passive electrode was used to generate high electric field region within microwave environment where high energetic electrons (1-3eV) are produced for the generation of non-thermal plasma (NTP). 2kW gen-set diesel exhaust gas was used to test our pilot-scale MW plasma reactor. The experimental results show that almost 100% removal of NO is possible for the exhaust gas flow rate of 60l/s. It was also shown that MW can significantly remove soot particles (PM, 10nm to 365nm) entrained in the exhaust gas of 200kW marine diesel engine with 40% engine load and gas flow rate of 130l/s. MW without generating plasma showed reduction up to 50% reduction of PM and with the plasma up to 90% reduction. The major challenge in these experiments was that igniting the desired plasma and sustaining it with passive electrodes for longer period (10s of minutes) as it required fine tuning of electrode position, which was influenced by many factors such as gas flow rate, geometry of reactor and MW power.

  13. Optimization of a thermoelectric generator subsystem for high temperature PEM fuel cell exhaust heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xin, Gao; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen; Rosendahl, Lasse

    2014-01-01

    In previous work, a thermoelectric (TE) exhaust heat recovery subsystem for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (HT-PEM) fuel cell stack was developed and modeled. Numerical simulations were conducted and have identified an optimized subsystem configuration and 4 types of compact heat exchangers with superior performance for further analysis. In this work, the on-design performances of the 4 heat exchangers are more thoroughly assessed on their corresponding optimized subsystem confi...

  14. Micro- and Nanostructural Characteristics of Particles Before and After an Exhaust Gas Recirculation System Scrubber.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lieke, Kirsten Inga; RosenØrn, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This work provides insight into the morphology and mixing state of submicron particles in diesel exhaust from a ship engine with an exhaust gas recirculation scrubber. Particles from this low-speed ship engine on test bed were collected using a microiner-tial impactor with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids on two stages. Micro- and nanostructural characteristics of sin-gle particles were studied by TEM. Image analysis was carried out on overview and high-resolution images, revealing influence of the exhaust gas treatment (scrubber) on the particle morphology and mixing state. Soot agglomerates were found to be collapsed after scrubber, reflected by their change in fractal dimension (fly) from 1.88 to 2.13. Soot was predominantly found internally mixed with other components, with a higher degree of internal mix-ing observed after scrubber. Soot nanostructural characteristics on the near atomic scale such as layer distance, lamella length, and tortuosity were not observed to be influenced by the scrub-ber. We also found that particles in the size range between 30 and 50 nm, which were abundant in the exhaust before and after scrubber, were not graphitic soot. Furthermore, we found indications that these particles are composed of other crystalline material (salts).

  15. Micro- and Nanostructural Characteristics of Particles Before and After an Exhaust Gas Recirculation System Scrubber

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lieke, Kirsten Inga; Rosenorn, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    This work provides insight into the morphology and mixing state of submicron particles in diesel exhaust from a ship engine with an exhaust gas recirculation scrubber. Particles from this low-speed ship engine on test bed were collected using a microinertial impactor with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grids on two stages. Micro- and nanostructural characteristics of single particles were studied by TEM. Image analysis was carried out on overview and high-resolution images, revealing influence of the exhaust gas treatment (scrubber) on the particle morphology and mixing state. Soot agglomerates were found to be collapsed after scrubber, reflected by their change in fractal dimension (D-f ) from 1.88 to 2.13. Soot was predominantly found internally mixed with other components, with a higher degree of internal mixing observed after scrubber. Soot nanostructural characteristics on the near atomic scale such as layer distance, lamella length, and tortuosity were not observed to be influenced by the scrubber. We also found that particles in the size range between 30 and 50nm, which were abundant in the exhaust before and after scrubber, were not graphitic soot. Furthermore, we found indications that these particles are composed of other crystalline material (salts). Copyright 2013 American Association for Aerosol Research

  16. 40 CFR 86.1343-88 - Calculations; particulate exhaust emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...Average temperature of the dilute exhaust sample at the inlet to the gas...gas meter located at the exit side of the secondary-dilution...Average temperature of the dilute exhaust sample at the inlet to the exit side gas meter or flow...

  17. 4-Nitrophenol, 1-nitropyrene, and 9-nitroanthracene emissions in exhaust particles from diesel vehicles with different exhaust gas treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inomata, Satoshi; Fushimi, Akihiro; Sato, Kei; Fujitani, Yuji; Yamada, Hiroyuki

    2015-06-01

    The dependence of nitro-organic compound emissions in automotive exhaust particles on the type of aftertreatment used was investigated. Three diesel vehicles with different aftertreatment systems (an oxidation catalyst, vehicle-DOC; a particulate matter and NOx reduction system, vehicle-DPNR; and a urea-based selective catalytic reduction system, vehicle-SCR) and a gasoline car with a three-way catalyst were tested. Nitro-polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitro-PAHs) and nitrophenols in the particles emitted were analyzed by thermal desorption gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. The secondary production of nitro-organic compounds on the filters used to collect particles and the adsorption of gaseous nitro-organic compounds by the filters were evaluated. Emissions of 1-nitropyrene, 9-nitroanthracene, and 4-nitrophenol in the diesel exhaust particles were then quantified. The NOx reduction process in vehicle-DPNR appeared to remove nitro-hydrocarbons efficiently but not to remove nitro-oxygenated hydrocarbons efficiently. The nitro-PAH emission factors were lower for vehicle-DOC when it was not fitted with a catalyst than when it was fitted with a catalyst. The 4-nitrophenol emission factors were also lower for vehicle-DOC with a catalyst than vehicle-DOC without a catalyst, suggesting that the oxidation catalyst was a source of both nitro-PAHs and 4-nitrophenol. The time-resolved aerosol mass spectrometry data suggested that nitro-organic compounds are mainly produced when an engine is working under load. The presence of 4-nitrophenol in the particles was not confirmed statistically because of interference from gaseous 4-nitrophenol. Systematic errors in the estimated amounts of gaseous 1-nitropyrene and 9-nitroanthracene adsorbed onto the filters and the estimated amounts of volatile nitro-organic compounds that evaporated during sampling and during post-sampling conditioning could not be excluded. An analytical method in which all gaseous compounds are absorbed before particles are collected, and in which the volatile compounds are derivatized, would improve the precision and the accuracy of the data.

  18. Experimental research on exhaust gas purifying facilities in incinerating treatment of radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among the research on the incinerating treatment of combustible low level wastes, three items, that is, combustible low level radioactive wastes and incinerating treatment method, wet type exhaust gas purifying facilities and ceramic filter type dry exhaust gas purifying facilities, were selected, and experimental research was carried out on the main theme of exhaust gas purification in the incineration of low level radioactive wastes. The definition of combustible low level radioactive wastes was decided, and the wastes conforming to this criteria were investigated and classified. The combustible low level wastes generated in the Tokai Research Establishment were classified and weighed, and the results reflected well the state of activities. The change of radioactive wastes to radioactive aerosol, radioactive gas and residue by incineration was investigated. The effect of volume reduction by incineration was studied. The decontamination performance of wet purifying system, the release of tritium steam, the cooling capacity of scrubbers and their corrosion, the construction of the test incinerator using ceramic filters, and the various tests on ceramic filters are reported. (K.I.)

  19. Analysis of Exhaust Gas Waste Heat Recovery and Pollution Processing for Z12V190 Diesel Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Hou Xuejun; Gao Deli

    2012-01-01

    With the increasingly prominent problem regarding rapid economy development and the gradually serious environmental pollution, the waste heat recovery and waste gas pollution processing have received significant attention. Z12V190 diesel engine has high fuel consumption and low thermal efficiency and releases large amounts of exhaust gas and waste heat into the atmosphere, causing serious problems of energy waste and environmental pollution. In this work, the diesel engine exhaust gas compone...

  20. Trigeneration scheme for energy efficiency enhancement in a natural gas processing plant through turbine exhaust gas waste heat utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ? Efficiency enhancement of Natural Gas (NG) processing plants in hot/humid climates. ? Gas turbine waste heat powered trigeneration scheme using absorption refrigeration. ? Annual NG savings of 1879 MSCM and operating cost savings of US$ 20.9 million realized. ? Trigeneration scheme payback period estimated at approximately 1 year. ? Significant economical and environmental benefits for NG processing plants. - Abstract: The performance of Natural Gas Processing Plants (NGPPs) can be enhanced with the integration of Combined Cooling, Heating and Power (CCHP) generation schemes. This paper analyzes the integration of a trigeneration scheme within a NGPP, that utilizes waste heat from gas turbine exhaust gases to generate process steam in a Waste Heat Recovery Steam Generator (WHRSG). Part of the steam generated is used to power double-effect water–lithium bromide (H2O–LiBr) absorption chillers that provide gas turbine compressor inlet air-cooling. Another portion of the steam is utilized to meet part furnace heating load, and supplement plant electrical power in a combined regenerative Rankine cycle. A detailed techno-economic analysis of scheme performance is presented based on thermodynamic predictions obtained using Engineering Equation Solver (EES). The results indicate that the trigeneration system could recover 79.7 MW of gas turbine waste heat, 37.1 MW of which could be utilized by three steam-fired H2O–LiBr absorption chillers to provide 45 MW of cooling at 5 °C. This could save approximately 9 MW of electric energy required by a typical compression chiller, while providing the same amount of cooling. In addition, the combined cycle generates 22.6 MW of additional electrical energy for the plant, while process heating reduces furnace oil consumption by 0.23 MSCM per annum. Overall, the trigeneration scheme would result in annual natural gas fuel savings of approximately 1879 MSCM, and annual operating cost savings of approximately US$ 20.9 million, with a payback period of 1 year. This study highlights the significant economical and environmental benefits that could be achieved through implementation of the proposed integrated cogeneration scheme in NGPPs, particularly in elevated ambient temperature and humidity conditions such as encountered in Middle East facilities.

  1. Nonlinear Adaptive Control of Exhaust Gas Recirculation for Large Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kræn Vodder; Blanke, Mogens

    2015-01-01

    A nonlinear adaptive controller is proposed for the exhaust gas recirculation systemon large two-stroke diesel engines. The control design is based on a control oriented model ofthe nonlinear dynamics at hand that incorporates load and engine speed changes as knowndisturbances to the exhaust gas recirculation. The paper provides proof of exponential stabilityfor closed loop control of the model given. Difficulties in the system include that certaindisturbance levels will make a desired setpoint in O2 unreachable, for reasons of the physics of thesystem, and it is proven that the proposed control will make the system converge exponentiallyto the best achievable state. Simulation examples confirm convergence and good disturbancerejection over relevant operational ranges of the engine.

  2. Modelling for Control of Exhaust Gas Recirculation on Large Diesel Engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jakob Mahler; Zander, Claes-Göran

    2013-01-01

    Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) reduces NOx emissions by reducing O2 concentration for the combustion and is a preferred way to obtain emission regulations that will take effect from 2016. If not properly controlled, reduction of O2 has adverse side eects and proper control requires proper dynamic models. While literature is rich on four-stroke automotive engines, this paper considers two-stroke engines and develops a non-linear dynamic model of the exhaust gas system. Parameters are determined by system identication. The paper uses black-box nonlinear model identication and modelling from rst principles followed by parameter identication and compares the results of these approaches. The paper performs a validation against experimental data from a test engine and presents a linearised model for EGR control design.

  3. 5th international exhaust gas and particulate emissions forum. Proceedings; 5. Internationales Forum Abgas- und Partikelemissionen. Beitraege

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2008-12-11

    The Proceedings of the 5th International Exhaust Gas and Particulate Emissions Forum contains 22 printed contributions as well as a CD-ROM. The titles of them are: (1) Diesel Emissions Control in the United States - 2010 and Beyond; (2) The MBE90 commercial vehicle engine for EPA '07 emissions regulations; (3) Concepts for engines and exhaust-gas cleaning systems for heavy duty trucks of the future; (4) HD Engine Technology for Near-Zero Emissions and Lowest Cost of Ownership; (5) (Partially-) Homogeneous Diesel Combustion; (6) Exhaust gas sensors for NOx storage catalysts and ammonia-SCR systems; (7) Sensors for modern exhaust gas after-treatment systems; (8) New reducing agents for low NOx-SCR Techno-logy; (9) Exhaust gas Aftertreatment on Lean Burn Gasoline Direct Injection Engines: The System of TWC and NOx-Storage Catalyst; (10) New Platinum/Palladium based catalyzed filter technologies for future passenger car applications; (11) Development of a Roadway Hydrocarbon Sorption Model and Characterization of a Novel PM Generator; (12) Requirements for current and future particulate measurement instrumentation from the point of view of the Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt; (13) Standardized dilution conditions for gravimetric PM sampling - measures to assure results that correlate; (14) Particle Counting according PMP; (15) Future high-confidence measurement of diesel particulate emissions for approval and development; (16) New developments in optical instrumentation for exhaust gas; (17) Simultaneous Detection of Gaseous and Particulate Exhaust Components by Photoacoustic Spectroscopy; (18) Boundaries of modern exhaust gas instrumentation; (19) Raising quality and reducing application effort through efficient data input to the particulate filter load model for a EURO5 diesel car; (20) Stop-start operation of diesel engines - modified require-ment for exhaust gas after-treatment?; (21) Particulates emission with Biodiesel B30 impact on CSF management; (22) Diesel engine soot and NOx emission modelling. (orig)

  4. Experimental Analysis of the Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) on Engine Performance and Exhaust Emissions on Diesel Engines

    OpenAIRE

    HA??MO?LU, Can

    2002-01-01

    When the temperature of the combustion chamber rises beyond 1800 K in internal combustion engines, the nitrogen and oxygen in the air combine chemically and become a gas called nitrogen oxide, which is harmful to human health and the environment. Nitrogen oxides combine with humidity in the lungs and become nitric acid, which causes breathing illnesses. Diesel engines use excess air for combustion, and this increases nitrogen oxide production potential. In this research, the reduction of ...

  5. Destruction of pollutants in waste water or exhaust gas by electron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pollutants in waste water (e.g. dyes, organochlorine compounds, phenols, etc.) or exhaust gas (e.g. NOsub(x), SO2, H2S, CS2, etc.) may be destroyed by radiation doses of about 1 to 50 kGy. Using electron accelerators as radiation sources, treatment costs can be calculated which under the most favourable conditions are already comparable to conventional treatment costs. (auth.)

  6. Investigation of Materials for Use in Exhaust Gas Condensate Environment with Focus on EGR systems

    OpenAIRE

    Olofsson, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    EGR (Exhaust Gas Recirculation) ar en teknik som anvands for dieselmotorer, for att mota de hart satta utslappskraven for kvaveoxider. EGR fungerar genom att en del av avgaserna aterfors till cylindrarna. Avgaserna gor sa att den maximala forbranningstemperaturen sanks, vilket kraftigt reducerar bildandet av kvaveoxider. Dieselavgaser inneh aller framst CO2, NOx, SO2 och H2O och innan avgasernaaterfors till cylindrarna kyls de ner. Detta leder till att det bildas ett korrosivt kondensat, eft...

  7. PERFORMANCE AND EXHAUST GAS EMISSIONS ANALYSIS OF DIRECT INJECTION CNG-DIESEL DUAL FUEL ENGINE

    OpenAIRE

    RANBIR SINGH; SAGAR MAJI

    2012-01-01

    Existing diesel engines are under stringent emission regulation particularly of smoke and particulate matter in their exhaust. Compressed Natural Gas and Diesel dual fuel operation is regarded as one of the best ways to control emissions from diesel engines and simultaneously saving petroleum based diesel fuel. Dual fuel engineis a conventional diesel engine which burn either gaseous fuel or diesel or both at the same time. In the present paper an experimental research was carried out on a la...

  8. Laboratory Scale of Liquid Coal Fuel Combustion Process and Exhaust Gas Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Kartika K. Hendratna; Osami Nishida; Hirotsugu Fujita; Wataru Harano

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Much research of coal has been already undertaken to ascertain the possibilities of coal being used as substitute for heavy fuel oil in the transportation sector. The effects of using coal as transportation fuel to the environment must also be considered. This study will review several aspects of the coal oil combustion process including combustion behavior, flame stability, some emissions from exhaust gas; CO, NOx and the particulate matter in a well insulated laboratory s...

  9. Emission factor of exhaust gas constituents during the pyrolysis of zinc chloride immersed biosolid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang, Hung-Lung; Lin, Kuo-Hsiung; Chiu, Hua-Hsien

    2013-08-01

    Pyrolysis enables ZnCl2 immersed biosolid to be reused, but some hazardous air pollutants are emitted during this process. Physical characteristics of biosolid adsorbents were investigated in this work. In addition, the constituents of pyrolytic exhaust were determined to evaluate the exhaust characteristics. Results indicated that the pyrolytic temperature was higher than 500 °C, the specific surface area was >900 m(2)/g, and the total pore volume was as much as 0.8 cm(3)/g at 600 °C. For non-ZnCl2 immersed biosolid pyrolytic exhaust, VOC emission factors increased from 0.677 to 3.170 mg-VOCs/g-biosolid with the pyrolytic temperature increase from 400 to 700 °C, and chlorinated VOCs and oxygenated VOCs were the dominant fraction of VOC groups. VOC emission factors increased about three to seven times, ranging from 1.813 to 21.448 mg/g for pyrolytic temperatures at 400-700 °C, corresponding to the mass ratio of ZnCl2 and biosolid ranging from 0.25-2.5. PMID:23471775

  10. Optimization of a thermoelectric generator subsystem for high temperature PEM fuel cell exhaust heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xin, Gao; Andreasen, SØren Juhl

    2014-01-01

    In previous work, a thermoelectric (TE) exhaust heat recovery subsystem for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane (HT-PEM) fuel cell stack was developed and modeled. Numerical simulations were conducted and have identified an optimized subsystem configuration and 4 types of compact heat exchangers with superior performance for further analysis. In this work, the on-design performances of the 4 heat exchangers are more thoroughly assessed on their corresponding optimized subsystem configurations. Afterward, their off-design performances are compared on the whole working range of the fuel cell stack. All through this study, different electrical connection styles of all the thermoelectric generator (TEG) modules in the subsystem and their influences are also discussed. In the end, the subsystem configuration is further optimized and a higher subsystem power output is achieved. All TEG modules are now connected into branches. The procedures of designing and optimizing this TE exhaust heat recovery subsystem are drawn out. The contribution of TE exhaust heat recovery to the HT-PEM fuel cell power system is preliminarily concluded. Its feasibility is also discussed.

  11. Environmental policy constraints for acidic exhaust gas scrubber discharges from ships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ülpre, H; Eames, I

    2014-11-15

    Increasingly stringent environmental legislation on sulphur oxide emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels onboard ships (International Maritime Organization (IMO) Regulation 14) can be met by either refining the fuel to reduce sulphur content or by scrubbing the exhaust gases. Commonly used open loop marine scrubbers discharge warm acidic exhaust gas wash water into the sea, depressing its pH. The focus on this paper is on the physics and chemistry behind the disposal of acidic discharges in seawater. The IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 59/24/Add.1 Annex 9) requires the wash water to reach a pH greater than 6.5 at a distance of 4m from the point of discharge. We examine the engineering constraints, specifically size and number of ports, to identify the challenges of meeting regulatory compliance. PMID:25284442

  12. Catalysts as Sensors—A Promising Novel Approach in Automotive Exhaust Gas Aftertreatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf Moos

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Sensors that detect directly and in situ the status of automotive exhaust gas catalysts by monitoring the electrical properties of the catalyst coating itself are overviewed. Examples included in this review are the in-situ determination of the electrical impedance of three-way catalysts based on ceria-zirconia solutions and of lean NOx traps of earth-alkaline based coatings, as well as approaches to determine the ammonia loading in Fe-SCR-zeolites with electrical ac measurements. Even more sophisticated approaches based on interactions with electromagnetic waves are also reviewed. For that purpose, metallic stick-like antennas are inserted into the exhaust pipe. The catalyst properties are measured in a contactless manner, directly indicating the catalyst status. The radio frequency probes gauge the oxygen loading degree of three-way catalysts, the NOx-loading of lean NOx traps, and the soot loading of Diesel particulate filters

  13. Catalysts as sensors--a promising novel approach in automotive exhaust gas aftertreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moos, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    Sensors that detect directly and in situ the status of automotive exhaust gas catalysts by monitoring the electrical properties of the catalyst coating itself are overviewed. Examples included in this review are the in-situ determination of the electrical impedance of three-way catalysts based on ceria-zirconia solutions and of lean NO(x) traps of earth-alkaline based coatings, as well as approaches to determine the ammonia loading in Fe-SCR-zeolites with electrical ac measurements. Even more sophisticated approaches based on interactions with electromagnetic waves are also reviewed. For that purpose, metallic stick-like antennas are inserted into the exhaust pipe. The catalyst properties are measured in a contactless manner, directly indicating the catalyst status. The radio frequency probes gauge the oxygen loading degree of three-way catalysts, the NO(x)-loading of lean NO(x) traps, and the soot loading of Diesel particulate filters. PMID:22163575

  14. An Experimental Study of Different Effects of EGR Rates on The Performance And Exhaust Emissions of The Stratified Charge Piston Direct Injection Compressed Natural Gas Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saheed O. Wasiu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR is one of the principal techniques used to control spark ignition NOX. A fraction of the exhaust gas is recycled through a control valve from the exhaust to the engine intake system. However, EGR has different effect on performance, combustion and emissions production that are difficult to distinguish such as increase of intake temperature, delay of Rate Of Heat Rrelease (ROHR, decrease of peak heat release, decrease in oxygen concentration etc. Therefore the impact of EGR on the aforementioned engine parameters (i.e., performance, combustion and exhaust emission is not perfectly understood, especially under high EGR rates. An experimental study has been conducted to analyze various effects of EGR rates on the performance and emissions of the stratified charge piston direct injection compressed natural gas engine and to determine the stable operating limit of the engine at different excess air ratios ( = 0.9, 1.0, 1.1 and 1.2 which represents rich, stoichiometric, slightly lean and moderately lean mixture respectively. The results showed that as the EGR is increased, the brake torque, brake specific fuel consumption decreased, while nitric oxide emissions (NO reduced drastically at various fraction of EGR, just as Unburnt Hydro Carbon (UHC increased. EGR has no significant effect on carbon monoxide (CO emission. The addition of EGR also reduces cylinder’s gas temperature and pressure. It can be concluded that in introducing EGR in DI-CNG engines, there is a tradeoff between the engine’s performance and NOX emission, while it is difficult to realize stable combustion at high temperature.

  15. Ion beam analyses of particulate matter in exhaust gas of a ship diesel engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There is an urgent need to reduce emission of the particulate matter (PM) in the exhaust gas from ship diesel engines causing various health hazards and serious environmental pollution. Usually the heavy fuel oil (HFO) for ships is of low quality, and contains various kinds of impurities. Therefore, the emission of PM along with exhaust gas from ship diesel engines is one of the most serious environmental issues. However, the PM fundamental properties are not well known. Therefore, it is important to perform elemental analysis of the PM. The HFO contains sulfur with a relatively high concentration of a few percent. It is important to make quantitative measurements of sulfur in the PM, because this element is poisonous for the human body. In the present work, PM samples were collected from exhaust gas of a test engine, and RBS and PIXE analyses were applied successfully to quantitative analysis of the PM samples. The RBS analysis enabled quantitative analysis of sulfur and carbon in the collected PM, while heavier elements such as vanadium and iron were analyzed quantitatively with the PIXE analysis. It has been found that the concentration ratio of sulfur to carbon was between 0.007 and 0.012, and did not strongly depend on the output power of the engine. The S/C ratio is approximately equal to the original composition of the HFO used in the present work, 0.01. From the known conversion ratio 0.015 of sulfur in the HFO to sulfates, the conversion ratio of carbon in the HFO to the PM is found to be 0.01–0.02 by the RBS measurements. On the other hand, the PIXE analysis revealed a vanadium enrichment of one order of magnitude in the PM.

  16. Evaluation of an exhaust gas evacuation system during propane-fueled lift truck maintenance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposure to carbon monoxide (CO) gas in the workplace can cause health problem. CO gas is colourless and odourless, and exposure to it can cause intoxication, particularly for mechanics working on internal combustion engines fed by propane-fueled lift trucks. Regular procedures for evacuating the gases emitted during routine mechanical repairs involve the use of rigid evacuating pipes attached to the building and hooked to a flexible pipe at the end of the exhaust pipe. With lift trucks, this procedure is limited because of the configuration of these vehicles, and also because this type of work is often done in places without access to permanent mechanical ventilation. The object of this study was to propose a new evacuation method for CO gas fumes that would lower the exposures of fumes for mechanics and for workstations. It identified the criteria that should be considered, such as the configuration of the existing exhaust system of lift trucks, and feasibility of using this system at a variety of on-site locations. The design of the device was described and evaluated. 7 refs., 6 tabs., 8 figs., 3 appendices

  17. Multiple Exhaust Nozzle Effects on J-2X Gas Generator Outlet Impedance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenny, R. Jeremy; Muss, Jeffrey; Hulka, James R.; Casiano, Matthew

    2010-01-01

    The current test setup of the J-2X gas generator system uses a multiple nozzle configuration to exhaust hot gases to drive the propellant supply turbines. Combustion stability assessment of this gas generator design requires knowledge of the impedance effects the multiple nozzle configuration creates on the combustion chamber acoustic modes. Parallel work between NASA and Sierra Engineering is presented, showing two methods used to calculate the effective end impedance resulting from multiple nozzle configurations. The NASA method is a simple estimate of the effective impedance using the long wavelength approximation. Sierra Engineering has developed a more robust numerical integration method implemented in ROCCID to accommodate for multiple nozzles. Analysis using both methods are compared to J-2X gas generator test data collected over the past year.

  18. Modelling of non-thermal plasma aftertreatment of exhaust gas streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A reaction mechanism has been developed that is appropriate for the plasma aftertreatment of diesel exhaust gas. It is based on a simulated gas mixture containing propene, nitric oxide, nitrogen dioxide, oxygen and nitrogen. The reaction mechanism has been used to determine the end-products from the plasma processing and their concentrations using a chemical kinetics modelling procedure. It has been validated by a range of experiments using the same gas mixture with a packed bed, a dielectric barrier plasma reactor and a wide range of end-product analysis techniques. Using a wide range of experimental conditions has enabled us to validate the model and its predictions and to critically evaluate several alternative reaction mechanisms for the oxidation of propene and the formation of end-products in a more systematic and reliable manner than before

  19. Variable-geometry turbocharger with asymmetric divided volute for engine exhaust gas pulse optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serres, Nicolas (Epinal, FR)

    2010-11-09

    A turbine assembly for a variable-geometry turbocharger includes a turbine housing defining a divided volute having first and second scrolls, wherein the first scroll has a substantially smaller volume than the second scroll. The first scroll feeds exhaust gas to a first portion of a turbine wheel upstream of the throat of the wheel, while the second scroll feeds gas to a second portion of the wheel at least part of which is downstream of the throat. Flow from the second scroll is regulated by a sliding piston. The first scroll can be optimized for low-flow conditions such that the turbocharger can operate effectively like a small fixed-geometry turbocharger when the piston is closed. The turbine housing defines an inlet that is divided by a dividing wall into two portions respectively feeding gas to the two scrolls, a leading edge of the dividing wall being downstream of the inlet mouth.

  20. Remote gas analysis of aircraft exhausts using FTIR-emission-spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heland, J.; Schaefer, K. [Fraunhofer Inst. for Atmospheric Environmental Research, Garmisch-Partenkirchen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    FITR emission spectroscopy as a remote sensing multi-component analyzing technique was investigated to determine the composition of aircraft exhausts at ground level. A multi-layer radiative transfer interpretation software based on a line-by-line computer algorithm using the HITRAN data base was developed. Measurements were carried out with different engine types to determine the traceable gas species and their detection limits. Finally validation measurements were made to compare the results of the system to those of conventional equipment. (author) 8 refs.

  1. Catalysts as Sensors—A Promising Novel Approach in Automotive Exhaust Gas Aftertreatment

    OpenAIRE

    Ralf Moos

    2010-01-01

    Sensors that detect directly and in situ the status of automotive exhaust gas catalysts by monitoring the electrical properties of the catalyst coating itself are overviewed. Examples included in this review are the in-situ determination of the electrical impedance of three-way catalysts based on ceria-zirconia solutions and of lean NOx traps of earth-alkaline based coatings, as well as approaches to determine the ammonia loading in Fe-SCR-zeolites with electrical ac measurements. Even more s...

  2. Oxidation and exhaust gas corrosion resistance of the cobalt base clad layers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Smolenska

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Purpose of this work is describing the behaviour of the cobalt base cladding layers after treatment in hot air (750°C, 200 hours and exhaust gases (700°C, two month.Design/methodology/approach: The layers were produced by two cladding, laser and PTA, cladding technique. Cladding was conducted with a high power diode laser HDPL ROFIN SINAR DL 020 and Plasma Transformed Arc method. The layers consisted of three multitracking sublayers. The cobalt base layers were evaluated by microstructure investigations (optical and scanning electron microscope SEM, chemical analysis and micro hardness measurements.Findings: The microstructure of the investigated layers did not change much, neither on the top part nor in the clad/steel interface after treatment in both environments. On the outer surfaces the oxide layers were observed which consisted generally of chromium and iron oxides. The compositions of this scales were reviled by the EDS analyze. The changes in chemical compositions before and after oxidation and after corrosion in exhaust gases in the dendritic regions and micro regions were confirmed by the semi-quantitative chemical analysis (EDS. Neither the oxidation nor exposition for two month in exhaust gases did not influence on the morphology of the clad layers in any region however changes in chemical composition were observed. For both sort of clads the oxide layers were observed on the surface. The proposed layers are resistant for the hot exhausted gases.Research limitations/implications: The future researches should be done on microstructural and kinetic analyze of high temperature corrosion for higher temperature and times of the process.Practical implications: The clad layers, of this composition, were designed as a method to prolong service time for the ship engine exhausted valve and after this investigation the first valve heads with laser clad layer were installed in working ship engine.Originality/value: The chemical composition of the powder was new one. Also using the laser cladding technique for ship engine parts subject of interesting.

  3. {open_quotes}Experimental investigation of brown coal combustion with siumlated gas Turbine Exhaust Gas in a combined cycle application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kakaras, E.; Vourliotis, P.

    1995-12-31

    The main objective of this study is the experimental investigation of the brown coal combustion (brown coal with high sulphur content, e.g. {open_quotes}Megalopolis{close_quotes} lignite) in a lab-scale Atmospheric Fluidized Bed (AFB). The fluidizing gas and the oxidant medium is the Simulated gas Turbine Exhaust flue Gas - {open_quotes}Vitiated Air{close_quotes} (STEG - V.A.). The STEG simulates the exhaust flue gas from the turbine MS 9/1 (FA) produced by EGT - GEC Alsthom (/1/). According to the IFRF experiments, the lowest O{sub 2} level allowed for stable combustion is 10%, concentration which corresponds to 88.4 % burnout in the IFRF experimental furnace. For the improvement of the coal burnout the presence of an oxidation catalyst is considered necessary in order, first, to avoid the incomplete combustion of the coal and second, to decrease the CO and C{sub x}H{sub y} emissions. The catalysts, supplied by KAT-TEC (/4/), are perovskit-type with TiO{sub 2} and Pt as stabilisers. The purposes of the trials are: (1) To examine the possibility to achieve the combustion of low grade brown coal under these conditions. (2) The investigation of the burnout behaviour as well as the resulting O{sub 2} CO{sub 2}, CO, SO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}O, C{sub x}H{sub y} and NO{sub x} emissions.

  4. Study of SI engine fueled with methanol vapor and dissociation gas based on exhaust heat dissociating methanol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The full load power decreases successively from gasoline engine, methanol vapor engine to dissociated methanol engine. • Both power and thermal efficiency of dissociated methanol engine can be improved by boosting pressure. • The conversion efficiency of recovered exhaust gas energy is largely influenced by the BMEP. • At the same BMEP, dissociated methanol engine has higher thermal efficiency than methanol vapor engine and gasoline engine. - Abstract: To improve the fuel efficiency of internal combustion (IC) engine and also achieve the goal of direct usage of methanol fuel on IC engine, an approach of exhaust heat dissociating methanol was investigated, which is a kind of method for IC engine exhaust heat recovery (EHR). A bottom cycle system is coupled with the IC engine exhaust system, which uses the exhaust heat to evaporate and dissociate methanol in its catalytic cracker. The methanol dissociation gas (including methanol vapor) is used as the fuel for IC engine. This approach was applied to both naturally aspirated (NA) engine and turbocharged engine, and the engine performance parameters were predicted by the software GT-power under various kinds of operating conditions. The improvement to IC engine performance and the conversion efficiency of recovered exhaust gas energy can be evaluated by comparing the performances of IC engine fueled with various kinds of fuels (or their compositions). Results show that, from gasoline engine, methanol vapor engine to dissociated methanol engine, the full load power decreases successively in the entire speed area due to the declining of volumetric efficiency, while it is contrary in the thermal efficiency at the same brake mean effective pressure (BMEP) level because of the improving of fuel heating value. With the increase of BMEP, the conversion efficiency of recovered exhaust gas energy is promoted. All those results indicate that the approach of exhaust heat dissociating methanol has large energy saving potential with great application prospect to IC engines

  5. Fuel composition and secondary organic aerosol formation: gas-turbine exhaust and alternative aviation fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miracolo, Marissa A; Drozd, Greg T; Jathar, Shantanu H; Presto, Albert A; Lipsky, Eric M; Corporan, Edwin; Robinson, Allen L

    2012-08-01

    A series of smog chamber experiments were performed to investigate the effects of fuel composition on secondary particulate matter (PM) formation from dilute exhaust from a T63 gas-turbine engine. Tests were performed at idle and cruise loads with the engine fueled on conventional military jet fuel (JP-8), Fischer-Tropsch synthetic jet fuel (FT), and a 50/50 blend of the two fuels. Emissions were sampled into a portable smog chamber and exposed to sunlight or artificial UV light to initiate photo-oxidation. Similar to previous studies, neat FT fuel and a 50/50 FT/JP-8 blend reduced the primary particulate matter emissions compared to neat JP-8. After only one hour of photo-oxidation at typical atmospheric OH levels, the secondary PM production in dilute exhaust exceeded primary PM emissions, except when operating the engine at high load on FT fuel. Therefore, accounting for secondary PM production should be considered when assessing the contribution of gas-turbine engine emissions to ambient PM levels. FT fuel substantially reduced secondary PM formation in dilute exhaust compared to neat JP-8 at both idle and cruise loads. At idle load, the secondary PM formation was reduced by a factor of 20 with the use of neat FT fuel, and a factor of 2 with the use of the blend fuel. At cruise load, the use of FT fuel resulted in no measured formation of secondary PM. In every experiment, the secondary PM was dominated by organics with minor contributions from sulfate when the engine was operated on JP-8 fuel. At both loads, FT fuel produces less secondary organic aerosol than JP-8 because of differences in the composition of the fuels and the resultant emissions. This work indicates that fuel reformulation may be a viable strategy to reduce the contribution of emissions from combustion systems to secondary organic aerosol production and ultimately ambient PM levels. PMID:22732009

  6. New waste processing technologies. Pyrolysis gasification system and corona discharge exhaust gas treatment system; Senshinteki haikibutsu shori gijutsu. Netsubunkai gas ka system to pulse corona hoden hai gas shori sochi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karato, S.; Fukushima, K. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1999-04-01

    Problems caused by conventional incineration, such as the presence of small quantities of harmful gases in the exhaust gas, are attracting public attention. Moreover, exhaust gas regulations are expected to be further strengthened in the future. We have developed two new waste processing technologies in response to this situation. These are a pyrolysis gasification system, which is a next-generation waste treatment system to replace the incineration method and a corona discharge exhaust gas treatment system, which breaks down and removes harmful substances directly from exhaust gas using pulse corona discharge. (author)

  7. Effects of exhaust gas recirculation on the thermal efficiency and combustion characteristics for premixed combustion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research, a boiler in a premixed combustion system used to achieve exhaust gas recirculation was investigated as a way to achieve high thermal efficiencies and low pollutant emissions. The effects of various exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) ratios, equivalence ratios and boiler capacities on thermal efficiency, NOx and CO emissions and the flame behavior on the burner surface were examined both experimentally and numerically. The results of the experiments showed that when EGR was used, the NOx and CO concentrations decreased and the thermal efficiency increased. In the case of a 15% EGR ratio at an equivalence ratio of 0.90, NOx concentrations were found to be smaller than for the current operating condition of the boiler, and the thermal efficiency was approximately 4.7% higher. However, unlike NOx concentrations, although the EGR ratio was increased to 20% at an equivalence ratio of 0.90, the CO concentration was higher than in the current operating condition of the boiler. From the viewpoint of burner safety, the red glow on the burner surface was noticeably reduced when EGR was used. These results confirmed that the EGR method is advantageous from the standpoint of reducing emission concentrations and ensuring burner safety. -- Highlights: ? The premixed boiler system applied EGR was investigated to achieve high thermal efficiencies and low pollutant emissions. ? Thermal efficiency and emission characteristics were examined with EGR ratios, equivalence ratios and boiler capacities. ? EGR method is advantageous from the standpoint of reducing emission concentrations and ensuring burner safety.

  8. DOE 6430.1a compliance checklist for the rotary mode core sampling exhauster flammable gas interlock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document examines the Safety Class I criteria in DOE 6430.1a and determines applicability to the rotary mode core sampling exhauster flammable gas interlock. Purpose of the interlock is to prevent the design basis accident of deflagration in single shell flammable gas watchlist tank

  9. DOE 6430.1a compliance checklist for the rotary mode core sampling exhauster flammable gas interlock

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robinson, J.D.

    1995-09-01

    This document examines the Safety Class I criteria in DOE 6430.1a and determines applicability to the rotary mode core sampling exhauster flammable gas interlock. Purpose of the interlock is to prevent the design basis accident of deflagration in single shell flammable gas watchlist tank.

