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Sample records for electronic excitation transfer

  1. The electronic couplings in electron transfer and excitation energy transfer.

    Hsu, Chao-Ping

    2009-04-21

    The transport of charge via electrons and the transport of excitation energy via excitons are two processes of fundamental importance in diverse areas of research. Characterization of electron transfer (ET) and excitation energy transfer (EET) rates are essential for a full understanding of, for instance, biological systems (such as respiration and photosynthesis) and opto-electronic devices (which interconvert electric and light energy). In this Account, we examine one of the parameters, the electronic coupling factor, for which reliable values are critical in determining transfer rates. Although ET and EET are different processes, many strategies for calculating the couplings share common themes. We emphasize the similarities in basic assumptions between the computational methods for the ET and EET couplings, examine the differences, and summarize the properties, advantages, and limits of the different computational methods. The electronic coupling factor is an off-diagonal Hamiltonian matrix element between the initial and final diabatic states in the transport processes. ET coupling is essentially the interaction of the two molecular orbitals (MOs) where the electron occupancy is changed. Singlet excitation energy transfer (SEET), however, contains a Frster dipole-dipole coupling as its most important constituent. Triplet excitation energy transfer (TEET) involves an exchange of two electrons of different spin and energy; thus, it is like an overlap interaction of two pairs of MOs. Strategies for calculating ET and EET couplings can be classified as (1) energy-gap-based approaches, (2) direct calculation of the off-diagonal matrix elements, or (3) use of an additional operator to describe the extent of charge or excitation localization and to calculate the coupling value. Some of the difficulties in calculating the couplings were recently resolved. Methods were developed to remove the nondynamical correlation problem from the highly precise coupled cluster

  2. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions: Progress report

    The fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom collisions are being studied at Penn State by Winter. (The related work of Alston, who recently came to Penn State, is not described here since he is not at present funded by DOE.) These collision processes are treated in the context of simple one- or two-electron systems in order to provide unambiguous results and reveal more clearly the collisional mechanisms. Three coupled-state calculations are being carried out over the present three-year period and are discussed here: a Sturmian-pseudostate study of electron transfer in collisions between protons and the hydrogenic ions He+, Li2+, Be3+, ...; a triple-center, atomic-state study of ionization in collisions between α particles and H(ls) atoms and between protons and He+(ls) ions; and a coupled-state study of electron transfer and excitation in collisions between protons and neutral He atoms

  3. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation atomic collisions

    Basic atomic-collision processes at intermediate and high energies are being studied theoretically at Penn State by Alston and Winter. In the high velocity regime, single-electron capture is treated using a high order multiple-scattering approach; extensive comparison with experiment and analysis of mechanisms have been made. Fitting the calculated amplitude with a simple analytic form, the asymptotic velocity dependence of the cross section is obtained. The effect on the capture amplitude of altering the inner part of the internuclear potential has also been explored. In the intermediate velocity regime, earlier work on collisions between protons and hydrogenic-ion targets using a coupled-state approach is being extended to the two-electron helium target. 29 refs

  4. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions]: Progress report

    The fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom collisions are being studied. These collision processes are treated in the context of simple one- or two-electron systems in order to provide unambiguous results and reveal more clearly the collisional mechanisms. As outlined in the original proposal, three coupled-state calculations are being carried out over the present three-year period: a Sturmian-pseudostate study of ionization in collisions between protons and the hydrogenic ions He+, Li2+, Be3+, ...; a triple-center, atomic-state study of ionization in collisions between α particles and H(ls) atoms and between protons and He+(ls) ions; and an atomic-state study of electron transfer and excitation in collisions between protons and neutral He atoms. 12 refs

  5. [Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions

    Fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom and ion-ion collisions are studied. Attention is focussed on one- and two-electron systems and, more recently, quasi-one-electron systems whose electron-target-ion core can be accurately modeled by one-electron potentials. The basic computational approaches can then be taken with few, if any, approximations, and the underlying collisional mechanisms can be more clearly revealed. At intermediate collision energies (e.g., proton energies for p-He+ collisions on the order of 100 kilo-electron volts), many electronic states are strongly coupled during the collision, a coupled-state approach, such as a coupled-Sturmian-pseudostate approach, is appropriate. At higher collision energies (million electron-volt energies) the coupling is weaker with, however, many more states being coupled together, so that high-order perturbation theory is essential

  6. [Electron transfer, ionization and excitation in atomic collisions

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental atomic-collision processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation. Winter has focussed attention on intermediate and, more recently, higher collision energies -- proton energies of at least about 50 keV -- for which coupled-state approaches are appropriate. Alston has concentrated on perturbative approaches to symmetric ion-ion/atom collisions at high energies and to asymmetric collisions at intermediate to high energies

  7. Electron transfer processs with excited molecules at semiconductor electrodes

    Memming, R.

    In the first part of the paper, energy levels used in solid-state physics, in electrochemistry and in photochemistry are introduced and combined in a l- electron energy concept. This is also applied to excited molecules being adsorbed at semiconductor electrodes. On the basis of this concept, theoretical models concerning electron-transfer processes between molecules in their ground and excited state and semiconductor electrodes are then developed. In the last part of the paper, a number of typical results are presented and discussed. It is shown that the primary step is an electron-transfer reaction between an excited molecule and the semiconductor, whereas energy transfer plays only a minor role, which leads mostly to quenching. Most processes can be interpreted on the basis of the theoretical model mentioned above. Various phenomena, such as quantum yield, supersensitization, quenching, and influence of pH and doping of the semiconductor are discussed in detail. Finally, a brief outlook at the applications in solar-energy conversion systems is given.

  8. Electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in atomic collisions

    The research being carried out at Penn State by Winter and Alston addresses the fundamental processes of electron transfer, ionization, and excitation in ion-atom (and ion-ion) collisions. The focus is on intermediate- and higher-energy collisions, corresponding to proton energies of about 25 kilo-electron-volts (keV) or larger. At intermediate energies, where the transition probabilities are not small, many states must be coupled in a large calculation, while at higher energies, perturbative approaches may be used. Several studies have been carried out in the current three-year period; most of these treat systems with only one or two electrons, so that fewer approximations need be made and the basic collisional mechanisms can be more clearly described

  9. Electronic excitation energy transfer between quasi-zero-dimensional systems

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    Ostrava : Tanger, 2013. ISBN 978-80-87294-44-4. [International Conference NANOCON 2013 /5./. Brno (CZ), 16.10.2013-18.10.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12236; GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : quantum dots * energy transfer * electron-phonon interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  10. Coherence, energy and charge transfers in de-excitation pathways of electronic excited state of biomolecules in photosynthesis

    Bohr, Henrik; Malik, F. Bary

    2013-01-01

    The observed multiple de-excitation pathways of photo-absorbed electronic excited state in the peridinin–chlorophyll complex, involving both energy and charge transfers among its constituents, are analyzed using the bio-Auger (B-A) theory. It is also shown that the usually used F¨orster–Dexter...

  11. Electronic excitation energy transfer between quasi-zero-dimensional systems

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav; Mao, H.

    Tokyo : The Surface Science Society of Japan, 2014, s. 11-17. ISSN 1348-0391. [International Conference on Atomically Controlled Surfaces, Interfaces and Nanostructures /12/ - International Colloquium on Scanning Probe Microscopy /21./. Tsukuba (JP), 04.11.2013-08.11.2013] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12236; GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : quantum dots * energy transfer * electron -phonon interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/result?item1=4&word1=Atomically+Controlled+Surfaces+ AND +kral

  12. Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    Hoffman, M. Z.

    1992-07-01

    Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

  13. Ab initio study on electron excitation and electron transfer in tryptophan-tyrosine system

    In this article, ab initio calculation has been performed to evaluate the transition energy of electronic excitation in tryptophan and tyrosine by using semiempirical molecular orbital method AM1 and complete active space self-consistent field method. The solvent effect has been considered by means of the conductor-like screening model. After geometric optimizations of isolated tryptophan and tyrosine, and their corresponding radicals and cations, reaction heat of these electron transfer reactions have been obtained by the means of complete active space self-consistent field method. The transition energies from the ground state, respectively, to the lowest excited state and to the lowest triplet state of these two amino acids are also calculated and compared with the experimentally observed values. The ionization potential and electron affinity are also calculated for tryptophan and tyrosine employing Koopmans' theorem and ab initio calculation. Compared with the experimental measurements, the theoretical results are found satisfactory. Theoretical results give good explanations on the experimental phenomena that N3· can preferably oxide the side chain of tryptophan residue and then the electron transfer from tyrosine residue to tryptophan residue follows in peptides involving tryptophan and tyrosine

  14. Nonlinear response of metal nanoparticles: Double plasmon excitation and electron transfer

    Gao, Shiwu

    2015-06-01

    We investigate the dynamical response of a metal nanoparticle and the electron transfer to a molecule near its surface using time-dependent density functional theory. In addition to the linear response of the Mie resonance, double plasmon excitations and a low-frequency charge transfer band emerge and become prominent at high laser intensities. Both modes are nonlinear processes, which are derived from the re-excitation and decay of the primary plasmon mode, respectively. Our results shed light on the localised characters of the plasmon-molecule coupling and hot electron distributions. These findings have general implications to photoinduced phenomena in nanosystems.

  15. Nonlinear response of metal nanoparticles: Double plasmon excitation and electron transfer

    Gao, Shiwu [Beijing Computational Science Research Center, Zhongguancun Software Park II, 100094, Beijing (China)

    2015-06-21

    We investigate the dynamical response of a metal nanoparticle and the electron transfer to a molecule near its surface using time-dependent density functional theory. In addition to the linear response of the Mie resonance, double plasmon excitations and a low-frequency charge transfer band emerge and become prominent at high laser intensities. Both modes are nonlinear processes, which are derived from the re-excitation and decay of the primary plasmon mode, respectively. Our results shed light on the localised characters of the plasmon-molecule coupling and hot electron distributions. These findings have general implications to photoinduced phenomena in nanosystems.

  16. Intermolecular electron transfer from intramolecular excitation and coherent acoustic phonon generation in a hydrogen-bonded charge-transfer solid.

    Rury, Aaron S; Sorenson, Shayne; Dawlaty, Jahan M

    2016-03-14

    Organic materials that produce coherent lattice phonon excitations in response to external stimuli may provide next generation solutions in a wide range of applications. However, for these materials to lead to functional devices in technology, a full understanding of the possible driving forces of coherent lattice phonon generation must be attained. To facilitate the achievement of this goal, we have undertaken an optical spectroscopic study of an organic charge-transfer material formed from the ubiquitous reduction-oxidation pair hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone. Upon pumping this material, known as quinhydrone, on its intermolecular charge transfer resonance as well as an intramolecular resonance of p-benzoquinone, we find sub-cm(-1) oscillations whose dispersion with probe energy resembles that of a coherent acoustic phonon that we argue is coherently excited following changes in the electron density of quinhydrone. Using the dynamical information from these ultrafast pump-probe measurements, we find that the fastest process we can resolve does not change whether we pump quinhydrone at either energy. Electron-phonon coupling from both ultrafast coherent vibrational and steady-state resonance Raman spectroscopies allows us to determine that intramolecular electronic excitation of p-benzoquinone also drives the electron transfer process in quinhydrone. These results demonstrate the wide range of electronic excitations of the parent of molecules found in many functional organic materials that can drive coherent lattice phonon excitations useful for applications in electronics, photonics, and information technology. PMID:26979698

  17. Modeling Electronic-Nuclear Interactions for Excitation Energy Transfer Processes in Light-Harvesting Complexes.

    Lee, Mi Kyung; Coker, David F

    2016-08-18

    An accurate approach for computing intermolecular and intrachromophore contributions to spectral densities to describe the electronic-nuclear interactions relevant for modeling excitation energy transfer processes in light harvesting systems is presented. The approach is based on molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of classical correlation functions of long-range contributions to excitation energy fluctuations and a separate harmonic analysis and single-point gradient quantum calculations for electron-intrachromophore vibrational couplings. A simple model is also presented that enables detailed analysis of the shortcomings of standard MD-based excitation energy fluctuation correlation function approaches. The method introduced here avoids these problems, and its reliability is demonstrated in accurate predictions for bacteriochlorophyll molecules in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson pigment-protein complex, where excellent agreement with experimental spectral densities is found. This efficient approach can provide instantaneous spectral densities for treating the influence of fluctuations in environmental dissipation on fast electronic relaxation. PMID:27472379

  18. Proton coupled electron transfer from the excited state of a ruthenium(ii) pyridylimidazole complex.

    Pannwitz, Andrea; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-04-20

    Proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) from the excited state of [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) (bpy = 2,2'-bipyridine; pyimH = 2-(2'-pyridyl)imidazole) to N-methyl-4,4'-bipyridinium (monoquat, MQ(+)) was studied. While this complex has been investigated previously, our study is the first to show that the formal bond dissociation free energy (BDFE) of the imidazole-N-H bond decreases from (91 ± 1) kcal mol(-1) in the electronic ground state to (43 ± 5) kcal mol(-1) in the lowest-energetic (3)MLCT excited state. This makes the [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) complex a very strong (formal) hydrogen atom donor even when compared to metal hydride complexes, and this is interesting for light-driven (formal) hydrogen atom transfer (HAT) reactions with a variety of different substrates. Mechanistically, formal HAT between (3)MLCT excited [Ru(bpy)2pyimH](2+) and monoquat in buffered 1 : 1 (v : v) CH3CN/H2O was found to occur via a sequence of reaction steps involving electron transfer from Ru(ii) to MQ(+) coupled to release of the N-H proton to buffer base, followed by protonation of reduced MQ(+) by buffer acid. Our study is relevant in the larger contexts of photoredox catalysis and light-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:27094541

  19. Photo- and radiation chemical studies of intermediates involved in excited-state electron-transfer reactions

    Excited-state inter- and intramolecular electron-transfer reactions lie at the heart of the most photochemical solar energy conversion schemes. The authors research, which has utilized the techniques of continuous and pulsed photolysis and radiolysis, has focused on three general aspects of these reactions involving transition metal coordination complexes and electron donor-acceptor complexes: i) the effect of solution medium on the properties and quenching of the excited states; ii) the control of the quantum yields of formation of redox products; iii) the mechanism by which reduced species interact with water to yield H2 homogeneously and heterogeneously. EDTA is among the most popular sacrificial electron donors used in model systems. Its role is to scavenge the oxidized form of the photosensitizer in order to prevent its rapid reaction with the reduced form of the electron relay species that results from the electron-transfer quenching of the excited photosensitizer. In systems involving MV2+, the radicals resulting from the oxidation of EDTA can eventually lead to the generation of a second equivalent of MV+; the reducing agent is believed to be a radical localized on the carbon atom alpha to the carboxylate group. The reaction of radiolytically-generated OH/H with EDTA produces this radical directly via H-abstraction or indirectly via deprotonation of the carbon atom adjacent to the nitrogen radical site in the oxidized amine moiety; it reduces MV2+ with rate constants of 2.8 x 109, 7.6 x 109, and 8.5 x 106M-1s-1 at pH 12.5, 8.3, and 4.7, respectively. Degradative decarboxylation of EDTA-radicals and their back electron-transfer reactions are enhanced in acidic solution causing the yield of MV+ to be severely diminished

  20. Near-IR excitation transfer and electron transfer in a BF2-chelated dipyrromethane-azadipyrromethane dyad and triad.

    El-Khouly, Mohamed E; Amin, Anu N; Zandler, Melvin E; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; D'Souza, Francis

    2012-04-23

    A molecular dyad and triad, comprised of a known photosensitizer, BF(2)-chelated dipyrromethane (BDP), covalently linked to its structural analog and near-IR emitting sensitizer, BF(2)-chelated tetraarylazadipyrromethane (ADP), have been newly synthesized and the photoinduced energy and electron transfer were examined by femtosecond and nanosecond laser flash photolysis. The structural integrity of the newly synthesized compounds has been established by spectroscopic, electrochemical, and computational methods. The DFT calculations revealed a molecular-clip-type structure for the triad, in which the BDP and ADP entities are separated by about 14 Å with a dihedral angle between the fluorophores of around 70°. Differential pulse voltammetry studies have revealed the redox states, allowing estimation of the energies of the charge-separated states. Such calculations revealed a charge separation from the singlet excited BDP ((1)BDP*) to ADP (BDP(.+)-ADP(.-)) to be energetically favorable in nonpolar toluene and in polar benzonitrile. In addition, the excitation transfer from the singlet BDP to ADP is also envisioned due to good spectral overlap of the BDP emission and ADP absorption spectra. Femtosecond laser flash photolysis studies provided concrete evidence for the occurrence of energy transfer from (1)BDP* to ADP (in benzonitrile and toluene) and electron transfer from BDP to (1)ADP* (in benzonitrile, but not in toluene). The kinetic study of energy transfer was measured by monitoring the rise of the ADP emission and revealed fast energy transfer (ca. 10(11) s(-1)) in these molecular systems. The kinetics of electron transfer via (1)ADP*, measured by monitoring the decay of the singlet ADP at λ=820 nm, revealed a relatively fast charge-separation process from BDP to (1)ADP*. These findings suggest the potential of the examined ADP-BDP molecules to be efficient photosynthetic antenna and reaction center models. PMID:22416038

  1. Bimolecular Excited-State Electron Transfer with Surprisingly Long-Lived Radical Ions

    Alsam, Amani A.

    2015-09-02

    We explored the excited-state interactions of bimolecular, non-covalent systems consisting of cationic poly[(9,9-di(3,3’-N,N’-trimethyl-ammonium) propyl fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)-alt-co-(9,9-dioctyl-fluorenyl-2,7-diyl)] diiodide salt (PFN) and 1,4-dicyanobenzene (DCB) using steady-state and time-resolved techniques, including femto- and nanosecond transient absorption and femtosecond infrared spectroscopies with broadband capabilities. The experimental results demonstrated that photo-induced electron transfer from PFN to DCB occurs on the picosecond time scale, leading to the formation of PFN+• and DCB-• radical ions. Interestingly, real-time observations of the vibrational marker modes on the acceptor side provided direct evidence and insight into the electron transfer process indirectly inferred from UV-Vis experiments. The band narrowing on the picosecond time scale observed on the antisymmetric C-N stretching vibration of the DCB radical anion provides clear experimental evidence that a substantial part of the excess energy is channeled into vibrational modes of the electron transfer product and that the geminate ion pairs dissociate. More importantly, our nanosecond time-resolved data indicate that the charge-separated state is very long lived ( 30 ns) due to the dissociation of the contact radical ion pair into free ions. Finally, the fast electron transfer and slow charge recombination anticipate the current donor−acceptor system with potential applications in organic solar cells.

  2. Laser-assisted ionization-excitation of helium by electron impact at large momentum transfer

    Ionization of a helium atom by electron impact in the presence of laser radiation is studied theoretically. The kinematic regime of high impact energy and large momentum transfer is considered. The S-matrix of the process is treated within the first Born and binary-encounter approximations. Triple differential cross sections are calculated for the cases when the residual He+ ion is left both in the ground (n=1) and in the first excited (n=2) states in the presence of a laser field with frequency ω = 1.55 eV and intensity I = 5*1011 W/cm2. The laser-assisted cross sections corresponding to n=2 are found to be more sensitive to the electron-electron correlations in helium than the field-free ones. (authors)

  3. Ultrafast electron transfer reactions initiated by excited CT states of push pull perylenes

    Miller, Scott E.; Zhao, Yongyu; Schaller, Richard; Mulloni, Viviana; Just, Eric M.; Johnson, Robert C.; Wasielewski, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Two new chromophores that absorb in the visible spectrum, the 9-( N-pyrrolidinyl)- and 9-( N-piperidinyl)perylene-3,4-dicarboximides, 5PMI and 6PMI, respectively, were synthesized and shown to possess lowest excited singlet states with about 70% charge transfer (CT) character. Changing the ring size of the cyclic amine from 5 to 6 significantly changes the energies of the CT states, as well as the redox potentials of the chromophores. These chromophores were linked to pyromellitimide (PI) and 1,8:4,5-naphthalenediimide (NI) electron acceptors using a single N-N bond between their respective imides to yield the corresponding donor-acceptor dyads 5PMI-PI, 5PMI-NI, 6PMI-PI, and 6PMI-NI. The donors and acceptors in these molecules are positioned relative to one another in a rod-like arrangement at fixed distances and restricted orientations. The rates of charge separation and recombination were measured using transient absorption spectroscopy. These chromophores were also used to prepare rigid donor-acceptor triads 5PMI-PI-NI and 6PMI-PI-NI, which display one- or two-step electron transfer mechanisms that depend on solvent polarity. These compounds exhibit a broad range of structure and media driven changes in electron transfer mechanism.

  4. Orbital angular momentum transfer in the excitation of the 2/sup 1/P state of helium by electrons

    Beijers, J.P.M.; Eck, J. van; Heideman, H.G.M.

    1984-04-28

    The orbital angular momentum transfer in the excitation of the 2/sup 1/P state of helium by electrons at incident electron energies of 50, 60 and 80 eV has been studied. This was done in an electron-photon coincidence experiment. At 80 eV the orbital angular momentum transferred by the electron to the atom appears to change sign at a certain scattering angle. At lower energies of 50 and 60 eV no sign reversal is observed.

  5. ANISOTROPY EFFECTS IN SINGLE-ELECTRON TRANSFER BETWEEN LASER-EXCITED ATOMS AND HIGHLY-CHARGED IONS

    1995-01-01

    Recent collision experiments are reviewed in which one-electron transfer between laser excited target atoms and (highly charged) keV-ions has been studied. Especially results showing a dependence of the charge exchange on the initial target orbital alignment are discussed. The question to what exten

  6. Hydrophobic Acceleration of Electron-Transfer Fluorescence Quenching Processes between Excited 1-Alkanoylperylenes and Ferrocene Derivatives

    SHI, Ji-Liang

    2001-01-01

    Coaggregation-facilitated Electron-transfer (ET) fluorescence quenching processes between an excited 1-alkanoylperylene (Pe-n, n=4, 8, 12) as an acceptor and an 1-alkanoylferrocene (Fc-m, m=4, 8, 12, 16 ) or a 1,1-dialkanoyiferrocene (Fc-m-2, m=4, 8, 12, 16) as a donor have been investigated by means of fluorescence spectroscopy in dioxane (DX)H2O binary solvents of different φ values, where φ is the volume fraction of the organic component of an aquiorgano mixture. This is a first observation of an ET processes facilitated by hydrophobic-lipophilic interaction (HLI) with organometallic compounds as donors. Tne extent of HLI-driven coaggregation between the acceptor and the donor may be assessed from the efficiency of fluorescence quenching, i.e.,the slope B of Eq. ( 2 ). The chain-foldability effect and the intramolecular “self-satisfation” of HLI for Fc-m-2 have been observed. The experimental results show that the behavior of Fc-m as a quencher for fluorescence quenching of Pen* is rather similar to that of N-alkylsubstituend phenothiazine.

  7. Excitation-wavelength-dependent, ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer in bisferrocene/BF2-chelated-azadipyrromethene/fullerene tetrads.

    Bandi, Venugopal; El-Khouly, Mohamed E; Ohkubo, Kei; Nesterov, Vladimir N; Zandler, Melvin E; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; D'Souza, Francis

    2013-05-27

    Donor-acceptor distance, orientation, and photoexcitation wavelength are key factors in governing the efficiency and mechanism of electron-transfer reactions both in natural and synthetic systems. Although distance and orientation effects have been successfully demonstrated in simple donor-acceptor dyads, revealing excitation-wavelength-dependent photochemical properties demands multimodular, photosynthetic-reaction-center model compounds. Here, we successfully demonstrate donor- acceptor excitation-wavelength-dependent, ultrafast charge separation and charge recombination in newly synthesized, novel tetrads featuring bisferrocene, BF2 -chelated azadipyrromethene, and fullerene entities. The tetrads synthesized using multistep synthetic procedure revealed characteristic optical, redox, and photo reactivities of the individual components and featured "closely" and "distantly" positioned donor-acceptor systems. The near-IR-emitting BF2-chelated azadipyrromethene acted as a photosensitizing electron acceptor along with fullerene, while the ferrocene entities acted as electron donors. Both tetrads revealed excitation-wavelength-dependent, photoinduced, electron-transfer events as probed by femtosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. That is, formation of the Fc(+)-ADP-C60(.-) charge-separated state upon C60 excitation, and Fc(+)-ADP(.-)-C60 formation upon ADP excitation is demonstrated. PMID:23554157

  8. Excited state electron transfer in systems with a well-defined geometry. [cyclophane

    Kaufmann, K.J.

    1980-12-01

    The effect of temperature, dielectric strength and ligand on the structure of the mesopyropheophorbide cyclophanes will be studied. ESR, NMR, emission and absorption spectroscopy, as well as circular dichroism will be used. The changes in structure will be correlated with changes in the photochemical activity. Electron acceptors such as benzoquinone will be utilized to stabilize the charge separation. Charge separation in porphyrin quinone dimers will also be studied. It was found that electron transfer in the cyclophane system is relatively slow. This is presumably due to an orientation requirement for fast electron transfer. Solvent dielectric also is important in producing a charge separation. Decreasing the temperature effects the yield of charge transfer, but not the kinetics.

  9. Resonant electron transfer and L-shell excitation for 26Fe19+ and 30Zn23+ ions

    RAMADAN, Hassan

    2012-01-01

    Resonant transfer and excitation (RTE) involving simultaneous electron capture and projectile L-shell excitation has been calculated for Fe19+ and Zn23+ ions, in charge states ranging from nitrogen-like to oxygen-like incident on molecular hydrogen over an energy range 0--250 MeV. By the same way the calculations have been performed with helium over an energy range 0--300 MeV. The calculations are carried out using the angular momentum average (AMA) scheme in the isolated resonance app...

  10. Density functional investigation of the electronic structure and charge transfer excited states of a multichromophoric antenna

    Basurto, Luis; Zope, Rajendra R.; Baruah, Tunna

    2016-05-01

    We report an electronic structure study of a multichromophoric molecular complex containing two of each borondipyrromethane dye, Zn-tetraphenyl-porphyrin, bisphenyl anthracene and a fullerene. The snowflake shaped molecule behaves like an antenna capturing photon at different frequencies and transferring the photon energy to the porphyrin where electron transfer occurs from the porphyrin to the fullerene. The study is performed within density functional formalism using large polarized Guassian basis sets (12,478 basis functions in total). The energies of the HOMO and LUMO states in the complex, as adjudged by the ionization potential and the electron affinity values, show significant differences with respect to their values in participating subunits in isolation. These differences are also larger than the variations of the ionization potential and electron affinity values observed in non-bonded C60-ZnTPP complexes in co-facial arrangement or end-on orientations. An understanding of the origin of these differences is obtained by a systematic study of the effect of structural strain, the presence of ligands, the effect of orbital delocalization on the ionization energy and the electron affinity. Finally, a few lowest charge transfer energies involving electronic transitions from the porphyrin component to the fullerene subunit of the complex are predicted.

  11. Evidence for resonance electron transfer in photon excited X-ray satellite spectra of fluorine compounds

    K Ram Narayana; B Seetharami Reddy; S S Raju; T Seshi Reddy; S Lakshmi Narayana; K Premachand; B M Rao; M V R Murti; L S Mombasawala

    2005-08-01

    The KL1/KL0 intensity ratio of fluorine is measured in five fluorine compounds with a crystal spectrometer. An anomalous reduction of this intensity ratio was observed in KF and SrF2, which is attributed to resonance electron transfer from the metal ion to the spectator vacancy in the fluorine ion. KL2/KL0 intensity ratio of fluorine is also measured. The measured relative intensities are compared with the theoretical estimates of Aberg.

  12. Chemical Physics Electrons and Excitations

    Larsson, Sven

    2012-01-01

    A full understanding of modern chemistry is impossible without quantum theory. Since the advent of quantum mechanics in 1925, a number of chemical phenomena have been explained, such as electron transfer, excitation energy transfer, and other phenomena in photochemistry and photo-physics. Chemical bonds can now be accurately calculated with the help of a personal computer. Addressing students of theoretical and quantum chemistry and their counterparts in physics, Chemical Physics: Electrons and Excitations introduces chemical physics as a gateway to fields such as photo physics, solid-state ph

  13. Femtosecond insights into direct electron injection in dye anchored ZnO QDs following charge transfer excitation.

    Kumar, Pushpendra; Kumar, Sunil; Ghosh, Subrata; Pal, Suman Kalyan

    2016-07-27

    The role of the charge transfer (CT) state in interfacial electron transfer in dye-sensitized semiconductor nanocrystals is still poorly understood. To address this problem, femtosecond transient absorption (TA) spectroscopy is used as a probe to investigate the electron injection across a newly synthesized coumarin dye (8-hydroxy-2-oxo-4-phenyl-2 benzo[h]chromene-3-carbonitrile, coded BC5) and ZnO quantum dots (QDs). Steady state and time-resolved spectroscopic measurements reveal that BC5 dye interacts strongly with ZnO QDs in the ground state forming a CT complex. The BC5-ZnO QD complex absorbs more towards red compared to only the dye and QDs, and emits fluorescence due to radiative recombination of photogenerated charges. The formation of charges following the excitation of the CT complex has been demonstrated by observing the signature of dye radical cations and electrons in the conduction band (CB) of the QDs in the TA spectra. The TA signals of these charges grow sharply as a result of ultrafast direct electron injection into the QD. We have monitored the complete dynamics of photogenerated charges by measuring the TA signals of the charges up to a couple of nanoseconds. The injected electrons that are free or shallowly trapped recombine with a time constant of 625 fs, whereas deeply trapped electrons disappear slowly (526 ps) via radiative recombination. Furthermore, theoretical studies based on ab initio calculations have been carried out to complement the experimental findings. PMID:27412034

  14. Observation of resonant transfer and excitation in O5+ + He collisions through high resolution O0 Auger electron spectroscopy

    In this paper we present new evidence that (resonant transfer and excitation) RTE is an important mechanism for the production of Be-like doubly excited states in energetic collisions of Li-like O5+ ions incident on He. We have measured the cross sections for the production of Auger electrons from the decay of the (1s2s2p2)3D and the (1s2s2p2)1D states in O4+ in high resolution at O0, as a function of the incident ion energy. We observe a resonant increase in the Auger cross section with a maximum at approx.13 MeV and full-width-at-half-maximum of approx.7 MeV. This feature is seen to sit on a non-resonant NTE background, which populates the same intermediate states through a two step capture and excitation process governed by the electron-nucleus Coulomb interaction. 13 ref., 3 figs

  15. Ultrafast Excited-State Dynamics of Diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP)-Based Materials: Static versus Diffusion-Controlled Electron Transfer Process

    Alsulami, Qana

    2015-06-25

    Singlet-to-triplet intersystem crossing (ISC) and photoinduced electron transfer (PET) of platinum(II) containing diketopyrrolopyrrole (DPP) oligomer in the absence and presence of strong electron-acceptor tetracyanoethylene (TCNE) were investigated using femtosecond and nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy with broadband capabilities. The role of platinum(II) incorporation in those photophysical properties was evaluated by comparing the excited-state dynamics of DPP with and without the metal centers. The steady-state measurements reveal that platinum(II) incorporation facilitates dramatically the interactions between DPP-Pt(acac) and TCNE, resulting in charge transfer (CT) complex formation. The transient absorption spectra in the absence of TCNE reveal ultrafast ISC of DPP-Pt(acac) followed by their long-lived triplet state. In the presence of TCNE, PET from the excited DPP-Pt(acac) and DPP to TCNE, forming the radical ion pairs. The ultrafast PET which occurs statically from DPP-Pt(acac) to TCNE in picosecond regime, is much faster than that from DPP to TCNE (nanosecond time scale) which is diffusion-controlled process, providing clear evidence that PET rate is eventually controlled by the platinum(II) incorporation.

  16. Description of electron transfer in the ground and excited states of organic donor–acceptor systems by single-reference and multi-reference density functional methods

    Electron transfer in the ground and excited states of a model donor–acceptor (D–A) system is investigated using the single-reference and multi-reference density functional theory (DFT) methods. To analyze the results of the calculations, a simple two-site multi-reference model was derived that predicts a stepwise electron transfer in the S0 state and a wave-like dependence of the S1 electron transfer on the external stimulus. The standard single-reference Kohn-Sham (KS) DFT approach and the time-dependent DFT (TDDFT) method failed to describe the correct dependence of the S0 and S1 electron transfer on the external electric field applied along the donor–acceptor system. The multi-reference DFT approach, the spin-restricted ensemble-referenced KS (REKS) method, was able to successfully reproduce the correct behavior of the S0 and S1 electron transfer on the applied field. The REKS method was benchmarked against experimentally measured gas phase charge transfer excitations in a series of organic donor–acceptor complexes and displayed its ability to describe this type of electronic transitions with a very high accuracy, mean absolute error of 0.05 eV with the use of the standard range separated density functionals. On the basis of the calculations undertaken in this work, it is suggested that the non-adiabatic coupling between the S0 and S1 states may interfere with the electron transfer in a weakly coupled donor–acceptor system. It is also suggested that the electronic excitation of a D+–A− system may play a dual role by assisting the further electron transfer at certain magnitudes of the applied electric field and causing the backward transfer at lower electric field strengths

  17. Transferred orbital angular momentum in the low-energy electron impact excitation of the 1S0-1P1 transition in barium

    Superelastic electron scattering involving the collisional de-excitation of laser-excited 138Ba(...6s6p 1P1) atoms to the (...6s21S0) ground state has been used to measure electron impact coherence parameters for the related (...6s21S0) to (...6s6p 1P1) inelastic process. Measurements of the orbital angular momentum transfer parameter, Lperp+, were made for excitation at impact energies of 7, 8.5, 11 and 16 eV. Experimental data are compared with available theoretical results. (author)

  18. Excitation energy transfer in the photosystem I

    Webber, Andrew N

    2012-09-25

    Photosystem I is a multimeric pigment protein complex in plants, green alage and cyanobacteria that functions in series with Photosystem II to use light energy to oxidize water and reduce carbon dioxide. The Photosystem I core complex contains 96 chlorophyll a molecules and 22 carotenoids that are involved in light harvesting and electron transfer. In eucaryotes, PSI also has a peripheral light harvesting complex I (LHCI). The role of specific chlorophylls in excitation and electron transfer are still unresolved. In particular, the role of so-called bridging chlorophylls, located between the bulk antenna and the core electron transfer chain, in the transfer of excitation energy to the reaction center are unknown. During the past funding period, site directed mutagenesis has been used to create mutants that effect the physical properties of these key chlorophylls, and to explore how this alters the function of the photosystem. Studying these mutants using ultrafast absorption spectroscopy has led to a better understanding of the process by which excitation energy is transferred from the antenna chlorophylls to the electron transfer chain chlorophylls, and what the role of connecting chlorophylls and A_0 chlorophylls is in this process. We have also used these mutants to investigate whch of the central group of six chlorophylls are involved in the primary steps of charge separation and electron transfer.

  19. Study of photo-activated electron transfer reactions in the first excited singlet state by picosecond and nanosecond laser spectroscopy

    Picosecond laser spectroscopy has been used to study two photo-activated electron transfer reactions: - a bimolecular electron transfer reaction between a sensitizer, DODCI, and an electron acceptor, methylviologen. The two radical ions created with an electron transfer efficiency γ ≅ 0.07 have been identified in picosecond and nanosecond laser absorption spectroscopy by adding selective solutes such as para-benzoquinone (an electron acceptor) or L(+) ascorbic acid (an electron donor). - an intramolecular electron transfer reaction in a triad molecule consisting of a tetra-aryl-porphyrin covalently linked to both a carotenoid and a quinone. The photoinduced charge separation occurs within 30 ps and leads, with a yield of 25 pc, to the formation of a zwitterion whose half-life is 2.5 μs. The experimental results obtained in these two studies show an effective decrease in the recombination rate of the two radical ions created in the encounter pair. (author)

  20. Electron-Transfer Oxidation of Chlorophenols by Uranyl Ion Excited State in Aqueous Solution. Steady-State and Nanosecond Flash Photolysis Studies

    Sarakha, Mohamed; Bolte, Michèle; Burrows, Hugh D.

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation of chlorophenols by photoexcited uranyl ion was studied in aqueous solution at concentrations where the ground-state interactions were negligible. Nanosecond flash photolysis showed that a clean electron-transfer process from the chlorophenols to the excited uranyl ion is involved. This is suggested to lead to the formation of a U(V)/chlorophenoxyl radical pair complex. The efficiency of this charge-transfer process is unity for the three chlorophenols. However, low product yiel...

  1. Electron-transfer fluorescence quenching processes in coaggregates between excited N-alkylcarbazoles as electron donors and 2, 4-dinitrophenyl carboxylates or pentafiuorophenyl carboxylates as acceptors

    SHI, Ji-Liang; YI, Hu-Nan; XU, Jia-Yi; JIANG, Xi-Kui

    2000-01-01

    Electron-transfer processes facilitated by hydrophobiclipophilic interaction (HLI) between excited N-alkylcarbazoles (1-n, n=4, 8, 12, 16) as electron donors and 2,4dinnrophenyl carboxylates (2-n, n = 4, 8, 12, 16) or pentafluorophenyl carboxylates (3-n, n = 4, 8, 12, 16) as electron acceptors have been investigated by means of fluorescence spectroscopy in aqueous or aquiorgano binary mixtures.The fluorescence quenching of-n* by2-n or-n indicates that preassociation precedes the electron transfer. The extent of HLI-drtven coaggregation of the acceptor and the donor may be assessed from the B value of the equation I0/I = A + B [Q]. The chain-length effect and possibly also a chain-foldability effect, as well as the solvent aggregating power (SAgP)effect have been observed. Comparison of the quenching constants ( B ) for 1-n* /2-n combinations and 1-n* / 3-n combinations shows that the order of increasing B values for the quenching processes is 3-n < 2-n.

  2. Efficiency of intramolecular electron transfer from the second excited state of the donor in molecular triads D-A1-A2

    Feskov, S. V.; Ivanov, A. I.

    2016-01-01

    It is found that intramolecular and intermolecular electron transfer from the second singlet excited state of the donor in all molecular dyads studied up to now is accompanied by ultrafast recombination into the first excited state, resulting in a low quantum yield of the thermalized state with separated charges. The ultrafast photoinduced intramolecular charge transfer in donor‒acceptor 1‒acceptor 2 molecular triads is studied to ascertain the possibilities of increasing the quantum yield of ionic state. It is demonstrated that nonthermal (hot) electron transfer from the primary acceptor to the secondary acceptor can, in parallel with relaxation of a polar solvent, efficiently suppress the ultrafast recombination of charges into the first excited state of the donor and increase the yield of the ionic state. It is established that the angle between the directions of reaction coordinates corresponding to the electron transfer from the donor to the primary acceptor and from the primary acceptor to the secondary acceptor play the most important role in describing these processes. It is concluded that the value of this angle is governed by the ratio between the reorganization energies of the three possible electron transfers in the triad and can vary within wide limits. The parametric regions with maximum quantum yield of the thermalized ionic state are revealed. The strong effect the geometry of a studied triad has on charge separation efficiency is observed.

  3. Excited-state intramolecular hydrogen transfer (ESIHT) of 1,8-Dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) characterized by ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling

    Mohammed, Omar F.

    2014-05-01

    We combine ultrafast electronic and vibrational spectroscopy and computational modeling to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular hydrogen-transfer dynamics in 1,8-dihydroxy-9,10-anthraquinone (DHAQ) in tetrachloroethene, acetonitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, and methanol. We analyze the electronic excited states of DHAQ with various possible hydrogen-bonding schemes and provide a general description of the electronic excited-state dynamics based on a systematic analysis of femtosecond UV/vis and UV/IR pump-probe spectroscopic data. Upon photoabsorption at 400 nm, the S 2 electronic excited state is initially populated, followed by a rapid equilibration within 150 fs through population transfer to the S 1 state where DHAQ exhibits ESIHT dynamics. In this equilibration process, the excited-state population is distributed between the 9,10-quinone (S2) and 1,10-quinone (S1) states while undergoing vibrational energy redistribution, vibrational cooling, and solvation dynamics on the 0.1-50 ps time scale. Transient UV/vis pump-probe data in methanol also suggest additional relaxation dynamics on the subnanosecond time scale, which we tentatively ascribe to hydrogen bond dynamics of DHAQ with the protic solvent, affecting the equilibrium population dynamics within the S2 and S1 electronic excited states. Ultimately, the two excited singlet states decay with a solvent-dependent time constant ranging from 139 to 210 ps. The concomitant electronic ground-state recovery is, however, only partial because a large fraction of the population relaxes to the first triplet state. From the similarity of the time scales involved, we conjecture that the solvent plays a crucial role in breaking the intramolecular hydrogen bond of DHAQ during the S2/S1 relaxation to either the ground or triplet state. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  4. Excited state Intramolecular Proton Transfer in Anthralin

    Møller, Søren; Andersen, Kristine B.; Spanget-Larsen, Jens;

    1998-01-01

    Quantum chemical calculations performed on anthralin (1,8-dihydroxy-9(10H)-anthracenone) predict the possibility of an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process. Fluorescence excitation and emission spectra of the compound dissolved in n-hexane at ambient temperature results in an......, associated with an excited-state intramolecular proton transfer process....

  5. Four-electron model for singlet and triplet excitation energy transfers with inclusion of coherence memory, inelastic tunneling and nuclear quantum effects

    Suzuki, Yosuke; Ebina, Kuniyoshi; Tanaka, Shigenori

    2016-08-01

    A computational scheme to describe the coherent dynamics of excitation energy transfer (EET) in molecular systems is proposed on the basis of generalized master equations with memory kernels. This formalism takes into account those physical effects in electron-bath coupling system such as the spin symmetry of excitons, the inelastic electron tunneling and the quantum features of nuclear motions, thus providing a theoretical framework to perform an ab initio description of EET through molecular simulations for evaluating the spectral density and the temporal correlation function of electronic coupling. Some test calculations have then been carried out to investigate the dependence of exciton population dynamics on coherence memory, inelastic tunneling correlation time, magnitude of electronic coupling, quantum correction to temporal correlation function, reorganization energy and energy gap.

  6. Excited-State Deactivation of Adenine by Electron-Driven Proton-Transfer Reactions in Adenine-Water Clusters: A Computational Study.

    Wu, Xiuxiu; Karsili, Tolga N V; Domcke, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    The reactivity of photoexcited 9H-adenine with hydrogen-bonded water molecules in the 9H-adenine-(H2 O)5 cluster is investigated by using ab initio electronic structure methods, focusing on the photoreactivity of the three basic sites of 9H-adenine. The energy profiles of excited-state reaction paths for electron/proton transfer from water to adenine are computed. For two of the three sites, a barrierless or nearly barrierless reaction path towards a low-lying S1 -S0 conical intersection is found. This reaction mechanism, which is specific for adenine in an aqueous environment, can explain the substantially shortened excited-state lifetime of 9H-adenine in water. Depending on the branching ratio of the nonadiabatic dynamics at the S1 -S0 conical intersection, the electron/proton transfer process can enhance the photostability of 9H-adenine in water or can lead to the generation of adenine-H(⋅) and OH(⋅) free radicals. Although the branching ratio is yet unknown, these findings indicate that adenine might have served as a catalyst for energy harvesting by water splitting in the early stages of the evolution of life. PMID:26833826

  7. Electron transfer reactions

    Cannon, R D

    2013-01-01

    Electron Transfer Reactions deals with the mechanisms of electron transfer reactions between metal ions in solution, as well as the electron exchange between atoms or molecules in either the gaseous or solid state. The book is divided into three parts. Part 1 covers the electron transfer between atoms and molecules in the gas state. Part 2 tackles the reaction paths of oxidation states and binuclear intermediates, as well as the mechanisms of electron transfer. Part 3 discusses the theories and models of the electron transfer process; theories and experiments involving bridged electron transfe

  8. Bionano donor-acceptor hybrids of porphyrin, ssDNA, and semiconductive single-wall carbon nanotubes for electron transfer via porphyrin excitation.

    D'Souza, Francis; Das, Sushanta K; Zandler, Melvin E; Sandanayaka, Atula S D; Ito, Osamu

    2011-12-14

    Photoinduced electron transfer in self-assemblies of porphyrins ion-paired with ssDNA wrapped around single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been reported. To accomplish the three-component hybrids, two kinds of diameter-sorted semiconducting SWCNT(n,m)s of different diameter ((n,m) = (6,5) and (7,6)) and free-base or zinc porphyrin bearing peripheral positive charges ((TMPyP(+))M (tetrakis(4-N-methylpyridyl)porphyrin); M = Zn and H(2)) serving as light-absorbing photoactive materials are utilized. The donor-acceptor hybrids are held by ion-pairing between the negatively charged phosphate groups of ssDNA on the surface of the SWCNT and the positively charged at the ring periphery porphyrin macrocycle. The newly assembled bionano donor-acceptor hybrids have been characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and spectroscopic methods. Photoinduced electron transfer from the excited singlet porphyrin to the SWCNTs directly and/or via ssDNA as an electron mediator has been established by performing systematic studies involving the steady-state and time-resolved emission as well as the transient absorption studies. Higher charge-separation efficiency has been successfully demonstrated by the selection of the appropriate semiconductive SWCNTs with the right band gap, in addition to the aid of ssDNA as the electron mediator. PMID:22088093

  9. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems

    Sjulstok, Emil Sjulstok; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'yov, Ilia A

    2015-01-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling...... quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to...

  10. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1995-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 4 presents the reaction mechanisms involving the movement of single electrons. This book discusses the electron transfer reactions in organic, biochemical, organometallic, and excited state systems. Organized into four chapters, this volume begins with an overview of the photochemical behavior of two classes of sulfonium salt derivatives. This text then examines the parameters that control the efficiencies for radical ion pair formation. Other chapters consider the progress in the development of parameters that control the dynamics and reaction p

  11. Excitation energy transfer and electron-vibrational coupling in phycobiliproteins of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina investigated by site-selective spectroscopy.

    Gryliuk, G; Rätsep, M; Hildebrandt, S; Irrgang, K-D; Eckert, H-J; Pieper, J

    2014-09-01

    In adaption to its specific environmental conditions, the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina developed two different types of light-harvesting complexes: chlorophyll-d-containing membrane-intrinsic complexes and phycocyanobilin (PCB) - containing phycobiliprotein (PBP) complexes. The latter complexes are believed to form a rod-shaped structure comprising three homo-hexamers of phycocyanin (PC), one hetero-hexamer of phycocyanin and allophycocyanin (APC) and probably a linker protein connecting the PBPs to the reaction centre. Excitation energy transfer and electron-vibrational coupling in PBPs have been investigated by selectively excited fluorescence spectra. The data reveal a rich spectral substructure with a total of five low-energy electronic states with fluorescence bands at 635nm, 645nm, 654nm, 659nm and a terminal emitter at about 673 nm. The electronic states at ~635 and 645 nm are tentatively attributed to PC and APC, respectively, while an apparent heterogeneity among PC subunits may also play a role. The other fluorescence bands may be associated with three different isoforms of the linker protein. Furthermore, a large number of vibrational features can be identified for each electronic state with intense phonon sidebands peaking at about 31 to 37cm⁻¹, which are among the highest phonon frequencies observed for photosynthetic antenna complexes. The corresponding Huang-Rhys factors S fall in the range between 0.98 (terminal emitter), 1.15 (APC), and 1.42 (PC). Two characteristic vibronic lines at about 1580 and 1634cm⁻¹ appear to reflect CNH⁺ and CC stretching modes of the PCB chromophore, respectively. The exact phonon and vibrational frequencies vary with electronic state implying that the respective PCB chromophores are bound to different protein environments. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy. PMID:24560813

  12. Charge transfer excitations from excited state Hartree-Fock subsequent minimization scheme

    Theophilou, Iris; Thanos, S

    2014-01-01

    Photoinduced charge transfer processes play a key role for novel photovoltaic phenomena and devices. Thus, the development of ab initio methods that allow for accurate and computationally inexpensive treatment of charge transfer excitations is a topic that attracts nowadays a lot of scientific attention. In this paper we extend an approach recently introduced for the description of single and double excitations (M. Tassi, I. Theophilou and S. Thanos, Int. J. Quantum Chem., {113}, 690 (2013), M. Tassi, I. Theophilou and S. Thanos, J. Chem. Phys. {138}, 124107 (2013)) to allow for the description of intermolecular charge transfer excitations. For the description of an excitation where an electron is transferred from a donor system to an acceptor one, it is necessary to keep the excited state orthogonal to the ground sate in order to avoid variational collapse. These conditions are achieved by decomposing the subspace spanned by the Hartree-Fock (HF) ground state orbitals to four subspaces: The subspace spanned ...

  13. Electronic excitations and energy transfer in A2SiO5-Ce (A=Y, Lu, Gd) and Sc2SiO5 single crystals

    The time-resolved emission spectra (2-6 eV), reflection and luminescence excitation spectra (4.5-35 eV) as well as the kinetics of luminescence have been studied for single crystals of silicates A2SiO5-Ce (A=Y, Gd, Lu) and Sc2SiO5 at 5.8 and 300 K using synchrotron radiation of X-ray (storage ring VEPP-3) or selective vacuum ultraviolet (storage ring DORIS) range. The spectral and decay parameters of the impurity and intrinsic luminescence are determined. The photon multiplication effect was found for all compounds for energy E>15 eV (E>2.5Eg). The role of electron-hole and exciton mechanisms of energy transfer in the silicates and their dependence on temperature are discussed

  14. Stepwise Two-Photon-Induced Fast Photoswitching via Electron Transfer in Higher Excited States of Photochromic Imidazole Dimer.

    Kobayashi, Yoichi; Katayama, Tetsuro; Yamane, Takuya; Setoura, Kenji; Ito, Syoji; Miyasaka, Hiroshi; Abe, Jiro

    2016-05-11

    Stepwise two-photon excitations have been attracting much interest because of their much lower power thresholds compared with simultaneous two-photon processes and because some stepwise two-photon processes can be initiated by a weak incoherent excitation light source. Here we apply stepwise two-photon optical processes to the photochromic bridged imidazole dimer, whose solution instantly changes color upon UV irradiation and quickly reverts to the initial color thermally at room temperature. We synthesized a zinc tetraphenylporphyrin (ZnTPP)-substituted bridged imidazole dimer, and wide ranges of time-resolved spectroscopic studies revealed that a ZnTPP-linked bridged imidazole dimer shows efficient visible stepwise two-photon-induced photochromic reactions upon excitation at the porphyrin moiety. The fast photoswitching property combined with stepwise two-photon processes is important not only for the potential for novel photochromic materials that are sensitive to the incident light intensity but also for fundamental photochemistry using higher excited states. PMID:27088169

  15. An accurate full-dimensional potential energy surface for H–Au(111): Importance of nonadiabatic electronic excitation in energy transfer and adsorption

    We have constructed a potential energy surface (PES) for H-atoms interacting with fcc Au(111) based on fitting the analytic form of the energy from Effective Medium Theory (EMT) to ab initio energy values calculated with density functional theory. The fit used input from configurations of the H–Au system with Au atoms at their lattice positions as well as configurations with the Au atoms displaced from their lattice positions. It reproduces the energy, in full dimension, not only for the configurations used as input but also for a large number of additional configurations derived from ab initio molecular dynamics (AIMD) trajectories at finite temperature. Adiabatic molecular dynamics simulations on this PES reproduce the energy loss behavior of AIMD. EMT also provides expressions for the embedding electron density, which enabled us to develop a self-consistent approach to simulate nonadiabatic electron-hole pair excitation and their effect on the motion of the incident H-atoms. For H atoms with an energy of 2.7 eV colliding with Au, electron-hole pair excitation is by far the most important energy loss pathway, giving an average energy loss ≈3 times that of the adiabatic case. This increased energy loss enhances the probability of the H-atom remaining on or in the Au slab by a factor of 2. The most likely outcome for H-atoms that are not scattered also depends prodigiously on the energy transfer mechanism; for the nonadiabatic case, more than 50% of the H-atoms which do not scatter are adsorbed on the surface, while for the adiabatic case more than 50% pass entirely through the 4 layer simulation slab

  16. Photoselected electron transfer pathways in DNA photolyase

    Prytkova, Tatiana R.; Beratan, David N.; Skourtis, Spiros S.

    2007-01-01

    Cyclobutane dimer photolyases are proteins that bind to UV-damaged DNA containing cyclobutane pyrimidine dimer lesions. They repair these lesions by photo-induced electron transfer. The electron donor cofactor of a photolyase is a two-electron-reduced flavin adenine dinucleotide (FADH−). When FADH− is photo-excited, it transfers an electron from an excited π → π* singlet state to the pyrimidine dimer lesion of DNA. We compute the lowest excited singlet states of FADH− using ab initio (time-de...

  17. Electron transfer in proteins

    Farver, O; Pecht, I

    1991-01-01

    Electron migration between and within proteins is one of the most prevalent forms of biological energy conversion processes. Electron transfer reactions take place between active centers such as transition metal ions or organic cofactors over considerable distances at fast rates and with remarkable...... specificity. The electron transfer is attained through weak electronic interaction between the active sites, so that considerable research efforts are centered on resolving the factors that control the rates of long-distance electron transfer reactions in proteins. These factors include (in addition to the......-containing proteins. These proteins serve almost exclusively in electron transfer reactions, and as it turns out, their metal coordination sites are endowed with properties uniquely optimized for their function....

  18. Excitation and charge transfer in He+ + H collisions. A molecular approach including two-electron translation factors

    In a previous paper we have pointed out that the common-translation-factor (CTF) method is the only one which, at present, and within the framework of the molecular model of atomic collisions, can be shown to be both convergent and computationally fast, even for many-electron systems. In this Communication we check that this second statement is correct, presenting, for the first time, a molecular calculation involving two-electron translation factors, for He+ + H collisions. A careful study of the sensitivity of the calculated cross sections to the choice of the CTF is performed, and conclusions on that sensitivity are drawn, for several types of processes

  19. Excitation transfer in stacked quantum dot chains

    Stacked InAs quantum dot chains (QDCs) on InGaAs/GaAs cross-hatch pattern (CHP) templates yield a rich emission spectrum with an unusual carrier transfer characteristic compared to conventional quantum dot (QD) stacks. The photoluminescent spectra of the controlled, single QDC layer comprise multiple peaks from the orthogonal QDCs, the free-standing QDs, the CHP, the wetting layers and the GaAs substrate. When the QDC layers are stacked, employing a 10 nm GaAs spacer between adjacent QDC layers, the PL spectra are dominated by the top-most stack, indicating that the QDC layers are nominally uncoupled. Under high excitation power densities when the high-energy peaks of the top stack are saturated, however, low-energy PL peaks from the bottom stacks emerge as a result of carrier transfers across the GaAs spacers. These unique PL signatures contrast with the state-filling effects in conventional, coupled QD stacks and serve as a means to quickly assess the presence of electronic coupling in stacks of dissimilar-sized nanostructures. (paper)

  20. Relations among theories of excitation transfer

    Recent applications of the generalized master equation (GME) theory for the transfer of excitation interacting linearly with phonons results in revision of some previous conclusions about relations between GME and other advanced theories: Haken-Strobl-Reineker (HSR) stochastic Liouville equation (SLE) theory, Grover-Silbey (GS) microscopic theory and Continuous Time Random Walk (CTRW) method. Two-channel memory functions (MF) derived from first principles relate entirely to those corresponding to GS and HRS approaches and unify theories of the excitation transfer. Trapping effects have pronounced influence on MFs. Coherence effects in the excitation transfer lead to a strange behaviour of ''probabilities'' in CTRW. Kenkre-Knox (KK) correspondence between MF and spectral properties has a limited applicability. Decay time obtained in such a manner could have nothing to do with much longer real coherence time. (author). 69 refs

  1. Anomalous temperature dependence of excitation transfer between quantum dots

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 4 (2015), 325-330. ISSN 2164-6627 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LD14011; GA MŠk LH12236; GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 Keywords : excitation transfer * quantum dots * temperature dependence * electron-phonon interaction Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  2. Electron-impact excitation of krypton

    Meneses, G.D.; da Paixo, F.J.; Padial, N.T.

    1985-07-01

    First-order many-body theory has been used to calculate the differential, integrated, and momentum-transfer cross sections for the electron-impact excitation of the 5s'((1/2))/sub 1//sup 0/( /sup 1/P/sub 1/ ), 5s((3/2))/sub 1//sup 0/( /sup 3/P/sub 1/), 5s'((1/2))/sub 0//sup 0/( /sup 3/P/sub 0/), and 5s((3/2))/sub 2//sup 0/( /sup 3/P/sub 2/)= states of krypton for the incident energies of 20, 30, 50, 60, and 100 eV. Electron-photon coincidence parameters for the optically allowed states have been obtained. The results are compared to available experimental results.

  3. Symmetry characterization of electrons and lattice excitations

    Schober H.

    2012-01-01

    Symmetry concerns all aspects of a physical system from the electronic orbitals to structural and magnetic excitations. In this article we will try to elaborate the fundamental connection between symmetry and excitations. As excitations are manyfold in physical systems it is impossible to treat them exhaustively. We thus concentrate on the two topics of Bloch electrons and phonons. These two examples are complementary in the sense that Bloch electrons describe single particles in an external ...

  4. Transferred orbital angular momentum in the low-energy electron impact excitation of the {sup 1}S{sub 0}-{sup 1}P{sub 1} transition in barium

    Johnson, P.V.; Spanu, C.; Zetner, P.W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB (Canada)

    2001-11-28

    Superelastic electron scattering involving the collisional de-excitation of laser-excited {sup 138}Ba(...6s6p {sup 1}P{sub 1}) atoms to the (...6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}) ground state has been used to measure electron impact coherence parameters for the related (...6s{sup 2} {sup 1}S{sub 0}) to (...6s6p {sup 1}P{sub 1}) inelastic process. Measurements of the orbital angular momentum transfer parameter, L{sub perp}{sup +}, were made for excitation at impact energies of 7, 8.5, 11 and 16 eV. Experimental data are compared with available theoretical results. (author)

  5. Cross sections for electron impact excitation of molecules

    The discussion in this chapter is restricted to elastic scattering, rotational, vibrational, and electronic excitation and total scattering cross sections in electron molecule collisions. Experimental data on differential, integral and momentum transfer cross sections are surveyed and short remarks are made on experimental techniques and theoretical approaches used for generating cross section data. 11 references, 3 figures

  6. Charge transfer excitations from excited state Hartree-Fock subsequent minimization scheme

    Theophilou, Iris, E-mail: i.theophilou@fz-juelich.de [Peter Grunberg Institut (PGI) Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany); Tassi, M.; Thanos, S. [Institute for Advanced Materials, Physicochemical Processes, Nanotechnology and Microsystems, ‘Demokritos’ National Center for Scientific Research, 15310 Athens (Greece)

    2014-04-28

    Photoinduced charge-transfer processes play a key role for novel photovoltaic phenomena and devices. Thus, the development of ab initio methods that allow for an accurate and computationally inexpensive treatment of charge-transfer excitations is a topic that nowadays attracts a lot of scientific attention. In this paper we extend an approach recently introduced for the description of single and double excitations [M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, Int. J. Quantum Chem. 113, 690 (2013); M. Tassi, I. Theophilou, and S. Thanos, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 124107 (2013)] to allow for the description of intermolecular charge-transfer excitations. We describe an excitation where an electron is transferred from a donor system to an acceptor one, keeping the excited state orthogonal to the ground state and avoiding variational collapse. These conditions are achieved by decomposing the space spanned by the Hartree-Fock (HF) ground state orbitals into four subspaces: The subspace spanned by the occupied orbitals that are localized in the region of the donor molecule, the corresponding for the acceptor ones and two more subspaces containing the virtual orbitals that are localized in the neighborhood of the donor and the acceptor, respectively. Next, we create a Slater determinant with a hole in the subspace of occupied orbitals of the donor and a particle in the virtual subspace of the acceptor. Subsequently we optimize both the hole and the particle by minimizing the HF energy functional in the corresponding subspaces. Finally, we test our approach by calculating the lowest charge-transfer excitation energies for a set of tetracyanoethylene-hydrocarbon complexes that have been used earlier as a test set for such kind of excitations.

  7. Excitation energy transfer from dye molecules to doped graphene

    R S Swathi; K L Sebastian

    2012-01-01

    Recently, we have reported theoretical studies on the rate of energy transfer from an electronically excited molecule to graphene. It was found that graphene is a very efficient quencher of the electronically excited states and that the rate -4. The process was found to be effective up to 30 which is well beyond the traditional FRET limit. In this report, we study the transfer of an amount of energy $\\hbar$ from a dye molecule to doped graphene. We find a crossover of the distance dependence of the rate from -4 to exponential as the Fermi level is increasingly shifted into the conduction band, with the crossover occurring at a shift of the Fermi level by an amount $\\hbar$ /2.

  8. Electron energy distribution functions and fractional power transfer in “cold” and excited CO{sub 2} discharge and post discharge conditions

    Pietanza, L. D., E-mail: luciadaniela.pietanza@cnr.it; Colonna, G.; D' Ammando, G.; Laricchiuta, A.; Capitelli, M. [Nanotec-CNR, sect. Bari, via Amendola 122/D, 70126 Bari (Italy)

    2016-01-15

    A Boltzmann equation, in the presence of superelastic vibrational and electronic collisions and of electron-electron Coulomb collisions, has been solved in CO{sub 2} plasma in discharge and post discharge conditions. Superelastic vibrational collisions play an important role in affecting the electron energy distribution function (eedf) in a wide range of the reduced electric field E/N and of vibrational temperatures characterizing the vibrational modes of CO{sub 2}. An important result is the dependence of fractional power losses and of the relevant rate coefficients on the vibrational temperatures of the system. Superelastic electronic collisions, on the other hand, are the main processes affecting eedf and related quantities in the post discharge conditions (i.e., E/N = 0). In particular at low vibrational temperatures, the superelastic electronic collisions form an important plateau in the eedf, largely influencing the rate coefficients and the fractional power transfer.

  9. Electron energy distribution functions and fractional power transfer in “cold” and excited CO2 discharge and post discharge conditions

    A Boltzmann equation, in the presence of superelastic vibrational and electronic collisions and of electron-electron Coulomb collisions, has been solved in CO2 plasma in discharge and post discharge conditions. Superelastic vibrational collisions play an important role in affecting the electron energy distribution function (eedf) in a wide range of the reduced electric field E/N and of vibrational temperatures characterizing the vibrational modes of CO2. An important result is the dependence of fractional power losses and of the relevant rate coefficients on the vibrational temperatures of the system. Superelastic electronic collisions, on the other hand, are the main processes affecting eedf and related quantities in the post discharge conditions (i.e., E/N = 0). In particular at low vibrational temperatures, the superelastic electronic collisions form an important plateau in the eedf, largely influencing the rate coefficients and the fractional power transfer

  10. Electron transfer in proteins.

    Gray, H B; Winkler, J R

    1996-01-01

    Electron-transfer (ET) reactions are key steps in a diverse array of biological transformations ranging from photosynthesis to aerobic respiration. A powerful theoretical formalism has been developed that describes ET rates in terms of two parameters: the nuclear reorganization energy (lambda) and the electronic-coupling strength (HAB). Studies of ET reactions in ruthenium-modified proteins have probed lambda and HAB in several metalloproteins (cytochrome c, myoglobin, azurin). This work has shown that protein reorganization energies are sensitive to the medium surrounding the redox sites and that an aqueous environment, in particular, leads to large reorganization energies. Analyses of electronic-coupling strengths suggest that the efficiency of long-range ET depends on the protein secondary structure: beta sheets appear to mediate coupling more efficiently than alpha-helical structures, and hydrogen bonds play a critical role in both. PMID:8811189

  11. Broadband visible light-harvesting naphthalenediimide (NDI) triad: study of the intra-/intermolecular energy/electron transfer and the triplet excited state.

    Wu, Shuang; Zhong, Fangfang; Zhao, Jianzhang; Guo, Song; Yang, Wenbo; Fyles, Tom

    2015-05-21

    A triad based on naphthalenediimides (NDI) was prepared to study the intersystem crossing (ISC), the fluorescence-resonance-energy-transfer (FRET), as well as the photoinduced electron transfer (PET) processes. In the triad, the 2-bromo-6-alkylaminoNDI moiety was used as singlet energy donor and the spin converter, whereas 2,6-dialkylaminoNDI was used as the singlet/triplet energy acceptor. This unique structural protocol and thus alignment of the energy levels ensures the competing ISC and FRET in the triad. The photophysical properties of the triad and the reference compounds were studied with steady-state UV-vis absorption spectra, fluorescence spectra, nanosecond transient absorption spectra, cyclic voltammetry, and DFT/TDDFT calculations. FRET was confirmed with steady-state UV-vis absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy. Intramolecular electron transfer was observed in polar solvents, demonstrated by the quenching of both the fluorescence and triplet state of the energy acceptor. Nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy shows that the T1 state of the triad is exclusively localized on the 2,6-dialkylaminoNDI moiety in the triad upon selective photoexcitation into the energy donor, which indicates the intramolecular triplet state energy transfer. The intermolecular triplet state energy transfer between the two reference compounds was investigated with nanosecond transient absorption spectroscopy. The photophysical properties were rationalized by TDDFT calculations. PMID:25919420

  12. Advances in electron transfer chemistry

    Mariano, Patrick S

    1993-01-01

    Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry, Volume 3 presents studies that discuss findings in the various aspects of electron chemistry. The book is comprised of four chapters; each chapter reviews a work that tackles an issue in electron transfer chemistry. Chapter 1 discusses the photoinduced electron transfer in flexible biaryl donor-acceptor molecules. Chapter 2 tackles light-induced electron transfer in inorganic systems in homogeneous and heterogeneous phases. The book also covers internal geometry relaxation effects on electron transfer rates of amino-centered systems. The sequential elec

  13. Lifetime of electronic excitations in metal nanoparticles

    Quijada, M; Diez Muino, R; Echenique, P M [Centro de Fisica de Materiales CFM-Materials Physics Center MPC, Centro Mixto CSIC-UPV/EHU, Edificio Korta, Avenida de Tolosa 72, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain); Borisov, A G; Alonso, J A, E-mail: rdm@ehu.e [Donostia International Physics Center DIPC, P Manuel de Lardizabal 4, 20018 San Sebastian (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    Electronic excitations in metal particles with sizes up to a few nanometers are shown to have a one-electron character when a laser pulse is applied off the plasmon resonance. The calculated lifetimes of these excitations are in the femtosecond timescale but their values are substantially different from those in bulk. This deviation can be explained from the large weight of the excitation wave function in the nanoparticle surface region, where dynamic screening is significantly reduced. The well-known quadratic dependence of the lifetime with the excitation energy in bulk breaks down in these finite-size systems.

  14. Symmetry characterization of electrons and lattice excitations

    Schober H.

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Symmetry concerns all aspects of a physical system from the electronic orbitals to structural and magnetic excitations. In this article we will try to elaborate the fundamental connection between symmetry and excitations. As excitations are manyfold in physical systems it is impossible to treat them exhaustively. We thus concentrate on the two topics of Bloch electrons and phonons. These two examples are complementary in the sense that Bloch electrons describe single particles in an external periodic potential while phonons exemplify a decoupled system of interacting particles. The way we develop the argument gives as by-product a short account of molecular orbitals and molecular vibrations.

  15. Electronic excitation and charge transfer processes in collisions of H+, H2+, and H3+ ions with carbon monoxide at typical solar-wind velocities

    Luminescence in the 200-580 nm spectral region was observed in the collisions of H+, H2+, and H3+ with CO in the 50-1000 eV projectile energy range. Using computer simulations, we have identified emission of the following products in the observed spectra: the CO+(A-X) comet-tail system, CO+(B-X) first negative system, CO+(B-A) Baldet-Johnson system, and CO(b-a) third positive system. Also, an emission from atomic hydrogen (Hβ line at 486nm) has been observed. From the analysis of the experimental spectra, we have determined the absolute emission cross-sections for the formation of the observed products. Computer simulations gave the excited-product population distributions over vibrational and rotational energy levels. The vibrational level distribution from the CO+(A-X) comet-tail system is compared with the data for CO excited by 100 eV electrons and extreme ultraviolet radiation (XUV) photons. We have used these data to analyze the excitation conditions in the comet Humason (1961e). From the vibrational population distributions observed in the comet, we found that this distribution can be reproduced if electrons produce 25%, protons 70%, and XUV photons produce 5% of the emitting molecules. We find that the ratio of the CO+(B-X) emission to the sum of two main emissions (CO+(A-X)+CO+(B-X)) is velocity dependent and does not depend on the projectile ion type. For small velocities (below 100 km s–1) the ratio is about 5%, while for higher velocities it increases to 30%. For these data, we have found an empirical formula that satisfactorily describes the experimental data: R = R max(1 – v th/v), (where R max = 33%, v th = 87 km s–1). This could be used to infer the velocity of ions producing the observed emission of CO+ products.

  16. Electron transfer reactions of excited dyes with metal complexes. Progress report, March 1, 1978-February 28, 1979. [Iron-methylene blue

    Lichtin, N.N.

    1979-03-15

    An intense absorption band of /sup 3/MBH/sup 2 +/ at 700nm was characterized in several media and its pK/sub A/ was measured to be 7.17 +- .1 in water. Flash photolysis show that semiethylene blue, MBH/sup +/, formed by quenching /sup 3/MBH/sup 2 +/ with Fe/sub II/(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6//sup 2 +/, decays by disproportionation at a diffusion-controlled rate. Rates of decay of the photostationary state of solutions of MB/sup +/ and Fe/sup II/(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6//sup 2 +/ in acidic media were measured using crossed beams to yield specific rates of oxidation of leucomethylene blue (MBH/sub 3//sup 2 +/) by MB/sup +/ (synproportionation) and by Fe(III). Laser flash-photolysis shows that quenching of MB/sup +/(S/sub 1/) by Fe(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6//sup 2 +/ can result in electron transfer to give MBH/sup +/. Profound differences between processes initiated by quenching triplet methylene blue with Fe(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6//sup 2 +/ and with stable coordination complexes of Fe(II) were found. Quenchers included (Fe/sup II/(CN)/sub 6/)/sup 4 -/, (Fe/sup II/(CN)/sub 4/(bpy)/sub 2/)/sup 2 -/, (Fe/sup II/(CN)/sub 2/(bpy))/sup 0/, and (Fe/sup II/(bpy)/sub 3/)/sup 2 +/. Measurements were made in aqueous and aqueous-alcoholic solutions at pH 2, 4.4, and 8.2. Quenching of /sup 3/MBH/sup 2 +/ or /sup 3/MB/sup +/ by a stable complex of Fe(II) is diffusion-controlled and 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 3/ times the rate at which Fe(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6//sup 2 +/ quenches /sup 3/MBH/sup 2 +/. Net electron transfer accounts for less than 1/3 of total quenching by complexed Fe(II). In contrast, quenching by Fe(H/sub 2/O)/sub 6//sup 2 +/ goes essentially entirely with net electron transfer. It is concluded that quenching of triplet methylene blue by complexes proceeds via electron transfer which is reversible in the encounter complex. The MBH/sup +/ which results from net electron transfer from complexes of Fe(II) decays essentially entirely to MB/sup +/ via oxidation by complexed Fe(III); no disproportionation has been

  17. Infrared emission from electronically excited biacetyl molecules

    Drent, E.; Kommandeur, J.

    1971-01-01

    The infrared emission of electronically excited biacetyl molecules in the gas phase at low pressure was observed. Some experimental details are given, and it is shown that the emission derives from biacetyl molecules in their triplet state. The emission is dependent on the wavelength of excitation.

  18. Nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET).

    Ahmad, I.; Dunford, R. W.; Esbensen, H.; Gemmell, D. S.; Kanter, E. P.; Kraessig, B.; Ruett, U.; Southworth, S. H.

    1999-04-28

    We present a report on recent measurements using the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory to explore the phenomenon of Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Transition (NEET) in the {sup 189}Os atomic/nuclear system.

  19. Stimulated excitation electron microscopy and spectroscopy

    Howie, A.

    2015-04-15

    Recent advances in instrumentation for electron optics and spectroscopy have prompted exploration of ultra-low excitations such as phonons, bond vibrations and Johnson noise. These can be excited not just with fast electrons but also thermally or by other external sources of radiation. The near-field theory of electron energy loss and gain provides a convenient platform for analysing these processes. Possibilities for selected phonon mapping and imaging are discussed. Effects should certainly be observable in atomic resolution structure imaging but diffraction contrast imaging could perhaps be more informative. Additional exciting prospects to be explored include the transition from phonon excitation to single atom recoil and the boosting of energy loss and gain signals with tuned laser illumination. - Highlights: • Electron energy gains and losses measure thermal or laser boosting of excitations. • Electron energy gains and losses are conveniently analysed by near field theory. • Diffraction contrast theory is relevant for phonon imaging by electrons. • The transition from phonon excitation to single atom recoil deserves study.

  20. Stimulated excitation electron microscopy and spectroscopy

    Recent advances in instrumentation for electron optics and spectroscopy have prompted exploration of ultra-low excitations such as phonons, bond vibrations and Johnson noise. These can be excited not just with fast electrons but also thermally or by other external sources of radiation. The near-field theory of electron energy loss and gain provides a convenient platform for analysing these processes. Possibilities for selected phonon mapping and imaging are discussed. Effects should certainly be observable in atomic resolution structure imaging but diffraction contrast imaging could perhaps be more informative. Additional exciting prospects to be explored include the transition from phonon excitation to single atom recoil and the boosting of energy loss and gain signals with tuned laser illumination. - Highlights: • Electron energy gains and losses measure thermal or laser boosting of excitations. • Electron energy gains and losses are conveniently analysed by near field theory. • Diffraction contrast theory is relevant for phonon imaging by electrons. • The transition from phonon excitation to single atom recoil deserves study

  1. Resonant electron transfer between quantum dots

    Openov, Leonid A.

    1999-01-01

    An interaction of electromagnetic field with a nanostructure composed of two quantum dots is studied theoretically. An effect of a resonant electron transfer between the localized low-lying states of quantum dots is predicted. A necessary condition for such an effect is the existence of an excited bound state whose energy lies close to the top of the barrier separating the quantum dots. This effect may be used to realize the reversible quantum logic gate NOT if the superposition of electron s...

  2. Theoretical study of intermolecular energy transfer involving electronically excited molecules: He(1S) + H2(B 1Σ/sub u/+)

    To further understanding of gas phase collision dynamics involving electronically-excited molecules, a fully quantum mechanical study of He + H2(B 1Σ/sub u/+) was undertaken. Iterative natural orbital configuration interaction (CI) calculations were performed to obtain the interaction potential between He and H2(B 1Σ/sub u/+). The potential energy surface (PES) is highly anisotropic and has a van der Waals well of about 0.03 eV for C/sub 2v/ approach. Avoided PES crossings occur with He + H2(E,F 1Σ/sub g/+) and with He + H2(X 1Σ/sub g/+) and cause a local maximum and a deep minimum in the He + H2(B 1Σ/sub u/+) PES, respectively. The crossing with He + H2(X 1Σ/sub g/+) provides a mechanism for fluorescence quenching. The computed CI energies were combined with previous multi-reference double excitation CI calculations and fit with analytic functions for convenience in scattering calculations. Accurate dipole polarizabilities and quadrupole moment of H2(B 1Σ/sub u/+) were computed for use in the multipole expansion, which is the analytic form of the long-range PES. 129 refs., 28 figs., 35 tabs

  3. Neutron scattering investigation of magnetic excitations at high energy transfers

    With the advance of pulsed spallation neutron sources, neutron scattering investigation of elementary excitations in magnetic materials can now be extended to energies up to several hundreds of MeV. We have measured, using chopper spectrometers and time-of-flight techniques, the magnetic response functions of a series of d and f transition metals and compounds over a wide range of energy and momentum transfer. In PrO2, UO2, BaPrO3 and CeB6 we observed crystal-field transitions between the magnetic ground state and the excited levels in the energy range from 40 to 260 MeV. In materials exhibiting spin-fluctuation or mixed-valent character such as Ce 74Th 26, on the other hand, no sharp crystal-field lines but a broadened quasielastic magnetic peak was observed. The line width of the quasielastic component is thought to be connected to the spin-fluctuation energy of the 4f electrons. The significance of the neutron scattering results in relation to the ground state level structure of the magnetic ions and the spin-dynamics of the f electrons is discussed. Recently, in a study of the spin-wave excitations in itinerant magnetic systems, we have extended the spin-wave measurements in ferromagnetic iron up to about 160 MeV. Neutron scattering data at high energy transfers are of particular interest because they provide direct comparison with recent theories of itinerant magnetism. 26 references, 7 figures

  4. Ultrafast electronic relaxation of excited state vitamin B12 in the gas phase

    The time evolution of electronically excited vitamin B12 (cyanocobalamin) has been observed for the first time in the gas phase. It reveals an ultrafast decay to a state corresponding to metal excitation. This decay is interpreted as resulting from a ring to metal electron transfer. This opens the observation of the excited state of other complex biomimetic systems in the gas phase, the key to the characterisation of their complex evolution through excited electronic states

  5. Excitation Energy-Transfer Dynamics of Brown Algal Photosynthetic Antennas.

    Kosumi, D; Kita, M; Fujii, R; Sugisaki, M; Oka, N; Takaesu, Y; Taira, T; Iha, M; Hashimoto, H

    2012-09-20

    Fucoxanthin-chlorophyll-a/c protein (FCP) complexes from brown algae Cladosiphon okamuranus TOKIDA (Okinawa Mozuku in Japanese) contain the only species of carbonyl carotenoid, fucoxanthin, which exhibits spectral characteristics attributed to an intramolecular charge-transfer (ICT) property that arises in polar environments due to the presence of the carbonyl group in its polyene backbone. Here, we investigated the role of the ICT property of fucoxanthin in ultrafast energy transfer to chlorophyll-a/c in brown algal photosynthesis using femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopic measurements. The observed excited-state dynamics show that the ICT character of fucoxanthin in FCP extends its absorption band to longer wavelengths and enhances its electronic interaction with chlorophyll-a molecules, leading to efficient energy transfer from fucoxanthin to chlorophyll-a. PMID:26295888

  6. Ultrafast Charge Transfer Visualized by Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    Mančal T.; Milota F.; Hauer J; Christensson N.; Bixner O.; Lukeš V.; Kauffmann H. F.

    2013-01-01

    Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES) is used to investigate ultrafast excited-state dynamics in a lutetium bisphthalocyanine dimer. Following optical excitation, a chain of electron and hole transfer steps gives rise to characteristic cross-peak dynamics in the electronic 2D spectra. The combination of density matrix propagation and quantum chemical calculations results in a molecular view of the charge transfer dynamics and highlights the role of the counter-ion in providing an en...

  7. Coherent electron transfer in polyacetylene

    Psiachos, D., E-mail: dpsi@physics.uoc.gr

    2014-06-03

    Highlights: • We study electron–ion dynamics in a donor–acceptor system. • We find two distinct electron-transfer regimes: hopping and tunnelling. • We establish conditions for achieving ballistic electron transfer. • Lattice vibrations can dramatically affect the rate of electron transfer. • Decoherence due to lattice vibrations is limited in the tunnelling regime. - Abstract: We examine, using mixed classical-quantum electron–ion dynamics, electron transfer in a donor–acceptor-like molecular junction system based on polyacetylene. We identify two qualitatively-different transfer regimes: hopping and tunnelling. We discuss the criteria for achieving each one and for minimising inelastic scattering and decoherence arising from the coupling to the ions, and we connect our main results to quantities derived from electron dynamics involving simpler, three-state model systems. We identify the requirements to have near-ballistic transfer.

  8. Electron-beam-excited gas laser research

    Net energy gain in laser fusion places requirements on the laser that are not realized by any existing laser. Utilization of relativistic electron beams (REB's), a relatively new source for the excitation of gas laser media, may lead to new lasers that could satisfy these requirements. Already REB's have been utilized to excite gas laser media and produce gas lasers that have not been produced as successfully any other way. Electron-beam-excitation has produced electronic-transition dimer lasers that have not yet been produced by any other excitation scheme (for example, Xe2/ sup *(1)/, Kr:O(21S)/sup 2/, KrF/sup *(3)/). In addition, REB's have initiated chemical reactions to produce HF laser radiation with unique and promising results. Relativistic-electron-beam gas-laser research is continuing to lead to new lasers with unique properties. Results of work carried out at Sandia Laboratories in this pioneering effort of electron-beam-excited-gas lasers are reviewed. (U.S.)

  9. Excitation energy transfer in chromophore aggregates within a dissipative medium

    Belov, Alexander S., E-mail: belov_as@mail.com [Chemistry Department, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1/3, Moscow (Russian Federation); Eremin, Vadim V. [Chemistry Department, Moscow State University, Leninskie Gory 1/3, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2012-10-01

    The Redfield theory-based model of excitation energy transfer in chromophore ensembles within dissipative environment is proposed. Application of the multipole expansion to an operator of interaction between the chromophore molecules and the environment together with some assumptions about the latter led to the closed-form expressions for the elements of the dissipation tensor. These expressions relate the rates of transition between eigenstates of a chromophore ensemble with the spectral and electronic properties of an environment and the chromophore molecules. For several model cases the exact solution of the Redfield equations was obtained. -- Highlights: ► A model for electronic relaxation dynamics in supramolecular ensembles is proposed. ► Closed-form expressions for relaxation rates are derived. ► Redfield equations are solved in closed form for several model systems. ► The effect of structural and electronic parameters on relaxation rates is discussed.

  10. Coherence in electron transfer pathways

    Skourtis, Spiros S.; Beratan, David N.; Waldeck, David H.

    2011-01-01

    Central to the view of electron-transfer reactions is the idea that nuclear motion generates a transition state geometry at which the electron/hole amplitude propagates coherently from the electron donor to the electron acceptor. In the weakly coupled or nonadiabatic regime, the electron amplitude tunnels through an electronic barrier between the donor and acceptor. The structure of the barrier is determined by the covalent and noncovalent interactions of the bridge. Because the tunneling bar...

  11. Electron impact ionization and excitation of laser-excited atoms: investigation by means of electron spectrometry

    We have measured the electron spectra following the excitation and ionization of laser-excited atoms by impact of 1.5 keV electrons: 2p excitation and 2s ionization of Na(3p3/2), 1s excitation of Li(2p3/2) and 5p ionization of Ba(6s5d 1,3D). Except for Ba the intensities of ejected electrons are directly proportional to the cross sections of Auger and autoionizing states. Theoretical excitation cross sections (Na 2p, Li 1s) are obtained in first Born approximation including the full relaxation of the atomic electrons. Relative ionization cross sections (Na 2s, Ba 5p) are evaluated in sudden approximation as a two-step process: pure 2s(5p) ionization plus relaxation of the rest of the atomic electrons. The experimental spectra are compared to theoretical spectra

  12. Electronic excitation of Na atom by electron impact

    Electronic excitation of the 3s-3p transition in the Na atom was studied by intermediate energy electron impact spectroscopy. Differential Cross Sections (DCS) and Generalized Oscillator Strenghts (GOS) were determined experimentally for 1 KeV electrons. Theoretical results within the First Born Approximation as well as Glauber theory, were also performed. (A.C.A.S.)

  13. Coherence in electron-impact excitation of helium

    This thesis describes an experimental study into the electron-impact excitation to the 33P, 31D and 33D states of Helium. The scattered electron and the photon, emitted by the excited atom, are measured in coincidence. The parameters, which can be varied, are the scattering angle and the kinetic energy of the projectile. Two parameters, which are used to characterize the excited state, are the angular momentum transferred to the atom, L perpendicular, and the alignment angle γ. It is shown that results of measurements on 31D excitation with photon detection perpendicular to the scattering plane do not agree in the small scattering angle region with any of the model calculations currently available. Remarkable is the sign of L perpendicular, which appears to start of negatively at 60 eV. It is shown that for 33P excitation the predicted large value of γ is indeed found experimentally. This supports the suggestion that exchange scattering is underestimated in model calculations for 1P excitation. Another result is that for 1P and 3P excitation the behaviour of L perpendicular as a function of the scattering angle can be related at different impact energies with the help of a partial wave expansion. A scaling relation can be formulated for the behaviour of L perpendicular. The influence of a negative ion resonance to excitation of the 33D state is investigated. Both in coincidence and non-coincidence measurements the presence of the resonance yields information on both the direct and indirect excitation of the 33D state. It is shown that the coincident measurement gives an unique opportunity to determine the excited 33D state completely. Results of measurements with photon detection in the scattering plane are given. They supplement previous 31D and 33D results and allow physical parameters, such as L perpendicular and γ, to be obtained. (H.W.). 132 refs.; 20 figs.; 18 tabs

  14. Computer simulation of cluster impact induced electronic excitation of solids

    We present a computational study of electronic excitation upon bombardment of a metal surface with cluster projectiles. Our model employs a molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to calculate the particle dynamics following the projectile impact. Kinetic excitation is implemented via two mechanisms describing the electronic energy loss of moving particles: autoionization in close binary collisions and a velocity proportional friction force resulting from direct atom–electron collisions. Two different friction models are compared with respect to the predicted sputter yields after single atom and cluster bombardment. We find that a density dependent friction coefficient leads to a significant reduction of the total energy transferred to the electronic sub-system as compared to the Lindhard friction model, thereby strongly enhancing the predicted sputter yield under cluster bombardment conditions. In contrast, the yield predicted for monoatomic projectile bombardment remains practically unchanged

  15. Electron impact cross sections of vibrationally and electronically excited molecules

    Yoon, Jung-Sik, E-mail: jsyoon@nfri.re.kr [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2, Osikdo-Dong, Gunsan, Jeollabuk-Do, 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Mi-Young; Kwon, Deuk-Chul; Choi, Heechol [Plasma Technology Research Center, National Fusion Research Institute, 814-2, Osikdo-Dong, Gunsan, Jeollabuk-Do, 573-540 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chang-Geun [National Center for Standard Reference Data, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Doryong-Dong, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of); Kumar, Vijay [B-82, Aarohi Twin Bungalows, Near Govt. Tubewell, Bopal, Ahmedabad-380058 (India)

    2014-10-30

    It is well known that the electron impact cross sections for elastic and inelastic processes for the vibrationally and electronically excited molecules are predominantly different than those for molecules in the ground state. Collisions of low energy electrons with excited molecules play an important role in explaining the behavior of gas discharges in laser and plasma physics, in planetary atmospheres, stars, and interstellar medium and in plasmas widely used in the fabrication of microelectronics. This explains as to why there is a need for having validated sets of electron impact cross sections for different processes. This work reviews the subject of electron collisions with vibrationally and electronically excited molecules in a comprehensive way. The survey has been carried out for a few excited molecules such as H{sub 2}, D{sub 2}, T{sub 2}, HD, HT, DT, N{sub 2}, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}. This review includes the discussion on the methods to produce and detect vibrationally and electronically excited molecules. We will take up the cross section data available in the literature for such molecules on electron scattering, dissociation, ionization and attachment processes and will discuss, evaluate and well-validate the same wherever and whenever possible.

  16. Electron impact cross sections of vibrationally and electronically excited molecules

    It is well known that the electron impact cross sections for elastic and inelastic processes for the vibrationally and electronically excited molecules are predominantly different than those for molecules in the ground state. Collisions of low energy electrons with excited molecules play an important role in explaining the behavior of gas discharges in laser and plasma physics, in planetary atmospheres, stars, and interstellar medium and in plasmas widely used in the fabrication of microelectronics. This explains as to why there is a need for having validated sets of electron impact cross sections for different processes. This work reviews the subject of electron collisions with vibrationally and electronically excited molecules in a comprehensive way. The survey has been carried out for a few excited molecules such as H2, D2, T2, HD, HT, DT, N2, O2, and CO2. This review includes the discussion on the methods to produce and detect vibrationally and electronically excited molecules. We will take up the cross section data available in the literature for such molecules on electron scattering, dissociation, ionization and attachment processes and will discuss, evaluate and well-validate the same wherever and whenever possible

  17. Thermal electronic excitations in liquid metals

    Chisolm, Eric D.; Bock, Nicolas; Rudin, Sven P.; Wallace, Duane C.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal electronic excitations in metal crystals are calculated by starting with a reference structure for the nuclei: the crystal structure of the appropriate phase. Here we explain the corresponding theory for metal liquids, starting with an appropriate reference structure for a liquid. We explain the significance of these structures, and we briefly review how to find them and calculate their properties. Then we examine the electronic densities of states for liquid structures of Na, Al, and...

  18. Excitations and benchmark ensemble density functional theory for two electrons

    A new method for extracting ensemble Kohn-Sham potentials from accurate excited state densities is applied to a variety of two-electron systems, exploring the behavior of exact ensemble density functional theory. The issue of separating the Hartree energy and the choice of degenerate eigenstates is explored. A new approximation, spin eigenstate Hartree-exchange, is derived. Exact conditions that are proven include the signs of the correlation energy components and the asymptotic behavior of the potential for small weights of the excited states. Many energy components are given as a function of the weights for two electrons in a one-dimensional flat box, in a box with a large barrier to create charge transfer excitations, in a three-dimensional harmonic well (Hooke's atom), and for the He atom singlet-triplet ensemble, singlet-triplet-singlet ensemble, and triplet bi-ensemble

  19. Excitations and benchmark ensemble density functional theory for two electrons

    Pribram-Jones, Aurora; Trail, John R; Burke, Kieron; Needs, Richard J; Ullrich, Carsten A

    2014-01-01

    A new method for extracting ensemble Kohn-Sham potentials from accurate excited state densities is applied to a variety of two electron systems, exploring the behavior of exact ensemble density functional theory. The issue of separating the Hartree energy and the choice of degenerate eigenstates is explored. A new approximation, spin eigenstate Hartree-exchange (SEHX), is derived. Exact conditions that are proven include the signs of the correlation energy components, the virial theorem for both exchange and correlation, and the asymptotic behavior of the potential for small weights of the excited states. Many energy components are given as a function of the weights for two electrons in a one-dimensional flat box, in a box with a large barrier to create charge transfer excitations, in a three-dimensional harmonic well (Hooke's atom), and for the He atom singlet-triplet ensemble, singlet-triplet-singlet ensemble, and triplet bi-ensemble.

  20. Quasiparticle theory of electron excitations in solids

    A first-principles quasiparticle approach to electron excitation energies in solids is reviewed. The theory has been applied to explain and predict the spectroscopic properties of a variety of systems including bulk crystals, surfaces, interfaces, clusters, defects, and materials under pressure. Several illustrative applications are presented and some recent theoretical developments discussed

  1. Electronic fund transfer & the "unbanked"

    Luxman Nathan

    1998-01-01

    As the Federal Government moves to switch most federal payments from paper check delivery to Direct Deposit by January 2, 1999, the Electronic Fund Transfer Initiative (EFT) attempts to educate consumers and serve the "unbanked."

  2. Electronic excitation of methane molecule by electron impact

    In this work, it is presented elastic and inelastic differential cross sections for the electronic excitation of the Triplet (3T2) of CH4 molecule calculated for electron incident energies of 20 and 30 eV. It is employed the Schwinger multichannel method and these results are compared to the ones available in the literature. (A.C.A.S.)

  3. Electronic excitation of the surface of UV-irradiated solids in heterogeneous recombination of hydrogen atoms

    Grankin, V. P.; Grankin, D. V.

    2016-06-01

    The reaction energy transfer to electrons and release of electrons from traps under the action of the recombination of H atoms on the surface of light-sum-storing crystals (Zn2SiO4-Mn, ZnS, ZnS,CdS-Ag) was studied. This effect is associated with the reaction energy accommodation via the electronic channel. The transfer of electronic excitations to the atomic recombination event is independent of the reaction rate, but depends on the electron transition energy in a solid. The possibility of electronic excitation per heterogeneous recombination event of H atoms increased exponentially as the electron transition energy decreased.

  4. Electron-excited hydrogen and helium collisions

    The Multichannel Eikonal Treatment (MET) is modified so as to facilitate highly accurate description of various asymptotic long range dipole couplings important in electron excited atom collisions. MET is applied to excitation in e-H(2s), e-H(2p), e-He(2 /sup 1,3/S) and e-He(2 /sup 1,3/P) collisions at intermediate energies. Integral and differential cross sections together with various coherence and alignment parameters for the radiative decay of the n=2 and 3 collisionally-excited P and D states of H and He are determined from MET with 10 channels associated with n = 1, 2, and 3 sublevels. Comparison is made with various recent measurements

  5. Ultrafast Charge Transfer Visualized by Two-Dimensional Electronic Spectroscopy

    Mančal T.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D-ES is used to investigate ultrafast excited-state dynamics in a lutetium bisphthalocyanine dimer. Following optical excitation, a chain of electron and hole transfer steps gives rise to characteristic cross-peak dynamics in the electronic 2D spectra. The combination of density matrix propagation and quantum chemical calculations results in a molecular view of the charge transfer dynamics and highlights the role of the counter-ion in providing an energetic perturbation which promotes charge transfer across the complex.

  6. Electron spectroscopy of collisional excited atoms

    In this thesis measurements are described in which coincidences are detected between scattered projectiles and emitted electrons. This yields information on two-electron excitation processes. In order to show what can be learnt from coincidence experiments a detailed theoretical analysis is given. The transition amplitudes, which contain all the information, are introduced (ch.2). In ch.3 the experimental set-up is shown. The results for the Li+-He system are shown in ch. 7 and are compared with predictions based on the Molecular-Orbitalmodel which however does not account for two-excitation mechanisms. With the transition amplitudes also the wave function of the excited atom has been completely determined. In ch.8 the shape of the electron cloud, induced by the collision, is derived from the amplitudes. The relation between the oscillatory motion of this cloud after the collision and the correlation between the two electrons of the excited atom is discussed. In ch. 6 it is shown that the broad structures in the non-coincident energy spectra of the Li+-He system are erroneously interpretated as a result of electron emission from the (Li-He)+-quasimolecule. A model is presented which explains, based on the results obtained from the coincidence measurements, these broad structures. In ch. 4 the Post-Collision Interaction process is treated. It is shown that for high-energy collisions, in contrast with general assumptions, PCI is important. In ch. 5 the importance of PCI-processes in photoionization of atoms, followed by Auger decay, are studied. From the formulas derived in ch. 4 simple analytical results are obtained. These are applied to recent experiments and good agreement is achieved. 140 refs.; 55 figs.; 9 tabs

  7. Concepts of Highly Excited Electronic Systems

    Berakdar, Jamal

    2003-05-01

    Knowledge of the excitation characteristics of matter is decisive for the descriptions of a variety of dynamical processes, which are of significant technological interest. E.g. transport properties and the optical response are controlled by the excitation spectrum. This self-contained work is a coherent presentation of the quantum theory of correlated few-particle excitations in electronic systems. It begins with a compact resume of the quantum mechanics of single particle excitations. Particular emphasis is put on Green function methods, which offer a natural tool to unravel the relations between the physics of small and large electronic systems. The book contains explicit expressions for the Coulomb Green function of two charge particles and a generalization to three-body systems. Techniques for the many-body Green function of finite systems are introduced and some explicit calculations of the Green functions are given. Concrete examples are provided and the theories are contrasted with experimental data, when available. The second volume presents an up-to-date selection of applications of the developed concepts and a comparison with available experiments is made

  8. Search for excited electrons at HERA

    H1 Collaboration; Adloff, C.; Andreev, V.; Andrieu, B.; Anthonis, T.; Astvatsatourov, A.; Babaev, A.; Bähr, J.; Baranov, P.; Barrelet, E.; Bartel, W.; Baumgartner, S.; Becker, J.; Beckingham, M.; Beglarian, A.; Behnke, O.; Belousov, A.; Berger, Ch.; Berndt, T.; Bizot, J. C.; Böhme, J.; Boudry, V.; Braunschweig, W.; Brisson, V.; Bröker, H.-B.; Brown, D. P.; Bruncko, D.; Büsser, F. W.; Bunyatyan, A.; Burrage, A.; Buschhorn, G.; Bystritskaya, L.; Campbell, A. J.; Caron, S.; Cassol-Brunner, F.; Clarke, D.; Collard, C.; Contreras, J. G.; Coppens, Y. R.; Coughlan, J. A.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cox, B. E.; Cozzika, G.; Cvach, J.; Dainton, J. B.; Dau, W. D.; Daum, K.; Davidsson, M.; Delcourt, B.; Delerue, N.; Demirchyan, R.; de Roeck, A.; de Wolf, E. A.; Diaconu, C.; Dingfelder, J.; Dixon, P.; Dodonov, V.; Dowell, J. D.; Droutskoi, A.; Dubak, A.; Duprel, C.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Efremenko, V.; Egli, S.; Eichler, R.; Eisele, F.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ellerbrock, M.; Elsen, E.; Erdmann, M.; Erdmann, W.; Faulkner, P. J. W.; Favart, L.; Fedotov, A.; Felst, R.; Ferencei, J.; Ferron, S.; Fleischer, M.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleming, Y. H.; Flügge, G.; Fomenko, A.; Foresti, I.; Formánek, J.; Franke, G.; Frising, G.; Gabathuler, E.; Gabathuler, K.; Garvey, J.; Gassner, J.; Gayler, J.; Gerhards, R.; Gerlich, C.; Ghazaryan, S.; Goerlich, L.; Gogitidze, N.; Grab, C.; Grabski, V.; Grässler, H.; Greenshaw, T.; Grindhammer, G.; Hadig, T.; Haidt, D.; Hajduk, L.; Haller, J.; Heinemann, B.; Heinzelmann, G.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hengstmann, S.; Henschel, H.; Heremans, R.; Herrera, G.; Herynek, I.; Hildebrandt, M.; Hilgers, M.; Hiller, K. H.; Hladký, J.; Höting, P.; Hoffmann, D.; Horisberger, R.; Hovhannisyan, A.; Hurling, S.; Ibbotson, M.; Işsever, Ç.; Jacquet, M.; Jaffre, M.; Janauschek, L.; Janssen, X.; Jemanov, V.; Jönsson, L.; Johnson, C.; Johnson, D. P.; Jones, M. A. S.; Jung, H.; Kant, D.; Kapichine, M.; Karlsson, M.; Karschnick, O.; Katzy, J.; Keil, F.; Keller, N.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kiesling, C.; Kjellberg, P.; Klein, M.; Kleinwort, C.; Kluge, T.; Knies, G.; Koblitz, B.; Kolya, S. D.; Korbel, V.; Kostka, P.; Kotelnikov, S. K.; Koutouev, R.; Koutov, A.; Kroseberg, J.; Krüger, K.; Kuhr, T.; Lamb, D.; Landon, M. P. J.; Lange, W.; Laštovička, T.; Laycock, P.; Lebailly, E.; Lebedev, A.; Leißner, B.; Lemrani, R.; Lendermann, V.; Levonian, S.; List, B.; Lobodzinska, E.; Lobodzinski, B.; Loginov, A.; Loktionova, N.; Lubimov, V.; Lüders, S.; Lüke, D.; Lytkin, L.; Malden, N.; Malinovski, E.; Mangano, S.; Maraček, R.; Marage, P.; Marks, J.; Marshall, R.; Martyn, H.-U.; Martyniak, J.; Maxfield, S. J.; Meer, D.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meyer, A. B.; Meyer, H.; Meyer, J.; Michine, S.; Mikocki, S.; Milstead, D.; Mohrdieck, S.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moreau, F.; Morozov, A.; Morris, J. V.; Müller, K.; Murín, P.; Nagovizin, V.; Naroska, B.; Naumann, J.; Naumann, Th.; Newman, P. R.; Niebergall, F.; Niebuhr, C.; Nix, O.; Nowak, G.; Nozicka, M.; Olivier, B.; Olsson, J. E.; Ozerov, D.; Panassik, V.; Pascaud, C.; Patel, G. D.; Peez, M.; Perez, E.; Petrukhin, A.; Phillips, J. P.; Pitzl, D.; Pöschl, R.; Potachnikova, I.; Povh, B.; Rauschenberger, J.; Reimer, P.; Reisert, B.; Risler, C.; Rizvi, E.; Robmann, P.; Roosen, R.; Rostovtsev, A.; Rusakov, S.; Rybicki, K.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Schätzel, S.; Scheins, J.; Schilling, F.-P.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, D.; Schmidt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, M.; Schoeffel, L.; Schöning, A.; Schörner, T.; Schröder, V.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schwanenberger, C.; Sedlák, K.; Sefkow, F.; Shekelyan, V.; Sheviakov, I.; Shtarkov, L. N.; Sirois, Y.; Sloan, T.; Smirnov, P.; Soloviev, Y.; South, D.; Spaskov, V.; Specka, A.; Spitzer, H.; Stamen, R.; Stella, B.; Stiewe, J.; Strauch, I.; Straumann, U.; Tchetchelnitski, S.; Thompson, G.; Thompson, P. D.; Tomasz, F.; Traynor, D.; Truöl, P.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsurin, I.; Turnau, J.; Turney, J. E.; Tzamariudaki, E.; Uraev, A.; Urban, M.; Usik, A.; Valkár, S.; Valkárová, A.; Vallée, C.; van Mechelen, P.; Vargas Trevino, A.; Vassiliev, S.; Vazdik, Y.; Veelken, C.; Vest, A.; Vichnevski, A.; Wacker, K.; Wagner, J.; Wallny, R.; Waugh, B.; Weber, G.; Wegener, D.; Werner, C.; Werner, N.; Wessels, M.; White, G.; Wiesand, S.; Wilksen, T.; Winde, M.; Winter, G.-G.; Wissing, Ch.; Wobisch, M.; Woehrling, E.-E.; Wünsch, E.; Wyatt, A. C.; Žáček, J.; Zálešák, J.; Zhang, Z.; Zhokin, A.; Zomer, F.; Zur Nedden, M.

    2002-11-01

    A search for excited electron (e*) production is described in which the electroweak decays e*-->eγ, e*-->eZ and e*-->νW are considered. The data used correspond to an integrated luminosity of 120 pb-1 taken in e+/-p collisions from 1994 to 2000 with the H1 detector at HERA at centre-of-mass energies of 300 and 318 GeV. No evidence for a signal is found. Mass dependent exclusion limits are derived for the ratio of the couplings to the compositeness scale, /f/Λ. These limits extend the excluded region to higher masses than has been possible in previous direct searches for excited electrons.

  9. Computer simulation of electronic excitations in beryllium

    Popov, A V

    2016-01-01

    An effective method for the quantitative description of the electronic excited states of polyatomic systems is developed by using computer technology. The proposed method allows calculating various properties of matter at the atomic level within the uniform scheme. A special attention is paid to the description of beryllium atoms interactions with the external fields, comparable by power to the fields in atoms, molecules and clusters.

  10. Perfect transfer of multiple excitations in quantum networks

    Brougham, T; Jex, I; 10.1103/PhysRevA.83.022323

    2011-01-01

    We present a general formalism to the problem of perfect state-transfer (PST), where the state involves multiple excitations of the quantum network. A key feature of our formalism is that it allows for inclusion of nontrivial interactions between the excitations. Hence, it is perfectly suited to addressing the problem of PST in the context of various types of physical realizations. The general formalism is also flexible enough to account for situations where multiple excitations are "focused" onto the same site.

  11. Electromagnetic Instabilities Excited by Electron Temperature Anisotropy

    陆全明; 王连启; 周艳; 王水

    2004-01-01

    One-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations are performed to investigate the nonlinear evolution of electromagnetic instabilities excited by the electron temperature anisotropy in homogeneous plasmas with different parameters. The results show that the electron temperature anisotropy can excite the two right-hand electromagnetic instabilities, one has the frequency higher than Ωe, the other is the whistler instability with larger amplitude,and its frequency is below Ωe. Their dispersion relations are consistent with the prediction from the cold plasma theory. In the initial growth stage (prediction from linear theory), the frequency of the dominant mode (the mode whose amplitude is large enough) of the whistler wave almost does not change, but in the saturation stage the situation is different. In the case that the ratio of electron plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency is larger than 1, the frequency of the dominant mode of the whistler wave drifts from high to low continuously. However, for the case of the ratio smaller than 1, besides the original dominant mode of the whistler wave whose frequency is about 2.6ωe, another dominant mode whose frequency is about 1.55ωe also begins to be excited at definite time,and its amplitude increases with time until it exceeds the original dominant mode.

  12. Electron impact excitation of SF6

    Trajmar, S.; Chutjian, A.

    1977-01-01

    A study of the electron impact energy-loss spectrum of SF6 under both optical (low scattering angle, high impact energy) and non-optical conditions (high scattering angle, low impact energy) has revealed a number of electronic excitation processes. With the help of theoretical calculations, several of these transitions have been assigned and approximate cross sections associated with four features have been determined. In addition, a strong resonance at 12 eV has been observed in both elastic and vibrationally inelastic (delta E = 0.092 eV) channels.

  13. Photoinduced energy and electron transfer in rubrene-benzoquinone and rubrene-porphyrin systems

    Khan, Jafar Iqbal

    2014-11-01

    Excited-state electron and energy transfer from singlet excited rubrene (Ru) to benzoquinone (BQ) and tetra-(4-aminophenyl) porphyrin (TAPP) were investigated by steady-state absorption and emission, time-resolved transient absorption, and femtosecond (fs)-nanosecond (ns) fluorescence spectroscopy. The low reduction potential of BQ provides the high probability of electron transfer from the excited Ru to BQ. Steady-state and time-resolved results confirm such an excited electron transfer scenario. On the other hand, strong spectral overlap between the emission of Ru and absorption of TAPP suggests that energy transfer is a possible deactivation pathway of the Ru excited state.

  14. Coherence in electron transfer pathways.

    Skourtis, Spiros S; Beratan, David N; Waldeck, David H

    2011-01-01

    Central to the view of electron-transfer reactions is the idea that nuclear motion generates a transition state geometry at which the electron/hole amplitude propagates coherently from the electron donor to the electron acceptor. In the weakly coupled or nonadiabatic regime, the electron amplitude tunnels through an electronic barrier between the donor and acceptor. The structure of the barrier is determined by the covalent and noncovalent interactions of the bridge. Because the tunneling barrier depends on the nuclear coordinates of the reactants (and on the surrounding medium), the tunneling barrier is highly anisotropic, and it is useful to identify particular routes, or pathways, along which the transmission amplitude propagates. Moreover, when more than one such pathway exists, and the paths give rise to comparable transmission amplitude magnitudes, one may expect to observe quantum interferences among pathways if the propagation remains coherent. Given that the effective tunneling barrier height and width are affected by the nuclear positions, the modulation of the nuclear coordinates will lead to a modulation of the tunneling barrier and hence of the electron flow. For long distance electron transfer in biological and biomimetic systems, nuclear fluctuations, arising from flexible protein moieties and mobile water bridges, can become quite significant. We discuss experimental and theoretical results that explore the quantum interferences among coupling pathways in electron-transfer kinetics; we emphasize recent data and theories associated with the signatures of chirality and inelastic processes, which are manifested in the tunneling pathway coherence (or absence of coherence). PMID:23833692

  15. Effect of electron excitation on radiation damage in fce metals

    Iwase, A.; Iwata, T.

    1994-05-01

    Defect production, radiation annealing and defect recovery are studied in several fcc metals (Al, Cu, Ni, Ag and Pt) irradiated with low-energy (˜ 1 MeV) and high-energy (˜ 100 MeV) ions. Irradiation of the metals with strong electron-lattice interaction (Al, Ni and Pt) by ˜ 100 MeV ions causes an anomalous reduction, or even a complete disappearance of stage-I recovery. This experimental result shows that the energy transferred from excited electrons to lattice atoms through the electron-lattice interaction contributes to the annihilation of single interstitials. This effect is also observed in Ni as a large cross section for radiation annealing, and a decrease of the damage efficiency. On the other hand, in Cu and Ag thin foils, we find that lattice defects are produced not only through elastic interactions, but also through a process strongly associated with electron excitation. In the latter process, the defect production cross section is proportional to Se1.7 in Cu and Se1.5 in Ag. The nearly quadratic dependence of the cross section on Se suggests that the mutual Coulomb repulsion of ions positively charged by electron excitation causes the defect production.

  16. Chemical excitation of electrons: A dark path to melanoma.

    Premi, Sanjay; Brash, Douglas E

    2016-08-01

    Sunlight's ultraviolet wavelengths induce cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs), which then cause mutations that lead to melanoma or to cancers of skin keratinocytes. In pigmented melanocytes, we found that CPDs arise both instantaneously and for hours after UV exposure ends. Remarkably, the CPDs arising in the dark originate by a novel pathway that resembles bioluminescence but does not end in light: First, UV activates the enzymes nitric oxide synthase (NOS) and NADPH oxidase (NOX), which generate the radicals nitric oxide (NO) and superoxide (O2(-)); these combine to form the powerful oxidant peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). A fragment of the skin pigment melanin is then oxidized, exciting an electron to an energy level so high that it is rarely seen in biology. This process of chemically exciting electrons, termed "chemiexcitation", is used by fireflies to generate light but it had never been seen in mammalian cells. In melanocytes, the energy transfers radiationlessly to DNA, inducing CPDs. Chemiexcitation is a new source of genome instability, and it calls attention to endogenous mechanisms of genome maintenance that prevent electronic excitation or dissipate the energy of excited states. Chemiexcitation may also trigger pathogenesis in internal tissues because the same chemistry should arise wherever superoxide and nitric oxide arise near cells that contain melanin. PMID:27262612

  17. An excitable electronic circuit as a sensory neuron model

    Medeiros, Bruno N S; Mindlin, Gabriel B; Copelli, Mauro; Leite, José R Rios

    2011-01-01

    An electronic circuit device, inspired on the FitzHugh-Nagumo model of neuronal excitability, was constructed and shown to operate with characteristics compatible with those of biological sensory neurons. The nonlinear dynamical model of the electronics quantitatively reproduces the experimental observations on the circuit, including the Hopf bifurcation at the onset of tonic spiking. Moreover, we have implemented an analog noise generator as a source to study the variability of the spike trains. When the circuit is in the excitable regime, coherence resonance is observed. At sufficiently low noise intensity the spike trains have Poisson statistics, as in many biological neurons. The transfer function of the stochastic spike trains has a dynamic range of 6 dB, close to experimental values for real olfactory receptor neurons.

  18. Effect resonance radiation transfer of excitation porous silicon to I sub 2 molecules sorbed in pores

    Zakharchenko, K V; Kuznetsov, M B; Chistyakov, A A; Karavanskij, V A

    2001-01-01

    One studies the effect of resonance radiation-free transfer of electronic excitation between silicon nanocrystals and iodine molecules sorbed in pores. The experiment procedure includes laser-induced luminescence and laser desorption mass spectrometry. One analyzes photoluminescence spectra prior to and upon iodine sorption. Excitation of iodine through the mechanism of resonance transfer is determined to result in desorption of the iodine sorbed molecules with relatively high kinetic energies (3-1 eV). One evaluated the peculiar distance of resonance transfer the approximate value of which was equal to 2 nm

  19. Effects of Herzberg--Teller vibronic coupling on coherent excitation energy transfer

    Zhang, Hou-Dao; Xu, Rui-Xue; Yan, YiJing

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we study the effects of non-Condon vibronic coupling on the quantum coherence of excitation energy transfer, via the exact dissipaton-equation-of-motion (DEOM) evaluations on excitonic model systems. Field-triggered excitation energy transfer dynamics and two dimensional coherent spectroscopy are simulated for both Condon and non-Condon vibronic couplings. Our results clearly demonstrate that the non-Condon vibronic coupling intensifies the dynamical electronic-vibrational energy transfer and enhances the total system-and-bath quantum coherence. Moreover, the hybrid bath dynamics for non-Condon effects enriches the theoretical calculation, and further sheds light on the interpretation of the experimental nonlinear spectroscopy.

  20. Ultrafast electron injection into photo-excited organic molecules.

    Cvetko, Dean; Fratesi, Guido; Kladnik, Gregor; Cossaro, Albano; Brivio, Gian Paolo; Venkataraman, Latha; Morgante, Alberto

    2016-08-10

    Charge transfer rates at metal/organic interfaces affect the efficiencies of devices for organic based electronics and photovoltaics. A quantitative study of electron transfer rates, which take place on the femtosecond timescale, is often difficult, especially since in most systems the molecular adsorption geometry is unknown. Here, we use X-ray resonant photoemission spectroscopy to measure ultrafast charge transfer rates across pyridine/Au(111) interfaces while also controlling the molecular orientation on the metal. We demonstrate that a bi-directional charge transfer across the molecule/metal interface is enabled upon creation of a core-exciton on the molecule with a rate that has a strong dependence on the molecular adsorption angle. Through density functional theory calculations, we show that the alignment of molecular levels relative to the metal Fermi level is dramatically altered when a core-hole is created on the molecule, allowing the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital to fall partially below the metal Fermi level. We also calculate charge transfer rates as a function of molecular adsorption geometry and find a trend that agrees with the experiment. These findings thus give insight into the charge transfer dynamics of a photo-excited molecule on a metal surface. PMID:27444572

  1. Plasmonic coupling and long-range transfer of an excitation along a DNA nanowire.

    Toppari, J Jussi; Wirth, Janina; Garwe, Frank; Stranik, Ondrej; Csaki, Andrea; Bergmann, Joachim; Paa, Wolfgang; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2013-02-26

    We demonstrate an excitation transfer along a fluorescently labeled dsDNA nanowire over a length of several micrometers. Launching of the excitation is done by exciting a localized surface plasmon mode of a 40 nm silver nanoparticle by 800 nm femtosecond laser pulses via two-photon absorption. The plasmonic mode is subsequently coupled or transformed to excitation in the nanowire in contact with the particle and propagated along it, inducing bleaching of the dyes on its way. In situ as well as ex situ fluorescence microscopy is utilized to observe the phenomenon. In addition, transfer of the excitation along the nanowire to another nanoparticle over a separation of 5.7 μm was clearly observed. The nature of the excitation coupling and transfer could not be fully resolved here, but injection of an electron into the DNA from the excited nanoparticle and subsequent coupled transfer of charge (Dexter) and delocalized exciton (Frenkel) is the most probable mechanism. However, a direct plasmonic or optical coupling and energy transfer along the nanowire cannot be totally ruled out either. By further studies the observed phenomenon could be utilized in novel molecular systems, providing a long-needed communication method between molecular devices. PMID:23305550

  2. Electron transfer and decay processes of highly charged iodine ions

    In the present experimental work we have investigated multi-electron transfer processes in Iq+ (q=10, 15, 20 and 25) + Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe collisions at 1.5q keV energy. The branching ratios between Auger and radiative decay channels have been measured in decay processes of multiply excited states formed by multi-electron transfer collisions. It has been shown that, in all the multi-electron transfer processes investigated, the Auger decays are far dominant over the radiative decay processes and the branching ratios are clearly characterized by the average principal quantum number of the initial excited states of projectile ions. We could express the branching ratios in high Rydberg states formed in multi-electron transfer processes by using the decay probability of one Auger electron emission. (author)

  3. Electronic excitation as a mode of heat dissipation in laser-driven cluster plasmas

    Electrons streaming out of laser plasma are known for non-local heat transport and energy deposition by the ionization wave. At 100 eV electron temperature, since the electronic excitation cross section is comparable to that of ionization for Ar and CO2, a non-local excitation wave akin to the ionization wave is envisaged where energy deposition in excitations forms a excited cluster sheath beyond the laser focus. Here, we show that nano-cluster systems have the right parameters to form such an exciton sheath and experimentally demonstrate this via charge transfer reactions

  4. Vibronic speed-up of the excitation energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex

    Nalbach, P; Thorwart, M

    2013-01-01

    We show that the efficient excitation energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson molecular aggregate under realistic physiological conditions is fueled by underdamped vibrations of the embedding proteins. For this, we present numerically exact results for the quantum dynamics of the excitons in the presence of nonadiabatic vibrational states in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson aggregate employing a environmental fluctuation spectral function derived from experiments. Assuming the prominent 180 cm$^{-1}$ vibrational mode to be underdamped, we observe, on the one hand, besides vibrational coherent oscillations between different excitation levels of the vibration also prolonged electronic coherent oscillations between the initially excited site and its neighbours. On the other hand, however, the underdamped vibrations provide additional channels for the excitation energy transfer and by this increase the transfer speed by up to $30\\%$ .