  10. Plasma and neutral gas jet interactions in the exhaust of a magnetic confinement system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A general purpose 2-1/2 dimensional, multifluid, time dependent computer code has been developed. This flexible tool models the dynamic behavior of plasma/neutral gas interactions in the presence of a magnetic field. The simulation has been used to examine the formation of smoke ring structure in the plasma rocket exhaust by injection of an axial jet of neutral gas. Specifically, the code was applied to the special case of attempting to couple the neutral gas momentum to the plasma in such a manner that plasma smoke rings would form, disconnecting the plasma from the magnetic field. For this scenario several cases where run scanning a wide range of neutral gas input parameters. In all the cases it was found that after an initial transient phase, the plasma eroded the neutral gas and after that followed the original magnetic field. From these findings it is concluded that smoke rings do not form with axial injection of neutral gas. Several suggestions for alternative injection schemes are presented

  11. Purification of exhaust air and off-gas in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sources of radioactivity present in nuclear power stations, the significance of the fission products for the environmental impact of nuclear power stations, and the pathway of the airborne radioactivity will be treated briefly. The devices for the removal of radioactivity from the exhaust air and from off-gas are discussed and their function is explained. The HEPA-filters for the removal of aerosols, the sorption filters for the removal of gaseous radioiodine, and the fission gas holdup beds with activated charcoal for decreasing the discharge of radioactive isotopes of the noble gases xenon and krypton will be treated in detail. The degree of penetration of these devices will be given. The factors reducing the removal efficiency will be mentioned. (orig.)

  12. Determination of analytical dependences in order to calculate the exhaust gas boiler with helical belt inserts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolyadin Evgeniy Alekseevich

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research is the identification of regularities of heat and aerodynamic processes and determination of analytical dependences in order to calculate heat exchange Nu = (Re, S/d and aerodynamic resistance ? = f(Re, S/d of the exhaust gas boiler with helical belt inserts. The experimental research of heat exchange and aerodynamics of all used helical belt inserts was performed in the same conditions, based on one methodology and the same ex-perimental installation. The received dependences help to evaluate the increasein heat exchange and aerodynamic resistance of a gas flow while using helical belt inserts with different geometrical specifications, and to select the best option of the geometry of the insert for a specific construction of a recuperative heat exchanger with multi-phase heat exchange environments.

  13. Exhaust-gas measurements from NASAs HYMETS arc jet.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, Paul Albert

    2010-11-01

    Arc-jet wind tunnels produce conditions simulating high-altitude hypersonic flight such as occurs upon entry of space craft into planetary atmospheres. They have traditionally been used to study flight in Earth's atmosphere, which consists mostly of nitrogen and oxygen. NASA is presently using arc jets to study entry into Mars' atmosphere, which consists of carbon dioxide and nitrogen. In both cases, a wide variety of chemical reactions take place among the gas constituents and with test articles placed in the flow. In support of those studies, we made measurements using a residual gas analyzer (RGA) that sampled the exhaust stream of a NASA arc jet. The experiments were conducted at the HYMETS arc jet (Hypersonic Materials Environmental Test System) located at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA. This report describes our RGA measurements, which are intended to be used for model validation in combination with similar measurements on other systems.

  14. Numerical model of a thermoelectric generator with compact plate-fin heat exchanger for high temperature PEM fuel cell exhaust heat recovery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xin, Gao; Andreasen, SØren Juhl

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a numerical model of an exhaust heat recovery system for a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HTPEMFC) stack. The system is designed as thermoelectric generators (TEGs) sandwiched in the walls of a compact plate-fin heat exchanger. Its model is based on a finite-element approach. On each discretized segment, fluid properties, heat transfer process and TEG performance are locally calculated for higher model precision. To benefit both the system design and fabrication, the way to model TEG modules is herein reconsidered; a database of commercialized compact plate-fin heat exchangers is adopted. Then the model is validated against experimental data and the main variables are identified by means of a sensitivity analysis. Finally, the system configuration is optimized for recovering heat from the exhaust gas. The results exhibit the crucial importance of the model accuracy and the optimization on system configuration. Future studies will concentrate on heat exchanger structures.

  15. Novel Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Fossil Fuel Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palitha Jayaweera; Francis Tanzella

    2005-03-01

    SRI International (SRI) is developing ceramic-based microsensors to detect exhaust gases such as NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO in advanced combustion and gasification systems under this DOE NETL-sponsored research project. The sensors detect the electrochemical activity of the exhaust gas species on catalytic electrodes attached to a solid state electrolyte and are designed to operate at the high temperatures, elevated pressures, and corrosive environments typical of large power generation exhausts. The sensors can be easily integrated into online monitoring systems for active emission control. The ultimate objective is to develop sensors for multiple gas detection in a single package, along with data acquisition and control software and hardware, so that the information can be used for closed-loop control in novel advanced power generation systems. This report details the Phase I Proof-of-Concept, research activities performed from October 2003 to March 2005. SRI's research work includes synthesis of catalytic materials, sensor design and fabrication, software development, and demonstration of pulse voltammetric analysis of NO, NO{sub 2}, and CO gases on catalytic electrodes.

  16. Effect of hydroxy (HHO) gas addition on performance and exhaust emissions in compression ignition engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, Ali Can; Uludamar, Erinc; Aydin, Kadir [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Cukurova University, 01330 Adana (Turkey)

    2010-10-15

    In this study, hydroxy gas (HHO) was produced by the electrolysis process of different electrolytes (KOH{sub (aq)}, NaOH{sub (aq)}, NaCl{sub (aq)}) with various electrode designs in a leak proof plexiglass reactor (hydrogen generator). Hydroxy gas was used as a supplementary fuel in a four cylinder, four stroke, compression ignition (CI) engine without any modification and without need for storage tanks. Its effects on exhaust emissions and engine performance characteristics were investigated. Experiments showed that constant HHO flow rate at low engine speeds (under the critical speed of 1750 rpm for this experimental study), turned advantages of HHO system into disadvantages for engine torque, carbon monoxide (CO), hydrocarbon (HC) emissions and specific fuel consumption (SFC). Investigations demonstrated that HHO flow rate had to be diminished in relation to engine speed below 1750 rpm due to the long opening time of intake manifolds at low speeds. This caused excessive volume occupation of hydroxy in cylinders which prevented correct air to be taken into the combustion chambers and consequently, decreased volumetric efficiency was inevitable. Decreased volumetric efficiency influenced combustion efficiency which had negative effects on engine torque and exhaust emissions. Therefore, a hydroxy electronic control unit (HECU) was designed and manufactured to decrease HHO flow rate by decreasing voltage and current automatically by programming the data logger to compensate disadvantages of HHO gas on SFC, engine torque and exhaust emissions under engine speed of 1750 rpm. The flow rate of HHO gas was measured by using various amounts of KOH, NaOH, NaCl (catalysts). These catalysts were added into the water to diminish hydrogen and oxygen bonds and NaOH was specified as the most appropriate catalyst. It was observed that if the molality of NaOH in solution exceeded 1% by mass, electrical current supplied from the battery increased dramatically due to the too much reduction of electrical resistance. HHO system addition to the engine without any modification resulted in increasing engine torque output by an average of 19.1%, reducing CO emissions by an average of 13.5%, HC emissions by an average of 5% and SFC by an average of 14%. (author)

  17. Combustion and exhaust emission characteristics of a dual fuel compression ignition engine operated with pilot Diesel fuel and natural gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towards the effort of reducing pollutant emissions, especially soot and nitrogen oxides, from direct injection Diesel engines, engineers have proposed various solutions, one of which is the use of a gaseous fuel as a partial supplement for liquid Diesel fuel. These engines are known as dual fuel combustion engines, i.e. they use conventional Diesel fuel and a gaseous fuel as well. This technology is currently reintroduced, associated with efforts to overcome various difficulties of HCCI engines, using various fuels. The use of natural gas as an alternative fuel is a promising solution. The potential benefits of using natural gas in Diesel engines are both economical and environmental. The high autoignition temperature of natural gas is a serious advantage since the compression ratio of conventional Diesel engines can be maintained. The present contribution describes an experimental investigation conducted on a single cylinder DI Diesel engine, which has been properly modified to operate under dual fuel conditions. The primary amount of fuel is the gaseous one, which is ignited by a pilot Diesel liquid injection. Comparative results are given for various engine speeds and loads for conventional Diesel and dual fuel operation, revealing the effect of dual fuel combustion on engine performance and exhaust emissions

  18. On exhaust emissions from petrol-fuelled passenger cars at low ambient temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurikko, J. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland). Energy Use

    1998-11-01

    The study at hand deals with regulated and unregulated exhaust emissions from petrol-fuelled cars at low ambient temperatures with present-day or near-future exhaust after treatment systems. The subject has been investigated at VTT over a decade and this report compiles data from various sub-studies carried out between the years 1993 - 1997. Each one of them viewed different aspects of the phenomenon, like determining the low-temperature response of today`s new cars employing three-way catalytic converters or assessing the long-term durability and the influence of vehicle mileage upon the low-temperature emissions performance. Within these studies, together more than 120 cars of model years from 1990 to 1997 have been tested. Most of them were normal, in-service vehicles with total mileages differing between only a few thousand kilometres for new cars up to 80,000 km or even more for the in-use vehicles. Both the US FTP75 and the European test cycle have been employed, and the ambient temperatures ranged from the baseline (+22 deg C) down to +- O deg C, -7 deg C and in some cases even to -20 deg C. The studies attested that new cars having today`s advanced emissions control systems produced fairly low levels of emissions when tested in conditions designated in the regulations that are the basis of the current new-vehicle certification. However, this performance was not necessarily attained at ambient temperatures that were below the normative range. Fairly widespread response was recorded, and cars having almost equal emissions output at baseline could produce largely deviating outcomes in low-temperature conditions. On average, CO and HC emissions increased by a factor of five to 10, depending on the ambient temperature and vehicle type. However, emissions of NO{sub x} were largely unaffected. Apart from these regulated emissions, many unregulated species were also determined, either by using traditional sampling and chromatography methods or on-line, employing the latest FTIR technology. Overall, the levels of these emissions were also mostly elevated at subnormal temperatures. Total vehicle mileage seemed not to affect cold-start emissions (CO and HC) at low temperatures. Nor did the overall durability of the emission control system appear to be worse in cold-climate conditions typical for Finland. The deterioration of the emissions performance in the tested vehicles either closely followed the average trend defined by the normal, assigned deterioration factors or was even lesser. The conclusions of this report underline the necessity of a separate low-temperature test in order to really effectively curb real-world emissions. Standards at normal temperature are no more effective alone, but need to be accompanied with additional requirements for good performance also in conditions closer to the everyday use, which comprises many cold-starts even in low ambient temperature conditions. (orig.) 75 refs.

  19. Exhaust circulation into dry gas desulfurization process to prevent carbon deposition in an Oxy-fuel IGCC power generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Power plant with semi-closed gas turbine and O2–CO2 coal gasifier was studied. • We adopt dry gas sulfur removal process to establish the system. • The exhaust gas circulation remarkably prevented carbon deposition. • Efficiency loss for exhaust gas circulation is quite small. • Appropriate operating condition of sulfur removal process is revealed. - Abstract: Semi-closed cycle operation of gas turbine fueled by oxygen–CO2 blown coal gasification provides efficient power generation with CO2 separation feature by excluding pre-combustion type CO2 capture that usually brings large efficiency loss. The plant efficiency at transmission end is estimated as 44% at lower heating value (LHV) providing compressed CO2 with concentration of 93 vol%. This power generation system will solve the contradiction between economical resource utilization and reduction of CO2 emission from coal-fired power plant. The system requires appropriate sulfur reduction process to protect gas turbine from corrosion and environment from sulfur emission. We adopt dry gas sulfur removal process to establish the system where apprehension about the detrimental carbon deposition from coal gas. The effect of circulation of a portion of exhaust gas to the process on the retardation of carbon deposition was examined at various gas compositions. The circulation remarkably prevented carbon deposition in the sulfur removal sorbent. The impact of the circulation on the thermal efficiency is smaller than the other auxiliary power consumption. Thus, the circulation is appropriate operation for the power generation

  20. Exhaust gas emissions and mutagenic effects of modern diesel fuels, GTL, biodiesel and biodiesel blends

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munack, Axel; Ruschel, Yvonne; Schroeder, Olaf [Federal Research Institute for Rural Areas, Forestry and Fisheries, Braunschweig (Germany)], E-mail: axel.munack@vti.bund.de; Krahl, Juergen [Coburg Univ. of Applied Sciences (Germany); Buenger, Juergen [University of Bochum (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    Biodiesel can be used alone (B100) or blended with petroleum diesel in any proportion. The most popular biodiesel blend in the U.S.A. is B20 (20% biodiesel, 80% diesel fuel), which can be used for Energy Policy Act of 1992 (EPAct) compliance. In the European Union, the use of biofuel blends is recommended and was introduced by federal regulations in several countries. In Germany, biodiesel is currently blended as B5 (5% biodiesel) to common diesel fuel. In 2008, B7 plus three percent hydrotreated vegetable oil (HVO) as well is intended to become mandatory in Germany. To investigate the influence of blends on the emissions and possible health effects, we performed a series of studies with several engines (Euro 0, III and IV) measuring regulated and non-regulated exhaust compounds and determining their mutagenic effects. Emissions of blends showed an approximate linear dependence on the blend composition, in particular when regulated emissions are considered. However, a negative effect of blends was observed with respect to mutagenicity of the exhaust gas emissions. In detail, a maximum of the mutagenic potency was found in the range of B20. From this point of view, B20 must be considered as a critical blend, in case diesel fuel and biodiesel are used as binary mixtures. (author)

  1. A study on exhaust gas emissions from ships in Turkish Straits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Turkish Straits, i.e. Istanbul (Bosphorus) and Canakkale (Dardanellen), which connect Black Sea and Aegean Sea, have a continuously increasing maritime traffic. Especially, the maritime traffic on Bosphorus (Istanbul Strait) that connects the continents of Europe and Asia is too complex due to geographical conditions. The maritime traffic in the Turkish Straits includes the ships, which are in use in domestic transport, the transit passing ships with various aims and fishing, sport or strolling ships. In this paper, fuel consumption and exhaust gas emissions NOx, CO, CO2, VOC, PM exhausted from ships such as transit vessels, which are passing both Bosphorus and Dardanellen, and passenger ships used in domestic transport on the Bosphorus are calculated. In order to do this the general characteristics, the main engine systems, the fuel types, cruising times and speeds of all vessels are taken into consideration. The calculated NOx emissions on the Bosphorus are 2720t from domestic passenger ships and 4357t from transit ships. In this case it is clear that the transit ships cause more than half of the total amount of emissions from ships on the Bosphorus. The amount of nitrogen oxide emissions from domestic passenger ships used for public transport in Istanbul Strait is equal to approx. 4% of nitrogen oxide emissions from motor vehicles in Istanbul. Finally, the future emissions from ships in Turkish Straits are discussed. (Author)

  2. Process and apparatus for separating and recovering krypton-85 from exhaust gas of nuclear reactor or the like

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An apparatus is described for separating and recovering radioactive krypton-85 contained in an exhaust gas of a nuclear reactor or the like, which comprises a plurality of adsorption beds connected in parallel with respect to a passageway for the exhaust gas, each being packed with activated carbon, wherein adsorption and desorption of krypton-85 in each of the beds are alternatively and repeatedly performed by operating valves disposed between each of the beds and means for reducing pressure in the beds to be desorbed in accordance with a predetermined time schedule. The adsorption and concentration efficiencies are markedly increased by combining the above adsorption apparatus and a distillation apparatus

  3. 40 CFR 92.114 - Exhaust gas and particulate sampling and analytical system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...the distance from the exhaust manifold flange(s), or turbocharger outlet to any exhaust aftertreatment device shall be the...system ducting from the exit of the engine exhaust manifold or turbocharger outlet to smoke meter exceeds 12 feet (3.7 m) in...

  4. Application of Irradiation. Application to polymer processing, exhaust gas treatment, sterilization of medical instruments and food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many fields such as industry, agriculture, medical treatment and environment use radiation. This report explained some examples of irradiation applications. Radiation source is 60Co ?-ray. Polymer industry use radiation for radiation curing (thermally stable polymer), tire, expanded polymer, radiation induced graft copolymerization and electron beam curing. On environmental conservation, radiation is used for elimination of NOx and SOx in exhaust combustion gas. In the medical treatment, radiation is applied to sterilization of medical instruments, that occupied about 50% volume, and blood for transfusion, which is only one method to prevent GVHD after transfusion. On agriculture, irradiation to spice, dry vegetable, frozen kitchen, potato and garlic are carried out in 30 countries. However, potato is only a kind food in Japan. Radiation breeding and pest control are put in practice. (S.Y.)

  5. Dual-catalyst aftertreatment of lean-burn natural gas engine exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A dual-catalyst system for the reduction of NO with CH4 under lean conditions was investigated. The system is comprised of a mixed bed containing a Co/ZrO2 catalyst, active for the oxidation of NO to NO2, and a Pd/sulfated zirconia (SZ) catalyst that is active for the reduction of NO2 with CH4. Such a system is capable of taking advantage of higher reduction rates for NO2, as compared to NO, that have been previously observed. When simulated exhaust streams from lean-burn natural gas engines are used as feed, the dual-catalyst system is simultaneously active for the reduction of NOx and the oxidation of unburned hydrocarbons and CO. (author)

  6. Design of a diesel exhaust-gas purification system for inert-gas drilling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caskey, B.C.

    1982-01-01

    To combat the serious oxygen corrosion of drill pipe when a low density drilling fluid (air or mist) is used in geothermal drilling, a system has been designed that produces an inert gas (essentially nitrogen) to be substituted for air. The system fits on three flatbed trailers, is roadable and produces 2000 scfm of gas. The projected cost for gas is slightly less than $2.00 per thousand standard cubic feet.

  7. Low-temperature gas from marine shales

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvie Daniel M; Mango Frank D

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Thermal cracking of kerogens and bitumens is widely accepted as the major source of natural gas (thermal gas). Decomposition is believed to occur at high temperatures, between 100 and 200°C in the subsurface and generally above 300°C in the laboratory. Although there are examples of gas deposits possibly generated at lower temperatures, and reports of gas generation over long periods of time at 100°C, robust gas generation below 100°C under ordinary laboratory conditions is unprecede...

  8. 40 CFR 86.1709-99 - Exhaust emission standards for 1999 and later light light-duty trucks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Exhaust emission standards...AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED...calibrations (e.g., air to fuel ratio, spark timing, and exhaust gas recirculation), may be used...coolant temperature, air charge...

  9. 40 CFR 86.1708-99 - Exhaust emission standards for 1999 and later light-duty vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 false Exhaust emission standards...AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED...calibrations (e.g. air to fuel ratio, spark timing, and exhaust gas recirculation), may be used...coolant temperature, air charge...

  10. Flow rate measuring method for radioactive off gas in local exhaustion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the inside of an exhaustion duct extending horizontally for flowing radioactive off-gas, a baffle plate having a size substantially covering the cross section of the duct is pivoted at the upper end thereof by means of a rotational shaft. The baffle plate is thus pivoted to the duct in a state where in can incline in the radial direction of the cross section of the duct around the rotational shaft. An indication pointer is secured to the upper end of the baffle plate penetrating a duct wall, and the pointer is tiltable together with the baffle plate around the rotational axis as a fulcrum. A display plate having gradients showing a relation between the inclination of the indication pointer and the flow rate in the duct is disposed at the back of the display pointer. When gas flows in the duct, buoyancy is caused to the baffle plate in accordance with the flow rate of the gas, whereby the baffle plate is inclined to display the flow rate corresponding to the indication pointer. (I.N.)

  11. Unit for combustion of process exhaust gas and production of hot air

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersson, J.O.; Eriksson, T.L.; Nystrom, O.

    1982-12-07

    Unit for thermal incineration of non-explosive gases with minor amounts of organic pollutants and for production of hot air, and which can be adapted to various types of supplementary fuel. There is a combustion chamber which consists of a flame pipe inside an outer jacket. Through the space therebetween, incoming process gas is led as coolant. At its front end, the combustion chamber has a burner for supplementary fuel and a mixing-in zone for process gas. The process gas rapidly mixes with the hot combustion gases in the flame, the gas reaching its reaction temperature directly. Powerful turbulence in the mixing-in zone gas, film-layer cooling, convective cooling and even flow give highly efficient and pure combustion while keeping the flame pipe temperature low enough to prevent corrosion.

  12. Numerical Simulation of Exhaust Gas Cooling in Channels with Periodic Elbows for Application in Compact Heat Recovery Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miniature and Micro devices represent the new frontier for advanced heat and mass transfer technology. Due to the small length scales, the use of CFD is very useful for designing and optimizing microfluidic devices since experimentation and visualization at these scales can be difficult. In this work a high temperature air microfluidic cooling strategy for applications such as compact waste heat recovery, exhaust gas recirculation and fuel cell thermal management is proposed. Initially, the application of a simple straight microchannel is considered. In an effort to partially compensate for the poor thermal properties of air, right-angle bends are introduced in order to induce Dean vortices which periodically restart the thermal boundary layer development, thus improving the heat transfer and fluid mixing. Numerical simulations in the range of 100 ? ReDh ? 1000 have been carried out for channels of square cross-section. Channel wall lengths of 1.0 mm are investigated for elbow spacings of 5 mm, 10 mm and 15 mm. High temperature air (300°C) at atmospheric inlet pressure is the working fluid. The results indicate that the elbows substantially improve the local and average heat transfer in the channels while increasing the pressure drop. Design considerations are discussed which take into account the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of the channels.

  13. Effect of exhaust gas recirculation on emissions from a flame-tube combustor using Liquid Jet A fuel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, C. J.; Tacina, R. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of uncooled exhaust gas recirculation as an inert diluent on emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NO + NO2) and on combustion efficiency were investigated. Ratios of recirculated combustion products to inlet airflow were varied from 10 to 80 percent by using an inlet air ejector nozzle. Liquid Jet A fuel was used. The flame-tube combustor was 10.2 cm in diameter. It was operated with and without a flameholder present. The combustor pressure was maintained constant at 0.5 MPa. The equivalence ratio was varied from 0.3 to 1.0. The inlet air temperature was varied from 590 to 800 K, and the reference velocity from 10 to 30 m/sec. Increasing the percent recirculation from 10 to 25 had the following effects: (1) the peak NOx emission was decreased by 37 percent, from 8 to 5 g NO2/kg fuel, at an inlet air temperature of 590 K and a reference velocity of 15 m/sec; (2) the combustion efficiency was increased, particularly at the higher equivalence ratios; and (3) for a high combustion efficiency of greater than 99.5 percent, the range of operation of the combustor was nearly doubled in terms of equivalence ratio. Increasing the recirculation from 25 to 50 percent did not change the emissions significantly.

  14. Low-temperature gas from marine shales

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarvie Daniel M

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Thermal cracking of kerogens and bitumens is widely accepted as the major source of natural gas (thermal gas. Decomposition is believed to occur at high temperatures, between 100 and 200°C in the subsurface and generally above 300°C in the laboratory. Although there are examples of gas deposits possibly generated at lower temperatures, and reports of gas generation over long periods of time at 100°C, robust gas generation below 100°C under ordinary laboratory conditions is unprecedented. Here we report gas generation under anoxic helium flow at temperatures 300° below thermal cracking temperatures. Gas is generated discontinuously, in distinct aperiodic episodes of near equal intensity. In one three-hour episode at 50°C, six percent of the hydrocarbons (kerogen & bitumen in a Mississippian marine shale decomposed to gas (C1–C5. The same shale generated 72% less gas with helium flow containing 10 ppm O2 and the two gases were compositionally distinct. In sequential isothermal heating cycles (~1 hour, nearly five times more gas was generated at 50°C (57.4 ?g C1–C5/g rock than at 350°C by thermal cracking (12 ?g C1–C5/g rock. The position that natural gas forms only at high temperatures over geologic time is based largely on pyrolysis experiments under oxic conditions and temperatures where low-temperature gas generation could be suppressed. Our results indicate two paths to gas, a high-temperature thermal path, and a low-temperature catalytic path proceeding 300° below the thermal path. It redefines the time-temperature dimensions of gas habitats and opens the possibility of gas generation at subsurface temperatures previously thought impossible.

  15. Improvement on functions and performances of exhaust gas sensor and its electronic module; Haiki seibun sensing no kudo kairo ni yoru kokino/koseinoka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueno, S.; Minami, N. [Hitachi Car Engineering Co., Tokyo (Japan); Ouchi, S.; Noto, Y. [Hitachi Ltd., Ibaraki (Japan)] Hasegawa, N. [The Technology Reseach Association of Automotive Products, Tokyo (Japan)

    1998-06-01

    This improvement on functions and performances of exhaust gas sensor should be indispensable to qualify the emission regulation of ULEV. The tubular zirconia cell with limited diffusion layer laminated platinum foil heater on it have been prepared for sensor. The electronic module mainly consists of an ASIC and a single-chip micro-computer. By time shared (4msec) feed back control for constant electromotive force (0.5V) and constant cell temperature (700degC), it have been achieved frequency response (20Hz), warm-up time (5sec) and required on board durability. 4 refs., 15 figs.

  16. PERFORMANCE AND EXHAUST GAS EMISSIONS ANALYSIS OF DIRECT INJECTION CNG-DIESEL DUAL FUEL ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RANBIR SINGH

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Existing diesel engines are under stringent emission regulation particularly of smoke and particulate matter in their exhaust. Compressed Natural Gas and Diesel dual fuel operation is regarded as one of the best ways to control emissions from diesel engines and simultaneously saving petroleum based diesel fuel. Dual fuel engineis a conventional diesel engine which burn either gaseous fuel or diesel or both at the same time. In the present paper an experimental research was carried out on a laboratory single cylinder, four-stroke variable compression ratio, direct injection diesel engine converted to CNG-Diesel dual fuel mode to analyze the performance and emission characteristics of pure diesel first and then CNG-Diesel dual fuel mode. The measurements were recorded for the compression ratio of 15 and 17.5 at CNG substitution rates of 30% and 60% and varying theload from idle to rated load of 3.5kW in steps of 1 up to 3kW and then to 3.5kW. The results reveal that brake thermal efficiency of dual fuel engine is in the range of 30%-40% at the rated load of 3.5 kW which is 11%-13% higher than pure diesel engine for 30% and 60% CNG substitution rates. This trend is observed irrespective of the compression ratio of the engine. Brake specific fuel consumption of dual fuel engine is found better than pure diesel engine at all engine loads and for both CNG substitution rates. It is found that there is drastic reduction in CO, CO2, HC, NOx and smoke emissions in the exhaust of dual fuel engine at all loads and for 30% and 60% CNG substitution rates by employing some optimum operating conditions set forth for experimental investigations in this study.

  17. The effect of ambient temperature on a gas turbine performance in part load operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baheta, Aklilu Tesfamichael; Gilani, Syed Ihtsham-Ul-Haq

    2012-06-01

    A gas turbine performance is affected by anything that changes the density and or mass flow of the air intake to the compressor. The air density is a function of ambient temperature, pressure and humidity. This paper examines effect of change of ambient temperature on the performance of a gas turbine operating in cogeneration plant. The turbine considered for this study is a single shaft gas turbine plant that can maintain its exhaust gas temperature if the load is greater than 50% of the full load by simultaneously regulating the compressor variable vanes (VVs) position and fuel flow. For load less than 50% the engine is running to meet the power demand. The study was made for three ambient temperature cases, 15°C, 25°C and 35°C. These temperature effects on the gas turbine parameters like fuel consumption, temperature, pressure ratio, variable vanes opening and efficiency were simulated and examined for a wide range of part load.

  18. Use of tracer gas technique for industrial exhaust hood efficiency evaluation--where to sample?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hampl, V; Niemelä, R; Shulman, S; Bartley, D L

    1986-05-01

    A tracer gas technique using sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) was developed for the evaluation of industrial exhaust hood efficiency. In addition to other parameters, accuracy of this method depends on proper location of the sampling probe. The sampling probe should be located in the duct at a minimum distance from the investigated hood where the SF6 is dispersed uniformly across the duct cross section. To determine the minimum sampling distance, the SF6 dispersion in the duct in fully developed turbulent flow was studied at four duct configurations frequently found in industry: straight duct, straight duct-side branch, straight duct-one elbow, and straight duct-two elbows combinations. Based on the established SF6 dispersion factor, the minimum sampling distances were determined as follows: for straight duct, at least 50 duct diameters; for straight duct-side branch combination, at least 25 duct diameters; for straight duct-one elbow combination, 7 duct diameters; and for straight duct-two elbow combination, 4 duct diameters. Sampling at (or beyond) these distances minimizes the error caused by the non-homogeneous dispersion of SF6 in the duct and contributes to the accuracy of the tracer gas technique. PMID:3717012

  19. Hazardous exhaust gas monitoring using a deep UV based differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS) system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A fibre-optic sensor for the monitoring of hazardous exhaust gases is described. The sensor based on Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy was developed to operate within exhaust environments, monitor several exhaust gases and demonstrate low susceptibility to interferences from other gases. Experimental results describing the calibration of the sensor against a commercial analyser and tests documenting the sensor's operating capabilities within the exhaust of an engine are presented. The lower limit of detection for the sensor was found to be 5ppm for nitric oxide, and 1ppm for both nitrogen dioxide and sulphur dioxide. Response times were found to be 3.4 seconds

  20. Combustion and exhaust emission characteristics of a compression ignition engine using liquefied petroleum gas-Diesel blended fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towards the effort of reducing pollutant emissions, especially smoke and nitrogen oxides, from direct injection (DI) Diesel engines, engineers have proposed various solutions, one of which is the use of a gaseous fuel as a partial supplement for liquid Diesel fuel. The use of liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) as an alternative fuel is a promising solution. The potential benefits of using LPG in Diesel engines are both economical and environmental. The high auto-ignition temperature of LPG is a serious advantage since the compression ratio of conventional Diesel engines can be maintained. The present contribution describes an experimental investigation conducted on a single cylinder DI Diesel engine, which has been properly modified to operate under LPG-Diesel blended fuel conditions, using LPG-Diesel blended fuels with various blended rates (0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%). Comparative results are given for various engine speeds and loads for conventional Diesel and blended fuels, revealing the effect of blended fuel combustion on engine performance and exhaust emissions

  1. Numerical Simulation of Exhaust Gas Cooling in Channels with Periodic Elbows for Application in Compact Heat Recovery Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bari, Sergio; Cotton, James S.; Robinson, Anthony J.

    2012-11-01

    Miniature and Micro devices represent the new frontier for advanced heat and mass transfer technology. Due to the small length scales, the use of CFD is very useful for designing and optimizing microfluidic devices since experimentation and visualization at these scales can be difficult. In this work a high temperature air microfluidic cooling strategy for applications such as compact waste heat recovery, exhaust gas recirculation and fuel cell thermal management is proposed. Initially, the application of a simple straight microchannel is considered. In an effort to partially compensate for the poor thermal properties of air, right-angle bends are introduced in order to induce Dean vortices which periodically restart the thermal boundary layer development, thus improving the heat transfer and fluid mixing. Numerical simulations in the range of 100 air (300°C) at atmospheric inlet pressure is the working fluid. The results indicate that the elbows substantially improve the local and average heat transfer in the channels while increasing the pressure drop. Design considerations are discussed which take into account the heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics of the channels.

  2. On Developing a Spectroscopic System for Fast Gas Temperature Measurements in Combustion Environments

    OpenAIRE

    Evseev, Vadim; Clausen, Sønnik

    2009-01-01

    Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR) spectroscopy techniques are known to provide reliable results for gas temperature measurements and can be comparatively easily performed on an industrial scale such as a boiler on a power plant or an exhaust of a ship engine cylinder. However temporal resolution is not high enough to trace fast temperature variations which are of great importance for complete combustion diagnostics. To eliminate the above mentioned shortcoming, a new IR spectroscopic-imaging...

  3. Study of an exhaust gas recirculation equipped micro gas turbine supplied with bio-fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors discuss in this paper some aspects related to the employment of liquid and gaseous bio-fuels in a micro-gas turbine. Besides the purpose of checking the effectiveness of methods for supplying the micro-turbine with fuels from renewable sources, the attention is focused on the need of controlling the pollutant emission. To this aim, several solutions are experienced and numerically tested. For the liquid fuel supply, a new shape and location of the main fuel injector is combined with a modified position of the pilot injector. In the case of the biogas fuelling, an external EGR option is considered as activated. Both methods aim at the reduction of the thermal and prompt NO formation by approaching the flameless combustion concept. -- Highlights: • External and internal EGR concepts applied to NOx control from micro gas turbines. • For gaseous fuels: internal EGR is obtained by a proper location of the pilot injector. • For liquid fuels: replacing the original radial injectors with a pressure swirl atomizer. • We apply a CFD based method, after validation with experimental data. • Blends of bio-fuels with fossil fuels promise noticeable benefits

  4. COMBINED IMPACT OF BIODIESEL (MENO AND EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION ON NOX EMISSIONS IN DI DIESEL ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Jothithirumal

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The steep rises in the prices of the petroleum fuels and the concern for the environment have forced the researchers to find alternative renewable fuels which are called bio-fuels. The objective of this work is to find the optimum EGR and biodiesel blend matrix for the better performance and optimum emission reduction in a DI diesel engine. The bio fuel used in the experimentation is derived from the Neem oil. A twin-cylinder, air-cooled, constant speed direct injection diesel engine is used for experiments. HC, NOx, CO, and smoke of the exhaust gas are measured. Various engine performance parameters such as thermal efficiency, and brake specific fuel consumption are calculated from the acquired data. As the percentage of bio diesel increased in diesel and bio fuel blend the NOx emission increased. In order to reduce the emission from bio diesel EGR is used. Application of EGR with biodiesel blends resulted in reductions in NOx emissions without any significant penalty in smoke emissions. The results reveal that the Blend 100 (100 % bio fuel produces maximum NOx emission (300 ppm. With 25% volume flow rate of EGR with the same B100 bio diesel, the NOx emission is reduced approximately 300 ppm to 100 ppm

  5. Robust control of speed and temperature in a power plant gas turbine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najimi, Ebrahim; Ramezani, Mohammad Hossein

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, an H(?) robust controller has been designed for an identified model of MONTAZER GHAEM power plant gas turbine (GE9001E). In design phase, a linear model (ARX model) which is obtained using real data has been applied. Since the turbine has been used in a combined cycle power plant, its speed and also the exhaust gas temperature should be adjusted simultaneously by controlling fuel signals and compressor inlet guide vane (IGV) position. Considering the limitations on the system inputs, the aim of the control is to maintain the turbine speed and the exhaust gas temperature within desired interval under uncertainties and load demand disturbances. Simulation results of applying the proposed robust controller on the nonlinear model of the system (NARX model), fairly fulfilled the predefined aims. Simulations also show the improvement in the performance compared to MPC and PID controllers for the same conditions. PMID:22062324

  6. Reduction of the exhaust gas emissions during warm up by improving the mixture preparation of spark-ignition engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During warm-up the engine emits the highest concentration of exhaust gas emissions. An improvement of the atomization behaviour of the injected fuel should lead to a good mixture preparation in the manifold and combustion chamber and further to lower exhaust gas emissions during warm up. During these investigations it was found out that the build-up of fuel film in the manifold of cold spark-ignition engines can not be prevented. But by injecting the fuel at the open inlet valve it is possible to reduce the fuel film. The injection of extremely finely atomized fuel at the open inlet valve leads to a better mixture preparation with smaller fuel dropplets in the manifold and combustion chamber. This again leads, during warm-up of the spark ignition engine, to a reduction of the HC emissions of 30% and the CO emissions of 50%. (author)

  7. Positional Arrangements of Waste Exhaust Gas Ducts of C-Type Balanced Chimney Heating Devices on Building Façades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan AVLAR

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In Turkey today, with the increase in availability of natural gas,detached heating devices are being preferred over existingheating devices. Due to the lack of chimneys in existing buildingsin Turkey or the presence of chimneys that fail to conformto standards, the use of C-type balanced chimney devices has increased.C-type balanced chimney devices take the combustionair directly from the outside by a specific air duct as detachedheating equipment, with enclosed combustion chambers anda specific waste gas exhaust duct, and they are ventilated independentlyof the field of equipment. Because of their essentiality,the use of a chimney is not required in these devices;the waste gas is exhausted through walls, windows, doors, orbalconies. The natural gas is a clean fossil fuel that requires nostorage in buildings and is easy to use. However, water vapor,carbon dioxide and nitrogen oxides are produced by the combustionof natural gas. It is widely known that high concentrationsof these products can have some adverse effects onhumans such as dizziness, headaches and nausea. As a result,the waste products could recoil through wall openings on thefaçade to create unhealthy indoor environments that could bedangerous to human health. Therefore, the importance of standardsand regulations about the positional arrangements of thewaste gas exhaust ducts of C-type balanced chimney devices onbuilding façades is increasing. In this research, we analyze thestudies of the Institution of Turkish Standards, Chamber of MechanicalEngineers, gas distribution companies, municipalitiesand authorized firms and compare the criteria to determine thenecessary application method. According to our comparison ofthe references accessed, the criteria are not uniform.

  8. 40 CFR 86.1310-90 - Exhaust gas sampling and analytical system; diesel engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...For methanol-fueled engines, cooling or reaction of the...Heating and possibly cooling capabilities as required...dilution function at the engine exhaust manifold or...valves, solenoids, pumps, and switches...

  9. A test bench for gas-dynamic investigations of exhaust diffusers and hoods of turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernikov, V. A.

    2008-06-01

    This article is concerned with methodological principles of experimental investigation of gasdynamics of exhaust diffusers and exhaust paths of turbines. The design of an experimental “stage—diffuser” aerodynamic test bench and the experimental technique used are presented. Coordinate-spacing devices used for traversing three-dimensional flow in components of the flow path of a model and the scheme of a measurement technique are described.

  10. NO sub x removal from gas engine exhaust gases. NO sub x -verwijdering uit uitlaatgassen van gasmotoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Der Kinderen, J.M.; Heijkoop, G.; Geus, J.W. (VEG-Gasinstituut NV, Apeldoorn (Netherlands) Rijksuniversiteit Utrecht (Netherlands))

    1990-01-01

    In burning natural gas less NO{sub x} is formed than with other fossil fuels but gas engines produce relatively much NO{sub x}. The most drastic reduction of the NO{sub x} content can be achieved by catalytic after-treatment of the exhaust gases. This article reports on research by VEG-Gasinstituut in cooperation with Gaz de France into the development and testing of catalysts and a system of non-elective NO{sub x} reduction. 6 figs., 6 refs., 5 ills.