  5. Erbium emission in MOS light emitting devices: from energy transfer to direct impact excitation

    The electroluminescence (EL) at 1.54 µm of metal–oxide–semiconductor (MOS) devices with Er3+ ions embedded in the silicon-rich silicon oxide (SRSO) layer has been investigated under different polarization conditions and compared with that of erbium doped SiO2 layers. EL time-resolved measurements allowed us to distinguish between two different excitation mechanisms responsible for the Er3+ emission under an alternate pulsed voltage signal (APV). Energy transfer from silicon nanoclusters (Si-ncs) to Er3+ is clearly observed at low-field APV excitation. We demonstrate that sequential electron and hole injection at the edges of the pulses creates excited states in Si-ncs which upon recombination transfer their energy to Er3+ ions. On the contrary, direct impact excitation of Er3+ by hot injected carriers starts at the Fowler–Nordheim injection threshold (above 5 MV cm−1) and dominates for high-field APV excitation. (paper)

  6. Reactive scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with molecules

    Representative families of excited alkali atom reactions have been studied using a crossed beam apparatus. For those alkali-molecule systems in which reactions are also known for ground state alkali and involve an early electron transfer step, no large differences are observed in the reactivity as Na is excited. More interesting are the reactions with hydrogen halides (HCl): it was found that adding electronic energy into Na changes the reaction mechanism. Early electron transfer is responsible of Na(5S, 4D) reactions, but not of Na(3P) reactions. Moreover, the NaCl product scattering is dominated by the HCl- repulsion in Na(5S, 4D) reactions, and by the NaCl-H repulsion in the case of Na(3P). The reaction of Na with O2 is of particular interest since it was found to be state specific. Only Na(4D) reacts, and the reaction requires restrictive constraints on the impact parameter and the reactants' relative orientation. The reaction with NO2 is even more complex since Na(4D) leads to the formation of NaO by two different pathways. It must be mentioned however, that the identification of NaO as product in these reactions has yet to be confirmed

  7. Excitation transfer and luminescence in porphyrin-carbon nanotube complexes

    Magadur, G; Alain-Rizzo, V; Voisin, C; Roussignol, Ph; Deleporte, E; Delaire, J A

    2007-01-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes with hydrosoluble porphyrins (TPPS) is achieved by "$\\pi$-stacking". The porphyrin/nanotube interaction is studied by means of optical absorption, photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopies. The main absorption line of the porphyrins adsorbed on nanotubes exhibits a 120 meV red shift, which we ascribe to a flattening of the molecule in order to optimize $\\pi-\\pi$ interactions. The porphyrin-nanotube complex shows a strong quenching of the TPPS emission while the photoluminescence intensity of the nanotubes is enhanced when the excitation laser is in resonance with the porphyrin absorption band. This reveals an efficient excitation transfer from the TPPS to the carbon nanotube.

  8. Electronic excited states and relaxation dynamics in polymer heterojunction systems

    Ramon, John Glenn Santos

    , we examine the effect of the nanoscale interfacial morphology and solvation on the electronic excited states of TFB/F8BT. Here, we employ time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT) to investigate the relevant excited states of two stacking configurations. We show that the calculated states agree with the excited states responsible for the experimentally observed emission peaks and that these states are blue shifted relative to those of the isolated chain. Furthermore, slight lateral shifts in the stacking orientation not only shift the excited state energies; more importantly, they alter the nature of these states altogether. Lastly, we see that solvation greatly stabilizes the charge-transfer states.

  9. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    Egidi, Franco, E-mail: franco.egidi@sns.it; Segado, Mireia; Barone, Vincenzo, E-mail: vincenzo.barone@sns.it [Scuola Normale Superiore, Piazza dei Cavalieri, 7 I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Koch, Henrik [Department of Chemistry, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, 7491 Trondheim (Norway); Cappelli, Chiara [Dipartimento di Chimica e Chimica Industriale, Università di Pisa, via G. Moruzzi, 3 I-56124 Pisa (Italy)

    2014-12-14

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π{sup *}, π-π{sup *}, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method.

  10. A benchmark study of electronic excitation energies, transition moments, and excited-state energy gradients on the nicotine molecule

    In this work, we report a comparative study of computed excitation energies, oscillator strengths, and excited-state energy gradients of (S)-nicotine, chosen as a test case, using multireference methods, coupled cluster singles and doubles, and methods based on time-dependent density functional theory. This system was chosen because its apparent simplicity hides a complex electronic structure, as several different types of valence excitations are possible, including n-π*, π-π*, and charge-transfer states, and in order to simulate its spectrum it is necessary to describe all of them consistently well by the chosen method

  11. Calculation of nuclear excitation in an electron transition

    Pisk, K. (Institut Rudjer Boskovic, Zagreb (Yugoslavia)); Kaliman, Z. (Rijeka Univ. (Yugoslavia). Faculty of Pedagogics); Logan, B.A. (Ottawa Univ., ON (Canada). Ottawa-Carleton Centre for Physics)

    1989-11-06

    We have made a theoretical investigation of nuclear excitation during an electron transition (NEET). Our approach allows us to express the NEET probabilities in terms of the excited nuclear level width, the energy difference between the nuclear and electron transition, the Coulomb interaction between the initial electron states, and the electron level width. A comparison is made with the available experimental results. (orig.).

  12. Electron Transfer to Vinylaromatic Polymers

    Aromatic polymers accept electrons from alkali metals to form polyradicalanions. These undergo chain scission as a result of electronic interaction between aromatic rings. Spectrophotometric and chemical evidence led to the conclusion that during the chain-breaking process polymeric fragments were formed which had the properties of ''living polymers'', i.e. the characteristic visible spectra and the capability of initiating the polymerization of a number of vinyl monomers. It was possible to follow the rate of chain scission in the case of poly (4-vinyl biphenyl) and poly(α-vinyl naphthalene) by means of viscosity and spectrophotometric measurements. The postulated mechanism was found to be consistent with the slow decrease in free spin concentration measured by means of the electron spin resonance technique. Chain scission in polyacenaphthalene takes place at a much faster rate than in poly (4-vinyl biphenyl) and this fact is in good agreement with simple LCAO MO calculations. Preliminary experiments indicate that electron transfer to poly-N-vinyl carbazole produces little if any degradation. These investigations led to the examination of the temperature effect on the electron-transfer reaction from sodium to some substituted aromatic hydrocarbons. The details of this effect are discussed. (author)

  13. Damage generation by electronic excitations in crystalline metals

    This paper will give a rapid overview of the main experimental results concerning the effects of high electronic energy deposition in metallic targets and present a tentative model based on the Coulomb explosion mechanism. More detailed reviews have been made recently concerning both the experiments and the theoretical model. High levels of localized energy deposition in electronic excitation are easily obtained using GeV heavy ions which during their slowing-down typically transfer a few keV/A to the electronic system of the target and a few eV/A in elastic collisions with target nuclei. In insulators and organic materials, it is well-known that both slowing-down processes contribute to damage creation, whereas in metals it has been claimed for a long time that the sole nuclear collisions are involved in damage processes. Although this last assertion remains true for some metals such as Cu, Ag, W, Cu3 Au...[2], high levels of electronic excitation can induce a partial annealing of the defects resulting from nuclear collisions in Fe, Ni, Nb, Pt..., lead to additional defect creation in Fe, Co, Zr, Ti...[2] or even to phase transformations in NiZr2 [5], Ni3B [6], NiTi [7], Ti [8]... In the following, we shall only focus on the last two effects. (author). 15 refs

  14. Double, Rydberg and charge transfer excitations from pairing matrix fluctuation and particle-particle random phase approximation

    Yang, Yang [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Aggelen, Helen van [Department of Chemistry, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States); Department of Inorganic and Physical Chemistry, Ghent University, 9000 Ghent (Belgium); Yang, Weitao, E-mail: weitao.yang@duke.edu [Department of Chemistry and Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina 27708 (United States)

    2013-12-14

    Double, Rydberg, and charge transfer (CT) excitations have been great challenges for time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Starting from an (N ± 2)-electron single-determinant reference, we investigate excitations for the N-electron system through the pairing matrix fluctuation, which contains information on two-electron addition/removal processes. We adopt the particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation (pp-TDA) to approximate the pairing matrix fluctuation and then determine excitation energies by the differences of two-electron addition/removal energies. This approach captures all types of interesting excitations: single and double excitations are described accurately, Rydberg excitations are in good agreement with experimental data and CT excitations display correct 1/R dependence. Furthermore, the pp-RPA and the pp-TDA have a computational cost similar to TDDFT and consequently are promising for practical calculations.

  15. Double, Rydberg and Charge Transfer Excitations from Pairing Matrix Fluctuation and Particle-Particle Random Phase Approximation

    Yang, Yang; van Aggelen, Helen; Yang, Weitao

    2014-03-01

    Double, Rydberg and charge transfer (CT) excitations have been great challenges for time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT). Starting from an (N +/- 2) -electron single-determinant reference, we investigate excitations for the N-electron system through the pairing matrix fluctuation, which contains information on two-electron addition/removal processes. We adopt the particle-particle random phase approximation (pp-RPA) and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation (pp-TDA) to approximate the pairing matrix fluctuation and then determine excitation energies by the differences of two-electron addition/removal energies. This approach captures all types of interesting excitations: single and double excitations are described accurately, Rydberg excitations are in good agreement with experimental data and CT excitations display correct 1/R dependence. Furthermore, the pp-RPA and the pp-TDA have a computational cost similar to TDDFT and consequently are promising for practical calculations.

  16. Excitation energy transfer processes in condensed matter theory and applications

    Singh, Jai

    1994-01-01

    Applying a unified quantum approach, contributors offer fresh insights into the theoretical developments in the excitation energy transfer processes in condensed matter This comprehensive volume examines Frenkel and Wannier excitonic processes; rates of excitonic processes; theory of laser sputter and polymer ablation; and polarons, excitonic polarons and self-trapping

  17. A Radiative Transfer Simulation of Water Rotational Excitation in Comets

    Zakharov, V.; Biver, N.; Bockelee-Morvan, D.; Crovisier, J.; Lecacheux, A.

    2005-08-01

    In order to interpret comet observations of the 557 GHz water line performed with the Odin satellite (e.g., Lecacheux et al. 2003, A&A, 402, 55), we have developed a numerical model for the simulation of optically thick water rotational emission in cometary coma. For the treatment of radiative transfer, we have elaborated a Monte Carlo code based on the accelerated lambda iteration algorithm presented in Hogerheijde and van der Tak (2000, A&A, 362, 697). The model assumes a spherically symmetric density distribution with constant expansion velocity. It includes the seven lowest rotational levels of ortho-water, which are the primarily populated levels in the rotationally cold gas of the coma. Collisions with water and electrons, and infrared pumping, are taken into account. The model is similar to that presented by Bensch and Bergin (2004, ApJ, 615, 531). We compared the results obtained with this new model with those obtained by the model of Bockelee-Morvan (1987, A&A, 181, 169). Bockelee-Morvan used the escape probability formalism to treat radiation trapping, which is in principle only valid for large velocity gradients. Surprisingly, the results of both models differ only by a few percent, showing that the escape probability formalism can be used with good confidence to treat rotational excitation in cometary atmospheres. This model will allow us to prepare future observations by the ESA Herschel Space Observatory. V.Zakharov acknowledges financial support from CNES.

  18. Excitation energy transfer: Study with non-Markovian dynamics

    In this paper, we investigate the non-Markovian dynamics of a model to mimic the excitation energy transfer (EET) between chromophores in photosynthesis systems. The numerical path integral method is used. This method includes the non-Markovian effects of the environmental affects, and it does not need the perturbation approximation in solving the dynamics of systems of interest. It implies that the coherence helps the EET between chromophores through lasting the transfer time rather than enhancing the transfer rate of the EET. In particular, the non-Markovian environment greatly increases the efficiency of the EET in the photosynthesis systems.

  19. Theoretical characterization of excitation energy transfer in chlorosome light-harvesting antennae from green sulfur bacteria

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Saikin, Semion K; Brookes, Jennifer C; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2013-01-01

    Chlorosomes are the largest and most efficient natural light-harvesting antenna systems. They contain thousands of pigment molecules - bacteriochlorophylls (BChls)- that are organized into supramolecular aggregates and form a very efficient network for excitonic energy migration. Here, we present a theoretical study of excitation energy transfer (EET) in the chlorosome based on experimental evidence of the molecular assembly. Our model for the exciton dynamics throughout the antenna combines a stochastic time propagation of the excitonic wave function with molecular dynamics simulations of supramolecular structure, and electronic structure calculations of the excited states. The simulation results reveal a detailed picture of the EET in the chlorosome. Coherent energy transfer is significant only for the first 50 fs after the initial excitation, and the wavelike motion of the exciton is completely damped at 100 fs. Characteristic time constants of incoherent energy transfer, subsequently, vary from 1 ps to se...

  20. Electron Impact Excitation of Noble Gases

    Zeman, Vlado; Bartschat, Klaus

    1998-05-01

    We have extended our Breit-Pauli R-matrix work [1,2] to model electron impact excitation of the [np^5(n+1)s] and [np^5(n+1)p] states in the noble gases Ne--Xe. Total and differential cross sections, the polarization of emitted light, and spin asymmetry parameters will be presented for incident electron energies between threshold and 30 eV. The results will be analyzed and compared with a large amount of recent experimental data [3--8]. 1. V. Zeman et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 79, 1825 (1997) 2. V. Zeman and K. Bartschat, J. Phys. B 30, 4609 (1997) 3. C. Norén et al., Phys. Rev. A53, 3253 (1996) and 54, 510 (1996) 4. T.J. Gay et al., Phys. Rev. A53, 1623 (1996) 5. D.H. Yu et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 2724 (1997); J. Phys. B 30, L461 5. (1997); J. Phys. B 30, 1799 (1997) 6. J.E. Chilton et al., Phys. Rev. A57, 267 (1998) 7. M.A. Khakoo, private communication (1998) 8. M. Dümmler, G.F. Hanne and J. Kessler, J. Phys. B 28, 2985 (1995)

  1. Nanostructuring graphene by dense electronic excitation

    Ochedowski, O.; Lehtinen, O.; Kaiser, U.; Turchanin, A.; Ban-d'Etat, B.; Lebius, H.; Karlušić, M.; Jakšić, M.; Schleberger, M.

    2015-11-01

    The ability to manufacture tailored graphene nanostructures is a key factor to fully exploit its enormous technological potential. We have investigated nanostructures created in graphene by swift heavy ion induced folding. For our experiments, single layers of graphene exfoliated on various substrates and freestanding graphene have been irradiated and analyzed by atomic force and high resolution transmission electron microscopy as well as Raman spectroscopy. We show that the dense electronic excitation in the wake of the traversing ion yields characteristic nanostructures each of which may be fabricated by choosing the proper irradiation conditions. These nanostructures include unique morphologies such as closed bilayer edges with a given chirality or nanopores within supported as well as freestanding graphene. The length and orientation of the nanopore, and thus of the associated closed bilayer edge, may be simply controlled by the direction of the incoming ion beam. In freestanding graphene, swift heavy ion irradiation induces extremely small openings, offering the possibility to perforate graphene membranes in a controlled way.

  2. Resonant Transfer Excitation of Fluorine-Like Mo33+ Ion

    Ramadan, Hassan; Elkilany, Sabbah

    2010-07-01

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) cross sections (σDR) and rate coefficients (αDR) for Mo33+ are calculated using the angular momentum average scheme (AMA). Moreover, the resonant transfer excitation followed by X-ray emission (RTEX) cross sections (σ RTEX) for the collision of Mo33+ with H2 and He targets are calculated and studied. The calculations of the cross sections are performed for both K- and L-shell excitations. A smooth change with the temperatures for αDR is found for all kinds of excitations. The rates for K-shell excitation are very small in comparison with the rates for Lshell excitation. The RTEX cross sections for Mo33+ ions are obtained from their corresponding DR cross sections by the method of folding in the impulse approximation (IMA). σ RTEX for the K-shell excitation shows two overlapped peaks which may be attributed to the two groups in this excitation process. The present calculations are considered as a database for future comparison with theoretical and experimental data using other coupling schemes. Multiple Auger channels are complicating the dependence of the cross sections on principal quantum numbers.

  3. Photoinitiated electron transfer in multichromophoric species: Synthetic tetrads and pentads

    NONE

    1993-03-01

    This project involves the design, synthesis and study of molecules which mimic some of the important aspects of photosynthetic electron and energy transfer. This research project is leading to a better understanding of the energy conserving steps of photosynthesis via the study of synthetic model systems which abstract features of the natural photosynthetic apparatus. The knowledge gained from these studies will aid in the design of artificial photosynthetic reaction centers which employ the basic chemistry and physics of photosynthesis to help meet mankind`s energy needs. The approach to artificial photosynthesis employed in this project is to use synthetic pigments, electron donors, and electron acceptors similar to those found in biological reaction centers, but to replace the protein component with covalent bonds. These chemical linkages determine the electronic coupling between the various moieties by controlling separation, relative orientation, and overlap of electronic orbitals. The model systems are designed to mimic the following aspects of natural photosynthetic electron transfer: electron donation from a tetrapyrrole excited single state, electron transfer between tetrapyrroles, electron transfer from tetrapyrroles to quinones, and electron transfer between quinones with different redox properties. In addition, they mimic carotenoid antenna function in photosynthesis (singlet-singlet energy transfer from carotenoid polyenes to chlorophyll) and carotenoid photoprotection from singlet oxygen damage (triplet-triplet energy transfer from chlorophyll to carotenoids).

  4. Electron transfer in helical polyaromatics

    Pospíšil, Lubomír; Gál, Miroslav; Horáček, Michal; Teplý, Filip; Adriaenssens, Louis; Severa, Lukáš

    Xi´an: International Society of Electrochemistry, 2009. O06-O06. [International Symposium on Frontiers of Electrochemical Science and Technology . 12.08.2009-15.08.2009, Xi´an] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/08/1157; GA MŠk OC 140; GA ČR GA203/09/0705; GA ČR GP203/09/P502; GA MŠk ME09114 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : electron transfer * helical polyaromatics Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  5. The mechanism of electronic excitation in the bacterial bioluminescent reaction

    The current state of the problem of formation of the electron-excited product in the chemiluminescent reaction that underlies the bacterial luminescence is analysed. Various schemes of chemical transformations capable of producing a bacterial bioluminescence emitter are presented. The problem of excitation of secondary emitters is considered; two possible mechanisms of their excitation are analysed.

  6. Electron-impact excitation of Fe II

    We report in this paper the computation of accurate total collision strengths and effective collision strengths for electron-impact excitation of FeII, using the parallel R-matrix program PRMAT. Target states corresponding to the 3d64s, 3d7, 3d64p and 3d54s4s basis configurations were included in the calculations giving rise to a 113 LS state 354 coupled channel problem. Following a detailed systematic study of correlation effects in both the target state and collision wavefunctions, it was found that an additional 21 configuration functions needed to be included in the Configuration Interaction expansion to obtain significantly more accurate target states and collision wavefunctions. This much improved 26-configuration model has been used to calculate converged total effective collision strengths for all sextet to quartet transitions among these levels with total spin S = 2, giving a total of 1785 lines. These calculations have laid the foundation for an approach which may be adopted in the study of electron collisions with the low ionization stages of other iron peak elements. The work has been further extended with the commencement of a Breit-Pauli relativistic calculation for one of the smaller models and includes 262 fine-structure levels and over 1800 coupled channels. At the same time the PRMAT parallel R-matrix package is being extended to include relativistic effects which will allow us to attempt the more sophisticated 26-configuration model and produce for the first time the amount and quality of atomic data required to perform a meaningful synthesis of the Fe II spectrum

  7. Heterostructure Intervalley Transferred Electron Effects

    XUE Fang-Shi

    2001-01-01

    A Gunn active layer is used as an X electron probe to detect the X tunnelling current in the GaAs-AlAs heterostructure, from which a new heterostructure intervalley transferred electron (HITE) device is obtained. In the 8 mm band, the highest pulse output power of these diodes is 2.65 W and the highest conversion efficiency is 18%. The dc and rf performance of the HITE devices was simulated by the band mixing resonant tunnelling theory and Monte Carlo transport simulation. The HITE effect has transformed the transit-time dipole-layer mode in the Gunn diode into a relaxation oscillation mode in the HITE device. From the comparison of simulated results to the measured data, the HITE effect is demonstrated straightforwardly

  8. Convoy electron emission following ionization of highly-charged ions excited by resonant coherent excitation

    Suda, S.; Nakano, Y.; Metoki, K.; Shindo, T.; Ohtsuki, S.; Azuma, T.; Hatakeyama, A.; Komaki, K.; Nakai, Y.; Takada, E.; Murakami, T.

    2012-11-01

    Projectile ionization of highly-charged Ar and Fe ions in the excited states passing relativistically fast through a thin crystalline foil was experimentally studied. We selectively controlled the population of the excited states of the projectiles, and their alignment by choosing a specific m-state through three-dimensional resonant coherent excitation technique by periodical electric fields in a crystalline. We measured energy-differential spectra of electron emission released from projectiles at zero degree. Under the resonance condition, we found an evident enhancement of the convoy electron yield, which reflects the electron momentum distribution of the initial bound state of the excited ions.

  9. Intramolecular photoinduced electron-transfer in azobenzene-perylene diimide

    This paper studies the intramolecular photoinduced electron-transfer (PET) of covalent bonded azobenzene-perylene diimide (AZO-PDI) in solvents by using steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy together with ultrafast transient absorption spectroscopic techniques. Fast fluorescence quenching is observed when AZO-PDI is excited at characteristic wavelengths of AZO and perylene moieties. Reductive electron-transfer with transfer rate faster than 1011 s−1 is found. This PET process is also consolidated by femtosecond transient absorption spectra

  10. An Accurate and Linear Scaling Method to Calculate Charge-Transfer Excitation Energies and Diabatic Couplings

    Pavanello, Michele; Visscher, Lucas; Neugebauer, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    Quantum--Mechanical methods that are both computationally fast and accurate are not yet available for electronic excitations having charge transfer character. In this work, we present a significant step forward towards this goal for those charge transfer excitations that take place between non-covalently bound molecules. In particular, we present a method that scales linearly with the number of non-covalently bound molecules in the system and is based on a two-pronged approach: The molecular electronic structure of broken-symmetry charge-localized states is obtained with the Frozen Density Embedding formulation of subsystem Density-Functional Theory; subsequently, in a post-SCF calculation, the full-electron Hamiltonian and overlap matrix elements among the charge-localized states are evaluated with an algorithm which takes full advantage of the subsystem DFT density partitioning technique. The method is benchmarked against Coupled-Cluster calculations and achieves chemical accuracy for the systems considered...

  11. Representation of electronic excited states by conditional wavefunction

    Koichiro, Yamaguchi; Yoshiaki, Ito; Takeshi, Mukoyama

    2000-03-01

    Hartree-Fock scheme is an ordinary method to calculate the zeroth order approximation for non-relativistic electronic excited states of atoms and molecules. The accuracy of zeroth order hamiltonian affects the efficiency of higher order estimation of the Hamiltonian and the Green's function. To improve the preciseness of zeroth order Hamiltonian, we try to include the relaxation of electronic excited states into zeroth order approximation by using conditional wavefunction representation instead of Hartree-Fock method. Our method is illustrated by the calculation of electronic double-excited states of Helium and single-excited states of Neon. Further extention of our formulation for multiple-exfcited states are also discussed.

  12. Excited State Structural Dynamics of Carotenoids and Charge Transfer Systems

    This dissertation describes the development and implementation of a visible/near infrared pump/mid-infrared probe apparatus. Chapter 1 describes the background and motivation of investigating optically induced structural dynamics, paying specific attention to solvation and the excitation selection rules of highly symmetric molecules such as carotenoids. Chapter 2 describes the development and construction of the experimental apparatus used throughout the remainder of this dissertation. Chapter 3 will discuss the investigation of DCM, a laser dye with a fluorescence signal resulting from a charge transfer state. By studying the dynamics of DCM and of its methyl deuterated isotopomer (an otherwise identical molecule), we are able to investigate the origins of the charge transfer state and provide evidence that it is of the controversial twisted intramolecular (TICT) type. Chapter 4 introduces the use of two-photon excitation to the S1 state, combined with one-photon excitation to the S2 state of the carotenoid beta-apo-8'-carotenal. These 2 investigations show evidence for the formation of solitons, previously unobserved in molecular systems and found only in conducting polymers Chapter 5 presents an investigation of the excited state dynamics of peridinin, the carotenoid responsible for the light harvesting of dinoflagellates. This investigation allows for a more detailed understanding of the importance of structural dynamics of carotenoids in light harvesting

  13. Electron impact excitation cross sections for carbon

    Ganas, P. S.

    1981-04-01

    A realistic analytic atomic independent particle model is used to generate wave functions for the valence and excited states of carbon. Using these wave functions in conjunction with the Born approximation and the Russell-Saunders LS-coupling scheme, we calculate generalized oscillator strengths and integrated cross sections for various excitations from the 2p 2( 3P O) valence state.

  14. Electron impact excitation cross sections for carbon

    A realistic analytic atomic independent particle model is used to generate wave functions for the valence and excited states of carbon. Using these wave functions in conjunction with the Born approximation and the Russell-Saunders LS-coupling scheme, we calculate generalized oscillator strengths and integrated cross sections for various excitations from the 2p2(3P0) valence state. (orig.)

  15. Light induced electron transfer reactions of metal complexes

    Properties of the excited states of tris(2,2'-bipyridine) and tris(1,10-phenanthroline) complexes of chromium(III), iron(II), ruthenium(II), osmium(II), rhodium(III), and iridium(III) are described. The electron transfer reactions of the ground and excited states are discussed and interpreted in terms of the driving force for the reaction and the distortions of the excited states relative to the corresponding ground states. General considerations relevant to the conversion of light into chemical energy are presented and progress in the use of polypyridine complexes to effect the light decomposition of water into hydrogen and oxygen is reviewed

  16. Fishbone instability excited by electrons in a tokamak

    Fishbone instability in Tokamak plasma is often produced by deeply trapped suprathermal ions. Theoretical analysis indicates that the instability can be excited by barely trapped suprathermal electrons. Negative magnetic shear help exciting electron fishbone or suppress ion one, while positive shear is opposite. The fishbone instability purely driven by suprathermal trapped electrons is firstly identified by using electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in the HL-1M Tokamak

  17. Theory of nuclear excitation by electron capture for heavy ions

    Gagyi-Palffy, Adriana

    2006-01-01

    The resonant process of nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC) in collisions involving highly-charged ions has been investigated theoretically. NEEC is a rare recombination process in which a free electron is captured into a bound shell of an ion with the simultaneous excitation of the nucleus. Total cross sections for NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the excited nucleus are presented for various collision systems. The possibility to observe the NEEC in scattering experiments wi...

  18. Search for Excited Electrons in ep Collisions at HERA

    Aaron, F D; Andreev, V; Antunovic, B; Aplin, S; Asmone, A; Astvatsatourov, A; Bacchetta, A; Backovic, S; Baghdasaryan, A; Baranov, P; Barrelet, E; Bartel, Wulfrin; Beckingham, M; Begzsuren, K; Behnke, O; Belousov, A; Berger, N; Bizot, J C; Boenig, M O; Boudry, V; Bozovic-Jelisavcic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, G; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Bruncko, D; Bunyatyan, A; Buschhorn, G; Bystritskaya, L; Campbell, A J; Cantun Avila, K B; Cassol-Brunner, F; Cerny, K; Cerny, V; Chekelian, V; Cholewa, A; Contreras, J G; Coughlan, J A; Cozzika, G; Cvach, J; Dainton, J B; Daum, K; Deák, M; De Boer, Y; Delcourt, B; Del Degan, M; Delvax, J; de Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Diaconu, C; Dodonov, V; Dossanov, A; Dubak, A; Eckerlin, G; Efremenko, V; Egli, S; Eliseev, A; Elsen, E; Essenov, S; Falkiewicz, A; Faulkner, P J W; Favart, L; Fedotov, A; Felst, R; Feltesse, J; Ferencei, J; Finke, L; Fleischer, M; Fomenko, A; Gabathuler, E; Gayler, J; Ghazaryan, S; Glazov, A; Glushkov, I; Görlich, L; Goettlich, M; Gogitidze, N; Gouzevitch, M; Grab, C; Greenshaw, T; Grell, B R; Grindhammer, G; Habib, S; Haidt, D; Hansson, M; Helebrant, C; Henderson, R C W; Henschel, H; Herrera-Corral, G; Hildebrandt, M; Hiller, K H; Hoffmann, D; Horisberger, R; Hovhannisyan, A; Hreus, T; Jacquet, M; Janssen, M E; Janssen, X; Jemanov, V; Jonsson, L; Johnson, D P; Jung, A W; Jung, H; Kapichine, M; Katzy, J; Kenyon, I R; Kiesling, C; Klein, M; Kleinwort, C; Klimkovich, T; Kluge, T; Knutsson, A; Kogler, R; Korbel, V; Kostka, P; Krämer, M; Krastev, K; Kretzschmar, J; Kropivnitskaya, A; Krüger, K; Kutak, K; Landon, M P J; Lange, W; Lastoviicka-Medin, G; Laycock, P; Lebedev, A; Leibenguth, G; Lendermann, V; Levonian, S; Li, G; Lipka, K; Liptaj, A; List, B; List, J; Loktionova, N; López-Fernandez, R; Lubimov, V; Lucaci-Timoce, A I; Lytkin, L; Makankine, A; Malinovski, E; Marage, P; Marti, L; Martyn, H U; Maxfield, S J; Mehta, A; Meier, K; Meyer, A B; Meyer, H; Meyer, J; Michels, V; Mikocki, S; Milcewicz-Mika, I; Moreau, F; Morozov, A; Morris, J V; Mozer, M U; Mudrinic, M; Müller, K; Murn, P; Nankov, K; Naroska, B; Naumann, T; Newman, P R; Niebuhr, C; Nikiforov, A; Nowak, G; Nowak, K; Nozicka, M; Olivier, B; Olsson, J E; Osman, S; Ozerov, D; Palichik, V; Panagouliasl, I; Pandurovic, M; Papadopouloul, T; Pascaud, C; Patel, G D; Pejchal, O; Peng, H; Pérez, E; Petrukhin, A; Picuric, I; Piec, S; Pitzl, D; Placakyte, R; Polifka, R; Povh, B; Preda, T; Radescu, V; Rahmat, A J; Raicevic, N; Raspiareza, A; Ravdandorj, T; Reimer, P; Rizvi, E; Robmann, P; Roland, B; Roosen, R; Rostovtsev, A; Rotaru, M; Ruiz Tabasco, J E; Rurikova, Z; Rusakov, S; Salek, D; Salvaire, F; Sankey, D P C; Sauter, M; Sauvan, E; Schmidt, S; Schmitt, S; Schmitz, C; Schoeffel, L; Schöning, A; Schultz-Coulon, H C; Sefkow, F; Shaw-West, R N; Shevyakov, I; Shtarkov, L N; Shushkevich, S; Sloan, T; Smiljanic, I; Smirnov, P; Soloviev, Yu; Sopicki, P; South, D; Spaskov, V; Specka, A; Staykova, Z; Steder, M; Stella, B; Straumann, U; Sunar, D; Sykora, T; Tchoulakov, V; Thompson, G; Thompson, P D; Toll, T; Tomasz, F; Tran, T H; Traynor, D; Trinh, T N; Truöl, P; Tsakov, I; Tseepeldorj, B; Tsurin, I; Turnau, J; Tzamariudaki, E; Urban, K; Valkárová, A; Vallée, C; Van Mechelen, P; VargasTrevino, A; Vazdik, Ya; Vinokurova, S; Volchinski, V; Wegener, D; Wessels, M; Wissing, C; Wünsch, E; Yeganov, V; Zácek, J; Zaleisak, J; Zhang, Z; Zhelezov, A; Zhokin, A; Zhu, Y C; Zimmermann, T; Zohrabyan, H; Zomer, F

    2008-01-01

    A search for excited electrons is performed using the full $e^{\\pm}p$ data sample collected by the H1 experiment at HERA, corresponding to a total luminosity of 475 pb$^{-1}$. The electroweak decays of excited electrons ${e}^{*}\\to{e}{\\gamma}$, ${e}^{*}\\to{e}Z$ and ${e}^{*}{\\to}\

  19. Scattering of electronically excited metastable rare gas atoms

    Low energy collisions of metastable rare gas atoms (mostly He) are reviewed. Principles of the experiment are presented as well as data analysis, excimer systems, excitation transfer collisions and Penning systems

  20. Electronic excitations in metallic systems: from defect annihilation to track formation

    This paper presents an overview of the effects of high electronic energy deposition in metallic targets irradiated with GeV heavy ions. The main result of these investigations is that high electronic excitations lead to various and sometimes conflicting effects according to the nature of the target: - partial annealing of the defects induced by elastic collisions, - creation of additional disorder, - phase transformation (tracks formation and amorphization), - anisotropic growth. These different effects of high electronic energy deposition in metallic targets are probably manifestations at various degrees of the same basic energy transfer process between the excited electrons and the target atoms. Up to now no theoretical model explains these effects. 24 refs

  1. Measurement of the electronic excitation of atoms in atom-molecule collisions near threshold

    In first part of the paper the measurement of scattering cross sections is described and the energy transfer in molecule-alkali systems is investigated. The influence of translational and vibrational energy could be separated near the excitation threshold. In the second part of the work measurements are reported on the electronic excitation of the work measurements are reported on the electronic excitation of Xe in Xe-Xe-collisions. The experimental data are compared with theoretical calculations. (KBE) 891 KBE/KBE 892 HIS

  2. Initial state dependence of convoy electrons emitted from the excited ions by resonant coherent excitation

    Azuma, T.; Nakano, Y.; Metoki, K.; Hatakeyama, A.; Nakai, Y.; Komaki, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Takada, E.; Murakami, T.

    2009-11-01

    Convoy electrons emitted from 416 MeV/u heliumlike Ar16+ ions excited by three-dimensional resonant coherent excitation (3D-RCE) have been explored. The 1s electron in the ground state was excited to the 2p state by a periodic crystal field during the passage through a Si crystal and released into the continuum by collisions with target atoms to form a cusp-shaped peak in the energy distribution, referred to as convoy electron. Under the resonance condition, we found not only enhancement of the convoy electron yield but also significant narrowing in the energy distribution, reflecting the initial bound state momentum distribution of the excited ions. This suggests that RCE is well-suited to study fast ion collisions involving the specific excited state.

  3. Plasmoelectronics: coupling plasmonic excitation with electron flow.

    Warren, Scott C; Walker, David A; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2012-06-19

    Explorations of the coupling of light and charge via localized surface plasmons have led to the discovery that plasmonic excitation can influence macroscopic flows of charge and, conversely, that charging events can change the plasmonic excitation. We discuss recent theory and experiments in the emerging field of plasmoelectronics, with particular emphasis on the application of these materials to challenges in nanotechnology, energy use, and sensing. PMID:22385329

  4. Theoretical characterization of excitation energy transfer in chlorosome light-harvesting antennae from green sulfur bacteria.

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Huh, Joonsuk; Saikin, Semion K; Brookes, Jennifer C; Aspuru-Guzik, Alán

    2014-06-01

    We present a theoretical study of excitation dynamics in the chlorosome antenna complex of green photosynthetic bacteria based on a recently proposed model for the molecular assembly. Our model for the excitation energy transfer (EET) throughout the antenna combines a stochastic time propagation of the excitonic wave function with molecular dynamics simulations of the supramolecular structure and electronic structure calculations of the excited states. We characterized the optical properties of the chlorosome with absorption, circular dichroism and fluorescence polarization anisotropy decay spectra. The simulation results for the excitation dynamics reveal a detailed picture of the EET in the chlorosome. Coherent energy transfer is significant only for the first 50 fs after the initial excitation, and the wavelike motion of the exciton is completely damped at 100 fs. Characteristic time constants of incoherent energy transfer, subsequently, vary from 1 ps to several tens of ps. We assign the time scales of the EET to specific physical processes by comparing our results with the data obtained from time-resolved spectroscopy experiments. PMID:24504540

  5. Role of pigment-protein coupling and pathways of excitation energy transfer in FMO complex

    Singh, Davinder

    2016-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the effect of different pigment-protein couplings and the role of quantum interference among different energy transfer channels in excitation energy transfer (EET) in FMO complex. We employ the non-Markovian master equation that allows the use of different values of pigment-protein couplings and cut-off frequencies for different BChla sites, in the adiabatic limit of electron transfer in FMO complex. Several pathways of EET are identified and investigated using a realistic set of pigment-pigment couplings and the site energy of each BChla site. We analyze that it is the destructive interference between different channels of a particular pathway that is responsible for the time-scales of oscillations of excitation energy as observed in the recent experiments.

  6. Hydrogen-bonded Intramolecular Charge Transfer Excited State of Dimethylaminobenzophenone using Time Dependent Density Functional Theory

    Yu-ling Chu; Zhong Yang; Zhe-feng Pan; Jing Liu; Yue-yi Han; Yong Ding; Peng Song

    2012-01-01

    Density functional theory and time-dependent density-functional theory have been used to investigate the photophysical properties and relaxation dynamics of dimethylaminobenzophenone (DMABP) and its hydrogen-bonded DMABP-MeOH dimer.It is found that,in nonpolar aprotic solvent,the transitions from S0 to S1 and S2 states of DMABP have both n→π* and π→π* characters,with the locally excited feature mainly located on the C=O group and the partial CT one characterized by electron transfer mainly from the dimethylaminophenyl group to the C=O group.But when the intermolecular hydrogen bond C=O…H-O is formed,the highly polar intramolecular charge transfer character switches over to the first excited state of DMABP-MeOH dimer and the energy difference between the two lowlying electronically excited states increases.To gain insight into the relaxation dynamics of DMABP and DMABP-MeOH dimer in the excited state,the potential energy curves for conformational relaxation are calculated.The formation of twisted intramolecular charge transfer state via diffusive twisting motion of the dimethylamino/dimethylaminophenyl groups is found to be the major relaxation process.In addition,the decay of the S1 state of DMABP-MeOH dimer to the ground state,through nonradiative intermolecular hydrogen bond stretching vibrations,is facilitated by the formation of the hydrogen bond between DMABP and alcohols.

  7. Resonance Raman spectra of organic molecules absorbed on inorganic semiconducting surfaces: Contribution from both localized intramolecular excitation and intermolecular charge transfer excitation

    Ye, ChuanXiang [Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Zhao, Yi, E-mail: yizhao@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Liang, WanZhen, E-mail: yizhao@xmu.edu.cn, E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn [Department of Chemical Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); State Key Laboratory of Physical Chemistry of Solid Surfaces, Collaborative Innovation Center of Chemistry for Energy Materials, and College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China)

    2015-10-21

    The time-dependent correlation function approach for the calculations of absorption and resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of organic molecules absorbed on semiconductor surfaces [Y. Zhao and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 044108 (2011)] is extended to include the contribution of the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) excitation from the absorbers to the semiconducting nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the bidirectionally interfacial CT significantly modifies the spectral line shapes. Although the intermolecular CT excitation makes the absorption spectra red shift slightly, it essentially changes the relative intensities of mode-specific RRS and causes the oscillation behavior of surface enhanced Raman spectra with respect to interfacial electronic couplings. Furthermore, the constructive and destructive interferences of RRS from the localized molecular excitation and CT excitation are observed with respect to the electronic coupling and the bottom position of conductor band. The interferences are determined by both excitation pathways and bidirectionally interfacial CT.

  8. Resonance Raman spectra of organic molecules absorbed on inorganic semiconducting surfaces: Contribution from both localized intramolecular excitation and intermolecular charge transfer excitation

    The time-dependent correlation function approach for the calculations of absorption and resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of organic molecules absorbed on semiconductor surfaces [Y. Zhao and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 044108 (2011)] is extended to include the contribution of the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) excitation from the absorbers to the semiconducting nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the bidirectionally interfacial CT significantly modifies the spectral line shapes. Although the intermolecular CT excitation makes the absorption spectra red shift slightly, it essentially changes the relative intensities of mode-specific RRS and causes the oscillation behavior of surface enhanced Raman spectra with respect to interfacial electronic couplings. Furthermore, the constructive and destructive interferences of RRS from the localized molecular excitation and CT excitation are observed with respect to the electronic coupling and the bottom position of conductor band. The interferences are determined by both excitation pathways and bidirectionally interfacial CT

  9. Local operator partitioning of electronic energy for electronic energy transfer: An efficient algorithm

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Brumer, Paul

    2013-01-01

    An efficient computational algorithm to implement a local operator approach to partitioning electronic energy in general molecular systems is presented. This approach, which rigorously defines the electronic energy on any subsystem within a molecule, gives a precise meaning to the subsystem ground and excited electronic energies, which is crucial for investigating electronic energy transfer from first principles. We apply the technique to the $9-$(($1-$naphthyl)$-$methyl)-anthracene (A1N) molecule by partitioning A1N into anthracenyl and CH$_2-$naphthyl groups as subsystems, and examine their electronic energies and populations for several excited states using Configuration Interaction Singles method. The implemented approach shows a wide variety of different behaviors amongst these excited electronic states.

  10. Matrix photochemistry of small molecules: Influencing reaction dynamics on electronically excited hypersurfaces

    Laursen, S.L.

    1990-01-01

    Investigations of chemical reactions on electronically excited reaction surfaces are presented. The role of excited-surface multiplicity is of particular interest, as are chemical reactivity and energy transfer in systems in which photochemistry is initiated through a metal atom sensitizer.'' Two approaches are employed: A heavy-atom matrix affords access to forbidden triplet reaction surfaces, eliminating the need for a potentially reactive sensitizer. Later, the role of the metal atom in the photosensitization process is examined directly.

  11. Matrix photochemistry of small molecules: Influencing reaction dynamics on electronically excited hypersurfaces

    Investigations of chemical reactions on electronically excited reaction surfaces are presented. The role of excited-surface multiplicity is of particular interest, as are chemical reactivity and energy transfer in systems in which photochemistry is initiated through a metal atom ''sensitizer.'' Two approaches are employed: A heavy-atom matrix affords access to forbidden triplet reaction surfaces, eliminating the need for a potentially reactive sensitizer. Later, the role of the metal atom in the photosensitization process is examined directly

  12. Modeling coherent excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting systems

    Huo, Pengfei

    2011-12-01

    Recent non-linear spectroscopy experiments suggest the excitation energy transfer in some biological light harvesting systems initially occurs coherently. Treating such processes brings significant challenge for conventional theoretical tools that usually involve different approximations. In this dissertation, the recently developed Iterative Linearized Density Matrix (ILDM) propagation scheme, which is non-perturbative and non-Markovian is extended to study coherent excitation energy transfer in various light harvesting complexes. It is demonstrated that the ILDM approach can successfully describe the coherent beating of the site populations on model systems and gives quantitative agreement with both experimental results and the results of other theoretical methods have been developed recently to going beyond the usual approximations, thus providing a new reliable theoretical tool to study this phenomenon. This approach is used to investigate the excited energy transfer dynamics in various experimentally studied bacteria light harvesting complexes, such as Fenna-Matthews-Olsen (FMO) complex, Phycocyanin 645 (PC645). In these model calculations, quantitative agreement is found between computed de-coherence times and quantum beating pattens observed in the non-linear spectroscopy. As a result of these studies, it is concluded that the stochastic resonance behavior is important in determining the optimal throughput. To begin addressing possible mechanics for observed long de-coherence time, various models which include correlation between site energy fluctuations as well as correlation between site energy and inter-site coupling are developed. The influence of both types of correlation on the coherence and transfer rate is explored using with a two state system-bath hamiltonian parametrized to model the reaction center of Rhodobacter sphaeroides bacteria. To overcome the disadvantages of a fully reduced approach or a full propagation method, a brownian dynamics

  13. Photoinduced electron transfers with carbon dots

    Wang, Xin; Cao, Li; Lu, Fushen; Meziani, Mohammed J.; Li, Heting; Qi, Gang; Zhou, Bing; Harruff, Barbara A.; Kermarrec, Fabien; Sun, Ya-Ping

    2009-01-01

    The photoluminescence in carbon dots (surface-passivated small carbon nanoparticles) could be quenched efficiently by electron acceptor or donor molecules in solution, namely that photo-excited carbon dots are both excellent electron donors and excellent electron acceptors, thus offering new opportunities for their potential uses in light energy conversion and related applications.

  14. Optimization of Plasmon Decay Through Scattering and Hot Electron Transfer

    DeJarnette, Drew

    Light incident on metal nanoparticles induce localized surface oscillations of conductive electrons, called plasmons, which is a means to control and manipulate light. Excited plasmons decay as either thermal energy as absorbed phonons or electromagnetic energy as scattered photons. An additional decay pathway for plasmons can exist for gold nanoparticles situated on graphene. Excited plasmons can decay directly to the graphene as through hot electron transfer. This dissertation begins by computational analysis of plasmon resonance energy and bandwidth as a function of particle size, shape, and dielectric environment in addition to diffractive coupled in lattices creating a Fano resonance. With this knowledge, plasmon resonance was probed with incident electrons using electron energy loss spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscope. Nanoparticles were fabricated using electron beam lithography on 50 nanometer thick silicon nitride with some particles fabricated with a graphene layer between the silicon nitride and metal structure. Plasmon resonance was compared between ellipses on and off graphene to characterize hot electron transfer as a means of plasmon decay. It was observed that the presence of graphene caused plasmon energy to decrease by as much as 9.8% and bandwidth to increase by 25%. Assuming the increased bandwidth was solely from electron transfer as an additional plasmon decay route, a 20% efficiency of plasmon decay to graphene was calculated for the particular ellipses analyzed.

  15. Multiply excited molecules produced by photon and electron interactions

    The photon and electron interactions with molecules resulting in the formation of multiply excited molecules and the subsequent decay are subjects of great interest because the independent electron model and Born-Oppenheimer approximation are much less reliable for the multiply excited states of molecules than for the ground and lower excited electronic states. We have three methods to observe and investigate multiply excited molecules: 1) Measurements of the cross sections for the emission of fluorescence emitted by neutral fragments in the photoexcitation of molecules as a function of incident photon energy [1-3], 2) Measurements of the electron energy-loss spectra tagged with the fluorescence photons emitted by neutral fragments [4], 3) Measurements of the cross sections for generating a pair of photons in absorption of a single photon by a molecule as a function of incident photon energy [5-7]. Multiply excited states degenerate with ionization continua, which make a large contribution in the cross section curve involving ionization processes. The key point of our methods is hence that we measure cross sections free from ionization. The feature of multiply excited states is noticeable in such a cross section curve. Recently we have measured: i) the cross sections for the emission of the Lyman- fluorescence in the photoexcitation of CH4 as a function of incident photon energy in the range 18-51 eV, ii) the electron energy-loss spectrum of CH4 tagged with the Lyman-photons at 80 eV incident electron energy and 10 electron scattering angle in the range of the energy loss 20-45 eV, in order to understand the formation and decay of the doubly excited methane in photon and electron interactions. [8] The results are summarized in this paper and the simultaneous excitation of two electrons by electron interaction is compared with that by photon interaction in terms of the oscillator strength. (authors)

  16. On the use of analytical approximate expressions for the transfer rate in excitation transfer kinetics

    We present a discussion about the range of validity of the usual approximate transfer rate expressions used in the description of the kinetics of diffusion-modulated excitation transfer, for a reactive interaction of exponential functional form. We simulate the features of energy transfer by a numerical inversion of the exact Laplace transform of the transfer rate. It is shown that for high diffusion coefficients of the order of 10-5cm2s-1, the kinetics may be well reproduced, even at short times, by the asymptotic form of the transfer rate. For slow molecular displacements, the short time static regime is brought to direct observation, but the transfer rate approaches is asymptotic value at a much later time

  17. Vibration-assisted resonance in photosynthetic excitation energy transfer

    Irish, E K; Lovett, B W

    2013-01-01

    Coherent quantum energy transfer, as observed in photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes, is inhibited by energetic disorder. While this difficulty can be overcome to some extent by the addition of environmental noise, it has recently has begun to be appreciated that discrete intra- and/or intermolecular vibrational modes may play an important role in quantum dynamics. We present a microscopic mechanism by which intramolecular vibrational modes create resonant energy transfer pathways, enhancing the efficiency of both coherent and dephasing-assisted transfer. The principles of this vibration-assisted resonance are illustrated in a simple model based on one energy-transfer branch of the well-characterised Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex. Despite its simplicity, this model captures the interplay between strong electronic coupling that produces delocalised exciton states and resonance-enhanced weak coupling to local vibrational modes. Analytical and numerical results show that intramolecular vibrations can enhance...

  18. Theoretical Studies of Chemical Reactions following Electronic Excitation

    Chaban, Galina M.

    2003-01-01

    The use of multi-configurational wave functions is demonstrated for several processes: tautomerization reactions in the ground and excited states of the DNA base adenine, dissociation of glycine molecule after electronic excitation, and decomposition/deformation of novel rare gas molecules HRgF. These processes involve bond brealung/formation and require multi-configurational approaches that include dynamic correlation.

  19. The separation of vibrational coherence from ground- and excited-electronic states in P3HT film

    Song, Yin

    2015-06-07

    © 2015 AIP Publishing LLC. Concurrence of the vibrational coherence and ultrafast electron transfer has been observed in polymer/fullerene blends. However, it is difficult to experimentally investigate the role that the excited-state vibrational coherence plays during the electron transfer process since vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states is usually temporally and spectrally overlapped. Here, we performed 2-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D ES) measurements on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films. By Fourier transforming the whole 2D ES datasets (S (λ 1, T∼ 2, λ 3)) along the population time (T∼ 2) axis, we develop and propose a protocol capable of separating vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states in 3D rephasing and nonrephasing beating maps (S (λ 1, ν∼ 2, λ 3)). We found that the vibrational coherence from pure excited electronic states appears at positive frequency (+ ν∼ 2) in the rephasing beating map and at negative frequency (- ν∼ 2) in the nonrephasing beating map. Furthermore, we also found that vibrational coherence from excited electronic state had a long dephasing time of 244 fs. The long-lived excited-state vibrational coherence indicates that coherence may be involved in the electron transfer process. Our findings not only shed light on the mechanism of ultrafast electron transfer in organic photovoltaics but also are beneficial for the study of the coherence effect on photoexcited dynamics in other systems.

  20. TDDFT study on the excited-state proton transfer of 8-hydroxyquinoline: Key role of the excited-state hydrogen-bond strengthening

    Lan, Sheng-Cheng; Liu, Yu-Hui

    2015-03-01

    Density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent density functional theory (TDDFT) calculations have been employed to study the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT) reaction of 8-hydroxyquinoline (8HQ). Infrared spectra of 8HQ in both the ground and the lowest singlet excited states have been calculated, revealing a red-shift of the hydroxyl group (-OH) stretching band in the excited state. Hence, the intramolecular hydrogen bond (O-H···N) in 8HQ would be significantly strengthened upon photo-excitation to the S1 state. As the intramolecular proton-transfer reaction occurs through hydrogen bonding, the ESIPT reaction of 8HQ is effectively facilitated by strengthening of the electronic excited-state hydrogen bond (O-H···N). As a result, the intramolecular proton-transfer reaction would occur on an ultrafast timescale with a negligible barrier in the calculated potential energy curve for the ESIPT reaction. Therefore, although the intramolecular proton-transfer reaction is not favorable in the ground state, the ESIPT process is feasible in the excited state. Finally, we have identified that radiationless deactivation via internal conversion (IC) becomes the main dissipative channel for 8HQ by analyzing the energy gaps between the S1 and S0 states for the enol and keto forms.

  1. Electron excitation from ground state to first excited state: Bohmian mechanics method

    Yang, Song; Shuang, Zhao; Fu-Ming, Guo; Yu-Jun, Yang; Su-Yu, Li

    2016-03-01

    The excitation process of electrons from the ground state to the first excited state via the resonant laser pulse is investigated by the Bohmian mechanics method. It is found that the Bohmian particles far away from the nucleus are easier to be excited and are excited firstly, while the Bohmian particles in the ground state is subject to a strong quantum force at a certain moment, being excited to the first excited state instantaneously. A detailed analysis for one of the trajectories is made, and finally we present the space and energy distribution of 2000 Bohmian particles at several typical instants and analyze their dynamical process at these moments. Project supported by the Doctoral Research Start-up Funding of Northeast Dianli University, China (Grant No. BSJXM-201332), the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11547114, 11534004, 11474129, 11274141, 11447192, and 11304116), and the Graduate Innovation Fund of Jilin University, China (Grant No. 2015091).

  2. Experimental apparatus for measurements of electron impact excitation

    Lafyatis, G. P.; Kohl, J. L.; Gardner, L. D.

    1987-01-01

    An ion beam apparatus for the absolute measurement of collision cross sections in singly and multiply charged ions is described. An inclined electron and ion beams arrangement is used. Emitted photons from the decay of collision produced excited states are collected by a mirror and imaged onto a photomultiplier. Absolute measurements of the electron impact excitation of the 2s-2p transition in C(3+) were used to demonstrate the reliability of the apparatus.

  3. Computing electronic structures: A new multiconfiguration approach for excited states

    We present a new method for the computation of electronic excited states of molecular systems. This method is based upon a recent theoretical definition of multiconfiguration excited states [due to one of us, see M. Lewin, Solutions of the multiconfiguration equations in quantum chemistry, Arch. Rat. Mech. Anal. 171 (2004) 83-114]. Our algorithm, dedicated to the computation of the first excited state, always converges to a stationary state of the multiconfiguration model, which can be interpreted as an approximate excited state of the molecule. The definition of this approximate excited state is variational. An interesting feature is that it satisfies a non-linear Hylleraas-Undheim-MacDonald type principle: the energy of the approximate excited state is an upper bound to the true excited state energy of the N-body Hamiltonian. To compute the first excited state, one has to deform paths on a manifold, like this is usually done in the search for transition states between reactants and products on potential energy surfaces. We propose here a general method for the deformation of paths which could also be useful in other settings. We also compare our method to other approaches used in Quantum Chemistry and give some explanation of the unsatisfactory behaviours which are sometimes observed when using the latter. Numerical results for the special case of two-electron systems are provided: we compute the first singlet excited state potential energy surface of the H 2 molecule

  4. Electronic Excited States of Tungsten(0) Arylisocyanides

    Kvapilová, Hana; Sattler, W.; Sattler, A.; Sazanovich, I.; Clark, I. P.; Towrie, M.; Gray, H. B.; Záliš, Stanislav; Vlček Jr., Antonín

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 54, č. 17 (2015), s. 8518-8528. ISSN 0020-1669 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH13015 Grant ostatní: COST(XE) CM1202 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : TRANSITION-METAL-COMPLEXES * FEMTOSECOND FLUORESCENCE * CHARGE-TRANSFER Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 4.762, year: 2014

  5. Electron-impact excitation of ions

    A review of electron-ion beam experiments is given. Techniques, difficulties, and present trends in this area are discussed. Measured cross sections are compared with theoretical results and the current level of agreement is assessed. 74 references

  6. Excited-State-Proton-Transfer-Triggered Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer: from 2-Naphthylamine to Phenosafranin

    Ghosh, Debanjana; Bose, Debosreeta; Sarkar, Deboleena; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2009-09-01

    Excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) have been linearly coupled leading to an efficient pH-sensitive energy transfer from 2-naphthylamine (2NA) to a potentially bioactive cationic phenazinium dye, phenosafranin (PSF). The prototropic product produced exclusively from the photoexcited 2NA in the presence of added alkali serves as the donor for the energy transfer process. The energy transfer process is turned on at pH ≥ 12, whereas the process is turned off at a pH lower than that. Within the range of pH 12 to 13, the energy transfer efficiency (E) has been shown to follow a linear relation with the solution pH establishing the governing role of pH of the solution on the energy transfer process. The energy transfer follows a long-range dipole-dipole interaction mechanism. The critical energy transfer distance (R0) and the distance between the acceptor and the donor (r) have been determined for the ESPT-promoted FRET process at an optimum pH of 13. The present study involving the coupled processes is simple but has its implication due to its potential to be exploited for designing a pH-sensitive molecular switch.

  7. Anomalous temperature dependence of excitation transfer betweenquantum dots

    Král, Karel; Menšík, Miroslav

    Praha : Czechoslovak Association for Crystal Growth (CSACG), 2014 - (Kožíšek, Z.; Nitsch, K.). s. 25-25 ISBN 978-80-260-6599-9. [Joint Seminar Development of Materials Science in Research and Education /24./. 08.09.2014-12.09.2014, Lednice] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LH12186 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : quantum dots * nanoparticles * electron-phonon interaction * energy transfer Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  8. Two-photon Induced Hot Electron Transfer to a Single Molecule in a Scanning Tunneling Microscope

    Wu, Shiwei; Ho, Wilson

    2010-01-01

    The junction of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in the tunneling regime was irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. A photo-excited hot electron in the STM tip resonantly tunnels into an excited state of a single molecule on the surface, converting it from the neutral to the anion. The electron transfer rate depends quadratically on the incident laser power, suggesting a two-photon excitation process. This nonlinear optical process is further confirmed by the polarization me...

  9. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  10. Ultrafast electron diffraction studies of optically excited thin bismuth films

    Rajkovic, Ivan

    2008-10-21

    This thesis contains work on the design and the realization of an experimental setup capable of providing sub-picosecond electron pulses for ultrafast electron diffraction experiments, and performing the study of ultrafast dynamics in bismuth after optical excitation using this setup. (orig.)

  11. An Exciting Aspect of Nanotechnology: Unimolecular Electronics

    Metzger R. M.

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available This is a brief update on our experimental work towards better one-molecule-thick monolayer rectifiers of electrical current, and on theoretical progress towards a one-molecule amplifier of electrical current. This program aims to provide electronic devices at the 2 to 3 nm level, as a dramatic advance towards practical integrated circuits of the future.

  12. Electron-driven excitations and dissociation of molecules

    Miller, Greg [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States); Orel, Ann E. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-02-13

    This program studied how energy is interchanged in electron and photon collisions with molecules leading to ex-citation and dissociation. Modern ab initio techniques, both for the photoionization and electron scattering, and the subsequent nuclear dynamics studies, are used to accurately treat these problems. This work addresses vibrational ex-citation and dissociative attachment following electron impact, and the dynamics following inner shell photoionzation. These problems are ones for which a full multi-dimensional treatment of the nuclear dynamics is essential and where non-adiabatic effects are expected to be important.

  13. Search for excited electrons using the ZEUS detector

    This paper reports a search for excited electrons at the HERA electron-proton collider. In a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 26 nb-1, no evidence was found for any resonant state decaying into e-γ, νW- or e-Z0. Limits on the coupling strength of an excited electron have been determined for masses between 45 and 225 GeV. This study also reports the observation of the wide-angle eγ Compton scattering process. (orig.)

  14. Peculiarities of electron excitations decay in ion-molecular crystals

    Ionic-molecular crystals (IMC) have wide application in various optical devices. Its are using in capacity of solid state dosimetric materials and isolators. Peculiarities of chemical and energetic states of IMC lead to following number of features of electron excitation decay in comparison with alkaline-halogen crystals: - both an electrons and a holes simultaneously could be captured and localized either on anion or on cation complexes; - in-molecular forces arising in result of charge capture could conduct to decay of anion or cation complex; - decay products od anion or cation complex could participate in following reaction of new products formation. All these processes and new products of electron excitation decay exert strong effect on optical, magnetic and electrical characteristics of IMC. Knowledge of way and mechanisms of electron excitation decay in IMC could allow to control of radiation stability of crystals with help of impurities participating in different channels of solid state reactions

  15. Efficient laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using excitation energy transfer from anthracene

    Highlights: ► Femtomolar detection of PAHs such as perylene and benzopyrene was achieved. ► Photoexcited anthracene molecules transferred their energy to PAHs. ► Electronically excited PAHs were then excited to be ions. ► Two-photon ionization process was necessary to complete the ionization process. ► The number of defect sites could be reduced by the annealing procedure. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as perylene and benzopyrene, doped at amounts on the order of femtomol (∼10−15 mol) in anthracene crystals could be detected by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Sensitivity was roughly 103 times higher than that of LDI method in our experimental conditions. It was revealed from the excitation power dependence of the peak intensity of PAHs on the mass spectra that two-photon excitation in one UV pulse was necessary to complete the ionization process. It was also clarified that the number of defect sites that trap excitons generated in anthracene crystals could be reduced by the annealing procedure, by which an efficient energy transfer between anthracene and PAHs became possible

  16. Efficient laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons using excitation energy transfer from anthracene

    Fujimori, Kensuke [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan); Fujino, Tatsuya, E-mail: fujino@tmu.ac.jp [Department of Chemistry, Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Metropolitan University, 1-1 Minami-Osawa, Hachioji-shi, Tokyo 192-0397 (Japan)

    2013-06-20

    Highlights: ► Femtomolar detection of PAHs such as perylene and benzopyrene was achieved. ► Photoexcited anthracene molecules transferred their energy to PAHs. ► Electronically excited PAHs were then excited to be ions. ► Two-photon ionization process was necessary to complete the ionization process. ► The number of defect sites could be reduced by the annealing procedure. - Abstract: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as perylene and benzopyrene, doped at amounts on the order of femtomol (∼10{sup −15} mol) in anthracene crystals could be detected by laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry. Sensitivity was roughly 10{sup 3} times higher than that of LDI method in our experimental conditions. It was revealed from the excitation power dependence of the peak intensity of PAHs on the mass spectra that two-photon excitation in one UV pulse was necessary to complete the ionization process. It was also clarified that the number of defect sites that trap excitons generated in anthracene crystals could be reduced by the annealing procedure, by which an efficient energy transfer between anthracene and PAHs became possible.

  17. Calculations for electron-impact excitation and ionization of beryllium

    Zatsarinny, Oleg; Fursa, Dmitry V; Bray, Igor

    2016-01-01

    The B-spline R-matrix and the convergent close-coupling methods are used to study electron collisions with neutral beryllium over an energy range from threshold to 100 eV. Coupling to the target continuum significantly affects the results for transitions from the ground state, but to a lesser extent the strong transitions between excited states. Cross sections are presented for selected transitions between low-lying physical bound states of beryllium, as well as for elastic scattering, momentum transfer, and ionization. The present cross sections for transitions from the ground state from the two methods are in excellent agreement with each other, and also with other available results based on nonperturbative convergent pseudo-state and time-dependent close-coupling models. The elastic cross section at low energies is dominated by a prominent shape resonance. The ionization from the $(2s2p)^3P$ and $(2s2p)^1P$ states strongly depends on the respective term. The current predictions represent an extensive set o...

  18. Relation between Nonlinear Optical Properties of Push-Pull Molecules and Metric of Charge Transfer Excitations.

    List, Nanna Holmgaard; Zaleśny, Robert; Murugan, N Arul; Kongsted, Jacob; Bartkowiak, Wojciech; Ågren, Hans

    2015-09-01

    We establish the relationships between the metric of charge transfer excitation (Δr) for the bright ππ* state and the two-photon absorption probability as well as the first hyperpolarizability for two families of push-pull π-conjugated systems. As previously demonstrated by Guido et al. (J. Chem. Theory Comput. 2013, 9, 3118-3126), Δr is a measure for the average hole-electron distance upon excitation and can be used to discriminate between short- and long-range electronic excitations. We indicate two new benefits from using this metric for the analyses of nonlinear optical properties of push-pull systems. First, the two-photon absorption probability and the first hyperpolarizability are found to be interrelated through Δr; if β ∼ (Δr)(k), then roughly, δ(TPA) ∼ (Δr)(k+1). Second, a simple power relation between Δr and the molecular hyperpolarizabilities of push-pull systems offers the possibility of estimating properties for longer molecular chains without performing calculations of high-order response functions explicitly. We further demonstrate how to link the hyperpolarizabilities with the chain length of the push-pull π-conjugated systems through the metric of charge transfer. PMID:26575913

  19. Evolution of microstructure resulting from high electronic excitation during swift heavy ion irradiations

    This paper is devoted to the specific damage processes resulting from high levels of energy deposition in electronic excitation (a few 10 keV/nm) in metallic targets. Such conditions are fulfilled during irradiations with GeV heavy ions. After a short discussion about the mechanisms of energy deposition in elastic and inelastic collisions, the various microstructural changes observed during swift heavy ion irradiations of metals are described. The damage resulting from electronic excitation is localized along the ion wake and consists mainly in local or long-range order modifications or even phase transformation in crystalline materials and in anisotropic growth in amorphous materials. A tentative model based on the Coulomb explosion mechanism explains how part of the energy deposited in electronic excitation can be transferred to lattice atoms and accounts for the available experimental results. (orig.)

  20. Electron-impact excitation cross sections for neon

    An analytic atomic independent particle model adjusted to experimental single-particle energy levels is used to generate wavefunctions for the excited states of neon. Using these wavefunctions in conjunction with the Born approximation and the Russell-Saunders LS-coupling scheme, a calculation is presented of generalized oscillator strengths and cross sections for electron-impact excitation of neon from the 2p6(1S0) ground state. (author)

  1. Modelling the effects of electronic excitations in ionic-covalent materials

    High energy radiation events in ionic and covalent materials can lead to highly excited electronic configurations which, over time, relax to the ground state, either radiatively by emitting photons, or non-radiatively. Non-radiative relaxation involves the transfer of energy to the lattice and this can result in lattice heating, defect formation or even phase changes. The effects of the relaxation mechanisms on the atomic configuration are challenging to model accurately by standard methods. The situation is further complicated by interactions between electronic excitations and pre-existing defects, possibly created by other radiation events. In this paper we describe a range of mechanisms by which the electronic energy is transferred to the lattice and the resulting effects on the atomic configuration, along with the different techniques that are used to model these effects.

  2. Ultrafast coherent dynamics of nonadiabatically coupled quasi-degenerate excited states in molecules: Population and vibrational coherence transfers

    Graphical abstract: Temporal behaviors due to quantum mechanical interferences between the nonadiabatically coupled quasi-degenerate excited states (b and c) after a coherent excitation. Highlights: ► A nonadiabatic theory of quasi-degenerate π-electronic states in aromatic molecules. ► Quantum interferences between the nonadiabatically-coupled π-electronic states. ► Analysis of time-dependent vibrational coherence transfer via nonadiabatic couplings. - Abstract: Results of a theoretical study of ultrafast coherent dynamics of nonadiabatically coupled quasi-degenerate π-electronic excited states of molecules were presented. Analytical expressions for temporal behaviors of population and vibrational coherence were derived using a simplified model to clarify the quantum mechanical interferences between the two coherently excited electronic states, which appeared in the nuclear wavepacket simulations [M. Kanno, H. Kono, Y. Fujimura, S.H. Lin, Phys. Rev. Lett 104 (2010) 108302]. The photon-polarization direction of the linearly polarized laser, which controls the populations of the two quasi-degenerate electronic states, determines constructive or destructive interference. Features of the vibrational coherence transfer between the two coupled quasi-electronic states through nonadiabatic couplings are also presented. Information on both the transition frequency and nonadiabatic coupling matrix element between the two states can be obtained by analyzing signals of two kinds of quantum beats before and after transfer through nonadiabatic coupling.

  3. Inelastic electron scattering at low momentum transfer

    Recent advances of high energy resolution (ΔE approx. 30 keV FWHM) inelastic electron scattering at low momentum transfer (q -1) using selected experimental data from the Darmstadt electron linear accelerator are discussed. Strong emphasis is given to a comparison of the data with theoretical nuclear model predictions. Of the low multipolarity electric transitions investigated, as examples only E1 transitions to unnatural parity states in 11B and E2 transitions of the very fragmented isoscalar quadrupole giant resonance in 208Pb are considered. In 11B the role of the Os hole in the configuration of the 1/2+, 3/2+ and 5/2+ states is quantitatively determined via an interference mechanism in the transition probability. By comparison of the high resolution data with RPA calculations the E2 EWSR in 208Pb is found to be much less exhausted than anticipated from previous medium energy resolution (e,e) and hadron scattering experiments. In the case of M1 transitions it is shown that the simplest idealized independent particle shell-model prediction breaks down badly. In 28Si, ground-state correlations influence largely the detected M1 strength and such ground-state correlations are also responsible for the occurence of a strong M1 transition to a state at Ex = 10.319 MeV in 40Ca. In 90Zr only about 10% of the theoretically expected M1 strength is seen in (e,e) and in 140Ce and 208Pb none (detection limit 1-2 μ2K). In the case of 208Pb high resolution spectra exist now up to an excitation energy of Ex = approx. 12MeV. The continuous decrease of the M1 strength with mass number is corroborated by the behaviour of strong but very fragmented M2 transitions which are detected in 28Si, 90Zr, 140Ce and 208Pb concentrated at an excitation energy E x approx. 44A-1/3MeV. In 90Zr, the distribution of spacings and widths of the many Jπ = 2 states are consistent with a Wigner and Porter-Thomas distribution, respectively. (orig.) 891 KBE/orig. 892 ARA

  4. Modified linear response for time-dependent density-functional theory: Application to Rydberg and charge-transfer excitations

    We present an improved ab initio time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) approach to electronic excitations. A conventional TDDFT scheme within the local-density approximation (LDA) inaccurately predicts Rydberg and charge-transfer excitation energies, mainly because the electron-hole (e-h) interaction is inappropriately described in these excitations, as can be found by analyzing the linear response formula [M. Petersilka, U. J. Gossmann, and E. K. U. Gross, Phys. Rev. Lett. 76, 1212 (1996)]. When the formula is averaged over the electron occupation, the inappropriate e-h interaction within LDA is corrected to become explicitly similar to that of the exact exchange system. As anticipated from the similarity, our proposed scheme of modified linear response greatly improves the prediction of the problematic excitations, which are exemplified for typical molecules

  5. Modulational instability of electron plasma waves excited by a cavity

    This report describes on an experimental study of the modulational instability of electron plasma waves excited by a cavity and a theoretical formula which can be used for comparison with experimental results. Electron plasma waves were generated by the electron cyclotron resonance at the Lisitano coil. The magnetic field intensity along the axis of the Lisitano coil can be changed to change the plasma density. The electron temperature and density were measured with shielded plane probes. The ion temperature was measured by an energy analyzer. Excitation of electron plasma waves, observation of side band waves, modulation instability at small amplitude and large amplitude were studied. It was found that the modulated waves of electron plasma waves make spatially growth and attenuation. The frequency of modulation is linear to the electric field intensity of electron plasma waves, and the amplitude is proportional to the square of the intensity. It is possible to perform experiments by distinguishing the parametric instability and the modulation instability of electron plasma waves. When the electric field intensity of electron plasma waves is more than 5.5 V/cm, low frequency waves are excited, which corresponds to the ion density variation with the phase different by π from the modulated waves. The results are discussed in comparison with the theory by Zakharov. (Kato, T.)

  6. Hierarchical control of electron-transfer

    Westerhoff, Hans V.; Jensen, Peter Ruhdal; Egger, Louis;

    1997-01-01

    In this chapter the role of electron transfer in determining the behaviour of the ATP synthesising enzyme in E. coli is analysed. It is concluded that the latter enzyme lacks control because of special properties of the electron transfer components. These properties range from absence of a strong...... back pressure by the protonmotive force on the rate of electron transfer to hierarchical regulation of the expression of the gens that encode the electron transfer proteins as a response to changes in the bioenergetic properties of the cell.The discussion uses Hierarchical Control Analysis...... as a paradigm. This allows one to analyse a complex system of regulatory interactions in terms of the importance of the contributing factors....

  7. Characterization of adsorption and electronic excited states of quercetin on titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    Zdyb, Agata; Krawczyk, Stanisław

    2016-03-01

    Adsorption of quercetin on colloidal titanium dioxide nanoparticles in ethanol and its excited-state electronic structure were investigated by means of electronic and vibrational spectroscopies. The changes in electronic charge redistribution as reflected by the dipole moment difference, ∆μ, between the ground and excited electronic states were measured with electroabsorption spectroscopy and analyzed using results of TD DFT computations. Adsorption of quercetin causes a red shift of its absorption spectrum. Raman spectra of quercetin analyzed with reference to analogous data for morin indicate binding of quercetin through the hydroxy groups of the catechol moiety. The difference dipole moment, which is 5.5 D in free quercetin, increases to 11.8 D in opposite direction in adsorbed quercetin, and is associated with charge-transfer to the Ti atom. The computed transition energy, intensity, vector Δμ and molecular orbitals involved in the electronic transition at different molecular configurations indicate a bidentate chelating mode of binding of quercetin.

  8. Advances in electron transfer chemistry, v.6

    Mariano, PS

    1999-01-01

    It is clear that electron transfer chemisty is now one of the most active areas of chemical study. Advances in Electron Transfer Chemistry has been designed to allow scientists who are developing new knowledge in this rapidly expanding area to describe their most recent research findings. This volume will serve those interested in learning about current breakthroughs in this rapidly expanding area of chemical research.

  9. Infrared multiphoton excitation and inverse electronic relaxation in SO2

    Visible luminescence (lambda=270--470 nm) has been observed from S16O2 and S18O2 at pressures of 0.2 to 20 Torr following irradiation by an intense infrared laser (lambda=9.3 μm). Our experiments show that the luminescence is not due to dielectric breakdown or recombination of dissociation fragments, but rather is fluorescence from the first excited singlet states of SO2 following inverse electronic relaxation from highly excited vibrational levels of the ground electronic state. Crossover from the ground to excited electronic states may also be collisionally assisted. Spectroscopic and kinetic measurements are consistent with previous studies on 1B1 emission from SO2. The pressure dependence of the fluorescence yield exhibits two distinct pressure regimes, while the dependence of visible emission on laser pump wavelength follows the small signal infrared absorption spectrum. The threshold for detection of fluorescence is 17--20 J/cm2 with 9.3 μm radiation as the excitation source. These observations are discussed in terms of recently proposed theories which describe the photophysics of vibrationally excited states coupled to a radiative continuum through higher electronic states

  10. Electronic and photophysical properties of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole and its derivatives enhancing in the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer processes: A TD-DFT study on substitution effect

    The effect of electron donating and withdrawing substituents on the enol absorption and keto emission spectra of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and its derivatives has been systematically investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) methods. The enol absorption spectra of HBO were simulated by using five different DFTs with various exchange-correlation functions to validate a suitable functional prior to being further used as a method of choice to study the effect of substituents on the spectral characteristics of HBO derivatives. The popular B3LYP (Becke, three-parameter, Lee–Yang–Parr) exchange-correlation functional is found to provide the best desirable result in predicting the absorption spectrum close to experimental data. In the ground state, enol forms of HBO and its derivatives are more stable than those of keto forms, while in the first lowest excited state, keto forms are found to be more stable than their enol forms. Overall, simulated absorption and emission spectra of HBO and its derivatives from TD-B3LYP calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data. For enol, absorption maxima of HBO derivatives having electron-withdrawing groups are red-shift corresponding to their lower HOMO–LUMO energy gaps compared to that of HBO. For keto emission, HBO having electron donating groups (m-MeHBO and MHBO) and withdrawing group (CNHBO) at 4′-position on the phenol fragment as well as electron donating groups (HBOMe and HBOM) at 6-position on the benzoxazole fragment make the position of keto emission peak shift to shorter wavelength (blue-shift). However, HBO derivatives with electron withdrawing groups (HBOF, HBOCl, HBOA and HBOE) at 6-position give redshifted emission compared to the parent compound (HBO). The type of substituent on both 4′- and 6-positions certainly has a pronounced effect on the absorption and emission spectra of HBO derivatives. - Highlights: • Simulated spectra

  11. Electronic and photophysical properties of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole and its derivatives enhancing in the excited-state intramolecular proton transfer processes: A TD-DFT study on substitution effect

    Daengngern, Rathawat; Kungwan, Nawee, E-mail: naweekung@gmail.com

    2015-11-15

    The effect of electron donating and withdrawing substituents on the enol absorption and keto emission spectra of 2-(2′-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole (HBO) and its derivatives has been systematically investigated by means of density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT (TD-DFT) methods. The enol absorption spectra of HBO were simulated by using five different DFTs with various exchange-correlation functions to validate a suitable functional prior to being further used as a method of choice to study the effect of substituents on the spectral characteristics of HBO derivatives. The popular B3LYP (Becke, three-parameter, Lee–Yang–Parr) exchange-correlation functional is found to provide the best desirable result in predicting the absorption spectrum close to experimental data. In the ground state, enol forms of HBO and its derivatives are more stable than those of keto forms, while in the first lowest excited state, keto forms are found to be more stable than their enol forms. Overall, simulated absorption and emission spectra of HBO and its derivatives from TD-B3LYP calculations are in good agreement with the experimental data. For enol, absorption maxima of HBO derivatives having electron-withdrawing groups are red-shift corresponding to their lower HOMO–LUMO energy gaps compared to that of HBO. For keto emission, HBO having electron donating groups (m-MeHBO and MHBO) and withdrawing group (CNHBO) at 4′-position on the phenol fragment as well as electron donating groups (HBOMe and HBOM) at 6-position on the benzoxazole fragment make the position of keto emission peak shift to shorter wavelength (blue-shift). However, HBO derivatives with electron withdrawing groups (HBOF, HBOCl, HBOA and HBOE) at 6-position give redshifted emission compared to the parent compound (HBO). The type of substituent on both 4′- and 6-positions certainly has a pronounced effect on the absorption and emission spectra of HBO derivatives. - Highlights: • Simulated spectra

  12. Ro-vibrational excitation of HCl by electron impact

    Padial, N.T.; Norcross, D.W.

    1984-03-01

    Ab initio calculations of cross sections for simultaneous rotational and vibrational excitation of HCl by low-energy electrons have been made in the multipole-extracted adiabatic-nuclei approximation. These calculations employed a free-electron-gas model of the exchange interaction, and represent the first application of a new parameter-free model of the correlation-polarization interaction to vibrational excitation. The cross sections increase by an order of magnitude with the inclusion of this interaction, which is much more important for vibrationally inelastic than elastic collisions. 22 references.

  13. Ro-vibrational excitation of HCl by electron impact

    Padial, N.T.; Norcross, D.W.

    1984-03-01

    Ab initio calculations of cross sections for simultaneous rotational and vibrational excitation of HCl by low-energy electrons have been made in the multipole-extracted adiabatic-nuclei (MEAN) approximation. These calculations employed a free-electron-gas model of the exchange interaction, and represent the first application of a new parameter-free model of the correlation-polarization interaction to vibrational excitation. The cross sections increase by an order of magnitude with the inclusion of this interaction, which is much more important for vibrationally inelastic than elastic collisions.

  14. Heat Transfer Augmentation for Electronic Cooling

    Suabsakul Gururatana

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The performance of electronic devices has been improving along with the rapid technology development. Cooling of electronic systems is consequently essential in controlling the component temperature and avoiding any hot spot. The study aims to review the present electronic cooling methods which are widely used in electronic devices. Approach: There are several methods to cool down the electronics components such as the pin-fin heat sink, confined jet impingement, heat pipe, micro heat sink and so on. Results: The cooling techniques can obviously increase heat transfer rate. Nonetheless, for active and passive cooling methods the pressure drop could extremely rise, when the heat transfer rate is increased. Conclusion: When the cooling techniques are used, it is clearly seen that the heat transfer increases with pressure drop. To avoid excessive expense due to high pressure drop, optimization method is required to obtain optimum cost and cooling rate.

  15. Charge-Transfer Excitations in the Model Superconductor HgBa$_2$CuO$_{\\bf 4+\\delta}$

    L. Lu; Zhao, X.; Chabot-Couture, G.; Hancock, J. N.; Kaneko, N; Vajk, O. P.; Yu, G.; Grenier, S.; Kim, Y. J.; Casa, D.; Gog, T.; Greven, M.

    2005-01-01

    We report a Cu $K$-edge resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) study of charge-transfer excitations in the 2-8 eV range in the structurally simple compound HgBa$_2$CuO$_{4+\\delta}$ at optimal doping ($T_{\\rm c} = 96.5 $ K). The spectra exhibit a significant dependence on the incident photon energy which we carefully utilize to resolve a multiplet of weakly-dispersive ($ < 0.5$ eV) electron-hole excitations, including a mode at 2 eV. The observation of this 2 eV excitation suggests the exi...

  16. A stochastic reorganizational bath model for electronic energy transfer

    Fujita, Takatoshi; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2014-01-01

    The fluctuations of optical gap induced by the environment play crucial roles in electronic energy transfer dynamics. One of the simplest approaches to incorporate such fluctuations in energy transfer dynamics is the well known Haken-Strobl-Reineker model, in which the energy-gap fluctuation is approximated as a white noise. Recently, several groups have employed molecular dynamics simulations and excited-state calculations in conjunction to take the thermal fluctuation of excitation energies into account. Here, we discuss a rigorous connection between the stochastic and the atomistic bath models. If the phonon bath is treated classically, time evolution of the exciton-phonon system can be described by Ehrenfest dynamics. To establish the relationship between the stochastic and atomistic bath models, we employ a projection operator technique to derive the generalized Langevin equations for the energy-gap fluctuations. The stochastic bath model can be obtained as an approximation of the atomistic Ehrenfest equ...

  17. Cold transfer between deformed, Coulomb excited nuclei; Kalter Transfer zwischen deformierten, Coulomb-angeregten Kernen

    Bauer, H.

    1998-12-31

    The scattering system {sup 162}Dy {yields} {sup 116}Sn has been examined at energies in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier using the Heidelberg-Darmstadt Crystal Ball spectrometer combined with 5 Germanium-CLUSTER detectors. In order to study pairing correlations as a function of angular momentum cold events were selected in the 2n stripping channel by identifying and suppressing the dominant hot part of the transfer with the Crystal Ball. The CLUSTER detectors with their high {gamma}-efficiency were used to identify the transfer channel and to resolve individual final states. Cross sections for the population of individual yrast states in a cold transfer reaction have been measured for the first time indicating the strong influence of higher transfer multipolarities. At small surface distances Coulomb-nuclear interferences were found to be responsible for the stronger decline of the population of higher yrast states in the transfer channel as compared to the Coulex channel. As a preparatory study for 2n transfer measurements between high spin yrast states in the backbending region of deformed nuclei the Coulomb excitation process in the crossing region of two bands in {sup 162}Dy has been analyzed. The gross properties of the measured population probabilities could be interpreted in a simple band mixing model. (orig.)

  18. Theoretical Study on Inner Shell Electron Impact Excitation of Lithium

    YANG Ning-Xuan; DONG Chen-Zhong; JIANG Jun

    2009-01-01

    Cross sections for electron impact excitation of lithium from the ground state ls22s to the excited states 1s2s2,1s2p2,1s2snp (n = 2-5),1s2sns (n = 3-5),1s2pns (n = 3-5),and 1s2pnp (n=3-5) are calculated by using a full relativistic distorted wave method.The latest experimental electron energy loss spectra for inner-shell electron excitations of lithium at a given incident electron energy of 2500 eV[Chin.Phys.Lett.25 (2008) 3649]have been reproduced by the present theoretical investigation excellently.At the same time,the structures of electron energy loss spectra of lithium at low incident electron energy are also predicted theoretically,it is found that the electron energy loss spectra in the energy region of 55-57eV show two-peak structures.

  19. Imaging the electrons from transfer ionization collisions

    The electrons emitted into the continuum in transfer ionization of He2+ on helium collisions in the energy range of 75 - 400 keV were imaged using reaction microscope. The electron emission patterns show big difference for projectile velocity lower and upper than 1 a.u. in the present studies.

  20. Low Temperature Electronic Transport and Electron Transfer through Organic Macromolecules

    Zimbovskaya, N A

    2002-01-01

    It is shown that at low temperatures and moderate electron dephasing the electron transmission function reveales a structure containing information about donor/acceptor sites effectively participating in the electron transfer (ET) processes and primary pathways of electrons tunneling through molecular bridges in macromolecules. This important information can be obtained as a result of analysis of experimental low temperature current-voltage characteristics for chosen molecules.

  1. Electron transfer across a thermal gradient.

    Craven, Galen T; Nitzan, Abraham

    2016-08-23

    Charge transfer is a fundamental process that underlies a multitude of phenomena in chemistry and biology. Recent advances in observing and manipulating charge and heat transport at the nanoscale, and recently developed techniques for monitoring temperature at high temporal and spatial resolution, imply the need for considering electron transfer across thermal gradients. Here, a theory is developed for the rate of electron transfer and the associated heat transport between donor-acceptor pairs located at sites of different temperatures. To this end, through application of a generalized multidimensional transition state theory, the traditional Arrhenius picture of activation energy as a single point on a free energy surface is replaced with a bithermal property that is derived from statistical weighting over all configurations where the reactant and product states are equienergetic. The flow of energy associated with the electron transfer process is also examined, leading to relations between the rate of heat exchange among the donor and acceptor sites as functions of the temperature difference and the electronic driving bias. In particular, we find that an open electron transfer channel contributes to enhanced heat transport between sites even when they are in electronic equilibrium. The presented results provide a unified theory for charge transport and the associated heat conduction between sites at different temperatures. PMID:27450086

  2. Excited-state intramolecular proton transfer of 2-acetylindan-1,3-dione studied by ultrafast absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy

    Pramod Kumar Verma

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We employ transient absorption from the deep-UV to the visible region and fluorescence upconversion to investigate the photoinduced excited-state intramolecular proton-transfer dynamics in a biologically relevant drug molecule, 2-acetylindan-1,3-dione. The molecule is a ß-diketone which in the electronic ground state exists as exocyclic enol with an intramolecular H-bond. Upon electronic excitation at 300 nm, the first excited state of the exocyclic enol is initially populated, followed by ultrafast proton transfer (≈160 fs to form the vibrationally hot endocyclic enol. Subsequently, solvent-induced vibrational relaxation takes place (≈10 ps followed by decay (≈390 ps to the corresponding ground state.

  3. Minimal-excitation states for electron quantum optics using levitons

    Dubois, J.; Jullien, T.; Portier, F.; Roche, P.; Cavanna, A.; Jin, Y.; Wegscheider, W.; Roulleau, P.; Glattli, D. C.

    2013-10-01

    The on-demand generation of pure quantum excitations is important for the operation of quantum systems, but it is particularly difficult for a system of fermions. This is because any perturbation affects all states below the Fermi energy, resulting in a complex superposition of particle and hole excitations. However, it was predicted nearly 20 years ago that a Lorentzian time-dependent potential with quantized flux generates a minimal excitation with only one particle and no hole. Here we report that such quasiparticles (hereafter termed levitons) can be generated on demand in a conductor by applying voltage pulses to a contact. Partitioning the excitations with an electronic beam splitter generates a current noise that we use to measure their number. Minimal-excitation states are observed for Lorentzian pulses, whereas for other pulse shapes there are significant contributions from holes. Further identification of levitons is provided in the energy domain with shot-noise spectroscopy, and in the time domain with electronic Hong-Ou-Mandel noise correlations. The latter, obtained by colliding synchronized levitons on a beam splitter, exemplifies the potential use of levitons for quantum information: using linear electron quantum optics in ballistic conductors, it is possible to imagine flying-qubit operation in which the Fermi statistics are exploited to entangle synchronized electrons emitted by distinct sources. Compared with electron sources based on quantum dots, the generation of levitons does not require delicate nanolithography, considerably simplifying the circuitry for scalability. Levitons are not limited to carrying a single charge, and so in a broader context n-particle levitons could find application in the study of full electron counting statistics. But they can also carry a fraction of charge if they are implemented in Luttinger liquids or in fractional quantum Hall edge channels; this allows the study of Abelian and non-Abelian quasiparticles in the

  4. Wave packet dynamics in molecular excited electronic states

    We theoretically explore the use of UV pump – UV probe schemes to resolve in time the dynamics of nuclear wave packets in excited electronic states of the hydrogen molecule. The pump pulse ignites the dynamics in singly excited states, that will be probed after a given time delay by a second identical pulse that will ionize the molecule. The field-free molecular dynamics is first explored by analyizing the autocorrelation function for the pumped wave packet and the excitation probabilities. We investigate both energy and angle differential ionization probabilities and demonstrate that the asymmetry induced in the electron angular distributions gives a direct map of the time evolution of the pumped wave packet

  5. Extremely confined gap surface-plasmon modes excited by electrons

    Raza, Søren; Stenger, Nicolas; Pors, Anders Lambertus; Holmgaard, Tobias; Kadkhodazadeh, Shima; Wagner, Jakob Birkedal; Pedersen, Kjeld; Wubs, Martijn; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I.; Mortensen, N. Asger

    2014-01-01

    High-spatial and energy resolution electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) can be used for detailed characterization of localized and propagating surface-plasmon excitations in metal nanostructures, giving insight into fundamental physical phenomena and various plasmonic effects. Here, applying...... EELS to ultra-sharp convex grooves in gold, we directly probe extremely confined gap surface-plasmon (GSP) modes excited by swift electrons in nanometre-wide gaps. We reveal the resonance behaviour associated with the excitation of the antisymmetric GSP mode for extremely small gap widths, down to ~5...... mode exploited in plasmonic waveguides with extreme light confinement is a very important factor that should be taken into account in the design of nanoplasmonic circuits and devices....

  6. Controlling multipolar surface plasmon excitation through the azimuthal phase structure of electron vortex beams

    Ugarte, Daniel; Ducati, Caterina

    2016-05-01

    We have theoretically studied how the azimuthal phase structure of an electron vortex beam excites surface plasmons on metal particles of different geometries as observed in electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). We have developed a semiclassical approximation combining a ring-shaped beam and the dielectric formalism. Our results indicate that for the case of total orbital angular momentum transfer, we can manipulate surface plasmon multipole excitation and even attain an enhancement factor of several orders of magnitude. Since electron vortex beams interact with particles mostly through effects due to azimuthal symmetry, i.e., in the plane perpendicular to the electron beam, anisotropy information (longitudinal and transversal) of the sample may be derived in EELS studies by comparing nonvortex and vortex beam measurements.

  7. Phonon soft modes and damage production by high electronic excitations in pure metals

    It is now well known that during high-energy heavy-ion irradiation, the very high-energy deposition in electronic excitation induces a spectacular damage creation in some types of metallic targets. A selected number of pure metals has been irradiated by GeV ions in order to test some possible criteria which might be pertinent to explain such effects: electron-phonon interaction, electrical conductivity, existence of various allotropic phases,... The present results show that the latter criterion or more precisely that the existence of a displacive transformation associated with a soft mode in the phonon spectrum seems to favour efficient energy transfers between highly excited electrons and target atoms. For titanium targets, electron microscopy observations show striations which are parallel to the incident ion beam direction

  8. The particle-hole map: a computational tool to visualize electronic excitations

    Li, Yonghui

    2015-01-01

    We introduce the particle-hole map (PHM), a visualization tool to analyze electronic excitations in molecules in the time or frequency domain, to be used in conjunction with time-dependent density-functional theory (TDDFT) or other ab initio methods. The purpose of the PHM is to give detailed insight into electronic excitation processes which is not obtainable from local visualization methods such as transition densities, density differences, or natural transition orbitals. The PHM is defined as a nonlocal function of two spatial variables and provides information about the origins, destinations, and connections of charge fluctuations during an excitation process; it is particularly valuable to analyze charge-transfer excitonic processes. In contrast with the transition density matrix, the PHM has a statistical interpretation involving joint probabilities of individual states and their transitions, it satisfies several sum rules and exact conditions, and it is easier to read and interpret. We discuss and illu...

  9. Hydrogen transfer in excited pyrrole-ammonia clusters

    David, O.; Dedonder-Lardeux, C.; Jouvet, C.; Kang, H.; Martrenchard, S.; Ebata, T.; Sobolewski, A. L.

    2004-06-01

    The excited state hydrogen atom transfer reaction (ESHT) has been studied in pyrrole-ammonia clusters [PyH-(NH3)n+hν→Py•+•NH4(NH3)n-1]. The reaction is clearly evidenced through two-color R2P1 experiments using delayed ionization and presents a threshold around 235 nm (5.3 eV). The cluster dynamics has also been explored by picosecond time scale experiments. The clusters decay in the 10-30 ps range with lifetimes increasing with the cluster size. The appearance times for the reaction products are similar to the decay times of the parent clusters. Evaporation processes are also observed in competition with the reaction, and the cluster lifetime after evaporation is estimated to be around 10 ns. The kinetic energy of the reaction products is fairly large and the energy distribution seems quasi mono kinetic. These experimental results rule out the hypothesis that the reaction proceeds through a direct N-H bond rupture but rather imply the existence of a fairly long-lived intermediate state. Calculations performed at the CASSCF/CASMP2 level confirm the experimental observations, and provide some hints regarding the reaction mechanism.

  10. Nuclear excitation in positron-K-electron annihilation

    Kaliman, Z.; Pisk, K.; Logan, B.A.

    1987-05-01

    We have calculated the cross section for nuclear excitation during positron-K-electron annihilation. The calculations allow for the effect of the nuclear Coulomb field and for relativistic effects. The results are compared to earlier predictions which were derived using the Born approximation, and to renormalized Born approximation predictions. Our calculated cross sections are well below the available experimental values.

  11. Investigations of ultrafast dynamics in electronically excited alkylbenzenes

    Maksyutenko P.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available We investigate ultrafast dynamics in electronically excited states of some typical alkylbenzenes by time-resolved two-colour four wave mixing and velocity map imaging as complementary methods. In this context an upgraded double-sided time-resolved velocity map imaging setup is also proposed.

  12. Electron excitation after plasmon decay in proton-aluminum collisions

    When a projectile travels inside a metal, it interacts with the electron gas, producing both binary and collective excitations (plasmons). Within the nearly-free-electron-gas scheme, Roesler and co-workers showed that plasmons decay in first order and a conduction electron is emitted (interband transition). Working within the frame of atomic collisions, we develop a simple model to describe this decay. The first-order Born expansion is used to approximate the electron wave functions. The influence of the lattice potential on the excited electron is considered in the calculations in order to balance the momentum-conservation equation. It gives contributions associated with sites of the reciprocal lattice. The potential expansion coefficients are obtained following Animalu and co-workers [Philos. Mag. 9, 451 (1964)]. First- and second-differential spectra (in energy and angle) are analyzed discriminating contributions due to different lattice momenta. In all cases, contributions due to binary excitations of the valence electrons and inner-shell ionization are presented to establish a comparison

  13. Dissociative electron attachment to laser-excited benzene

    We have conducted comprehensive measurements on enhanced electron attachment to ArF and KrF laser-excited benzene in the presence of Ar and N2 buffer gases. At both these laser lines, two-photon absorption leads to excitation of benzene to energies above its ionization potential. Such excitations have been shown to lead to a population of long-lived, core-excited high-Rydberg states in addition to the ionization of the molecule. Present measurements on the dependence of negative ion yield on laser fluence, benzene pressure, and applied electric field verify that the observed negative ion formation is due to the attachment of the photoelectrons to the concomitantly produced high-Rydberg states. Using a rate equation analysis, the electron attachment rate constant for the core-excited Rydberg states was estimated to be of the order of 10-4-10-3 cm3 s-1. Laser photoionization cross sections were also estimated, and the cross section at the KrF laser line is in agreement (author)

  14. Electronic excitation processes in rare gas clusters studied by electron energy loss spectroscopy

    We present the electron energy loss spectra for Ar clusters as a function of incident electron energy and of cluster size. In spectra measured with 100 eV incident electron energy the bulk excitation peak becomes visible for a mean cluster size above 170 atoms per cluster. For 250 eV incident electron energy the bulk excitation peak is clearly observable even for a mean cluster size of 120 atoms per cluster. These experimental results are qualitatively reproduced by a simple calculation that accounts for the mean free path of electrons in Ar clusters; i.e., the penetration depth of incident electrons into the cluster.

  15. Excited-state kinetics of the carotenoid S//1 state in LHC II and two-photon excitation spectra of lutein and beta-carotene in solution Efficient Car S//1 yields Chl electronic energy transfer via hot S//1 states?

    Walla, P J; Linden, Patricia A; Ohta, Kaoru

    2002-01-01

    The excited-state dynamics of the carotenoids (Car) in light- harvesting complex II (LHC II) of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii were studied by transient absorption measurements. The decay of the Car S //1 population ranges from similar to 200 fs to over 7 ps, depending on the excitation and detection wavelengths. In contrast, a 200 fs Car S//1 yields Chlorophyll (Chl) energy transfer component was the dominant time constant for our earlier two-photon fluorescence up- conversion measurements (Walla, P.J. ; et al. J. Phys. Chem. B 2000, 104, 4799-4806). We also present the two-photon excitation (TPE) spectra of lutein and beta-carotene in solution and compare them with the TPE spectrum of LHC II. The TPE-spectrum of LHC II has an onset much further to the blue and a width that is narrower than expected from comparison to the S//1 fluorescence of lutein and beta-carotene in solution. Different environments may affect the shape of the S//1 spectrum significantly. To explain the blue shift of the TPE spectrum and the d...

  16. Photoinduced electron transfer in ordered polymers

    Jones, G. II.

    1991-12-01

    Long range photoinduced electron transfer between electron donor and acceptor groups is of considerable current interest in terms of strategies for artificial photosynthesis and studies regarding the redox properties of proteins. As part of an extensive study of long range electron transfer involving biopolymers, we have carried out this year investigations of the assembly of electron transfer agents in a system of model short peptides. Also studied is a polyelectrolyte that can adopt a helical conformation when electrostatically complexed with organic dye counter-ions. The principal interest in these systems has to do with the well ordered secondary structures adopted by peptide polymers, and the capabilities for synthetic modification of peptide side chains and end groups with chromophores or electroactive substituents. The present report gives a brief account of the following elements of work related to photochemical electron transfer themes: (1) the synthesis and photochemical characterization of chromophore-bound peptides and amino acid model compounds based on the amino acids, tryptophan and the spacer residue, alanine (Ala); (2) the study of binding of the cationic organic dye to a peptide electrolyte, for which cooperative dye loading and helix formation is important; and (3) completion of the synthesis of a new series of acridinium chromophores that have rod-like'' arrangements of inked aryl rings for assembly of electron donor-acceptor systems that will exhibit especially long lived charge separation.

  17. Dynamics of two-electron excitations in helium

    Excitation of both electrons in helium offers a unique window for studying electron correlation at the most basic level in an atom in which these two electrons and the nucleus form a three-body system. The authors utilized the first light available at the U-8 undulator-SGM monochromator beamline to investigate the dynamic parameters, partial cross sections, differential cross sections, and photoelectron angular distribution parameters (β), with a high resolving power for the photon beam and at the highly differential level afforded by the use of their electron spectrometer. In parallel, they carried out detailed calculations of the relevant properties by a theoretical approach that is based on the hyperspherical close-coupling method. Partial photoionization cross sections σn, and photoelectron angular distributions βn were measured for all possible final ionic states He+(n) in the region of the double excitations N(K,T)A up to the N=5 threshold. At a photon energy bandpass of 12 meV below the thresholds N=3, 4, and 5, this level of differentiation offers the most critical assessment of the dynamics of the two-electron excitations to date. The experimental data were seen to be very well described by the most advanced theoretical calculations

  18. Dynamics of two-electron excitations in helium

    Caldwell, C.D.; Menzel, A.; Frigo, S.P. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Excitation of both electrons in helium offers a unique window for studying electron correlation at the most basic level in an atom in which these two electrons and the nucleus form a three-body system. The authors utilized the first light available at the U-8 undulator-SGM monochromator beamline to investigate the dynamic parameters, partial cross sections, differential cross sections, and photoelectron angular distribution parameters ({beta}), with a high resolving power for the photon beam and at the highly differential level afforded by the use of their electron spectrometer. In parallel, they carried out detailed calculations of the relevant properties by a theoretical approach that is based on the hyperspherical close-coupling method. Partial photoionization cross sections {sigma}{sub n}, and photoelectron angular distributions {beta}{sub n} were measured for all possible final ionic states He{sup +}(n) in the region of the double excitations N(K,T){sup A} up to the N=5 threshold. At a photon energy bandpass of 12 meV below the thresholds N=3, 4, and 5, this level of differentiation offers the most critical assessment of the dynamics of the two-electron excitations to date. The experimental data were seen to be very well described by the most advanced theoretical calculations.

  19. Thermal emission of electrons from highly excited sodium clusters

    Schlipper, R.; Kusche, R.; Issendorff, B. v.; Haberland, H. [Freiburg Univ. (Germany). Fakultaet fuer Physik

    2001-03-01

    Positively charged sodium clusters can be easily ionized by a fs laser pulse of relatively low intensity (<10{sup 10} W/cm{sup 2}), if the laser is in resonance with the plasmon excitation of the cluster. This ionization process was investigated in detail by measuring the kinetic energy distribution of electrons emitted from a size-selected Na{sub 93}{sup +} as a function of the fs laser intensity. In all cases pure Boltzmann-like energy distributions were observed. A comparison with statistical theory shows that the emission is a purely thermal process. It is different to normal thermionic emission insofar as the electrons are emitted from a hot electron system which is only weakly coupled to a cold ionic background. The results demonstrate purely statistical behaviour of a small fermionic system even for very high excitation energy. (orig.)

  20. Electron excitation rates among fine structure levels in O III

    Electron collision strengths have been calculated for 146 transitions among the fine-structure levels in O III using a suitable transformation of LS coupling reactance matrix elements computed with the R-matrix method. These have been obtained at a fine energy grid in an energy region below 5.16 Ry and are found to be varying with electron energy, exhibiting a complicated resonance structure in almost the entire energy range. These have been averaged over a Maxwellian distribution of electron energies to get the effective collision strengths which are very simply related to the excitation and the de-excitation rate coefficients. The results are tabulated in a temperature region below 60,000 K. These are the first extensive results in the literature and are believed to be highly useful for astrophysical plasma diagnostics

  1. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He+2. The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He+2, which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD+ is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  2. Electron collisions and internal excitation in stored molecular ion beams

    Buhr, H.

    2006-07-26

    In storage ring experiments the role, which the initial internal excitation of a molecular ion can play in electron collisions, and the effect of these collisions on the internal excitation are investigated. Dissociative recombination (DR) and inelastic and super-elastic collisions are studied in the system of He{sup +}{sub 2}. The DR rate coefficient at low energies depends strongly on the initial vibrational excitation in this system. Therefore changes in the DR rate coefficient are a very sensitive probe for changes in the vibrational excitation in He{sup +}{sub 2}, which is used to investigate the effects of collisions with electrons and residual gas species. The low-energy DR of HD{sup +} is rich with resonances from the indirect DR process, when certain initial rotational levels in the molecular ion are coupled to levels in neutral Rydberg states lying below the ion state. Using new procedures for high-resolution electron-ion collision spectroscopy developed here, these resonances in the DR cross section can be measured with high energy sensitivity. This allows a detailed comparison with results of a MQDT calculation in an effort to assign some or all of the resonances to certain intermediate Rydberg levels. (orig.)

  3. Electron impact excitation of highly charged sodium-like ions

    Blaha, M.; Davis, J.

    1978-01-01

    Optical transition probabilities and electron collision strengths for Ca X, Fe XVI, Zn XX, Kr XXVI and Mo XXXII are calculated for transitions between n equal to 3 and n equal to 4 levels. The calculations neglect relativistic effects on the radial functions. A semi-empirical approach provides wave functions of the excited states; a distorted wave function without exchange is employed to obtain the excitation cross sections. The density dependence of the relative intensities of certain emission lines in the sodium isoelectronic sequence is also discussed.

  4. An RF excited plasma cathode electron beam gun design

    Del Pozo, S.; Ribton, C; Smith, DR

    2014-01-01

    A plasma cathode electron beam (EB) gun is presented in this work. A radio frequency (RF) excited plasma at 84 MHz was used as the electron source to produce a beam power of up to 3.2 kW at -60 kV accelerating voltage. The pressure in the plasma chamber is approximately 1 mbar. The electrons are extracted from the plasma chamber to the vacuum chamber (at 10-5 mbar) through a diaphragm with a 0.5 mm diameter nozzle. Advantages over thermionic cathode guns were demonstrated empirically. Mainten...

  5. Dynamics of the excited state intramolecular charge transfer

    The 6-dodecanoyl-2-dimethylaminonaphtalene (laurdan), a derivative of 6-propanoyl- 2-dimethylaminonaphthalene (prodan), has been used as a fluorescent probe in cell imaging, especially in visualizing the lipid rafts by the generalized polarization (GP) images, where GP=(I440-I490)/(I440+I490) with I being the fluorescence intensity. The fluorescence spectrum of laurdan is sensitive to its dipolar environment due to the intramolecular charge transfer (ICT) process in S1 state, which results in a dual emission from the locally excited (LE) and the ICT states. The ICT process and the solvation of the ICT state are very sensitive to the dipolar nature of the environment. In this work, the ICT of laurdan in ethanol has been studied by femtosecond time resolved fluorescence (TRF), especially TRF spectra measurement without the conventional spectral reconstruction method. TRF probes the excited states exclusively, a unique advantage over the pump/probe transient absorption technique, although time resolution of the TRF is generally lower than transient absorption and the TRF spectra measurement was possible only though the spectral reconstruction. Over the years, critical advances in TRF technique have been made in our group to achieve <50 fs time resolution with direct full spectra measurement capability. Detailed ICT and the subsequent solvation processes can be visualized unambiguously from the TRF spectra. Fig. 1 shows the TRF spectra of laurdan in ethanol at several time delays. Surprisingly, two bands at 433 and 476 nm are clearly visible in the TRF spectra of laurdan even at T = 0 fs. As time increases, the band at 476 nm shifts to the red while its intensity increases. The band at 433 nm also shifts slightly to the red, but loses intensity as time increases. The intensity of the 476 nm band reaches maximum at around 5 ps, where it is roughly twice as intense as that at 0 fs, and stays constant until lifetime decay is noticeable. The spectra were fit by two log

  6. Unusual distance dependences of electron transfer rates.

    Kuss-Petermann, Martin; Wenger, Oliver S

    2016-07-28

    Usually the rates for electron transfer (kET) decrease with increasing donor-acceptor distance, but Marcus theory predicts a regime in which kET is expected to increase when the transfer distance gets longer. Until recently, experimental evidence for such counter-intuitive behavior had been very limited, and consequently this effect is much less well-known than the Gaussian free energy dependence of electron transfer rates leading to the so-called inverted driving-force effect. This article presents the theoretical concepts that lead to the prediction of electron transfer rate maxima at large donor-acceptor distances, and it discusses conditions that are expected to favor experimental observations of such behavior. It continues with a consideration of specific recent examples in which electron transfer rates were observed to increase with increasing donor-acceptor distance, and it closes with a discussion of the importance of this effect in the context of light-to-chemical energy conversion. PMID:27353891

  7. Vibrational energy transfer in selectively excited diatomic molecules

    Single rovibrational states of HCl(v=2), HBr(v=2), DCl(v=2), and CO(v=2) were excited with a pulsed optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Total vibrational relaxation rates near - resonance quenchers were measured at 2950K using time resolved infrared fluorescence. These rates are attributed primarily to V - V energy transfer, and they generally conform to a simple energy gap law. A small deviation was found for the CO(v) + DCl(v') relaxation rates. Upper limits for the self relaxation by V - R,T of HCl(v=2) and HBr(v=2) and for the two quantum exchange between HCl and HBr were determined. The HF dimer was detected at 2950K and 30 torr HF pressure with an optoacoustic spectrometer using the OPO. Pulsed and chopped, resonant and non-resonant spectrophones are analyzed in detail. From experiments and first order perturbation theory, these V - V exchange rates appear to behave as a first order perturbation in the vibrational coordinates. The rotational dynamics are known to be complicated however, and the coupled rotational - vibrational dynamics were investigated theoreticaly in infinite order by the Dillon and Stephenson and the first Magnus approximations. Large ΔJ transitions appear to be important, but these calculations differ by orders of magnitude on specific rovibrational transition rates. Integration of the time dependent semiclassical equations by a modified Gordon method and a rotationally distorted wave approximation are discussed as methods which would treat the rotational motion more accurately. 225 references

  8. Is There a Linear Building Transfer Function for Small Excitation?

    Clinton, J. F.; Heaton, T. H.

    2003-12-01

    In the absence of actual building accelerometer data, the linear response of a structure to strong ground motion is estimated by the convolution of the dynamic response of the structure with an input ground motion. The input motion is usually provided by a local `reference' station record. In this study, we look at whether actual recorded ground motion at two instrumented buildings with well studied dynamic properties can be satisfactorily modeled using a local ground station. All stations record continuous 24-bit data streams on the CISN network, so analysis of a variety of weak earthquake motions, as well as ambient noise, is possible. Our buildings are the 9-story reinforced concrete Millikan Library (CISN Station MIK) and the 3-story braced steel frame Broad Center (CBC), both on the Caltech Campus. Motions recorded on their upper floors are compared with motions from ground stations located in the basement of a lightweight wood-frame house (GSA), and in a subsurface vault (CRP). All stations are within 200m of each other. Recent work using the new continuous datastream indicates that the natural frequencies of these structures can vary by up to 5% during normal ambient conditions, due to such factors as changing building usage, diurnal temperature variation, and wind/rainfall events. These shifts can be sudden, and models of building motions are sensitive to these previously un-documented changes. Further, during stronger motions, such as forced vibration testing, and minor earthquake shaking, natural frequencies are shown to drop by up to 10% (2003 M5.4 Big Bear Earthquake, Δ = 119km), with near-instantaneous recovery once the excitation is over. Moderate earthquakes can temporarily reduce frequencies by up to 30% with no apparent structural damage (1971 M6.6 San Fernando Earthquake, Δ = 31km). Post-event permanent reductions of about 10% have been observed. The ability to monitor these evolving dynamic characteristics makes a re-evaluation of the

  9. Electromicrobiology: Electron Transfer via Biowires in Nature and Practical Applications

    Lovley Derek

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most exciting developments in the field of electromicrobiology has been the discovery of electrically conductive pili (e-pili in Geobacter species that transport electrons with a metallic-like mechanism. The e-pili are essential for extracellular electron transport to Fe(III oxides and longrange electron transport through the conductive biofilms that form on the anodes of microbial fuel cells. The e-pili also facilitate direct interspecies electron transfer between Geobacter and Methanosaeta or Methanosarcina species. Metatranscriptomic studies have demonstrated that Geobacter/Methanosaeta DIET is an important process in anaerobic digesters converting brewery wastes to methane. Increasing e-pili expression through genetic modification of regulatory systems or adaptive evolution yields strains with enhanced rates of extracellular electron transfer. Measurement of the conductivity of individual e-pili has demonstrated that they have conductivities higher than those of a number of synthetic conducting organic polymers. Multiple lines of evidence have demonstrated that aromatic amino acids play an important role in the electron transport along e-pili, suggesting opportunities to tune e-pili conductivity via genetic manipulation of the amino acid composition of e-pili. It is expected that e-pili will be harnessed to improve microbe-electrode processes such as microbial electrosynthesis and for the development of novel biosensors. Also, e-pili show promise as a sustainable ‘green’ replacement for electronic materials that contain toxic components and/or are produced with harsh chemicals.

  10. The separation of vibrational coherence from ground- and excited-electronic states in P3HT film

    Song, Yin [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Hellmann, Christoph; Stingelin, Natalie [Department of Materials and Centre for Plastic Electronics, Imperial College London, South Kensington Campus, London SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); Scholes, Gregory D., E-mail: gscholes@princeton.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, 80 St. George Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Department of Chemistry, Princeton University, Washington Road, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States)

    2015-06-07

    Concurrence of the vibrational coherence and ultrafast electron transfer has been observed in polymer/fullerene blends. However, it is difficult to experimentally investigate the role that the excited-state vibrational coherence plays during the electron transfer process since vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states is usually temporally and spectrally overlapped. Here, we performed 2-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2D ES) measurements on poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) films. By Fourier transforming the whole 2D ES datasets (S(λ{sub 1},T{sup ~}{sub 2},λ{sub 3})) along the population time (T{sup ~}{sub 2}) axis, we develop and propose a protocol capable of separating vibrational coherence from the ground- and excited-electronic states in 3D rephasing and nonrephasing beating maps (S(λ{sub 1},ν{sup ~}{sub 2},λ{sub 3})). We found that the vibrational coherence from pure excited electronic states appears at positive frequency (+ν{sup ~}{sub 2}) in the rephasing beating map and at negative frequency (−ν{sup ~}{sub 2}) in the nonrephasing beating map. Furthermore, we also found that vibrational coherence from excited electronic state had a long dephasing time of 244 fs. The long-lived excited-state vibrational coherence indicates that coherence may be involved in the electron transfer process. Our findings not only shed light on the mechanism of ultrafast electron transfer in organic photovoltaics but also are beneficial for the study of the coherence effect on photoexcited dynamics in other systems.

  11. Defect production and annihilation in metals through electronic excitation by energetic heavy ion bombardment

    Iwase, Akihiro [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    Defect production, radiation annealing and defect recovery are studied in Ni and Cu irradiated with low-energy ({approx}1-MeV) and high-energy ({approx}100-MeV) ions. Irradiation of Ni with {approx}100-MeV ions causes an anomalous reduction, or even a complete disappearance of the stage-I recovery. This result shows that the energy transferred from excited electrons to lattice atoms through the electron-lattice interaction contributes to the annihilation of the stage-I interstitials. This effect is also observed in Ni as a large radiation annealing during 100-MeV heavy ion irradiation. On the other hand, in Cu thin foils, we find the defect production process strongly associated with electron excitation, where the defect production cross section is nearly proportional to S{sub e}{sup 2}. (author)

  12. Theoretical studies on the reaction pathways of electronically excited DAAF

    Quenneville, Jason M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Moore, David S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    The use of temporally and spectrally shaped ultrafast laser pulses to initiate, as well as detect, high explosives is being explored at Los Alamos. High level ab initio calculations, presented here, are employed to help guide and interpret the experiments. The ground and first excited electronic states of 3,3{prime}-diamino-4,4{prime}-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) are investigated using complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) and time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT). The geometrical and energetic character of the excited state minima, conical intersections and reaction pathways of DAAF are described. Two radiative and two non-radiative excited state population quenching mechanisms are outlined, and possible pathways for photochemical and spectroscopic control are discussed. The use of laser light to control chemical reactions has many applications. The initiation and the detection of explosives are two such applications currently under development at Los Alamos. Though inherently experimental, the project can be aided by theory through both prediction and interpretation. When the laser light is in the UV/visible region of the electromagnetic spectrum, the absorbing molecule is excited electronically and excitation decay may occur either radiatively (fluorescence or phosphorescence) or non-radiatively (through internal conversion). In many cases decay of the excitation occurs through a mixture of processes, and maximizing the desired result requires sophisticated laser pulses whose amplitude has been optimally modulated in time and/or frequency space. Control of cis-stilbene photochemistry was recently demonstrated in our group, and we aim to extend this work to high explosive compounds. Maximizing radiative decay leads to increased fluorescence quantum yields and enhances the possibility of spectral detection of the absorbing molecule. Maximizing non-radiative decay can lead to chemistry, heating of the sample and possibly detonation initiation in

  13. Facile Interfacial Electron Transfer of Hemoglobin

    Chunhai Fan; Shiping Song; Haiping Wu; Lihua Wang; Xiaofang Hu; Runguang Sun; Bo Zhou

    2005-01-01

    Abstract: We herein describe a method of depositing hemoglobin (Hb) and sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN) on GC electrodes that facilitate interfacial protein electron transfer. Well-defined, reproducible, chemically reversible peaks of Hb and SPAN can be obtained in our experiments. We also observed enhanced peroxidase activity of Hb in SPAN films. These results clearly showed that SPAN worked as molecular wires and effectively exchanged electrons between Hb and electrodes.Mediated by Conjugated...

  14. Facile Interfacial Electron Transfer of Hemoglobin

    Chunhai Fan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: We herein describe a method of depositing hemoglobin (Hb and sulfonated polyaniline (SPAN on GC electrodes that facilitate interfacial protein electron transfer. Well-defined, reproducible, chemically reversible peaks of Hb and SPAN can be obtained in our experiments. We also observed enhanced peroxidase activity of Hb in SPAN films. These results clearly showed that SPAN worked as molecular wires and effectively exchanged electrons between Hb and electrodes.Mediated by Conjugated Polymers

  15. Facilitating electron transfer in bioelectrocatalytic systems

    Sekretaryova, Alina

    2016-01-01

    Bioelectrocatalytic systems are based on biological entities, such as enzymes, whole cells, parts of cells or tissues, which catalyse electrochemical processes that involve the interaction between chemical change and electrical energy. In all cases, biocatalysis is implemented by enzymes, isolated or residing inside cells or part of cells. Electron transfer (ET) phenomena, within the protein molecules and between biological redox systems and electronics, enable the development of various bioe...