  11. Temperature Modulation of a Catalytic Gas Sensor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike Brauns

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of catalytic gas sensors usually offers low selectivity, only based on their different sensitivities for various gases due to their different heats of reaction. Furthermore, the identification of the gas present is not possible, which leads to possible misinterpretation of the sensor signals. The use of micro-machined catalytic gas sensors offers great advantages regarding the response time, which allows advanced analysis of the sensor response. By using temperature modulation, additional information about the gas characteristics can be measured and drift effects caused by material shifting or environmental temperature changes can be avoided. In this work a miniaturized catalytic gas sensor which offers a very short response time (<150 ms was developed. Operation with modulated temperature allows analysis of the signal spectrum with advanced information content, based on the Arrhenius approach. Therefore, a high-precise electronic device was developed, since theory shows that harmonics induced by the electronics must be avoided to generate a comprehensible signal.

  12. Emission characteristics of iso-propanol/gasoline blends in a spark-ignition engine combined with exhaust gas re-circulation

    OpenAIRE

    Gong Jing; Zhang Yingjia; Tang Chenglong; Huang Zuohua

    2014-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a spark-ignition engine fueled with iso-propanol/gasoline blends. Emission characteristics of this engine were investigated experimentally, including gaseous emissions (HC, CO, NOx) and particulate matter emission in term of number and size distributions. The effects of different iso-propanol percentages, loads and exhaust gas recirculation rates on emissions were analyzed. Results show that the introduction of exhaust gas re...

  13. Effect of ambient temperature on the performance of micro gas turbine with cogeneration system in cold region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small-scale prime mover especially micro gas turbine is a key factor in order to widespread the utilization of biogas. It is well known that a performance of large-scale gas turbine is greatly affected by its inlet air temperature. However, the effect of the inlet air temperature on the performance of small-scale gas turbine (micro gas turbine) is not widely reported. The purpose of the present study is to investigate the effect of the inlet air temperature on the performance of a micro gas turbine (MGT) with cogeneration system (CGS) arrangement. An analysis model of the MGT-CGS was set up on the basis of experimental results obtained in a previous study and a manufacturer standard data, and it was analysed under a various ambient temperature condition in a cold region. The results show that when ambient temperature increased, electrical efficiency ?ele of the MGT decreased but exhaust heat recovery ?ehr increased. It was also found that when ambient temperature increased, exhaust heat to mass flow rate Qexe/me and exhaust heat recovery to mass flow rate Qehr/me increased, with maximum ratios of 259 kJ/kg and 200 kJ/kg, respectively were found in summer peak. Furthermore, it was also found that the exhaust heat to power ratio Qexe/Pe had a similar characteristic with exhaust heat recovery to power ratio Qehr/Pe. Qexe/Pe and Qehr/Pe increased with the increase of ambient temperature. Moreover, although different values of total energy efficiency, fuel energy saving and CO2 reduction for every temperature condition were found comparing with a two conventional system that were considered, the MGT-CGS could annually reduce 30,000-80,000 m3/y of fuel consumption and 35-94 t-CO2/y of CO2 emissions. - Research highlights: ? Micro gas turbine cogeneration system (MGT-CGS) has higher electrical efficiency and lower exhaust heat recovery efficiency under cold condition. ? MGT-CGS has lower exhaust heat and exhaust heat recovery to power ratio under cold condition. ? The performance of MGT-CGS depends on heat and electrical demands of applied facilities, and it can decide the necessity of inlet precooling. ? MGT-CGS is very efficient on total energy efficiency, fuel saving and CO2 reduction.

  14. Effects of Gas Velocity and Temperature on Nitric Oxide Conversion in Simulated Catalytic Converter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathaporn Chuepeng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Gaseous emissions from gasoline engine such as carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxides were usually reduced in three-way catalytic converter simultaneously around theoretical fuel and air combustion. Engine speed and load and other parameters were varied over a wide range of operating conditions, resulting in different exhaust gas composition and condition intake into catalytic converter. This work was studied the conversion of Nitric Oxide (NO in exhaust gas catalytic converter affected by gas velocity and inlet temperature using numerical modeling. Approach: The simulation was based on a one-dimensional time-dependent model within a single monolith channel of the converter. Upon certain assumptions, the study was considered heterogeneous combustion reaction between gas and solid phases based on lumped kinetic reactions. In this study, constants and variables used for mass and heat transfers were dependent on gas or solid phase temperature and mole fraction. Finite difference scheme incorporated with the generated computer code was established for solving species and energy balances within gas and solid phases. Results: The NO conversion was increased with transient period in initial and reached steady state at different values. The lower inlet gas temperature was resulted in lesser NO conversion at the same inlet NO concentration and gas velocity. The light-off temperatures were up to 520 K and a sudden rise in NO conversion was from 550-605 K and decreasing onwards, generating working temperature window. NO conversion increased throughout the catalyst bed from the inlet and the conversion decreased as the gas velocity increased. Conclusion/Recommendations: Gas space velocity and gas temperature intake to the converter affected the NO conversion over the time and the axial distance from the catalyst bed inlet. The numerical results have summarily demonstrated a good approximation compared to experimental data provided in the literature. Further investigation of such effects on other gaseous components is recommended for future work.

  15. Thermally grown oxide films and corrosion performance of ferritic stainless steels under simulated exhaust gas condensate conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Five ferritic stainless steels with dissimilar composition included. • Thermal oxide films and performance under exhaust gas condensate conditions studied. • Oxide films grown at 300 and 600 °C show differences in structure and properties. • Performance of alloys with >11.5 wt.% Cr is related to elements Ti, Si, Nb and Mo. • Compositional optimization requires knowledge on several linked processes. - Abstract: Five ferritic stainless steels are characterized in terms of thermally grown oxide films and corrosion performance under simulated exhaust gas condensate conditions. Oxide films developed at 300 °C show only little variation in microstructure and properties between the alloys, whereas those evolved at 600 °C exhibit clear differences. Especially in alloys with >11.5 wt.% chromium, the presence and distribution of such alloying elements as titanium, silicon, niobium and molybdenum are crucial for the film properties and the overall corrosion performance. The results may be exploited in the compositional optimization of the alloys for the cold-end components of automotive exhaust system

  16. Estimation of exhaust gas aerodynamic force on the variable geometry turbocharger actuator: 1D flow model approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Estimation of aerodynamic force on variable turbine geometry vanes and actuator. • Method based on exhaust gas flow modeling. • Simulation tool for integration of aerodynamic force in automotive simulation software. - Abstract: This paper provides a reliable tool for simulating the effects of exhaust gas flow through the variable turbine geometry section of a variable geometry turbocharger (VGT), on flow control mechanism. The main objective is to estimate the resistive aerodynamic force exerted by the flow upon the variable geometry vanes and the controlling actuator, in order to improve the control of vane angles. To achieve this, a 1D model of the exhaust flow is developed using Navier–Stokes equations. As the flow characteristics depend upon the volute geometry, impeller blade force and the existing viscous friction, the related source terms (losses) are also included in the model. In order to guarantee stability, an implicit numerical solver has been developed for the resolution of the Navier–Stokes problem. The resulting simulation tool has been validated through comparison with experimentally obtained values of turbine inlet pressure and the aerodynamic force as measured at the actuator shaft. The simulator shows good compliance with experimental results

  17. Optical Temperature Sensor For Gas Turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossey, P. W.

    1987-01-01

    New design promises accuracy even in presence of contamination. Improved sensor developed to measure gas temperatures up to 1,700 degree C in gas-turbine engines. Sensor has conical shape for mechanical strengths and optical configuration insensitive to deposits of foreign matter on sides of cone.

  18. Effect of ejector dilutors on measurements of automotive exhaust gas aerosol size distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ejector dilutors have long been used for automotive exhaust particle sampling, as they can offer a low-cost option for stable dilution. In an ejector dilutor, pressurized air expanding in the periphery of a nozzle draws in and mixes with an exhaust sample which is then led to analytical equipment. The combination of processes involved may lead to particle losses which can affect the measurement. This study examines the losses of diesel exhaust particles of different characteristics (nucleation mode, non-volatile accumulation mode, internally and externally mixed accumulation mode) when these are sampled through an ejector dilutor. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS), an electrical low-pressure impactor and a diffusion charger were used as analytical equipment to characterize losses with different instruments. Particle losses were found negligible for all practical applications of diesel exhaust aerosol sampling. Also, the sampling outlet and the operating pressure of the ejector dilutor were found to have a non-measurable effect on the distribution shape. Some variation of the labile nucleation mode particles was attributed to evaporation within the SMPS rather than an ejector effect, and this was confirmed by sampling solid NaCl particles in the same size range. The study further confirms the usability of ejector dilutors for exhaust particle sampling and dilution

  19. Temperature Modulation of a Catalytic Gas Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Eike Brauns; Eva Morsbach; Sebastian Kunz; Marcus Baeumer; Walter Lang

    2014-01-01

    The use of catalytic gas sensors usually offers low selectivity, only based on their different sensitivities for various gases due to their different heats of reaction. Furthermore, the identification of the gas present is not possible, which leads to possible misinterpretation of the sensor signals. The use of micro-machined catalytic gas sensors offers great advantages regarding the response time, which allows advanced analysis of the sensor response. By using temperature modulation, additi...

  20. Gas-particle partitioning of primary organic aerosol emissions: (1) Gasoline vehicle exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Andrew A.; Presto, Albert A.; Hennigan, Christopher J.; Nguyen, Ngoc T.; Gordon, Timothy D.; Robinson, Allen L.

    2013-10-01

    The gas-particle partitioning of the primary organic aerosol (POA) emissions from fifty-one light-duty gasoline vehicles (model years 1987-2012) was investigated at the California Air Resources Board Haagen-Smit Laboratory. Each vehicle was operated over the cold-start unified cycle on a chassis dynamometer and its emissions were sampled using a constant volume sampler. Four independent yet complementary approaches were used to investigate POA gas-particle partitioning: sampling artifact correction of quartz filter data, dilution from the constant volume sampler into a portable environmental chamber, heating in a thermodenuder, and thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analysis of quartz filter samples. This combination of techniques allowed gas-particle partitioning measurements to be made across a wide range of atmospherically relevant conditions - temperatures of 25-100 °C and organic aerosol concentrations of designed to be applied to quartz filter POA emission factors in order to update emissions inventories for use in chemical transport models.

  1. Prediction of emissions and exhaust temperature for direct injection diesel engine with emulsified fuel using ANN

    OpenAIRE

    KÖKKÜLÜNK, Görkem; AKDO?AN, Erhan; Ayhan, Vezir

    2012-01-01

    Exhaust gases have many effects on human beings and the environment. Therefore, they must be kept under control. The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships (MARPOL), which is concerned with the prevention of marine pollution, limits the emissions according to the regulations. In Emission Control Area (ECA) regions, which are determined by MARPOL as ECAs, the emission rates should be controlled. Direct injection (DI) diesel engines are commonly used as a prop...

  2. Influence of heat pipe operating temperature on exhaust heat thermoelectric generation

    OpenAIRE

    Brito, F. P.; Martins, Jorge; Gonçalves, L. M.; Antunes, Nuno; Sousa, Diogo

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly stringent targets on energy efficiency and emissions, as well as growing vehicle electrification are making attractive the electric recovery of the energy normally wasted through the tailpipe of Internal Combustion Engines. Recent developments in thermoelectrics (TE) may soon make them a viable solution for such applications. This team has been exploring the potential of using TE modules in combination with variable conductance heat pipes for transferring the exhaust heat to ...

  3. Optical Sensor Of High Gas Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Arthur J.

    1988-01-01

    Contact pyrometer resists effects of heat, vibration, and moisture. New sensor consists of shielded sapphire rod with sputtered layer of precious metal on end. Metal layer acts as blackbody. Emits radiation having known dependence of spectral distribution with temperature of metal and temperature of hot gas flowing over metal. Fiber-optic cable carries radiation from sapphire rod to remote photodetector.

  4. Temperature modulation of a catalytic gas sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauns, Eike; Morsbach, Eva; Kunz, Sebastian; Baeumer, Marcus; Lang, Walter

    2014-01-01

    The use of catalytic gas sensors usually offers low selectivity, only based on their different sensitivities for various gases due to their different heats of reaction. Furthermore, the identification of the gas present is not possible, which leads to possible misinterpretation of the sensor signals. The use of micro-machined catalytic gas sensors offers great advantages regarding the response time, which allows advanced analysis of the sensor response. By using temperature modulation, additional information about the gas characteristics can be measured and drift effects caused by material shifting or environmental temperature changes can be avoided. In this work a miniaturized catalytic gas sensor which offers a very short response time (Arrhenius approach. Therefore, a high-precise electronic device was developed, since theory shows that harmonics induced by the electronics must be avoided to generate a comprehensible signal. PMID:25356643

  5. 40 CFR 86.110-90 - Exhaust gas sampling system; diesel vehicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... measure the true mass of both gaseous and particulate emissions in the exhaust of either diesel light-duty...) Filter acceptance criteria. Valid diesel particulate net filter weights shall be accepted according to... flow over the test period. The mass of particulate emissions is determined from a proportional...

  6. REDUCING DIESEL NOX AND SOOT EMISSIONS VIA PARTICLE-FREE EXHAUST GAS RECIRCULATION - PHASE I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diesel engines play an important role in the United States economy for power generation and transportation. However, NOx and soot emissions from both stationary and mobile diesel engines are a major contributor to air pollution. Many engine modifications and exhaust-after-t...

  7. Lightweight Exhaust Manifold and Exhaust Pipe Ducting for Internal Combustion Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northam, G. Burton (Inventor); Ransone, Philip O. (Inventor); Rivers, H. Kevin (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    An improved exhaust system for an internal combustion gasoline-and/or diesel-fueled engine includes an engine exhaust manifold which has been fabricated from carbon- carbon composite materials in operative association with an exhaust pipe ducting which has been fabricated from carbon-carbon composite materials. When compared to conventional steel. cast iron. or ceramic-lined iron paris. the use of carbon-carbon composite exhaust-gas manifolds and exhaust pipe ducting reduces the overall weight of the engine. which allows for improved acceleration and fuel efficiency: permits operation at higher temperatures without a loss of strength: reduces the "through-the wall" heat loss, which increases engine cycle and turbocharger efficiency and ensures faster "light-off" of catalytic converters: and, with an optional thermal reactor, reduces emission of major pollutants, i.e. hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide.

  8. Multifunctional potentiometric gas sensor array with an integrated temperature control and temperature sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blackburn, Bryan M; Wachsman, Eric D

    2015-05-12

    Embodiments of the subject invention relate to a gas sensor and method for sensing one or more gases. An embodiment incorporates an array of sensing electrodes maintained at similar or different temperatures, such that the sensitivity and species selectivity of the device can be fine tuned between different pairs of sensing electrodes. A specific embodiment pertains to a gas sensor array for monitoring combustion exhausts and/or chemical reaction byproducts. An embodiment of the subject device related to this invention operates at high temperatures and can withstand harsh chemical environments. Embodiments of the device are made on a single substrate. The devices can also be made on individual substrates and monitored individually as if they were part of an array on a single substrate. The device can incorporate sensing electrodes in the same environment, which allows the electrodes to be coplanar and, thus, keep manufacturing costs low. Embodiments of the device can provide improvements to sensitivity, selectivity, and signal interference via surface temperature control.

  9. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF AN AMMONIA REMOVAL UNIT FROM THE EXHAUST GAS OF A MANURE DRYING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. E. Ghaly

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The storage and handling of animal wastes is one of the main sources of ammonia gas emissions. Ammonia gas has a distinct, unpleasant odor and can become detrimental to the health of humans and animals at high concentrations. Ammonia emissions are of particular concern in manure drying systems, where large losses of nitrogen, in the form of ammonia can cause air quality concerns. The aim of this study was to develop an ammonia removal system for a poultry manure drying system. The thin layer drying of poultry manure in 1-3 cm thick layers resulted in effective sterilization; with the removal of 99.44-99.56% of total bacterial count, 88.51-93.705 of yeast and mold cells, 99.13-99.565 of E.coli cells, and complete removal of Salmonellae. The drying of poultry manure resulted in a large loss of nitrogen, through ammonia loss in the exhaust gasses. The use of a water scrubber resulted in a 75-99% removal of ammonia gas from the exhaust gases. The absorption of ammonia into the scrubberâ??s water resulted in an increase in pH, which subsequently fell as the drying process finished, and ammonia emission decreased. The heated air drying of poultry manure, with the use of an ammonia removal system proved effective in reducing the odor intensity and offensiveness of the poultry manure drying process, resulting in increased air quality. While producing a high value product.

  10. Fast Spatially Resolved Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR) Distribution Measurements in an Internal Combustion Engine Using Absorption Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Jihyung; Prikhodko, Vitaly; Parks, James E; Perfetto, Anthony; Geckler, Sam; Partridge, William P

    2015-09-01

    Exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) in internal combustion engines is an effective method of reducing NOx emissions while improving efficiency. However, insufficient mixing between fresh air and exhaust gas can lead to cycle-to-cycle and cylinder-to-cylinder non-uniform charge gas mixtures of a multi-cylinder engine, which can in turn reduce engine performance and efficiency. A sensor packaged into a compact probe was designed, built and applied to measure spatiotemporal EGR distributions in the intake manifold of an operating engine. The probe promotes the development of more efficient and higher-performance engines by resolving high-speed in situ CO2 concentration at various locations in the intake manifold. The study employed mid-infrared light sources tuned to an absorption band of CO2 near 4.3 ?m, an industry standard species for determining EGR fraction. The calibrated probe was used to map spatial EGR distributions in an intake manifold with high accuracy and monitor cycle-resolved cylinder-specific EGR fluctuations at a rate of up to 1 kHz. PMID:26253286

  11. The Performance Test on Local Exhaust Ventilation (LEV) System to Prevent Chlorine Gas Leakage in Water Treatment Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Nor Halim Hasan; M. R. Said; A. M. Leman; Anuar Mohd Mokhtar

    2013-01-01

    Water is a necessity of life to humans and animals. In Malaysia, Government Link Companies (GLC) or Private Companies manages most of the water treatment plants. Chlorine gas is used as one of the water treatment media to treat raw water that will then be distributed for public or commercial usage. The large volume of Chlorine gases used and stored in these treatment plants has the potential to create a disaster if it leaks. Objective of this paper to highlight a result of Local Exhaust Venti...

  12. Gas conduction in a high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hot gas is distributed and mixed by polygonal blocks in the reactor floor. Radial and an annular channel are used for this purpose. This annular channel also carried circular ducts distributed evenly over the circumference, which lead to a heat exchanger. Temperature differences across the crossection of the reactor floor are evened out by multiple deflection, combination and renewed splitting of the gas flows. (DG)

  13. Electrochemical cell with integrated hydrocarbon gas sensor for automobile exhaust gas; Elektrochemische Zelle mit integriertem Kohlenwasserstoff-Gassensor fuer das Automobilabgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biskupski, D.; Moos, R. [Univ. Bayreuth (Germany). Bayreuth Engine Research Center, Lehrstuhl fuer Funktionsmaterialien; Wiesner, K.; Fleischer, M. [Siemens AG, Corporate Technology, CT PS 6, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    In the future sensors will be necessary to control the compliance with hydrocarbon limiting values, allowing a direct detection of the hydrocarbons. Appropriate sensor-active functional materials are metal oxides, which have a hydrocarbon sensitivity but are also dependent on the oxygen partial pressure. It is proposed that the gas-sensing layer should be integrated into an electrochemical cell. The authors show that the integration of a resistive oxygen sensor into a pump cell allows a defined oxygen concentration level at the sensor layer in any exhaust gas.

  14. Catalysts to reduce NO.sub.x in an exhaust gas stream and methods of preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellano, Christopher R. (Ringoes, NJ); Moini, Ahmad (Princeton, NJ); Koermer, Gerald S. (Basking Ridge, NJ); Furbeck, Howard (Hamilton, NJ); Schmieg, Steven J. (Troy, MI); Blint, Richard J. (Shelby Township, MI)

    2011-05-17

    Catalysts, systems and methods are described to reduce NO.sub.x emissions of an internal combustion engine. In one embodiment, an emissions treatment system for an exhaust stream is provided having a catalyst comprising silver and a platinum group metal on a particulate alumina support, the atomic fraction of the platinum group metal being less than or equal to about 0.25. Methods of manufacturing catalysts are described in which silver is impregnated on alumina particles.

  15. Influence of steam injection through exhaust heat recovery on the design performance of solid oxide fuel cell . gas turbine hybrid systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study analyzed the influence of steam injection on the performance of hybrid systems combining a solid oxide fuel cell and a gas turbine. Two different configurations (pressurized system and ambient pressure system) were examined and the effects of injecting steam, generated by recovering heat from the exhaust gas, on system performances were compared. Performance variations according to the design of different turbine inlet temperatures were examined. Two representative gas turbine pressure ratios were used. Without steam injection, the pressurized system generally exhibits higher system efficiency than the ambient pressure system. The steam injection augments gas turbine power, thus increasing the power capacity of the hybrid system. The power boost effect due to the steam injection is generally greater in the relatively higher pressure ratio design in both the pressurized and ambient pressure systems. The effect of the steam injection on system efficiency varies depending on system configurations and design conditions. The pressurized system hardly takes advantage of the steam injection in terms of system efficiency. On the other hand, the steam injection contributes to the efficiency improvement of the ambient pressure system in some design conditions. In particular, a higher pressure ratio provides a better chance of efficiency increase due to the steam injection

  16. Atmospheric pressure glow discharge generated in nitrogen-methane gas mixture: PTR-MS analyzes of the exhaust gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torokova, Lucie; Mazankova, Vera; Krcma, Frantisek; Mason, Nigel J.; Matejcik, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the results of an extensive study of with the in situ mass spectrometry analysis of gaseous phase species produced by an atmospheric plasma glow discharge in N2-CH4 gas mixtures (with methane concentrations ranging from 1% to 4%). The products are studied using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). HCN and CH3CN are identified as the main gaseous products. Hydrazine, methanimine, methyldiazene, ethylamine, cyclohexadiene, pyrazineacetylene, ethylene, propyne and propene are identified as minor compounds. All the detected compounds and their relative abundances are determined with respect to the experimental conditions (gas composition and applied power). The same molecules were observed by the Cassini-Huygens probe in Titan's atmosphere (which has same N2-CH4 gas mixtures). Such, experiments show that the formation of such complex organics in atmospheres containing C, N and H, like that of Titan, could be a source of prebiotic molecules. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  17. 14 CFR 29.1123 - Exhaust piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exhaust piping. 29.1123 Section 29.1123... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Exhaust System § 29.1123 Exhaust piping. (a) Exhaust... by operating temperatures. (b) Exhaust piping must be supported to withstand any vibration...

  18. 14 CFR 27.1123 - Exhaust piping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Exhaust piping. 27.1123 Section 27.1123... STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Powerplant Exhaust System § 27.1123 Exhaust piping. (a) Exhaust piping... operating temperatures. (b) Exhaust piping must be supported to withstand any vibration and inertia loads...

  19. 77 FR 76842 - Exhaust Emissions Standards for New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines and Identification Plate for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-31

    ...Emissions Standards for New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines and Identification Plate...EPA also proposed adopting the gas turbine engine test procedures of ICAO...airplanes that are powered by aircraft gas turbine engines of the classes...

  20. Emission characteristics of iso-propanol/gasoline blends in a spark-ignition engine combined with exhaust gas re-circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Jing

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Experiments were carried out in a spark-ignition engine fueled with iso-propanol/gasoline blends. Emission characteristics of this engine were investigated experimentally, including gaseous emissions (HC, CO, NOx and particulate matter emission in term of number and size distributions. The effects of different iso-propanol percentages, loads and exhaust gas recirculation rates on emissions were analyzed. Results show that the introduction of exhaust gas recirculation reduces the NOx emission and NOx emission gives the highest value at full load condition. HC and CO emissions present inconspicuous variations at all the loads except the load of 10%. Additionally, HC emission shows a sharp increase for pure propanol when the exhaust gas recirculation rate is up to 5%, while little variation is observed at lager exhaust gas recirculation rates. Moreover, the particulate matter number concentration increases monotonically with the increase of load and the decrease of exhaust gas recirculation rate. There exists a critical spark timing that produces the highest particulate matter number concentration at all the blending ratios.

  1. Improvement of the warm-up phase of an automobile internal combustion engine by exhaust gas heat recovery and modified fuel injection parameters; Amelioration de la montee en temperature d'un moteur thermique automobile par recuperation d'energie a l'echappement et modification des lois d'injection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hocine, A.

    2003-07-01

    The automotive industry is constantly developing new designs in order to reduce diesel engine fuel consumption. As a result, cabin heating is compromised by low heat rejection. This thesis provides a new industrial solution to this problem. The first part of the thesis presents the energetic analysis of the Diesel engine. The heat sources and the resulting heat transfers are studied precisely. The second part relates to the design and construction of an engine test rig and the associated experimental study. The results highlight the impact of diesel injection control on heat rejection (on cooling water and exhaust gases). The third part consists in a transient thermodynamic analysis of the engine. It demonstrates the potential of a technological solution based on heat recovery of the exhaust gases with modifications on the diesel injection parameters. The fourth and last part of the thesis presents the validation of the system and its industrialization. (author)

  2. Impact of intake CO 2 addition and exhaust gas recirculation on NO x emissions and soot reactivity in a common rail diesel engine

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Qurashi, Khalid

    2012-10-18

    The impact of intake CO 2 addition and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) on engine combustion characteristics, NO x emissions, and soot oxidative reactivity was studied in a common rail diesel engine equipped with a cooled EGR system. The engine test results and the heat release analysis show that the reduced flame temperature, induced by the reduction of the oxygen concentration (dilution effect) is the dominant mechanism via which CO 2 and EGR lower NO x emissions in diesel engines. On the other hand, the collected soot from the engine tests was examined for its oxidative reactivity using a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). Results show that EGR has a significant effect on soot reactivity and results in higher initial active sites compared to the CO 2 case. We conclude that the reduced flame temperature (thermal effect) which is a consequence of the dilution effect is responsible for the observed increase in soot reactivity. These results confirm observations from our past work on flame soot, which showed that the peak adiabatic flame temperature is the governing factor affecting soot reactivity. These findings imply that driving the combustion concepts toward low temperature is favorable to effectively control engine pollutants, including soot reactivity. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  3. Amperometric NOx-sensor for Combustion Exhaust Gas Control. Studies on transport properties and catalytic activity of oxygen permeable ceramic membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the research described in this thesis is the development of a mixed conducting oxide layer, which can be used as an oxygen permselective membrane in an amperometric NOx sensor. The sensor will be used in exhaust gas systems. The exhaust gas-producing engine will run in the lean mix mode. The preparation of this sensor is carried out using screen-printing technology, in which the different layers of the sensor are applied successively. Hereafter, a co-firing step is applied in which all layers are sintered together. This co-firing step imposes several demands on the selection of materials. The design specifications of the sensor further include requirements concerning the operating temperature, measurement range and overall stability. The operating temperature of the sensor varies between 700 and 850C, enabling measurement of NOx concentrations between 50 and 1200 ppm with a measurement accuracy of 10 ppm. Concerning the stability of the sensor, it must withstand the exhaust gas atmosphere containing, amongst others, smoke, acids, abrasive particles and sulphur. Because of the chosen lean-mix engine concept, in which the fuel/air mixture switches continuously between lean (excess oxygen) and fat (excess fuel) mixtures, the sensor must withstand alternately oxidising and reducing atmospheres. Besides, it should be resistant to thermal shock and show no cross-sensitivity of NOx with other exhaust gas constituents like oxygen and hydrocarbons. The response time should be short, typically less than 500 ms. Because of the application in combustion engines of cars, the operational lifetime should be longer than 10 years. Demands on the mixed conducting oxide layer include the following ones. The layer should show minimal catalytic activity towards NOx-reduction. The oxygen permeability must be larger than 6.22 10-8 mol/cm2s at a layer thickness between 3-50 ?m. Since the mixed conducting oxide layer is coated on the YSZ electrolyte embodiment, the two materials must be co-firable and, hence, match in thermal, chemical and mechanical behaviour. A number of studies on different mixed oxygen ion/electron conducting materials is described in this thesis. Emphasis is put on the demands of the targeted sensor application, in which these materials are used as mixed conducting dense ceramic membranes. In Chapter 2, a series of perovskite materials is studied. The general composition is ABO3-? (A = Gd, Pr, Y; B = Mn, Cr, Fe), being partially doped with Ca2+ and Sr2+ on the A-site to create mobile oxygen vacancies. The main focus of the work presented is on the measurement of catalytic activities towards NOx and the ionic conductivities of the selected materials. In Chapter 3, the preparation and characterisation of a material with the overall composition of Gd0.7Ca0.3CoOx is described. Dual phase composite membranes are the subject of investigations presented in Chapters 4-7. The main advantage of these type of materials is that their properties can be tailored to meet the demands imposed by the sensor design. Emphasis is on the preparation of the materials, characterisation by SEM-EDX, XRD, catalytic activity and measurement of ionic/electronic conductivities. In Chapter 4, dual phase composites of composition Gd0.7Ca0.3CoOx/Ce0.8Gd0.2O2- are studied. Composites ZrO2/In2O3 and ZrO2/ITO are subject to the investigations reported in Chapters 5 and 6, respectively. Finally, in Chapter 7, composite Au/YSZ and Au/Ce0.8Gd0.2O2- membranes are studied. Finally, in Chapter 8 a summary of the results is given together with recommendations for future research

  4. Quantification of diesel exhaust gas phase organics by a thermal desorption proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Erickson

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available A new approach was developed to measure the total abundance of long chain alkanes (C12 and above in urban air using thermal desorption with a proton transfer reaction mass spectrometer (PTR-MS. These species are emitted in diesel exhaust and may be important precursors to secondary organic aerosol production in urban areas. Long chain alkanes undergo dissociative proton transfer reactions forming a series of fragment ions with formula CnH2n+1. The yield of the fragment ions is a function of drift conditions. At a drift field strength of 80 Townsends, the most abundant ion fragments from C10 to C16 n-alkanes were m/z 57, 71 and 85. The PTR-MS is insensitive to n-alkanes less than C8 but displays an increasing sensitivity for larger alkanes. Higher drift field strengths yield greater normalized sensitivity implying that the proton affinity of the long chain n-alkanes is less than H2O. Analysis of diesel fuel shows the mass spectrum was dominated by alkanes (CnH2n+1, monocyclic aromatics, and an ion group with formula CnH2n?1 (m/z 97, 111, 125, 139. The PTR-MS was deployed in Sacramento, CA during the Carbonaceous Aerosols and Radiative Effects Study field experiment in June 2010. The ratio of the m/z 97 to 85 ion intensities in ambient air matched that found in diesel fuel. Total diesel exhaust alkane concentrations calculated from the measured abundance of m/z 85 ranged from the method detection limit of ~1 ?g m?3 to 100 ?g m?3 in several air pollution episodes. The total diesel exhaust alkane concentration determined by this method was on average a factor of 10 greater than the sum of alkylbenzenes associated with spark ignition vehicle exhaust.

  5. Design of thermoelectric generators operating on exhaust gas from marine diesel engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khalykov Kamil Rafaelevich

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The design of thermoelectric generator (TEG, forming the exhaust system of the vessel, is offered in the paper. Thermal calculation of the TEG for the ves-sel engine, Ro-8 6VDS48/42-AL2, with the capacity of 2 650 kW is given. Values of output parameters of the TEG are comparable with output values of the pa-rameters of existing analogues. The thermoelectric generator with the received parameters can be used on a vessel as an additional source of the direct current electric power.

  6. An experimental investigation on engine performance and emissions of a single cylinder diesel engine using hydrogen as inducted fuel and diesel as injected fuel with exhaust gas recirculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bose, Probir Kumar; Maji, Dines [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Jadavpur University, Heat Power Laboratory, Kolkata 32, West Bengal (India)

    2009-06-15

    Fast depletion of fossil fuels is demanding an urgent need to carry out research work to find out the viable alternative fuels for meeting sustainable energy demand with minimum environmental impact. In the future, our energy systems will need to be renewable and sustainable, efficient and cost-effective, convenient and safe. The technology for producing hydrogen from a variety of resources, including renewable, is evolving and that will make hydrogen energy system as cost-effective. Hydrogen safety concerns are not the cause for fear but they simply are different than those we are accustomed to with gasoline, diesel and other fossil fuels. For the time being full substitution of diesel with hydrogen is not convenient but use of hydrogen in a diesel engine in dual fuel mode is possible. So Hydrogen has been proposed as the perfect fuel for this future energy system. The experiment is conducted using diesel-hydrogen blend. A timed manifold induction system which is electronically controlled has been developed to deliver hydrogen on to the intake manifold. The solenoid valve is activated by the new technique of taking signal from the rocker arm of the engine instead of cam actuation mechanism. In the present investigation hydrogen-enriched air has been used in a diesel engine with hydrogen flow rate at 0.15 kg/h. As diesel is substituted and hydrogen is inducted, the NO{sub x} emission is increased. In order to reduce NO{sub x} emission an EGR system has been developed. In the EGR system a lightweight EGR cooler has been used instead of bulky heat exchanger. In this experiment performance parameters such as brake thermal efficiency, volumetric efficiency, BSEC are determined and emissions such as oxides of nitrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide, hydrocarbon, smoke and exhaust gas temperature are measured. Dual fuel operation with hydrogen induction coupled with exhaust gas recirculation results in lowered emission level and improved performance level compared to the case of neat diesel operation. (author)

  7. High-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of broadening industrial applications of nuclear energy while significantly cutting CO2 emission can be achieved with the near-term deployable, passively-safe high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs), which can supply heat of high-temperatures of up to 950degC to a wide range of industrial plants for CO2-free hydrogen production, power generation, etc. This paper introduces technical features of HTGR and the current status of HTGR developments worldwide with emphasis on the R and D activities conducted by Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA). JAEA as the center of excellence on R and D of the HTGR system in Japan, which leads the world R and D on HTGR and nuclear hydrogen production technologies, has successfully carried out the reactor passive safety demonstration and most recently the 50-day high-temperature operation test by using the High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor (HTTR) of 30 MWt. Based on the test results obtained in the HTTR, a commercial power generation system with gas turbine and an advanced system cogenerating electricity by the gas turbine and hydrogen by a thermochemical method have been designed. This paper concludes by giving a perspective of future HTGR developments. (author)

  8. Low-temperature gas from marine shales: wet gas to dry gas over experimental time

    OpenAIRE

    Jarvie Daniel M; Mango Frank D

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Marine shales exhibit unusual behavior at low temperatures under anoxic gas flow. They generate catalytic gas 300° below thermal cracking temperatures, discontinuously in aperiodic episodes, and lose these properties on exposure to trace amounts of oxygen. Here we report a surprising reversal in hydrocarbon generation. Heavy hydrocarbons are formed before light hydrocarbons resulting in wet gas at the onset of generation grading to dryer gas over time. The effect is moderate under ga...

  9. 40 CFR 86.1311-94 - Exhaust gas analytical system; CVS bag sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...formaldehyde is performed using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine...Methane Measurement Using Gas Chromatography.” (Incorporated by reference...has the option of using gas chromatography to measure NMHC...

  10. 78 FR 63017 - Exhaust Emissions Standards for New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines and Identification Plate for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ...Emissions Standards for New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines and Identification Plate...amending the emission standards for turbine engine powered airplanes to incorporate...EPA also proposed adopting the gas turbine engine test procedures of...

  11. METHANOL MEASUREMENT IN AUTO EXHAUST USING A GAS-FILTER CORRELATION SPECTROMETER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spectroscopic methods offer an alternative to wet chemical methods for analysis of methanol emissions from automobiles. The gas filter correlation infrared optical analysis approach appears very promising. The report describes the gas correlation optical system constructed to ana...

  12. The Evolution of High Temperature Gas Sensors.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garzon, F. H. (Fernando H.); Brosha, E. L. (Eric L.); Mukundan, R. (Rangachary)

    2001-01-01

    Gas sensor technology based on high temperature solid electrolytes is maturing rapidly. Recent advances in metal oxide catalysis and thin film materials science has enabled the design of new electrochemical sensors. We have demonstrated prototype amperometric oxygen sensors, nernstian potentiometric oxygen sensors that operate in high sulfur environments, and hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide sensing mixed potentials sensors. Many of these devices exhibit part per million sensitivities, response times on the order of seconds and excellent long-term stability.