  16. Weakly coupled molecular photonic wires: synthesis and excited-state energy-transfer dynamics.

    Ambroise, Arounaguiry; Kirmaier, Christine; Wagner, Richard W; Loewe, Robert S; Bocian, David F; Holten, Dewey; Lindsey, Jonathan S

    2002-05-31

    Molecular photonic wires, which absorb light and undergo excited-state energy transfer, are of interest as biomimetic models for photosynthetic light-harvesting systems and as molecular devices with potential applications in materials chemistry. We describe the stepwise synthesis of four molecular photonic wires. Each wire consists of an input unit, transmission element, and output unit. The input unit consists of a boron-dipyrrin dye or a perylene-monoimide dye (linked either at the N-imide or the C9 position); the transmission element consists of one or three zinc porphyrins affording short or long wires, respectively; and the output unit consists of a free base (Fb) porphyrin. The components in the arrays are joined in a linear architecture via diarylethyne linkers (an ethynylphenyl linker is attached to the C9-linked perylene). The wires have been examined by static absorption, static fluorescence, and time-resolved absorption spectroscopy. Each wire (with the exception of the C9-linked perylene wire) exhibits a visible absorption spectrum that is the sum of the spectra of the component parts, indicating the relatively weak electronic coupling between the components. Excitation of each wire at the wavelength where the input unit absorbs preferentially (typically 480-520 nm) results in emission almost exclusively from the Fb porphyrin. The static emission and time-resolved data indicate that the overall rate constants and quantum efficiencies for end-to-end (i.e., input to output) energy transfer are as follows: perylene-(N-imide)-linked short wire, (33 ps)(-1) and >99%; perylene-(C9)-linked short wire, (26 ps)(-1) and >99%; boron-dipyrrin-based long wire, (190 ps)(-1) and 81%; perylene-(N-imide)-linked long wire, (175 ps)(-1) and 86%. Collectively, the studies provide valuable insight into the singlet-singlet excited-state energy-transfer properties in weakly coupled molecular photonic wires. PMID:12027698

  17. Vibrational relaxation pathways in the electronic excited state of carotenoid

    The intra- and inter-molecular vibrational relaxation in the electronic excited state (1Bu+) of spheroidene derivative (the number of conjugated double bonds, n=8) has been investigated at room temperature by means of femtosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy based on an optical-Kerr-gate technique. Depending on the photo-excitation either to the 1Bu+(v=1) or 1Bu+(v=2) vibronic level, remarkable differences were observed in hot luminescence spectra related to the vibrational relaxation process of high- and low-frequency modes. Under the excitation to the 1Bu+(v=2) state hot luminescence from the 1Bu+(v=1) state was observed as a dominant feature of the time-resolved spectra while the dynamic Stokes shift originating from the low-frequency-modes dynamics was clearly observed under the excitation to the 1Bu+(v=1). These observations of the excitation energy dependence of time-resolved fluorescence spectra were discussed by analyzing the Franck-Condon factors of transitions from v=0,1, and 2 levels of high-frequency modes

  18. Nuclear excitation by electronic transition of 235U

    Chodash, P. A.; Burke, J. T.; Norman, E. B.; Wilks, S. C.; Casperson, R. J.; Fisher, S. E.; Holliday, K. S.; Jeffries, J. R.; Wakeling, M. A.

    2016-03-01

    Background: Nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that can occur in isotopes containing a low-lying nuclear excited state. Over the past 40 yr, several experiments have attempted to measure NEET of 235U and those experiments have yielded conflicting results. Purpose: An experiment was performed to determine whether NEET of 235U occurs and to determine its excitation rate. Method: A pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm with a pulse energy of 790 mJ and a pulse width of 9 ns was used to generate a uranium plasma. The plasma was collected on a catcher plate and electrons from the catcher plate were accelerated and focused onto a microchannel plate detector. An observation of a decay with a 26-min half-life would suggest the creation of Um235 and the possibility that NEET of 235U occurred. Results: A 26-min decay consistent with the decay of Um235 was not observed and there was no evidence that NEET occurred. An upper limit for the NEET rate of 235U was determined to be λNEETconfidence level of 68.3%. Conclusions: The upper limit determined from this experiment is consistent with most of the past measurements. Discrepancies between this experiment and past measurements can be explained by assuming that past experiments misinterpreted the data.

  19. Calculation of electron-impace excitation and ionization of atoms

    Over the last few years it has been the author's goal to develop a open-quotes completeclose quotes electron-atom scattering theory. For a given projectile energy such a theory would be able to correctly predict the major scattering processes. These include elastic, excitation, and ionization cross sections. The convergent close-coupling (CCC) approach is a candidate for such a theory. Hamiltonians in an orthogonal Laguerre basis. The usage of this basis ensures that open-quotes completenessclose quotes is approached as N is increased. The CCC method may be thought of as a more systematic implementation of pseudostate methods. Whereas the success of the close-coupling approach to the calculation of excitation cross sections has been demonstrated for many decades it has rarely been applied to the calculation of ionization processes. By demonstrating the ability to obtain accurate ionization cross sections simultaneously with excitation processes the CCC method appears to have fulfilled these goals. In the talk a general outline of the CCC method will be given and its recent applications to the measurements of electron-impact ionization and excitation of the ground state of helium discussed

  20. Electron transfer in dinucleoside phosphate anions

    The electron transfer reaction within various dinucleoside phosphate radical anions has been investigated by ESR spectroscopy and pulse radiolysis. In the ESR work electrons are produced by photolysis of K4Fe(CN)6 in a 12 M LiCl glass at 770K. Upon photobleaching the electrons react with the dinucleoside phosphate to form the anion radical. The anions of the four DNA nucleosides were also produced and their ESR spectra were appropriately weighted and summed by computer to simulate the spectra found for the dinucleoside phosphate anions. From the analysis the relative amounts of each of the nucleoside anions in the dinucleoside phosphate anion were determined. Evidence suggests the electron affinity of the pyrimidine bases are greater than the purine bases; however, the results are not sufficient to distinguish between the individual purine or pyrimidine. When dinucleoside phosphate anions containing thymidine are warmed, protonation occurs only on thymine to produce the well known ''thymyl'' spectrum. Pulse radiolysis experiments on individual nucleotides (TMP, dAMP), mixtures of these nucleotides and the dinucleoside phosphate, TdA, in aqueous solution at room temperature show that in the TdA anion electron transfer occurs from adenine to thymine, whereas no electron transfer is found for mixtures of individual nucleotides. Protonation is found to occur only on thymine in the TdA anion in agreement with the ESR results

  1. Dynamic correlation of photo-excited electrons: Anomalous levels induced by light–matter coupling

    Nonlinear light–matter coupling plays an important role in many aspects of modern physics, such as spectroscopy, photo-induced phase transition, light-based devices, light-harvesting systems, light-directed reactions and bio-detection. However, excited states of electrons are still unclear for nano-structures and molecules in a light field. Our studies unexpectedly present that light can induce anomalous levels in the electronic structure of a donor–acceptor nanostructure with the help of the photo-excited electrons transferring dynamically between the donor and the acceptor. Furthermore, the physics underlying is revealed to be the photo-induced dynamical spin–flip correlation among electrons. These anomalous levels can significantly enhance the electron current through the nanostructure. These findings are expected to contribute greatly to the understanding of the photo-excited electrons with dynamic correlations, which provides a push to the development and application of techniques based on photosensitive molecules and nanostructures, such as light-triggered molecular devices, spectroscopic analysis, bio-molecule detection, and systems for solar energy conversion.

  2. Electronic Excitation Temperature in DC Positive Streamer Discharge

    WANG Xiaochen; WANG Ninghui; DING Zhenfeng

    2007-01-01

    The electronic excitation temperature in a direct current positive streamer discharge based on ultra-thin sheet electrodes was measured by optical emission spectrometry in order to deposit materials for potential future applications. It was remarkable that the electronic excitation temperature (Texc) did not vary monotonically with the discharge current, but demonstrated a peak at a certain position. In a mixture of oxygen and argon (80% oxygen), the maximum Texc reached about 6300 K at an average current of 600 μA. Both the positive ions accumulation in the discharge region and the increase of the local temperature around the streamer channel caused by Joule heating are considered to be the main reasons for the variations of Texc.

  3. Electron densities and the excitation of CN in molecular clouds

    Black, John H.; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.

    1991-01-01

    In molecular clouds of modest density and relatively high fractional ionization, the rotational excitation of CN is controlled by a competition among electron impact, neutral impact and the interaction with the cosmic background radiation. The degree of excitation can be measured through optical absorption lines and millimeter-wave emission lines. The available, accurate data on CN in diffuse and translucent molecular clouds are assembled and used to determine electron densities. The derived values, n(e) = roughly 0.02 - 0.5/cu cm, imply modest neutral densities, which generally agree well with determinations by other techniques. The absorption- and emission-line measurements of CN both exclude densities higher than n(H2) = roughly 10 exp 3.5/cu cm on scales varying from 0.001 to 60 arcsec in these clouds.

  4. The role of electron-impact vibrational excitation in electron transport through gaseous tetrahydrofuran

    Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Do, T. P. T. [School of Education, Can Tho University, Campus II, 3/2 Street, Xuan Khanh, Ninh Kieu, Can Tho City (Viet Nam); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D. [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville (Australia); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jones, D. B., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia)

    2015-03-28

    In this paper, we report newly derived integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact vibrational excitation of tetrahydrofuran (THF) at intermediate impact energies. These cross sections extend the currently available data from 20 to 50 eV. Further, they indicate that the previously recommended THF ICS set [Garland et al., Phys. Rev. A 88, 062712 (2013)] underestimated the strength of the electron-impact vibrational excitation processes. Thus, that recommended vibrational cross section set is revised to address those deficiencies. Electron swarm transport properties were calculated with the amended vibrational cross section set, to quantify the role of electron-driven vibrational excitation in describing the macroscopic swarm phenomena. Here, significant differences of up to 17% in the transport coefficients were observed between the calculations performed using the original and revised cross section sets for vibrational excitation.

  5. Photoinduced electron transfer in ordered polymers

    Jones, G. II.

    1990-10-20

    Photochemical studies on organic polymers or biopolymers (particularly synthetic peptides) that have been modified by covalent attachment (or other means of binding) of organic chromophores and electron transfer agents are described. Specific projects involve are: peptide conjugates bearing electroactive residues such as tryptophan and specifically labeled at the N- or C-terminus of peptide chains; the electrostatic binding of organic dyes to poly-electrolytes (polyacrylates) for which the formation of dimeric aggregates of bound dye that display unusual photophysical and electron transfer properties is important; a study of the binding of dyes and electron transfer agents to the protein mimic,'' polyvinyl-2-pyrrolidinone (PVP), in hydrophobic domains that depend on specific H-bond interaction; and completion of an earlier study having to do with the triplet state properties of charge-transfer (CT) complexes of a high potential quinone and various electron donors (investigation of the properties of triplet (contact) radical-ion pairs). 13 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Quantum effects in biological electron transfer

    de la Lande, A.; Babcock, N. S.; Řezáč, Jan; Levy, B.; Sanders, B. C.; Salahub, D.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 17 (2012), s. 5902-5918. ISSN 1463-9076 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : electron transfer * tunnelling * decoherence * semi-classical molecular dynamics * density functional theory Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.829, year: 2012

  7. Syntheses and excitation transfer studies of near-orthogonal free-base porphyrin-ruthenium phthalocyanine dyads and pentad.

    Jacobs, Rachel; Stranius, Kati; Maligaspe, Eranda; Lemmetyinen, Helge; Tkachenko, Nikolai V; Zandler, Melvin E; D'Souza, Francis

    2012-03-19

    A new series of molecular dyads and pentad featuring free-base porphyrin and ruthenium phthalocyanine have been synthesized and characterized. The synthetic strategy involved reacting free-base porphyrin functionalized with one or four entities of phenylimidazole at the meso position of the porphyrin ring with ruthenium carbonyl phthalocyanine followed by chromatographic separation and purification of the products. Excitation transfer in these donor-acceptor polyads (dyad and pentad) is investigated in nonpolar toluene and polar benzonitrile solvents using both steady-state and time-resolved emission techniques. Electrochemical and computational studies suggested that the photoinduced electron transfer is a thermodynamically unfavorable process in nonpolar media but may take place in a polar environment. Selective excitation of the donor, free-base porphyrin entity, resulted in efficient excitation transfer to the acceptor, ruthenium phthalocyanine, and the position of imidazole linkage on the free-base porphyrin could be used to tune the rates of excitation transfer. The singlet excited Ru phthalocyanine thus formed instantly relaxed to the triplet state via intersystem crossing prior to returning to the ground state. Kinetics of energy transfer (k(ENT)) was monitored by performing transient absorption and emission measurements using pump-probe and up-conversion techniques in toluene, respectively, and modeled using a Förster-type energy transfer mechanism. Such studies revealed the experimental k(ENT) values on the order of 10(10)-10(11) s(-1), which readily agreed with the theoretically estimated values. Interestingly, in polar benzonitrile solvent, additional charge transfer interactions in the case of dyads but not in the case of pentad, presumably due to the geometry/orientation consideration, were observed. PMID:22390175

  8. Quantum mechanical study of the coupling of plasmon excitations to atomic-scale electron transport

    The coupling of optical excitation and electron transport through a sodium atom in a plasmonic dimer junction is investigated using time-dependent density functional theory. The optical absorption and dynamic conductance is determined as a function of gap size. Surface plasmons are found to couple to atomic-scale transport through several different channels including dipolar, multipolar, and charge transfer plasmon modes. These findings provide insight into subnanoscale couplings of plasmons and atoms, a subject of general interest in plasmonics and molecular electronics.

  9. Theory of nuclear excitation by electron capture for heavy ions

    Gagyi-Palffy, A.

    2006-07-01

    The resonant process of nuclear excitation by electron capture (NEEC) in collisions involving highly-charged ions has been investigated theoretically. NEEC is a rare recombination process in which a free electron is captured into a bound shell of an ion with the simultaneous excitation of the nucleus. Total cross sections for NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the excited nucleus are presented for various collision systems. The possibility to observe the NEEC in scattering experiments with trapped or stored ions was discussed focusing on the cases with the largest calculated resonance strength. As the photons emitted in different channels of the electron recombination process are indistinguishable in the total cross section, the interference between NEEC followed by the radiative decay of the nucleus and radiative recombination was investigated. The angular distribution of the emitted photons in the recombination process provides means to discern the two processes. Angular differential cross sections for the emitted photons in the case of E2 nuclear transitions were presented for several heavy elements. (orig.)

  10. Ultrafast Structural Dynamics of Tertiary Amines upon Electronic Excitation

    Cheng, Xinxin; Minitti, Michael P.; Deb, Sanghamitra; Zhang, Yao; Budarz, James; Weber, Peter M.

    2011-06-01

    The structural response of several tertiary amines to electronic excitation has been investigated using Rydberg Fingerprint Spectroscopy. The 3p Rydberg states are reached by excitation with a 5.93 eV photon while 3s states are populated by electronic relaxation from 3p state. We observe binding energy shifts on ultrafast time scales in all peaks that reflect the structural change of the molecular ion cores. The shifts are in the range of 15 meV to 30 meV, within time scales of less than 500 fs, depending on the specific molecular systems and the nature of the electronic state. In cases where the p states are spectrally separate, the trends of the energy shifts are different for the p_z and p_x_y Rydberg states whereas the p_z and s states are similar. This suggests that the response of the Rydberg states to structural displacements depends on the symmetry. Very fast binding energy shifts, observed on sub-picosecond time scales, are attributed to the structural adjustment from a pyramidal to a planar structure upon Rydberg excitation. The quantitative values of the binding energy shifts can also be affected by laser chirp, which we model using simulations.

  11. Excitation transfer pathways in excitonic aggregates revealed by the stochastic Schrödinger equation

    Abramavicius, Vytautas, E-mail: vytautas.ab@gmail.com; Abramavicius, Darius, E-mail: darius.abramavicius@ff.vu.lt [Faculty of Physics, Department of Theoretical Physics, Vilnius University, Saulėtekio 9, LT-10222 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2014-02-14

    We derive the stochastic Schrödinger equation for the system wave vector and use it to describe the excitation energy transfer dynamics in molecular aggregates. We suggest a quantum-measurement based method of estimating the excitation transfer time. Adequacy of the proposed approach is demonstrated by performing calculations on a model system. The theory is then applied to study the excitation transfer dynamics in a photosynthetic pigment-protein Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) aggregate using both the Debye spectral density and the spectral density obtained from earlier molecular dynamics simulations containing strong vibrational high-frequency modes. The obtained results show that the excitation transfer times in the FMO system are affected by the presence of the vibrational modes; however, the transfer pathways remain the same.

  12. Excitation transfer pathways in excitonic aggregates revealed by the stochastic Schr\\"odinger equation

    Abramavicius, Vytautas

    2014-01-01

    We derive the stochastic Schr\\"odinger equation for the system wave vector and use it to describe the excitation energy transfer dynamics in molecular aggregates. We suggest a quantum-measurement based method of estimating the excitation transfer time. Adequacy of the proposed approach is demonstrated by performing calculations on a model system. The theory is then applied to study the excitation transfer dynamics in a photosynthetic pigment-protein Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) aggregate using both the Debye spectral density and the spectral density obtained from earlier molecular dynamics simulations containing strong vibrational high-frequency modes. The obtained results show that the excitation transfer times in the FMO system are affected by the presence of the vibrational modes, however the transfer pathways remain the same.

  13. Nanosecond length electron pulses from a laser-excited photocathode

    A photocathode made from polycrystalline lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) has produced nanosecond length electron pulses when excited by an excimer laser at 308nm. Peak currents in excess of 1A have been observed, with quantum yields of 4 x 10-5 being measured. A method for extracting the electrons from an emission-limited cathode, plasma extraction, has been demonstrated. This technique uses a low power continuous discharge to provide the electric field needed to extract the photoelectrons. This technique may be useful in producing high repetition rate short pulse ion sources. 10 refs., 4 figs

  14. Double-atom excitation in heavy-particle collisions induced by the electron-electron interaction

    We present an analytical method for rapid calculation of matrix elements for double-atom excitation induced by the electron-electron interaction. The method is applied to calculation of probabilities and cross sections for double-atom n = 2 excitation in H(1s)-H(1s) and various A(Zp-1)+(1s)-H(1s) collisions at intermediate and high projectile energies. Based on first-order perturbation theory an empirical scaling rule for the double-atom excitation cross sections is derived. The calculated cross sections are shown to be in good agreement with this scaling relation. (author)

  15. Electron attachment to excited states of silane: Implications for plasma processing discharges

    Observation of enhanced negative-ion formation in ArF endash excimer endash laser irradiated silane was reported in a recent paper [L. A. Pinnaduwage, M. Z. Martin, and L. G. Christophorou, Appl. Phys. Lett. 65, 2571 (1994)]. In that paper, preliminary evidence was presented to show that highly excited electronic states of silane or its photofragments could be responsible for the observed enhanced negative-ion formation. In the present paper, we report evidence, obtained using a new experimental technique, that the electron attaching species are high-Rydberg (HR) states of silane indirectly populated via laser irradiation and show that an absolute lower bound for the corresponding electron attachment rate constant is ∼4x10-7cm3s-1. The initial capture of the electron by the HR states is likely to be a diabatic process and the large polarizabilities associated with the HR states appear to be responsible for the observed large electron attachment rate constants. We also measured electron attachment to thermally excited vibrational states of the ground electronic state of silane, which showed no measurable electron attachment up to 750 K. Implications of these observations in modeling of silane discharges used for plasma processing of amorphous silicon are discussed. It is also pointed out that large negative ion formation observed in many open-quotes weakly electronegativeclose quotes plasma processing gas discharges could be due to enhanced electron attachment to HR states: such states could be populated via direct electron impact and/or via excitation transfer from the metastable states of rare gases that are commonly used in these processing discharges. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  16. Attosecond dynamics of electron correlation in doubly excited atomic states

    We have solved the time-dependent Schroedinger equation describing the simultaneous interaction of the He 1s2s 1S state with two laser-generated pulses of trapezoidal or Gaussian shape, of duration 86 fs and of frequencies ω1=1.453 au and ω2=1.781 au. The system is excited to the energy region of two strongly correlated doubly excited states, chosen for this study according to specific criteria. It is demonstrated quantitatively that, provided one focuses on the dynamics occurring within the attosecond timescale, the corresponding orbital configurations, 2s2p and 2p3d 1P0, exist as nonstationary states, with occupation probabilities that are oscillating as the states decay exponentially into the 1sεp continuum, during and after the laser-atom interaction. It follows that it is feasible to probe by attosecond pulses the motion of configurations of electrons as they correlate via the total Hamiltonian. For the particular system studied here, the probe pulses could register the oscillating doubly excited configurations by de-exciting to the He 1s3d 1D state, which emits at 6680 A. (author). Letter-to-the-editor

  17. Strong monopole electron-collisional excitation in highly stripped ions

    The collision strengths for electric monopole collisional excitation of the outermost subshell of highly stripped closed-shell ions are examined and found to scale nearly hydrogenically. The collision strength near threshold for the principal monopole excitation process (in the distorted-wave approximation) is written as Ω(Z) = ξ/sub n//sub l/(Z)eta/sub nl/(Z)N/sub nl/I/sub H//ΔE(Z), where ξ/sub n//sub l/(Z) is near 0.3, 0.5, and 0.6 for the He-like (1s--2s), Ne-like (2p--3p), and Ni-like (3d--4d) sequences, respectively, and where eta/sub n//sub l/(Z) accounts for mixing effects and is near unity at low Z. The excitation process in nickel-like ions is more effective per electron than for neonlike ions and is favorable to the development of x-ray lasers below 44 A. The extension of the monopole excitation scheme to Nd-like ions appears very attractive for longer wavelengths

  18. Complete Solution of Electronic Excitation and Ionization in Electron-Hydrogen Molecule Scattering

    Zammit, Mark C.; Savage, Jeremy S.; Fursa, Dmitry V.; Bray, Igor

    2016-06-01

    The convergent close-coupling method has been used to solve the electron-hydrogen molecule scattering problem in the fixed-nuclei approximation. Excellent agreement with experiment is found for the grand total, elastic, electronic-excitation, and total ionization cross sections from the very low to the very high energies. This shows that for the electronic degrees of freedom the method provides a complete treatment of electron scattering on molecules as it does for atoms.

  19. Absolute cross sections for electronic excitation of pyrimidine by electron impact

    Regeta, Khrystyna; Allan, Michael [Department of Chemistry, University of Fribourg, Chemin du Musée 9, CH-1700 Fribourg (Switzerland); Mašín, Zdeněk [Max-Born Institute for Nonlinear Optics and Short Pulse Spectroscopy, Max-Born-Straße 2A, 12489 Berlin (Germany); Gorfinkiel, Jimena D. [Department of Physical Sciences, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom)

    2016-01-14

    We measured differential cross sections for electron-impact electronic excitation of pyrimidine, both as a function of electron energy up to 18 eV, and of scattering angle up to 180°. The emphasis of the present work is on recording detailed excitation functions revealing resonances in the excitation process. The differential cross sections were summed to obtain integral cross sections. These are compared to results of R-matrix calculations, which successfully reproduce both the magnitude of the cross section and the major resonant features. Comparison of the experiment to the calculated contributions of different symmetries to the integral cross section permitted assignment of several features to specific core-excited resonances. Comparison of the resonant structure of pyrimidine with that of benzene revealed pronounced similarities and thus a dominant role of π–π{sup ∗} excited states and resonances. Electron energy loss spectra were measured as a preparation for the cross section measurements and vibrational structure was observed for some of the triplet states. A detailed analysis of the electronic excited states of pyrimidine is also presented.

  20. Excitation of plasmonic nanoantennas by nonresonant and resonant electron tunnelling

    Uskov, Alexander V.; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Protsenko, Igor E.; Smetanin, Igor V.; Bouhelier, Alexandre

    2016-07-01

    A rigorous theory of photon emission generated by inelastic electron tunnelling inside the gap of plasmonic nanoantennas is developed. The disappointingly low efficiency of the electrical excitation of surface plasmon polaritons in these structures can be increased by orders of magnitude when a resonant tunnelling structure is incorporated inside the gap. A resonant tunnelling assisted surface plasmon emitter may become a key element in future electrically-driven plasmonic nanocircuits.A rigorous theory of photon emission generated by inelastic electron tunnelling inside the gap of plasmonic nanoantennas is developed. The disappointingly low efficiency of the electrical excitation of surface plasmon polaritons in these structures can be increased by orders of magnitude when a resonant tunnelling structure is incorporated inside the gap. A resonant tunnelling assisted surface plasmon emitter may become a key element in future electrically-driven plasmonic nanocircuits. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Plasmonic mode in nanowires, the probability of stimulated emission in tunnelling through the Fermi's Golden Rule and electron wave functions in tunnelling structures with nonresonant and resonant tunnelling. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr01931e

  1. Electric dipole excitation of 208Pb by polarized electron impact

    The cross sections and spin asymmetries for the excitation of 1- states in 208Pb by transversely polarized electrons with collision energy of 30-180MeV have been examined within the DWBA scattering formalism. As examples, we have considered a low-lying 1- state and also states belonging to the pygmy dipole and giant dipole resonances. The structure of these states and their corresponding transition charge and current densities have been taken from an RPA calculation within the quasiparticle phonon model. The complex-plane rotation method has been applied to achieve the convergence of the radial DWBA integrals for backward scattering. We have studied the behaviour of the cross sections and spin asymmetries as a function of electron energy and scattering angle. The role of the longitudinal and transversal contributions to the excitation has been thoroughly studied. We conclude that the spin asymmetry S, related to unpolarized outgoing electrons, is mostly well below 1% even at the backward scattering angles and its measurement provides a challenge for future experiments with polarized electrons. (orig.)

  2. Hot electron mediated desorption rates calculated from excited state potential energy surfaces

    Olsen, Thomas; Schiøtz, Jakob

    2008-01-01

    We present a model for Desorption Induce by (Multiple) Electronic Transitions (DIET/DIMET) based on potential energy surfaces calculated with the Delta Self-Consistent Field extension of Density Functional Theory. We calculate potential energy surfaces of CO and NO molecules adsorbed on various transition metal surfaces, and show that classical nuclear dynamics does not suffice for propagation in the excited state. We present a simple Hamiltonian describing the system, with parameters obtained from the excited state potential energy surface, and show that this model can describe desorption dynamics in both the DIET and DIMET regime, and reproduce the power law behavior observed experimentally. We observe that the internal stretch degree of freedom in the molecules is crucial for the energy transfer between the hot electrons and the molecule when the coupling to the surface is strong.

  3. Energy shift of collective electron excitations in highly corrugated graphitic nanostructures: Experimental and theoretical investigation

    Sedelnikova, O. V., E-mail: o.sedelnikova@gmail.com; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Science, 3 Acad. Lavrentiev Ave., Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogov Str., Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University, 36 Lenina Ave., Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation); Asanov, I. P. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Science, 3 Acad. Lavrentiev Ave., Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, 2 Pirogov Str., Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Yushina, I. V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Siberian Branch of Russian Academy of Science, 3 Acad. Lavrentiev Ave., Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2014-04-21

    Effect of corrugation of hexagonal carbon network on the collective electron excitations has been studied using optical absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy in conjunction with density functional theory calculations. Onion-like carbon (OLC) was taken as a material, where graphitic mantle enveloping agglomerates of multi-shell fullerenes is strongly curved. Experiments showed that positions of π and π + σ plasmon modes as well as π → π* absorption peak are substantially redshifted for OLC as compared with those of highly ordered pyrolytic graphite and thermally exfoliated graphite consisted of planar sheets. This effect was reproduced in behavior of dielectric functions of rippled graphite models calculated within the random phase approximation. We conclude that the energy of electron excitations in graphitic materials could be precisely tuned by a simple bending of hexagonal network without change of topology. Moreover, our investigation suggests that in such materials optical exciton can transfer energy to plasmon non-radiatively.

  4. Electron energy distributions and excitation rates in high-frequency argon discharges

    The electron energy distribution functions and rate coefficients for excitation and ionisation in argon under the action of an uniform high-frequency electric field were calculated by numerically solving the homogeneous Boltzmann equation. Analytic calculations in the limiting cases ω>>νsub(c) and ω<<νsub(c), where ω is the wave angular frequency and νsub(c) is the electron-neutral collision frequency for momentum transfer, are also presented and shown to be in very good agreement with the numerical computations. The results reported here are relevant for the modelling of high-frequency discharges in argon and, in particular, for improving recent theoretical descriptions of a plasma column sustained by surface microwaves. The properties of surface wave produced plasmas make them interesting as possible substitutes for other more conventional plasma sources for such important applications as plasma chemistry laser excitation, plasma etching spectroscopic sources etc...

  5. Optogalvanic monitoring of collisional transfer of laser excitation energy in a neon RF plasma

    The optogalvanic signals produced by pulsed laser excitation of 1s5--2p8 and 1s5-2p9 (Paschen notation) transition by a ∼29 MHz radiofrequency (rf) discharge at ∼5 torr have been investigated. The optogalvanic signal produced by 1s5-2p9 excitations indicates that there is transfer of energy from the 2p9 state to some other state. The state to which this energy is transferred is believed to be mainly the 2p8 state because of the very small energy gap between the 2p9 and 2p8 states. To verify this transfer, the 1s5-2p8 transition was investigated. The similarity of the temporal profiles of the optogalvanic signals in both excitations confirms the collisional transfer of laser excitation energy from 2p9 to 2p8

  6. Dependence of the energy transfer to graphene on the excitation energy

    Fluorescence studies of natural photosynthetic complexes on a graphene layer demonstrate pronounced influence of the excitation wavelength on the energy transfer efficiency to graphene. Ultraviolet light yields much faster decay of fluorescence, with average efficiencies of the energy transfer equal to 87% and 65% for excitation at 405 nm and 640 nm, respectively. This implies that focused light changes locally the properties of graphene affecting the energy transfer dynamics, in an analogous way as in the case of metallic nanostructures. Demonstrating optical control of the energy transfer is important for exploiting unique properties of graphene in photonic and sensing architectures

  7. The role of electronic excitation in cold atom-ion chemistry

    Sullivan, Scott T.; Rellergert, Wade G.; Kotochigova, Svetlana; Hudson, Eric R.

    2012-01-01

    The role of electronic excitation in charge exchange chemical reactions between ultracold Ca atoms and Ba$^+$ ions, confined in a hybrid trap, is studied. This prototypical system is energetically precluded from reacting in its ground state, allowing a particularly simple interpretation of the influence of electronic excitation. It is found that while electronic excitation of the ion can critically influence the chemical reaction rate, electronic excitation of the neutral atom is less importa...

  8. Electron, Hole, Singlet, and Triplet Energy Transfer in Photoexcited Porphyrin-Naphthalenediimide Dyads.

    Yushchenko, Oleksandr; Hangarge, Rahul V; Mosquera-Vazquez, Sandra; Boshale, Sheshanath V; Vauthey, Eric

    2015-06-18

    The excited-state dynamics of two molecular dyads, consisting of zinc (1) and free-base (2) porphyrin connected via a peptide linker to a core-substituted naphthalenediimide (NDI) have been investigated using optical spectroscopy. These dyads exhibit rich photophysics because of the large number of electronic excited states below 3 eV. In the case of 1 in apolar solvents, excitation energy transfer from the vibrationally hot singlet excited porphyrin to the NDI takes place with a 500 fs time constant. Electronic energy ends up in the NDI-localized triplet state, which decays to the ground state on a microsecond timescale. In polar solvents, ground-state recovery is faster by 5 orders of magnitude because of the occurrence of charge separation followed by recombination. On the other hand, excitation energy transfer in 2 takes place in the opposite direction, namely from the NDI to the porphyrin, which then undergoes intersystem crossing to the triplet state, followed by triplet energy transfer back to the NDI. Therefore, four distinct local electronic excited states are consecutively populated after excitation of the NDI unit of 2, with the energy shuttling between the two ends of the dyad. PMID:25418961

  9. Electronic transfer between low-dimensional nanosystems

    Král, Karel

    Hoboken: Wiley, 2011 - (Nair, K.; Priya, S.; Jia, Q.), s. 33-40. (Ceramic Transactions. vol. 226). ISBN 9781118059999. [Materials Science and Technology meeting 2010 (MS&T'10). Dielectric Ceramic Materials and Electronic Devices.. Houston (US), 17.10.2010-21.10.2010] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) OC10007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100520 Keywords : electron transfer * nanostructures quantum dots Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism http://eu.wiley.com/WileyCDA/WileyTitle/productCd-1118059999,descCd-tableOfContents.html

  10. Vibration transfers to measure the performance of vibration isolated platforms on site using background noise excitation

    Segerink, F.B.; Korterik, J.P.; Offerhaus, H.L.

    2011-01-01

    This article demonstrates a quick and easy way of quantifying the performance of a vibration-isolated platform. We measure the vibration transfer from floor to table using background noise excitation from the floor. As no excitation device is needed, our setup only requires two identical sensors (in

  11. Electron transfer theory revisit: Quantum solvation effect

    Han, P; Cui, P; Mo, Y; He, G; Yan, Y J; Han, Ping; Xu, Rui-Xue; Cui, Ping; Mo, Yan; He, Guozhong; Yan, YiJing

    2006-01-01

    The effect of solvation on the electron transfer (ET) rate processes is investigated on the basis of the exact theory constructed in J. Phys. Chem. B Vol. 110, (2006); quant-ph/0604071. The nature of solvation is studied in a close relation with the mechanism of ET processes. The resulting Kramers' turnover and Marcus' inversion characteristics are analyzed accordingly. The classical picture of solvation is found to be invalid when the solvent longitudinal relaxation time is short compared with the inverse temperature.

  12. Electron Transfer Phenomena in Interfacial Bioelectrochemistry

    Baier, Claudia

    2011-01-01

    Biomolecules at the solid-liquid interface have been investigated using electrochemical measurement techniques such as cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical scanning probe microscopies. Structure and function of the biomolecules, depending on the electron transfer and the used electrode material could be studied down to a single molecule level. Besides investigating natural electroactive proteins, e.g. the metalloprotein azurin or the iron storage protein ferritin, a method has been develope...

  13. Computer simulation of electronic excitation in atomic collision cascades

    The impact of an keV atomic particle onto a solid surface initiates a complex sequence of collisions among target atoms in a near-surface region. The temporal and spatial evolution of this atomic collision cascade leads to the emission of particles from the surface - a process usually called sputtering. In modern surface analysis the so called SIMS technology uses the flux of sputtered particles as a source of information on the microscopical stoichiometric structure in the proximity of the bombarded surface spots. By laterally varying the bombarding spot on the surface, the entire target can be scanned and chemically analyzed. However, the particle detection, which bases upon deflection in electric fields, is limited to those species that leave the surface in an ionized state. Due to the fact that the ionized fraction of the total flux of sputtered atoms often only amounts to a few percent or even less, the detection is often hampered by rather low signals. Moreover, it is well known, that the ionization probability of emitted particles does not only depend on the elementary species, but also on the local environment from which a particle leaves the surface. Therefore, the measured signals for different sputtered species do not necessarily represent the stoichiometric composition of the sample. In the literature, this phenomenon is known as the Matrix Effect in SIMS. In order to circumvent this principal shortcoming of SIMS, the present thesis develops an alternative computer simulation concept, which treats the electronic energy losses of all moving atoms as excitation sources feeding energy into the electronic sub-system of the solid. The particle kinetics determining the excitation sources are delivered by classical molecular dynamics. The excitation energy calculations are combined with a diffusive transport model to describe the spread of excitation energy from the initial point of generation. Calculation results yield a space- and time-resolved excitation

  14. Computer simulation of electronic excitation in atomic collision cascades

    Duvenbeck, A.

    2007-04-05

    The impact of an keV atomic particle onto a solid surface initiates a complex sequence of collisions among target atoms in a near-surface region. The temporal and spatial evolution of this atomic collision cascade leads to the emission of particles from the surface - a process usually called sputtering. In modern surface analysis the so called SIMS technology uses the flux of sputtered particles as a source of information on the microscopical stoichiometric structure in the proximity of the bombarded surface spots. By laterally varying the bombarding spot on the surface, the entire target can be scanned and chemically analyzed. However, the particle detection, which bases upon deflection in electric fields, is limited to those species that leave the surface in an ionized state. Due to the fact that the ionized fraction of the total flux of sputtered atoms often only amounts to a few percent or even less, the detection is often hampered by rather low signals. Moreover, it is well known, that the ionization probability of emitted particles does not only depend on the elementary species, but also on the local environment from which a particle leaves the surface. Therefore, the measured signals for different sputtered species do not necessarily represent the stoichiometric composition of the sample. In the literature, this phenomenon is known as the Matrix Effect in SIMS. In order to circumvent this principal shortcoming of SIMS, the present thesis develops an alternative computer simulation concept, which treats the electronic energy losses of all moving atoms as excitation sources feeding energy into the electronic sub-system of the solid. The particle kinetics determining the excitation sources are delivered by classical molecular dynamics. The excitation energy calculations are combined with a diffusive transport model to describe the spread of excitation energy from the initial point of generation. Calculation results yield a space- and time-resolved excitation

  15. Electronically excited rubidium atom in a helium cluster or film

    Leino, Markku; Viel, Alexandra; Zillich, Robert E.

    2008-11-01

    We present theoretical studies of helium droplets and films doped with one electronically excited rubidium atom Rb∗ (P2). Diffusion and path integral Monte Carlo approaches are used to investigate the energetics and the structure of clusters containing up to 14 helium atoms. The surface of large clusters is approximated by a helium film. The nonpair additive potential energy surface is modeled using a diatomic in molecule scheme. Calculations show that the stable structure of Rb∗Hen consists of a seven helium atom ring centered at the rubidium, surrounded by a tirelike second solvation shell. A very different structure is obtained when performing a "vertical Monte Carlo transition." In this approach, a path integral Monte Carlo equilibration starts from the stable configuration of a rubidium atom in the electronic ground state adsorbed to the helium surface after switching to the electronically excited surface. In this case, Rb∗Hen relaxes to a weakly bound metastable state in which Rb∗ sits in a shallow dimple. The interpretation of the results is consistent with the recent experimental observations [G. Auböck et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 035301 (2008)].

  16. Compilation of electron collision excitation cross sections for neutro argon

    The present work presents a compilation and critical analysis of the available data on electron collision excitation cross sections for neutral Argon levels. This study includes: 1.- A detailed description in intermediate coupling for all the levels belonging the 20 configurations 3p''5 ns(n=4 to 12), np(n=4 to 8) and nd(n=3 to 8) of neutral Argon. 2.- Calculation of the electron collision excitation cross sections in Born and Born-Oppenheimer-Ochkur approximations for all the levels in the 14 configurations 3p''5 ns(n=4 to 7), np(n=4 to 7) and nd(n=3 to 8). 3.- Comparison and discussion of the compiled data. These are the experimental and theoretical values available from the literature, and those from this work. 4.- Analysis of the regularities and systematic behaviors in order to determine which values can be considered more reliable. It is show that the concept of one electron cross section results quite useful for this purpose. In some cases it has been possible to obtain in this way approximate analytical expressions interpolating the experimental data. 5.- All the experimental and theoretical values studied are graphically presented and compared. 6.- The last part of the work includes a listing of several general purpose programs for Atomic Physics calculations developed for this work. (Author)

  17. Effect of Electronic Excitation on Thin Film Growth

    Elsayed-Ali, Hani E. [Old Dominion University

    2011-01-31

    The effect of nanosecond pulsed laser excitation on surface diffusion during growth of Ge on Si(100) at 250 degrees C was studied. In Situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) was used to measure the surface diffusion coefficient while ex situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to probe the structure and morphology of the grown quantum dots. The results show that laser excitation of the substrate increases the surface diffusion during growth of Ge on Si(100), changes the growth morphology, improves crystalline structure of the grown quantum dots, and decreases their size distribution. A purely electronic mechanism of enhanced surface diffusion of the deposited Ge is proposed. Ge quantum dots were grown on Si(100)-(2x1) by pulsed laser deposition at various substrate temperatures using a femtosecond Ti:sapphire laser. In-situ reflection high-energy electron diffraction and ex-situ atomic force microscopy were used to analyze the fim structure and morphology. The morphology of germanium islands on silicon was studied at differect coverages. The results show that femtosecond pulsed laser depositon reduces the minimum temperature for epitaxial growth of Ge quantum dots to ~280 degrees C, which is 120 degrees C lower then previously observed in nanosecond pulsed laser deposition and more than 200 degrees C lower than that reported for molecular beam epitaxy and chemical vapor deposition.

  18. The reaction dynamics of alkali dimer molecules and electronically excited alkali atoms with simple molecules

    Hou, H [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1995-12-01

    This dissertation presents the results from the crossed molecular beam studies on the dynamics of bimolecular collisions in the gas phase. The primary subjects include the interactions of alkali dimer molecules with simple molecules, and the inelastic scattering of electronically excited alkali atoms with O2. The reaction of the sodium dimers with oxygen molecules is described in Chapter 2. Two reaction pathways were observed for this four-center molecule-molecule reaction, i.e. the formations of NaO2 + Na and NaO + NaO. NaO2 products exhibit a very anisotropic angular distribution, indicating a direct spectator stripping mechanism for this reaction channel. The NaO formation follows the bond breaking of O2, which is likely a result of a charge transfer from Na2 to the excited state orbital of O2-. The scattering of sodium dimers from ammonium and methanol produced novel molecules, NaNH3 and Na(CH3OH), respectively. These experimental observations, as well as the discussions on the reaction dynamics and the chemical bonding within these molecules, will be presented in Chapter 3. The lower limits for the bond dissociation energies of these molecules are also obtained. Finally, Chapter 4 describes the energy transfer between oxygen molecules and electronically excited sodium atoms.

  19. Stepwise vs concerted excited state tautomerization of 2-hydroxypyridine: Ammonia dimer wire mediated hydrogen/proton transfer

    The stepwise and concerted excited state intermolecular proton transfer (PT) and hydrogen transfer (HT) reactions in 2-hydroxypyridine-(NH3)2 complex in the gas phase under Cs symmetry constraint and without any symmetry constraints were performed using quantum chemical calculations. It shows that upon excitation, the hydrogen bonded in 2HP-(NH3)2 cluster facilitates the releasing of both hydrogen and proton transfer reactions along ammonia wire leading to the formation of the 2-pyridone tautomer. For the stepwise mechanism, it has been found that the proton and the hydrogen may transfer consecutively. These processes are distinguished from each other through charge translocation analysis and the coupling between the motion of the proton and the electron density distribution along ammonia wire. For the complex under Cs symmetry, the excited state HT occurs on the A″(1πσ∗) and A′(1nσ∗) states over two accessible energy barriers along reaction coordinates, and excited state PT proceeds mainly through the A′(1ππ∗) and A″(1nπ∗) potential energy surfaces. For the unconstrained complex, potential energy profiles show two 1ππ∗-1πσ∗ conical intersections along enol → keto reaction path indicating that proton and H atom are localized, respectively, on the first and second ammonia of the wire. Moreover, the concerted excited state PT is competitive to take place with the stepwise process, because it proceeds over low barriers of 0.14 eV and 0.11 eV with respect to the Franck-Condon excitation of enol tautomer, respectively, under Cs symmetry and without any symmetry constraints. These barriers can be probably overcome through tunneling effect

  20. Stepwise vs concerted excited state tautomerization of 2-hydroxypyridine: Ammonia dimer wire mediated hydrogen/proton transfer

    Esboui, Mounir, E-mail: mounir.esboui@fst.rnu.tn [Laboratoire de Spectroscopie Atomique, Moléculaire et Applications, Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences de Tunis, 2092 Tunis (Tunisia); Technical and Vocational Training Corporation, Hail College of Technology, P.O. Box 1960, Hail 81441 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-07-21

    The stepwise and concerted excited state intermolecular proton transfer (PT) and hydrogen transfer (HT) reactions in 2-hydroxypyridine-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} complex in the gas phase under Cs symmetry constraint and without any symmetry constraints were performed using quantum chemical calculations. It shows that upon excitation, the hydrogen bonded in 2HP-(NH{sub 3}){sub 2} cluster facilitates the releasing of both hydrogen and proton transfer reactions along ammonia wire leading to the formation of the 2-pyridone tautomer. For the stepwise mechanism, it has been found that the proton and the hydrogen may transfer consecutively. These processes are distinguished from each other through charge translocation analysis and the coupling between the motion of the proton and the electron density distribution along ammonia wire. For the complex under Cs symmetry, the excited state HT occurs on the A″({sup 1}πσ{sup ∗}) and A′({sup 1}nσ{sup ∗}) states over two accessible energy barriers along reaction coordinates, and excited state PT proceeds mainly through the A′({sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}) and A″({sup 1}nπ{sup ∗}) potential energy surfaces. For the unconstrained complex, potential energy profiles show two {sup 1}ππ{sup ∗}-{sup 1}πσ{sup ∗} conical intersections along enol → keto reaction path indicating that proton and H atom are localized, respectively, on the first and second ammonia of the wire. Moreover, the concerted excited state PT is competitive to take place with the stepwise process, because it proceeds over low barriers of 0.14 eV and 0.11 eV with respect to the Franck-Condon excitation of enol tautomer, respectively, under Cs symmetry and without any symmetry constraints. These barriers can be probably overcome through tunneling effect.

  1. Double electron excitation of helium by charged particle impact

    Complete text of publication follows. A four-body classical trajectory Monte Carlo method is applied in the study of double electron excitation of helium by charged particle impact. The calculations are based on the independent particle model. As projectiles we consider protons and antiprotons with energies between 0.25 and 5 MeV. The state selective total cross sections as a function of the impact energy are calculated and compared with experimental and theoretical data. Fig. 1. shows the double excitation cross sections of helium to the (2s2)1S (Fig. 1a), (2s2p)1P (Fig. 1b) and (2p2)1D (Fig. 1c) states as a function of the impact energy. The errors of our calculated data are smaller or comparable with the size of the symbols. Our recent cross sections are compared with the experimental data of Giese et al. and Moretto-Capelle et al. and with the previous calculations of Bodea et al. Instead of the antiproton impact, the experiments in ref. were carried out with electron impact. These cross sections are shown at the energy where the electron velocity is equal that of the antiproton velocity. In all cases the cross sections for antiprotons exceeds the cross section for protons. The largest difference is obtained for the excitation of the (2s2)1S state (Fig. 1a). According to our expectation, with increasing projectile energies the cross sections for proton and antiproton impact approaching each other. This tendency is valid for the previous calculations of Bodea et al. except for the (2p2)1D (Fig. 1c). The calculated cross sections generally agree with the experimental values. (author)

  2. Electron Elevator: Excitations across the Band Gap via a Dynamical Gap State.

    Lim, A; Foulkes, W M C; Horsfield, A P; Mason, D R; Schleife, A; Draeger, E W; Correa, A A

    2016-01-29

    We use time-dependent density functional theory to study self-irradiated Si. We calculate the electronic stopping power of Si in Si by evaluating the energy transferred to the electrons per unit path length by an ion of kinetic energy from 1 eV to 100 keV moving through the host. Electronic stopping is found to be significant below the threshold velocity normally identified with transitions across the band gap. A structured crossover at low velocity exists in place of a hard threshold. An analysis of the time dependence of the transition rates using coupled linear rate equations enables one of the excitation mechanisms to be clearly identified: a defect state induced in the gap by the moving ion acts like an elevator and carries electrons across the band gap. PMID:26871327

  3. R-matrix calculations for electron impact excitation

    The large number of high-resolution spectra routinely recorded in the astrophysical and fusion communities leads to the need for an extensive set of accurate baseline atomic data. The advantages of the intermediate-coupling frame transformation R-matrix method make it feasible to provide excitation data along iso-electronic sequences covering a substantial range of astrophysically important ions at the high level of accuracy afforded by the R-matrix method. This is one of the key goals of the UK Atomic Processes for Astrophysical Plasmas (APAP) network.

  4. Electron impact excitation of F-like W LXVI

    Aggarwal, K M

    2016-01-01

    Electron impact excitation collision strengths are calculated for all transitions among 113 levels of the 2s$^2$2p$^5$, 2s2p$^6$, 2s$^2$2p$^4$3$\\ell$, 2s2p$^5$3$\\ell$, and 2p$^6$3$\\ell$ configurations of F-like W~LXVI. For this purpose Dirac Atomic R-matrix Code (DARC) has been adopted and results are listed over a wide energy range of 1000 to 6000 Ryd. For comparison purpose analogous calculations have also been performed with the Flexible Atomic Code (FAC), and the results obtained are comparable with those from DARC.

  5. Comparative study on contribution of charge-transfer collision to excitations of iron ion between argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma and nitrogen microwave induced plasma

    Satoh, Kozue; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an ionization/excitation phenomenon of singly-ionized iron occurring in an Okamoto-cavity microwave induced plasma (MIP) as well as an argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma (ICP), by comparing the Boltzmann distribution among iron ionic lines (Fe II) having a wide range of the excitation energy from 4.76 to 9.01 eV. It indicated in both the plasmas that plots of Fe II lines having lower excitation energies (4.76 to 5.88 eV) were fitted on each linear relationship, implying that their excitations were caused by a dominant thermal process such as collision with energetic electron. However, Fe II lines having higher excitation energies (more than 7.55 eV) had a different behavior from each other. In the ICP, Boltzmann plots of Fe II lines assigned to the higher excited levels also followed the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels, even including a deviation from it in particular excited levels having an excitation energy of ca. 7.8 eV. This deviation can be attributed to a charge-transfer collision with argon ion, which results in the overpopulation of these excited levels, but the contribution is small. On the other hand, the distribution of the high-lying excited levels was non-thermal in the Okamoto-cavity MIP, which did not follow the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels. A probable reason for the non-thermal characteristics in the MIP is that a charge-transfer collision with nitrogen molecule ion having many vibrational/rotational levels could work for populating the 3d64p (3d54s4p) excited levels of iron ion broadly over an energy range of 7.6-9.0 eV, while collisional excitation by energetic electron would occur insufficiently to excite these high-energy levels.

  6. Coherent Transfer of Electronic Wavepacket Motion Between Atoms

    Zhou, Tao; Richards, B. G.; Jones, R. R.

    2016-05-01

    We have shown that electron correlations, induced by controlled dipole-dipole (DD) interactions, can enable the coherent transfer of electronic wavepacket motion from atoms to their neighbors. In the experiment, a 5 ns tunable dye laser excites Rb atoms in a MOT to the 25s state in a weak static electric field for which the tunable 25s 33 s 24p34p DD interaction is resonant. A picosecond THz pulse then further excites each Rydberg atom into a coherent superposition, of 25s and 24p states. The evolution of this mixed-parity wavepacket is characterized by time-dependent oscillations in the electric dipole moment, with a period of 2.9 ps. Approximately 5 ns after the wavepacket creation, a second 5 ns dye-laser promotes a second set of atoms from the 5p level into the 33s state. Because of the DD interaction, the second dye laser actually creates atom pairs whose electronic states are correlated via the resonant DD coupling. A 33 s + 34p wavepacket, oscillating with the same 2.9 ps period as the 25 s + 24p wavepacket, develops on the second set of atoms as a result of the correlation. A second, time-delayed ps THz pulse enables the detection of the coherent wavepacket motion on the two sets of atoms. This research has been supported by the NSF.

  7. Electronic Energy Transfer in Polarizable Heterogeneous Environments

    Svendsen, Casper Steinmann; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Theoretical prediction of transport and optical properties of protein-pigment complexes is of significant importance when aiming at understanding the structure versus function relationship in such systems. Electronic energy transfer (EET) couplings represent a key property in this respect since...... such couplings provide important insight into the strength of interaction between photo-active pigments in protein-pigment complexes. Recently, attention has been payed to how the environment modifies or even controls the electronic couplings. To enable such theoretical predictions, a fully polarizable embedding...... of transition densities in the calculation of the electronic couplings - also when including the explicit environment contribution - can be replaced by a much simpler transition point charge description without comprising the quality of the model predictions....

  8. Promoting interspecies electron transfer with biochar

    Chen, Shanshan; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Shrestha, Pravin Malla;

    2014-01-01

    attached to the biochar, yet not in close contact, suggesting that electrons were likely conducted through the biochar, rather than biological electrical connections. The finding that biochar can stimulate DIET may be an important consideration when amending soils with biochar and can help explain why......Biochar, a charcoal-like product of the incomplete combustion of organic materials, is an increasingly popular soil amendment designed to improve soil fertility. We investigated the possibility that biochar could promote direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) in a manner similar...... to that previously reported for granular activated carbon (GAC). Although the biochars investigated were 1000 times less conductive than GAC, they stimulated DIET in co-cultures of Geobacter metallireducens with Geobacter sulfurreducens or Methanosarcina barkeri in which ethanol was the electron donor. Cells were...

  9. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Delocalized Excited States of the Hydrated Electron

    Research under support of this grant has been focused on the understanding of highly delocalized ''conduction-band-like'' excited states of solvated electrons in bulk water, in water trapped in the core of reverse micelles, and in alkane solvents. We have strived in this work to probe conduction-band-like states by a variety of ultrafast spectroscopy techniques. (Most of which were developed under DOE support in a previous funding cycle.) We have recorded the optical spectrum of the hydrated electron for the first time. This was accomplished by applying a photo-detrapping technique that we had developed in a previous funding cycle, but had not yet been applied to characterize the actual spectrum. In the cases of reverse micelles, we have been investigating the potential role of conduction bands in the electron attachment process and the photoinduced detrapping, and have published two papers on this topic. Finally, we have been exploring solvated electrons in isooctane from various perspectives. All of these results strongly support the conclusion that optically accessible, highly delocalized electronic states exist in these various media

  10. Excitation transfer and luminescence in porphyrin-carbon nanotube complexes

    Magadur, Gurvan; Lauret, Jean-Sébastien; Alain-Rizzo, Valérie; C. Voisin; Roussignol, Ph.; Deleporte, Emmanuelle; Delaire, Jacques,

    2007-01-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes with hydrosoluble porphyrins (TPPS) is achieved by "$\\pi$-stacking". The porphyrin/nanotube interaction is studied by means of optical absorption, photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopies. The main absorption line of the porphyrins adsorbed on nanotubes exhibits a 120 meV red shift, which we ascribe to a flattening of the molecule in order to optimize $\\pi-\\pi$ interactions. The porphyrin-nanotube complex shows a strong quenching ...

  11. High resolution fluorescent bio-imaging with electron beam excitation.

    Kawata, Yoshimasa; Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru

    2014-11-01

    We have developed electron beam excitation assisted (EXA) optical microscope[1-3], and demonstrated its resolution higher than 50 nm. In the microscope, a light source in a few nanometers size is excited by focused electron beam in a luminescent film. The microscope makes it possible to observe dynamic behavior of living biological specimens in various surroundings, such as air or liquids. Scan speed of the nanometric light source is faster than that in conventional near-field scanning optical microscopes. The microscope enables to observe optical constants such as absorption, refractive index, polarization, and their dynamic behavior on a nanometric scale. The microscope opens new microscopy applications in nano-technology and nano-science.Figure 1(a) shows schematic diagram of the proposed EXA microscope. An electron beam is focused on a luminescent film. A specimen is put on the luminescent film directly. The inset in Fig. 1(a) shows magnified image of the luminescent film and the specimen. Nanometric light source is excited in the luminescent film by the focused electron beam. The nanometric light source illuminates the specimen, and the scattered or transmitted radiation is detected with a photomultiplier tube (PMT). The light source is scanned by scanning of the focused electron beam in order to construct on image. Figure 1(b) shows a luminescence image of the cells acquired with the EXA microscope, and Fig. 1(c) shows a phase contrast microscope image. Cells were observed in culture solution without any treatments, such as fixation and drying. The shape of each cell was clearly recognized and some bright spots were observed in cells. We believe that the bright spots indicated with arrows were auto-fluorescence of intracellular granules and light- grey regions were auto-fluorescence of cell membranes. It is clearly demonstrated that the EXA microscope is useful tool for observation of living biological cells in physiological conditions.jmicro;63/suppl_1/i

  12. Education and solar conversion. Demonstrating electron transfer

    Smestad, Greg P. [Institute of Physical Chemistry, ICP-2, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    1998-07-23

    A simplified solar cell fabrication procedure is presented that uses natural anthocyanin or chlorophyll dyes extracted from plants. This procedure illustrates how interdisciplinary science can be taught at lower division university and upper division high school levels for an understanding of renewable energy as well as basic science concepts. Electron transfer occurs on the Earth in the mitochondrial membranes found in living cells, and in the thylakoid membranes found in the photosynthetic cells of green plants. Since we depend on the results of this electron and energy transfer, e.g. in our use of petroleum and agricultural products, it is desirable to understand and communicate how the electron transfer works. The simplified solar cell fabrication procedure, based on nanocrystalline dye-sensitized solar cells, has therefore been developed so that it can be inexpensively reproduced and utilized in the teaching of basic principles in biology, chemistry, physics, and environmental science. A water-based solution of commercial nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) powder is used to deposit a highly porous semiconductor electron acceptor. This acceptor couples the light-driven processes occurring at an organic dye to the macroscopic world and an external electrical circuit. Materials science and semiconductor physics are emphasized during the deposition of the sintered TiO{sub 2} nanocrystalline ceramic film. Chelation, complexation and molecular self-assembly are demonstrated during the attachment of the dye molecule to the surface of the TiO{sub 2} semiconductor particles. Environmental chemistry and energy conversion can be linked to these concepts via the regenerative oxidation and reduction cycle found in the cell. The resulting device, made in under 3 h, can be used as a light detector or power generator that produces 0.4-0.5 V at open circuit, and 1-2 mA per square cm under solar illumination

  13. Ion-acoustic envelope excitations in electron-positron-ion plasma with nonthermal electrons

    Gill, Tarsem Singh, E-mail: gillsema@yahoo.co.i [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Bains, Amandeep Singh [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Saini, Nareshpal Singh, E-mail: nssaini@yahoo.co [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India); Center for Plasma Physics, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Queen' s University Belfast, BT7 1NN (United Kingdom); Bedi, Chanchal [Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University, Amritsar 143005 (India)

    2010-07-12

    A theoretical investigation has been made for modulational instability of ion-acoustic waves in an electron-positron-ion plasma with nonthermal electrons. Employing reductive perturbation method (RPM), the nonlinear Schroedinger equation (NLSE) is derived. The dispersive and nonlinearity coefficients, P and Q, respectively, are the functions of nonthermal parameter ({beta}), ratio of positron to electron density (d), ratio of the electron to positron temperature ({delta}) and ratio of ion to electron temperature ({sigma}). It is observed that these parameters significantly modify the conditions of the modulational instability. The system supports both types of bright and dark envelope excitations.

  14. Cold chemistry with electronically excited Ca+ Coulomb crystals

    Rate constants for chemical reactions of laser-cooled Ca+ ions and neutral polar molecules (CH3F, CH2F2, or CH3Cl) have been measured at low collision energies (coll>/kB=5-243 K). Low kinetic energy ensembles of 40Ca+ ions are prepared through Doppler laser cooling to form ''Coulomb crystals'' in which the ions form a latticelike arrangement in the trapping potential. The trapped ions react with translationally cold beams of polar molecules produced by a quadrupole guide velocity selector or with room-temperature gas admitted into the vacuum chamber. Imaging of the Ca+ ion fluorescence allows the progress of the reaction to be monitored. Product ions are sympathetically cooled into the crystal structure and are unambiguously identified through resonance-excitation mass spectrometry using just two trapped ions. Variations of the laser-cooling parameters are shown to result in different steady-state populations of the electronic states of 40Ca+ involved in the laser-cooling cycle, and these are modeled by solving the optical Bloch equations for the eight-level system. Systematic variation of the steady-state populations over a series of reaction experiments allows the extraction of bimolecular rate constants for reactions of the ground state (2S1/2) and the combined excited states (2D3/2 and 2P1/2) of 40Ca+. These results are analyzed in the context of capture theories and ab initio electronic structure calculations of the reaction profiles. In each case, suppression of the ground state rate constant is explained by the presence of a submerged or real barrier on the ground state potential surface. Rate constants for the excited states are generally found to be in line with capture theories.

  15. Cold chemistry with electronically excited Ca+ Coulomb crystals

    Gingell, Alexander D.; Bell, Martin T.; Oldham, James M.; Softley, Timothy P.; Harvey, Jeremy N.

    2010-11-01

    Rate constants for chemical reactions of laser-cooled Ca+ ions and neutral polar molecules (CH3F, CH2F2, or CH3Cl) have been measured at low collision energies (⟨Ecoll⟩/kB=5-243 K). Low kinetic energy ensembles of C40a+ ions are prepared through Doppler laser cooling to form "Coulomb crystals" in which the ions form a latticelike arrangement in the trapping potential. The trapped ions react with translationally cold beams of polar molecules produced by a quadrupole guide velocity selector or with room-temperature gas admitted into the vacuum chamber. Imaging of the Ca+ ion fluorescence allows the progress of the reaction to be monitored. Product ions are sympathetically cooled into the crystal structure and are unambiguously identified through resonance-excitation mass spectrometry using just two trapped ions. Variations of the laser-cooling parameters are shown to result in different steady-state populations of the electronic states of C40a+ involved in the laser-cooling cycle, and these are modeled by solving the optical Bloch equations for the eight-level system. Systematic variation of the steady-state populations over a series of reaction experiments allows the extraction of bimolecular rate constants for reactions of the ground state (S21/2) and the combined excited states (D23/2 and P21/2) of C40a+. These results are analyzed in the context of capture theories and ab initio electronic structure calculations of the reaction profiles. In each case, suppression of the ground state rate constant is explained by the presence of a submerged or real barrier on the ground state potential surface. Rate constants for the excited states are generally found to be in line with capture theories.

  16. Heat transfer in high density electronics packaging

    2001-01-01

    In order to get an insight into the thermal characteristic and to evaluate the thermal reliability of the "System in Packaging"(SIP), a new solution of electronics packaging, a heat transfer model of SIP was developed to predict the heat dissipation capacity and to investigate the effect of different factors on the temperature distribution in the electronics. The affecting parameters under consideration include the thermophysical properties of the substrates, the coefficient of convection heat transfer, the thickness of the chip, and the density of power dissipation. ALGOR, a kind of finite element analysis software,was used to do the model simulation. Based on the sinulation and analysis of the heat conduction and convection resistance, criteria for the thermal design were established and possible measurement for enhancing power dissipation was provided, The results show that the heat transfer model provides a new and effective way to the thermal design and thermal analysis of SIP and to the mechanical analysis for the further investigation of SIP.

  17. Electron transfer from CO2lg-bullet- to perylene in cyclohexane

    CO2lg-bullet- formed by the reactions of the electron with CO2 in cyclohexane transfers an electron to perylene with a rate constant of 2.9 x 1010 M-1s-1. Gε580nm for the perylene radical anion is 9 x 103 molecules (100 eV)-1 M -1 cm-1. The transfer of an electron from CO2lg-bullet+ to an aromatic molecule is a significant process when CO2 is used as an electron scavenger in solution where the production of excited states of the aromatic molecule is studied. 24 refs., 6 figs

  18. Inelastic electron and light scattering from the elementary electronic excitations in quantum wells: Zero magnetic field

    Manvir S. Kushwaha

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The most fundamental approach to an understanding of electronic, optical, and transport phenomena which the condensed matter physics (of conventional as well as nonconventional systems offers is generally founded on two experiments: the inelastic electron scattering and the inelastic light scattering. This work embarks on providing a systematic framework for the theory of inelastic electron scattering and of inelastic light scattering from the electronic excitations in GaAs/Ga1−xAlxAs quantum wells. To this end, we start with the Kubo's correlation function to derive the generalized nonlocal, dynamic dielectric function, and the inverse dielectric function within the framework of Bohm-Pines’ random-phase approximation. This is followed by a thorough development of the theory of inelastic electron scattering and of inelastic light scattering. The methodological part is then subjected to the analytical diagnoses which allow us to sense the subtlety of the analytical results and the importance of their applications. The general analytical results, which know no bounds regarding, e.g., the subband occupancy, are then specified so as to make them applicable to practicality. After trying and testing the eigenfunctions, we compute the density of states, the Fermi energy, the full excitation spectrum made up of intrasubband and intersubband – single-particle and collective (plasmon – excitations, the loss functions for all the principal geometries envisioned for the inelastic electron scattering, and the Raman intensity, which provides a measure of the real transitions induced by the (laser probe, for the inelastic light scattering. It is found that the dominant contribution to both the loss peaks and the Raman peaks comes from the collective (plasmon excitations. As to the single-particle peaks, the analysis indicates a long-lasting lack of quantitative comparison between theory and experiments. It is inferred that the inelastic electron

  19. Dynamics of Electron Transfer Processes at the Surface of Dye-Sensitized Mesoporous Semiconductor Films

    Teuscher, Joël

    2010-01-01

    Electron transfer reactions taking place at the surface of dye-sensitized semiconductors are key processes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). After light absorption, the excited state of a dye injects an electron into a wide-bandgap semiconductor, usually titanium dioxyde, TiO2. The formed oxidized dye can then be intercepted by a redox mediator, typically iodide, before charge recombination between the injected electron and the oxidized dye...

  20. Excitation energy transfer in a classical analogue of photosynthetic antennae.

    Mančal, Tomáš

    2013-09-26

    We formulate a classical pure dephasing system-bath interaction model in a full correspondence to the well-studied quantum model of natural light-harvesting antennae. The equations of motion of our classical model not only represent the correct classical analogy to the quantum description of excitonic systems, but they also have exactly the same functional form. We demonstrate derivation of classical dissipation and relaxation tensor in second order perturbation theory. We find that the only difference between the classical and quantum descriptions is in the interpretation of the state and in certain limitations imposed on the parameters of the model by classical physics. The effects of delocalization, transfer pathway interference, and the transition from coherent to diffusive transfer can be found already in the classical realm. The only qualitatively new effect occurring in quantum systems is the preference for a downhill energy transfer and the resulting possibility of trapping the energy in the lowest energy state. PMID:23822554

  1. $d$-wave bond-order charge excitations in electron-doped cuprates

    Yamase, Hiroyuki; Bejas, Matías; Greco, Andrés

    2015-01-01

    We study charge excitation spectra in the two-dimensional $t$-$J$ model on a square lattice to explore a charge-order tendency recently found in electron-doped cuprates around the carrier density 0.15. The static susceptibility of $d$-wave charge density, which corresponds to the nematic susceptibility at the momentum transfer ${\\bf q}=(0,0)$, shows two characteristic peaks at momenta of the form ${\\bf q}_{1}=(q',q')$ and ${\\bf q}_{2}=(q,0)$. These two peaks originate from the so-called $2k_{...

  2. Electronic Energy transfer in light-harvesting antenna complexes

    Hossein-Nejad, Hoda

    The studies presented in this thesis explore electronic energy transfer (EET) in light-harvesting antenna complexes and investigate the role of quantum coherence in EET. The dynamics of energy transfer are investigated in three distinct length scales and a different formulation of the exciton transport problem is applied at each scale. These scales include: the scale of a molecular dimer, the scale of a single protein and the scale of a molecular aggregate. The antenna protein phycoerythrin 545 (PE545) isolated from the photosynthetic cryptophyte algae Rhodomonas CS4 is specifically studied in two chapters of this thesis. It is found that formation of small aggregates delocalizes the excitation across chromophores of adjacent proteins, and that this delocalization has a dramatic effect in enhancing the rate of energy transfer between pigments. Furthermore, we investigate EET from a donor to an acceptor via an intermediate site and observe that interference of coherent pathways gives a finite correction to the transfer rate that is sensitively dependent on the nature of the vibrational interactions in the system. The statistical fluctuations of a system exhibiting EET are investigated in the final chapter. The techniques of non-equilibrium statistical mechanics are applied to investigate the steady-state of a typical system exhibiting EET that is perturbed out of equilibrium due to its interaction with a fluctuating bath.

  3. How fast is optically induced electron transfer in organic mixed valence systems?

    Lambert, C; Moos, M; Schmiedel, A; Holzapfel, M; Schäfer, J; Kess, M; Engel, V

    2016-07-28

    The rate of thermally induced electron transfer in organic mixed valence compounds has thoroughly been investigated by e.g. temperature dependent ESR spectroscopy. However, almost nothing is known about the dynamics of optically induced electron transfer processes in such systems. Therefore, we investigated these processes in mixed valence compounds based on triphenylamine redox centres bridged by conjugated spacers by NIR transient absorption spectroscopy with fs-time resolution. These experiments revealed an internal conversion (IC) process to be on the order of 50-200 fs which is equivalent to the back electron transfer after optical excitation into the intervalence charge transfer band. This IC is followed by ultrafast cooling to the ground state within 1 ps. Thus, in the systems investigated optically induced electron transfer is about 3-4 orders of magnitude faster than thermally induced ET. PMID:27376572

  4. Linker proteins enable ultrafast excitation energy transfer in the phycobilisome antenna system of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus.

    Nganou, C; David, L; Adir, N; Mkandawire, M

    2016-01-01

    We applied a femtosecond flash method, using induced transient absorption changes, to obtain a time-resolved view of excitation energy transfer in intact phycobilisomes of Thermosynechococcus vulcanus at room temperature. Our measurement of an excitation energy transfer rate of 888 fs in phycobilisomes shows the existence of ultrafast kinetics along the phycocyanin rod subcomplex to the allophycocyanin core that is faster than expected for previous excitation energy transfer based on Förster theory in phycobilisomes. Allophycocyanin in the core further transfers energy to the terminal emitter(s) in 17 ps. In the phycobilisome, rod doublets composed of hexameric phycocyanin discs and internal linker proteins are arranged in a parallel fashion, facilitating direct rod-rod interactions. Excitonic splitting likely drives rod absorption at 635 nm as a result of strong coupling between β84 chromophores (20 ± 1 Å) in adjacent hexamers. In comparison to the absorbance of the phycobilisome antenna system of the cyanobacterium Acaryochloris marina, which possesses a single rod structure, the linkers in T. vulcanus rods induce a 17 nm red shift in the absorbance spectrum. Furthermore, the kinetics of 888 fs indicates that the presence of the linker protein induces ultrafast excitation energy transfer between phycocyanin and allophycocyanin inside the phycobilisome, which is faster than all previous excitation energy transfer in phycobilisome subunits or sub-complexes reported to date. PMID:26537632

  5. Donor-acceptor substituted phenylethynyltriphenylenes – excited state intramolecular charge transfer, solvatochromic absorption and fluorescence emission

    Ritesh Nandy

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Several 2-(phenylethynyltriphenylene derivatives bearing electron donor and acceptor substituents on the phenyl rings have been synthesized. The absorption and fluorescence emission properties of these molecules have been studied in solvents of different polarity. For a given derivative, solvent polarity had minimal effect on the absorption maxima. However, for a given solvent the absorption maxima red shifted with increasing conjugation of the substituent. The fluorescence emission of these derivatives was very sensitive to solvent polarity. In the presence of strongly electron withdrawing (–CN and strongly electron donating (–NMe2 substituents large Stokes shifts (up to 130 nm, 7828 cm−1 were observed in DMSO. In the presence of carbonyl substituents (–COMe and –COPh, the largest Stokes shift (140 nm, 8163 cm−1 was observed in ethanol. Linear correlation was observed for the Stokes shifts in a Lippert–Mataga plot. Linear correlation of Stokes shift was also observed with ET(30 scale for protic and aprotic solvents but with different slopes. These results indicate that the fluorescence emission arises from excited state intramolecular charge transfer in these molecules where the triphenylene chromophore acts either as a donor or as an acceptor depending upon the nature of the substituent on the phenyl ring. HOMO–LUMO energy gaps have been estimated from the electrochemical and spectral data for these derivatives. The HOMO and LUMO surfaces were obtained from DFT calculations.

  6. Dynamic localization of electronic excitation in photosynthetic complexes revealed with chiral two-dimensional spectroscopy

    Fidler, Andrew F.; Singh, Ved P.; Long, Phillip D.; Dahlberg, Peter D.; Engel, Gregory S.

    2014-02-01

    Time-resolved ultrafast optical probes of chiral dynamics provide a new window allowing us to explore how interactions with such structured environments drive electronic dynamics. Incorporating optical activity into time-resolved spectroscopies has proven challenging because of the small signal and large achiral background. Here we demonstrate that two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy can be adapted to detect chiral signals and that these signals reveal how excitations delocalize and contract following excitation. We dynamically probe the evolution of chiral electronic structure in the light-harvesting complex 2 of purple bacteria following photoexcitation by creating a chiral two-dimensional mapping. The dynamics of the chiral two-dimensional signal directly reports on changes in the degree of delocalization of the excitonic states following photoexcitation. The mechanism of energy transfer in this system may enhance transfer probability because of the coherent coupling among chromophores while suppressing fluorescence that arises from populating delocalized states. This generally applicable spectroscopy will provide an incisive tool to probe ultrafast transient molecular fluctuations that are obscured in non-chiral experiments.

  7. Characteristics of Response of Piezoelectric Actuators in Electron Flux Excitation

    Philip C. Hadinata

    2003-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the working parameters of non-contact strain control for piezoelectric ceramics are evaluated. The piezoelectric material functions as an actuator that transforms electrical into mechanical energy, and the electrical input is carried out by electron flux on the positive surface. The sample is exposed to some quasi-static inputs, and its responses are recorded using strain gages. The data shows faster and more stable response in the positive regime, but significantly slower response with drift in the negative regime. An electron collector is introduced on the positive surface to enhance the response in the negative regime. Theoretical analyses of energy transfer and electron movements is discussed, and a string of working conditions for controlling the surface strain of piezoelectric material are given as conclusions.

  8. Photophysical Parameters, Excitation Energy Transfer, and Photoreactivity of 1,4-Bis(5-phenyl-2-oxazolylbenzene (POPOP Laser Dye

    Samy A. El-Daly

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of solvents on the absorption and emission spectra of 1,4-bis(5-phenyl-2-oxazolylbenzene (POPOP laser dye has been studied in various solvents at 298 K. A bathochromic shift was observed in absorption and fluorescence spectra upon increase of solvent polarity, which indicates that this transition is π-∗. The ground and excited state dipole moments were calculated as 2.23 and 6.34 Debye, respectively. The dye solution in MeOH, n-heptane, and methyl isobutyl ketone gives laser emission in the blue region upon excitation by a 337.1 nm nitrogen pulse; the gain coefficient and emission cross section as well as normalized photostability have been determined. Excitation energy transfer from POPOP to rhodamine B and fluorescine was studied to improve the laser emission from these dyes. Such an energy transfer dye laser system (ETDL obeys a long range columbic energy transfer mechanism with a critical transfer distance, R0, of 25 and 33 Å and kq equal to 10.4×1012 and 26.2×1012M−1s−1 for the POPOP/RB and POPOP/fluorescine pair, respectively. The POPOP dye is highly photostable in polar protic and polar aprotic solvents, while it displays photodecomposition in chloromethane solvent via formation of a contact ion pair. The photochemical quantum yield and rate of photodecomposition depend on the electron affinity of solvent.

  9. Effect of electronic excitation on high-temperature flows behind strong shock waves

    In the present paper, a strongly non-equilibrium one-dimensional steady-state flow behind the plane shock wave is studied. We consider a high-temperature chemically reacting five-component ionized mixture of nitrogen species (N2/N22/N/N+/e−) taking into account electronic degrees of freedom in N and N+ (170 and 625 electronic energy levels respectively), and electronic-rotational-vibrational modes in N2 and N2+ (5 and 7 electronic terms). Non-equilibrium reactions of ionization, dissociation, recombination and charge-transfer are included to the kinetic scheme. The system of governing equations is written under the assumption that translation and internal energy relaxation is fast whereas chemical reactions and ionization proceed on the macroscopic gas-dynamics time-scale. The developed model is applied to simulate the flow behind a plane shock wave under initial conditions characteristic for the spacecraft re-entry from an interplanetary flight (Hermes and Fire II experiments). Fluid-dynamic parameters behind the shock wave as well as transport coefficients and the heat flux are calculated for the (N2/N2+/N/N+/e−) mixture. The effect of electronic excitation on kinetics, dynamics and heat transfer is analyzed. Whereas the contribution of electronic degrees of freedom to the flow macroparameters is negligible, their influence on the heat flux is found to be important under conditions of Hermes re-entry

  10. 14 CFR 1260.69 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    2010-01-01

    ... Government by electronic funds transfer through the Treasury Fedline Payment System (FEDLINE) or the... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS General Special Conditions § 1260.69 Electronic funds transfer payment...

  11. How coherence help excitation energy transfer between chromophres of photosynthesis systems

    Liang, Xian-Ting

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the excited energy transfer (EET) between chromophres by using a dynamical model of EET in photosynthesis systems. The numerical path integral method is used. This method includes the non-Markovian effects of the environmental affects and it does not need the perturbation approximation in solving the dynamics of systems of interest. We obtained that coherence help EET between molecules is because it increases the transfer time rather than enhances the transfer rate of energy.

  12. Explanation of Turbulent Suppression of Electron Heat Transfer in GOL-3 Facility at the Stage of Relativistic Electron Beam Injection

    The effect of the electron heat transfer suppression during the stage of relativistic electron beam injection into a plasma was discovered experimentally more than a decade ago. It is now widely adopted that the suppression is a side sequel of Langmuir turbulence excited by the beam, however neither quantitative theory nor even rough estimates of the phenomena were available so far. We argue that the coefficient of turbulent thermal conductivity can be evaluated from a robust judgement based on the energy balance consideration

  13. Surface nanostructuring of LiNbO3 by high-density electronic excitations

    Lithium niobate (LiNbO3) single crystals were irradiated with high energy gold ions (0.5–2.2 GeV) at the UNILAC (GSI) and with 150-keV highly charged xenon ions from an EBIT (Electron Beam Ion Trap, HZDR). The surfaces of the irradiated crystals were analyzed by scanning force microscopy showing very similar topographic changes. Swift heavy ions and slow highly charged ions produce hillock-like nanostructures on the surface. In both cases, the energy deposition of the ions is characterized by dense localized electronic excitations and efficient transfer to the lattice. Furthermore, the irradiation results in a shift in the band gap energy as evidenced by UV–Vis absorption spectroscopy. Specific modifications (e.g. hillock size, energy loss threshold) induced by slow highly charged ions are discussed in comparison with effects due to the electronic energy loss by swift heavy ions

  14. Electron transfer in branched expanded pyridinium molecules

    Hromadová, Magdaléna; Lachmanová, Štěpánka; Pospíšil, Lubomír; Fortage, J.; Dupeyre, G.; Perruchot, Ch.; Lainé, P. P.

    Aveiro: DEMAC - Universidade de Aveiro, 2014. s. 99-99. [Meeting of the Portuguese Electrochemical Society /19./. Iberian Meeting of Electrochemistry /16./. 30.06.2014-02.07.2014, Aveiro] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-05180S Grant ostatní: Rada Programu interní porpory projektů mezinárodní spolupráce AV ČR M200401202 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : electron transfer * electrochemistry * pyridinium Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry

  15. Direct heterogeneous electron transfer of theophylline oxidase

    Christenson, Andreas; Dock, Eva; Gorton, Lo; Ruzgas, Tautgirdas

    2004-01-01

    Direct electron transfer (DET) was shown between the heme containing enzyme theophylline oxidase (ThO) and the surface of both graphite and gold electrodes. As proof on graphite a steady state current for theophylline was recorded using the electrode modified with adsorbed ThO. The electrode showed a Michaelis–Menten-like response to theophylline with a detection limit of 0.2 mM and a Michaelis–Menten constant equal to 3.2 mM. These initial results open up a possibility for the development of...

  16. Quantifying electron transfer reactions in biological systems: what interactions play the major role?

    Sjulstok, Emil; Olsen, Jógvan Magnus Haugaard; Solov'Yov, Ilia A.

    2015-12-01

    Various biological processes involve the conversion of energy into forms that are usable for chemical transformations and are quantum mechanical in nature. Such processes involve light absorption, excited electronic states formation, excitation energy transfer, electrons and protons tunnelling which for example occur in photosynthesis, cellular respiration, DNA repair, and possibly magnetic field sensing. Quantum biology uses computation to model biological interactions in light of quantum mechanical effects and has primarily developed over the past decade as a result of convergence between quantum physics and biology. In this paper we consider electron transfer in biological processes, from a theoretical view-point; namely in terms of quantum mechanical and semi-classical models. We systematically characterize the interactions between the moving electron and its biological environment to deduce the driving force for the electron transfer reaction and to establish those interactions that play the major role in propelling the electron. The suggested approach is seen as a general recipe to treat electron transfer events in biological systems computationally, and we utilize it to describe specifically the electron transfer reactions in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochrome-a signaling photoreceptor protein that became attractive recently due to its possible function as a biological magnetoreceptor.

  17. Production of excited electrons at TESLA and CLIC based $e\\gamma$ colliders

    Aydin, Z Z; Kirca, Z

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the potential of TESLA and CLIC based electron-photon colliders to search for excited spin-1/2 electrons. The production of excited electrons in the resonance channel through the electron-photon collision and their subsequent decays to leptons and electroweak gauge bosons are investigated. We study in detail the three signal channels of excited electrons and the corresponding backgrounds through the reactions e gamma --> e gamma, e gamma --> eZ and e gamma --> nu W. Excited electrons can be discovered with the masses up to about 90% of the available collider energy.

  18. Properties of Auger electrons following excitation of polarized atoms by polarized electrons

    Kupliauskiene, A. [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy of Vilnius University, A. Gostauto 12, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania)], E-mail: akupl@itpa.lt; Tutlys, V. [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy of Vilnius University, A. Gostauto 12, LT-01108 Vilnius (Lithuania)

    2009-01-15

    In non-relativistic approximation, the most general expression for differential cross sections describing the properties of Auger-electron emission induced in the excitation of polarized atoms by polarized electrons is obtained for the first time. The ways of the application of the general expressions suitable for the specific experimental conditions are outlined by deriving the expressions for the asymmetry parameters and the magnetic dichroism of the angular distribution of the Auger electrons as well as of the angular correlations between the scattered and Auger electrons.

  19. Electron-photon angular correlations in electron-helium collisions for 31P excitations

    Electron-photon angular correlations have been measured by detecting, in delayed coincidence, electrons inelastically scattered from helium and photons emitted in decays from the 31P level. The measurements have been carried out using both the 31P-11S (53.7nm) line and the 31P-21S (501.6nm) line. Analysis of the data yields the ratio of differential cross sections for exciting 31P magnetic sublevels and the absolute value of the relative phase between the corresponding excitation amplitudes for electron scattering angles between 100 and 300 at incident electron energies in the range 50 eV to 150 eV. Data of the atomic orientation is also presented. The results are compared with the predictions of the first Born approximation and a recent multichannel eikonal calculation. (author)

  20. Correlated electron-ion dynamics: the excitation of atomic motion by energetic electrons

    Correlated electron-ion dynamics (CEID) is an extension of molecular dynamics that allows us to introduce in a correct manner the exchange of energy between electrons and ions. The formalism is based on a systematic approximation: small amplitude moment expansion. This formalism is extended here to include the explicit quantum spread of the ions and a generalization of the Hartree-Fock approximation for incoherent sums of Slater determinants. We demonstrate that the resultant dynamical equations reproduce analytically the selection rules for inelastic electron-phonon scattering from perturbation theory, which control the mutually driven excitations of the two interacting subsystems. We then use CEID to make direct numerical simulations of inelastic current-voltage spectroscopy in atomic wires, and to exhibit the crossover from ionic cooling to heating as a function of the relative degree of excitation of the electronic and ionic subsystems

  1. Integral cross sections for electron impact excitation of vibrational and electronic states in phenol

    Neves, R. F. C. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Instituto Federal do Sul de Minas Gerais, Campus Poços de Caldas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Jones, D. B. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Blanco, F. [Departamento de Física Atómica, Molecular y Nuclear, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); García, G. [Instituto de Física Fundamental, CSIC, Serrano 113-bis, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Ratnavelu, K. [Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: Michael.Brunger@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide SA 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia)

    2015-05-21

    We report on measurements of integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of composite vibrational modes and electronic-states in phenol, where the energy range of those experiments was 15–250 eV. There are currently no other results against which we can directly compare those measured data. We also report results from our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction computations, namely, for the inelastic ICS (all discrete electronic states and neutral dissociation) and the total ionisation ICS. In addition, for the relevant dipole-allowed excited electronic states, we also report f-scaled Born-level and energy-corrected and f-scaled Born-level (BEf-scaled) ICS. Where possible, our measured and calculated ICSs are compared against one another with the general level of accord between them being satisfactory to within the measurement uncertainties.

  2. Integral cross sections for electron impact excitation of vibrational and electronic states in phenol

    We report on measurements of integral cross sections (ICSs) for electron impact excitation of a series of composite vibrational modes and electronic-states in phenol, where the energy range of those experiments was 15–250 eV. There are currently no other results against which we can directly compare those measured data. We also report results from our independent atom model with screened additivity rule correction computations, namely, for the inelastic ICS (all discrete electronic states and neutral dissociation) and the total ionisation ICS. In addition, for the relevant dipole-allowed excited electronic states, we also report f-scaled Born-level and energy-corrected and f-scaled Born-level (BEf-scaled) ICS. Where possible, our measured and calculated ICSs are compared against one another with the general level of accord between them being satisfactory to within the measurement uncertainties

  3. Electronic excitation of C4F6 isomers by electron impact

    We have measured electronic excitation differential cross sections for C4F6 molecules isomers by electron impact. In the case of hexafluoro-1,3-butadiene we observed an optical forbidden transition at around 5 eV. The spectra of the three C4F6 isomers show the most intense band clearly shifted to lower energies when going from 2-C4F6, to c-C4F6 and to 1,3-C4F6.

  4. Electron transfer pathways in microbial oxygen biocathodes

    Freguia, Stefano, E-mail: stefano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Tsujimura, Seiya, E-mail: seiya@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan); Kano, Kenji, E-mail: kkano@kais.kyoto-u.ac.j [Bio-analytical and Physical Chemistry Laboratory, Division of Applied Life Sciences, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8205 (Japan)

    2010-01-01

    The ability of some bacteria to enhance the rate of cathodic oxygen reduction to water has been recently discovered, opening the way to an entirely renewable and environmentally friendly concept of biocathode. In this study we reveal that several mechanisms may induce catalytic effects by bacteria. These comprise mechanisms that are putatively beneficial to the bacteria as well as mechanisms which are merely side effects, including quinone autoxidation and direct O{sub 2} reduction by heme compounds. Here we showed that 1 muM of ACNQ is able to generate a significant catalytic wave for oxygen reduction, with onset at approximately 0 V vs. SHE. Similarly, adsorption of hemin on a carbon surface catalyses O{sub 2} reduction to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} with an onset of +0.2 V vs. SHE. To evaluate the catalytic pathways of live cells on cathodic oxygen reduction, two species of electrochemically active bacteria were selected as pure cultures, namely Acinetobacter calcoaceticus and Shewanella putrefaciens. The former appears to exploit a self-excreted redox compound with redox characteristics matching those of pyrroloquinoline quinone (PQQ) for extracellular electron transfer. The latter appears to utilise outer membrane-bound redox compounds. Interaction of quinones and cytochromes with the membrane-bound electron transfer chain is yet to be proven.

  5. Electron transfer interactome of cytochrome C.

    Alexander N Volkov

    Full Text Available Lying at the heart of many vital cellular processes such as photosynthesis and respiration, biological electron transfer (ET is mediated by transient interactions among proteins that recognize multiple binding partners. Accurate description of the ET complexes - necessary for a comprehensive understanding of the cellular signaling and metabolism - is compounded by their short lifetimes and pronounced binding promiscuity. Here, we used a computational approach relying solely on the steric properties of the individual proteins to predict the ET properties of protein complexes constituting the functional interactome of the eukaryotic cytochrome c (Cc. Cc is a small, soluble, highly-conserved electron carrier protein that coordinates the electron flow among different redox partners. In eukaryotes, Cc is a key component of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, where it shuttles electrons between its reductase and oxidase, and an essential electron donor or acceptor in a number of other redox systems. Starting from the structures of individual proteins, we performed extensive conformational sampling of the ET-competent binding geometries, which allowed mapping out functional epitopes in the Cc complexes, estimating the upper limit of the ET rate in a given system, assessing ET properties of different binding stoichiometries, and gauging the effect of domain mobility on the intermolecular ET. The resulting picture of the Cc interactome 1 reveals that most ET-competent binding geometries are located in electrostatically favorable regions, 2 indicates that the ET can take place from more than one protein-protein orientation, and 3 suggests that protein dynamics within redox complexes, and not the electron tunneling event itself, is the rate-limiting step in the intermolecular ET. Further, we show that the functional epitope size correlates with the extent of dynamics in the Cc complexes and thus can be used as a diagnostic tool for protein mobility.

  6. Vibrational excitations in molecular layers probed by ballistic electron microscopy

    Kajen, Rasanayagam Sivasayan; Chandrasekhar, Natarajan [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, 3 Research Link, 117602 (Singapore); Feng Xinliang; Muellen, Klaus [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Polymerforschung, Postfach 3148, D-55021 Mainz (Germany); Su Haibin, E-mail: n-chandra@imre.a-star.edu.sg, E-mail: muellen@mpip-mainz.mpg.de, E-mail: hbsu@ntu.edu.sg [Division of Materials Science, Nanyang Technological University, 50 Nanyang Avenue, 639798 (Singapore)

    2011-10-28

    We demonstrate the information on molecular vibrational modes via the second derivative (d{sup 2}I{sub B}/dV{sup 2}) of the ballistic electron emission spectroscopy (BEES) current. The proposed method does not create huge fields as in the case of conventional derivative spectroscopy and maintains a zero bias across the device. BEES studies carried out on three different types of large polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecular layers show that the d{sup 2}I{sub B}/dV{sup 2} spectra consist of uniformly spaced peaks corresponding to vibronic excitations. The peak spacing is found to be identical for molecules within the same PAH family though the BEES onset voltage varies for different molecules. In addition, injection into a particular orbital appears to correspond to a specific vibrational mode as the manifestation of the symmetry principle.

  7. Electron impact excitation of carbon and oxygen ions

    This report is an attempt at a comprehensive compilation of currently available theoretical data on electron impact excitation of carbon and oxygen ions. It is designed to be of use primarily to theoretical atomic physicists, allowing them a broader than usual view of how various approximations compare. We do not attempt to place an estimate on the accuracy to which any of the collision strengths are known. The reader may obtain some idea of the accuracy from the spread in the calculations. Further, we do not evaluate rate coefficients or make any comparison with observed results. We do provide simple analytic fits to the data, where possible, thus allowing the reader to make comparison with observation or evaluate rate coefficients if he desires. The present data contains little about resonance effects, due to the difficulty of their presentation. It is possible that resonances could make a considerable change in the average collision strength near threshold, and this topic requires further study

  8. Communication: Fragment-based Hamiltonian model of electronic charge-excitation gaps and gap closure

    Capturing key electronic properties such as charge excitation gaps within models at or above the atomic scale presents an ongoing challenge to understanding molecular, nanoscale, and condensed phase systems. One strategy is to describe the system in terms of properties of interacting material fragments, but it is unclear how to accomplish this for charge-excitation and charge-transfer phenomena. Hamiltonian models such as the Hubbard model provide formal frameworks for analyzing gap properties but are couched purely in terms of states of electrons, rather than the states of the fragments at the scale of interest. The recently introduced Fragment Hamiltonian (FH) model uses fragments in different charge states as its building blocks, enabling a uniform, quantum-mechanical treatment that captures the charge-excitation gap. These gaps are preserved in terms of inter-fragment charge-transfer hopping integrals T and on-fragment parameters U(FH). The FH model generalizes the standard Hubbard model (a single intra-band hopping integral t and on-site repulsion U) from quantum states for electrons to quantum states for fragments. We demonstrate that even for simple two-fragment and multi-fragment systems, gap closure is enabled once T exceeds the threshold set by U(FH), thus providing new insight into the nature of metal-insulator transitions. This result is in contrast to the standard Hubbard model for 1d rings, for which Lieb and Wu proved that gap closure was impossible, regardless of the choices for t and U

  9. Electronic Structure and Dynamics of Higher-Lying Excited States in Light Harvesting Complex 1 from Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    Dahlberg, Peter D; Ting, Po-Chieh; Massey, Sara C; Martin, Elizabeth C; Hunter, C Neil; Engel, Gregory S

    2016-06-23

    Light harvesting in photosynthetic organisms involves efficient transfer of energy from peripheral antenna complexes to core antenna complexes, and ultimately to the reaction center where charge separation drives downstream photosynthetic processes. Antenna complexes contain many strongly coupled chromophores, which complicates analysis of their electronic structure. Two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) provides information on energetic coupling and ultrafast energy transfer dynamics, making the technique well suited for the study of photosynthetic antennae. Here, we present 2DES results on excited state properties and dynamics of a core antenna complex, light harvesting complex 1 (LH1), embedded in the photosynthetic membrane of Rhodobacter sphaeroides. The experiment reveals weakly allowed higher-lying excited states in LH1 at 770 nm, which transfer energy to the strongly allowed states at 875 nm with a lifetime of 40 fs. The presence of higher-lying excited states is in agreement with effective Hamiltonians constructed using parameters from crystal structures and atomic force microscopy (AFM) studies. The energy transfer dynamics between the higher- and lower-lying excited states agree with Redfield theory calculations. PMID:27232937

  10. Investigation of the neon 2p collisional excitation transfer processes via CW laser collisionally induced fluorescence

    We present a method for determining the 2p (in Paschen notation) collisional excitation transfer coefficients in noble gases using continuous-wave laser collisionally induced fluorescence (CW LCIF, i.e. fluorescence from an upper level which is not that of the laser transition). The technique requires isolation of the specific 2p coupling process under examination, whereby that process provides an important and quantifiable contribution to the LCIF. This is achieved by selecting appropriate laser excitation and LCIF transitions. For a neon discharge operating at pressures ranging from 1.5 to 8.0 Torr and currents from 1 to 10 mA, 2p coupling is by ground-state atom collisions and the largest coupling exists between adjacent states. We show that in certain cases excitation transfer plays an important role in the excited-state kinetics. (author)

  11. Excitation of vibrational states in 114Cd by inelastic electron scattering

    Inelastic electron scattering form factors for excitation of states up to 2.4 MeV in 114Cd have been obtained in the momentum-transfer range between 0.37 and 1.09 fm-1. The 21+ quadrupole moment and 22+ radiative transition rates are deduced using a vibrational model in which one-and two-phonon states are mixed. The results obtained are in excellent agreement with recent reorientation effect measurements. Inclusion of higher momentum transfer data favours a 3- assignment for the 1.957 MeV level. The 4+ level at 2.35 MeV is shown to have an enhanced transition rate, making it a candidate for the single-phonon hexadecupole transition. (author)

  12. DFT study of electronic transfer properties of carboxyl and nitro substituted benzene

    The electronic and optical transfer properties of Benzene, Benzoic Acid (BA), Nitrobenzene (NB) and Para Nitro Benzoic Acid (PNBA) at ground and first excited state has been investigated by the Density functional theory (DFT)and Time Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) using SVWN functional/3-21G basis set respectively. Possible intra-molecular charge transfer and n to π* transitions in the ground and the first excitation states have been predicted by the molecular orbitals and the Natural Bond Orbital (NBO) analysis. The simulated absorption spectra have been generated and the result compared with existing experimental results

  13. Decision making based on optical excitation transfer via near-field interactions between quantum dots

    Optical near-field interactions between nanostructured matters, such as quantum dots, result in unidirectional optical excitation transfer when energy dissipation is induced. This results in versatile spatiotemporal dynamics of the optical excitation, which can be controlled by engineering the dissipation processes and exploited to realize intelligent capabilities such as solution searching and decision making. Here, we experimentally demonstrate the ability to solve a decision making problem on the basis of optical excitation transfer via near-field interactions by using colloidal quantum dots of different sizes, formed on a geometry-controlled substrate. We characterize the energy transfer behavior due to multiple control light patterns and experimentally demonstrate the ability to solve the multi-armed bandit problem. Our work makes a decisive step towards the practical design of nanophotonic systems capable of efficient decision making, one of the most important intellectual attributes of the human brain.

  14. Decision making based on optical excitation transfer via near-field interactions between quantum dots

    Naruse, Makoto; Aono, Masashi; Ohtsu, Motoichi; Sonnefraud, Yannick; Drezet, Aurélien; Huant, Serge; Kim, Song-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Optical near-field interactions between nanostructured matter, such as quantum dots, result in unidirectional optical excitation transfer when energy dissipation is induced. This results in versatile spatiotemporal dynamics of the optical excitation, which can be controlled by engineering the dissipation processes and exploited to realize intelligent capabilities such as solution searching and decision making. Here we experimentally demonstrate the ability to solve a decision making problem on the basis of optical excitation transfer via near-field interactions by using colloidal quantum dots of different sizes, formed on a geometry-controlled substrate. We characterize the energy transfer behavior due to multiple control light patterns and experimentally demonstrate the ability to solve the multi-armed bandit problem. Our work makes a decisive step towards the practical design of nanophotonic systems capable of efficient decision making, one of the most important intellectual attributes of the human brain.

  15. INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS

    Bartoloni, Fernando Heering; Monteiro Leite Ciscato, Luiz Francisco; Augusto, Felipe Alberto; Baader, Wilhelm Josef

    2010-01-01

    INVERSE ELECTRON TRANSFER IN PEROXYOXALATE CHEMIEXCITATION USING EASILY REDUCIBLE ACTIVATORS. Chemiluminescence properties of the peroxyoxalate reaction in the presence of activators bearing electron withdrawing substituents were studied, to evaluate the possible occurrence of an inverse electron tr

  16. Excited atomic bromine energy transfer and quenching mechanisms

    Johnson, Ray O.

    1993-08-01

    Pulsed and steady-state photolysis experiments have been conducted to determine the rate coefficients for collisional deactivation of the spin-orbit excited state of atomic bromine, Br((sup 2)P(sub 1/2)). Pulsed lifetime studies for quenching by Br2 and CO2 established absolute rate coefficients at room temperature of k(sub Br2) = 1.2 +/- 0.1 x 10(exp-12) and k(sub CO2) = 1.5 +/0.2 x 10(exp-11) cu cm/molecule-s. Steady-state photolysis methods were used to determine the quenching rates for the rare gases, N2, 02, H2, D2, NO, NO2, N2O, SF6, CF4, CH4, CO, CO2, COS, SO2, H2S, HBr, HC1, and HI relative to that for Br2. Quenching rate temperature dependence was examined for Br2, CO2, N2O, HCl, COS, NO, and NO2 for temperatures from 300 to 420 K. Diffusion and three body effects were examined in order to determine the slowest relative quenching rate measurable by this experimental technique.

  17. Interfacial Electron Transfer and Transient Photoconductivity Studied with Terahertz Spectroscopy

    Milot, Rebecca Lee

    Terahertz spectroscopy is distinguished from other far infrared and millimeter wave spectroscopies by its inherent phase sensitivity and sub-picosecond time resolution making it a versatile technique to study a wide range of physical phenomena. As THz spectroscopy is still a relatively new field, many aspects of THz generation mechanisms have not been fully examined. Using terahertz emission spectroscopy (TES), THz emission from ZnTe(110) was analyzed and found to be limited by two-photon absorption and free-carrier generation at high excitation fluences. Due to concerns about the continued use of fossil fuels, solar energy has been widely investigated as a promising source of renewable energy. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been developed as a low-cost alternative to conventional photovoltaic solar cells. To solve the issues of the intermittency and inefficient transport associated with solar energy, researchers are attempting to adapt DSSCs for water oxidation and chemical fuel production. Both device designs incorporate sensitizer molecules covalently bound to metal oxide nanoparticles. The sensitizer, which is comprised of a chromophore and anchoring group, absorbs light and transfers an electron from its excited state to the conduction band of the metal oxide, producing an electric current. Using time-resolved THz spectroscopy (TRTS), an optical pump/THz probe technique, the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from sensitizers to metal oxides was evaluated as a function of the chromophore, its anchoring group, and the metal oxide identity. Experiments for studying fully functioning DSSCs and water oxidation devices are also described. Bio-inspired pentafluorophenyl porphyrin chromophores have been designed and synthesized for use in photoelectrochemical water oxidation cells. Influences on the efficiency and dynamics of electron injection from the chromophores into TiO2 and SnO2 nanoparticles due to changes in both the central substituent to

  18. Vibration-assisted coherent excitation energy transfer in a detuning system

    Wang, Xin; Li, Hong-rong

    2014-01-01

    The roles of the vibration motions played in the excitation energy transfer process are studied. It is found that a strong coherent transfer in the hybrid system emerges when the detuning between the donor and the acceptor equals the intrinsic frequency of the vibrational mode, and as a result the energy can be transferred into the acceptor much effectively. Three cases of the donor and the acceptor coupling with vibrational modes are investigated respectively. We find that the quantum interference between the two different transfer channels via the vibrational modes can affects the dynamics of the system significantly.

  19. Coexistence of Different Electron-Transfer Mechanisms in the DNA Repair Process by Photolyase.

    Lee, Wook; Kodali, Goutham; Stanley, Robert J; Matsika, Spiridoula

    2016-08-01

    DNA photolyase has been the topic of extensive studies due to its important role of repairing photodamaged DNA, and its unique feature of using light as an energy source. A crucial step in the repair by DNA photolyase is the forward electron transfer from its cofactor (FADH(-) ) to the damaged DNA, and the detailed mechanism of this process has been controversial. In the present study, we examine the forward electron transfer in DNA photolyase by carrying out high-level ab initio calculations in combination with a quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach, and by measuring fluorescence emission spectra at low temperature. On the basis of these computational and experimental results, we demonstrate that multiple decay pathways exist in DNA photolyase depending on the wavelength at excitation and the subsequent transition. This implies that the forward electron transfer in DNA photolyase occurs not only by superexchange mechanism but also by sequential electron transfer. PMID:27362906

  20. Electron transfer in gas surface collisions

    In this thesis electron transfer between atoms and metal surfaces in general is discussed and the negative ionization of hydrogen by scattering protons at a cesiated crystalline tungsten (110) surface in particular. Experimental results and a novel theoretical analysis are presented. In Chapter I a theoretical overview of resonant electron transitions between atoms and metals is given. In the first part of chapter II atom-metal electron transitions at a fixed atom-metal distance are described on the basis of a model developed by Gadzuk. In the second part the influence of the motion of the atom on the atomic charge state is incorporated. Measurements presented in chapter III show a strong dependence of the fraction of negatively charged H atoms scattered at cesiated tungsten, on the normal as well as the parallel velocity component. In chapter IV the proposed mechanism for the parallel velocity effect is incorporated in the amplitude method. The scattering process of protons incident under grazing angles on a cesium covered surface is studied in chapter V. (Auth.)

  1. Assessment of quantum chemical methods and basis sets for excitation energy transfer

    The validity of several standard quantum chemical approaches and other models for the prediction of exciton energy transfer is investigated using the HOMO-LUMO excited states of benzene dimer as an example. The configuration interaction singles (CIS), time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TD-HF), time dependent density functional theroy (TD-DFT), and complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF) methods are applied with a supermolecule approach and compared to the previously established monomer transition density method and the ideal dipole approximation. Strong and physically incorrect admixture of charge-transfer states makes TD-DFT inappropriate for investigations of potential energy surfaces in such dimer systems. CIS, TD-HF and CASSCF perform qualitatively correct. TD-HF seems to be a particularly appropriate method due to its general applicability and overall good performance for the excited state and for transition properties. Double-zeta basis sets with polarisation functions are found to be sufficient to predict transfer rates of dipole allowed excitations. Efficient excitation energy transfer is predicted between degenerate excited states while avoided curve crossings of nearly spaced π-aggregates are identified as a possible trapping mechanism

  2. Energy transfer followed by electron transfer in a supramolecular triad composed of boron dipyrrin, zinc porphyrin, and fullerene: a model for the photosynthetic antenna-reaction center complex.

    D'Souza, Francis; Smith, Phillip M; Zandler, Melvin E; McCarty, Amy L; Itou, Mitsunari; Araki, Yasuyuki; Ito, Osamu

    2004-06-30

    The first example of a working model of the photosynthetic antenna-reaction center complex, constructed via self-assembled supramolecular methodology, is reported. For this, a supramolecular triad is assembled by axially coordinating imidazole-appended fulleropyrrolidine to the zinc center of a covalently linked zinc porphyrin-boron dipyrrin dyad. Selective excitation of the boron dipyrrin moiety in the boron dipyrrin-zinc porphyrin dyad resulted in efficient energy transfer (k(ENT)(singlet) = 9.2 x 10(9) s(-)(1); Phi(ENT)(singlet) = 0.83) creating singlet excited zinc porphyrin. Upon forming the supramolecular triad, the excited zinc porphyrin resulted in efficient electron transfer to the coordinated fullerenes, resulting in a charge-separated state (k(cs)(singlet) = 4.7 x 10(9) s(-)(1); Phi(CS)(singlet) = 0.9). The observed energy transfer followed by electron transfer in the present supramolecular triad mimics the events of natural photosynthesis. Here, the boron dipyrrin acts as antenna chlorophyll that absorbs light energy and transports spatially to the photosynthetic reaction center, while the electron transfer from the excited zinc porphyrin to fullerene mimics the primary events of the reaction center where conversion of the electronic excitation energy to chemical energy in the form of charge separation takes place. The important feature of the present model system is its relative "simplicity" because of the utilized supramolecular approach to mimic rather complex "combined antenna-reaction center" events of photosynthesis. PMID:15212538

  3. Polarization dependence of charge-transfer excitations in La2CuO4

    Lu, Li; Chabot-Couture, Guillaume; Hancock, Jason; Vajk, Owen; Yu, Guichuan; Ishii, Kenji; Mizuki, Jun'ichiro; Casa, Diego; Gog, Thomas; Greven, Martin

    2006-03-01

    We have carried out an extensive resonant inelastic x-ray scattering (RIXS) study of La2CuO4 at the Cu K-edge. Multiple charge-transfer excitations have been identified using the incident photon energy dependence of the cross section and studied carefully with polarizations E//c and E //ab. An analysis of the incident photon energy dependence, the polarization dependence, as well as the K-edge absorption spectra, indicates that the RIXS spectra reveal rich physics about the K-edge absorption process and momentum-dependent charge-transfer excitations in cuprates.

  4. Formation of excited tin ion in collisions of slow electrons with SnCl2 molecules

    Formation of tin excited ions in collisions of slow electrons with tin dichloride molecules was studied experimentally. At electron energy of 100 eV 50 cross sections of excited single charged tin ions spectral lines were measured. 6 optical functions of dissociative excitation in the electron energy range of 0-100 eV were recorded. Comparison of cross sections for direct and dissociative excitation of certain lines was made. Dissociative excitation of spectral lines in two systems of SnCl molecules was studied simultaneously

  5. Dissociative excitation of NO2 by electron impact

    Young, J. A.; Malone, C. P.; Johnson, P. V.; Liu, X.; Ajello, J. M.; Kanik, I.

    2009-09-01

    Electron-impact-induced vacuum ultraviolet emissions are measured for NO2, a species important to discharge phenomena and ozone decomposition in the Earth's atmosphere. A calibrated spectrum for 100 eV incident electrons is presented, along with cross sections for strong emission features between 80 and 160 nm. The dominant N i (2p3 4S°-3s 4P) emission at 120.1 nm is compared with that of N2 and used to provide an absolute calibration for all measured cross sections. In addition, 10-300 eV excitation functions for the N i (120.1 nm) and O i (130.4 nm) emissions are presented and interpreted. Comparisons are made with similar measurements of related species, in particular N2O and NO. Of interest, it was found that, on average, the variation in the intensity of oxygen and nitrogen emissions could be reasonably explained by the difference in the number of constituent oxygen and nitrogen atoms in each target.

  6. Comparative study on contribution of charge-transfer collision to excitations of iron ion between argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma and nitrogen microwave induced plasma

    Satoh, Kozue; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki, E-mail: wagatuma@imr.tohoku.ac.jp

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes an ionization/excitation phenomenon of singly-ionized iron occurring in an Okamoto-cavity microwave induced plasma (MIP) as well as an argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma (ICP), by comparing the Boltzmann distribution among iron ionic lines (Fe II) having a wide range of the excitation energy from 4.76 to 9.01 eV. It indicated in both the plasmas that plots of Fe II lines having lower excitation energies (4.76 to 5.88 eV) were fitted on each linear relationship, implying that their excitations were caused by a dominant thermal process such as collision with energetic electron. However, Fe II lines having higher excitation energies (more than 7.55 eV) had a different behavior from each other. In the ICP, Boltzmann plots of Fe II lines assigned to the higher excited levels also followed the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels, even including a deviation from it in particular excited levels having an excitation energy of ca. 7.8 eV. This deviation can be attributed to a charge-transfer collision with argon ion, which results in the overpopulation of these excited levels, but the contribution is small. On the other hand, the distribution of the high-lying excited levels was non-thermal in the Okamoto-cavity MIP, which did not follow the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels. A probable reason for the non-thermal characteristics in the MIP is that a charge-transfer collision with nitrogen molecule ion having many vibrational/rotational levels could work for populating the 3d{sup 6}4p (3d{sup 5}4s4p) excited levels of iron ion broadly over an energy range of 7.6–9.0 eV, while collisional excitation by energetic electron would occur insufficiently to excite these high-energy levels. - Highlights: • This paper describes the excitation mechanism of iron ion in Okamoto-cavity MIP in comparison with conventional ICP. • Boltzmann distribution is studied among iron ionic lines of

  7. Comparative study on contribution of charge-transfer collision to excitations of iron ion between argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma and nitrogen microwave induced plasma

    This paper describes an ionization/excitation phenomenon of singly-ionized iron occurring in an Okamoto-cavity microwave induced plasma (MIP) as well as an argon radio-frequency inductively-coupled plasma (ICP), by comparing the Boltzmann distribution among iron ionic lines (Fe II) having a wide range of the excitation energy from 4.76 to 9.01 eV. It indicated in both the plasmas that plots of Fe II lines having lower excitation energies (4.76 to 5.88 eV) were fitted on each linear relationship, implying that their excitations were caused by a dominant thermal process such as collision with energetic electron. However, Fe II lines having higher excitation energies (more than 7.55 eV) had a different behavior from each other. In the ICP, Boltzmann plots of Fe II lines assigned to the higher excited levels also followed the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels, even including a deviation from it in particular excited levels having an excitation energy of ca. 7.8 eV. This deviation can be attributed to a charge-transfer collision with argon ion, which results in the overpopulation of these excited levels, but the contribution is small. On the other hand, the distribution of the high-lying excited levels was non-thermal in the Okamoto-cavity MIP, which did not follow the normal Boltzmann relationship among the low-lying excited levels. A probable reason for the non-thermal characteristics in the MIP is that a charge-transfer collision with nitrogen molecule ion having many vibrational/rotational levels could work for populating the 3d64p (3d54s4p) excited levels of iron ion broadly over an energy range of 7.6–9.0 eV, while collisional excitation by energetic electron would occur insufficiently to excite these high-energy levels. - Highlights: • This paper describes the excitation mechanism of iron ion in Okamoto-cavity MIP in comparison with conventional ICP. • Boltzmann distribution is studied among iron ionic lines of various

  8. Activation entropy of electron transfer reactions

    Milischuk, A A; Newton, M D; Milischuk, Anatoli A.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.; Newton, Marshall D.

    2005-01-01

    We report microscopic calculations of free energies and entropies for intramolecular electron transfer reactions. The calculation algorithm combines the atomistic geometry and charge distribution of a molecular solute obtained from quantum calculations with the microscopic polarization response of a polar solvent expressed in terms of its polarization structure factors. The procedure is tested on a donor-acceptor complex in which ruthenium donor and cobalt acceptor sites are linked by a four-proline polypeptide. The reorganization energies and reaction energy gaps are calculated as a function of temperature by using structure factors obtained from our analytical procedure and from computer simulations. Good agreement between two procedures and with direct computer simulations of the reorganization energy is achieved. The microscopic algorithm is compared to the dielectric continuum calculations. We found that the strong dependence of the reorganization energy on the solvent refractive index predicted by conti...

  9. Devices which transfer electrons one-by-one

    An introduction is given to the field of single-electron devices, which are electronic circuits across which electrons may be transferred one by one. Experiments are described on the single-junction box and the four-junction box, devices in which electrons were transferred to a metallic island and their presence detected using a single-electron electrometer. The single-junction box, the simpler of the two devices, allows one to control the thermally-averaged number of excess electrons on the metallic island, whereas with the four-junction box one can actually control the transfer of individual electrons. (author) 11 refs.; 5 figs

  10. Vibrational transition rule during a through-bond electron transfer process

    Monturet, Serge; Kepenekian, M.; Robles, Roberto; Lorente, N.; Joachim, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The transition rule governing the inelastic excitations of molecular vibrations occurring during a molecular through-state electron transfer process is presented. Using an effective Hamiltonian model, it is shown that the quantum time oscillation of the intermediate electronic state population triggers this transition. Its corresponding quantum oscillation frequency has to be equal to a quantum of vibration. This transition rule is extended to the full spectrum of a quantum vibrator. This new...

  11. Path integral approach to non-relativistic electron charge transfer

    A path integral approach has been generalized for the non-relativistic electron charge transfer processes. The charge transfer - the capture of an electron by an ion passing another atom, or more generally the problem of rearrangement collisions - is formulated in terms of influence functionals. It has been shown that the electron charge transfer process can be treated either as an electron transition problem or as ion and atom elastic scattering in the effective potential field. The first-order Born approximation for the electron charge transfer reaction cross section has been reproduced to prove the adequacy of the path integral approach for this problem. (author)

  12. Fully Relativistic Electron Impact Excitation Cross-Section and Polarization for Tungsten Ions

    Priti; Dipti; Lalita Sharma; Rajesh Srivastava

    2015-01-01

    Electron impact excitation of highly charged tungsten ions in the framework of a fully relativistic distorted wave approach is considered in this paper. Calculations of electron impact excitation cross-sections for the M- and L-shell transitions in the tungsten ions Wn+ (n = 44–66) and polarization of the decay of photons from the excited tungsten ions are briefly reviewed and discussed. New calculations in the wide range of incident electron energies are presented for M-shell transitions in ...

  13. Coherent excitation transferring via dark state in light-harvesting process

    Dong, H.; Xu, D. Z.; Sun, C. P.

    2011-01-01

    We study the light absorption and energy transferring in a donor-acceptor system with a bionic structure. In the optimal case with uniform couplings, it is found that the quantum dynamics of this seemingly complicated system is reduced as a three-level system of $\\Lambda$-type. With this observation, we show that the dark state based electromagnetically-induced transparency (EIT) effect could enhance the energy transfer efficiency, through a quantum interference effect suppressing the excited...

  14. Excited-state proton transfer from pyranine to acetate in methanol

    Sudip Kumar Mondal; Subhadip Ghosh; Kalyanasis Sahu; Pratik Sen; Kankan Bhattacharyya

    2007-03-01

    Excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) of pyranine (8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulphonate, HPTS) to acetate in methanol has been studied by steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. The rate constant of direct proton transfer from pyranine to acetate (1) is calculated to be ∼ 1 × 109 M-1 s-1. This is slower by about two orders of magnitude than that in bulk water (8 × 1010 M-1 s-1) at 4 M acetate.

  15. The population transfer of high excited states of Rydberg lithium atoms in a microwave field

    Using the time-dependent multilevel approach (TDMA), the properties of high excited Rydberg lithium atom have been obtained in the microwave field. The population transfer of lithium atom are studied on numerical calculation, quantum states are controlled and manipulated by microwave field. It shows that the population can be completely transferred to the target state by changing the chirped rate and field amplitude. (authors)

  16. Electronic structure and excited state dynamics in optically excited PTCDA films investigated with two-photon photoemission

    Marks, M.; Sachs, S.; Schwalb, C. H.; Schöll, A.; Höfer, U.

    2013-09-01

    We present an investigation of the electronic structure and excited state dynamics of optically excited 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) thin films adsorbed on Ag(111) using two-photon photoemission spectroscopy (2PPE). 2PPE allows us to study both occupied and unoccupied electronic states, and we are able to identify signals from the highest occupied and the two lowest unoccupied electronic states of the PTCDA thin film in the 2PPE spectra. The energies for occupied states are identical to values from ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Compared to results from inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (IPES), the 2PPE signals from the two lowest unoccupied electronic states, LUMO and LUMO+1, are found at 0.8 eV and 1.0 eV lower energies, respectively. We attribute this deviation to the different final states probed in 2PPE and IPES and the attractive interaction of the photoexcited electron and the remaining hole. Furthermore, we present a time-resolved investigation of the excited state dynamics of the PTCDA film in the femtosecond time regime. We observe a significantly shorter inelastic excited state lifetime compared to findings from time-resolved photoluminescence spectroscopy of PTCDA single crystals which could originate from excitation quenching by the metal substrate.