  13. Simultaneous high-speed gas property measurements at the exhaust gas recirculation cooler exit and at the turbocharger inlet of a multicylinder diesel engine using diode-laser-absorption spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jatana, Gurneesh S; Magee, Mark; Fain, David; Naik, Sameer V; Shaver, Gregory M; Lucht, Robert P

    2015-02-10

    A diode-laser-absorption-spectroscopy-based sensor system was used to perform high-speed (100 Hz to 5 kHz) measurements of gas properties (temperature, pressure, and H(2)O vapor concentration) at the turbocharger inlet and at the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) cooler exit of a diesel engine. An earlier version of this system was previously used for high-speed measurements of gas temperature and H(2)O vapor concentration in the intake manifold of the diesel engine. A 1387.2 N?m tunable distributed feedback diode laser was used to scan across multiple H(2)O absorption transitions, and the direct absorption signal was recorded using a high-speed data acquisition system. Compact optical connectors were designed to conduct simultaneous measurements in the intake manifold, the EGR cooler exit, and the turbocharger inlet of the engine. For measurements at the turbocharger inlet, these custom optical connectors survived gas temperatures as high as 800 K using a simple and passive arrangement in which the temperature-sensitive components were protected from high temperatures using ceramic insulators. This arrangement reduced system cost and complexity by eliminating the need for any active water or oil cooling. Diode-laser measurements performed during steady-state engine operation were within 5% of the thermocouple and pressure sensor measurements, and within 10% of the H(2)O concentration values derived from the CO(2) gas analyzer measurements. Measurements were also performed in the engine during transient events. In one such transient event, where a step change in fueling was introduced, the diode-laser sensor was able to capture the 30 ms change in the gas properties; the thermocouple, on the other hand, required 7.4 s to accurately reflect the change in gas conditions, while the gas analyzer required nearly 600 ms. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first implementation of such a simple and passive arrangement of high-temperature optical connectors as well as the first documented application of diode-laser absorption for high-speed gas dynamics measurements in the turbocharger inlet and EGR cooler exit of a diesel engine. PMID:25968043

  14. The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimize Fuel Economy and Minimize Emission in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Ko-Jen

    2011-12-31

    This report summarizes activities conducted for the project “The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimized Fuel Economy and Minimize Emissions in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel” under COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC26-07NT43271, which are as outlined in the STATEMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVES (SOPO) dated March 2007 and in the supplemental SOPO dated October 2010. The project objective was to develop and demonstrate an internal combustion engine that is optimized for E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline) fuel operation to achieve substantially improved fuel economy while operating with E85 fuel and that is also production viable in the near- to medium-term. The key engine technology selected for research and development was turbocharging, which is known to improve fuel economy thru downsizing and is in particular capable of exploiting ethanol fuel’s characteristics of high octane number and high latent heat of vaporization. The engine further integrated synergistic efficiency improving technologies of cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), direct fuel injection and dual continuously variable intake and exhaust cam phasers. On the vehicle level, fuel economy was furthered thru powertrain system optimization by mating a state-of-the-art six-speed automatic transmission to the engine. In order to achieve the project’s objective of near- to medium-term production viability, it was essential to develop the engine to be flex-fuel capable of operating with fuels ranging from E0 (0% ethanol and 100% gasoline) to E85 and to use three-way type of catalyst technology for exhaust aftertreatment. Within these scopes, various technologies were developed through systems approach to focus on ways to help accelerate catalyst light-off. Significant amount of development took place during the course of the project within General Motors, LLC. Many prototype flex-fuel engines were designed, built and developed with various hardware configurations selected to achieve the project goals. Several flex-fuel demonstration vehicles were designed and built for carrying out calibration development and final testing to quantify the technology merits. Based on the extensive test results collected from dynamometer and vehicle testing, the fuel economy benefits of cooled EGR from the intended level of turbocharger technology were quantified. When combined with turbo downsizing, the FE benefits are considered large enough for E0 fuel as well as for E85 fuel to warrant further development of the technology beyond the current proof-of-concept level to a level that can meet production driveability quality and durability requirements in order to meet customers’ expectations. Cold-start cart test results from the emissions segment of the project were positive, confirming the assumption of faster thermal response of turbo exhaust system for emissions reductions for both E0 and E85 fuels. Vehicle emissions test results directionally correlated to the cold-start cart findings. The limited number of test runs did demonstrate the potentials of meeting stringent emission standards, however, they did not comprehend the factors such as hardware variability and long-term durability, 3 which are essential for mass production to satisfy customers’ expectations. It is therefore recommended, moving forward, durability concerns over turbocharger, EGR system and aftertreatment system, which would likely impact production viability, should be addressed. The data moreover suggested that further FE increase is likely with turbocharger technology advancement.

  15. Experimental Investigation of a Temperature-Controlled Car Seat Powered by an Exhaust Thermoelectric Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, H.; Wang, Y. P.; Yuan, X. H.; Deng, Y. D.; Su, C. Q.

    2015-10-01

    To improve the riding comfort and rational utilization of the electrical energy captured by an automotive thermoelectric generator (ATEG), a temperature-controlled car seat was constructed to adjust the temperature of the car seat surface. Powered by the ATEG and the battery, the seat-embedded air conditioner can improve the riding comfort using a thermoelectric device to adjust the surface temperature of the seat, with an air duct to regulate the cold side and hot side of the thermoelectric device. The performance of the thermoelectric cooler (TEC) and theoretical analysis on the optimum state of the TEC device are put forward. To verify the rationality of the air duct design and to ensure sufficient air supply, the velocity field of the air duct system was obtained by means of the finite element method. To validate the reliability of the numerical simulation, the air velocity around the thermoelectric device was measured by a wind speed transmitter. The performance of the temperature-controlled car seat has been validated and is in good agreement with bench tests and real vehicle tests.

  16. The Performance Test on Local Exhaust Ventilation (LEV System to Prevent Chlorine Gas Leakage in Water Treatment Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nor Halim Hasan

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Water is a necessity of life to humans and animals. In Malaysia, Government Link Companies (GLC or Private Companies manages most of the water treatment plants. Chlorine gas is used as one of the water treatment media to treat raw water that will then be distributed for public or commercial usage. The large volume of Chlorine gases used and stored in these treatment plants has the potential to create a disaster if it leaks. Objective of this paper to highlight a result of Local Exhaust Ventilation (LEV monitoring system and their performance test in controlling of air flow from the chlorine gas building to prevent leakage and spread to the surrounding environment. Methodology used follows the American Governmental Industrial Hygienist (ACGIH. The Chlorine Gas leakage system is checked and verified by using ACGIH Standard. Finally as a result, all the measured parameters (velocity, flow rate, face velocity and brake horse power (bhp show that the measurement and monitoring system of LEV are complied with ACGIH Standard and Local Law and Regulations.

  17. Purex canyon exhaust fan bearing temperature monitoring system doric 245 datalogger programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A micro-processor based datalogger is used to monitor, display, and log seventeen RTD temperature channels. Five bearings are monitored for each of the three electric motor-fan assemblies and two bearings are monitored on the steam turbine unit. Several alarms per data channel (a High alarm at 236 degrees and a High High alarm at 246 degrees F) will alert the operation's staff to increasing abnormal bearing temperatures. This procedure is cross-referenced to the manufacturers manual. All programming steps will have the following footnote: Mpg x-xx. The Mpg refers to the Manual page, with x as the section number and xx as the page number in that section. When more information is needed, such as pictures or details, then the manual section and page number is provided

  18. Estimation of current density distribution of PAFC by analysis of cell exhaust gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, S.; Seya, A. [Fuji Electric Co., Ltd., Ichihara-shi (Japan); Asano, A. [Fuji Electric Corporate, Ltd., Yokosuka-shi (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    To estimate distributions of Current densities, voltages, gas concentrations, etc., in phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) stacks, is very important for getting fuel cells with higher quality. In this work, we leave developed a numerical simulation tool to map out the distribution in a PAFC stack. And especially to Study Current density distribution in the reaction area of the cell, we analyzed gas composition in several positions inside a gas outlet manifold of the PAFC stack. Comparing these measured data with calculated data, the current density distribution in a cell plane calculated by the simulation, was certified.

  19. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project.

  20. High temperature gas-cooled reactor: gas turbine application study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-temperature capability of the High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) is a distinguishing characteristic which has long been recognized as significant both within the US and within foreign nuclear energy programs. This high-temperature capability of the HTGR concept leads to increased efficiency in conventional applications and, in addition, makes possible a number of unique applications in both electrical generation and industrial process heat. In particular, coupling the HTGR nuclear heat source to the Brayton (gas turbine) Cycle offers significant potential benefits to operating utilities. This HTGR-GT Application Study documents the effort to evaluate the appropriateness of the HTGR-GT as an HTGR Lead Project. The scope of this effort included evaluation of the HTGR-GT technology, evaluation of potential HTGR-GT markets, assessment of the economics of commercial HTGR-GT plants, and evaluation of the program and expenditures necessary to establish HTGR-GT technology through the completion of the Lead Project

  1. Investigation of exhaust gas NO reduction by thermal nitrogen plasma treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and theoretical investigations on the reduction of nitric oxides in flue gases by thermal nitrogen plasma treatment were carried out at the Steinbeis Transferzentrum - Raumfahrtsysteme (TZ-RS). The feasibility of this technology was experimentally investigated on a small combustor test facility at the Institut fuer Raumfahrtsysteme in Stuttgart. Preliminary experiments have shown that the process works for low oxygen concentrations in the flue gas. Reduction rates of more than 30% have been realized using pure nitrogen as plasma gas. (author)

  2. Analysis Proton Conducting Electrolyte IT-SOFC Hybrid System Exhaust Gas With External Reforming of Biofuel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nizar Amir

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available In this analysis, a hybrid system containing proton SOFC (P-SOFC combine with micro gas turbine (MGT with biofuel external reforming is investigation to decrease the greenhouse gases problem facing in electrical power plant. The hybrid system consist of a proton solid oxide fuel cell stack, a micro gas turbine, a combustor, compressors, heat exchangers and external reformer. The main operating parameter such as, fuel utilization and steam - carbon ratio is determined in this analysis.

  3. Analysis Proton Conducting Electrolyte IT-SOFC Hybrid System Exhaust Gas With External Reforming of Biofuel

    OpenAIRE

    Nizar Amir; I.N.G. Wardana

    2013-01-01

    In this analysis, a hybrid system containing proton SOFC (P-SOFC) combine with micro gas turbine (MGT) with biofuel external reforming is investigation to decrease the greenhouse gases problem facing in electrical power plant. The hybrid system consist of a proton solid oxide fuel cell stack, a micro gas turbine, a combustor, compressors, heat exchangers and external reformer. The main operating parameter such as, fuel utilization and steam - carbon ratio is determined in this analysis.

  4. LDV measurements of mean velocity components and turbulence intensities in supersonic high-temperature exhaust plumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, L.-Y.; Sislian, J. P.

    1993-07-01

    Comprehensive analyses and tests with a two-dimensional LDV system were extensively carried out which made this research possible. The experimental analysis has proved that the effect of multiaxial-mode lasers on the Doppler frequency could be neglected. The LDV system was optimized to reduce various biases and other errors. The mean velocity components and turbulence quantities were carefully measured at ten cross-sections and along the axis for a supersonic high-temperature jet (1200 m/s) with and without a coflowing air; the recirculation region was mapped in detail. Results obtained provide benchmark data for numerical modeling of such flows.

  5. Optical fiber sensor for temperature measurement from 600 to 1900 C in gas turbine engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregay, G. W.; Calabrese, P. R.; Kaplin, P. L.; Finney, M. J.

    1991-01-01

    A temperature sensor system has been fabricated specifically for the harsh environment encountered in temperature measurement on gas turbine engines. Four components comprised the system: a thermally emissive source, a high temperature lightguide, a flexible optical cable and an electro-optic signal processor. The emissive source was located inside a sapphire rod so that the sapphire serves as both a lightguide and as a protective shroud. As the probe was heated, the thermal radiation from the emissive source increased with increasing temperature. The flexible optical cable was constructed with 200 micron core fiber and ruggedized for turbine engine applications. The electro-optic signal processor used the ratio of intensity in two wavelength intervals to determine a digital value of the temperature. The probe tip was operated above 1900 C in a low velocity propane flame and above 1500 C at Mach .37. Probe housings, optical cables, and signal processors were constructed and environmentally tested for the temperature and vibration experienced by turbine engine sensors. This technology was used to build an optical exhaust gas sensor for a General Electric Aircraft Engines F404 turbine. The four optical probes and optical cable were a functional replacement for four thermocouple probes. The system was ground tested for 50 hours with an excess of 1000 thermal cycles. This optical temperature sensor system measured gas temperature up to the operational limit of the turbine engine.

  6. Low-temperature gas from marine shales: wet gas to dry gas over experimental time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarvie Daniel M

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Marine shales exhibit unusual behavior at low temperatures under anoxic gas flow. They generate catalytic gas 300° below thermal cracking temperatures, discontinuously in aperiodic episodes, and lose these properties on exposure to trace amounts of oxygen. Here we report a surprising reversal in hydrocarbon generation. Heavy hydrocarbons are formed before light hydrocarbons resulting in wet gas at the onset of generation grading to dryer gas over time. The effect is moderate under gas flow and substantial in closed reactions. In sequential closed reactions at 100°C, gas from a Cretaceous Mowry shale progresses from predominately heavy hydrocarbons (66% C5, 2% C1 to predominantly light hydrocarbons (56% C1, 8% C5, the opposite of that expected from desorption of preexisting hydrocarbons. Differences in catalyst substrate composition explain these dynamics. Gas flow should carry heavier hydrocarbons to catalytic sites, in contrast to static conditions where catalytic sites are limited to in-place hydrocarbons. In-place hydrocarbons and their products should become lighter with conversion thus generating lighter hydrocarbon over time, consistent with our experimental results. We recognize the similarities between low-temperature gas generation reported here and the natural progression of wet gas to dry gas over geologic time. There is now substantial evidence for natural catalytic activity in source rocks. Natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium and the results reported here add to that evidence. Natural catalysis provides a plausible and unique explanation for the origin and evolution of gas in sedimentary basins.

  7. Exhaust pressure pulsation observation from turbocharger instantaneous speed measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macián, V.; Luján, J. M.; Bermúdez, V.; Guardiola, C.

    2004-06-01

    In internal combustion engines, instantaneous exhaust pressure measurements are difficult to perform in a production environment. The high temperature of the exhaust manifold and its pulsating character make its application to exhaust gas recirculation control algorithms impossible. In this paper an alternative method for estimating the exhaust pressure pulsation is presented. A numerical model is built which enables the exhaust pressure pulses to be predicted from instantaneous turbocharger speed measurements. Although the model is data based, a theoretical description of the process is also provided. This combined approach makes it possible to export the model for different engine operating points. Also, compressor contribution in the turbocharger speed pulsation is discussed extensively. The compressor contribution is initially neglected, and effects of this simplified approach are analysed.

  8. Study on Thermal Conductivity Gas Sensor Constant Temperature Detection Method

    OpenAIRE

    Xi-bo Ding; Xiao-yan Guo; Yue-chao Chen; Xue Sun; Zhao-xia Li

    2013-01-01

    The thermal conductivity gas sensor can detect gas concentration that measure the thermal conductivity coefficient of the measured gas different from the background gas.This paper analyzes the theory of thermal conductivity gas sensor and method of measurement,proposes thermal conductivity gas sensor constant temperature detection method,and experimentally validate the feasibility of ambient temperature compensation. Experimental results show that the method effectively reduces the effect of ...

  9. Modelling diesel engines with a variable-geometry turbocharger and exhaust gas recirculation by optimization of model parameters for capturing non-linear system dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Wahlström, Johan; Eriksson, Lars

    2011-01-01

    A mean-value model of a diesel engine with a variable-geometry turbocharger (VGT) and exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) is developed, parameterized, and validated. The intended model applications are system analysis, simulation, and development of model-based control systems. The goal is to construct a model that describes the gas flow dynamics including the dynamics in the manifold pressures, turbocharger, EGR, and actuators with few states in order to obtain short simulation times. An investi...

  10. Development of High Temperature Gas Sensor Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.; Chen, Liang-Yu; Neudeck, Philip G.; Knight, Dak; Liu, Chung-Chiun; Wu, Quing-Hai; Zhou, Huan-Jun

    1997-01-01

    The measurement of engine emissions is important for their monitoring and control. However, the ability to measure these emissions in-situ is limited. We are developing a family of high temperature gas sensors which are intended to operate in harsh environments such as those in an engine. The development of these sensors is based on progress in two types of technology: (1) The development of SiC-based semiconductor technology; and (2) Improvements in micromachining and microfabrication technology. These technologies are being used to develop point-contact sensors to measure gases which are important in emission control especially hydrogen, hydrocarbons, nitrogen oxides, and oxygen. The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development of this point-contact sensor technology. The detection of each type of gas involves its own challenges in the fields of materials science and fabrication technology. Of particular importance is sensor sensitivity, selectivity, and stability in long-term, high temperature operation. An overview is presented of each sensor type with an evaluation of its stage of development. It is concluded that this technology has significant potential for use in engine applications but further development is necessary.

  11. Process for separating krypton from a radioactive exhaust gas mixture, and gas separating unit to carry out the process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear fuels reprocessing radioactive waste gases in the form of krypton and xenon are produced. These nuclides are separated in the carrier gas flow from CO2, NOsub(x), hydrocarbons and water vapour, cooled down, liquefied, and separated using liquid nitrogen. The radioactive krypton is then separated from the carrier gas by leading it through activated carbon. (TK)

  12. Development of high temperature metallic melting processes related to detritiation of exhausted control rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dworschak, H.; Mannone, F.; Modica, G. [Commission of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy). Joint Research Centre; Nannicini, R. [Anima Unione Costruttori di Caldareria, Milan (Italy)

    1994-05-01

    A rather critical problem to be faced in developing a safe strategy for the management of tritiated solid wastes is dealing with the outgassing property of tritium. Releases of tritium under elemental or oxide form may occur from waste items at different temperatures and rates depending upon the nature of tritium bonds into the waste matrix as well as on its `contamination history`. Apart from the commercial value of tritium, its release from waste packages anyhow represents a risk of tritium exposure that cannot be accepted by skippers, by store and disposal site operators as well as by the general public. Consequently it is mandatory to carry out the detritiation of such wastes before their packaging and storage or disposal. In the boron carbide control rods from the Lingen BWR after about three years of operation, tritium generated by neutron reaction was essentially retained in the B{sub 4}C matrix. The objectives of the study are to demonstrate the feasibility of two processes aimed at reducing to the maximum practicable extent the level of tritium contamination in such waste management are facilitated.

  13. Development of high temperature metallic melting processes related to detritiation of exhausted control rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rather critical problem to be faced in developing a safe strategy for the management of tritiated solid wastes is dealing with the outgassing property of tritium. Releases of tritium under elemental or oxide form may occur from waste items at different temperatures and rates depending upon the nature of tritium bonds into the waste matrix as well as on its 'contamination history'. Apart from the commercial value of tritium, its release from waste packages anyhow represents a risk of tritium exposure that cannot be accepted by skippers, by store and disposal site operators as well as by the general public. Consequently it is mandatory to carry out the detritiation of such wastes before their packaging and storage or disposal. In the boron carbide control rods from the Lingen BWR after about three years of operation, tritium generated by neutron reaction was essentially retained in the B4C matrix. The objectives of the study are to demonstrate the feasibility of two processes aimed at reducing to the maximum practicable extent the level of tritium contamination in such waste management are facilitated

  14. 78 FR 63015 - Exhaust Emissions Standards for New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines and Identification Plate for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... kilonewtons (kN) (76 FR 45012). The EPA also proposed adopting the gas turbine engine test procedures of the... 18, 2012 (77 FR 36342), and was effective July 18, 2012. On December 31, 2012, the FAA published a final rule with a request for comments (77 FR 76842) adopting the EPA's new emissions standards in...

  15. METHANE EMISSIONS FROM THE NATURAL GAS INDUSTRY VOLUME 11: COMPRESSOR DRIVER EXHAUST

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 15-volume report summarizes the results of a comprehensive program to quantify methane (CH4) emissions from the U.S. natural gas industry for the base year. The objective was to determine CH4 emissions from the wellhead and ending downstream at the customer's meter. The accur...

  16. Fuel-air mixing apparatus for reducing gas turbine combustor exhaust emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zupanc, Frank J. (Inventor); Yankowich, Paul R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A fuel-air mixer for use in a combustion chamber of a gas turbine engine is provided. The fuel air mixing apparatus comprises an annular fuel injector having a plurality of discrete plain jet orifices, a first swirler wherein the first swirler is located upstream from the fuel injector and a second swirler wherein the second swirler is located downstream from the fuel injector. The plurality of discrete plain jet orifices are situated between the highly swirling airstreams generated by the two radial swirlers. The distributed injection of the fuel between two highly swirling airstreams results in rapid and effective mixing to the desired fuel-air ratio and prevents the formation of local hot spots in the combustor primary zone. A combustor and a gas turbine engine comprising the fuel-air mixer of the present invention are also provided as well as a method using the fuel-air mixer of the present invention.

  17. Development of a catalytic water gas shift reactor for fusion fuel exhaust streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic reactors based on the water gas shift reaction were designed, built and tested to provide data for the design of a prototype reactor as an alternative to the uranium hot metal beds in a Fusion Fuel Clean Up (FCU) system. The reactor was designed so it could be implemented into a FCU using only existing technology. A closed loop system was chosen so that safety and net efficiency would not be compromised during upset conditions. The system uses only pure reactants thus eliminating the requirement for a carrier gas. The prototype reactor contains only 10 g of catalyst and is expected to last at least five years. The reactor is small and operates at about490 K. It will convert water to hydrogen, at a CO/H2O ratio of 1.5 with greater than 98% efficiency and with an estimated 95% efficiency for a tritiated stream of 90,000 Ci/day

  18. Flow characteristics in the exhaust of a pulsed megawatt gas fed arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michels, C. J.; York, T. M.

    1973-01-01

    The transient flow generated by a pulsed, megawatt-level, gas-fed arc with an applied magnetic nozzle has been examined with a new design piezoelectric pressure transducer. Sensor thermal conduction and accelerations have been examined and eliminated in the 500 microsec period of plasma flow. Existence of a large magnitude cold gas pressure front of 20 microsec duration has been reconfirmed and its relationship to the following plasma flow of about 200 microsec duration has been examined for the first time. At a point 30 cm from the arc source, initially near vacuum conditions (typically with an arc current of 11.2 kA and 1 tesla applied magnetic field), a pressure pulse of unionized gas with a magnitude of 10,000 N/sq m is followed by plasma flows with nearly constant impact pressure of 1000 N/sq m. Pressure and number density in this plasma region are seen to decrease with applied magnetic field strength.

  19. Electrochemical high-temperature gas sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saruhan, B.; Stranzenbach, M.; Yüce, A.; Gönüllü, Y.

    2012-06-01

    Combustion produced common air pollutant, NOx associates with greenhouse effects. Its high temperature detection is essential for protection of nature. Component-integration capable high-temperature sensors enable the control of combustion products. The requirements are quantitative detection of total NOx and high selectivity at temperatures above 500°C. This study reports various approaches to detect NO and NO2 selectively under lean and humid conditions at temperatures from 300°C to 800°C. All tested electrochemical sensors were fabricated in planar design to enable componentintegration. We suggest first an impedance-metric gas sensor for total NOx-detection consisting of NiO- or NiCr2O4-SE and PYSZ-electrolyte. The electrolyte-layer is about 200?m thickness and constructed of quasi-single crystalline columns. The sensing-electrode (SE) is magnetron sputtered thin-layers of NiO or NiCr2O4. Sensor sensitivity for detection of total NOx has been measured by applying impedance analysis. The cross-sensitivity to other emission gases such as CO, CO2, CH4 and oxygen (5 vol.%) has been determined under 0-1000ppm NO. Sensor maintains its high sensitivity at temperatures up to 550°C and 600°C, depending on the sensing-electrode. NiO-SE yields better selectivity to NO in the presence of oxygen and have shorter response times comparing to NiCr2O4-SE. For higher temperature NO2-sensing capability, a resistive DC-sensor having Al-doped TiO2-sensing layers has been employed. Sensor-sensitivity towards NO2 and cross-sensitivity to CO has been determined in the presence of H2O at temperatures 600°C and 800°C. NO2 concentrations varying from 25 to 100ppm and CO concentrations from 25 to 75ppm can be detected. By nano-tubular structuring of TiO2, NO2 sensitivity of the sensor was increased.

  20. Exhaust Emission Characteristics of Diesel Engine Operating on Biodiesel and its Blends at Elevated Temperature of Air

    OpenAIRE

    K.Sureshkumar; *, K.Muralidharan

    2014-01-01

    In this study, performance and exhaust emission characteristics of Pongamia Pinnata oil blends (B10,B20,B30 and B50) with mineral diesel were investigated in preheated intake air conditions in a single cylinder 4-Stroke direct injection CI engine at 75 % maximum load and its rated engine speed 1500 rpm. Two types of heat exchanger designed to preheat the suction air and the heating is accomplished by both engine cooling water and exhaust gases. Two types of heat exchanger incl...

  1. La-Ce-Co perovskites as catalysts for exhaust gas depollution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forni, L.; Oliva, C.; Vatti, F.P. [Dipartimento di Chimica Fisica ed Elettrochimica, Universita di Milano, Milan (Italy); Kandala, M.A.; Ezerets, A.M.; Vishniakov, A.V. [D.I. Mendeleev University of Chemical Technology of Russia, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1996-01-18

    A series of La{sub 1}-xCe{sub x}CoO{sub 3}+{delta} perovskite-type catalysts, with x ranging from 0 to 0.20, showed to be quite active for reduction of NO by CO (reaction 1) and for oxidation of CO by air oxygen (reaction 2) at temperatures ranging from 373 to 723 K. Analysis by X-ray diffraction, electron probe microanalysis, temperature-programmed desorption-temperature-programmed reaction and electron paramagnetic resonance, coupled with catalytic activity data, showed that the active sites on these catalysts are very likely localised onto Co ions, which coordinate O{sup -}{sub 2} ions as intermediates for reaction 2, the latter taking place essentially through a suprafacial mechanism. For reaction 1, taking place through both a suprafacial and an intrafacial mechanism, the Co-based sites play also an additional role, favouring the electron transfer from site to site and so enhancing the transfer of oxygen species from surface to bulk and vice versa. Ce ions seem to act only as a stabiliser of O{sup -}{sub 2} ions, helping in keeping them at the catalyst surface

  2. High temperature coatings for gas turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiaoci Maggie

    2003-10-21

    Coating for high temperature gas turbine components that include a MCrAlX phase, and an aluminum-rich phase, significantly increase oxidation and cracking resistance of the components, thereby increasing their useful life and reducing operating costs. The aluminum-rich phase includes aluminum at a higher concentration than aluminum concentration in the MCrAlX alloy, and an aluminum diffusion-retarding composition, which may include cobalt, nickel, yttrium, zirconium, niobium, molybdenum, rhodium, cadmium, indium, cerium, iron, chromium, tantalum, silicon, boron, carbon, titanium, tungsten, rhenium, platinum, and combinations thereof, and particularly nickel and/or rhenium. The aluminum-rich phase may be derived from a particulate aluminum composite that has a core comprising aluminum and a shell comprising the aluminum diffusion-retarding composition.

  3. Tokamak fusion reactor exhaust

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents a compilation of papers dealing with reactor exhaust which were produced as part of the TIGER Tokamak Installation for Generating Electricity study at Culham. The papers are entitled: (1) Exhaust impurity control and refuelling. (2) Consideration of the physical problems of a self-consistent exhaust and divertor system for a long burn Tokamak. (3) Possible bundle divertors for INTOR and TIGER. (4) Consideration of various magnetic divertor configurations for INTOR and TIGER. (5) A appraisal of divertor experiments. (6) Hybrid divertors on INTOR. (7) Refuelling and the scrape-off layer of INTOR. (8) Simple modelling of the scrape-off layer. (9) Power flow in the scrape-off layer. (10) A model of particle transport within the scrape-off plasma and divertor. (11) Controlled recirculation of exhaust gas from the divertor into the scrape-off plasma. (U.K.)

  4. High-Performance Silicon-Germanium-Based Thermoelectric Modules for Gas Exhaust Energy Scavenging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanjek, K.; Vesin, S.; Aixala, L.; Baffie, T.; Bernard-Granger, G.; Dufourcq, J.

    2015-06-01

    Some of the energy used in transportation and industry is lost as heat, often at high-temperatures, during conversion processes. Thermoelectricity enables direct conversion of heat into electricity, and is an alternative to the waste-heat-recovery technology currently used, for example turbines and other types of thermodynamic cycling. The performance of thermoelectric (TE) materials and modules has improved continuously in recent decades. In the high-temperature range ( T hot side > 500°C), silicon-germanium (SiGe) alloys are among the best TE materials reported in the literature. These materials are based on non-toxic elements. The Thermoelectrics Laboratory at CEA (Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives) has synthesized n and p-type SiGe pellets, manufactured TE modules, and integrated these into thermoelectric generators (TEG) which were tested on a dedicated bench with hot air as the source of heat. SiGe TE samples of diameter 60 mm were created by spark-plasma sintering. For n-type SiGe doped with phosphorus the peak thermoelectric figure of merit reached ZT = 1.0 at 700°C whereas for p-type SiGe doped with boron the peak was ZT = 0.75 at 700°C. Thus, state-of-the-art conversion efficiency was obtained while also achieving higher production throughput capacity than for competing processes. A standard deviation 3.6 W. An air-water heat exchanger was developed and 30 TE modules were clamped and connected electrically. The TEG was tested under vacuum on a hot-air test bench. The measured output power was 45 W for an air flow of 16 g/s at 750°C. The hot surface of the TE module reached 550°C under these conditions. Silicon-germanium TE modules can survive such temperatures, in contrast with commercial modules based on bismuth telluride, which are limited to 400°C.

  5. Photochemical transformation of aircraft exhausts at their transition from the plume to the large scale dispersion in the Northern temperature belt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karol, I.L.; Kiselev, A.A. [Main Geophysical Observatory, St.Petersburg (Russian Federation)

    1997-12-31

    The 2-D diurnally varying photochemical model of the Northern temperate zonal tropospheric belt with fixed (off line) temperature and air transport is used for the description of the formation of aircraft exhaust concentration distribution in the North Atlantic commercial flight corridor, based on actual flights in summer and winter. A strong diurnal and seasonal variation of emitted NO{sub x} oxidation rate is revealed and evaluated. (author) 11 refs.

  6. Radon and Thoron Measured in Petrol and Gas-oil Exhaust Fumes by Using CR-39 and LR-115 II Nuclear Track Detectors: Radiation Doses to the Respiratory Tract of Mechanic Workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misdaq, M A; Chaouqi, A; Ouguidi, J; Touti, R; Mortassim, A

    2015-06-01

    Mechanic workers are exposed to exhaust fumes when controlling vehicle engines in motion inside repair shops. To assess radiation doses due to radon short-lived progeny from the inhalation of exhaust fumes by mechanic workers, concentrations of these radionuclides were measured in petrol (gasoline) and gas-oil exhaust fumes by evaluating mean critical angles of etching of the CR-39 and LR-115 type II SSNTDs for alpha particles emitted by the radon and thoron decay series. Committed effective doses due to ²¹?Po and ²¹?Po short-lived radon decay products from the inhalation of petrol and gas-oil exhaust fumes by workers were evaluated. A maximum value of 1.35 mSv y?¹ due to radon short-lived decay products from the inhalation of gas-oil exhaust fumes by mechanic workers was found, which is lower than the (3-10 mSv y?¹) dose limit interval for workers. PMID:25905520

  7. Mean gas opacity for circumstellar environments and equilibrium temperature degeneracy

    CERN Document Server

    Malygin, M G; Klahr, H; Dullemond, C P; Henning, Th

    2014-01-01

    In a molecular cloud dust opacity typically dominates over gas opacity, yet in the vicinities of forming stars dust is depleted, and gas is the sole provider of opacity. In the optically thin circumstellar environments the radiation temperature cannot be assumed to be equal to the gas temperature, hence the two-temperature Planck means are necessary to calculate the radiative equilibrium. By using the two-temperature mean opacity one does obtain the proper equilibrium gas temperature in a circumstellar environment, which is in a chemical equilibrium. A careful consideration of a radiative transfer problem reveals that the equilibrium temperature solution can be degenerate in an optically thin gaseous environment. We compute mean gas opacities based on the publicly available code DFSYNTHE by Kurucz and Castelli. We performed the calculations assuming local thermodynamic equilibrium and an ideal gas equation of state. The values were derived by direct integration of the high-resolution opacity spectrum. We prod...

  8. A car air-conditioning system based on an absorption refrigeration cycle using energy from exhaust gas of an internal combustion engine

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    G, Vicatos; J, Gryzagoridis; S, Wang.

    Full Text Available Energy from the exhaust gas of an internal combustion engine is used to power an absorption refrigeration system to air-condition an ordinary passenger car. The theoretical design is verified by a unit that is tested under both laboratory and road-test conditions. For the latter, the unit is install [...] ed in a Nissan 1400 truck and the results indicate a successful prototype and encouraging prospects for future development.

  9. Comparative Design Study of a Diesel Exhaust Gas Heat Exchanger for Truck Applications with Conventional and State of the Art Heat Transfer Enhancements

    OpenAIRE

    Mavridou, S.; Mavropoulos, G.C.; Bouris, D.; Hountalas, D.T.; Bergeles, G.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The exhaust gas of heavy duty diesel engines can provide an important heat source that may be used in a number of ways to provide additional power and improve overall engine efficiency. The sizing of a heat exchanger that can manage the heat load and still be of reasonable size and weight without excessive pressure drop is of significant importance especially for truck applications. This is the subject of the present work. To approach the problem, a total of five different...

  10. 14 CFR 34.21 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standards for exhaust emissions. 34.21... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.21 Standards for exhaust emissions. (a) Exhaust emissions...

  11. 14 CFR 34.31 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standards for exhaust emissions. 34.31... FUEL VENTING AND EXHAUST EMISSION REQUIREMENTS FOR TURBINE ENGINE POWERED AIRPLANES Exhaust Emissions (In-use Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 34.31 Standards for exhaust emissions. (a) Exhaust...

  12. Deactivation of Pd Catalysts by Water during Low Temperature Methane Oxidation Relevant to Natural Gas Vehicle Converters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahman Gholami

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Effects of H2O on the activity and deactivation of Pd catalysts used for the oxidation of unburned CH4 present in the exhaust gas of natural-gas vehicles (NGVs are reviewed. CH4 oxidation in a catalytic converter is limited by low exhaust gas temperatures (500–550 °C and low concentrations of CH4 (400–1500 ppmv that must be reacted in the presence of large quantities of H2O (10–15% and CO2 (15%, under transient exhaust gas flows, temperatures, and compositions. Although Pd catalysts have the highest known activity for CH4 oxidation, water-induced sintering and reaction inhibition by H2O deactivate these catalysts. Recent studies have shown the reversible inhibition by H2O adsorption causes a significant drop in catalyst activity at lower reaction temperatures (below 450 °C, but its effect decreases (water adsorption becomes more reversible with increasing reaction temperature. Thus above 500 °C H2O inhibition is negligible, while Pd sintering and occlusion by support species become more important. H2O inhibition is postulated to occur by either formation of relatively stable Pd(OH2 and/or partial blocking by OH groups of the O exchange between the support and Pd active sites thereby suppressing catalytic activity. Evidence from FTIR and isotopic labeling favors the latter route. Pd catalyst design, including incorporation of a second noble metal (Rh or Pt and supports high O mobility (e.g., CeO2 are known to improve catalyst activity and stability. Kinetic studies of CH4 oxidation at conditions relevant to natural gas vehicles have quantified the thermodynamics and kinetics of competitive H2O adsorption and Pd(OH2 formation, but none have addressed effects of H2O on O mobility.

  13. Determination of benzene in exhaust gas from biofuels. Final report; Bestimmung von Benzol im Abgas von Biokraftstoffen. Abschlussbericht

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutz, M.; Buenger, J.; Gnuschke, H.; Halboth, H.; Gruedl, P.; Krahl, J.

    2001-10-01

    With the advance of environmental legislation and practices oriented towards sustainability renewable energy resources are becoming increasingly important. Use of replenishable raw materials helps preserve fossil resources. In the fuel sector the most widely used replenishable materials are rape methyl ester (RME) and ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE). The purpose of the present project on the ''Determination of benzene in exhaust gas from biofuels'' was to generate orienting data on the potential health relevance of mixtures of fossil and renewable fuel intended for use in spark ignition and diesel engines. This included a determination of benzene emissions and the mutagenicity of particles. Beyond the applied-for scope of research measurements were also performed on the test engine's toluene, ethyl benzene and xylene emissions as well as on the smoke spot number and nitrogen oxide (NO{sub x}) and hydrocarbon (HC) emissions of the diesel engine. [German] Regenerative Energien gewinnen durch die Umweltgesetzgebungen und das Streben nach einer nachhaltigen Entwicklung zunehmend an Bedeutung. Durch die Verwendung nachwachsender Rohstoffe koennen die fossilen Ressourcen geschont werden. Im Kraftstoffsektor sind hier hauptsaechlich Rapsoelmethylester (RME) und optional Ethyltertiaerbutylether (ETBE) zu nennen. Um fuer Diesel- und Ottomotoren insbesondere mit Blick auf Kraftstoffgemische aus fossilen und regenerativen Komponenten orientierende Daten ueber eine potenzielle Gesundheitsrelevanz zu generieren, wurde das Projekt 'Bestimmung von Benzol im Abgas von Biokraftstoffen' durchgefuehrt. Neben der Benzolemission wurde die Mutagenitaet der Partikeln ermittelt. Ueber den beantragten Untersuchungsrahmen hinaus wurden die Tuluol-, Ethylbenzol-, und Xylolemissionen der eingesetzten Motoren, sowie die Russzahl (RZ) und die Stickoxid- (NO{sub x}) und Kohlenwasserstoffemissionen (HC) des Dieselmotors bestimmt. (orig.)

  14. Controlling exhaust gas recirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurlo, James Richard (Madison, WI); Konkle, Kevin Paul (West Bend, WI); May, Andrew (Milwaukee, WI)

    2012-01-31

    In controlling an engine, an amount of an intake charge provided, during operation of the engine, to a combustion chamber of the engine is determined. The intake charge includes an air component, a fuel component and a diluent component. An amount of the air component of the intake charge is determined. An amount of the diluent component of the intake charge is determined utilizing the amount of the intake charge, the amount of the air component and, in some instances, the amount of the fuel component. An amount of a diluent supplied to the intake charge is adjusted based at least in part on the determined amount of diluent component of the intake charge.

  15. Measured gas and particle temperatures in VTT's entrained flow reactor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, SØnnik; SØrensen, L.H.

    2006-01-01

    Particle and gas temperature measurements were carried out in experiments on VTTs entrained flow reactor with 5% and 10% oxygen using Fourier transform infrared emission spectroscopy (FTIR). Particle temperature measurements were performed on polish coal,bark, wood, straw particles, and bark and wood particles treated with additive. A two-color technique with subtraction of the background light was used to estimate particle temperatures during experiments. A transmission-emission technique was used tomeasure the gas temperature in the reactor tube. Gas temperature measurements were in good agreement with thermocouple readings. Gas lines and bands from CO, CO2 and H2O can be observed in the spectra. CO was only observed at the first measuring port (100ms) with the strongest CO-signal seen during experiments with straw particles. Variations in gas concentration (CO2 and H2O) and the signal from solid particles reflects variations in particle feeding rates during the experiments.