  17. An efficient implementation of the localized operator partitioning method for electronic energy transfer

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Brumer, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The localized operator partitioning method [Y. Khan and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 194112 (2012)] rigorously defines the electronic energy on any subsystem within a molecule and gives a precise meaning to the subsystem ground and excited electronic energies, which is crucial for investigating electronic energy transfer from first principles. However, an efficient implementation of this approach has been hindered by complicated one- and two-electron integrals arising in its formulation. Using a resolution of the identity in the definition of partitioning we reformulate the method in a computationally e?cient manner that involves standard one- and two-electron integrals. We apply the developed algorithm to the 9-((1-naphthyl)-methyl)-anthracene (A1N) molecule by partitioning A1N into anthracenyl and CH2-naphthyl groups as subsystems, and examine their electronic energies and populations for several excited states using Configuration Interaction Singles method. The implemented approach shows a wide variety o...

  18. Excitation and ionization of highly charged ions by electron impact

    Two approaches for very rapid calculation of atomic data for high temperature plasma modeling have been developed. The first uses hydrogenic basis states and has been developed and applied in many papers discussed in previous progress reports. Hence, it is only briefly discussed here. The second is a very rapid, yet accurate, fully relativistic approach that has been developed over the past two or three years. It is described in more detail. Recently it has been applied to large scale production of atomic data. Specifically, it has been used to calculate relativistic distorted wave collision strengths and oscillator strengths for the following: all transitions from the ground level to the n=3 and 4 excited levels in the 71 Neon-like ions with nuclear charge number Z in the range 22 ≤ Z ≤ 92; all transitions among the 2s1/2, 2p1/2 and 2p3/2 levels and from them to all nlj levels with n=3,4 and 5 in the 85 Li-like ions with 8 ≤ Z ≤ 92; all transitions among the 3s1/2, 3p3/2, 3d3/2 and 3d5/2 levels and from them to all nlj levels with n=4 and 5 in the 71 Na-like ions with 22 ≤ Z ≤ 92; and all transitions among 4s1/2, 4p1/2, 4p3/2, 4d3/2, 4d5/2, 4f5/2 and 4f7/2 levels and from them to all nlj levels with n=5 in the 33 Cu-like ions with 60 ≤ Z ≤ 92. Also the program has been extended to give cross-sections for excitation to specific magnetic sublevels of the target ion by an electron beam and very recently it has been extended to give relativistic distorted wave cross sections for ionization of highly charged ions by electron impact

  19. Nuclear Excitation by Electronic Transition of U-235

    Chodash, Perry Adam [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-07-14

    Nuclear excitation by electronic transition (NEET) is a rare nuclear excitation that is theorized to occur in numerous isotopes. One isotope in particular, 235U, has been studied several times over the past 40 years and NEET of 235U has never been conclusively observed. These past experiments generated con icting results with some experiments claiming to observe NEET of 235U and others setting limits for the NEET rate. This dissertation discusses the latest attempt to measure NEET of 235U. If NEET of 235U were to occur, 235mU would be created. 235mU decays by internal conversion with a decay energy of 76 eV and a half-life of 26 minutes. A pulsed Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm with a pulse energy of 789 mJ and a pulse width of 9 ns was used to generate a uranium plasma. The plasma was captured on a catcher plate and electrons emitted from the catcher plate were accelerated and focused onto a microchannel plate detector. A decay of 26 minutes would suggest the creation of 235mU and the possibility that NEET occurred. However, measurements performed using a variety of uranium targets spanning depleted uranium up to 99.4% enriched uranium did not observe a 26 minute decay. Numerous other decays were observed with half-lives ranging from minutes up to hundreds of minutes. While NEET of 235U was not observed during this experiment, an upper limit for the NEET rate of 235U was determined. In addition, explanations for the con icting results from previous experiments are given. Based on the results of this experiment and the previous experiments looking for NEET of 235U, it is likely that NEET of 235U has never been observed.

  20. I. Concepts of Highly Excited Electronic Systems / II. Electronic Correlation Mapping from Finite to Extended Systems

    Berakdar, Jamal

    2006-02-01

    Knowledge of the excitation characteristics of matter is decisive for the descriptions of a variety of dynamical processes, which are of significant technological interest. E.g. transport properties and the optical response are controlled by the excitation spectrum. This self-contained work is a coherent presentation of the quantum theory of correlated few-particle excitations in electronic systems. It begins with a compact resume of the quantum mechanics of single particle excitations. Particular emphasis is put on Green function methods, which offer a natural tool to unravel the relations between the physics of small and large electronic systems. The book contains explicit expressions for the Coulomb Green function of two charge particles and a generalization to three-body systems. Techniques for the many-body Green function of finite systems are introduced and some explicit calculations of the Green functions are given. Concrete examples are provided and the theories are contrasted with experimental data, when available. A complimentary volume presents an up-to-date selection of applications of the developed concepts and a comparison with available experiments is made

  1. Mechanism for Highly Efficient Non-Radiative Deactivation of Electronic Excitation in Rutin

    Bondarev, S. L.; Knyukshto, V. N.; Tikhomirov, S. A.; Buganov, O. V.

    2016-01-01

    Steady-state and pulsed spectroscopic methods are used to study the spectroscopic and photophysical properties of the biologically important plant pigment rutin at room temperature and 77 K in organic solvents and a buffer solution at pH 7.0. The large dipole moment μe = 13.3 D of the rutin molecule in a Franck-Condon excited state indicates that rutin is dipolar in this excited state. The nonstationary S1 → Sn induced absorption spectra are characterized by a short-wavelength band at λabs max = 460 nm and low-intensity absorption in the 500-750 range which clearly belongs to associates of rutin. No residual induced absorption which might be related to triplet-triplet T1→Tk transitions in rutin was observed over the entire spectral range for times >50 ns. S1 → S0 fluorescence with a quantum yield Φfl ~ 10-4 was also observed at room temperature. The fluorescence and fluorescence excitation spectra manifest a weak dependence on the excitation and detection wavelengths, which may be related to the presence of conformers in the solution owing to rotation of the phenol B ring around a single 1'-2 bond. Lowering the temperature of a glassy frozen solution of rutin in ethanol to 77 K raises Φfl by a factor of 750. A rate constant kic = 3.7·1011 s-1 for internal conversion from the S1 state at room temperature is calculated from the spectral-luminescence data. It is found that the main channel for exchange of electronic excitation energy in the rutin molecule at room temperature is S1(π,π*) ~~> S0-internal conversion induced by the charge-transfer state.

  2. 48 CFR 18.123 - Electronic funds transfer.

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Electronic funds transfer. 18.123 Section 18.123 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION CONTRACTING METHODS AND CONTRACT TYPES EMERGENCY ACQUISITIONS Available Acquisition Flexibilities 18.123 Electronic funds transfer. Electronic funds...

  3. Respiratory electron transfer in Escherichia coli : components, energetics and regulation

    M. Bekker

    2009-01-01

    The respiratory chain that is housed in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, generally transfers electrons from NADH to oxygen; in the absence of oxygen it can use several alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate and fumarate. Transfer of electrons through this chain is usually coupled to the

  4. Theoretical aspects of electron transfer reactions of complex molecules

    Kuznetsov, A. M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2001-01-01

    Features of electron transfer involving complex molecules are discussed. This notion presently refers to molecular reactants where charge transfer is accompanied by large molecular reorganization, and commonly used displaced harmonic oscillator models do not apply. It is shown that comprehensive ...

  5. Transcriptomic and genetic analysis of direct interspecies electron transfer

    Shrestha, Pravin Malla; Rotaru, Amelia-Elena; Summers, Zarath M;

    2013-01-01

    The possibility that metatranscriptomic analysis could distinguish between direct interspecies electron transfer (DIET) and H2 interspecies transfer (HIT) in anaerobic communities was investigated by comparing gene transcript abundance in cocultures in which Geobacter sulfurreducens was the elect...

  6. Electron-irradiation-induced crystallization at metallic amorphous/silicon oxide interfaces caused by electronic excitation

    Nagase, Takeshi; Yamashita, Ryo; Lee, Jung-Goo

    2016-04-01

    Irradiation-induced crystallization of an amorphous phase was stimulated at a Pd-Si amorphous/silicon oxide (a(Pd-Si)/SiOx) interface at 298 K by electron irradiation at acceleration voltages ranging between 25 kV and 200 kV. Under irradiation, a Pd-Si amorphous phase was initially formed at the crystalline face-centered cubic palladium/silicon oxide (Pd/SiOx) interface, followed by the formation of a Pd2Si intermetallic compound through irradiation-induced crystallization. The irradiation-induced crystallization can be considered to be stimulated not by defect introduction through the electron knock-on effects and electron-beam heating, but by the electronic excitation mechanism. The observed irradiation-induced structural change at the a(Pd-Si)/SiOx and Pd/SiOx interfaces indicates multiple structural modifications at the metal/silicon oxide interfaces through electronic excitation induced by the electron-beam processes.

  7. Theoretical and experimental differential cross sections for electron impact excitation of the electronic bands of furfural

    Jones, D. B.; Neves, R. F. C.; Lopes, M. C. A.; da Costa, R. F.; do N. Varella, M. T.; Bettega, M. H. F.; Lima, M. A. P.; García, G.; Limão-Vieira, P.; Brunger, M. J.

    2016-03-01

    We report results from a joint experimental and theoretical investigation into electron scattering from the important industrial species furfural (C5H4O2). Specifically, differential cross sections (DCSs) have been measured and calculated for the electron-impact excitation of the electronic states of C5H4O2. The measurements were carried out at energies in the range 20-40 eV, and for scattered-electron angles between 10° and 90°. The energy resolution of those experiments was typically ˜80 meV. Corresponding Schwinger multichannel method with pseudo-potential calculations, for energies between 6-50 eV and with and without Born-closure, were also performed for a sub-set of the excited electronic-states that were accessed in the measurements. Those calculations were undertaken at the static exchange plus polarisation-level using a minimum orbital basis for single configuration interaction (MOB-SCI) approach. Agreement between the measured and calculated DCSs was qualitatively quite good, although to obtain quantitative accord, the theory would need to incorporate even more channels into the MOB-SCI. The role of multichannel coupling on the computed electronic-state DCSs is also explored in some detail.

  8. Electron transfer and ionization in collisions of highly stripped ions with neutral targets at intermediate velocities

    A highly-charged ion impinging upon a neutral target atom will capture electrons into excited states of the projectile. If the velocity is much less than that of the target electrons, little direct ionization is expected, although appreciable target ionization has been reported for very highly charged ions. Recent studies on both transfer and ionization for Arq+ (6≤q≤17) and O+8,7 on Ar and He target shave been performed for projectile velocities between 0.2 and 1.7 a.u. The measured quantities include charge-state-correlated differential cross sections, K-x-ray emission, and longitudinal recoil- ion momentum transfer, from which Q values can be deduced. Non-negligible direct ionization is observed. Information is extracted on both the primary transfer process and the decay of the multiply excited projectile states formed. Comparisons with model predictions will be made

  9. Femtosecond dynamics of electron transfer in a neutral organic mixed-valence compound

    In this article we report a femtosecond time-resolved transient absorption study of a neutral organic mixed-valence (MV) compound with the aim to gain insight into its charge-transfer dynamics upon optical excitation. The back-electron transfer was investigated in five different solvents, toluene, dibutyl ether, methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE), benzonitrile and n-hexane. In the pump step, the molecule was excited at 760 nm and 850 nm into the intervalence charge-transfer band. The resulting transients can be described by two time constant. We assign one time constant to the rearrangement of solvent molecules in the charge-transfer state and the second time constant to back-electron transfer to the electronic ground state. Back-electron transfer rates range from 1.5 x 1012 s-1 in benzonitrile through 8.3 x 1011 s-1 in MTBE, around 1.6 x 1011 s-1 in dibutylether and toluene and to 3.8 x 109 s-1 in n-hexane

  10. Elastic, excitation, ionization and charge transfer cross sections of current interest in fusion energy research

    Schultz, D.R.; Krstic, P.S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. TN (United States). Physics Div.

    1997-01-01

    Due to the present interest in modeling and diagnosing the edge and divertor plasma regions in magnetically confined fusion devices, we have sought to provide new calculations regarding the elastic, excitation, ionization, and charge transfer cross sections in collisions among relevant ions, neutrals, and isotopes in the low-to intermediate-energy regime. We summarize here some of our recent work. (author)

  11. Computer modelling of coherence effects in excitation transfer in hexagonal PSU

    The time development of the site occupation probabilities in the hexagonal model of photosynthetic units is investigated. The method based on Stochastic Liouville Equations allows us to describe the excitation transfer with a trap (reaction center) in coherent, quasicoherent and incoherent regimes. (author). 26 refs, 9 figs

  12. Symmetry-breaking intramolecular charge transfer in the excited state of meso-linked BODIPY dyads

    Whited, Matthew T.

    2012-01-01

    We report the synthesis and characterization of symmetric BODIPY dyads where the chromophores are attached at the meso position, using either a phenylene bridge or direct linkage. Both molecules undergo symmetry-breaking intramolecular charge transfer in the excited state, and the directly linked dyad serves as a visible-light-absorbing analogue of 9,9′-bianthryl.

  13. Development of an electron-temperature-dependent interatomic potential for molecular dynamics simulation of tungsten under electronic excitation

    Irradiation of a metal by lasers or swift heavy ions causes the electrons to become excited. In the vicinity of the excitation, an electronic temperature is established within a thermalization time of 10-100 fs, as a result of electron-electron collisions. For short times, corresponding to less than 1 ps after excitation, the resulting electronic temperature may be orders of magnitude higher than the lattice temperature. During this short time, atoms in the metal experience modified interatomic forces as a result of the excited electrons. These forces can lead to ultrafast nonthermal phenomena such as melting, ablation, laser-induced phase transitions, and modified vibrational properties. We develop an electron-temperature-dependent empirical interatomic potential for tungsten that can be used to model such phenomena using classical molecular dynamics simulations. Finite-temperature density functional theory calculations at high electronic temperatures are used to parametrize the model potential

  14. Electron transfer reaction in the Marcus inverted region: Role of high frequency vibrational modes

    A theoretical study of the dynamics of photo-electron transfer reactions in the Marcus inverted regime is presented. This study is motivated partly by the recent proposal of Barbara et al. (J. Phys. Chem. 96, 3728, 1991) that a minimal model of an electron transfer reaction should consist of a polar solvent mode (X), a low frequency vibrational mode (Q) and one high frequency mode (q). Interplay between these modes may be responsible for the crossover observed in the dynamics from a solvent controlled to a vibrational controlled electron transfer. The following results have been obtained. (i) In the case of slowly relaxing solvents, the proximity of the point of excitation to an effective sink on the excited surface is critical in determining the decay of the reactant population. This is because the Franck-Condon overlap between the reactant ground and the product excited states decreases rapidly with increase in the quantum number of the product vibrational state. (ii) Non-exponential solvation dynamics has an important effect in determining the rates of electron transfer. Especially, a biphasic solvation and a large coupling between the reactant and the product states both may be needed to explain the experimental results

  15. Nonlocality in the excitation energy transfer in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson complex

    Bengtson, Charlotta; Sjöqvist, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Pigment protein complexes involved in photosynthesis are remarkably efficient in transferring excitation energy from light harvesting antenna molecules to a reaction centre where it is converted to and stored as chemical energy. Recent experimental and theoretical studies suggest that quantum coherence and correlations may play a role in explaining this efficiency. We examine whether bipartite nonlocality, a property that verifies a strong correlation between two quantum systems, exists between different pairs of chromophore states in the Fenna-Matthews-Olson (FMO) complex and how this is connected to the amount of bipartite entanglement. In particular, it is tested in what way these correlation properties are affected by different initial conditions (i.e., which chromophore is initially excited). When modeling the excitation energy transfer (EET) in the FMO complex with the hierarchically coupled equations of motions (HEOM), it is found that bipartite nonlocality indeed exists for some pairs of chromophore s...

  16. Detailed glycan structural characterization by electronic excitation dissociation.

    Yu, Xiang; Jiang, Yan; Chen, Yajie; Huang, Yiqun; Costello, Catherine E; Lin, Cheng

    2013-11-01

    The structural complexity and diversity of glycans parallel their multilateral functions in living systems. To better understand the vital roles glycans play in biological processes, it is imperative to develop analytical tools that can provide detailed glycan structural information. This was conventionally achieved by multistage tandem mass spectrometry (MS(n)) analysis using collision-induced dissociation (CID) as the fragmentation method. However, the MS(n) approach lacks the sensitivity and throughput needed to analyze complex glycan mixtures from biological sources, often available in limited quantities. We define herein the critical parameters for a recently developed fragmentation technique, electronic excitation dissociation (EED), which can yield rich structurally informative fragment ions during liquid chromatographic (LC)-MS/MS analysis of glycans. We further demonstrate that permethylation, reducing end labeling and judicious selection of the metal charge carrier, can greatly facilitate spectral interpretation. With its high sensitivity, throughput, and compatibility with online chromatographic separation techniques, EED appears to hold great promise for large-scale glycomics studies. PMID:24080071

  17. The Liability of banks in electronic fund transfer transaction

    Algudah, Fayyad

    1993-01-01

    The liability of banks in electronic fund transfer (EFT) transactions is discussed in this thesis under the British and the United States law. The thesis covers banks’ liability in electronic credit and debit transfers. It covers banks’ liability in Electronic Fund Transfer at the Point Of Sale (EFTPOS), Automatic Teller Machines (ATM) and home and office banking. Liability of banks in credit card transactions and cheque truncation falls outside the scope of this thesis. In ...

  18. Electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins

    2010-01-01

    This paper reviews the recent progress in the electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins. Significant achievements in the relevant fields are summarized including the direct electron transfer between proteins and electrodes, the thermodynamic and kinetic properties, catalytic activities and activity regulation of the redox proteins. It has been demonstrated that the electrochemical technique is an effective tool for protein studies, especially for probing into the electron transfer and interfacial behavior of redox proteins.

  19. Internal electron transfer within mitochondrial succinate-cytochrome C reductase

    Internal electron transfer within succinate-cytochrome C reductase from pigeon breast muscle mitochondria was followed by the pulse radiolytic technique. The electron equivalent is transferred from an unknown donor to b type cytochrome(s), in a first order process with a rate constant of: 660 +- 150s-1. This process might be the rate determining step of electron transfer in mitochondria, since it is similar in rate to the turnover number of the mitochondrial respiratory chain

  20. Spin-transfer torque based damping control of parametrically excited spin waves in a magnetic insulator

    Lauer, V.; Bozhko, D. A.; Brächer, T.; Pirro, P.; Vasyuchka, V. I.; Serga, A. A.; Jungfleisch, M. B.; Agrawal, M.; Kobljanskyj, Yu. V.; Melkov, G. A.; Dubs, C.; Hillebrands, B.; Chumak, A. V.

    2016-01-01

    The damping of spin waves parametrically excited in the magnetic insulator Yttrium Iron Garnet (YIG) is controlled by a dc current passed through an adjacent normal-metal film. The experiment is performed on a macroscopically sized YIG(100 nm)/Pt(10 nm) bilayer of 4 × 2 mm2 lateral dimensions. The spin-wave relaxation frequency is determined via the threshold of the parametric instability measured by Brillouin light scattering spectroscopy. The application of a dc current to the Pt film leads to the formation of a spin-polarized electron current normal to the film plane due to the spin Hall effect. This spin current exerts a spin transfer torque in the YIG film and, thus, changes the spin-wave damping. Depending on the polarity of the applied dc current with respect to the magnetization direction, the damping can be increased or decreased. The magnitude of its variation is proportional to the applied current. A variation in the relaxation frequency of ± 7.5 % is achieved for an applied dc current density of 5 × 1010 A/m2.

  1. Tuning the reorganization energy of electron transfer in supramolecular ensembles - metalloporphyrin, oligophenylenevinylenes, and fullerene - and the impact on electron transfer kinetics

    Stangel, Christina; Schubert, Christina; Kuhri, Susanne; Rotas, Georgios; Margraf, Johannes T.; Regulska, Elzbieta; Clark, Timothy; Torres, Tomás; Tagmatarchis, Nikos; Coutsolelos, Athanassios G.; Guldi, Dirk M.

    2015-01-01

    Oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) (oPPV) wires of various lengths featuring pyridyls at one terminal and C60 moieties at the other, have been used as molecular building blocks in combination with porphyrins to construct a novel class of electron donor-acceptor architectures. These architectures, which are based on non-covalent, directional interactions between the zinc centers of the porphyrins and the pyridyls, have been characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Complementary physico-chemical assays focused on the interactions between electron donors and acceptors in the ground and excited states. No appreciable electron interactions were noted in the ground state, which was being probed by electrochemistry, absorption spectroscopy, etc.; the electron acceptors are sufficiently decoupled from the electron donors. In the excited state, a different picture evolved. In particular, steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence and transient absorption measurements revealed substantial electron donor-acceptor interactions. These led, upon photoexcitation of the porphyrins, to tunable intramolecular electron-transfer processes, that is, the oxidation of porphyrin and the reduction of C60. In this regard, the largest impact stems from a rather strong distance dependence of the total reorganization energy in stark contrast to the distance independence seen for covalently linked conjugates.Oligo(p-phenylenevinylene) (oPPV) wires of various lengths featuring pyridyls at one terminal and C60 moieties at the other, have been used as molecular building blocks in combination with porphyrins to construct a novel class of electron donor-acceptor architectures. These architectures, which are based on non-covalent, directional interactions between the zinc centers of the porphyrins and the pyridyls, have been characterized by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Complementary physico-chemical assays focused on the interactions

  2. Investigation of the charge-transfer in photo-excited nanoparticles for CO2 reduction in non-aqueous media

    Dimitrijević Nada M.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Photoinduced charge separation in TiO2 and Cu2O semiconductor nanoparticles was examined using Electron Paramagnetic Resonance spectroscopy in order to get insight into the photocatalytic reduction of CO2 in nonaqueous media. For dissolution/grafting of CO2 we have used carboxy-PEG4-amine, and as a solvent poly(ethylene glycol 200. We have found that, in this system, reduction of CO2 starts at potential of -0.5 V vs Ag/AgCl, which is significantly more positive than the potential for electrochemical reduction of CO2 in most organic solvents and water (-2.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. The electron transfer from excited nanoparticles to CO2 is governed both by thermodynamic and kinetic parameters, namely by the redox potential of conduction band electrons and adsorption/binding of CO2 on the surface of nanoparticles.

  3. Electronic structure and angular momentum coupling as reflected in electron excitation out of rare-gas metastable levels: Excitation cross sections of krypton

    We present measurements of electron-impact excitation cross sections into levels of the 4p55p configuration from the J=0 and J=2 metastable levels of krypton. Metastable-atom targets were generated using two different sources, a hollow-cathode discharge and via charge-exchange collisions between a fast Kr+ beam and Cs atoms. The metastable atoms are excited to 4p55p levels by a monoenergetic electron beam and the fluorescence from the levels are used to determine the excitation cross sections. Laser quenching of the hollow-cathode target is used to separate the signal contributions from excitation of the two metastable levels. Like excitation from the metastable levels of Ar, cross sections for dipole-allowed excitations are generally larger than ones for dipole-forbidden excitations. Krypton differs from Ar and Ne, however, in having a larger spin-orbit coupling for the 4p5 core so that the energy levels of each excited configuration segregate into two tiers based on the value of the core angular momentum. Cross sections for dipole-allowed excitation with a change in the core angular momentum are not only much smaller than their core-preserving counterparts, but also have different energy dependence. The measured cross sections are compared with recent theoretical calculations and with previous experimental work

  4. Coherent excitation-energy transfer and quantum entanglement in a dimer

    We study coherent energy transfer of a single excitation and quantum entanglement in a dimer, which consists of a donor and an acceptor modeled by two two-level systems. Between the donor and the acceptor, there exists a dipole-dipole interaction, which provides the physical mechanism for coherent energy transfer and entanglement generation. The donor and the acceptor couple to two independent heat baths with diagonal couplings that do not dissipate the energy of the noncoupling dimer. Special attention is paid to the effect on single-excitation energy transfer and entanglement generation of the energy detuning between the donor and the acceptor and the temperatures of the two heat baths. It is found that, the probability for single-excitation energy transfer largely depends on the energy detuning in the low temperature limit. Concretely, the positive and negative energy detunings can increase and decrease the probability at steady state, respectively. In the high temperature limit, however, the effect of the energy detuning on the probability is negligibly small. We also find that the probability is negligibly dependent on the bath temperature difference of the two heat baths. In addition, it is found that quantum entanglement can be generated in the process of coherent energy transfer. As the bath temperature increases, the generated steady-state entanglement decreases. For a given bath temperature, the steady-state entanglement decreases with the increase of the absolute value of the energy detuning.

  5. Resonant transfer excitation of fluorine-like Mo{sup 33+} ion

    Ramadan, Hassan [Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt). Dept. of Basic Sciences; Elkilany, Sabbah [Kafr El-sheikh Univ. (Egypt). Dept. of Mathematics

    2010-06-15

    Dielectronic recombination (DR) cross sections (anti {sigma}{sup DR}) and rate coefficients ({alpha}{sup DR}) for Mo{sup 33+} are calculated using the angular momentum average scheme (AMA). Moreover, the resonant transfer excitation followed by X-ray emission (RTEX) cross sections ({sigma}{sup RTEX}) for the collision of Mo{sup 33+} with H{sub 2} and He targets are calculated and studied. The calculations of the cross sections are performed for both K- and L-shell excitations. A smooth change with the temperatures for {alpha}{sup DR} is found for all kinds of excitations. The rates for K-shell excitation are very small in comparison with the rates for L-shell excitation. The RTEX cross sections for Mo{sup 33+} ions are obtained from their corresponding DR cross sections by the method of folding in the impulse approximation (IMA). {sigma}{sup RTEX} for the K-shell excitation shows two overlapped peaks which may be attributed to the two groups in this excitation process. The present calculations are considered as a database for future comparison with theoretical and experimental data using other coupling schemes. Multiple Auger channels are complicating the dependence of the cross sections on principal quantum numbers. (orig.)

  6. Ultrafast excited state dynamics of the bi- and termolecular stilbene-viologen charge-transfer complexes assembled via host-guest interactions

    Excited state dynamics of the highly stable 1:1 and 2:1 charge-transfer (CT) complexes assembled via host-guest interactions between a biscrown stilbene and a viologen vinylog was studied using transient pump-supercontinuum probe spectroscopy. In acetonitrile, both complexes showed ultrafast two-component transient absorption dynamics after excitation in the CT absorption band by a 616 nm, 70 fs laser pulse. The faster component (τ<200 fs) is assigned to relaxation processes in the lowest CT excited state. The second component is due to the back electron transfer (ET) reaction leading to the ground state. The measured ET time constants for the 1:1 and 2:1 CT complexes are about 540 fs and 1.08 ps, respectively. Excitation of the bimolecular complex by a 308 nm laser pulse gave rise to three-component transient absorption dynamics. The fastest transient (τ∼150 fs) is assigned to relaxation processes in the high-lying excited states of the complex. The high-amplitude rise component with a time constant of about 300 fs is due to the internal conversion from the high-lying excited states to the lowest CT excited state. The latter decayed to the ground state via the back ET with a time constant very close to that measured when the complex was excited in the CT absorption band

  7. Coupled sensitizer-catalyst dyads: electron-transfer reactions in a perylene-polyoxometalate conjugate.

    Odobel, Fabrice; Séverac, Marjorie; Pellegrin, Yann; Blart, Errol; Fosse, Céline; Cannizzo, Caroline; Mayer, Cédric R; Elliott, Kristopher J; Harriman, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Ultrafast discharge of a single-electron capacitor: A variety of intramolecular electron-transfer reactions are apparent for polyoxometalates functionalized with covalently attached perylene monoimide chromophores, but these are restricted to single-electron events. (et=electron transfer, cr=charge recombination, csr=charge-shift reaction, PER=perylene, POM=polyoxometalate).A new strategy is introduced that permits covalent attachment of an organic chromophore to a polyoxometalate (POM) cluster. Two examples are reported that differ according to the nature of the anchoring group and the flexibility of the linker. Both POMs are functionalized with perylene monoimide units, which function as photon collectors and form a relatively long-lived charge-transfer state under illumination. They are reduced to a stable pi-radical anion by electrolysis or to a protonated dianion under photolysis in the presence of aqueous triethanolamine. The presence of the POM opens up an intramolecular electron-transfer route by which the charge-transfer state reduces the POM. The rate of this process depends on the molecular conformation and appears to involve through-space interactions. Prior reduction of the POM leads to efficient fluorescence quenching, again due to intramolecular electron transfer. In most cases, it is difficult to resolve the electron-transfer products because of relatively fast reverse charge shift that occurs within a closed conformer. Although the POM can store multiple electrons, it has not proved possible to use these systems as molecular-scale capacitors because of efficient electron transfer from the one-electron-reduced POM to the excited singlet state of the perylene monoimide. PMID:19197929

  8. Absolute cross sections for electron collisions with diacetylene: Elastic scattering, vibrational excitation and dissociative attachment

    We present absolute experimental cross sections for elastic scattering, vibrational excitation by electron impact and for dissociative electron attachment to 1,3-butadiyne, as well as calculations of the elastic cross sections.

  9. Electronic transfer of sensitive patient data.

    Detterbeck, A M W; Kaiser, J; Hirschfelder, U

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop decision-making aids and recommendations for dental practitioners regarding the utilization and sharing of sensitive digital patient data. In the current environment of growing digitization, healthcare professionals need detailed knowledge of secure data management to maximize confidentiality and minimize the risks involved in both archiving patient data and sharing it through electronic channels. Despite well-defined legal requirements, an all-inclusive technological solution does not currently exist. The need for a preliminary review and critical appraisal of common practices of data transfer prompted a search of the literature and the Web to identify viable methods of secure data exchange and to develop a flowchart. A strong focus was placed on the transmission of datasets both smaller than and larger than 10 MB, and on secure communication by smartphone. Although encryption of patient-related data should be routine, it is often difficult to implement. Pretty Good Privacy (PGP) and Secure/Multipurpose Internet Mail Extensions (S/MIME) are viable standards for secure e-mail encryption. Sharing of high-volume data should be accomplished with the help of file encryption. Careful handling of sensitive patient data is mandatory, and it is the end-user's responsibility to meet any requirements for encryption, preferably by using free, open-source (and hence transparent) software. PMID:25911828

  10. Activation entropy of electron transfer reactions

    We report microscopic calculations of free energies and entropies for intramolecular electron transfer reactions. The calculation algorithm combines the atomistic geometry and charge distribution of a molecular solute obtained from quantum calculations with the microscopic polarization response of a polar solvent expressed in terms of its polarization structure factors. The procedure is tested on a donor-acceptor complex in which ruthenium donor and cobalt acceptor sites are linked by a four-proline polypeptide. The reorganization energies and reaction energy gaps are calculated as a function of temperature by using structure factors obtained from our analytical procedure and from computer simulations. Good agreement between two procedures and with direct computer simulations of the reorganization energy is achieved. The microscopic algorithm is compared to the dielectric continuum calculations. We found that the strong dependence of the reorganization energy on the solvent refractive index predicted by continuum models is not supported by the microscopic theory. Also, the reorganization and overall solvation entropies are substantially larger in the microscopic theory compared to continuum models

  11. Anisotropy of electronic states excited in ion-atom collisions

    The author reports coincidence measurements made on the He+ + Ne and He+ + He systems. The complex population amplitudes for the magnetic sublevels of the investigated excited states, Ne(2p43s2)1D and He(2p2)1D, were completely determined and possible excitation mechanisms are described. (Auth.)

  12. Electromagnetic field excitation by an electron bunches in a partially filled cylindrical dielectric resonator

    A nonlinear self-consistent theory of wakefield excitation by an electron bunches in cylindrical resonator with longitudinally nonuniform filling by dielectric is constructed. A bunch-excited field are presented in the form of superposition solenoidal and potential fields. The formulated nonlinear theory allows carrying out numerical analysis of resonator excitation by electron bunches for the best interpretation of the results received in experiment

  13. Effect of vacuum polarization on the excitation of hydrogen atom by electron impact

    Sujata Bhattacharyya

    1981-01-01

    for 1S−2S excitation of the hydrogen atom by electron impact. The excitation amplitude calculated field theoretically is found to be lowered by 0.47t2/(t2+93 where t2=4|P−Q|2, P and Q being the momenta of the incident and scattered electrons respectively.

  14. Theoretical research of electron-ion direct impact excitation cross sections for hot dense plasma

    An average-atom (AA) model, Younger formula and partial wave method are employed to study the electron- ion direct impact excitation cross sections for hot dense plasma. The phenomenon of electron resonance near the excitation threshold and its mechanism are discussed. (author)

  15. Probing the Mechanism of Electron Capture and Electron Transfer Dissociation Using Tags with Variable Electron Affinity

    Sohn, Chang Ho; Chung, Cheol K.; Yin, Sheng; Ramachandran, Prasanna; Loo, Joseph A; Beauchamp, J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Electron capture dissociation (ECD) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD) of doubly protonated electron affinity (EA)-tuned peptides were studied to further illuminate the mechanism of these processes. The model peptide FQpSEEQQQTEDELQDK, containing a phosphoserine residue, was converted to EA-tuned peptides via β-elimination and Michael addition of various thiol compounds. These include propanyl, benzyl, 4-cyanobenzyl, perfluorobenzyl, 3,5-dicyanobenzyl, 3-nitrobenzyl, and 3,5-dinitrobenz...

  16. Photoinduced electron transfer in fullerene triads bearing pyrene and fluorene

    Sandanayaka, Atula S. D.; Araki, Yasuyaki; Ito, Osamu; Deviprasad, Gollapalli R.; Smith, Phillip M.; Rogers, Lisa M.; Zandler, Melvin E.; D'Souza, Francis

    2006-06-01

    Photochemical properties of pyrene and fluorene appended fulleropyrrolidine triads (AH 1-C 60-AH 2; AH 1 = pyrene and fluorene; AH 2 = naphthalene and phenyl) are reported. Electrochemical studies using cyclic voltammetry technique and DFT calculations at B3LYP/3-21G( ∗) method revealed that the charge-separated states in pyrene and fluorene appended triads are pyrene-C60rad --AH2 and fluorene-C60rad --AH2, respectively; however, no such charge-separated states could be established for naphthalene and phenyl appended triads. As demonstrated from the time resolved fluorescence, upon excitation of AH moiety in nonpolar solvents, energy transfer predominantly occurred from the singlet excited fluorophore to the C 60 moiety, whereas in polar DMF charge-separation also contributed to the fluorescence quenching. Additionally, charge separation also occurred from the singlet excited C 60 to the pyrene or fluorene entities of the triads in DMF. The rates and quantum yields of charge separation obtained by time-resolved emission studies were around 10 9 s -1 and 0.9-0.6 for pyrene-C 60-AH 2 and fluorene-C 60-AH 2 triads. Nanosecond transient absorption spectral studies performed by using 355 nm laser light on the triads, exhibited transient bands corresponding to the C60rad - and pyrene rad + or fluorene rad + , thus establishing the occurrence of electron transfer in these triads in DMF. The rates of charge recombination obtained by monitoring the decay of the C60rad - were found to be around 10 6 s -1 in DMF which resulted in the lifetimes of the radical ion pairs up to 1000 ns indicating charge stabilization in pyrene-C 60-AH 2 and fluorene-C 60-AH 2 triads. The formations of long-lived charge-separated states, pyrene-C60rad --AH2 and fluorene-C60rad --AH2 in DMF, were rationalized by evaluating the Marcus parameters from the temperature dependence of the charge-recombination rate constants.

  17. Photoinduced electron transfer in fullerene triads bearing pyrene and fluorene

    Sandanayaka, Atula S.D. [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Araki, Yasuyaki [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Ito, Osamu [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)], E-mail: ito@tagen.tohoku.ac.jp; Deviprasad, Gollapalli R. [Department of Chemistry, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount, Wichita, KS 67260-0051 (United States); Smith, Phillip M. [Department of Chemistry, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount, Wichita, KS 67260-0051 (United States); Rogers, Lisa M. [Department of Chemistry, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount, Wichita, KS 67260-0051 (United States); Zandler, Melvin E. [Department of Chemistry, Wichita State University, 1845 Fairmount, Wichita, KS 67260-0051 (United States); D' Souza, Francis [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials, Tohoku University, Katahira, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)], E-mail: Francis.DSouza@wichita.edu

    2006-06-20

    Photochemical properties of pyrene and fluorene appended fulleropyrrolidine triads (AH{sub 1}-C{sub 60}-AH{sub 2}; AH{sub 1}=pyrene and fluorene; AH{sub 2}=naphthalene and phenyl) are reported. Electrochemical studies using cyclic voltammetry technique and DFT calculations at B3LYP/3-21G(*) method revealed that the charge-separated states in pyrene and fluorene appended triads are pyrene{sup dot+}-C{sub 60}{sup dot-}AH{sub 2} and fluorene{sup dot+}-C{sub 60}{sup dot-}AH{sub 2}, respectively; however, no such charge-separated states could be established for naphthalene and phenyl appended triads. As demonstrated from the time resolved fluorescence, upon excitation of AH moiety in nonpolar solvents, energy transfer predominantly occurred from the singlet excited fluorophore to the C{sub 60} moiety, whereas in polar DMF charge-separation also contributed to the fluorescence quenching. Additionally, charge separation also occurred from the singlet excited C{sub 60} to the pyrene or fluorene entities of the triads in DMF. The rates and quantum yields of charge separation obtained by time-resolved emission studies were around 10{sup 9}s{sup -1} and 0.9-0.6 for pyrene-C{sub 60}-AH{sub 2} and fluorene-C{sub 60}-AH{sub 2} triads. Nanosecond transient absorption spectral studies performed by using 355nm laser light on the triads, exhibited transient bands corresponding to the C{sub 60}{sup dot-} and pyrene{sup dot+} or fluorene{sup dot+}, thus establishing the occurrence of electron transfer in these triads in DMF. The rates of charge recombination obtained by monitoring the decay of the C{sub 60}{sup dot-} were found to be around 10{sup 6}s{sup -1} in DMF which resulted in the lifetimes of the radical ion pairs up to 1000ns indicating charge stabilization in pyrene-C{sub 60}-AH{sub 2} and fluorene-C{sub 60}-AH{sub 2} triads. The formations of long-lived charge-separated states, pyrene{sup dot+}-C{sub 60}{sup d}'o{sup t-}AH{sub 2} and fluorene{sup dot+}-C{sub 60}{sup

  18. Photoinduced electron transfer in fullerene triads bearing pyrene and fluorene

    Photochemical properties of pyrene and fluorene appended fulleropyrrolidine triads (AH1-C60-AH2; AH1=pyrene and fluorene; AH2=naphthalene and phenyl) are reported. Electrochemical studies using cyclic voltammetry technique and DFT calculations at B3LYP/3-21G(*) method revealed that the charge-separated states in pyrene and fluorene appended triads are pyrenedot+-C60dot-AH2 and fluorenedot+-C60dot-AH2, respectively; however, no such charge-separated states could be established for naphthalene and phenyl appended triads. As demonstrated from the time resolved fluorescence, upon excitation of AH moiety in nonpolar solvents, energy transfer predominantly occurred from the singlet excited fluorophore to the C60 moiety, whereas in polar DMF charge-separation also contributed to the fluorescence quenching. Additionally, charge separation also occurred from the singlet excited C60 to the pyrene or fluorene entities of the triads in DMF. The rates and quantum yields of charge separation obtained by time-resolved emission studies were around 109s-1 and 0.9-0.6 for pyrene-C60-AH2 and fluorene-C60-AH2 triads. Nanosecond transient absorption spectral studies performed by using 355nm laser light on the triads, exhibited transient bands corresponding to the C60dot- and pyrenedot+ or fluorenedot+, thus establishing the occurrence of electron transfer in these triads in DMF. The rates of charge recombination obtained by monitoring the decay of the C60dot- were found to be around 106s-1 in DMF which resulted in the lifetimes of the radical ion pairs up to 1000ns indicating charge stabilization in pyrene-C60-AH2 and fluorene-C60-AH2 triads. The formations of long-lived charge-separated states, pyrenedot+-C60d'ot-AH2 and fluorenedot+-C60dot-AH2 in DMF, were rationalized by evaluating the Marcus parameters from the temperature dependence of the charge-recombination rate constants

  19. Excitation Transfer in Vertically Self-Organized Pairs of Unequal-Sized InAs/GaAs Quantum Dots

    WANG Hai-Long; FENG Song-Lin; YANG Fu-Hua; SUN Bao-Quan; JIANG De-Sheng

    2000-01-01

    The excitation transfer processes in vertically self-organized pairs of unequal-sized quantum dots (QD's), which are created in InAs/GaAs bilayers with different InAs deposition amounts in the first and second layers, have been investigated experimentally by photoluminescence technique. The distance between the two dot layers is varied from 3 to 12nm. The optical properties of the formed pairs of unequal-sized QD's with clearly discernible ground-state transition energy depend on the spacer thickness. When the spacer layer of GaAs is thin enough, only one photoluminescence peak related to the large QD ensemble has been observed as a result of strong electronic coupling in the InAs QD pairs. The results provide evidence for nonresonant energy transfer from the smaller QDs in the second layer to the larger QD's in the first layer in such an asymmetric QD pair.

  20. Assessment of asymptotically corrected model potential scheme for charge-transfer-like excitations in oligoacenes

    Peng, Wei-Tao

    2014-01-01

    We examine the performance of the asymptotically corrected model potential scheme on the two lowest singlet excitation energies of acenes with different number of linearly fused benzene rings (up to 5), employing both the real-time time-dependent density functional theory and the frequency-domain formulation of linear-response time-dependent density functional theory. The results are compared with the experimental data and those calculated by long-range corrected hybrid functionals and others. The long-range corrected hybrid scheme is shown to outperform the asymptotically corrected model potential scheme for charge-transfer-like excitations.

  1. Quantum effects in ultrafast electron transfers within cryptochromes.

    Firmino, Thiago; Mangaud, Etienne; Cailliez, Fabien; Devolder, Adrien; Mendive-Tapia, David; Gatti, Fabien; Meier, Christoph; Desouter-Lecomte, Michèle; de la Lande, Aurélien

    2016-08-21

    Cryptochromes and photolyases are flavoproteins that may undergo ultrafast charge separation upon electronic excitation of their flavin cofactors. Charge separation involves chains of three or four tryptophan residues depending on the protein of interest. The molecular mechanisms of these processes are not completely clear. In the present work we investigate the relevance of quantum effects like the occurrence of nuclear tunneling and of coherences upon charge transfer in Arabidopsis thaliana cryptochromes. The possible breakdown of the Condon approximation is also investigated. We have devised a simulation protocol based on the realization of molecular dynamics simulations on diabatic potential energy surfaces defined at the hybrid constrained density functional theory/molecular mechanics level. The outcomes of the simulations are analyzed through various dedicated kinetics schemes related to the Marcus theory that account for the aforementioned quantum effects. MD simulations also provide a basic material to define realistic model Hamiltonians for subsequent quantum dissipative dynamics. To carry out quantum simulations, we have implemented an algorithm based on the Hierarchical Equations of Motion. With this new tool in hand we have been able to model the electron transfer chain considering either two- or three-state models. Kinetic models and quantum simulations converge to the conclusion that quantum effects have a significant impact on the rate of charge separation. Nuclear tunneling involving atoms of the tryptophan redox cofactors as well as of the environment (protein atoms and water molecules) is significant. On the other hand non-Condon effects are negligible in most simulations. Taken together, the results of the present work provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms controlling charge separation in this family of flavoproteins. PMID:27427185

  2. Electronic Excitation Processes in Single-Strand and Double-Strand DNA: A Computational Approach

    Plasser, F.; Aquino, A. J. A.; Lischka, H.; Nachtigallová, Dana

    Cham: Springer, 2015 - (Barbatti, M.; Borin, A.; Ullrich, S.), s. 1-37. (Topics in Current Chemistry . 356). ISBN 978-3-319-13271-6 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : ab initio calculations * charge transfer excited states * excitonic states * interaction of excited state nucleic acid bases * photodynamics * UV absorption spectra Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  3. Interfacial electron transfer dynamics of ru(II)-polypy6ridine sensitized TiO2

    Jakubikova, Elena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Martin, Richard L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Batista, Enrique R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Snoeberger, Robert C [YALE UNIV.; Batista, Victor S [YALE UNIV.

    2009-01-01

    Quantum dynamics simulations combined with density functional theory calculations are applied to study interfacial electron transfer (IET) from pyridine-4-phosphonic acid, [Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 2+} and [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)-Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 4+} into the (101) surface of anatase TiO{sub 2}. IET rate from pyridine-4-phosphonic acid attached to the nanoparticle in bidentate mode ({tau} {approx} 100 fs) is an order of magnitude faster than the IET rate of the adsorbate attached in the monodentate mode ({tau} {approx} 1 ps). Upon excitation with visible light, [Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 2+} attached to TiO{sub 2} in bidentate binding mode will undergo IET with the rate of {approx} 1-10 ps, which is competitive with the excited state decay into the ground state. The probability of electron injection from [Ru(tpy)(bpy)(H{sub 2}O)-Ru(tpy)(tpy(PO{sub 3}H{sub 2}))]{sup 4+} is rather low, as the excitation with visible light localizes the excited electron in the tpy-tpy bridge, which does not have favorable coupling with the TiO{sub 2} nanoparticle. The results are relevant to better understanding of the adsorbate features important for promoting efficient interfacial electron transfer into the semiconductor.

  4. Cross Sections for Electron Impact Excitation of Ions Relevant to Planetary Atmospheres Observation

    Tayal, Swaraj S.

    1998-01-01

    The goal of this research grant was to calculate accurate oscillator strengths and electron collisional excitation strengths for inelastic transitions in atomic species of relevance to Planetary Atmospheres. Large scale configuration-interaction atomic structure calculations have been performed to obtain oscillator strengths and transition probabilities for transitions among the fine-structure levels and R-matrix method has been used in the calculations of electron-ion collision cross sections of C II, S I, S II, S III, and Ar II. A number of strong features due to ions of sulfur have been detected in the spectra of Jupiter satellite Io. The electron excitation cross sections for the C II and S II transitions are studied in collaboration with the experimental atomic physics group at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. There is excellent agreement between experiment and theory which provide an accurate and broad-base test of the ability of theoretical methods used in the calculation of atomic processes. Specifically, research problems have been investigated for: electron impact excitation cross sections of C II: electron impact excitation cross sections of S III; energy levels and oscillator strengths for transitions in S III; collision strengths for electron collisional excitation of S II; electron impact excitation of inelastic transitions in Ar II; oscillator strengths of fine-structure transitions in neutral sulfur; cross sections for inelastic scattering of electrons from atomic nitrogen; and excitation of atomic ions by electron impact.

  5. Role of electron transfer in Ce3+ sensitized Yb3+ luminescence in borate glass

    In a Ce3+-Yb3+ system, two mechanisms are proposed so far namely, the quantum cutting mechanism and the electron transfer mechanism explaining Yb3+ infrared luminescence under Ce3+ excitation. Among them, the quantum cutting mechanism, where one Ce3+ photon (ultraviolet/blue) gives rise to two Yb3+ photons (near infrared) is widely sought for because of its huge potential in enhancing the solar cell efficiency. In present study on Ce3+-Yb3+ codoped borate glasses, Ce3+ sensitized Yb3+ luminescence at ∼1 μm have been observed on Ce3+ 5d state excitation. However, the intensity of sensitized Yb3+ luminescence is found to be very weak compared to the strong quenching occurred in Ce3+ luminescence in Yb3+ codoped glasses. Moreover, the absolute luminescence quantum yield also showed a decreasing trend with Yb3+ codoping in the glasses. The overall behavior of the luminescence properties and the quantum yield is strongly contradicting with the quantum cutting phenomenon. The results are attributed to the energetically favorable electron transfer interactions followed by Ce3+-Yb3+ ⇌ Ce4+-Yb2+ inter-valence charge transfer and successfully explained using the absolute electron binding energies of dopant ions in the studied borate glass. Finally, an attempt has been presented to generalize the electron transfer mechanism among opposite oxidation/reduction property dopant ions using the vacuum referred electron binding energy (VRBE) scheme for lanthanide series

  6. Identification of a new electron-transfer relaxation pathway in photoexcited pyrrole dimers

    Neville, Simon P.; Kirkby, Oliver M.; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Worth, Graham A.; Fielding, Helen H.

    2016-04-01

    Photoinduced electron transfer is central to many biological processes and technological applications, such as the harvesting of solar energy and molecular electronics. The electron donor and acceptor units involved in electron transfer are often held in place by covalent bonds, π-π interactions or hydrogen bonds. Here, using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and ab initio calculations, we reveal the existence of a new, low-energy, photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism in molecules held together by an NH⋯π bond. Specifically, we capture the electron-transfer process in a pyrrole dimer, from the excited π-system of the donor pyrrole to a Rydberg orbital localized on the N-atom of the acceptor pyrrole, mediated by an N-H stretch on the acceptor molecule. The resulting charge-transfer state is surprisingly long lived and leads to efficient electronic relaxation. We propose that this relaxation pathway plays an important role in biological and technological systems containing the pyrrole building block.

  7. Microbial extracellular electron transfer and its relevance to iron corrosion

    Kato, Souichiro

    2016-01-01

    Summary Extracellular electron transfer (EET) is a microbial metabolism that enables efficient electron transfer between microbial cells and extracellular solid materials. Microorganisms harbouring EET abilities have received considerable attention for their various biotechnological applications, including bioleaching and bioelectrochemical systems. On the other hand, recent research revealed that microbial EET potentially induces corrosion of iron structures. It has been well known that corr...

  8. 14 CFR 1274.931 - Electronic funds transfer payment methods.

    2010-01-01

    ... cooperative agreement will be made by the Government by electronic funds transfer through the Treasury Fedline... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electronic funds transfer payment methods... COOPERATIVE AGREEMENTS WITH COMMERCIAL FIRMS Other Provisions and Special Conditions § 1274.931...

  9. Behavior of crystalline silicon under huge electronic excitations: A transient thermal spike description

    Chettah, A. [LRPCSI, University of Skikda, route d' El Hadaiek, BP 26, 21000 Skikda (Algeria); Kucal, H. [CIMAP Laboratory, CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN and Universite of Caen, BP5133, 14070 Caen-cedex 5 (France); Wang, Z.G. [CIMAP Laboratory, CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN and Universite of Caen, BP5133, 14070 Caen-cedex 5 (France); Institute of Modern Physics, CAS, 363 Nanchang Road, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Kac, M. [CIMAP Laboratory, CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN and Universite of Caen, BP5133, 14070 Caen-cedex 5 (France); Institute of Nuclear Physics PAN, Radzikowskiego 152, 31-342 Krakow (Poland); Meftah, A. [LRPCSI, University of Skikda, route d' El Hadaiek, BP 26, 21000 Skikda (Algeria); Toulemonde, M. [CIMAP Laboratory, CEA-CNRS-ENSICAEN and Universite of Caen, BP5133, 14070 Caen-cedex 5 (France)], E-mail: toulemonde@ganil.fr

    2009-08-15

    Recent experimental works devoted to the phenomena of mixing observed at metallic multilayers Ni/Si irradiated by swift heavy ions irradiations make it necessary to revisit the insensibility of crystalline Si under huge electronic excitations. Knowing that Ni is an insensitive material, such observed mixing would exist only if Si is a sensitive material. In order to extend the study of swift heavy ion effects to semiconductor materials, the experimental results obtained in bulk silicon have been analyzed within the framework of the inelastic thermal spike model. Provided the quenching of a boiling (or vapor) phase is taken as the criterion of amorphization, the calculations with an electron-phonon coupling constant g(300 K) = 1.8 x 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 3}/K and an electronic diffusivity D{sub e}(300 K) = 80 cm{sup 2}/s nicely reproduce the size of observed amorphous tracks as well as the electronic energy loss threshold value for their creation, assuming that they result from the quenching of the appearance of a boiling phase along the ion path. Using these parameters for Si in the case of a Ni/Si multilayer, the mixing observed experimentally can be well simulated by the inelastic thermal spike model extended to multilayers, assuming that this occurs in the molten phase created at the Ni interface by energy transfer from Si.

  10. Behavior of crystalline silicon under huge electronic excitations: A transient thermal spike description

    Recent experimental works devoted to the phenomena of mixing observed at metallic multilayers Ni/Si irradiated by swift heavy ions irradiations make it necessary to revisit the insensibility of crystalline Si under huge electronic excitations. Knowing that Ni is an insensitive material, such observed mixing would exist only if Si is a sensitive material. In order to extend the study of swift heavy ion effects to semiconductor materials, the experimental results obtained in bulk silicon have been analyzed within the framework of the inelastic thermal spike model. Provided the quenching of a boiling (or vapor) phase is taken as the criterion of amorphization, the calculations with an electron-phonon coupling constant g(300 K) = 1.8 x 1012 W/cm3/K and an electronic diffusivity De(300 K) = 80 cm2/s nicely reproduce the size of observed amorphous tracks as well as the electronic energy loss threshold value for their creation, assuming that they result from the quenching of the appearance of a boiling phase along the ion path. Using these parameters for Si in the case of a Ni/Si multilayer, the mixing observed experimentally can be well simulated by the inelastic thermal spike model extended to multilayers, assuming that this occurs in the molten phase created at the Ni interface by energy transfer from Si.

  11. Picosecond time-resolved fluorescence studies on excitation energy transfer in a histidine 117 mutant of the D2 protein of photosystem II in Synechocystis 6803.

    Vasil'ev, S; Bruce, D

    2000-11-21

    The role of the peripheral reaction center chlorophyll a molecule associated with His117 of the D2 polypeptide in photosystem II was investigated in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 using a combination of steady state, pump-probe, and picosecond time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. Data were obtained from intact cells and isolated thylakoid membranes of a control mutant and a D2-H117T mutant, both of which lacked photosystem I. Excitation energy transfer and trapping were investigated by analyzing the data with a kinetic model that used an exact numerical solution of the Pauli master equation, taking into account available photosystem II spectral and structural information. The results of our kinetic analysis revealed the observed difference in excited-state dynamics between the H117T mutant and the control to be consistent with a retardation of the rate of excitation energy transfer from the peripheral chlorophyll of D2 (Chl at His117) to the electron-transfer pigments and an increase of the rate constant for charge recombination in the H117T mutant. The kinetic model was able to account for the experimentally observed changes in absorption cross section and fluorescence decay kinetics between the control and mutant by invoking changes in only these two rate constants. The results rule out quenching of excitation by a chlorophyll cation radical as a mechanism responsible for the lower efficiency of excitation energy utilization in the H117T mutant. Our work also demonstrates the importance of the chlorophyll associated with His117 of the D2 protein for excitation energy transfer to the PSII electron-transfer pigments and for the effective stabilization of the primary radical pair. PMID:11087370

  12. Nuclear fission fragment excitation of electronic transition laser media

    Lorents, D. C.; Mccusker, M. V.; Rhodes, C. K.

    1976-01-01

    Specific characteristics of the media including density, excitation rates, wavelength, kinetics, fissile material, scale size, and medium uniformity are assessed. The use of epithermal neutrons, homogeneously mixed fissile material, and special high cross section nuclear isotopes to optimize coupling of the energy to the medium are shown to be important considerations maximizing the scale size, energy deposition, and medium uniformity. It is demonstrated that e-beam excitation can be used to simulate nuclear pumping conditions to facilitate the search for candidate media.

  13. Elastic and rotational excitation cross-sections for electron-water collisions in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges

    We present a theoretical study on electron-H2O collisions in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges. More specifically, we report calculated elastic differential, integral and momentum transfer cross-sections as well as rotational excitation cross-sections in the (2-500)-eV range. In our calculations, an optical potential is used to represent the electron-molecule interaction. The Schwinger variational method combined with the distorted-wave approximation is used to solve the scattering equations. The comparison of our calculated results with other theoretical and/or experimental data available in the literature is very encouraging. (authors)

  14. Production of excited electrons at TESLA and CLIC based egamma colliders

    Kirca, Z; Cakir, O

    2003-01-01

    We analyze the potential of TESLA and CLIC based electron-photon colliders to search for excited spin-1/2 electrons. The production of excited electrons in the resonance channel through the electron- photon collision and their subsequent decays to leptons and electroweak gauge bosons are investigated. We study in detail the three signal channels of excited electrons and the corresponding backgrounds through the reactions egamma yields egamma, egamma yields eZ and egamma yields vW. Excited electrons with masses up to about 90% of the available collider energy can be probed down to the coupling f = f prime = 0.05(0.1) at TESLA(CLIC) based egamma colliders. 22 Refs.

  15. Electron emission from fast heavy ions associated with resonant coherent excitation

    Suda, S.; Nakano, Y.; Metoki, K.; Azuma, T.; Takano, Y.; Hatakeyama, A.; Nakai, Y.; Komaki, K.; Takada, E.; Murakami, T.

    2011-06-01

    We observed convoy electrons emitted from 416 MeV/u He-like Ar16+ passing through a thin Si crystal under the condition of three-dimensional resonant coherent excitation (3D-RCE). The convoy electrons, which originate from electrons released from ions into the continuum by collisions with target atoms, emerged in the forward direction and formed a cusp-shaped peak in the energy distribution. We selectively controlled the population of the ground and excited states of ions traveling through the crystal by using 3D-RCE, where the 1s electron was excited to the 2p state by a periodic crystal field. Under the resonance condition, we found an enhancement of the convoy electrons with a narrowing in the energy distribution, which reflects the electron momentum distribution of the initial bound state of the excited ions.

  16. Fluorescent excitation transfer immunoassay for the determination of spinosyn A in water.

    Lee, M; Walt, D R; Nugent, P

    1999-07-01

    A fluorescent excitation transfer immunoassay for spinosyn A, a fermentation derived insect control agent, has been developed and applied to the analysis of tap water and wastewater effluent from manufacturing plants. Fluorescein (F) and tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) were chosen as donor and quencher, respectively, for the excitation transfer. Fluorescence quenching was observed from the binding of F-labeled antigen to TMR-labeled antibody. By employing nonlabeled antigen in a competitive immunoassay format, we reversed fluorescence quenching. The assay provides a limit of detection of 0. 01 ppb and a working range of 0.05-1 ppb and allows for the rapid determination of spinosyn A in water with recovery values ranging from 96% to 120%. With the exploitation of the small size of optical fibers, fluorescence from an assay volume of 24 microL could be measured without special vessels. PMID:10552562

  17. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-06-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work.