  16. Effect of cooling the recirculated exhaust gases on diesel engine emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although combustion is essential in most energy generation processes, it is one of the major causes of air pollution. Spiral fin exhaust pipes were designed to study the effect of cooling the recirculated exhaust gases (EGR) of Diesel engines on the chemical composition of the exhaust gases and the reduction in the percentages of pollutant emissions. The gases examined in this study were oxides of nitrogen (NOx), carbon dioxide (CO2) and carbon monoxide (CO). In addition, O2 concentration in the exhaust was measured. The two designs adopted in this study were exhaust pipes with solid and hollow fins around them. The first type uses air flow around the fins to cool the exhaust gases. The second type consists of hollow fins around the exhaust pipe to allow cooling water to flow in the hollow passage. Different combinations and arrangements of the solid and hollow fins exhaust pipes were used. It was found that decreasing the temperature of the EGR resulted in reductions in the oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and carbon dioxide (CO2) but increased the carbon monoxide (CO) in the exhaust gases. In addition, the oxygen (O2) concentration in the exhaust was decreased. As a general trend, the percentages of reduction in the NOx gas concentrations were lower than the percentages of increase in the CO emissions as a result of cooling the EGR of a Diesel engine by a heat exchanger. Using water as a cooling medium decreased the exhaust gases temperature and the amount of pollutants more than did air as a cooling medium. In a separate series of tests, increasing the cooled EGR ratios decreased the exhaust NOx but increased the particulate matter concentrations in the exhaust gases

  17. Controlling automotive exhaust emissions: successes and underlying science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twigg, Martyn V

    2005-04-15

    Photochemical reactions of vehicle exhaust pollutants were responsible for photochemical smog in many cities during the 1960s and 1970s. Engine improvements helped, but additional measures were needed to achieve legislated emissions levels. First oxidation catalysts lowered hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide, and later nitrogen oxides were reduced to nitrogen in a two-stage process. By the 1980s, exhaust gas could be kept stoichiometric and hydrocarbons, carbon monoxide and nitrogen oxides were simultaneously converted over a single 'three-way catalyst'. Today, advanced three-way catalyst systems emissions are exceptionally low. NOx control from lean-burn engines demands an additional approach because NO cannot be dissociated under lean conditions. Current lean-burn gasoline engine NOx control involves forming a nitrate phase and periodically enriching the exhaust to reduce it to nitrogen, and this is being modified for use on diesel engines. Selective catalytic reduction with ammonia is an alternative that can be very efficient, but it requires ammonia or a compound from which it can be obtained. Diesel engines produce particulate matter, and, because of health concerns, filtration processes are being introduced to control these emissions. On heavy duty diesel engines the exhaust gas temperature is high enough for NO in the exhaust to be oxidised over a catalyst to NO2 that smoothly oxidises particulate material (PM) in the filter. Passenger cars operate at lower temperatures, and it is necessary to periodically burn the PM in air at high temperatures. PMID:15901550

  18. Temperature detection in a gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lacy, Benjamin; Kraemer, Gilbert; Stevenson, Christian

    2012-12-18

    A temperature detector includes a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal. The first metal includes a plurality of wires and the second metal includes a wire. The plurality of wires of the first metal are connected to the wire of the second metal in parallel junctions. Another temperature detector includes a plurality of resistance temperature detectors. The plurality of resistance temperature detectors are connected at a plurality of junctions. A method of detecting a temperature change of a component of a turbine includes providing a temperature detector include ing a first metal and a second metal different from the first metal connected to each other at a plurality of junctions in contact with the component; and detecting any voltage change at any junction.

  19. Thermoelectric generators incorporating phase-change materials for waste heat recovery from engine exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meisner, Gregory P; Yang, Jihui

    2014-02-11

    Thermoelectric devices, intended for placement in the exhaust of a hydrocarbon fuelled combustion device and particularly suited for use in the exhaust gas stream of an internal combustion engine propelling a vehicle, are described. Exhaust gas passing through the device is in thermal communication with one side of a thermoelectric module while the other side of the thermoelectric module is in thermal communication with a lower temperature environment. The heat extracted from the exhaust gasses is converted to electrical energy by the thermoelectric module. The performance of the generator is enhanced by thermally coupling the hot and cold junctions of the thermoelectric modules to phase-change materials which transform at a temperature compatible with the preferred operating temperatures of the thermoelectric modules. In a second embodiment, a plurality of thermoelectric modules, each with a preferred operating temperature and each with a uniquely-matched phase-change material may be used to compensate for the progressive lowering of the exhaust gas temperature as it traverses the length of the exhaust pipe.

  20. Effects of inlet distortion on gas turbine combustion chamber exit temperature profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqsood, Omar Shahzada

    Damage to a nozzle guide vane or blade, caused by non-uniform temperature distributions at the combustion chamber exit, is deleterious to turbine performance and can lead to expensive and time consuming overhaul and repair. A test rig was designed and constructed for the Allison 250-C20B combustion chamber to investigate the effects of inlet air distortion on the combustion chamber's exit temperature fields. The rig made use of the engine's diffuser tubes, combustion case, combustion liner, and first stage nozzle guide vane shield. Rig operating conditions simulated engine cruise conditions, matching the quasi-non-dimensional Mach number, equivalence ratio and Sauter mean diameter. The combustion chamber was tested with an even distribution of inlet air and a 4% difference in airflow at either side. An even distribution of inlet air to the combustion chamber did not create a uniform temperature profile and varying the inlet distribution of air exacerbated the profile's non-uniformity. The design of the combustion liner promoted the formation of an oval-shaped toroidal vortex inside the chamber, creating localized hot and cool sections separated by 90° that appeared in the exhaust. Uneven inlet air distributions skewed the oval vortex, increasing the temperature of the hot section nearest the side with the most mass flow rate and decreasing the temperature of the hot section on the opposite side. Keywords: Allison 250, Combustion, Dual-Entry, Exit Temperature Profile, Gas Turbine, Pattern Factor, Reverse Flow.

  1. Swirl and blade wakes in the interaction between gas turbines and exhaust diffusers investigated by endoscopic particle image velocimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Opilat, Victor

    2011-10-21

    Exhaust diffusers studied in this thesis are installed behind the last turbine stage of gas turbines, including those used in combined cycle power plants. Extensive research made in recent years proved that effects caused by an upstream turbine need to be taken into account when designing efficient diffusers. Under certain conditions these effects can stabilize the boundary layer in diffusers and prevent separation. In this research the impact of multiple parameters, such as tip leakage flow, swirl, and rotating blade wakes, on the performance of a diffuser is studied. Experiments were conducted using a diffuser test rig with a rotating bladed wheel as a turbine effect generator and with an additional tip leakage flow insert. The major advantages of this test rig are modularity and easy variation of the main parameters. To capture the complexity and understand the physics of diffuser flow, and to clarify the phenomenon of the flow stabilisation, the 2D endoscopic laser optical measurement technique Partide Image Velocimetry (PIV) was adopted to the closed ''rotating'' diffuser test rig. Intensity and distribution of vortices in the blade tip area are decisive for diffuser performance. Large vortices in the annular diffuser inlet behind the blade tips interact with the boundary layer in diffusers. At design point these vortices are very early suppressed by the main flow. For the operating point with a low value of the flow coefficient (negative swirl), vortices are ab out two tim es stronger than for design point and the boundary layer is destabilized. V mtices develop in the direction contrary to swirl in the main flow and just cause flow destabilization. Coherent back flow zones are induced and reduction of diffuser performance occurs. For the operating point with positive swirl (for a high flow coefficient value), these vortices are also strong but do not counteract the main flow because they develop in the same direction with the swirl in the main flow. Pressure recovery in the annular diffuser is even high er than for design point because vortices energize the boundary layer and the turbulence level in the core flow is very high. Turbulent energy is better transported to the peripheral zones of the channel by the swirled flow. A small positive swirl angle in the inlet flow (behind the rotating bladed wheel in experiments) has a stabilizing effect on the diffuser, while negative swirl decreases its performance. This occurs due to change in the development of vertical structures downstream of the rotor blade tip area. The tip leakage flow from the last turbine stage positively affects pressure recovery in the diffuser energizing the boundary layer. Comparison of results for different diffuser test rig configurations with results from a more gas turbine-like test rig with a similar diffuser and a scaled turbine stage model and for higher Mach numbers showed similar pressure recovery trends, verifying the results.

  2. Isolating Gas Sensor From Pressure And Temperature Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprinkle, Danny R.; Chen, Tony T. D.; Chaturvedi, Sushi K.

    1994-01-01

    Two-stage flow system enables oxygen sensor in system to measure oxygen content of low-pressure, possibly-high-temperature atmosphere in test environment while protecting sensor against possibly high temperature and fluctuations in pressure of atmosphere. Sensor for which flow system designed is zirconium oxide oxygen sensor sampling atmospheres in high-temperature wind tunnels. Also adapted to other gas-analysis instruments that must be isolated from pressure and temperature effects of test environments.

  3. Studi Experimental Penggunaan Venturi Scrubber dan Cyclonic Separator Untuk Meningkatkan Kinerja pada Sistem Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR dalam Menurunkan NOX pada Motor Diesel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samsu Dlukha N

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Salah satu cara yang efektif untuk mengurangi NOX adalah dengan menggunakan metode Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR. Dengan metode EGR, oksigen yang masuk ke ruang bakar akan berkurang sehingga NOX dapat diturunkan dengan signifikan, akan tetapi power dari mesin tersebut juga akan berkurang dan Particulate Matter (PM akan naik secara signifikan. Dalam penelitian ini dibahas penggunaan EGR yang telah di optimalkan dengan penambahan venturi scrubber dan cyclonic separator, tujuannya mengurangi NOX tanpa meningkatkan PM. Hasil pengujian menunjukkan NOX turun sebesar 48.89% dan PM turun dari 69,87%  menjadi 9.87%.

  4. Analysis and improvement of gas turbine blade temperature measurement error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi; Daniel, Ketui

    2015-10-01

    Gas turbine blade components are easily damaged; they also operate in harsh high-temperature, high-pressure environments over extended durations. Therefore, ensuring that the blade temperature remains within the design limits is very important. In this study, measurement errors in turbine blade temperatures were analyzed, taking into account detector lens contamination, the reflection of environmental energy from the target surface, the effects of the combustion gas, and the emissivity of the blade surface. In this paper, each of the above sources of measurement error is discussed, and an iterative computing method for calculating blade temperature is proposed.

  5. Fuel arrangement for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disclosed is a fuel arrangement for a high temperature gas cooled reactor including fuel assemblies with separate directly cooled fissile and fertile fuel elements removably inserted in an elongated moderator block also having a passageway for control elements

  6. Nitrogen charge temperature prediction in a gas lift valve

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Marcelo M., Ganzarolli; Carlos A. C., Altemani.

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The operation of a class of retrievable gas-lift valves (GLV) is controlled by the axial movement of a bellows. One force acting on the bellows is due to the pressure exerted by the nitrogen gas contained in the GLV dome. It depends on the nitrogen temperature, which is influenced by both the produc [...] tion fluid and the injection gas temperatures in the well. This work investigated this dependence for a GLV installed in a side pocket mandrel tube. Three independent procedures were used for this purpose, comprising a compact thermal model, an experimental investigation with a thermal mockup and a numerical analysis. From these, a correlation for the nitrogen temperature was proposed, based on the local production fluid and injection gas temperatures, and on their convective coefficients with the mandrel tube surfaces.

  7. The gas temperature in the surface layers of protoplanetary disks

    OpenAIRE

    Kamp, I van; Dullemond, C. P.

    2004-01-01

    Models for the structure of protoplanetary disks have so far been based on the assumption that the gas and the dust temperature are equal. The gas temperature, an essential ingredient in the equations of hydrostatic equilibrium of the disk, is then determined from a continuum radiative transfer calculation, in which the continuum opacity is provided by the dust. It has been long debated whether this assumption still holds in the surface layers of the disk, where the dust inf...

  8. Metal oxide gas sensors upon various temperature-induced profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwi?d?, Patryk; Brudnik, Andrzej; Zakrzewska, Katarzyna

    2014-08-01

    This paper presents how an array of sensors with different sensitivities to gases can be applied for detection of hydrogen in the presence of humidity when operated upon various temperature - induced profiles. The sensors in the array are subject to temperature modulation over the range of 350 - 500°C. Temperature profiles are based on a cardinal sine as well as Meyer wavelet phi and psi functions. Changes in the sensor operating temperature lead to distinct resistance patterns of the sensors depending on gas concentration. The sensors responses are studied as a function of target gas concentration (0 - 3000 ppm) and relative humidity level (0 - 75%Rh). Feedforward back-propagation neural networks are used in order to facilitate gas concentration and humidity level prediction. The results show reliable hydrogen detection upon temperature modulation and a reduction of the total power consumption.

  9. Biomass Gasification and High Temperature Gas Cleaning.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejdová, Petra; Solich, M.; Vosecký, Martin; Malecha, J.; Koutský, B.; Pun?ochá?, Miroslav; Skoblia, Sergej

    - : -, 2005, s. 221-224. ISBN 80-8073-382-1. [New Trends in Technology Systems Operation'05. Prešov (SK), 20.11.2005-21.11.2005] R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GA104/04/0829 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : biomass and waste * gasification * hot gas cleaning Subject RIV: CI - Industrial Chemistry, Chemical Engineering

  10. Application of modern online instrumentation for chemical analysis of gas and particulate phases of exhaust at the European Commission heavy-duty vehicle emission laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, T W; Chirico, R; Clairotte, M; Elsasser, M; Manfredi, U; Martini, G; Sklorz, M; Streibel, T; Heringa, M F; Decarlo, P F; Baltensperger, U; De Santi, G; Krasenbrink, A; Zimmermann, R; Prevot, A S H; Astorga, C

    2011-01-01

    The European Commission recently established a novel test facility for heavy-duty vehicles to enhance more sustainable transport. The facility enables the study of energy efficiency of various fuels/scenarios as well as the chemical composition of evolved exhaust emissions. Sophisticated instrumentation for real-time analysis of the gas and particulate phases of exhaust has been implemented. Thereby, gas-phase characterization was carried out by a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR; carbonyls, nitrogen-containing species, small hydrocarbons) and a resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometer (REMPI-TOFMS; monocyclic and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). For analysis of the particulate phase, a high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectrometer (HR-TOF-AMS; organic matter, chloride, nitrate), a condensation particle counter (CPC; particle number), and a multiangle absorption photometer (MAAP; black carbon) were applied. In this paper, the first application of the new facility in combination with the described instruments is presented, whereby a medium-size truck was investigated by applying different driving cycles. The goal was simultaneous chemical characterization of a great variety of gaseous compounds and particulate matter in exhaust on a real-time basis. The time-resolved data allowed new approaches to view the results; for example, emission factors were normalized to time-resolved consumption of fuel and were related to emission factors evolved during high speeds. Compounds could be identified that followed the fuel consumption, others showed very different behavior. In particular, engine cold start, engine ignition (unburned fuel), and high-speed events resulted in unique emission patterns. PMID:21126058

  11. Effects of Gas Velocity and Temperature on Nitric Oxide Conversion in Simulated Catalytic Converter

    OpenAIRE

    Sathaporn Chuepeng

    2012-01-01

    Problem statement: Gaseous emissions from gasoline engine such as carbon monoxide, unburned hydrocarbon and nitrogen oxides were usually reduced in three-way catalytic converter simultaneously around theoretical fuel and air combustion. Engine speed and load and other parameters were varied over a wide range of operating conditions, resulting in different exhaust gas composition and condition intake into catalytic converter. This work was studied the conversion of Nitric Oxide (NO) in exhaust...

  12. Simultaneous conversion of nitrogen oxides and soot into nitrogen and carbon dioxide over iron containing oxide catalysts in diesel exhaust gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper deals with the simultaneous catalytic conversion of NOx and soot into N2 and CO2 in diesel exhaust gas. Several iron containing oxide catalysts were partially modified by the alkali metal potassium and were used for NOx-soot reaction in a model exhaust gas. Fe1.9K0.1O3 has shown highest catalytic performance for N2 formation in the so far investigated catalysts. Further studies have shown that Fe1.9K0.1O3 was deactivated in a substantial way after about 20 TPR experiments due to the agglomeration of the promoter potassium. Experiments carried out over the aged Fe1.9K0.1O3 catalyst have shown that NOx-soot reaction was suppressed at higher O2 concentration, since O2-soot conversion was kinetically favored. In contrast to that, the catalytic activity was increased in presence of NO2 and H2O. Mechanistic examinations suggest that (CO) intermediates, formed at the soot surface, are the reactive sites in the NOx-soot reaction. Higher catalytic performance in presence of NO2 could be explained by the enhanced formation of these (CO) species. Moreover, nitrate species formed at the catalyst surface might also play an important role in NOx-soot conversion

  13. GC/MS Gas Separator Operates At Lower Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Mahadeva P.; Gutnikov, George

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show palladium/silver tube used to separate hydrogen carrier gas from gases being analyzed in gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry (GC/MS) system functions satisfactorily at temperatures as low as 70 to 100 degrees C. Less power consumed, and catalytic hydrogenation of compounds being analyzed diminished. Because separation efficiency high even at lower temperatures, gas load on vacuum pump of mass spectrometer kept low, permitting use of smaller pump. These features facilitate development of relatively small, lightweight, portable GC/MS system for such uses as measuring concentrations of pollutants in field.

  14. 40 CFR 87.31 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for exhaust emissions. 87.31... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM AIRCRAFT AND AIRCRAFT ENGINES Exhaust Emissions (In-Use Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 87.31 Standards for exhaust emissions. (a) Exhaust emissions of smoke from...

  15. 40 CFR 87.21 - Standards for exhaust emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Standards for exhaust emissions. 87.21... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM AIRCRAFT AND AIRCRAFT ENGINES Exhaust Emissions (New Aircraft Gas Turbine Engines) § 87.21 Standards for exhaust emissions. (a) Exhaust emissions of smoke from each...

  16. Temperature dependence of thermal diffusion in CO isotopic gas mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The temperature dependence of thermal diffusion in several different isotopic gas mixtures of CO is investigated theoretically and the results are compared with experiment. The temperature range includes the inversion temperatures for all mixtures. Thermal conductivity and diffusion coefficients are also calculated. The basis of the study is a previously presented theory which provides expressions for classical collision integrals for molecules with rotational structure in terms of spherical ?* integrals

  17. Bimodular high temperature planar oxygen gas sensor

    OpenAIRE

    YuLei; HaiyongGao; PuxianGao

    2014-01-01

    A bimodular planar O2 sensor was fabricated using NiO nanoparticles (NPs) thin film coated yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) substrate. The thin film was prepared by radio frequency (r.f.) magnetron sputtering of NiO on YSZ substrate, followed by high temperature sintering. The surface morphology of NiO nanoparticles film was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns of NiO NPs thin film before and after high tempera...

  18. Determination of gas temperature in the plasmatron channel according to the known distribution of electronic temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerasimov Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical method to calculate the temperature distribution of heavy particles in the channel of the plasma torch on the known distribution of the electronic temperature has been proposed. The results can be useful for a number of model calculations in determining the most effective conditions of gas blowing through the plasma torch with the purpose of heating the heavy component. This approach allows us to understand full details about the heating of cold gas, inpouring the plasma, and to estimate correctly the distribution of the gas temperature inside the channel.

  19. The gas temperature in and the gas expulsion from a graphite furnace used for atomic absorption spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, C. L.; Wu, Shaole; Karwowska, R.; Rogers, J. T.; Dick, R.

    A simplified model for heat transfer based on thermal conduction is used to calculate the radial gas temperature distribution inside a semi-enclosed, commercial graphite tube furnace used for atomic absorption spectrometry. In the absence of a forced convective flow of a purge gas, the gas temperature inside the graphite furnace during its heating is lower than the wall temperature. After the wall temperature has attained a steady-state value, the gas temperature approaches the wall temperature and the radial temperature gradient in the gas decreases. The difference between the wall temperature and the gas temperature depends on the temperature program used, the thermal properties of the purge gas, and the atomizer geometry. The residence time of relatively volatile analyte elements is largely controlled by expulsion when wall atomization at high heating rates and high atomization temperatures are used. Analytical sensitivities are often enhanced by vaporizing the analyte into a gas having an approximately constant temperature.

  20. Effect of Exhaust Gas Recirculation on the Dual Fuel Combustion of Gasoline and CNG by Compression Ignition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Rashid A. Aziz

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI is a combustion process that promises the combination of diesel like efficiencies and very low NOx emissions. The major issues with HCCI are high heat release rates, lack of combustion control and high CO and HC emissions. Operating HCCI with two fuels of different properties and recirculation of exhaust gases are effective strategies of promoting and controlling autoignition. This study discusses the effects of EGR on the combustion characteristics of dual fuel HCCI of gasoline and CNG. The results show that EGR retards ignition timing, affects thermal efficiency and reduces heat release rates.

  1. Improved gas distributor for coating high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new and improved gas distributor was developed for use in coating fuel particles for the high-temperature gas-cooled reactor. The coating gas enters the coating furnace through multiple thin regions of a porous plate. This more uniformly disperses the gas and leads to improved coating properties. High-quality carbon and silicon carbide coatings were deposited with the new distributor in both 13- and 24-cm (130- and 240-mm)-diam coating furnaces

  2. A laser-based sensor for measurement of off-gas composition and temperature in basic oxygen steelmaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are developing an optical sensor for process control in basic oxygen steelmaking. The sensor measures gas temperature and relative CO/CO2 concentration ratios in the furnace off-gas by transmitting the laser probe beam directly above the furnace lip and below the exhaust hood during oxygen blowing. Dynamic off-gas information is being evaluated for optimizing variables such as lance height, oxygen flow, post-combustion control, and prediction of final melt-carbon content. The non-invasive nature of the optical sensor renders it robust and relatively maintenance-free. Additional potential applications of the method are process control for electric arc furnace and bottom-blown oxygen steelmaking processes. (author)

  3. Corona discharge reactor for removal of PM and NO{sub x} in diesel exhaust; Corona hoden ni yoru diesel hai gas chu no ryushijo busshitsu to chisso sankabutsu no jokyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimune, T.; Kinoshita, K. [Shonan Institute of Technology, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2000-03-25

    In order to remove particulate matter (PM) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) contained in diesel exhaust gas, the gas is excited by passing through a corona discharge tubes in a high electric voltage field. A corona discharge collector for PM (CCPM) is designed to collect diesel PM electrically on central electrode and accumulated PM will be removed by a controlled burning (regeneration) process every 15-20 minutes. In a corona discharge reactor for NO{sub x} removal (CRNR), the NO is oxidized to NO{sub 2}, and OH radical generated from H{sub 2}O in gas reacts with NO{sub 2}, and NO{sub x} concentration decreases as a result of formation of HNO{sub 3}. In this paper, the discharge instability of CCPM by the PM accumulation on electrodes is investigated, and PM collection efficiency > 90% is obtained under the condition of 23kv, 0.35 mA. As for CRNR, the effect of inlet temperature on the NO{sub x} reduction rate is discussed experimentally. The NO{sub x} removal rate of about 95% is observed at an input power of 80 watts. The configuration of a prototype reactor coupled with CCPM and CRNR is proposed in our study. (author)

  4. High temperature gas dynamics an introduction for physicists and engineers

    CERN Document Server

    Bose, Tarit K

    2014-01-01

    High Temperature Gas Dynamics is a primer for scientists, engineers, and students who would like to have a basic understanding of the physics and the behavior of high-temperature gases. It is a valuable tool for astrophysicists as well. The first chapters treat the basic principles of quantum and statistical mechanics and how to derive thermophysical properties from them. Special topics are included that are rarely found in other textbooks, such as the thermophysical and transport properties of multi-temperature gases and a novel method to compute radiative transfer. Furthermore, collision processes between different particles are discussed. Separate chapters deal with the production of high-temperature gases and with electrical emission in plasmas, as well as related diagnostic techniques.This new edition adds over 100 pages and includes the following updates: several sections on radiative properties of high temperature gases and various radiation models, a section on shocks in magneto-gas-dynamics, a sectio...

  5. Titanium dioxide thin films for high temperature gas sensors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) thin film gas sensors were fabricated via the sol-gel method from a starting solution of titanium isopropoxide dissolved in methoxyethanol. Spin coating was used to deposit the sol on electroded aluminum oxide (Al2O3) substrates forming a film 1 ?m thick. The influence of crystallization temperature and operating temperature on crystalline phase, grain size, electronic conduction activation energy, and gas sensing response toward carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH4) was studied. Pure anatase phase was found with crystallization temperatures up to 800 oC, however, rutile began to form by 900 oC. Grain size increased with increasing calcination temperature. Activation energy was dependent on crystallite size and phase. Sensing response toward CO and CH4 was dependent on both calcination and operating temperatures. Films crystallized at 650 oC and operated at 450 oC showed the best selectivity toward CO.

  6. Design and development of gas turbine high temperature reactor 300

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAERI (Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute) has been designing a Japan's original gas turbine high temperature reactor, GTHTR300 (Gas Turbine High Temperature Reactor 300). The greatly simplified design based on salient features of the HTGR (High Temperature Gas-cooled reactor) with a closed helium gas turbine enables the GTHTR300 a high efficient and economically competitive reactor to be deployed in early 2010s. Also, the GTHTR300 fully taking advantage of various experiences accumulated in design, construction and operation of the HTTR (High Temperature Engineering Test Reactor) and fossil gas turbine systems reduces technological development concerning a reactor system and electric generation system. Original features of this system are core design with two-year refueling interval, conventional steel material usage for a reactor pressure vessel, innovative plant flow scheme and horizontally installed gas turbine unit. Due to these salient features, the capital cost of the GTHTR300 is less than a target cost of 200 thousands Yen/kWe, and the electric generation cost is close to a target cost of 4 Yen/kWh. This paper describes the original design features focusing on reactor core design, fuel design, in-core structure design and reactor pressure vessel design except PCU design. Also, R and D for developing the power conversion unit is briefly described. The present study is entrusted from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology of Japan. (author)

  7. Simulation of Wake Vortex Radiometric Detection via Jet Exhaust Proxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Taumi S.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an analysis of the potential of an airborne hyperspectral imaging IR instrument to infer wake vortices via turbine jet exhaust as a proxy. The goal was to determine the requirements for an imaging spectrometer or radiometer to effectively detect the exhaust plume, and by inference, the location of the wake vortices. The effort examines the gas spectroscopy of the various major constituents of turbine jet exhaust and their contributions to the modeled detectable radiance. Initially, a theoretical analysis of wake vortex proxy detection by thermal radiation was realized in a series of simulations. The first stage used the SLAB plume model to simulate turbine jet exhaust plume characteristics, including exhaust gas transport dynamics and concentrations. The second stage used these plume characteristics as input to the Line By Line Radiative Transfer Model (LBLRTM) to simulate responses from both an imaging IR hyperspectral spectrometer or radiometer. These numerical simulations generated thermal imagery that was compared with previously reported wake vortex temperature data. This research is a continuation of an effort to specify the requirements for an imaging IR spectrometer or radiometer to make wake vortex measurements. Results of the two-stage simulation will be reported, including instrument specifications for wake vortex thermal detection. These results will be compared with previously reported results for IR imaging spectrometer performance.

  8. On the gas temperature in circumstellar disks around A stars

    CERN Document Server

    Kamp, I; Kamp, Inga; Zadelhoff, Gerd-Jan van

    2001-01-01

    In circumstellar disks or shells it is often assumed that gas and dust temperatures are equal where the latter is determined by radiative equilibrium. This paper deals with the question whether this assumption is applicable for tenous circumstellar disks around young A stars. In this paper the thin hydrostatic equilibrium models described by Kamp & Bertoldi (2000) are combined with a detailed heating/cooling balance for the gas. The most important heating and cooling processes are heating through infrared pumping, heating due to the drift velocity of dust grains, and fine structure and molecular line cooling. Throughout the whole disk gas and dust are not efficiently coupled by collisions and hence their temperatures are quite different. Most of the gas in the disk models considered here stays well below 300 K. In the temperature range below 300 K the gas chemistry is not much affected by T_gas and therefore the simplifying approximation T_gas = T_dust can be used for calculating the chemical structure of...

  9. Current correlation functions of ideal Fermi gas at ?nite temperature

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R P Kaur; K Tankeshwar; K N Pathak

    2002-04-01

    Expressions for transverse and longitudinal current–current correlation functions of an ideal Fermi gas describing the current ?uctuations induced in the electron system by external probe perpendicular and parallel to the propagation of electron wave, have been obtained at ?nite temperature. The results obtained for transverse and longitudinal functions are presented for different values of wavelength and frequency at different temperatures. The diamagnetic susceptibility as a function of temperature has also been obtained from transverse current correlation function as its long wavelength and static limit, which smoothly cross over from known quantum values to the classical limit with increase in temperature.

  10. Partially integrated exhaust manifold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayman, Alan W; Baker, Rodney E

    2015-01-20

    A partially integrated manifold assembly is disclosed which improves performance, reduces cost and provides efficient packaging of engine components. The partially integrated manifold assembly includes a first leg extending from a first port and terminating at a mounting flange for an exhaust gas control valve. Multiple additional legs (depending on the total number of cylinders) are integrally formed with the cylinder head assembly and extend from the ports of the associated cylinder and terminate at an exit port flange. These additional legs are longer than the first leg such that the exit port flange is spaced apart from the mounting flange. This configuration provides increased packaging space adjacent the first leg for any valving that may be required to control the direction and destination of exhaust flow in recirculation to an EGR valve or downstream to a catalytic converter.

  11. A comparative study of the elemental composition of the exhaust emissions of cars powered by liquefied petroleum gas and unleaded petrol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, McKenzie C. H.; Ayoko, Godwin A.; Morawska, Lidia; Ristovski, Zoran D.; Jayaratne, E. Rohan; Kokot, Serge

    Elements emitted from the exhausts of new Ford Falcon Forte cars powered by unleaded petrol (ULP) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) were measured on a chassis dynamometer. The measurements were carried out in February, June and August 2001, and at two steady state driving conditions (60 and 80 km h -1). Thirty seven elements were quantified in the exhaust samples by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS). The total emission factors of the elements from the exhausts of ULP cars were higher than those of LPG cars at both engine speeds even though high variability in the exhaust emissions from different cars was noted. The effect of the operating conditions such as mileage of the cars, engine speed, fuel and lubricating oil compositions on the emissions was studied. To investigate the effects of these conditions, multivariate data analysis methods were employed including exploratory principal component analysis (PCA), and the multi-criteria decision making methods (MCDM), preference ranking organization method for enrichment evaluation (PROMETHEE) and geometrical analysis for interactive aid (GAIA), for ranking the cars on the basis of the emission factors of the elements. PCA biplot of the complete data matrix showed a clear discrimination of the February, June and August emission test results. In addition, (i) platinum group elements (PGE) emissions were separated from each other in the three different clusters viz. Pt with February, Pd with June and Rh with August; (ii) the motor oil related elements, Zn and P, were particularly associated with the June and August tests (these vectors were also grouped with V, Al and Cu); and (iii) highest emissions of most major elements were associated with the August test after the cars have recorded their highest mileage. Extensive analysis with the aid of the MCDM ranking methods demonstrated clearly that cars powered by LPG outperform those powered by ULP. In general, cars tested in June perform better than those tested in August, which suggested that mileage was the key criterion of car performance on the basis of elemental emission factors.

  12. Gas sensing properties of nanocrystalline diamond at room temperature

    OpenAIRE

    Davydova, Marina; Kulha, Pavel; Laposa, Alexandr; Hruska, Karel; Demo, Pavel; Kromka, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    This study describes an integrated NH3 sensor based on a hydrogenated nanocrystalline diamond (NCD)-sensitive layer coated on an interdigitated electrode structure. The gas sensing properties of the sensor structure were examined using a reducing gas (NH3) at room temperature and were found to be dependent on the electrode arrangement. A pronounced response of the sensor, which was comprised of dense electrode arrays (of 50 µm separation distance), was observed. The sensor functionality was e...

  13. Utilisation of CO2, fixation of nitrogen and exhaust gas cleaning in electric discharge with electrode catalysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The method reported here provides a contribution to CO2 utilisation, nitrogen fixation and combustion exhaust cleaning using synergetic effect of electric discharge with heterogeneous catalysis on electrodes. The efficiency of CO2 removal is about 40-65%. The process of CO2 removal is always accompanied by NOx, VOC, SX and other component removal and is connected with O2 formation. The final product of process is powder with fractal microstructure, low specific weight, water insoluble suitable for use as nitrogen containing fertilizer. The main component (95%) of solid product is amorphous condensate of amino acids with about 5% of metal organic compound with catalytic properties. The condensate has character of statistical proteinoid. Its creation seems to play important role during formation of life in pre-biotic Earth

  14. Optimal control strategies for carbon dioxide enrichment in greenhouse tomato crops, Part II: Using the exhaust gases of natural gas fired boilers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chalabi, Z.S.; Bailey, B.J. [Silsoe Research Institute, Bedford (United Kingdom); Biro, A. [Godollo University of Agricultural Sciences, Godollo (Hungary); Aikman, D.P.; Cockshull, K.E. [Horticulture Research International, Warwick (United Kingdom)

    2002-03-01

    Optimized control strategies for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) enrichment of greenhouse tomato crops using CO{sub 2} from the exhaust gases of boilers burning natural gas are presented. In one group of strategies, the heat produced during CO{sub 2} generation which exceeds the immediate heat requirement of the greenhouse is stored as hot water and used subsequently for heating. The simulations show that, use of optimal control can increase the financial margin of crop value over the combined expenditure on gas used for CO{sub 2} and heating by 2.3 pounds m{sup -2} (11%) when heat is not stored and by 4.9 pounds m{sup -2} (24%) when heat is stored, compared with enriching with CO{sub 2} only when heating is required. A 30% increase in gas price reduced the financial margin by 11%, whereas a 30% increase in tomato price increased the margin by 40%. The capacity of the heat store places a limit on the amount of heat that can be stored and consequently on the amount of natural gas that can be burnt and the associated amount of CO{sub 2} produced during the day. The optimum size of heat store is 20x10{sup -3} m{sup 3} per unit greenhouse area. (author)

  15. Gas diffusion and temperature dependence of bubble nucleation during irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foreman, A. J. E.; Singh, Bachu Narain

    1986-01-01

    The continuous production of gases at relatively high rates under fusion irradiation conditions may enhance the nucleation of cavities. This can cause dimensional changes and could induce embrittlement arising from gas accumulation on grain boundaries. Computer calculations have been made of the diatomic nucleation of helium bubbles, assuming helium to diffuse substitutionally, with radiation-enhanced diffusion at lower temperatures. The calculated temperature dependence of the bubble density sh...

  16. Microstructural Characterization of Low Temperature Gas Nitrided Martensitic Stainless Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernandes, Frederico Augusto Pires; Christiansen, Thomas Lundin

    2015-01-01

    The present work presents microstructural investigations of the surface zone of low temperature gas nitrided precipitation hardening martensitic stainless steel AISI 630. Grazing incidence X-ray diffraction was applied to investigate the present phases after successive removal of very thin sections of the sample surface. The development of epsilon nitride, expanded austenite and expanded martensite resulted from the low temperature nitriding treatments. The microstructural features, hardness and phase composition are discussed with emphasis on the influence of nitriding duration and nitriding potential.

  17. The Influence of Mixing in High Temperature Gas Phase Reactions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østberg, Martin

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this thesis is to describe the mixing in high temperature gas phase reactions.The Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction of NOx (referred as the SNR process) using NH3 as reductant was chosen as reaction system. This in-furnace denitrification process is made at around 1200 - 1300 K by injection of NH3 with carrier gas into the flue gas. NH3 can react with NO and form N2, but a competing reaction path is the oxidation of NH3 to NO.The SNR process is briefly described and it is shown ...

  18. MAGNETIC RESONANCE STUDIES OF ATOMIC HYDROGEN GAS AT LOW TEMPERATURES

    OpenAIRE

    Hardy, W.; Morrow, M.; Jochemsen, R.; Statt, B.; Kubik, P.; Marsolais, R.; Berlinsky, A.; Landesman, A.

    1980-01-01

    Using a pulsed low temperature discharge in a closed cell containing H2 and 4He, we have been able to store a low density (~ 1012 atoms/cc) gas of atomic hydrogen for periods of order one hour in zero magnetic field and T ? 1 K. Pulsed magnetic resonance at the 1420 MHz hyperfine transition has been used to study a number of the properties of the gas, including the recombination rate H + H + 4He ? H2 + 4He, the hydrogen spin-exchange relaxation rates, the diffusion coefficient of H in 4He gas...

  19. Low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - hydrogen - air mixtures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newson, E.; Roth, F. von; Hottinger, P.; Truong, T.B. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1999-08-01

    The low temperature catalytic combustion of natural gas - air mixtures would allow the development of no-NO{sub x} burners for heating and power applications. Using commercially available catalysts, the room temperature ignition of methane-propane-air mixtures has been shown in laboratory reactors with combustion efficiencies over 95% and maximum temperatures less than 700{sup o}C. After a 500 hour stability test, severe deactivation of both methane and propane oxidation functions was observed. In cooperation with industrial partners, scaleup to 3 kW is being investigated together with startup dynamics and catalyst stability. (author) 3 figs., 3 refs.

  20. Pengaruh Variasi Temperatur Sintesa, Temperatur Operasi dan Konsentrasi gas CO terhadap sensitivitas Sensor Gas Co dari Material ZnO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endah Lutfiana

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Karbon monoksida ( CO merupakan gas yang tidak berwarna dan tidak berbau yang dihasilkan dari proses pembakaran yang tidak sempurna. Gas ini sangat beracun bagi tubuh manusia karena sifat biologinya yang mampu berikatan dengan hemoglobin yang mana bertugas membawa oksigen dalam darah, sehingga kadar oksigen dapat menurun drastis dan menyebabkan keracunan bahkan kematian. Sehingga dibutuhkan suatu alat pendeteksi atau sensor untuk mendeteksi adanya gas tersebut.Oksida metal seringkali digunakan untuk material sensor. ZnO merupakan suatu material semikonduktor yang telah digunakan untuk aplikasi sensor. Dalam penelitian ini pembuatan sensor ZnO dilakukan dengan mengoksidasi serbuk Zn pada variasi temperatur 800, 850, 900 oC selama 40 menit. Selanjutnya dibuat pelet sensor dengan mengkompaksi serbuk ZnO hasil Oksidasi dengan tekanan 200 Bar. Pelet kemudian disinter dengan temperatur 500oC. Setelah itu dilakukan pengujian SEM, XRD, dan uji Sensitivitas dengan variasi temperatur operasi 30, 50, 100 oC dan variasi konsentrasi 10 ppm, 50 ppm, 100 ppm, 250 ppm, 500 ppm. Dari hasil pengujian didapatkan nilai sensitivitas tertinggi pada temperatur sintesa 800oC dengan konsentrasi gas CO 500 ppm pada temperatur operasi sensor 100oC yaitu sebesar 0,52.

  1. 40 CFR 86.1309-90 - Exhaust gas sampling system; Otto-cycle and non-petroleum-fueled engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...sampling system; Otto-cycle and non-petroleum-fueled engines. 86.1309-90...sampling system; Otto-cycle and non-petroleum-fueled engines. (a)(1) General...gasoline-fueled, natural gas-fueled, liquefied petroleum gas-fueled or...

  2. Amperometric Gas Detection Using Room Temperature Ionic Liquid Solvents

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, EI; O'Mahony, AM; Aldous, L; Compton, RG

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemistry of various gases, including oxygen, carbon dioxide, hydrogen, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, sulfur dioxide and nitrogen dioxide, in room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs) is reviewed. The application of RTILs to gas sensor design and development is highlighted. ©The Electrochemical Society.

  3. Denuder for measuring emissions of gaseous organic exhaust gas constituents; Denuder zur Emissionsmessung von gasfoermigen organischen Abgasinhaltsstoffen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerchel, B.; Jockel, W.; Kallinger, G.; Niessner, R.

    1997-05-01

    Industrial plants which emit carcinogenic or other noxious substances should be given top priority in any policy to ward off harmful environmental effects. This also applies to many volatile and semi-volatile air constituents such as volatile aliphatic carbonyls or amines. To date there are no satisfactory methods for determining trace organic components of exhaust gases. It is true that aldehydes are considered in the VDI Guideline 3862, but the measuring methods given there are based on absorption in liquids and are accordingly difficult to use and show a high cross-sensitivity for other substances. No VDI Guideline exists to date on amine emissions. In view of the complexity of exhaust gases a selective enrichment of certain families of substances would appear indicated. Sampling trouble could be reduced if it was possible only to accumulate the gaseous phase, or even just one family of gaseous constituents. A particularly suitable air sampling method is that of diffusion separation. These diffusion separators (denuders) are well known as a powerful measuring system which is able to accumulate trace pollutants in the outside air. The purpose of the present study was to find out whether the concept of diffusion separation is also applicable to emission monitoring, and in particular whether it is suitable for detecting volatile aliphatic aldehydes and amines (primary and secondary) at extremely low concentrations (<10 ppb). (orig./SR) [Deutsch] Fuer Anlagen mit Emissionen von krebserzeugenden und gesundheitsgefaehrdenden Stoffen ergibt sich ein besonderer Handlungsbedarf zum Schutz vor schaedlichen Umwelteinwirkungen. Zu diesen Stoffen gehoeren auch viele leicht- und mittelfluechtigen Luftinhaltsstoffe, wie z.B. die leichtfluechtigen aliphatischen Carbonyle oder Amine. Fuer organische Komponenten, die nur in geringen Konzentrationen im Abgas vorkommen, existieren bisher keine zufriedenstellenden Messverfahren. Fuer die Aldehyde liegt zwar die VDI-Richtlinie 3862 vor, diese Messverfahren beruhen aber auf dem Absorptionsprinzip in Fluessigkeiten, das umstaendlich zu handhaben ist und eine grosse Querempfindlichkeit zu anderen Stoffen besitzt. Fuer die Emissionsmessung von Aminen gibt es derzeit noch keine VDI-Richtlinie. Aufgrund der Komplexitaet des Mediums Abgas ist eine selektive Anreicherung bestimmter Substanzklassen wuenschenswert. So koennen Stoerungen bei der Probenahme verringert werden, indem nur die Gasphase, und hier moeglichst nur eine Substanzklasse, selektiv angereichert wird. Dazu eignet sich besonders die Luftprobenahme auf dem Prinzip der Diffusionsabscheidung. Diese Diffusionsabscheider (Denuder) sind ein bekanntes Messsystem zur nachweisstarken und selektiven Anreicherung von Spurenschadstoffen in der Aussenluft. In diesem Vorhaben soll nun dieses Konzept der Diffusionsabscheidung auf die Anwendbarkeit im Emissionsbereich ueberprueft werden, speziell zur Erfassung der leichtfluechtigen aliphatischen Aldehyde und Amine (primaere und sekundaere) mit extrem niedrigen Nachweisgrenzen (<10 ppb). (orig./SR)

  4. Process for separating NO/sub x/ from an exhaust gas. Verfahren zum Abscheiden von Stickstoffoxiden aus einem Abgas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Billet, R.; Gostomczyk, M.; Mackowiak, J.; Suder, S.

    1988-01-14

    A description is given of a well-known method for separating nitrogen oxides from waste gas. The nitrogen monoxide contained in the waste gas is oxidized into NO/sub 2/ by means of an aqueous chlorate solution. Then the NO/sub 2/ contained in the waste gas is absorbed by alkali hydroxides in alkaline solutions. Finally the absorption solution is cleaned. In order to improve the separation rate, the nitrogen monoxide is oxidized in the gas phase with dichlorine monoxide (Cl/sub 2/O) in an oxidation column, with the dichlorine monoxide being generated in a separate reactor by acidification of an alkali hypochlorite or alkaline-earth hypochlorite, preferably, however, alkali hypochlorite - and then being added to the waste gas. This method is especially suitable for cleaning waste gases from refuse incineration plants.

  5. Discussion of the effects of recirculating exhaust air on performance and efficiency of a typical microturbine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on a specific phenomenon, noticed during steam injection experiments on a microturbine. During the considered experiments, measurements indicated an unsteady inlet air temperature of the compressor, resulting in unstable operation of the microturbine. Non-continuous exhaust air recirculation was a possible explanation for the observed behaviour of the microturbine. The aim of this paper is to investigate and demonstrate the effects of exhaust recirculation on a microgasturbine. Depending on wind direction, exhaust air re-entered the engine, resulting in changing inlet conditions which affects the operating regime of the microturbine. For this paper, a series of experiments were performed in the wind tunnel. These series of experiments allowed investigation of the effect of the wind direction on flue gasses flow. Next to the experiments, steady-state simulations of exhaust recirculation were performed in order to study the effect of exhaust recirculation on thermodynamic performance of the microturbine. Dynamic simulations of the non-continuous recirculation revealed the effects of frequency and amplitude on average performance and stability. Results from simulations supported the important impact of exhaust recirculation. Wind tunnel tests demonstrated the influence of the wind direction on recirculation and revealed the necessity to heighten the stack, thus preventing exhaust recirculation. -- Highlights: ? Unstable operation of a T100 microturbine during steam injection tests was noticed, caused by exhaust gas recirculation. ? Wind tunnel tests were performed to study the effect of the wind direction on the recirculation process. ? Steady-state simulations to investigate the effect of exhaust gas recirculation on thermodynamic performance. ? Dynamic simulations to reveal effects of frequency and amplitude on average performance and stability. ? Wind tunnel tests revealed the necessity to heighten the stack to prevent exhaust recirculation.

  6. Low temperature dynamic characteristics of a three-way catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balenovic, M.; Backx, A.C.P.M. [Technische Univ. Eindhoven (Netherlands). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Harmsen, J.M.A.; Hoebink, J.H.B.J. [Technische Univ. Eindhoven (Netherlands). Lab. of Chemical Reactor Engineering

    2001-07-01

    A mathematical model of a three-way catalytic converter based on a detailed chemical kinetic model has been created mainly to analyze the converter's dynamic behavior at low temperatures. The light-off process of the converter is analyzed in detail. Competition of species for empty noble metal surface determines the light-off characteristic, as inhibition processes increase light-off temperatures of some exhaust gas components in the complete exhaust mixture. Perturbations of the exhaust gas mixture around stoichiometry can in certain conditions decrease the effect of inhibition and lower the light-off temperature for some exhaust components. (orig.)

  7. Low temperature dynamic characteristics of a three-way catalytic converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balenovic, M.; Backx, A.C.P.M. [Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Harmsen, J.M.A.; Hoebink, J.H.B.J. [Eindhoven University of Technology (Netherlands). Laboratory of Chemical Reactor Engineering

    2001-07-01

    A mathematical model of a three-way catalytic converter based on a detailed chemical kinetic model has been created mainly to analyze the converter's dynamic behavior at low temperatures. The light-off process of the converter is analyzed in detail. Competition of species for empty noble metal surface determines the light-off characteristic, as inhibition processes increase light-off temperatures of some exhaust gas components in the complete exhaust mixture. Perturbations of the exhaust gas mixture around stoichiometry can in certain conditions decrease the effect of inhibition and lower the light-off temperature for some exhaust components. (author)

  8. 30 CFR 36.25 - Engine exhaust system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...service. (c) Exhaust cooling system. (1) A cooling system shall be provided for the engine exhaust gas. The heat-dissipation...the point of discharge from the cooling system under any condition of engine operation acceptable to...

  9. 40 CFR 1039.245 - How do I determine deterioration factors from exhaust durability testing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...deterioration factors from exhaust durability testing...AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS...deterioration factors from exhaust durability testing...any engines that use exhaust-gas recirculation or...

  10. A survey on gas-bearing circulators of high-temperature gas cooled reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In development of multi-purpose high-temperature gas cooled experimental reactor VHTR with 50 MWt, the usage of gas-bearing blowers with high precision and environmental safety is one of important problems. A survey in this connection revealed the following: (1) Gas-bearing compressors are used not only in test loops but also in auxiliary systems. (2) Main circulators of self-acting gas lubricated bearings with jacking gas systems are practically used in case of Dragon reactor (20 MWt). (3) To develop a large gas-bearing blower (2,000 -- 3,000 HP output) for proven reactors, a hydrostatic gas lubricated bearing of large load capacity and high speed stability must be studied under reactor conditions. (auth.)

  11. Measurement of characteristics of exhaust pipe for the system for gas-vapor medium filtration of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pilot investigation into the dependence of thermal power of pipe of (air-air heat exchanger) from the flow and temperature of heating air was conducted, temperature fields from top to bottom of the pipe was measured. Experiments were performed in the follow regime parameters: the flow of cold (heated) air is equal to 30 m2/h (?0.01 kg/s), the temperature at the inlet was changed in the ranges of Tinlc=28-36 Deg C; the flow of heating air was equal to 30, 90, 150 and 220 m3/h (0,01-0.075 kg/s) at the temperature at the inlet Tinlh=170, 220 and 280 Deg C. In addition to experiments were conducted at 120 Deg C. At 280 Deg C increase of the flow from 0.01 to 0.02 kg/s is over thermal power approximately by 2 times

  12. Temperature and distortion transients in gas tungsten-arc weldments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis and test program to develop a fundamental understanding of the gas tungsten-arc welding process has been undertaken at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory to develop techniques to determine and control the various welding parameters and weldment conditions so as to result in optimum weld response characteristics. These response characteristics include depth of penetration, weld bead configuration, weld bead sink and roll, distortion, and cracking sensitivity. The results are documented of that part of the program devoted to analytical and experimental investigations of temperatures, weld bead dimensions, and distortions for moving gas tungsten-arc welds applied to Alloy 600 plates

  13. DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING OF AN AMMONIA REMOVAL UNIT FROM THE EXHAUST GAS OF A MANURE DRYING SYSTEM

    OpenAIRE

    A. E. Ghaly; Macdonald, K. N.

    2013-01-01

    The storage and handling of animal wastes is one of the main sources of ammonia gas emissions. Ammonia gas has a distinct, unpleasant odor and can become detrimental to the health of humans and animals at high concentrations. Ammonia emissions are of particular concern in manure drying systems, where large losses of nitrogen, in the form of ammonia can cause air quality concerns. The aim of this study was to develop an ammonia removal system for a poultry manure drying system. The thin layer ...

  14. Generating usable and safe CO{sub 2} for enrichment of greenhouses from the exhaust gas of a biomass heating system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dion, L.M.; Lefsrud, M. [McGill Univ., Macdonald Campus, Ste-Anne-deBellevue, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Bioresource Engineering

    2010-07-01

    This study demonstrated the use of biomass as a renewable fuel to enrich a greenhouse with carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). CO{sub 2} enrichment of greenhouses has been shown to improve crop production whether it occurs from liquid CO{sub 2} or combustion of fossil fuels. Biomass, in the form of wood chips or pellets, has received much interest as a sustainable and economically viable alternative to heat greenhouses. As such, the opportunity exists to convert exhaust gases from a greenhouse wood heating system into a useful resource. CO{sub 2} can be extracted from flue gas via membrane separation instead of electrostatic precipitators. This technique has shown potential for large industries trying to reduce and isolate CO{sub 2} emissions for sequestration and may be applicable to the greenhouse industry. Some research has also been done with wet scrubbers using catalysts to obtain plant fertilizers. Sulphur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen (NO) emissions can be stripped from flue gas to form ammonium sulphate as a valuable byproduct for fertilizer markets. This study will review the potential of these techniques in the summer of 2010 when experiments will be conducted at the Macdonald Campus of McGill University.

  15. Automobile Exhaust Pollution and Purification Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Dawei

    2014-01-01

    As we all know, the automobile gas exhaust pollution has become more and more severe at recent years. It influences both to the human beings health and to quality of environment. The purpose of this thesis is to find out what are the main components of the exhaust gases, and give a basic and effective way to solve the problem. In this thesis, first the danger of exhaust pollution and its components will be presented. Then the writer will give the general mechanism of automobile exhaust ...

  16. Gas temperature measurement in combustors by use of suction pyrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this paper is to introduce new measurement techniques and configurations in gas suction pyrometry. A detailed description of three types of mini-pyrometers for the study of burning and heat transfer processes is presented. A suction pyrometer whose inner cavity is insulated by ceramic wool was developed for use in high velocity and high temperature jets of combustion products. A second type of pyrometer was developed for measuring oscillating gas temperatures, based on a micron-size sensitive head located in a spherical piece of fibrous material, through which the hot gases are aspirated. A third pyrometer was developed with an electrically-heated thermocouple and pulsed suction for use in low velocity 'dirty' gaseous media

  17. Effect of temperature on elastic properties of rare gas solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have derived expressions for the first and second order pressure derivatives of the bulk and shear moduli of rare gas solids, including the effect of temperature. The computed results of these expressions, i.e. dK/dP, dCS/dP, dC'44/dP, d2K/dP2, d2CS/dP2 and dC'44/dP2, for Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe up to their critical temperature are showing a distinct behaviour as compared to that of the corresponding ionic solids, and are in good agreement with the available experimental and theoretical results. The results are also satisfying Swenson's relation. Thus the present analysis may be useful to obtain information on the third and fourth-order elastic constants, for potential expansions in a lattice dynamics model and also in the study of the equation of state of rare gas solids

  18. The transition temperature of the dilute interacting Bose gas

    OpenAIRE

    Baym, Gordon; Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Holzmann, Markus; Laloë, Franck; Vautherin, Dominique

    1999-01-01

    We show that the critical temperature of a uniform dilute Bose gas must increase linearly with the s-wave scattering length describing the repulsion between the particles. Because of infrared divergences, the magnitude of the shift cannot be obtained from perturbation theory, even in the weak coupling regime; rather, it is proportional to the size of the critical region in momentum space. By means of a self-consistent calculation of the quasiparticle spectrum at low momenta ...

  19. Properties of super alloys for high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existing data on the properties at high temperature in helium gas of iron base super alloys. Incoloy-800, -802 and -807, nickel base super alloys, Hastelloy-X, Inconel-600, -617 and -625, and a casting alloy HK-40 were collectively evaluated from the viewpoint of the selection of material for HTGRs. These properties include corrosion resistance, strength and toughness, weldability, tube making, formability, radioactivation, etc. Creep strength was specially studied, taking into consideration the data on the creep characteristics in the actual helium gas atmosphere. The necessity of further long run creep data is suggested. Hastelloy-X has completely stable corrosion resistance at high temperature in helium gas. Incoloy 800 and 807 and Inconel 617 are not preferable in view of corrosion resistance. The creep strength of Inconel 617 extraporated to 1,000 deg C for 100,000 hours in air was the greatest rupture strength of 0.6 kg/mm2 in all above alloys. However, its strength in helium gas began to fall during a relatively short time, so that its creep strength must be re-evaluated in the use for long time. The radioactivation and separation of oxide film in primary construction materials came into question, Inconel 617 and Incoloy 807 showed high induced radioactivity intensity. Generally speaking, in case of nickel base alloys such as Hastelloy-X, oxide film is difficult to break away. (Iwakiri, K.)

  20. Design and instrumentation of an automotive heat pump system using ambient air, engine coolant and exhaust gas as a heat source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because the amount of waste heat used for comfort heating of the passenger compartment in motor vehicles decreases continuously as a result of the increasing engine efficiencies originating from recent developments in internal combustion engine technology, it is estimated that heat requirement of the passenger compartment in vehicles using future generation diesel engines will not be met by the waste heat taken from the engine coolant. The automotive heat pump (AHP) system can heat the passenger compartment individually, or it can support the present heating system of the vehicle. The AHP system can also be employed in electric vehicles, which do not have waste heat, as well as vehicles driven by a fuel cell. The authors of this paper observed that such an AHP system using ambient air as a heat source could not meet the heat requirement of the compartment when ambient temperature was extremely low. The reason is the decrease in the amount of heat taken from the ambient air as a result of low evaporating temperatures. Furthermore, the moisture condensed from air freezed on the evaporator surface, thus blocking the air flow through it. This problem can be solved by using the heat of engine coolant or exhaust gases. In this case, the AHP system can have a higher heating capacity and reuse waste heat. (author)

  1. High-Temperature Gas Sensor Array (Electronic Nose) Demonstrated

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    The ability to measure emissions from aeronautic engines and in commercial applications such as automotive emission control and chemical process monitoring is a necessary first step if one is going to actively control those emissions. One single sensor will not give all the information necessary to determine the chemical composition of a high-temperature, harsh environment. Rather, an array of gas sensor arrays--in effect, a high-temperature electronic "nose"--is necessary to characterize the chemical constituents of a diverse, high-temperature environment, such as an emissions stream. The signals produced by this nose could be analyzed to determine the constituents of the emission stream. Although commercial electronic noses for near-room temperature applications exist, they often depend significantly on lower temperature materials or only one sensor type. A separate development effort necessary for a high-temperature electronic nose is being undertaken by the NASA Glenn Research Center, Case Western Reserve University, Ohio State University, and Makel Engineering, Inc. The sensors are specially designed for hightemperature environments. A first-generation high-temperature electronic nose has been demonstrated on a modified automotive engine. This nose sensor array was composed of sensors designed for hightemperature environments fabricated using microelectromechanical-systems- (MEMS-) based technology. The array included a tin-oxide-based sensor doped for nitrogen oxide (NOx) sensitivity, a SiC-based hydrocarbon (CxHy) sensor, and an oxygen sensor (O2). These sensors operate on different principles--resistor, diode, and electrochemical cell, respectively--and each sensor has very different responses to the individual gases in the environment. A picture showing the sensor head for the array is shown in the photograph on the left and the sensors installed in the engine are shown in the photograph on the right. Electronics are interfaced with the sensors for temperature control and signal conditioning, and packaging designed for high temperatures is necessary for the array to survive the engine environment.

  2. Optimum Reactor Outlet Temperatures for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors Integrated with Industrial Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee O. Nelson

    2011-04-01

    This report summarizes the results of a temperature sensitivity study conducted to identify the optimum reactor operating temperatures for producing the heat and hydrogen required for industrial processes associated with the proposed new high temperature gas-cooled reactor. This study assumed that primary steam outputs of the reactor were delivered at 17 MPa and 540°C and the helium coolant was delivered at 7 MPa at 625–925°C. The secondary outputs of were electricity and hydrogen. For the power generation analysis, it was assumed that the power cycle efficiency was 66% of the maximum theoretical efficiency of the Carnot thermodynamic cycle. Hydrogen was generated via the hightemperature steam electrolysis or the steam methane reforming process. The study indicates that optimum or a range of reactor outlet temperatures could be identified to further refine the process evaluations that were developed for high temperature gas-cooled reactor-integrated production of synthetic transportation fuels, ammonia, and ammonia derivatives, oil from unconventional sources, and substitute natural gas from coal.

  3. Monitoring temperature for gas turbine blade: correction of reflection model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi; Xiao, Yihan; Daniel, Ketui

    2015-06-01

    For a gas turbine blade working in a narrow space, the accuracy of blade temperature measurements is greatly impacted by environmental irradiation. A reflection model is established by using discrete irregular surfaces to calculate the angle factor between the blade surface and the hot adjacent parts. The model is based on the rotational angles and positions of the blades, and can correct for measurement error caused by background radiation when the blade is located at different rotational positions. This method reduces the impact of reflected radiation on the basis of the turbine's known geometry and the physical properties of the material. The experimental results show that when the blade temperature is 911.2±5 K and the vane temperature ranges from 1011.3 to 1065.8 K, the error decreases from 4.21 to 0.75%.

  4. Raman-scattering gas temperature measurements in particle-laden flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The feasibility of making time-averaged Raman-scattering temperature measurements in highly luminous flows has been investigated in tests on the Sandia Atmospheric Combustor Exhaust Simulator facility (ACES). In these experiments the diluted exhaust stream from a methane-burning combustor was seeded with 5 ?m diameter fly ash particles. Tests were run at temperatures ranging from 900 to 14500K at particle densities up to 6000 particles/cm3. Measurements were made using a pulsed argon-ion probe laser and a gated detection system for enhancement of signal-to-background ratio. Scans of the Stokes Q-branch vibrational Raman spectrum of nitrogen were fit by calculated spectra in order to determine temperature. The Raman-scattered signal was small but measurable in all cases. There was no apparent laser-induced interference from either fluorescence or particle incandescence. Good agreement between Raman-scattering temperature measurements and radiation-corrected thermocouple mearurements was obtained

  5. A highly efficient six-stroke internal combustion engine cycle with water injection for in-cylinder exhaust heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concept adding two strokes to the Otto or Diesel engine cycle to increase fuel efficiency is presented here. It can be thought of as a four-stroke Otto or Diesel cycle followed by a two-stroke heat recovery steam cycle. A partial exhaust event coupled with water injection adds an additional power stroke. Waste heat from two sources is effectively converted into usable work: engine coolant and exhaust gas. An ideal thermodynamics model of the exhaust gas compression, water injection and expansion was used to investigate this modification. By changing the exhaust valve closing timing during the exhaust stroke, the optimum amount of exhaust can be recompressed, maximizing the net mean effective pressure of the steam expansion stroke (MEPsteam). The valve closing timing for maximum MEPsteam is limited by either 1 bar or the dew point temperature of the expansion gas/moisture mixture when the exhaust valve opens. The range of MEPsteam calculated for the geometry of a conventional gasoline engine and is from 0.75 to 2.5 bars. Typical combustion mean effective pressures (MEPcombustion) of naturally aspirated gasoline engines are up to 10 bar, thus this concept has the potential to significantly increase the engine efficiency and fuel economy.

  6. Roles of catalytic oxidation in control of vehicle exhaust emissions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalytic oxidation was initially associated with the early development of catalysis and it subsequently became a part of many industrial processes, so it is not surprising it was used to remove hydrocarbons and CO when it became necessary to control these emissions from cars. Later NOx was reduced in a process involving reduction over a Pt/Rh catalyst followed by air injection in front of a Pt-based oxidation catalyst. If over-reduction of NO to NH3 took place, or if H2S was produced, it was important these undesirable species were converted to NOx and SOx in the catalytic oxidation stage. When exhaust gas composition could be kept stoichiometric hydrocarbons, CO and NOx were simultaneously converted over a single Pt/Rh three-way catalyst (TWC). With modern TWCs car tailpipe emissions can be exceptionally low. NO is not catalytically dissociated to O2 and N2 in the presence of O2, it can only be reduced to N2. Its control from lean-burn gasoline engines involves catalytic oxidation to NO2 and thence nitrate that is stored and periodically reduced to N2 by exhaust gas enrichment. This method is being modified for diesel engines. These engines produce soot, and filtration is being introduced to remove it. The exhaust temperature of heavy-duty diesels is sufficient (250-400oC) for NO to be catalytically oxidised to NO2 over an upstream platinum catalyst that smoothly oxidises soot in the filter. The exhaust gas temperature of passenger car diesels is too low for this to take place all of the time, so trapped soot is periodically burnt in O2 above 550oC. Catalytic oxidation of higher than normal amounts of hydrocarbon and CO over an upstream catalyst is used to give sufficient temperature for soot combustion with O2 to take place. (author)

  7. Abnormal wear of exhaust valve seat under use of lead-free gasoline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The large problem in the use of lead-free gasoline is valve recession, in which the wear of an exhaust valve seat made of cast iron becomes large when lead-free gasoline is used, and the gas tightness is impaired, but its mechanism has been unknown. The authors have carried out the continuous measurement of wear with radioisotopes in order to solve this problem. As most of wear chips are mixed in condensed water, the measurement of wear can be carried out by the measurement of radioactivity in condensed water. As for the movement of a valve, besides the rotation, the side oscillation occurs violently. The making of a radioactive exhaust valve seat, the collection of wear chips, the collection efficiency of a filter, the measurement of the attenuation of radioactivity, the measurement of the rotation and side oscillation of an exhaust valve, and the experimental engine used are explained. The cast iron of the valve seat is deposited on the seating face of the exhaust valve, and it shaves the valve seat owing to the rotation and side oscillation of the exhaust valve. The wear increased rapidly in high evolution and high load operation. The rotation and side oscillation of the exhaust valve were intensified by high revolution. The effect of exhaust temperature was not large. (Kako, I.)

  8. 40 CFR 86.544-90 - Calculations; exhaust emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Calculations; exhaust emissions. 86... Regulations for 1978 and Later New Motorcycles; Test Procedures § 86.544-90 Calculations; exhaust emissions... of HC in exhaust gas. (A) For gasoline-fuel; DensityHC=576.8 g/m3-carbon atom (16.33...

  9. 40 CFR 92.129 - Exhaust sample analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Exhaust sample analysis. 92.129... (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92.129 Exhaust... is then applied to the analyzer's response to a sample of exhaust gas in order to compute the...

  10. La catalyse d'épuration des gaz d'échappement automobiles. Situation actuelle et nouvelles orientations Catalytic Automotive Exhaust Gas Depollution. Present Status and New Trends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prigent M.

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Cet article passe en revue les différents systèmes catalytiques de post-traitement utilisés actuellement sur la plupart des automobiles pour limiter leurs rejets de polluants. Les systèmes sont différenciés par leur mode de fonctionnement, le type de moteur à dépolluer (deux-temps, quatre-temps, diesel ou essence ou par leur mode de réalisation. Les nouvelles orientations, prévues pour respecter les futures réglementations antipollution, sont également décrites. On montre que certains véhicules prototypes, équipés de moteurs à combustion interne, sont capables d'avoir des émissions très proches de zéro tout comme les véhicules électriques. A review is made of the various types of exhaust gas aftertreatment systems presently used on most vehicles to reduce pollutant emissions. The systems are differentiated by their mode of action, according to the engine type to be depolluted (two-stroke, four-stroke, diesel or spark-ignition, and by their type of make-up. The major developments foreseen in the future, in view of compliance with the new legislations, are described. It is shown that some prototype vehicles with internal combustion engines are able to emit pollutant quantities really close to zero, such as electric cars.

  11. Gas-controlled heat-pipes for accurate temperature measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several gas-controlled heatpipes are operating at IMGC for primary temperature measurements from 100 to 962 deg. C. One consists of a stainless steel heat-pipe with a single thermometer well and uses 7N-pure mercury as working fluid; another is made in Inconel with six thermometer wells and uses 3N5-pure sodium as working fluid. Both heat-pipes are connected in parallel to the same accurate helium pressure control system made at IMGC. These heatpipes realize a very uniform and stable temperature zone, adequate for measurement at the millikelvin level with platinum resistance thermometers. The paper describes the two heat-pipes and their thermal characteristics, such as the temperature uniformity along the thermometer wells and their temperature response to a pressure change. For the study on the capillary structure, the heating system and the working fluids, heat-pipes in Pyrex glass with a conical connection for their opening and with three thermometer wells have been made. Some results, using pure water and a 3MTM speciality fluid for heat transfer applications, showed that a stability and uniformity of a few millikelvin can be obtained for short-term periods (about 10-15 min) without any pressure control, around the boiling temperature

  12. Variations of the gas temperature in He/N2 barrier discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For obtaining the gas temperature in the micro-discharge areas and in the ambient gas of dielectric barrier discharges in helium/nitrogen mixtures we have studied the rotational temperature of the emission of molecular nitrogen ions

  13. Exhaust detritiation system for Jet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    If the torus or other tritium containment is breached for maintenance or accidentally, the Exhaust Detritiation System (EDS) prevents the escape of tritium to the Torus Hall, and elsewhere, by maintaining the breached system at slightly sub-atmospheric pressure. The exhaust gas from the breached system is detritiated and discharged through the stack. The system includes catalytic recombiners for the oxidation of tritiated compounds, and molecular sieve driers for the recovery of water vapour. Provision for internal recirculation of the gas allows a fast start-up of torus detritiation operations (within two minutes) and processing of feed gas at a variable rate. An isotopic swamping technique is used, as required, to displace HTO from molecular sieve during the drier regeneration cycle. All major operations are controlled by a programmable control system

  14. Combustion Noise and Pollutants Prediction for Injection Pattern and Exhaust Gas Recirculation Tuning in an Automotive Common-Rail Diesel Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arsie Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the last years, emissions standards for internal combustion engines are becoming more and more restrictive, particularly for NOx and soot emissions from Diesel engines. In order to comply with these requirements, OEMs have to face with innovative combustion concepts and/or sophisticate after-treatment devices. In both cases, the role of the Engine Management System (EMS is increasingly essential, following the large number of actuators and sensors introduced and the need to meet customer expectations on performance and comfort. On the other hand, the large number of control variables to be tuned imposes a massive recourse to the experimental testing which is poorly sustainable in terms of time and money. In order to reduce the experimental effort and the time to market, the application of simulation models for EMS calibration has become fundamental. Predictive models, validated against a limited amount of experimental data, allow performing detailed analysis on the influence of engine control variables on pollutants, comfort and performance. In this paper, a simulation analysis on the impact of injection pattern and Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR rate on fuel consumption, combustion noise, NO and soot emissions is presented for an automotive Common-Rail Diesel engine. Simulations are accomplished by means of a quasi-dimensional multi-zone model of in-cylinder processes. Furthermore a methodology for in-cylinder pressure processing is presented to estimate combustion noise contribution to radiated noise. Model validation is carried out by comparing simulated in-cylinder pressure traces and exhaust emissions with experimental data measured at the test bench in steady-state conditions. Effects of control variables on engine performance, noise and pollutants are analyzed by imposing significant deviation of EGR rate and injection pattern (i.e. rail pressure, start-of-injection, number of injections. The results evidence that quasi-dimensional in-cylinder models can be effective in supporting the engine control design toward the optimal tuning of EMS with significant saving of time and money.

  15. New high temperature gas flow cell developed at ISIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A flow-through quartz gas cell, together with a gas flow control and monitoring system, has been designed and constructed at ISIS. This equipment allows neutron powder diffraction data to be collected on samples at temperatures up to around 1300 K when exposed to user chosen mixtures of O2, Ar, CO2, and CO. By exploiting the sensitivity of neutrons to the presence of light atoms such as oxygen, it is possible to probe the crystal structure of oxide materials as a function of oxygen partial pressures down to log10p(O2) of about -20. The resultant structural information can then be correlated with the bulk properties of the materials, whose research and technological interests lie in fields such as energy production, storage materials, catalysis, and earth science.

  16. CO{sub 2}-fertilization via exhaust gas treatment of reciprocating gas engines: developments and experiences; Fertilisation au CO{sub 2} par traitement des gaz provenant de moteurs a gaz alternatifs: developpement et experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bekker, M.; Hoving, K.; Klimstra, J.; Top, H. [N.V. Nederlandse Gasunie (Netherlands)

    2000-07-01

    The Dutch climate is such that greenhouses are used to produce vegetables, flowers and other plants. To heat the greenhouse, boilers and combined heat and power systems (CHP) are used. CHP has a better fuel utilisation than a boiler because of the simultaneously production of heat and power. In a greenhouse, CO{sub 2} has to be added to compensate the CO{sub 2} consumed by the plants to grow. Higher CO{sub 2} concentration than ambient are being used to increase plant growth and yield. The use of 'clean' flue gas from boilers was common practice but nowadays flue gas of engines can be used after cleaning. Exhaust gas cleaning systems (EGC) based on a Selective Reduction Catalyst and an Oxidation Catalyst make this possible. This paper describes the principle of these EGCs, gives insight into the important parameters which determine the required cleanliness and discusses the research results of Gasunie Research on this topic. It is found that different catalyst makes have their own specific behaviour depending on the monolith and active material and the how the catalyst is manufactured, mechanical mixed or impregnated. The use of CHP gives a high fuel utilisation and, in combination with EGC, increased crop yields. This results in an even more efficient use of the primary fuel, natural gas. (authors)

  17. Exhaust gas emissions from various automotive fuels for light-duty vehicles. Effects on health, environment and energy utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main aim of the investigation has been to assess the effects on health and environment from various alternative fuels for light-duty vehicles. Effects that can be identified and quantified, such as acidification, ozone formation, cancer risk and climate change, have been of primary interest but other effects, such as respiratory diseases, have also been investigated. Data have been collected through literature surveys for subsequent calculation of the mentioned effects in different time-frames. Corrections have been used to take into consideration the influence of climate, ageing and driving pattern. Emissions generated in fuel production have also been accounted for. The most significant and important differences between the fuels have been found for effects as ozone formation cancer risk and particulate emissions. Alternative fuels, such as methanol and methane (natural gas and biogas), significantly decrease the ozone formation in comparison to petrol, while ethanol, methanol and methane are advantageous concerning cancer risk. The particulate emissions are considerably higher for diesel engines fuelled by diesel oil and RME in comparison to the other fuels. In the future, the importance of acid emissions in the fuel production will increase since the NOx and SOx emissions will decrease from the vehicles. The emissions of climate gases could be significantly reduced by using non-fossil fuels but the efficiency of the drive train is also of importance. The technical development potential for further emission reductions is considerable for all fuels but the advantage for the best fuel options will remain in the future

  18. Design of indirect gas turbine cycle for a modular high temperature gas cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a design of the indirect gas turbine cycle for the 200MWt pebble bed MHTGR. In the design, the helium out of the Intermediate Heat eXchanger (IHX) is extracted to a small RPV cooling system. The gas flows through a small RPV recuperator and is cooled down, then it is used to cool the RPV. The whole primary circuit is integrated in a pressure vessel. The core inlet/outlet temperatures are 550 deg. C/900 deg. C, which can supply a gas heat source of 500 deg. C/850 deg. C in the secondary side. The heat source could be used to drive a nitrogen gas turbine cycle and a plant busbar electricity generation efficiency of about 48% is estimated. The thermodynamic calculation, preliminary design of the system components, and the important accident analysis are described in this paper. (author). 5 refs, 3 figs, 4 tabs

  19. Brayton Cycle for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes research on improving the Brayton cycle efficiency for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). In this study, we are investigating the efficiency of an indirect helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion side of an HTGR power plant. A reference case based on a 250-MW(thermal) pebble bed HTGR was developed using helium gas as a working fluid in both the primary and power conversion sides. The commercial computer code HYSYS was used for process optimization. A numerical model using the Visual-Basic (V-B) computer language was also developed to assist in the evaluation of the Brayton cycle efficiency. Results from both the HYSYS simulation and the V-B model were compared with Japanese calculations based on the 300-MW(electric) Gas Turbine High-Temperature Reactor (GTHTR) that was developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. After benchmarking our models, parametric investigations were performed to see the effect of important parameters on the cycle efficiency. We also investigated single-shaft versus multiple-shaft arrangements for the turbomachinery. The results from this study are applicable to other reactor concepts such as fast gas-cooled reactors, supercritical water reactors, and others. The ultimate goal of this study is to use other fluids such as supercritical carbon dioxide for the HTGR power conversion loop in order to improve the cycle efficiency over that of the helium Brayton cycle. This study is in progress, and the results will be published in a subsequent paper

  20. Brayton Cycle for High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes research on improving the Brayton cycle efficiency for a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR). In this study, we are investigating the efficiency of an indirect helium Brayton cycle for the power conversion side of an HTGR power plant. A reference case based on a 250-MW(thermal) pebble bed HTGR was developed using helium gas as a working fluid in both the primary and power conversion sides. The commercial computer code HYSYS was used for process optimization. A numerical model using the Visual-Basic (V-B) computer language was also developed to assist in the evaluation of the Brayton cycle efficiency. Results from both the HYSYS simulation and the V-B model were compared with Japanese calculations based on the 300-MW(electric) Gas Turbine High-Temperature Reactor (GTHTR) that was developed by the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. After benchmarking our models, parametric investigations were performed to see the effect of important parameters on the cycle efficiency. We also investigated single-shaft versus multiple-shaft arrangements for the turbomachinery. The results from this study are applicable to other reactor concepts such as fast gas-cooled reactors, supercritical water reactors, and others.The ultimate goal of this study is to use other fluids such as supercritical carbon dioxide for the HTGR power conversion loop in order to improve the cycle efficiency over that of the helium Brayton cycle. This study is in progress, and the results will be published in a subsequent paper

  1. Gas-Metal Reactions at High Temperature with Particular Reference to Niobium-Gas Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most serious disadvantages to the use of niobium as a high temperature construction material is its relatively high reactivity with gases. When appreciable amounts of gases are dissolved in the metal lattice, the material becomes very brittle. The equilibrium states between the solid solution and gas phase can be studied effectively by gas- absorption and degassing experiments performed at high temperature and under low pressure. Under these conditions the reaction of nitrogen, oxygen and water vapour with niobium was evaluated gravimetrically and volumetrically. It was found that in the Nb-N system the condensed phases are in equilibrium with molecular nitrogen, whereas in the Nb-O system the gas phase consists of volatile oxides and the oxygen partial pressure can be neglected. In the Nb-N system equilibrium pressures were measured as a function of nitrogen concentration at temperatures between 1600 and 2200°C. Based upon these results, the p-T-c diagram for the metal-rich side of the system was established up to 30 at.% N and some thermodynamic data were calculated. In the Nb-O system evaporation rates of the volatile oxides were measured at temperatures between 1600 and 2300°C, under vacuum and in an oxygen or water vapour atmosphere at pressures of less than 10-2 torr. With presence of oxygen or water vapour a dynamic equilibrium was obtained, for a definite pressure and temperature range, between gas absorption and evaporation of volatile oxides from the niobium-oxygen solid solution. Equations were established showing quantitative relationships between oxygen concentration, temperature and oxygen or water vapour pressure in dynamic equilibrium. In addition, the vapour pressure of the volatile oxides was determined, as were also the respective values of the activation energies of the gas-absorption and degassing reactions. From the oxygen to niobium ratio of the volatile component and from the dependence of this ratio on temperature and concentration it can be concluded that the oxides NbO and NbO2 evaporate. The thermodynamic data obtained for niobium-gas systems were compared with the corresponding values for tantalum, which show somilar behaviour with oxygen and nitrogen. (author)

  2. Thorium fueled high temperature gas cooled reactors. An assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of thorium as a fertile fuel for the High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor (HTR) instead of uranium has been reviewed. It has been concluded that the use of thorium might be beneficial to reduce the actinide waste production. To achieve a real advancement, the uranium of the spent fuel has to be recycled and the requested make-up fissile material for the fresh fuel has to be used in the form of highly-enriched uranium. A self-sustaining fuel cycle may be possible in the HTR of large core size, but this could reduce the inherent safety features of the design. (orig.)