  18. Direct observation of multistep energy transfer in LHCII with fifth-order 3D electronic spectroscopy

    Zhang, Zhengyang; Lambrev, Petar H.; Wells, Kym L.; Garab, Győző; Tan, Howe-Siang

    2015-07-01

    During photosynthesis, sunlight is efficiently captured by light-harvesting complexes, and the excitation energy is then funneled towards the reaction centre. These photosynthetic excitation energy transfer (EET) pathways are complex and proceed in a multistep fashion. Ultrafast two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (2DES) is an important tool to study EET processes in photosynthetic complexes. However, the multistep EET processes can only be indirectly inferred by correlating different cross peaks from a series of 2DES spectra. Here we directly observe multistep EET processes in LHCII using ultrafast fifth-order three-dimensional electronic spectroscopy (3DES). We measure cross peaks in 3DES spectra of LHCII that directly indicate energy transfer from excitons in the chlorophyll b (Chl b) manifold to the low-energy level chlorophyll a (Chl a) via mid-level Chl a energy states. This new spectroscopic technique allows scientists to move a step towards mapping the complete complex EET processes in photosynthetic systems.

  19. Polarizability of the active site of cytochrome c reduces the activation barrier for electron transfer

    Dinpajooh, Mohammadhasan; Martin, Daniel R.; Matyushov, Dmitry V.

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes in biology’s energy chains operate with low energy input distributed through multiple electron transfer steps between protein active sites. The general challenge of biological design is how to lower the activation barrier without sacrificing a large negative reaction free energy. We show that this goal is achieved through a large polarizability of the active site. It is polarized by allowing a large number of excited states, which are populated quantum mechanically by electrostatic fluctuations of the protein and hydration water shells. This perspective is achieved by extensive mixed quantum mechanical/molecular dynamics simulations of the half reaction of reduction of cytochrome c. The barrier for electron transfer is consistently lowered by increasing the number of excited states included in the Hamiltonian of the active site diagonalized along the classical trajectory. We suggest that molecular polarizability, in addition to much studied electrostatics of permanent charges, is a key parameter to consider in order to understand how enzymes work. PMID:27306204

  20. Modeling time-coincident ultrafast electron transfer and solvation processes at molecule-semiconductor interfaces

    Kinetic models based on Fermi's Golden Rule are commonly employed to understand photoinduced electron transfer dynamics at molecule-semiconductor interfaces. Implicit in such second-order perturbative descriptions is the assumption that nuclear relaxation of the photoexcited electron donor is fast compared to electron injection into the semiconductor. This approximation breaks down in systems where electron transfer transitions occur on 100-fs time scale. Here, we present a fourth-order perturbative model that captures the interplay between time-coincident electron transfer and nuclear relaxation processes initiated by light absorption. The model consists of a fairly small number of parameters, which can be derived from standard spectroscopic measurements (e.g., linear absorbance, fluorescence) and/or first-principles electronic structure calculations. Insights provided by the model are illustrated for a two-level donor molecule coupled to both (i) a single acceptor level and (ii) a density of states (DOS) calculated for TiO2 using a first-principles electronic structure theory. These numerical calculations show that second-order kinetic theories fail to capture basic physical effects when the DOS exhibits narrow maxima near the energy of the molecular excited state. Overall, we conclude that the present fourth-order rate formula constitutes a rigorous and intuitive framework for understanding photoinduced electron transfer dynamics that occur on the 100-fs time scale

  1. Electronic State-Resolved Electron-Phonon Coupling in an Organic Charge Transfer Material from Broadband Quantum Beat Spectroscopy.

    Rury, Aaron S; Sorenson, Shayne; Driscoll, Eric; Dawlaty, Jahan M

    2015-09-17

    The coupling of electron and lattice phonon motion plays a fundamental role in the properties of functional organic charge-transfer materials. In this Letter we extend the use of ultrafast vibrational quantum beat spectroscopy to directly elucidate electron-phonon coupling in an organic charge-transfer material. As a case study, we compare the oscillatory components of the transient reflection (TR) of a broadband probe pulse from single crystals of quinhydrone, a 1:1 cocrystal of hydroquinone and p-benzoquinone, after exciting nonresonant impulsive stimulated Raman scattering and resonant electronic transitions using ultrafast pulses. Spontaneous resonance Raman spectra confirm the assignment of these oscillations as coherent lattice phonon excitations. Fourier transforms of the vibrational quantum beats in our broadband TR measurements allow construction of spectra that we show report the ability of these phonons to directly modulate the electronic structure of quinhydrone. These results demonstrate how coherent ultrafast processes can characterize the complex interplay of charge transfer and lattice motion in materials of fundamental relevance to chemistry, materials sciences, and condensed matter physics. PMID:26722724

  2. Amplified spontaneous emission of a molecular nitrogen laser excited by an intense relativistic electron beam

    Report of a study of the shape and length of the output pulse of a molecular nitrogen laser, excited by an intense relativistic electron beam, is described. The rate equations are computer solved, at first ignoring the spontaneous emission during the excitation process. Afterwards the rate equations are solved taking into account excitation functions of various shapes and lengths, related to electron-beam pulses of a few kA and a few nsec. Laser power output, energy, and peak-time, i.e., the time at which the gain reaches its saturated value, are given and discussed as functions of the intensity and rise time of the excitation functions

  3. Probing core-electron orbitals by scanning transmission electron microscopy and measuring the delocalization of core-level excitations

    Jeong, Jong Seok; Odlyzko, Michael L.; Xu, Peng; Jalan, Bharat; Mkhoyan, K. Andre

    2016-04-01

    By recording low-noise energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy maps from crystalline specimens using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy, it is possible to probe core-level electron orbitals in real space. Both the 1 s and 2 p orbitals of Sr and Ti atoms in SrTi O3 are probed, and their projected excitation potentials are determined. This paper also demonstrates experimental measurement of the electronic excitation impact parameter and the delocalization of an excitation due to Coulombic beam-orbital interaction.

  4. Characterisation of an RF excited argon plasma cathode electron beam gun

    Del Pozo, S.; Ribton, C; Smith, DR

    2014-01-01

    This work describes the experimental set up used for carrying out spectroscopic measurements in a plasma cathode electron beam (EB) gun. Advantages of plasma cathode guns over thermionic guns are described. The factors affecting electron beam power such as plasma pressure, excitation power and plasma chamber geometry are discussed. The maximum beam current extracted was 53 mA from a 0.5 mm diameter aperture in the plasma chamber. In this work, the electron source is an argon plasma excited at...

  5. Excited State Structural Dynamics of Carotenoids and ChargeTransfer Systems

    Van Tassle, Aaron Justin

    2006-09-01

    This dissertation describes the development andimplementation of a visible/near infrared pump/mid-infrared probeapparatus. Chapter 1 describes the background and motivation ofinvestigating optically induced structural dynamics, paying specificattention to solvation and the excitation selection rules of highlysymmetric molecules such as carotenoids. Chapter 2 describes thedevelopment and construction of the experimental apparatus usedthroughout the remainder of this dissertation. Chapter 3 will discuss theinvestigation of DCM, a laser dye with a fluorescence signal resultingfrom a charge transfer state. By studying the dynamics of DCM and of itsmethyl deuterated isotopomer (an otherwise identical molecule), we areable to investigate the origins of the charge transfer state and provideevidence that it is of the controversial twisted intramolecular (TICT)type. Chapter 4 introduces the use of two-photon excitation to the S1state, combined with one-photon excitation to the S2 state of thecarotenoid beta-apo-8'-carotenal. These 2 investigations show evidencefor the formation of solitons, previously unobserved in molecular systemsand found only in conducting polymers Chapter 5 presents an investigationof the excited state dynamics of peridinin, the carotenoid responsiblefor the light harvesting of dinoflagellates. This investigation allowsfor a more detailed understanding of the importance of structuraldynamics of carotenoids in light harvesting.

  6. Observation of excited state charge transfer with fs/ps-CARS

    Excited state charge transfer processes are studied using the fs/ps-CARS probe technique. This probe allows for multiplexed detection of Raman active vibrational modes. Systems studied include Michler's Ketone, Coumarin 120, 4-dimethylamino-4(prime)-nitrostilbene, and several others. The vibrational spectrum of the para di-substituted benzophenone Michler's Ketone in the first excited singlet state is studied for the first time. It is found that there are several vibrational modes indicative of structural changes of the excited molecule. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study the simplest 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, Coumarin 120. Vibrations observed in FTIR and spontaneous Raman spectra are assigned using density functional calculations and a continuum solvation model is used to predict how observed modes are affected upon inclusion of a solvent. The low frequency modes of the excited state charge transfer species 4-dimethylamino-4(prime)-nitrostilbene are studied in acetonitrile. Results are compared to previous work on this molecule in the fingerprint region. Finally, several partially completed projects and their implications are discussed. These include the two photon absorption of Coumarin 120, nanoconfinement in cyclodextrin cavities and sensitization of titania nanoparticles

  7. Observation of excited state charge transfer with fs/ps-CARS

    Blom, Alex Jason [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Excited state charge transfer processes are studied using the fs/ps-CARS probe technique. This probe allows for multiplexed detection of Raman active vibrational modes. Systems studied include Michler's Ketone, Coumarin 120, 4-dimethylamino-4'-nitrostilbene, and several others. The vibrational spectrum of the para di-substituted benzophenone Michler's Ketone in the first excited singlet state is studied for the first time. It is found that there are several vibrational modes indicative of structural changes of the excited molecule. A combined experimental and theoretical approach is used to study the simplest 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin, Coumarin 120. Vibrations observed in FTIR and spontaneous Raman spectra are assigned using density functional calculations and a continuum solvation model is used to predict how observed modes are affected upon inclusion of a solvent. The low frequency modes of the excited state charge transfer species 4-dimethylamino-4{prime}-nitrostilbene are studied in acetonitrile. Results are compared to previous work on this molecule in the fingerprint region. Finally, several partially completed projects and their implications are discussed. These include the two photon absorption of Coumarin 120, nanoconfinement in cyclodextrin cavities and sensitization of titania nanoparticles.

  8. Electron Transfer Pathways in Cholesterol Synthesis.

    Porter, Todd D

    2015-10-01

    Cholesterol synthesis in the endoplasmic reticulum requires electron input at multiple steps and utilizes both NADH and NADPH as the electron source. Four enzymes catalyzing five steps in the pathway require electron input: squalene monooxygenase, lanosterol demethylase, sterol 4α-methyl oxidase, and sterol C5-desaturase. The electron-donor proteins for these enzymes include cytochrome P450 reductase and the cytochrome b5 pathway. Here I review the evidence for electron donor protein requirements with these enzymes, the evidence for additional electron donor pathways, and the effect of deletion of these redox enzymes on cholesterol and lipid metabolism. PMID:26344922

  9. Respiratory electron transfer in Escherichia coli : components, energetics and regulation

    Hellingwerf, K.J.; Teixeira De Mattos, M.J.; Bekker, M.

    2009-01-01

    The respiratory chain that is housed in the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane, generally transfers electrons from NADH to oxygen; in the absence of oxygen it can use several alternative electron acceptors, such as nitrate and fumarate. Transfer of electrons through this chain is usually coupled to the translocation of protons across the membrane. The resulting gradient of protons is then used for the generation of ATP by the F0F1-ATPase, and for other free energy requiring processes such as solu...

  10. Electronic energy transfer between coumarin 460 and Eu3+ in thorium phosphate xerogel

    Optical spectroscopy experiments performed on thorium phosphate xerogels, doped with both a laser dye (coumarin 460) and europium, have pointed out the existence of an electronic energy transfer from coumarin 460 to the 5D3 level of Eu3+. Indeed, the excitation spectrum of the red fluorescence of Eu3+ in thorium phosphate xerogel doped simultaneously with coumarin 460 exhibits a broad band corresponding to the absorption of coumarin 460 in this optical region

  11. Photoinduced electron transfer in porous organic salt crystals impregnated with fullerenes.

    Hasegawa, Tetsuya; Ohkubo, Kei; Hisaki, Ichiro; Miyata, Mikiji; Tohnai, Norimitsu; Fukuzumi, Shunichi

    2016-06-28

    Porous organic salt (POS) crystals composed of 9-(4-sulfophenyl)anthracene (SPA) and triphenylmethylamine (TPMA) were impregnated with fullerenes (C60 and C70), which were arranged in one dimensional close contact. POS crystals of SPA and TPMA without fullerenes exhibit blue fluorescence due to SPA, whereas the fluorescence was quenched in POS with fullerenes due to electron transfer from the singlet excited state of SPA to fullerenes. PMID:27182038

  12. Probing ultrafast excitation energy transfer of the chlorosome with exciton-phonon variational dynamics.

    Somoza Márquez, Alejandro; Chen, Lipeng; Sun, Kewei; Zhao, Yang

    2016-07-27

    The chlorosome antenna complex is a fascinating structure which due to its immense scale, accurate simulation of excitation energy transfer (EET) dynamics supposes a genuine computational challenge. Resonant vibronic modes have been recently identified in 2D spectra of the chlorosome which motivates our present endeavour of modelling electronic and vibrational degrees of freedom on an equal footing. Following the Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational principle, we exploit a general theory of polaron dynamics in two-dimensional lattices based on the Holstein molecular crystal model and investigate a single rod model of pigment aggregates. Unlike reduced formalisms, explicit integration of the degrees of freedom of both the system and the bath requires extensive computational resources. We exploit the architecture of graphic processor units (GPUs) by implementing our simulations on this platform. The simulation of dynamic properties of hundreds or even thousands of pigments is thus achievable in just a few hours. The potential investigation and design of natural or engineered two-dimensional pigment networks can thus be accommodated. Due to the lack of consensus regarding the precise arrangement of chromophores in the chlorosome, helicity and dimerization are investigated independently, extracting their contributions to both optical and EET properties. The presence of dimerization is found to slow down the delocalization process. Exciton delocalization is completed in 100 fs in a single rod aggregate whose dimensions (20 nm) fairly exceed the estimated extent of a coherent domain. Ultrafast energy relaxation in the exciton manifold occurs in 50 fs and the duration of super-diffusive transport is found to last for about 80 fs. PMID:26792106

  13. Evidence of additional excitation energy transfer pathways in the phycobiliprotein antenna system of Acaryochloris marina.

    Nganou, A C; David, L; Adir, N; Pouhe, D; Deen, M J; Mkandawire, M

    2015-02-01

    To improve the energy conversion efficiency of solar organic cells, the clue may lie in the development of devices inspired by an efficient light harvesting mechanism of some aquatic photosynthetic microorganisms that are adapted to low light intensity. Consequently, we investigated the pathways of excitation energy transfer (EET) from successive light harvesting pigments to the low energy level inside the phycobiliprotein antenna system of Acaryochloris marina, a cyanobacterium, using a time resolved absorption difference spectroscopy with a resolution time of 200 fs. The objective was to understand the actual biochemical process and pathways that determine the EET mechanism. Anisotropy of the EET pathway was calculated from the absorption change trace in order to determine the contribution of excitonic coupling. The results reveal a new electron energy relaxation pathway of 14 ps inside the phycocyanin component, which runs from phycocyanin to the terminal emitter. The bleaching of the 660 nm band suggests a broader absorption of the terminal emitter between 660 nm and 675 nm. Further, there are trimer depolarization kinetics of 450 fs and 500 fs in high and low ionic strength, respectively, which arise from the relaxation of the β84 and α84 in adjacent monomers of phycocyanin. Under conditions of low ionic strength buffer solution, the evolution of the kinetic amplitude during the depolarization of the trimer is suggestive of trimer conservation within the phycocyanin hexamer. The anisotropy values were 0.38 and 0.40 in high and in low ionic strength, respectively, indicating that there is no excitonic delocalization in the high energy level of phycocyanin hexamers. PMID:25470281

  14. Electron-beam-sustained discharge revisited - light emission from combined electron beam and microwave excited argon at atmospheric pressure

    Dandl, T; Neumeier, A; Wieser, J; Ulrich, A

    2015-01-01

    A novel kind of electron beam sustained discharge is presented in which a 12keV electron beam is combined with a 2.45GHz microwave power to excite argon gas at atmospheric pressure in a continuous mode of operation. Optical emission spectroscopy is performed over a wide wavelength range from the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) to the near infrared (NIR). Several effects which modify the emission spectra compared to sole electron beam excitation are observed and interpreted by the changing plasma parameters such as electron density, electron temperature and gas temperature.

  15. Modulation of the electron transfer processes in Au-ZnO nanostructures

    Aguirre, M. E.; Armanelli, A.; Perelstein, G.; Feldhoff, A.; Tolley, A. J.; Grela, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Plasmonic nanostructures comprising Au and ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by the spontaneous reduction of HAuCl4 in ethylene glycol were used to assess the possibility of modulating the direction of the electron transfer processes at the interface. One electron UV reduction and visible oxidation of the reversible couple TEMPOL/TEMPOL-H was confirmed by EPR spectroscopy. The apparent quantum yield for TEMPOL-H conversion under continuous wave visible excitation depends on the irradiation wavelength, being 0.57% and 0.27% at 450 +/- 12 and 530 +/- 12 nm, respectively. These results indicate that both the surface plasmon resonance and the interband transition from the 5d to the 6s level of Au nanoparticles contribute to the visible activity of the nanostructure. In addition, by detecting free electron conduction band electrons in ZnO, after the visible excitation of Au/ZnO nanostructures, we provide direct evidence of the photoexcited electron transfer from gold nanoparticles to ZnO.Plasmonic nanostructures comprising Au and ZnO nanoparticles synthesized by the spontaneous reduction of HAuCl4 in ethylene glycol were used to assess the possibility of modulating the direction of the electron transfer processes at the interface. One electron UV reduction and visible oxidation of the reversible couple TEMPOL/TEMPOL-H was confirmed by EPR spectroscopy. The apparent quantum yield for TEMPOL-H conversion under continuous wave visible excitation depends on the irradiation wavelength, being 0.57% and 0.27% at 450 +/- 12 and 530 +/- 12 nm, respectively. These results indicate that both the surface plasmon resonance and the interband transition from the 5d to the 6s level of Au nanoparticles contribute to the visible activity of the nanostructure. In addition, by detecting free electron conduction band electrons in ZnO, after the visible excitation of Au/ZnO nanostructures, we provide direct evidence of the photoexcited electron transfer from gold nanoparticles to ZnO. Electronic

  16. How To Reach Intense Luminescence for Compounds Capable of Excited-State Intramolecular Proton Transfer?

    Skonieczny, Kamil; Yoo, Jaeduk; Larsen, Jillian M; Espinoza, Eli M; Barbasiewicz, Michał; Vullev, Valentine I; Lee, Chang-Hee; Gryko, Daniel T

    2016-05-23

    Photoinduced intramolecular direct arylation allows structurally unique compounds containing phenanthro[9',10':4,5]imidazo[1,2-f]phenanthridine and imidazo[1,2-f]phenanthridine skeletons, which mediate excited-state intramolecular proton transfer (ESIPT), to be efficiently synthesized. The developed polycyclic aromatics demonstrate that the combination of five-membered ring structures with a rigid arrangement between a proton donor and a proton acceptor provides a means for attaining large fluorescence quantum yields, exceeding 0.5, even in protic solvents. Steady-state and time-resolved UV/Vis spectroscopy reveals that, upon photoexcitation, the prepared protic heteroaromatics undergo ESIPT, converting them efficiently into their excited-state keto tautomers, which have lifetimes ranging from about 5 to 10 ns. The rigidity of their structures, which suppresses nonradiative decay pathways, is believed to be the underlying reason for the nanosecond lifetimes of these singlet excited states and the observed high fluorescence quantum yields. Hydrogen bonding with protic solvents does not interfere with the excited-state dynamics and, as a result, there is no difference between the occurrences of ESIPT processes in MeOH versus cyclohexane. Acidic media has a more dramatic effect on suppressing ESIPT by protonating the proton acceptor. As a result, in the presence of an acid, a larger proportion of the fluorescence of ESIPT-capable compounds originates from their enol excited states. PMID:27062363

  17. Measured multipole moments of continuum electron transfer angular distributions

    The velocity space distribution of electrons emitted near the forward direction from collisions involving fast, highly stripped oxygen ions with gaseous and solid targets is presented and described in terms of multipole moments of the ejected charge distribution, which permits direct comparison with recent theory. The measurements are produced by employing position-sensitive electron detection to combine emission angle definition with conventional electrostatic spectrometry. Agreement obtained between theory and distributions observed for binary continuum electron loss processes coupled with a similar multipole content observed with solid targets suggests a model of convoy electron production dominated by electron loss from the projectile within the bulk of the target. Further, the connection between multipoles of the projectile electron emission distribution in single collisions and the state of excitation of that projectile excited states may provide the basis for a probe of the state of ions traversing bulk solid matter. 14 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab

  18. Synthesis, Characterization, Photophysics and Photochemistry of Pyrylogen Electron Transfer Sensitizers

    Clennan, Edward L. [University of Wyoming, Laramie; Liao, Chen [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    A series of new dicationic sensitizers that are hybrids of pyrylium salts and viologens has been synthesized. The electrochemical and photophysical properties of these "pyrylogen" sensitizers are reported in sufficient detail to allow rationale design of new photoinduced electron transfer reactions. The range of their reduction potentials (+0.37-+0.05V vs SCE) coupled with their range of singlet (48-63 kcal mol(-1)) and triplet (48-57kcalmol(-1)) energies demonstrate that they are potent oxidizing agents in both their singlet and triplet excited states, thermodynamically capable of oxidizing substrates with oxidation potentials as high as 3.1eV. The pyrylogens are synthesized in three steps from readily available starting materials in modest overall 11.4-22.3% yields. These sensitizers have the added advantages that: (1) their radical cations do not react on the CV timescale with oxygen bypassing the need to run reactions under nitrogen or argon and (2) have long wavelength absorptions between 413 and 523nm well out of the range where competitive absorbance by most substrates would cause a problem. These new sensitizers do react with water requiring special precautions to operate in a dry reaction environment.

  19. Excitation of positive ions by low-energy electrons - Relevance to the Io Torus

    Smith, Steven J.; Chutjian, A.; Mawhorter, R. J.; Williams, I. D.; Shemansky, D. E.

    1993-01-01

    The importance of measuring electron-ion excitation cross sections in singly and multiply charged positive ions is outlined, and recent results for Mg II and O II ions are given using the JPL's electron energy-loss merged-beams apparatus. Theoretical comparisons are given with two five-state close-coupling calculations. The energy variation of the collision strength is fitted with a semiempirical analytic function which includes approximations to polarization, resonance, and exchange contributions. In O II, first spectra anywhere of electron excitation of the optically allowed transitions are presented. In addition, excitations of two low lying, optically forbidden transitions are detected for the first time.

  20. Fully Relativistic Electron Impact Excitation Cross-Section and Polarization for Tungsten Ions

    Priti

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electron impact excitation of highly charged tungsten ions in the framework of a fully relativistic distorted wave approach is considered in this paper. Calculations of electron impact excitation cross-sections for the M- and L-shell transitions in the tungsten ions Wn+ (n = 44–66 and polarization of the decay of photons from the excited tungsten ions are briefly reviewed and discussed. New calculations in the wide range of incident electron energies are presented for M-shell transitions in the K-like through Ne-like tungsten ions.

  1. Ultrafast photoinduced energy and electron transfer in multi-modular donor-acceptor conjugates.

    El-Khouly, Mohamed E; Wijesinghe, Channa A; Nesterov, Vladimir N; Zandler, Melvin E; Fukuzumi, Shunichi; D'Souza, Francis

    2012-10-22

    New multi-modular donor-acceptor conjugates featuring zinc porphyrin (ZnP), catechol-chelated boron dipyrrin (BDP), triphenylamine (TPA) and fullerene (C(60)), or naphthalenediimide (NDI) have been newly designed and synthesized as photosynthetic antenna and reaction-center mimics. The X-ray structure of triphenylamine-BDP is also reported. The wide-band capturing polyad revealed ultrafast energy-transfer (k(ENT) =1.0 × 10(12) s(-1)) from the singlet excited BDP to the covalently linked ZnP owing to close proximity and favorable orientation of the entities. Introducing either fullerene or naphthalenediimide electron acceptors to the TPA-BDP-ZnP triad through metal-ligand axial coordination resulted in electron donor-acceptor polyads whose structures were revealed by spectroscopic, electrochemical and computational studies. Excitation of the electron donor, zinc porphyrin resulted in rapid electron-transfer to coordinated fullerene or naphthalenediimide yielding charge separated ion-pair species. The measured electron transfer rate constants from femtosecond transient spectral technique in non-polar toluene were in the range of 5.0 × 10(9)-3.5 × 10(10) s(-1). Stabilization of the charge-separated state in these multi-modular donor-acceptor polyads is also observed to certain level. PMID:22996909

  2. Imaging Excited Orbitals of Quantum Dots: Experiment and Electronic Structure Theory.

    Nienhaus, Lea; Goings, Joshua J; Nguyen, Duc; Wieghold, Sarah; Lyding, Joseph W; Li, Xiaosong; Gruebele, Martin

    2015-11-25

    Electronically excited orbitals play a fundamental role in chemical reactivity and spectroscopy. In nanostructures, orbital shape is diagnostic of defects that control blinking, surface carrier dynamics, and other important optoelectronic properties. We capture nanometer resolution images of electronically excited PbS quantum dots (QDs) by single molecule absorption scanning tunneling microscopy (SMA-STM). Dots with a bandgap of ∼1 eV are deposited on a transparent gold surface and optically excited with red or green light to produce hot carriers. The STM tip-enhanced laser light produces a large excited-state population, and the Stark effect allows transitions to be tuned into resonance by changing the sample voltage. Scanning the QDs under laser excitation, we were able to image electronic excitation to different angular momentum states depending on sample bias. The shapes differ from idealized S- or P-like orbitals due to imperfections of the QDs. Excitation of adjacent QD pairs reveals orbital alignment, evidence for electronic coupling between dots. Electronic structure modeling of a small PbS QD, when scaled for size, reveals Stark tuning and variation in the transition moment of different parity states, supporting the simple one-electron experimental interpretation in the hot carrier limit. The calculations highlight the sensitivity of orbital density to applied field, laser wavelength, and structural fluctuations of the QD. PMID:26518039

  3. An efficient implementation of the localized operator partitioning method for electronic energy transfer

    Nagesh, Jayashree; Brumer, Paul [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Izmaylov, Artur F. [Chemical Physics Theory Group, Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3H6 (Canada); Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, Scarborough, Toronto, Ontario M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2015-02-28

    The localized operator partitioning method [Y. Khan and P. Brumer, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 194112 (2012)] rigorously defines the electronic energy on any subsystem within a molecule and gives a precise meaning to the subsystem ground and excited electronic energies, which is crucial for investigating electronic energy transfer from first principles. However, an efficient implementation of this approach has been hindered by complicated one- and two-electron integrals arising in its formulation. Using a resolution of the identity in the definition of partitioning, we reformulate the method in a computationally efficient manner that involves standard one- and two-electron integrals. We apply the developed algorithm to the 9 − ((1 − naphthyl) − methyl) − anthracene (A1N) molecule by partitioning A1N into anthracenyl and CH{sub 2} − naphthyl groups as subsystems and examine their electronic energies and populations for several excited states using configuration interaction singles method. The implemented approach shows a wide variety of different behaviors amongst the excited electronic states.

  4. Modifications of poly (vinilydene fluoride) under electronic excitations produced by charged particles (heavy ions and electrons)

    Some of the physico-chemical properties of organic solids like conductivity or permeation can be improved by irradiation. The aim of this work is to characterize modifications induced in poly (vinylidene fluoride) films (PVDF) by charged particles (ions and electrons), with electronic stopping power, for doses ranging from zero to twenty G-Grays. Influence of dose, density of electronic excitations, and flux (in particles per square centimeter), and the nature of defects induced by the beam, were studied with two methods: X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (or XPS) for surface analysis, and electron Spin Resonance (or ESR) to probe the bulk of the film. Three ranges of doses are revealed in view of experimental results. At lower doses, PVDF undergoes deshydrofluorination induced by desorption; it is a low modifications regime. For intermediate range doses, conjugated carbon backbones of polyene compounds are produced. At higher doses, intermolecular interactions between the resulting fragments give a crosslinked network. For the upper limit of doses used, bond breaking results in a non reversible degradation of PVDF. In this last situation, direct atomic displacement of target atoms, is not negligible

  5. Ultrafast electronic dynamics in laser-excited crystalline bismuth

    Chekalin S.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond spectroscopy was applied to capture complex dynamics of non equilibrium electrons in bismuth. Data analysis reveals significant wavevector dependence of electron-hole and electron-phonon coupling strength along the Γ-T direction of the Brillouin zone

  6. Free electron degeneracy effects on collisional excitation, ionization, de-excitation and three-body recombination

    Tallents, G. J.

    2016-09-01

    Collisional-radiative models enable average ionization and ionization populations, plus the rates of absorption and emission of radiation to be calculated for plasmas not in thermal equilbrium. At high densities and low temperatures, electrons may have a high occupancy of the free electron quantum states and evaluations of rate coefficients need to take into account the free electron degeneracy. We demonstrate that electron degeneracy can reduce collisional rate coefficients by orders-of-magnitude from values calculated neglecting degeneracy. We show that assumptions regarding the collisional differential cross-section can alter collisional ionization and recombination rate coefficients by a further factor two under conditions relevant to inertial fusion.

  7. 2D-IR spectroscopy of hydrogen-bond-mediated vibrational excitation transfer.

    Chuntonov, Lev

    2016-05-18

    Vibrational excitation transfer along the hydrogen-bond-mediated pathways in the complex of methyl acetate (MA) and 4-cyanophenol (4CP) was studied by dual-frequency femtosecond two-dimensional infrared spectroscopy. We excited the energy-donating ester carbonyl stretching vibrational mode and followed the transfer to the energy-accepting benzene ring and cyano stretching vibrations. The complexes with no, one, and two hydrogen-bonded 4CP molecules were studied. Vibrational relaxation of the carbonyl mode is more efficient in both hydrogen-bonded complexes as compared with free MA molecules. The inter-molecular transport in a hydrogen-bonded complex involving a single 4CP molecule is slower than that in a complex with two 4CP molecules. In the former, vibrational relaxation leads to local heating, as shown by the spectroscopy of the carbonyl mode, whereas the local heating is suppressed in the latter because the excitation redistribution is more efficient. At early times, the transfer to the benzene ring is governed by its direct coupling with the energy-donating carbonyl mode, whereas at later times intermediate states are involved. The transfer to a more distant site of the cyano group in 4CP involves intermediate states at all times, since no direct coupling between the energy-donating and accepting modes was observed. We anticipate that our findings will be of importance for spectroscopic studies of bio-molecular structures and dynamics, and inter- and intra-molecular signaling pathways, and for developing molecular networking applications. PMID:27145861

  8. Excitation and dissociation of molecules by low-energy (0-15 eV) electrons

    The author deals with excitation and dissociation processes which result from the interaction between low-energy (0.15 eV) electrons and molecules. Low-energy electron-impact spectroscopy is used to gain a better knowledge of the electronic structure of halomethanes, ethylene and some of its halogen substituted derivatives, and some more complex organic molecules. (Auth.)

  9. A new technique for excitation studies in electron-ion collisions

    A new technique based on an electron energy-loss technique is being developed to measure absolute total cross sections for ion excitation by electron impact. Novel aspects of the instrument include collection of the electrons in the backward direction, and the use of curved trochoidal plates to minimise distortion of the inelastically scattered beam during analysis. (orig.)

  10. Electron impact excitation of helium in Debye plasma

    Diallo, S.; Gomis, L.; Faye, I. G.; Tall, M. S.; Diédhiou, I. [Département de Physique, Faculté des Sciences and Techniques, Université Cheikh Anta Diop, Dakar-Fann (Senegal); Diatta, C. S. [Institut International des Sciences et de Technologie, 28 Avenue des Ambassadeurs Dakar-Fann (Senegal); Zammit, M. [ARC Centre for Antimatter-Matter Studies, Curtin University, GPO Box U1987, Perth, Western Australia 6845 (Australia)

    2015-03-15

    The probability, differential, and integral scattering cross sections of the 1{sup 1}S→2{sup 1}S and 1{sup 1}S→2{sup 1}P transitions of helium have been calculated in the first Born approximation. The projectile-target interactions depending on the temperature and the density of plasma are described by the Debye-Hückel model. Wave functions of the target before and after collision were modeled by non orthogonal Hartree-Fock orbitals. The wave functions parameters are calculated with the Ritz variational method. We improve our unscreened first Born approximation integral cross sections by using the BE-scaled (B stands for binding energy and E excitation energy) method. The second Born approximation has also been used to calculate the excitation cross sections in Debye plasma. Our calculations are compared to other theoretical and experimental results where applicable.

  11. Endoergic and resonant charge transfer excitation in He-Cu discharge

    Mezei, P.; Rózsa, K.; Jánossy, M.; Apai, P.

    1987-09-01

    The intensity of Cu-II lines with upper level energies near and above those of the He ion was measured as a function of He pressure in a Cu hollow cathode tube. In this tube at low pressures the negative glow could expand above the cathode. The maximum intensity of the Cu-II 493.1 nm line was found in the low voltage, high pressure hollow cathode discharge region in accordance with a resonant charge transfer excitation process. Enhancement of the intensity of the Cu-II 436.5 nm and 417.9 nm lines was observed in the cathode glow at low pressures. Excitation of these lines is attributed to endoergic charge transfer collisions between He ions accelerated by the 2 kV tube voltage and ground state Cu atoms. The cross-section for this reaction exciting the 436.5 nm line was estimated to be of the order of 10-17 cm2.

  12. 76 FR 29901 - Electronic Fund Transfers

    2011-05-23

    ... Board anticipates that final rules on remittance transfers will be issued by the Bureau. \\26\\ 75 FR... recipient of the funds. For instance, a consumer may add his daughter, who is studying abroad, as an...'' made by foreign-born residents in the United States to households abroad totaled $37.6 billion in...

  13. Electron-Transfer Acceleration Investigated by Time Resolved Infrared Spectroscopy

    Vlček Jr., Antonín; Kvapilová, Hana; Towrie, M.; Záliš, Stanislav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2015), s. 868-876. ISSN 0001-4842 Institutional support: RVO:61388955 Keywords : electron transfer * infrared spectroscopy Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 22.323, year: 2014

  14. Two-Photon Study on the Electronic Interactions between the First Excited Singlet States in Carotenoid-Tetrapyrrole Dyads

    Liao, Pen-Nan [Technische Universitat Braunschweig (Germany); Pillai, Smitha [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Gust, Devens [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Moore, Thomas A. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Moore, Ana L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Walla, Peter J. [Technische Universitat Braunschweig (Germany)

    2011-03-22

    Electronic interactions between the first excited states (S1) of carotenoids (Car) of different conjugation lengths (8-11 double bonds) and phthalocyanines (Pc) in different Car-Pc dyad molecules were investigated by two-photon spectroscopy and compared with Car S1-chlorophyll (Chl) interactions in photosynthetic light harvesting complexes (LHCs). The observation of Chl/Pc fluorescence after selective two-photon excitation of the Car S1 state allowed sensitive monitoring of the flow of energy between Car S1 and Pc or Chl. It is found that two-photon excitation excites to about 80% to 100% exclusively the carotenoid state Car S1 and that only a small fraction of direct tetrapyrrole two-photon excitation occurs. Amide-linked Car-Pc dyads in tetrahydrofuran demonstrate a molecular gear shift mechanism in that effective Car S1 → Pc energy transfer is observed in a dyad with 9 double bonds in the carotenoid, whereas in similar dyads with 11 double bonds in the carotenoid, the Pc fluorescence is strongly quenched by Pc → Car S1 energy transfer. In phenylamino-linked Car-Pc dyads in toluene extremely large electronic interactions between the Car S1 state and Pc were observed, particularly in the case of a dyad in which the carotenoid contained 10 double bonds. This observation together with previous findings in the same system provides strong evidence for excitonic Car S1-Pc Qy interactions. Very similar results were observed with photosynthetic LHC II complexes in the past, supporting an important role of such interactions in photosynthetic down-regulation.

  15. Asymmetry of collective excitations in electron and hole doped cuprate superconductors

    Lee, W. S.; Lee, J J; Nowadnick, E. A.; Tabis, W.; Huang, S. W.; Strocov, V. N.; Motoyama, E. M.; G. Yu; Moritz, B.; Greven, M.; T. Schmitt; Shen, Z. X.; Devereaux, T. P.

    2013-01-01

    High-temperature superconductivity (HTSC) mysteriously emerges upon doping holes or electrons into insulating copper oxides with antiferromagnetic (AFM) order. It has been thought that the large energy scale of magnetic excitations, compared to phonon energies for example, lies at the heart of an electronically-driven superconducting phase at high temperatures. However, despite extensive studies, little information is available for comparison of high-energy magnetic excitations of hole- and e...

  16. Electron Impact Excitation and Dielectronic Recombination of Highly Charged Tungsten Ions

    Zhongwen Wu; Yanbiao Fu; Xiaoyun Ma; Maijuan Li; Luyou Xie; Jun Jiang; Chenzhong Dong

    2015-01-01

    Electron impact excitation (EIE) and dielectronic recombination (DR) of tungsten ions are basic atomic processes in nuclear fusion plasmas of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) tokamak. Detailed investigation of such processes is essential for modeling and diagnosing future fusion experiments performed on the ITER. In the present work, we studied total and partial electron-impact excitation (EIE) and DR cross-sections of highly charged tungsten ions by using the multi...

  17. Quantum-chemical study of electronically excited states ofprotolytic forms of vanillic acid

    Vusovich, O. V.; Tchaikovskaya, O. N.; I. V. Sokolova; Vasileva, N. Y.

    2015-01-01

    The paper describes an analysis of possible ways of deactivation of electronically excited states of 4-hydroxy- 3-methoxy-benzoic acid (vanillic acid) and its protolytic forms with the use of quantum-chemical methods INDO/S (intermediate neglect of differential overlap with a spectroscopic parameterization) and MEP (molecular electrostatic potential). The ratio of radiative and non-radiative deactivation channels of the electronic excitation energy is established. The rate constants of photop...

  18. 77 FR 6310 - Electronic Fund Transfers (Regulation E)

    2012-02-07

    ... numbers of transactions as being outside the normal course of business. Nor did they suggest other means... the first transaction in a series of preauthorized remittance transfers the same as all other... electronic transfers of funds sent by consumers in the United States to recipients in other countries....

  19. Theory of interrelated electron and proton transfer processes

    Kuznetsov, A.M.; Ulstrup, Jens

    2003-01-01

    A simple theory of elementary act of interrelated reactions of electron and proton transfer is developed. Mechanisms of synchronous and multistage transfer and coherent transitions via a dynamically populated intermediate state are discussed. Formulas for rate constants of adiabatic and nonadiaba...

  20. Analysis of transmission efficiency of SSRF electron beam transfer lines

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the main factors which influence transmission efficiency of the SSRF electron beam transfer lines are described, including physical requirements for magnet system, vacuum system, beam diagnostic system,trajectory correction system, etc. The dynamic simulation calculation and transmission efficiency analysis of the SSRF electron beam transfer lines are presented, and the studies show that the design purpose of efficient beam transmission and injection will be achieved.

  1. A role for microbial palladium nanoparticles in extracellular electron transfer.

    Wu, X; Zhao, F; Rahunen, N; Varcoe, JR; Avignone-Rossa, C.; Thumser, AE; Slade, RC

    2011-01-01

    Herein we have demonstrated a DET mechanism used by D. desulfuricans; where the periplasmic cytochromes and hydrogenases play an important role, and Pd nanoparticles bound to the microbes may participate in the electron transfer process. The present work is of importance not only for the fundamental studies of electron transfer processes in microbial physiology and ecology, but also for increased understanding and improvement of the performance of bioelectrochemical techniques e.g. precious m...

  2. Three-electron correlations in electron-helium collisions: a study of excitation and decay of helium autoionising states

    This thesis is concerned with the effects of negative-ion resonances in the threshold excitation of the helium autoionising states. A detailed discussion is given of the structures in the excitation functions of the singly-excited helium states. Experimental indications for the decay of one of the shape resonances to its non-parent states are presented. The author describes a study of the effects of post-collision interaction in spectra of ejected electrons. Measurements are performed on an angular distribution of electrons ejected by one of the autoionising states after its excitation via a negative-ion resonance. Analysis of the angular distribution provides evidence for the occurrence of angular momentum exchange during the post-collision interaction between the ejected and the scattered electron. A model for post-collision interaction is formulated, which incorporates the effects of angular momentum exchange. (Auth.)

  3. Direct evidences for inner-shell electron-excitation by laser induced electron recollision

    Deng, Yunpei; Jia, Zhengmao; Komm, Pavel; Zheng, Yinhui; Ge, Xiaochun; Li, Ruxin; Marcus, Gilad

    2015-01-01

    Extreme ultraviolet (XUV) attosecond pulses, generated by a process known as laser-induced electron recollision, are a key ingredient for attosecond metrology, providing a tool to precisely initiate and probe sub-femtosecond dynamics in the microcosms of atoms, molecules and solids[1]. However, with the current technology, extending attosecond metrology to scrutinize the dynamics of the inner-shell electrons is a challenge, that is because of the lower efficiency in generating the required soft x-ray \\hbar\\omega>300 eV attosecond bursts and the lower absorption cross-sections in this spectral range. A way around this problem is to use the recolliding electron to directly initiate the desired inner-shell process, instead of using the currently low flux x-ray attosecond sources.Such an excitation process occurs in a sub-femtosecond timescale, and may provide the necessary "pump" step in a pump-probe experiment[2]. Here we used a few cycle infrared \\lambda_{0}~1800nm source[3] and observed direct evidences for i...

  4. Theoretical analysis of proton relays in electrochemical proton-coupled electron transfer.

    Auer, Benjamin; Fernandez, Laura E; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

    2011-06-01

    The coupling of long-range electron transfer to proton transport over multiple sites plays a vital role in many biological and chemical processes. Recently the concerted proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction in a molecule with a hydrogen-bond relay inserted between the proton donor and acceptor sites was studied electrochemically. The standard rate constants and kinetic isotope effects (KIEs) were measured experimentally for this double proton transfer system and a related single proton transfer system. In the present paper, these systems are studied theoretically using vibronically nonadiabatic rate constant expressions for electrochemical PCET. Application of this approach to proton relays requires the calculation of multidimensional proton vibrational wave functions and the incorporation of multiple proton donor-acceptor motions. The decrease in proton donor-acceptor distances due to thermal fluctuations and the contributions from excited electron-proton vibronic states play important roles in these systems. The calculated KIEs and the ratio of the standard rate constants for the single and double proton transfer systems are in agreement with the experimental data. The calculations indicate that the standard PCET rate constant is lower for the double proton transfer system because of the smaller overlap integral between the ground state reduced and oxidized proton vibrational wave functions, resulting in greater contributions from excited electron-proton vibronic states with higher free energy barriers. The theory predicts that this rate constant may be increased by modifying the molecule in a manner that decreases the equilibrium proton donor-acceptor distances or alters the molecular thermal motions to facilitate the concurrent decrease of these distances. These insights may guide the design of more efficient catalysts for energy conversion devices. PMID:21524104

  5. Differential cross sections for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran at intermediate impact energies

    Do, T. P. T. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); School of Education, Can Tho University, Campus II, 3/2 Street, Xuan Khanh, Ninh Kieu, Can Tho City (Viet Nam); Duque, H. V. [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Lopes, M. C. A. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, 36036-330 Juiz de Fora, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Konovalov, D. A.; White, R. D. [College of Science, Technology and Engineering, James Cook University, Townsville (Australia); Brunger, M. J., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia); Institute of Mathematical Sciences, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Jones, D. B., E-mail: michael.brunger@flinders.edu.au, E-mail: darryl.jones@flinders.edu.au [School of Chemical and Physical Sciences, Flinders University, GPO Box 2100, Adelaide, South Australia 5001 (Australia)

    2015-03-28

    We report differential cross sections (DCSs) for electron-impact vibrational-excitation of tetrahydrofuran, at intermediate incident electron energies (15-50 eV) and over the 10°-90° scattered electron angular range. These measurements extend the available DCS data for vibrational excitation for this species, which have previously been obtained at lower incident electron energies (≤20 eV). Where possible, our data are compared to the earlier measurements in the overlapping energy ranges. Here, quite good agreement was generally observed where the measurements overlapped.

  6. Electronically driven adsorbate excitation mechanism in femtosecond-pulse laser desorption

    Brandbyge, Mads; Hedegård, Per; Heinz, T. F.;

    1995-01-01

    a systematic theoretical treatment of this coupling process in the language of an electronic friction, which generates Langevin noise in the adsorbate center-of-mass degrees of freedom, while the electronic degrees of freedom are at a high temperature. Starting from an influence-functional path...... electronic excitation energies the friction becomes strongly temperature dependent due to dominance by virtual excitations between different adsorbate potential energy surfaces. The former regime is related to the electronic friction model for the desorption process, and the latter to the desorption induced...

  7. Quantum entanglement for two electrons in the excited states of helium-like systems

    Lin, Yen-Chang; Ho, Yew Kam

    2013-01-01

    The quantum entanglement for the two electrons in the excited states of the helium-like atom/ions is investigated using the two-electron wave functions constructed by the B-spline basis. As a measure of the spatial (electron-electron orbital) entanglement, the von Neumann entropy and linear entropy of the reduced density matrix are calculated for the 1s2s 1,3S excited states for systems with some selected Z values from Z=2 to Z=100. Results for the helium atom are compared with other availabl...

  8. Determination of Surface excitation correction in elastic peak electron spectroscopy for selected conducting polymers

    Lesiak, B. [Institute of Physical Chemistry Polish Academy of Sciences, 01-224 Warszawa, Kasprzaka 44/52 (Poland)]. E-mail: blo@ichf.edu.pl; Gergely, G. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Toth, J. [Nuclear Research Institute ATOMKI, H-4001 Debrecen, P.O. Box 51 (Hungary); Menyhard, M. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Varga, D. [Nuclear Research Institute ATOMKI, H-4001 Debrecen, P.O. Box 51 (Hungary); Gurban, S. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Sulyok, A. [Research Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, H-1525 Budapest, P.O. Box 49 (Hungary); Kosinski, A. [Institute of Physical Chemistry Polish Academy of Sciences, 01-224 Warszawa, Kasprzaka 44/52 (Poland)

    2006-12-15

    Inelastic mean free paths (IMFPs) determined by elastic peak electron spectroscopy (EPES) have been frequently evaluated neglecting surface excitations that affect the elastic peak intensity for a sample and a reference material. Surface excitation correction is defined by Surface excitation parameter, P {sub s}, denoted by SEP. SEPs for eight selected conducting polymers (polythiophenes, polyaniline and polyethylene) undoped and doped with Pd were determined by EPES using Ag, Ni and Si reference materials for electron energies between 0.2 and 2.0 keV. The mean percentage deviations between IMFPs uncorrected for surface excitations and those calculated with the predictive formulae of Gries and Tanuma et al. were 4.32 and 27.32%, respectively. Relevant deviations for IMFPs corrected for surface excitations were 2.97 and 22.90%, respectively.

  9. A theoretical study of electronic excited states of photosynthetic reaction center in Rhodopseudomonas viridis

    2006-01-01

    The electronic singlet vertical excited states of photosynthetic reaction center (PSRC) in Rhodopseudomonas (Rps.) viridis were investigated by ZINDO and INDO/S methods. The effects of the interactions of pigment-pigment and pigment-protein on the electronic excitations were examined. The calculation results showed that the interactions of pigment-pigment and pigment-protein play an important role in reasonably assigning the experimental absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectra of PSRC in Rps. virids. By comparing the theoretically computed excited states with the experimental absorption and CD spectra, satisfactory assignments of the experimental spectroscopic peaks were achieved.

  10. Electron-photon polarization correlation study of Ne, Ar and Kr excitation by electron impact

    The electron impact excitation of the 3s' [1/2]01 state in neon, the 4s' [1/2]O1 state in argon and the 5s[3/2]01 state in krypton have been studied using the electron-photon polarization correlation technique. The two linear coherence parameters P1 and P2 have been measured and the alignment angle γ and the linear polarization P+lin of the angular part of the collisionally induced excited state charge cloud were extracted from the measured P1 and P2 parameters. The authors measured P1 and P2 in neon at an impact energy of 50 eV, in argon at impact energies of 50 eV, 40 eV, 30 eV and 25 eV, and in krypton at impact energies of 50 eV and 30 eV and electron scattering angles up to 55 degrees in all cases. A comparison with theoretical predictions from first-order perturbative theories such as a Distorted Wave Born Approximation (DWBA) and a First Order Many Body Theory (FOMBT) was made. At 50 eV in neon and argon, the agreement between experiment and theory is generally good at small scattering angles up to 25 degrees and somewhat poorer at larger scattering angles. At 50 eV in krypton, the agreement between experiment and theory is generally good at scattering angles up to 40 degrees. The measurements in argon (40 eV, 30 eV, and 25 eV) generally follow the trend of the theoretical predictions, but it was found that the experimentally measured coherence parameters appear to be shifted towards larger scattering angles compared to the theoretical predictions as the impact energy is decreased. At 30 eV in krypton, very good agreement between experiment and theory was found over the entire range of electron scattering angles (up to 55 degrees). The level of agreement between experiment and theory indicates that the DWBA and FOMBT appear to provide a better description of the collision process for a more complex target

  11. Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Reactions with Photometric Bases Reveal Free Energy Relationships for Proton Transfer.

    Eisenhart, Thomas T; Howland, William C; Dempsey, Jillian L

    2016-08-18

    The proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) oxidation of p-aminophenol in acetonitrile was initiated via stopped-flow rapid-mixing and spectroscopically monitored. For oxidation by ferrocenium in the presence of 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline proton acceptors, both the electron transfer and proton transfer components could be optically monitored in the visible region; the decay of the ferrocenium absorbance is readily monitored (λmax = 620 nm), and the absorbance of the 2,4-substituted 7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives (λmax = 370-392 nm) red-shifts substantially (ca. 70 nm) upon protonation. Spectral analysis revealed the reaction proceeds via a stepwise electron transfer-proton transfer process, and modeling of the kinetics traces monitoring the ferrocenium and quinolinium signals provided rate constants for elementary proton and electron transfer steps. As the pKa values of the conjugate acids of the 2,4-R-7-(dimethylamino)quinoline derivatives employed were readily tuned by varying the substituents at the 2- and 4-positions of the quinoline backbone, the driving force for proton transfer was systematically varied. Proton transfer rate constants (kPT,2 = (1.5-7.5) × 10(8) M(-1) s(-1), kPT,4 = (0.55-3.0) × 10(7) M(-1) s(-1)) were found to correlate with the pKa of the conjugate acid of the proton acceptor, in agreement with anticipated free energy relationships for proton transfer processes in PCET reactions. PMID:27500804

  12. Excited-state proton transfer of photoexcited pyranine in water observed by femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    Han, Fangyuan; Liu, Weimin; Fang, Chong, E-mail: Chong.Fang@oregonstate.edu

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: • A number of low – frequency modes are sequentially observed in photoexcited HPTS. • Evidence of coherent quantum beat in several low – frequency modes with anharmonic coupling. • The most transient low – frequency mode is the symmetric ring breathing of HPTS. • Excited – state proton transfer occurs nonadiabatically on the 5–200 ps timescale. • Kinetic isotope effect is 3–4 for the two-stage ESPT components in water. - Abstract: We use femtosecond stimulated Raman spectroscopy (FSRS) to illuminate the choreography of intermolecular excited-state proton transfer (ESPT) of photoacid pyranine (8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonic acid, HPTS) in water. The multidimensional reaction coordinate responsible for photoacidity is revealed to involve sequential activation of characteristic skeletal motions during the ca. 1 ps preparation stage preceding ESPT. The initial ring-coplanarity breaking follows in-plane ring breathing (191 cm{sup −1}), and is facilitated by HPTS ring wagging (108 cm{sup −1}) and ring-H out-of-plane motions (321, 362, 952 cm{sup −1}), which largely decay within ∼1 ps. ESPT then occurs with intrinsic inhomogeneity via various number of intervening water molecules over relatively larger distances than those in acetate–water system. The intricate relationship between the time-resolved excited-state vibrational modes of HPTS reveals the essential role of coherent low-frequency skeletal motions gating ESPT, and the multi-staged proton-transfer process having the kinetic isotope effect (KIE) value of 3–4 in aqueous solution on the 5–200 ps timescale.

  13. On the validity of the electron transfer model in photon emission from ion bombarded vanadium surfaces

    The spectral structure of the radiation (250-500 nm) emitted during sputtering of clean and oxygen-covered polycrystalline vanadium and V2O5 by 5 keV Kr+ ions is presented. The optical spectra obtained by bombarding the vanadium target consist of series of sharp lines, which are attributed to neutral and ionic excited V. The same lines are observed in the spectra of V2O5 and vanadium when oxygen is present. The absolute intensities of VI and VII lines are measured under similar conditions for all spectra. The difference in photon yield from the clean and oxide vanadium targets is discussed in terms of the electron-transfer processes between the excited sputtered and electronic levels of the two types of surfaces. We have examined the existing models of ionisation, excitation, neutralisation and de-excitation of atomic particles in the vicinity of solid surfaces. Continuum radiation was also observed and interpreted as a result of the emission of excited molecules of the metal-oxide. (authors)

  14. Resonant transfer excitation followed by X-ray for boron-like ions

    RAMADAN, Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Theoretical cross sections for resonant transfer excitation followed by x-ray emission (RTEX) are calculated for the collisions of some ions in the series of the Boron-like ions with H2 as a target. The calculations have been done for C II, N III, O IV, F V, Ar XIV and Fe XXII ions by folding their dielectronic recombination (DR) cross sections over the momentum distribution (Compton profile) of H2 target gas. Calculations have been performed from both ground and metastable initial st...

  15. Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction in 4-(1-azetidinyl)benzonitrile: Solvent isotope effects

    Tuhin Pradhan; Piue Ghoshal; Ranjit Biswas

    2009-01-01

    Excited state intramolecular charge transfer reaction of 4-(1-azetidinyl) benzonitrile (P4C) in deuterated and normal methanol, ethanol and acetonitrile has been studied in order to investigate the solvent isotope effects on reaction rates and yields. These quantities (reaction rates and yields) along with several other properties such as quantum yield and radiative rates have been found to be insensitive to the solvent isotope substitution in all these solvents. The origin of the solvent isotope insensitivity of the reaction is discussed and correlated with the observed slowing down of the solvation dynamics upon isotope substitution.

  16. Finite Size Corrections to the Excitation Energy Transfer in a Massless Scalar Interaction Model

    Maeda, N; Tobita, Y; Ishikawa, K

    2016-01-01

    We study the excitation energy transfer (EET) for a simple model in which a virtual massless scalar particle is exchanged between two molecules. If the time interval is finite, then the finite size effect generally appears in a transition amplitude through the regions where the wave nature of quanta remains. We calculated the transition amplitude for EET and obtained finite size corrections to the standard formula derived by using Fermi's golden rule. These corrections for the transition amplitude appear outside the resonance energy region. The estimation in a photosynthesis system indicates that the finite size correction could reduce the EET time considerably.

  17. Methods, algorithms and computer codes for calculation of electron-impact excitation parameters

    Bogdanovich, P; Stonys, D

    2015-01-01

    We describe the computer codes, developed at Vilnius University, for the calculation of electron-impact excitation cross sections, collision strengths, and excitation rates in the plane-wave Born approximation. These codes utilize the multireference atomic wavefunctions which are also adopted to calculate radiative transition parameters of complex many-electron ions. This leads to consistent data sets suitable in plasma modelling codes. Two versions of electron scattering codes are considered in the present work, both of them employing configuration interaction method for inclusion of correlation effects and Breit-Pauli approximation to account for relativistic effects. These versions differ only by one-electron radial orbitals, where the first one employs the non-relativistic numerical radial orbitals, while another version uses the quasirelativistic radial orbitals. The accuracy of produced results is assessed by comparing radiative transition and electron-impact excitation data for neutral hydrogen, helium...

  18. Probing the carrier transfer processes in a self-assembled system with In0.3Ga0.7As/GaAs quantum dots by photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy

    Podemski, Paweł; Pieczarka, Maciej; Maryński, Aleksander; Misiewicz, Jan; Löffler, Andreas; Höfling, Sven; Reithmaier, Johann Peter; Reitzenstein, Stephan; Sęk, Grzegorz

    2016-05-01

    In this report we present experimental studies on the energy transfer between the wetting layer and single large elongated In0.3Ga0.7As/GaAs quantum dots. We obtain insight into the electronic and optical properties of In0.3Ga0.7As/GaAs quantum dots by probing their confined electronic states via photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy on the single dot level. We demonstrate that the energy separation between the states of a quantum dot and the wetting layer states affects the carrier transfer efficiency - reduced transfer efficiency is observed for smaller dots with higher indium content. We also discuss the effects of the excited states and the trapping of carriers on confinement potential fluctuations of the wetting layer. Eventually, the transfer of charge carriers from localized wetting layer states to a single quantum dot is evidenced in temperature-dependent photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy.

  19. Measurements and analysis of excitation coefficients and secondary electron yields in Townsend dark discharges

    In this paper, we review our study of excitation coefficients in rare gases and in methane, some of the excitation cross sections that were obtained, the spatial profiles of emission (with absolute calibration) and secondary electron yields. The data for excitation coefficients have been analysed to produce the cross section data in some cases. The spatial profiles of emission at the low currents were used to establish the importance of the non-hydrodynamic relaxation and the contributions of heavy particles and reflected electrons. These data were also used to get more reliable secondary electron yields for rare gases. The spatial emission profiles at higher currents have been applied to obtain field profiles and make comparisons with hybrid models. In particular, we present in this paper, the emission coefficients in krypton and we discuss the wide range of interconnected applications of excitation coefficients and spatial emission profiles

  20. Two-photon-induced hot-electron transfer to a single molecule in a scanning tunneling microscope

    The junction of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) operating in the tunneling regime was irradiated with femtosecond laser pulses. A photoexcited hot electron in the STM tip resonantly tunnels into an excited state of a single molecule on the surface, converting it from the neutral to the anion. The electron-transfer rate depends quadratically on the incident laser power, suggesting a two-photon excitation process. This nonlinear optical process is further confirmed by the polarization measurement. Spatial dependence of the electron-transfer rate exhibits atomic-scale variations. A two-pulse correlation experiment reveals the ultrafast dynamic nature of photoinduced charging process in the STM junction. Results from these experiments are important for understanding photoinduced interfacial charge transfer in many nanoscale inorganic-organic structures.