  3. The transition temperature of the dilute interacting Bose gas

    CERN Document Server

    Baym, G A; Holzmann, M; Laloë, F; Vautherin, D; Baym, Gordon; Blaizot, Jean-Paul; Holzmann, Markus; Laloë, Franck; Vautherin, Dominique

    1999-01-01

    We show that the critical temperature of a uniform dilute Bose gas must increase linearly with the s-wave scattering length describing the repulsion between the particles. Because of infrared divergences, the magnitude of the shift cannot be obtained from perturbation theory, even in the weak coupling regime; rather, it is proportional to the size of the critical region in momentum space. By means of a self-consistent calculation of the quasiparticle spectrum at low momenta at the transition, we find an estimate of the effect in reasonable agreement with numerical simulations.

  4. Fission gas release from uranium dioxide in high temperature transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiments described in this thesis investigate the kinetics and mechanisms for release of inert fission gases from irradiated fuel (uranium dioxide) during temperature transients, occuring in AGR type and PWR type reactors. A description is given of the fundamental physical properties of uranium dioxide with particular emphasis placed on the effects of irradiation damage and the build-up of fission product concentrations. A brief review is given of the principle mechanisms by which gases are thought to be released, covering both thermal and irradiation induced processes. The main design features of the Civil Advanced Gas Cooled Reactor (CAGR) and Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) systems, concentrating on the specifications and normal operating conditions of the uranium dioxide fuel. This is followed by a brief description of the conditions anticipated during postulated reactor malfunctions. Two classes of fault are considered, in which the fuel temperature increases through loss of coolant efficiency or a rise in heat generation rate. (author)

  5. Power Conversion Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh; Richard Moore; Robert Barner

    2005-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is investigating a Brayton cycle efficiency improvement on a high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) as part of Generation-IV nuclear engineering research initiative. There are some technical issues to be resolved before the selection of the final design of the high temperature gascooled reactor, called as a Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is supposed to be built at the INEEL by year 2017. The technical issues are the selection of the working fluid, direct vs. indirect cycle, power cycle type, the optimized design in terms of a number of intercoolers, and others. In this paper, we investigated a number of working fluids for the power conversion loop, direct versus indirect cycle, the effect of intercoolers, and other thermal hydraulics issues. However, in this paper, we present part of the results we have obtained. HYSYS computer code was used along with a computer model developed using Visual Basic computer language.

  6. Anisotropic ordering in a two-temperature lattice gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szolnoki, Attila; Szabó, György

    1997-01-01

    We consider a two-dimensional lattice gas model with repulsive nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor interactions that evolves in time according to anisotropic Kawasaki dynamics. The hopping of particles along the principal directions is governed by two heat baths at different temperatures T-x and T-y. The stationary states of this nonequilibrium model are studied using a simple mean-field theory and linear stability analysis. The results are improved by a generalized dynamical mean-field approximation. In the stable ordered state the particles form parallel chains which are oriented along the direction of the higher temperature. In the resulting phase diagram in the T-x-T-y plane the critical temperature curve shows a weak maximum as a function of the parallel temperature which is confirmed by Monte Carlo simulations. Finite-size scaling analysis suggests that the model leaves the equilibrium universality class of the x-y model with cubic anisotropy and is described by the Ising exponents.

  7. Temperature profile and producer gas composition of high temperature air gasification of oil palm fronds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental pollution and scarcity of reliable energy source are the current pressing global problems which need a sustainable solution. Conversion of biomass to a producer gas through gasification process is one option to alleviate the aforementioned problems. In the current research the temperature profile and composition of the producer gas obtained from the gasification of oil palm fronds by using high temperature air were investigated and compared with unheated air. By preheating the gasifying air at 500°C the process temperature were improved and as a result the concentration of combustible gases and performance of the process were improved. The volumetric percentage of CO, CH4 and H2 were improved from 22.49, 1.98, and 9.67% to 24.98, to 2.48% and 13.58%, respectively. In addition, HHV, carbon conversion efficiency and cold gas efficiency were improver from 4.88 MJ/Nm3, 83.8% and 56.1% to 5.90 MJ/Nm3, 87.3% and 62.4%, respectively.

  8. Extraction of Mg(OH)2 from Mg silicate minerals with NaOH assisted with H2O: implications for CO2 capture from exhaust flue gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeddu, Silvia; Priestnall, Michael; Godoy, Erik; Kumar, R Vasant; Raymahasay, Sugat; Evans, Michael; Wang, Ruofan; Manenye, Seabelo; Kinoshita, Hajime

    2015-12-01

    The utilisation of Mg(OH)2 to capture exhaust CO2 has been hindered by the limited availability of brucite, the Mg(OH)2 mineral in natural deposits. Our previous study demonstrated that Mg(OH)2 can be obtained from dunite, an ultramafic rock composed of Mg silicate minerals, in highly concentrated NaOH aqueous systems. However, the large quantity of NaOH consumed was considered an obstacle for the implementation of the technology. In the present study, Mg(OH)2 was extracted from dunite reacted in solid systems with NaOH assisted with H2O. The consumption of NaOH was reduced by 97% with respect to the NaOH aqueous systems, maintaining a comparable yield of Mg(OH)2 extraction, i.e. 64.8-66%. The capture of CO2 from a CO2-N2 gas mixture was tested at ambient conditions using a Mg(OH)2 aqueous slurry. Mg(OH)2 almost fully dissolved and reacted with dissolved CO2 by forming Mg(HCO3)2 which remained in equilibrium storing the CO2 in the aqueous solution. The CO2 balance of the process was assessed from the emissions derived from the power consumption for NaOH production and Mg(OH)2 extraction together with the CO2 captured by Mg(OH)2 derived from dunite. The process resulted as carbon neutral when dunite is reacted at 250 °C for durations of 1 and 3 hours and CO2 is captured as Mg(HCO3)2. PMID:26391815

  9. SiC based MOSFET transistors for high temperature industrial gas sensing applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd Spetz, Anita

    2000-03-01

    Field effect sensors based on silicon carbide have been demonstrated for industrial applications at high temperatures and in rough environments. Metal insulator silicon carbide, MISiC, Schottky diode devices as well as FET transistor devices that can be operated up to 700°C are presented. For high operation temperatures the sensors respond within milliseconds to a change between an oxidizing and reducing atmosphere, and cylinder specific monitoring of a combustion engine has been demonstrated. Changing the temperature and the type of gate metal gives sensors with diverse response patterns to different components in e.g. exhaust gases and flue gases. Sensor devices operating around 300°C with some selectivity to nitric oxide in synthetic diesel exhaust gases are presented. At a higher temperature, about 500°C, some selectivity to HC is found in synthetic petrol exhausts. Boilers of the size 0.5 - 5 MW constitute a potential market for combustion monitoring sensors. We have demonstrated MISiC devices with high selectivity to carbon monoxide in flue gases. References: Fast responding air/fuel sensor for individual cylinder control, A. Baranzahi, P. Tobias, A. Lloyd Spetz, I Lundström, P. Mårtensson, M. Glavmo, A. Göras, J. Nytomt, P. Salomonsson, and H. Larsson, SAE Technical Paper Series 972940, Combustion and Emisson Formation in SI Engines, (SP-1300) (1997) 231-240. MISiC Schottky Diodes as NOx sensors in simulated exhausts, H. Svenningstorp, P. Tobias, C. Wijk, I. Lundström, P. Salomonsson, L.-G. Ekedahl, and A. Lloyd Spetz, proc. Eurosensors XIII, The Hague, The Netherlands, September 12-15, pp. 501-504, 1999. Measurements with MISiC and MOS sensors in flue gases, L. Unéus, P. Ljung, M. Mattsson, P. Mårtenssson, R. Wigren, P. Tobias, I. Lundström, L-G. Ekedahl and A. Lloyd Spetz, proc. Eurosensors XIII, The Hague, The Netherlands, September 12-15, pp. 521-524, 1999.

  10. Metaphysics methods development for high temperature gas cooled reactor analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas cooled reactors have been characterized as one of the most promising nuclear reactor concepts in the Generation-IV technology road map. Considerable research has been performed on the design and safety analysis of these reactors. However, the calculational tools being used to perform these analyses are not state-of-the-art and are not capable of performing detailed three-dimensional analyses. This paper presents the results of an effort to develop an improved thermal-hydraulic solver for the pebble bed type high temperature gas cooled reactors. The solution method is based on the porous medium approach and the momentum equation including the modified Ergun's resistance model for pebble bed is solved in three-dimensional geometry. The heat transfer in the pebble bed is modeled considering the local thermal non-equilibrium between the solid and gas, which results in two separate energy equations for each medium. The effective thermal conductivity of the pebble-bed can be calculated both from Zehner-Schluender and Robold correlations. Both the fluid flow and the heat transfer are modeled in three dimensional cylindrical coordinates and can be solved in steady-state and time dependent. The spatial discretization is performed using the finite volume method and the theta-method is used in the temporal discretization. A preliminary verification was performed by comparing the results with the experiments conducted at the SANA test facility. This facility is located at the Institute for Safety Research and Reactor Technology (ISR), Julich, Germany. Various experimental cases are modeled and good agreement in the gas and solid temperatures is observed. An on-going effort is to model the control rod ejection scenarios as described in the OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR-400 benchmark problem. In order to perform these analyses PARCS reactor simulator code will be coupled with the new thermal-hydraulic solver. Furthermore, some of the other anticipated accident scenarios in the benchmark require full three dimensional modeling and will be analyzed to include the malfunctioning of one of the de-fueling chutes and blockage of the helium flow channels in the side reflector at the PBMR-400 model

  11. Vacuum exhaustion system for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An ejector is disposed near a vacuum vessel and connected to the vacuum vessel by a short pipeline. The ejector is disposed at the inner side of a boundary of a high magnetic field area of a thermonuclear device. An argon gas is used as a driving gas for the ejector. If an argon gas is supplied to the ejector by an argon gas supply pipe, gases in the vacuum vessel and the pipeline are exhausted by the effect of the ejector. The pipeline of the exhaustion side of the ejector is connected to a gas recovery device. The gas recovering device comprises an argon trap having a heat exchanger therein. The gas recovering device is connected to an argon gas reutilizing circuit. The gas recovering device is connected to a backing pump system. The backing pump system is a mechanical type vacuum pump such as a turbo molecular pump. (I.N.)

  12. Medium-size high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) experience for the 40-MW(e) Peach Bottom Nuclear Generating Station of Philadelphia Electric Company and the 330-MW(e) Fort St. Vrain Nuclear Generating Station of the Public Service Company of Colorado. Both reactors are graphite moderated and helium cooled, operating at approx. 7600C (14000F) and using the uranium/thorium fuel cycle. The plants have demonstrated the inherent safety characteristics, the low activation of components, and the high efficiency associated with the HTGR concept. This experience has been translated into the conceptual design of a medium-sized 1170-MW(t) HTGR for generation of 450 MW of electric power. The concept incorporates inherent HTGR safety characteristics [a multiply redundant prestressed concrete reactor vessel (PCRV), a graphite core, and an inert single-phase coolant] and engineered safety features

  13. High temperature superconductors as a two-dimensional electron gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammadizadeh, M.R.; Akhavan, M. [Magnet Research Laboratory (MRL), Department of Physics, Sharif University of Technology, P.O. Box 11365-9161, Tehran (Iran)

    2004-05-01

    Based on transport and magnetic measurements on Gd(Ba{sub 2-x}Pr{sub x})Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7+{delta}}, and some other properties of high temperature superconductors (HTSC), we have extracted similarities between superconductors, two-dimensional electron gas (2D-EG) i.e., MOSFETs. These are based on properties such as superconductor-insulator transition in superconductors and metal-insulator transition (MIT) in 2D-EG with doping and magnetic field, localization in transport conduction, quantum unit of resistance at MIT, larger change in resistivity from critical doping to the insulating side in comparison with change from critical doping to the metallic side, and strongly electron-electron coupling. These similarities could lead to a deeper understanding of HTSC and 2D-EG systems. (copyright 2004 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Advances in High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuel Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication reports on the results of a coordinated research project on advances in high temperature gas cooled reactor (HTGR) fuel technology and describes the findings of research activities on coated particle developments. These comprise two specific benchmark exercises with the application of HTGR fuel performance and fission product release codes, which helped compare the quality and validity of the computer models against experimental data. The project participants also examined techniques for fuel characterization and advanced quality assessment/quality control. The key exercise included a round-robin experimental study on the measurements of fuel kernel and particle coating properties of recent Korean, South African and US coated particle productions applying the respective qualification measures of each participating Member State. The summary report documents the results and conclusions achieved by the project and underlines the added value to contemporary knowledge on HTGR fuel.

  15. Gearbox scheme in high temperature reactor helium gas turbine system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helium Turbine is used in High Temperature Reactor-helium Gas Turbine (HTR-GT) system, by which the direct helium circulation between the reactor and turbine generator system will come true. Between helium turbine and generator, there is gearbox device which reduces the turbine rotation speed to normal speed of the generator. Three optional gearbox schemes are discussed. (1) Single reduction cylindrical gearbox, which consists of one high speed gear and one low speed gear. Its advantage is simple structure, easy to manufacture, and high reliability, while disadvantage is large volume and misalignment of input and output axle. (2) Planetary gear mechanism with static planet carrier. (3) Planetary gear mechanism with static internal gear. The latter two gearbox devices have similar structure. Their advantage is small volume and high reduction gear ratio, while disadvantage are complicated structure, many gears, low reliability and low mechanical efficiency. (author)

  16. Vacuum exhaust duct used for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention concerns a vacuum exhaust duct used for a thermonuclear device. A cylindrical metal liners is lined with a gap to the inside of a vacuum exhaust duct main body. Bellows are connected to both ends of the metal liners and the end of the bellows is welded to the vacuum exhaust duct main body. Futher, a heater is mounted to the metal liner on the side of the vacuum exhaust duct main body, and the metal liner is heated by the heater to conduct baking for the vacuum exhaust duct main body. Accordingly, since there is no requirement for elevating the temperature of the vacuum exhaust duct upon conducting baking, the vacuum exhaust duct scarcely suffers substantial deformation due to heat expansion. Further, there is also no substantial deformation for the bellows disposed between the outer circumference of the vacuum vessel and a portion of a vacuum exhaust duct, so that the durability of the bellows is greatly improved. (I.S.)

  17. Very-high-temperature gas reactor environmental impacts assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The operation of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), a slightly modified General Atomic type High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) with 1600 F primary coolant, as a source of process heat for the 14000F steam-methanation reformer step in a hydrogen producing plant (via hydrogasification of coal liquids) was examined. It was found that: (a) from the viewpoint of product contamination by fission and activation products, an Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) is probably not necessary; and (b) long term steam corrosion of the core support posts may require increasing their diameter (a relatively minor design adjustment). However, the hydrogen contaminant in the primary coolant which permeates the reformer may reduce steam corrosion but may produce other problems which have not as yet been resolved. An IHX in parallel with both the reformer and steam generator would solve these problems, but probably at greater cost than that of increasing the size of the core support posts. It is recommended that this corrosion problem be examined in more detail, especially by investigating the performance of current fossil fuel heated reformers in industry. Detailed safety analysis of the VHTR would be required to establish definitely whether the IHX can be eliminated. Water and hydrogen ingress into the reactor system are potential problems which can be alleviated by an IHX. These problems will require analysis, research and development within the program required for development of the VHTR

  18. Helium chemistry for high temperature gas-cooled reactors (Thesis)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemistry control is important for the helium coolant of high-temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGRs) because impurities cause oxidation of the graphite applied to the core structure and corrosion of high-temperature materials utilized at the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX). This thesis describes the helium chemistry which should be maintained adequately during reactor operations not only for the safety and stability of operations, but also for the increase of economic competitiveness by reducing replacing times of IHXs and simplifying helium purification systems. In this paper the chemical impurity behaviour was clarified by the obtained chemistry data by the Japan's HTTR and the criteria of chemical impurities for the GTHTR300C, which can supply both of electricity and hydrogen for the future hydrogen society, was proposed with its control technologies. In this R and D, the chemical impurity behavior, purification abilities, emitted impurities from graphite and thermal insulator, and hydrogen permeation at the heat transfer tubes of the IHX during the 950degC operation of the HTTR were evaluated. Utilizing these results, radical reactions at the core were identified. Also, chemical impurity criteria were proposed to avoid structural degradation of the Hastelloy XR and thermophysical properties deterioration at the heat transfer tubes. As a result, active chemistry control technologies where the necessary chemistry impurity will be injected in response to the chemical balance at the core are proposed for the GTHTR300C. The proposing technology is expected to contribute economically to the purification systems of the future HTGRs. (author)

  19. Very-high-temperature gas reactor environmental impacts assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baumann, C. D.; Barton, C. J.; Compere, E. L.; Row, T. H.

    1977-08-01

    The operation of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR), a slightly modified General Atomic type High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) with 1600 F primary coolant, as a source of process heat for the 1400/sup 0/F steam-methanation reformer step in a hydrogen producing plant (via hydrogasification of coal liquids) was examined. It was found that: (a) from the viewpoint of product contamination by fission and activation products, an Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) is probably not necessary; and (b) long term steam corrosion of the core support posts may require increasing their diameter (a relatively minor design adjustment). However, the hydrogen contaminant in the primary coolant which permeates the reformer may reduce steam corrosion but may produce other problems which have not as yet been resolved. An IHX in parallel with both the reformer and steam generator would solve these problems, but probably at greater cost than that of increasing the size of the core support posts. It is recommended that this corrosion problem be examined in more detail, especially by investigating the performance of current fossil fuel heated reformers in industry. Detailed safety analysis of the VHTR would be required to establish definitely whether the IHX can be eliminated. Water and hydrogen ingress into the reactor system are potential problems which can be alleviated by an IHX. These problems will require analysis, research and development within the program required for development of the VHTR.

  20. Device for liquefying and storing exhaust gases containing radioactive substances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object: To always maintain an exhaust liquefying and storing tank in a cooled state so that the exhaust gases may be liquefied and stored in a short period of time. Structure: A liquid nitrogen tank is disposed within a cooling tank with an thermal insulator affixed to inner surfaces thereof, a heat exchanger for pre-cooling the exhaust gases by nitrogen is embedded into said thermal insulator, and an exhaust gas liquefying and storing tank having a liquefyer for liquefying the precooled exhaust gases by the liquid nitrogen encased therein is disposed within the liquid nitrogen tank. (Kawakami, Y.)

  1. The gas corrosion of the cobalt base clad layer at elevated temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Smolenska

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Purpose of this paper is to evaluate the microstructural and mechanical properties evolution of thelaser and PTA clad layers made of the powder containing cobalt after oxidation in air (750°C, 200 hours andcorrosion in exhaust gases (700°C, two month.Design/methodology/approach: The layers were made by cladding technique. Cladding was conducted witha high power diode laser HDPL ROFIN SINAR DL 020 and Plasma Transformed Arc method. The subsequenttracks were overlapped by 30÷40%. The performance of the hardfaced materials were evaluated by microstructure(optical and scanning electron microscope SEM, chemical analysis and micro hardness measurements.Findings: After heat treatment the microstructure of the clad layers did not change much, neither on the top partnor in the clad/steel interface. However the oxide layer on the surface is observed. The EDS analyze revile thecomposition of this scale which consisted generally of chromium and iron oxides. The semi-quantitative chemicalanalysis (EDS of the dendritic regions and micro regions confirms changes in chemical contents before and afteroxidation and after corrosion in exhaust gases. The oxidation at temperature 750°C for 200 hours in air and fortwo month in exhaust gases did not influence on the morphology of the clad layers neither on the top part nor inthe clad/steel interface. However changes in chemical composition were observed. On the surface of both sort ofclads the oxide layers were observed. These sorts of layers are resistant for the hot exhausted gases.Research limitations/implications: During the future research kinetic analyze of high temperature corrosionshould be done also for different temperature and times of the process.Practical implications: The layers were designed as a method to prolong service time for the ship engineexhausted valve.Originality/value: The chemical composition of the powder was new one. Also using the laser claddingtechnique for ship engine parts is a subject of interest.

  2. Thermal Hydraulics of the Very High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang Oh; Eung Kim; Richard Schultz; Mike Patterson; Davie Petti

    2009-10-01

    The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) is conducting research on the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design concept for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, thermal neutron spectrum reactor that will produce electricity and hydrogen in a highly efficient manner. The NGNP reactor core will be either a prismatic graphite block type core or a pebble bed core. The NGNP will use very high-burnup, low-enriched uranium, TRISO-coated fuel, and have a projected plant design service life of 60 years. The VHTR concept is considered to be the nearest-term reactor design that has the capability to efficiently produce hydrogen. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during reactor core-accidents. The objectives of the NGNP Project are to: Demonstrate a full-scale prototype VHTR that is commercially licensed by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and Demonstrate safe and economical nuclear-assisted production of hydrogen and electricity. The DOE laboratories, led by the INL, perform research and development (R&D) that will be critical to the success of the NGNP, primarily in the areas of: • High temperature gas reactor fuels behavior • High temperature materials qualification • Design methods development and validation • Hydrogen production technologies • Energy conversion. This paper presents current R&D work that addresses fundamental thermal hydraulics issues that are relevant to a variety of possible NGNP designs.

  3. Critical power concept adapted for the specific table tennis test: comparisons between exhaustion criteria, mathematical modeling, and correlation with gas exchange parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zagatto, A; Miranda, M F; Gobatto, C A

    2011-07-01

    The purposes of this study were to determine and to compare the critical power concept adapted for the specific table tennis test (critical frequency - C F ) estimated from 5 mathematical models and using 2 different exhaustion criteria (voluntary and technical exhaustions). Also, it was an aim to assess the relationship between C F estimated from mathematical models and respiratory compensation point (RCP), peak oxygen uptake ( V?O (2PEAK)) and minimal intensity at which V?O (2PEAK) ( F V?O (2PEAK)) appears. 9 male table tennis players [18(1) years; 62.3(4.4) kg] performed the maximal incremental test and 3-4 exhaustive exercise bouts to estimate C F s (balls · min (-1)). The exhaustion time and C F obtained were independent of the exhaustion criteria. The C F from 3-parameter model [45.2(7.0)-voluntary, 43.2(5.6)-technical] was lower than C F estimated by linear 2-parameter models, frequency-time (-1) [53.5(3.6)-voluntary, 53.5(3.5)-technical] and total ball thrown-time [52.2(3.5)-voluntary, 52.2(3.5)-technical] but significantly correlated. C F values from 2 linear models were significantly correlated with RCP [47.4(3.4) balls · min (-1)], and C F values of the linear and nonlinear models were correlated with F V?O (2PEAK) [56.7(3.4) balls · min (-1)]. However, there were no significant correlations between C F values and V?O (2PEAK) [49.8(1.1)ml · kg (-1) · min (-1)]. The results were not modified by exhaustion criteria. The 2 linear and non-linear 2-parameter models can be used to estimate aerobic endurance in specific table tennis tests. PMID:21563021

  4. Hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Ristiniemi, Heli; Perski, Aleksander; Lyskov, Eugene; Emtner, Margareta

    2014-01-01

    Chronic stress is among the most common diagnoses in Sweden, most commonly in the form of exhaustion syndrome (ICD-10 classification – F43.8). The majority of patients with this syndrome also have disturbed breathing (hyperventilation). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome. Thirty patients with exhaustion syndrome and 14 healthy subjects were evaluated with the Nijmegen Symptom Questionnaire (NQ). The participants completed ...

  5. Diesel Exhaust After-Treatment by Silicon Carbide Fiber Filter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuhiro Yamamoto

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available To reduce particulate matter (PM in diesel exhaust gas, a diesel particulate filter (DPF has been developed. The thermal durability of existing platinum catalyst-supported DPFs is inadequate. We are focusing on a non-catalytic after-treatment of silicon carbide (SiC fibers with highly thermal durability. In this study, we simulated the processes of soot deposition and oxidation. Results show that even in exhaust gas without soot, a complex flow pattern is observed. The porosity of the filter is not constant along the flow direction, and the pressure gradient varies. The friction factor is slightly larger than the predicted value by the empirical equation in uniform porous media flow. Since the soot deposition occurs inside the filter, the depth filtration by SiC fibers was confirmed. In addition, the effects of filter temperature and oxygen concentration are clearly revealed. That is, comparing the oxidation at 700 °C, the deposited soot amount at 1200 and 1400 °C is decreased by 60% and 92%, respectively. Raising the oxygen concentration from 10% to 20% increases the oxidation efficiency from 42% to 64%. Although more work is needed over a wide range of operating conditions, a combination of these two parameters is important to achieve the non-catalytic exhaust after-treatment.

  6. 40 CFR 86.1310-2007 - Exhaust gas sampling and analytical system for gaseous emissions from heavy-duty diesel-fueled...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...analytical system for diesel engines requires a heated flame...valves, solenoids, pumps, and switches may...to perform the sample cooling primarily via dilution...of the introduction of engine exhaust into the CVS...unless a common sample pump is used for all...

  7. CFD Analysis of the Fuel Temperature in High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High temperature gas-cooled reactors (HTGR) have received a renewed interest as potential sources for future energy needs, particularly for a hydrogen production. Among the HTGRs, the pebble bed reactor (PBR) and a prismatic modular reactor (PMR) are considered as the nuclear heat source in Korea's nuclear hydrogen development and demonstration project. PBR uses coated fuel particles embedded in spherical graphite fuel pebbles. The fuel pebbles flow down through the core during an operation. PMR uses graphite fuel blocks which contain cylindrical fuel compacts consisting of the fuel particles. The fuel blocks also contain coolant passages and locations for absorber and control material. The maximum fuel temperature in the core hot spot is one of the important design parameters for both PBR and PMR. The objective of this study is to predict the fuel temperature distributions in PBR and PMR using a computational fluid dynamics(CFD) code, CFX-5. The reference reactor designs used in this analysis are PBMR400 and GT-MHR600

  8. Capture efficiency measurement of pollutants over a workbench with the reinforced slot exhaust system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavelek M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the measurement of the capture efficiency of pollutants by the slot reinforced exhaust system situated in two positions over the workbench. The slot reinforced exhaust system, which is known as REEXS, is the traditional slot exhaust hood equipped with an air supply inlet that intensifies exhausting along the axis of the exhaust hood. It can operate in traditional or reinforced exhaust modes. Measurements were made for the same air velocity in the suction slot and with the different momentum flux ratio of supplied and exhausted air flow. The tracer gas method was used for the capture efficiency measurement of the system. As the tracer gas the carbon dioxide was chosen. The knowledge of the shape and range of the effective exhaust area for various configurations in front of the exhaust hood is important for the exhaust hood setting according to a source of pollutants.

  9. Capture efficiency measurement of pollutants over a workbench with the reinforced slot exhaust system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pech, O.; Pavelek, M.

    2013-04-01

    The paper deals with the measurement of the capture efficiency of pollutants by the slot reinforced exhaust system situated in two positions over the workbench. The slot reinforced exhaust system, which is known as REEXS, is the traditional slot exhaust hood equipped with an air supply inlet that intensifies exhausting along the axis of the exhaust hood. It can operate in traditional or reinforced exhaust modes. Measurements were made for the same air velocity in the suction slot and with the different momentum flux ratio of supplied and exhausted air flow. The tracer gas method was used for the capture efficiency measurement of the system. As the tracer gas the carbon dioxide was chosen. The knowledge of the shape and range of the effective exhaust area for various configurations in front of the exhaust hood is important for the exhaust hood setting according to a source of pollutants.

  10. Atomic and molecular hydrogen gas temperatures in a low-pressure helicon plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuell, Cameron M.; Corr, Cormac S.

    2015-08-01

    Neutral gas temperatures in hydrogen plasmas are important for experimental and modelling efforts in fusion technology, plasma processing, and surface modification applications. To provide values relevant to these application areas, neutral gas temperatures were measured in a low pressure (evolution of the molecular gas temperature during a high power 1.1?ms plasma pulse was also investigated and found to vary considerably as a function of pressure.

  11. Duplex tab exhaust nozzle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim Jeff (Inventor); Martens, Steven (nmn) (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An exhaust nozzle includes a conical duct terminating in an annular outlet. A row of vortex generating duplex tabs are mounted in the outlet. The tabs have compound radial and circumferential aft inclination inside the outlet for generating streamwise vortices for attenuating exhaust noise while reducing performance loss.

  12. I. Textural/Structural tuning and nanoparticle stabilization of copper-containing nanocomposite materials. II. Generation of reducing agents for automotive exhaust gas purification via the processing of hydrocarbons in a PACT (plasma and catalysis integrated technologies) reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yu

    This research consists of two parts. The first part deals with the preparation and properties of copper-containing nanocomposite materials. For studies of textural tuning, structural tuning, or material sintering, copper/aluminum and copper/zinc nanocomposites were prepared via various inorganic synthesis methods including conventional coprecipitation methods and a novel urea-gelation/thermal-modification method that produces narrow distributions of pore sizes, high surface areas, and significantly higher specific metal loadings. Solid-solid reaction analysis and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis were developed for the determination of the mixing homogeneities of the copper/aluminum nanocomposites. A sintering experiment at 250-600°C for 350 h under methanol-steam reforming conditions was carried out to compare the stability of supported Cu0 nanoparticles. The mixing homogeneities of CuO/Al2O3 nanocomposites significantly affected the thermal stability of their reduced Cu0 crystallites. Creation of relatively narrow distributions of pore sizes with relatively small major pore diameters (e.g., 3.5 nm) can also be used for the stabilization of supported Cu0 nanoparticles. The supported nanoparticles with a relatively small initial size cannot ensure good thermal stability. A "hereditary" character on the homogeneity of copper/aluminum nanocomposites was revealed. Stepwise reduction and reoxidation were studied for the structural tuning and purification of Cu-Al-O spinels with isotropic and gradual unit-cell contractions. The second part of the research deals with the processing of hydrocarbons. Conversion of a model hydrocarbon (n-hexane or n-octane) in an AC discharge PACT (plasma and catalysis integrated technologies) reactor was verified to be an effective method to instantly produce reducing agents (e.g., hydrogen or/and light alkanes and alkenes), at room temperature and atmospheric pressure for automotive exhaust gas purification. Effects of electrode composition, hydrocarbon feedstock, electrode diameter, applied voltage, flow rate of carrier gas, gap size, and residence time of hydrocarbon molecules, were investigated systematically. Catalytic dehydrogenation, catalytic addition, and noncatalytic cracking reactions were discussed. Compared with space velocity, applied voltage has dominant effects on power consumption. Energy efficiency will increase as the residence time of feed molecules decreases, and decrease as applied voltage increases.

  13. Evaluation of loss coefficient at exhaust junction for turbocharger matching calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The suitability of the analysis for an unsteady compressible gas flow through an exhaust junction plays an important role in developing a computer program for the matching of a diesel engine to an exhaust turbocharger. The maximum momentary temperature differences between the lateral flow and the main flow at the junction is about 300 degrees C in an actual engine under operation. It is important to adopt boundary conditions compatible with the flow phenomena in order to improve the accuracy of the estimation of the exhaust energy. In previous works, the incompressible joining flow loss coefficients were employed in the computer program for the convenience of the calculation. In this study, the joining flow model of different kinds of gases has been assumed, and the flow loss coefficients are compared with incompressible ones. In this paper it is shown that the present results gives the precise boundary conditions for the computer program

  14. MELCOR Model Development of High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor is one of the major challenging issues on the development of licensing technology for HTGR. The safety evaluation tools of HTGR can be developed in two ways - development of new HTGR-specific codes or revision of existing codes. The KINS is considering using existing analytic tools to the extent feasible, with appropriate modifications for the intended purpose. The system-level MELCOR code is traditionally used for LWR safety analysis, which is capable of performing thermal-fluid and accident analysis, including fission-product transport and release. Recently, this code is being modified for the NGNP HTGR by the NRC. In this study, the MELCOR input model for HTGR with Reactor Cavity Cooling System (RCCS) was developed and the steady state performance was analyzed to evaluate the applicability in HTGR. HTGR model with design characteristics of GT-MHR was developed using MELCOR 2.1 code to validate the applicability of MELCOR code to HTGR. In addition, the steady state of GT-MHR was analyzed with the developed model. It was evaluated to predict well the design parameters of GT-MHR. The developed model can be used as the basis for accident analysis of HTGR with further update of packages such as Radio Nuclide (RN) package

  15. An Annular Mechanical Temperature Compensation Structure for Gas-Sealed Capacitive Pressure Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    Kohei Higuchi; Yonggang Jiang; Kazusuke Maenaka; Hidekuni Takao; Xiuchun Hao

    2012-01-01

    A novel gas-sealed capacitive pressure sensor with a temperature compensation structure is reported. The pressure sensor is sealed by Au-Au diffusion bonding under a nitrogen ambient with a pressure of 100 kPa and integrated with a platinum resistor-based temperature sensor for human activity monitoring applications. The capacitance-pressure and capacitance-temperature characteristics of the gas-sealed capacitive pressure sensor without temperature compensation structure are calculated. It is...

  16. Effect of combustion gas temperatures on the heat consumption of coke ovens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakagawa, T. (and others)

    1987-08-01

    The effects of theoretical flame temperature on average crosswall temperature, end flue wall temperature, net coking time and index of dust concentration were determined experimentally by changing top pressure, air ratio and fuel gas CV. It is concluded that oven heat consumption is reduced by increasing the flame temperature.

  17. Scaling Studies for High Temperature Test Facility and Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richard R. Schult; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; James R. Wolf; Brian Woods

    2012-02-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5-year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project. Because the NRC's interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC).

  18. Use of exhaust gas energy in heavy trucks using the Rankine process; Nutzung der Abgasenergie von Nutzfahrzeugen mit dem Rankine-Prozess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lutz, Rainer; Geskes, Peter; Pantow, Eberhard; Eitel, Jochen [Behr GmbH and Co. KG, Stuttgart (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    Worldwide emissions legislation, rising fuel prices and future standards for CO{sub 2} emissions will also require further efforts to be made to reduce the fuel consumption of commercial vehicle engines, for example by optimising thermal management. In a joint project with its partners AVL and ZF, Behr has developed a system for the recuperation of exhaust heat that can reduce fuel consumption by approximately 5 %. (orig.)

  19. Improvement of emissions and performance by using of air jet, exhaust gas re-circulation and insulation methods in a direct injection diesel engine

    OpenAIRE

    Jafarmadara S.; Hosenzadeh M.B.

    2013-01-01

    This article investigates the improvement of operation characteristics and emissions reduction by means of creating an air-cell inside the piston body, exhaust gases recirculating and insulating combustion chamber in a direct injection diesel engine simultaneously. The engine considered is a caterpillar 3401 which was modeled with an air-cell included as part of the piston geometry. This air-cell demonstrates that air injection in late combustion period can be effective in a significant...

  20. Protection against high temperature corrosion with laser welded claddings. Applied and tested on exhaust valve discs of large diesel engines burning heavy fuel oil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlager, D. [Waertsilae Switzerland Ltd., Winterthur (Switzerland); Theiler, C.; Kohn, H. [Bremer Inst. fuer Angewandte Strahltechnik, Bremen (Germany)

    2002-02-01

    In close co-operation between WaertsilaeSwitzerland and BIAS, exhaust valves of two-stroke diesel engines were clad by laser welding with functional coatings to improve the corrosion behaviour and extend the life cycle of these exhaust valves. The coatings consisted of different nickel-based alloys. The investigations were carried out in a period of three years. The cladding tests and experimental investigations were carried out at BIAS, whereas WaertsilaeSwitzerland organised the suitable valves and a seagoing ship for the testing. The inspections of the coatings on board and the evaluations of the results after valve dismounting were carried out jointly. In the preliminary stages of the study, the process window of various corrosion-resistant materials were determined and the most promising ones were applied on Nimonic 80A valve discs. The laser-clad valves were installed for test runs in a modern container ship. Depending on the process parameters and the corrosion resistant materials used the laser generated coatings were inspected after every 1000 h of service and evaluated comparatively. The results of this study are presented. (orig.)

  1. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikamatsu N, M. A. [Instituto Tecnologico y de Estudios Superiores de Monterrey, Campus Santa Fe, Av. Carlos Lazo No. 100, Santa Fe, 01389 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Puente E, F., E-mail: midori.chika@gmail.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2014-10-15

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  2. Proliferation resistance assessment of high temperature gas reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Generation IV International Forum has established different objectives for the new generation of reactors to accomplish. These objectives are focused on sustain ability, safety, economics and proliferation resistance. This paper is focused on how the proliferation resistance of the High Temperature Gas Reactors (HTGR) is assessed and the advantages that these reactors present currently. In this paper, the focus will be on explaining why such reactors, HTGR, can achieve the goals established by the GIF and can present a viable option in terms of proliferation resistance, which is an issue of great importance in the field of nuclear energy generation. The reason why the HTGR are being targeted in this writing is that these reactors are versatile, and present different options from modular reactors to reactors with the same size as the ones that are being operated today. Besides their versatility, the HTGR has designed features that might improve on the overall sustain ability of the nuclear reactors. This is because the type of safety features and materials that are used open up options for industrial processes to be carried out; cogeneration for instance. There is a small section that mentions how HTGR s are being developed in the international sector in order to present the current world view in this type of technology and the further developments that are being sought. For the proliferation resistance section, the focus is on both the intrinsic and the extrinsic features of the nuclear systems. The paper presents a comparison between the features of Light Water Reactors (LWR) and the HTGR in order to be able to properly compare the most used technology today and one that is gaining international interest. (Author)

  3. THE INTEGRATION OF PROCESS HEAT APPLICATIONS TO HIGH TEMPERATURE GAS REACTORS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michael G. McKellar

    2011-11-01

    A high temperature gas reactor, HTGR, can produce industrial process steam, high-temperature heat-transfer gases, and/or electricity. In conventional industrial processes, these products are generated by the combustion of fossil fuels such as coal and natural gas, resulting in significant emissions of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide. Heat or electricity produced in an HTGR could be used to supply process heat or electricity to conventional processes without generating any greenhouse gases. Process heat from a reactor needs to be transported by a gas to the industrial process. Two such gases were considered in this study: helium and steam. For this analysis, it was assumed that steam was delivered at 17 MPa and 540 C and helium was delivered at 7 MPa and at a variety of temperatures. The temperature of the gas returning from the industrial process and going to the HTGR must be within certain temperature ranges to maintain the correct reactor inlet temperature for a particular reactor outlet temperature. The returning gas may be below the reactor inlet temperature, ROT, but not above. The optimal return temperature produces the maximum process heat gas flow rate. For steam, the delivered pressure sets an optimal reactor outlet temperature based on the condensation temperature of the steam. ROTs greater than 769.7 C produce no additional advantage for the production of steam.

  4. Investigation and Optimization of the Acoustic Performance of Exhaust Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Elsaadany, Sara

    2012-01-01

    There is a strong competition among automotive manufacturers to reduce the radiated noise levels. One important source is the engine exhaust where the main noise control strategy is by using efficient mufflers. Stricter vehicle noise regulations combined with various exhaust gas cleaning devices, removing space for traditional mufflers, are also creating new challenges. Thus, it is crucial to have efficient models and tools to design vehicle exhaust systems. In addition the need to reduce CO2...

  5. Reactor User Interface Technology Development Roadmaps for a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Outlet Temperature of 750 degrees C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ian Mckirdy

    2010-12-01

    This report evaluates the technology readiness of the interface components that are required to transfer high-temperature heat from a High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (HTGR) to selected industrial applications. This report assumes that the HTGR operates at a reactor outlet temperature of 750°C and provides electricity and/or process heat at 700°C to conventional process applications, including the production of hydrogen.

  6. A novel nuclear combined power and cooling system integrating high temperature gas-cooled reactor with ammonia–water cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • We propose a novel nuclear ammonia–water power and cooling cogeneration system. • The high temperature reactor is inherently safe, with exhaust heat fully recovered. • The thermal performances are improved compared with nuclear combined cycle. • The base case attains an energy efficiency of 69.9% and exergy efficiency of 72.5%. • Energy conservation and emission reduction are achieved in this cogeneration way. - Abstract: A nuclear ammonia–water power and refrigeration cogeneration system (NAPR) has been proposed and analyzed in this paper. It consists of a closed high temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) topping Brayton cycle and a modified ammonia water power/refrigeration combined bottoming cycle (APR). The HTGR is an inherently safe reactor, and thus could be stable, flexible and suitable for various energy supply situation, and its exhaust heat is fully recovered by the mixture of ammonia and water in the bottoming cycle. To reduce exergy losses and enhance outputs, the ammonia concentrations of the bottoming cycle working fluid are optimized in both power and refrigeration processes. With the HTGR of 200 MW thermal capacity and 900 °C/70 bar reactor-core-outlet helium, the system achieves 88.8 MW net electrical output and 9.27 MW refrigeration capacity, and also attains an energy efficiency of 69.9% and exergy efficiency of 72.5%, which are higher by 5.3%-points and 2.6%-points as compared with the nuclear combined cycle (NCC, like a conventional gas/steam power-only combined cycle while the topping cycle is a closed HTGR Brayton cycle) with the same nuclear energy input. Compared with conventional separate power and refrigeration generation systems, the fossil fuel saving (based on CH4) and CO2 emission reduction of base-case NAPR could reach ?9.66 × 104 t/y and ?26.6 × 104 t/y, respectively. The system integration accomplishes the safe and high-efficiency utilization of nuclear energy by power and refrigeration cogeneration

  7. Process for cleaning the exhaust gases of a reprocessing plant for irradiated nuclear fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dissolver and shears waste gas of the reprocessing plant consists of an inert transport gas and impurities from NOx, iodine and iodine compounds, and tritiated steam. Cleaning takes place in a combined similar and counterflow column, where a super-azotrope nitric acid is used as the washing liquid. The temperatures in the column parts are set differently as regards the melting point of the washing liquid. The nitric acid vapour contained in the cleaned exhaust gas can be washed out with dilute nitric acid at -20 to -400C. (DG)

  8. Analysis Of A High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor Powered High Temperature Electrolysis Hydrogen Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An updated reference design for a commercial-scale high-temperature electrolysis (HTE) plant for hydrogen production has been developed. The HTE plant is powered by a high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) whose configuration and operating conditions are based on the latest design parameters planned for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). The current HTGR reference design specifies a reactor power of 600 MWt, with a primary system pressure of 7.0 MPa, and reactor inlet and outlet fluid temperatures of 322 C and 750 C, respectively. The reactor heat is used to produce heat and electric power to the HTE plant. A Rankine steam cycle with a power conversion efficiency of 44.4% was used to provide the electric power. The electrolysis unit used to produce hydrogen includes 1.1 million cells with a per-cell active area of 225 cm2. The reference hydrogen production plant operates at a system pressure of 5.0 MPa, and utilizes a steam-sweep system to remove the excess oxygen that is evolved on the anode (oxygen) side of the electrolyzer. The overall system thermal-to-hydrogen production efficiency (based on the higher heating value of the produced hydrogen) is 42.8% at a hydrogen production rate of 1.85 kg/s (66 million SCFD) and an oxygen production rate of 14.6 kg/s (33 million SCFD). An economic analysis of this plant was performed with realistic financial and cost estimating The results of the economic analysis demonstrated that the HTE hydrogen production plant driven by a high-temperature helium-cooled nuclear power plant can deliver hydrogen at a competitive cost. A cost of $3.03/kg of hydrogen was calculated assuming an internal rate of return of 10% and a debt to equity ratio of 80%/20% for a reactor cost of $2000/kWt and $2.41/kg of hydrogen for a reactor cost of $1400/kWt.

  9. Spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature of the atmospheric-pressure microwave induced nitrogen plasma torch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuan-Jie; Li, Shou-Zhe

    2015-06-01

    Atmospheric-pressure microwave induced N2 plasma is diagnosed by optical emission spectroscopy with respect to the plasma gas temperature. The spectroscopic measurement of plasma gas temperature is discussed with respect to the spectral line broadening of Ar I and the various emission rotational-vibrational band systems of N2(B-A), N2(C-B) and \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}). It is found that the Boltzmann plot of the selective spectral lines from \\text{N}2+(\\text{B-X}) at 391.4?nm is preferable to others with an accuracy better than 5% for an atmospheric-pressure plasma of high gas temperature. On the basis of the thermal balance equation, the dependences of the plasma gas temperature on the absorbed power, the gas flow rate, and the gas composition are investigated experimentally with photographs recording the plasma morphology.

  10. Modeling of Aerobrake Ballute Stagnation Point Temperature and Heat Transfer to Inflation Gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahrami, Parviz A.

    2012-01-01

    A trailing Ballute drag device concept for spacecraft aerocapture is considered. A thermal model for calculation of the Ballute membrane temperature and the inflation gas temperature is developed. An algorithm capturing the most salient features of the concept is implemented. In conjunction with the thermal model, trajectory calculations for two candidate missions, Titan Explorer and Neptune Orbiter missions, are used to estimate the stagnation point temperature and the inflation gas temperature. Radiation from both sides of the membrane at the stagnation point and conduction to the inflating gas is included. The results showed that the radiation from the membrane and to a much lesser extent conduction to the inflating gas, are likely to be the controlling heat transfer mechanisms and that the increase in gas temperature due to aerodynamic heating is of secondary importance.

  11. Effects of temperature on the carbonation of flue gas desulphurization gypsum using a CO2/N2 gas mixture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Myung Gyu; Ryu, Kyung Won; Chae, Soo Chun; Jang, Young Nam

    2015-01-01

    The carbonation of flue gas desulphurization (FGD) gypsum using a CO2/N2 gas mixture was investigated to study the feasibility of using the flue gas directly in the gypsum carbonation. The effect of the reaction temperature on the carbonation reaction and the carbonation conversion efficiency of the samples were considered. In this study, the carbonation conversion efficiency was calculated using a new method for decreasing the error range from a sample containing unreacted gypsum. The carbonation reaction at 40°C was nearly twice as fast as the reaction at room temperature. In addition, the carbonation conversion efficiency at 40°C (96%) was nearly the same as that at room temperature. However, the efficiency decreased significantly with temperature, especially above 60°C. It can, therefore, be concluded that the direct use of flue gas in gypsum carbonation is most feasible at 40°C. The temperature of carbonation strongly affected the CaCO3 polymorphs and the morphological characteristics. Calcite with various shapes was the dominant (40-90%) phase at all temperatures. At temperatures below 40°C, spherical-shaped vaterite was pronounced, while needle-flower-shaped aragonite was dominant at temperatures above 80°C. PMID:25409589

  12. A ROBUST RADIAL TRAVERSE TEMPERATURE PROBE FOR APPLICATION TO A GAS TURBINE HP/IP STAGE

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, AJW; Ireland, PT; Stevenson, R.; Thorpe, SJ; Martin, D.

    2012-01-01

    The requirements to reduce engine fuel burn costs and gaseous emissions combine to ensure that gas turbine engine manufacturers continually seek to increase the peak cycle temperatures of new engine designs. Consequently, high-pressure turbine components must be developed that can withstand increasing gas temperatures, resulting in the continuous introduction of new technologies that allow appropriate service life. Accurate gas path measurements are vital for early understanding of the perfor...

  13. Silicon Carbide-Based Hydrogen Gas Sensors for High-Temperature Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sangchoel Kim

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigated SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors with metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS structure for high temperature process monitoring and leak detection applications in fields such as the automotive, chemical and petroleum industries. In this work, a thin tantalum oxide (Ta2O5 layer was exploited with the purpose of sensitivity improvement, because tantalum oxide has good stability at high temperature with high permeability for hydrogen gas. Silicon carbide (SiC was used as a substrate for high-temperature applications. We fabricated Pd/Ta2O5/SiC-based hydrogen gas sensors, and the dependence of their I-V characteristics and capacitance response properties on hydrogen concentrations were analyzed in the temperature range from room temperature to 500 °C. According to the results, our sensor shows promising performance for hydrogen gas detection at high temperatures.

  14. Local Exhaust Ventilation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Ulla; Breum, N. O.; Nielsen, Peter V.

    1993-01-01

    Capture efficiency of a local exhaust system, e.g. a kitchen hood, should include only contaminants being direct captured. In this study basic concepts of local exhaust capture efficiency are given, based on the idea of a control box. A validated numerical model is used for estimation of the capture efficiency. An experimental technique is introduced for field studies taking into account knowledge of flow patterns of air and contaminants obtained from smoke testing and contaminant concentrations...

  15. Heat exhaustion in a deep underground metalliferous mine

    OpenAIRE

    Donoghue, A.; Sinclair, M.; Bates, G.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To examine the incidence, clinical state, personal risk factors, haematology, and biochemistry of heat exhaustion occurring at a deep underground metalliferous mine. To describe the underground thermal conditions associated with the occurrence of heat exhaustion.?METHODS—A 1 year prospective case series of acute heat exhaustion was undertaken. A history was obtained with a structured questionnaire. Pulse rate, blood pressure, tympanic temperature, and specific gravity of urine were...

  16. Investigation and design optimization of exhaust-based thermoelectric generator system for internal combustion engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • A 3-D model for exhaust-based thermoelectric waste heat recovery is developed. • Various heat, mass and electric transfer characteristics are elucidated. • Channel size needs to be moderate to balance heat transfer and pressure drop. • Bafflers need to be placed at all locations near all TEG modules. • Baffler angle needs to be sufficiently large, especially for downstream locations. - Abstract: Thermoelectric generator (TEG) has attracted considerable attention for the waste heat recovery of internal combustion engine. In this study, a 3-D numerical model for engine exhaust-based thermoelectric generator (ETEG) system is developed. By considering the detailed geometry of thermoelectric generator (TEG) and exhaust channel, the various transport phenomena are investigated, and design optimization suggestions are given. It is found that the exhaust channel size needs to be moderate to balance the heat transfer to TEG modules and pressure drop along channel. Increasing the number of exhaust channels may improve the performance, however, since more space and TEG modules are needed, the system size and cost need to be considered as well. Although only placing bafflers at the channel inlet could increase the heat transfer coefficient for the whole channel, the near wall temperature downstream might decrease significantly, leading to performance degradation of the TEG modules downstream. To ensure effective utilization of hot exhaust gas, the baffler angle needs to be sufficiently large, especially for the downstream locations. Since larger baffler angles increase the pressure drop significantly, it is suggested that variable baffler angles, with the angle increasing along the flow direction, might be a middle course for balancing the heat transfer and pressure drop. A single ETEG design may not be suitable to all the engine operating conditions, and making the number of exhaust channels and baffler angle adjustable according to different engine operating conditions might improve the performance

  17. Tangential seals for a gas-cooled high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tangential seal is situated above the reactor core and separates the hot gas space from the cold gas space. It consists of seals which are moved by a combination of screws and tensioning elements if thermal differential expansion occurs. Each seal is made as a cantilever. The whole tangential seal can glide along the chamfered surface of the side reflector. (DG)

  18. High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactor Fuels and Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the third annual meeting of the technical working group on Nuclear Fuel Cycle Options and Spent Fuel Management (TWG-NFCO), held in Vienna, in 2004, it was suggested 'to develop manuals/handbooks and best practice documents for use in training and education in coated particle fuel technology' in the IAEA's Programme for the year 2006-2007. In the context of supporting interested Member States, the activity to develop a handbook for use in the 'education and training' of a new generation of scientists and engineers on coated particle fuel technology was undertaken. To make aware of the role of nuclear science education and training in all Member States to enhance their capacity to develop innovative technologies for sustainable nuclear energy is of paramount importance to the IAEA Significant efforts are underway in several Member States to develop high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGR) based on either pebble bed or prismatic designs. All these reactors are primarily fuelled by TRISO (tri iso-structural) coated particles. The aim however is to build future nuclear fuel cycles in concert with the aim of the Generation IV International Forum and includes nuclear reactor applications for process heat, hydrogen production and electricity generation. Moreover, developmental work is ongoing and focuses on the burning of weapon-grade plutonium including civil plutonium and other transuranic elements using the 'deep-burn concept' or 'inert matrix fuels', especially in HTGR systems in the form of coated particle fuels. The document will serve as the primary resource materials for 'education and training' in the area of advanced fuels forming the building blocks for future development in the interested Member States. This document broadly covers several aspects of coated particle fuel technology, namely: manufacture of coated particles, compacts and elements; design-basis; quality assurance/quality control and characterization techniques; fuel irradiations; fuel failure mechanisms; accident testing; fuel and fission product chemistry; fuel cycles; fission product transport; spent fuel management; and nuclear hydrogen production. This knowledge base was gained over nearly fifty years of fuel materials research and development in the international HTGR community. The primary intent of this effort is that this documented experience will provide the basis for further development of HTGR fuels and reactor systems. In many ways this book is a unique source of past experience, and hopefully, it will serve as an important part of future development of nuclear energy worldwide for the new generation scientists and engineers

  19. Temperature and pressure measurement based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy with gas absorption linewidth detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yunxia; Liu, Tiegen; Liu, Kun; Jiang, Junfeng; Wang, Tao; Wang, Ranran

    2014-11-01

    A gas temperature and pressure measurement method based on Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) detecting linewidth of gas absorption line was proposed in this paper. Combined with Lambert-Beer Law and ideal gas law, the relationship between temperature, pressure and gas linewidth with Lorentzian line shape was investigated in theory. Taking carbon monoxide (CO) at 1567.32 nm for example, the linewidths of gas absorption line in different temperatures and pressures were obtained by simulation. The relationship between the linewidth of second harmonic and temperature, pressure with the coefficient 0.025 pm/K and 0.0645 pm/kPa respectively. According to the relationship of simulation results and detected linewidth, the undefined temperature and pressure of CO gas were measured. The gas temperature and pressure measurement based on linewidth detection, avoiding the influence of laser intensity, is an effective temperature and pressure measurement method. This method also has the ability to detect temperature and pressure of other gases with Lorentzian line shape.

  20. Electron temperature and density measurement of tungsten inert gas arcs with Ar-He shielding gas mixture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The diagnostics of atmospheric welding plasma is a well-established technology. In most cases the measurements are limited to processes using pure shielding gas. However in many applications shielding gas is a mixture of various components including metal vapor in gas metal arc welding (GMAW). Shielding gas mixtures are intentionally used for tungsten inert gas (TIG) welding in order to improve the welding performance. For example adding Helium to Argon shielding gas allows the weld geometry and porosity to be influenced. Yet thermal plasmas produced with gas mixtures or metal vapor still require further experimental investigation. In this work coherent Thomson scattering is used to measure electron temperature and density in these plasmas, since this technique allows independent measurements of electron and ion temperature. Here thermal plasmas generated by a TIG process with 50% Argon and 50% Helium shielding gas mixture have been investigated. Electron temperature and density measured by coherent Thomson scattering have been compared to the results of spectroscopic measurements of the plasma density using Stark broadening of the 696.5 nm Argon spectral line. Further investigations of MIG processes using Thomson scattering technique are planned

  1. Research for automotive exhaust catalysts using synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In promoting research and development of alternative materials and precious metals for more high-performance exhaust gas purification catalyst has become increasingly important in the detailed analysis of the dynamic behavior of the reaction atmosphere. This paper introduces a case study using synchrotron radiation automobile exhaust purification catalyst. (author)

  2. Multi-spectral pyrometer for gas turbine blade temperature measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shan; Wang, Lixin; Feng, Chi

    2014-09-01

    To achieve the highest possible turbine inlet temperature requires to accurately measuring the turbine blade temperature. If the temperature of blade frequent beyond the design limits, it will seriously reduce the service life. The problem for the accuracy of the temperature measurement includes the value of the target surface emissivity is unknown and the emissivity model is variability and the thermal radiation of the high temperature environment. In this paper, the multi-spectral pyrometer is designed provided mainly for range 500-1000°, and present a model corrected in terms of the error due to the reflected radiation only base on the turbine geometry and the physical properties of the material. Under different working conditions, the method can reduce the measurement error from the reflect radiation of vanes, make measurement closer to the actual temperature of the blade and calculating the corresponding model through genetic algorithm. The experiment shows that this method has higher accuracy measurements.

  3. Temperature and Humidity Dependence of a Polymer-Based Gas Sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, M. A.; Buehler, M. G.

    1997-01-01

    This paper quantifies the temperature and humidity dependence of a polymer-based gas sensor. The measurement and analysis of three polymers indicates that resistance changes in the polymer films, due to temperature and humidity, can be positive or negative. The temperature sensitivity ranged from +1600 to -320 ppm/nd the relative sensitivity ranged from +1100 to -260 ppm/%.

  4. Engineering task plan for five portable exhausters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exhausters will be employed to ventilate certain single-shell tanks (SSTs) during salt well pumping campaigns. Active ventilation is necessary to reduce the potential flammable gas inventory (LANL 1996a) in the dome space that may accumulate during steady-state conditions or during/after postulated episodic gas release events. The tanks described in this plan support the activities required to fabricate and test three 500 cfm portable exhausters in the 200 W area shops, and to procure, design, fabricate and test two 1000 cfm units. Appropriate Notice of Construction (NOC) radiological and toxic air pollutant permits will be obtained for the portable exhausters. The portable exhauster design media to be employed to support this task was previously developed for the 241-A-101 exhauster. The same design as A101 will be fabricated with only minor improvements to the design based upon operator input/lessons learned. The safety authorization basis for this program effort will follow SAD 36 (LANL 1996b), and each tank will be reviewed against this SAD for changes or updates. The 1000 cfm units will be designed by the selected offsite contractor according to the specification requirements in KHC-S-O490. The offsite units have been specified to utilize as many of the same components as the 500 cfm units to ensure a more cost effective operation and maintenance through the reduction of spare parts and additional procedures

  5. Application of plasma techniques for exhaust aftertreatment.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pospíšil, M.; Viden, I.; Šimek, Milan; Pekárek, S.

    2001-01-01

    Ro?. 27, 1-4 (2001), s. 306-314. ISSN 0143-3369 R&D Projects: GA ?R GA202/99/1298 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z2043910 Keywords : Non- thermal plasma, elctrical discharge, exhaust aftertreatment Subject RIV: BL - Plasma and Gas Discharge Physics Impact factor: 0.190, year: 2001

  6. DESIGN CRITERIA FOR ROCKET EXHAUST SCRUBBERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report gives results of an engineering study and design of methods for scrubbing the exhaust of static-tested solid rockets. Pollutants of major concern were hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride gases. The best process for removing these gases was found to be a gas-atomize...

  7. Simulación del flujo de gas en ductos de escape de motores de combustión interna: Primera parte: aspectos teóricos / Internal combustion engine exhaust pipe flow simulation: Part I: theoretical aspects

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Juan Miguel, Mantilla; Camilo Andrés, Falla; Jorge Arturo, Gómez.

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available La simulación del sistema de escape de un motor de combustión de cuatro tiempos encendido por chispa se puede realizar a partir de la teoría de flujo inestable de gases utilizando ondas de presión. El método aquí explicado se basa en la discretización de espacios interpolables denominados mallas, qu [...] e se ubican a lo largo de toda la tubería sin importar la forma o el tamaño de ésta. Se hace entonces una exploración teórica por los aspectos más importantes, como son el movimiento y choque de las ondas de presión y su aplicación a casos encontrados en ductos de motores reales. Así mismo se plantea la forma en que debe realizarse la simulación utilizando como base la anterior exploración. Los resultados presentados en forma de ecuaciones para esta primera entrega, muestran la gran influencia que ejerce el movimiento de las ondas de presión dentro de un motor sobre el flujo a través del mismo y por ende sobre su desempeño final. Abstract in english Unsteady gas flow theory can be used for simulating a spark ignition internal combustion engine’s exhaust system, using pressure waves. The method explained here is based on the discretization of interpolated spaces (called meshes) which are located throughout the whole length of the exhaust pipe, i [...] rrespective of its form or size. The most important aspects of this theory are theoretically explored, such as pressure wave movement and shock and their application to cases found in real engines’ exhaust pipes. This work also considers how the simulation must be made, based on the previous exploration. The results (presented as equations in this first paper) show the great influence exerted by pressure wave movement on flow through the engine and therefore on its final performance.

  8. Predicted nuclear heating and temperatures in gas-cooled nuclear reactors for process heat applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high-temperature gas-cooled nuclear reactor (HTGR) is an attractive potential source of primary energy for many industrial and chemical process applications. Significant modification of current HTGR core design will be required to achieve the required elevations in exit gas temperatures without exceeding the maximum allowable temperature limits for the fuel material. A preliminary evaluation of the effects of various proposed design modifications by predicting the resulting fuel and gas temperatures with computer calculational modeling techniques is reported. The design modifications evaluated are generally those proposed by the General Atomic Company (GAC), a manufacturer of HTGRs, and some developed at the LASL. The GAC modifications do result in predicted fuel and exit gas temperatures which meet the proposed design objectives

  9. Coupled model of deformation and gas flow process with temperature and slippage effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhui ZHANG

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of temperature, slippage effect and effective stress of coal on the coupled mechanism of deformation and gas glow are key issues to control coal and gas outburst and design the methane recovery engineering. Firstly, intact coal from Huaxing mine in Jilin Province is crushed and coal briquette specimen are made. Then the tri-axial coupled test setup of the deformation, gas flow and temperature developed by ourselves is adopted to investigate the effects of pore pressure, effective stress and temperature on the permeability of coal briquette specimen. The results show that: 1 Under the condition of low pore pressure, the permeability first reduces with pore pressure increasing, then at a threshold of pore pressure it rises with pore pressure increasing, which is called “slippage effect”. 2 The effective confining stress significantly influences the permeability. With increasing effective confining stress, the space of pores and cracks are compressed and the permeability reduces. 3 The temperature significantly influences the permeability and the permeability decreases with temperature increasing. The main reason is that the space of pores and cracks is compressed due to the temperature stress. Because of the constraint around, temperature compressive stress appears in internal coal samples. Coal pore and fracture space is compressed, and the sample permeability decreases. Besides, the viscosity of gas increases with temperature increasing. It decreases the trend of coal permeability . The temperature influence on coal permeability approximates to linear relationship. 4 The empirical permeability evolution equation with varying temperature, effective stress and slippage effects is presented. The coal is viewed as elastic medium, combined with effective stress principle and the empirical permeability equation, the coupled model of deformation and gas flow with varying temperature and slippage effects is built. Furthermore, the code based on the finite element method in MATLAB is developed. ?The effects of varying temperature and slippage effects on the deformation and gas flow are studied through a numerical case, and the results show that: 1 without the temperature and slippage effects the gas flow may be underestimated, and the temperature and slippage effects should be taken into account in the coupled analysis of the deformation and gas flow; 2 the effects of varying temperature, slippage effect and effective stress on gas flow can be reflected by the model in this paper, which provides a new method to predict gas flow.

  10. The impact of carbon dioxide and exhaust gas recirculation on the oxidative reactivity of soot from ethylene flames and diesel engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Qurashi, Khalid O.

    Restrictive emissions standards to reduce nitrogen oxides (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions from diesel engines necessitate the development of advanced emission control technology. The engine manufacturers in the United States have implemented the exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) and diesel particulate filters (DPF) to meet the stringent emissions limits on NOx and PM, respectively. Although the EGR-DPF system is an effective means to control diesel engine emissions, there are some concerns associated with its implementation. The chief concern with this system is the DPF regenerability, which depends upon several factors, among which are the physicochemical properties of the soot. Despite the plethora of research that has been conducted on DPF regenerability, the impact of EGR on soot reactivity and DPF regenerability is yet to be examined. This work concerns the impact of EGR on the oxidative reactivity of diesel soot. It is part of ongoing research to bridge the gap in establishing a relationship between soot formation conditions, properties, and reactivity. This work is divided into three phases. In the first phase, carbon dioxide (CO2) was added to the intake charge of a single cylinder engine via cylinders of compressed CO2. This approach simulates the cold-particle-free EGR. The results showed that inclusion of CO2 changes the soot properties and yields synergistic effects on the oxidative reactivity of the resulting soot. The second phase of this research was motivated by the findings from the first phase. In this phase, post-flame ethylene soot was produced from a laboratory co-flow laminar diffusion flame to better understand the mechanism by which the CO2 affects soot reactivity. This phase was accomplished by successfully isolating the dilution, thermal, and chemical effects of the CO2. The results showed that all of these effects account for a measurable increase in soot reactivity. Nevertheless, the thermal effect was found to be the most important factor governing the soot reactivity. In the third phase of this research, diesel soot was generated under 0 and 20% EGR using a four-cylinder, four-stroke, turbocharged common rail direct injection (DI) DDC diesel engine. The objective of this work was to examine the relevance of the single cylinder engine and flame studies to practical engine operation. The key engine parameters such as load, speed, and injection timing were kept constant to isolate the EGR effect on soot properties from any other engine effects. The thermokinetic analyses of the flame soot and engine soot showed a significant increase in soot oxidation rate as a result of the CO2 or EGR inclusion into the combustion process. The activation energy of soot oxidation was found to be independent of soot origin or formation history. The increase in soot oxidation rate is attributed solely to the increase in soot active sites, which are presented implicitly in the pre-exponential factor (A) of the oxidation rate equation. This latter statement was confirmed by measuring the initial active site area (ASA i) of all soot samples considered in this study. As expected, higher oxidation rates are associated with higher ASAi. The chemical properties of the soot were investigated to determine their effects upon soot reactivity. The results showed that the H/C and O/C ratios were not modified by CO2 or EGR addition. Therefore, these ratios are not reactivity parameters and their effects upon soot reactivity were ruled out. In distinct contrast, the physical properties of the soot were modified by the addition of CO2 or EGR. The interlayer spacing (d002) between the aromatic sheets increased, the crystallite width (La) decreased and the crystallite height (Lc) decreased as a consequence of CO 2 or EGR addition. The modified physical properties of the soot are responsible for the increased rate of soot oxidation. In order to examine the soot oxidation behavior in the DPF, the soot samples produced from the DDC engine under 0 and 20% EGR were partially oxidized in a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) to s

  11. Optical methods to study the gas exchange processes in large diesel engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gros, S.; Hattar, C. [Wartsila Diesel International Oy, Vaasa (Finland); Hernberg, R.; Vattulainen, J. [Tampere Univ. of Technology, Tampere (Finland). Plasma Technology Lab.

    1996-12-01

    To be able to study the gas exchange processes in realistic conditions for a single cylinder of a large production-line-type diesel engine, a fast optical absorption spectroscopic method was developed. With this method line-of-sight UV-absorption of SO{sub 2} contained in the exhaust gas was measured as a function of time in the exhaust port area in a continuously fired medium speed diesel engine type Waertsilae 6L20. SO{sub 2} formed during the combustion from the fuel contained sulphur was used as a tracer to study the gas exchange as a function of time in the exhaust channel. In this case of a 4-stroke diesel engine by assuming a known concentration of SO{sub 2} in the exhaust gas after exhaust valve opening and before inlet and exhaust valve overlap period, the measured optical absorption was used to determine the gas density and further the instantaneous exhaust gas temperature during the exhaust cycle. (author)

  12. Study of metals erosion in high temperature coal gas streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to provide the basis for alloy selection in future turbines using pulverized coal, an investigation is undertaken to obtain a basic understanding of the mechanisms of erosion at high temperatures. The test equipment has been designed to simulate the aerodynamic and thermodynamic conditions in the turbine. This facility has the capability of providing between ambient and a 1093 C (2000 F) environment temperature for erosion testing of various materials. The effects of high temperature on the erosion rate was determined and the test results from 304 stainless steel alloy are presented

  13. Investigations on burning efficiency and exhaust emission of in-line type emulsified fuel system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Kuei Tseng, Hsien Chang Cheng

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In this research, the burning efficiency as well as exhaust emission of a new water-in-oil emulsified fuel system was studied. This emulsified system contains two core processes, the first one is to mix 97% water with 3% emulsifier by volume, and get the milk-like emulsified liquid, while the second one is to compound the milk-like emulsified liquid with heavy oil then obtain the emulsified fuel. In order to overcome the used demulsification problem during in reserve or in transport, this system was designed as a made and use in-line type. From the results of a series burning tests, the fuel saving can be over 8~15%. Also, from the comparison of decline for the heat value and total energy output of varies emulsified fuel, one can find that the water as the dispersed phase in the combustion process will leading a micro-explosion as well as the water gas effect, both can raise the combustion temperature and burning efficiency. By comparing the waste gas emission of different types of emulsified fuel, one can know that, the CO2 emission reduces approximately 14%, and NOx emission reduces above 46%, that means the reduction of the exhaust gas is truly effectively. From the exhaust temperature of tail pipe, the waste heat discharge also may reduce 27%, it is quite advantageous to the global warming as well as earth environmental protection.

  14. Integrated exhaust control with divertor parameter feedback and pellet ELM pacemaking in ASDEX Upgrade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An integrated exhaust scenario has been developed in ASDEX Upgrade providing simultaneous control of particle exhaust, time averaged divertor power flux and ELM power via pace-making of the ELM frequency. Feedback quantities are the divertor neutral flux (actuator: deuterium gas puff) and the divertor temperature as measured by thermoelectric currents (actuator: argon gas puff). The ELM frequency is stabilised to a level high enough for moderate ELM power load with repetitive injection of small pellets from the high field side. The scenario is fully compatible with the present tungsten wall coating, which constitutes about 65% of the area of the plasma facing components. It is intended for application in a future full-tungsten ASDEX Upgrade with strongly reduced intrinsic carbon radiation in order to simulate a possible full-tungsten stage of ITER

  15. Analysis of characteristics of different working fluids for gas turbine cycle with high temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas turbine cycle with high temperature gas-cooled reactor is the main direction of nuclear energy generation, which is with the advantages in terms of the safety and economy. The thermal and physical properties of helium, nitrogen, carbon dioxide and the mixtures were compared and analyzed in this paper. Further more, the heat transfer coefficient, pressure loss and the stage number of turbo-machines have been also compared. Results indicate that taking the mixture of helium and carbon dioxide as the working fluid of gas turbine cycle with high temperature gas-cooled reactor can not only improve the heat transfer coefficient and decrease the stage number of turbo-machinery, but also can limit the pressure loss to a certain level. (authors)

  16. Process heat exchangers for gas-cooled high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The process gas heat exchangers for the pebble bed reactor on the Otto cycle principle takes the shape of a tubular furnace with suspended pipes closed at one end and is combined in construction with a steam raising unit. The tubular furnace and the steam raising unit can be fixed at their cold ends by suitable provision of cooling gas. A ceramic partition wall with a metal jacket is provided between the two units. A chamber with filter devices is situated above the tubular furnace. (DG)

  17. Waste heat recovery from the exhaust of a diesel generator using Rankine Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Diesel engine exhaust contains 40% energy which can be used to produce extra power. • Extra 11% power gained with optimized heat exchangers using water as working fluid. • As a result brake specific fuel consumption improved by 12%. • Parallel arrangement of heat exchangers showed better performance than series. • Optimum working fluid pressure varies with the engine power. - Abstract: Exhaust heat from diesel engines can be an important heat source to provide additional power using a separate Rankine Cycle (RC). In this research, experiments were conducted to measure the available exhaust heat from a 40 kW diesel generator using two ‘off-the-shelf’ heat exchangers. The effectiveness of the heat exchangers using water as the working fluid was found to be 0.44 which seems to be lower than a standard one. This lower performance of the existing heat exchangers indicates the necessity of optimization of the design of the heat exchangers for this particular application. With the available experimental data, computer simulations were carried out to optimize the design of the heat exchangers. Two heat exchangers were used to generate super-heated steam to expand in the turbine using two orientations: series and parallel. The optimized heat exchangers were then used to estimate additional power considering actual turbine isentropic efficiency. The proposed heat exchanger was able to produce 11% additional power using water as the working fluid at a pressure of 15 bar at rated engine load. This additional power resulted into 12% improvement in brake-specific fuel consumption (bsfc). The effects of the working fluid pressure were also investigated to maximize the additional power production. The pressure was limited to 15 bar which was constrained by the exhaust gas temperature. However, higher pressure is possible for higher exhaust gas temperatures from higher capacity engines. This would yield more additional power with further improvements in bsfc. At 40% part load, the additional power developed was 3.4% which resulted in 3.3% reduction in bsfc

  18. Gas sensing properties of nanocrystalline diamond at room temperature.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Davydova, Marina; Kulha, P.; Laposa, A.; Hruška, Karel; Demo, Pavel; Kromka, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Ro?. 5, Dec (2014), s. 2339-2345. ISSN 2190-4286 R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GP14-06054P Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : gas sensor * integrator * interdigitated electrodes * nanocrystalline diamond * response Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 2.670, year: 2014

  19. Storage method of radioactive exhaust gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Object: To positively separate and recover radioactive rare gases from exhaust gases without the former being released into open air and to store the recovered radioactive rare gases for a long period of time under sufficient safety control. Structure: A double cylinder is temporarily assembled within a preparation room, the assembled cylinder is placed on a truck, after which the truck is transported to a sealing equipment room to separate the cap, gas piping is connected to a radioactive exhaust gas feed valve, and the cylinder is interiorly held vacuum and thereafter the radioactive exhaust gases are sealed therein. Next, liquid nitrogen is fed through a valve into a cover cylinder and a gas seal valve is closed. Then, the truck loaded with the double cylinder with the exhaust gases sealed is transported to a welding position, where the cap is coupled, for automatic welding. Upon completion of welding process, the double cylinder is inserted into a leak testing vessel to ensure of good weldability using a leak detector, after which the double cylinder is stored in the pool. (Kawakami, Y.)

  20. Hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristiniemi, Heli; Perski, Aleksander; Lyskov, Eugene; Emtner, Margareta

    2014-12-01

    Chronic stress is among the most common diagnoses in Sweden, most commonly in the form of exhaustion syndrome (ICD-10 classification - F43.8). The majority of patients with this syndrome also have disturbed breathing (hyperventilation). The aim of this study was to investigate the association between hyperventilation and exhaustion syndrome. Thirty patients with exhaustion syndrome and 14 healthy subjects were evaluated with the Nijmegen Symptom Questionnaire (NQ). The participants completed questionnaires about exhaustion, mental state, sleep disturbance, pain and quality of life. The evaluation was repeated 4 weeks later, after half of the patients and healthy subjects had engaged in a therapy method called 'Grounding', a physical exercise inspired by African dance. The patients reported significantly higher levels of hyperventilation as compared to the healthy subjects. All patients' average score on NQ was 26.57 ± 10.98, while that of the healthy subjects was 15.14 ± 7.89 (t = -3.48, df = 42, p < 0.001). The NQ scores correlated strongly with two measures of exhaustion (Karolinska Exhaustion Scale KES r = 0.772, p < 0.01; Shirom Melamed Burnout Measure SMBM r = 0.565, p < 0.01), mental status [Hospital Anxiety and Depression Score (HADS) depression r = 0.414, p < 0.01; HADS anxiety r = 0.627, p < 0.01], sleep disturbances (r = -0.514, p < 0.01), pain (r = -.370, p < 0.05) and poor well-being (Medical Outcomes Survey Short Form 36 questionnaire- SR Health r = -0.529, p < 0.05). In the logistic regression analysis, the variance in the scores from NQ were explained to a high degree (R(2) = 0.752) by scores in KES and HADS. The brief Grounding training contributed to a near significant reduction in hyperventilation (F = 2.521, p < 0.124) and to significant reductions in exhaustion scores and scores of depression and anxiety. The conclusion is that hyperventilation is common in exhaustion syndrome patients and that it can be reduced by systematic physical therapy such as Grounding. PMID:24134551