WorldWideScience

Sample records for earth pressure balance

  1. Rare earths and the balance problem

    OpenAIRE

    Binnemans, Koen; Jones , Peter Tom

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining the balance between the demand by the economic markets and the natural abundance of the rare-earth elements (REEs) in ores constitutes a major challenge for manufacturers of these elements. This is the so-called balance problem (or balancing problem). The ideal situation is a perfect match between the demand and (production) supply of REEs, so that there are no surpluses of any of the REEs. The balance problem implicates that the rare-earth industry has to either find new applicat...

  2. Earth Pressure on Tunnel Crown

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lars

    2008-01-01

    Two different analyses have been carried out in order to find the vertical earth pressure, or overburden pressure, at the crown of a tunnel going through a dike. Firstly, a hand calculation is performed using a simple dispersion of the stresses over depth. Secondly, the finite?element program Plaxis is utilized to check the result.

  3. Seismic induced earth pressures in buried vaults

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The magnitude and distribution of earth pressures acting on buried structures and induced by a seismic event are considered in this paper. A soil-structure-interaction analysis is performed for typical Department of Energy high level waste storage tanks using a lumped parameter model. The resulting soil pressure distributions are determined and compared with the static soil pressure to assess the design significance of the seismic induced soil pressures. It is found that seismic pressures do not control design unless the peak ground acceleration exceeds about 0.3 G. The effect of soil non linearities (resulting from local soil failure) are also found to have little effect on the predictions of the seismic response of the buried structure. The seismic induced pressures are found to be very similar to those predicted using the elastic model in ASCE 4-86

  4. Dynamic active earth pressure on retaining structures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepankar Choudhury; Santiram Chatterjee

    2006-12-01

    Earth-retaining structures constitute an important topic of research in civil engineering, more so under earthquake conditions. For the analysis and design of retaining walls in earthquake-prone zones, accurate estimation of dynamic earth pressures is very important. Conventional methods either use pseudo-static approaches of analysis even for dynamic cases or a simple single-degree of freedom model for the retaining wall–soil system. In this paper, a simpli?ed two-degree of freedom mass–spring–dashpot (2-DOF) dynamic model has been proposed to estimate the active earth pressure at the back of the retaining walls for translation modes of wall movement under seismic conditions. The horizontal zone of in?uence on dynamic earth force on the wall is estimated. Results in terms of displacement, velocity and acceleration-time history are presented for some typical cases, which show the ?nal movement of the wall in terms of wall height, which is required for the design. The non-dimensional design chart proposed in the present study can be used to compute the total dynamic earth force on the wall under different input ground motion and back?ll conditions. Finally, the results obtained have been compared with those of the available Scott model and the merits of the present results have been discussed.

  5. High pressure polymorphism of rare earth sulfideiodides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High pressure transformations of rare earth sulfideiodides are reported. Compounds with the GdSI-type structure (GdSI to DySI) transform to the SmSI-type within the pressure range up to 40 kb. For GdSI itself an ?-CeSI-type arrangement can be achieved additionally in the higher pressure range. All compounds crystallizing in the SmSI-type at ambient pressures transform to the ?-CeSI-type under such conditions. We explain these structures briefly in terms of a topological description, and we offer a structure model for GdSI. Possible reaction mechanism are discussed in comparison with similar transformations in LnOCl and LnSF compounds. (author)

  6. Low-temperature hydrogen circulation system of the pressure balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In China Spallation Neutron Source (CSNS), which is under construction recently in Southern China, a cryogenic system is used to cool down the neutron moderator. Pressure control system is a key unit to balance the pressure in H2 loop. Denisty of H2 in loop is almost constant under the design condition of 18-21K. When temperature change 1K, large variation pressure about 1 MPa change in H2 loop. By analysis three pressure control modes of warm buffer, cryogenic dewar and accumulator, pressure fluctuation can be controlled by accumulator more perfectly with less hydrogen inventory in H2 loop. (authors)

  7. The energy balance of the earth' surface : a practical approach

    OpenAIRE

    Bruin, H.A.R.

    1982-01-01

    This study is devoted to the energy balance of the earth's surface with a special emphasis on practical applications. A simple picture of the energy exchange processes that take place at the ground is the following. Per unit time and area an amount of radiant energy is supplied to the surface. This radiation originates partly from the sun, but an~ other fraction is coming from the atmosphere (= infra-red radiation emitted by clouds, water vapour and CO 2 ). From these gain terms the following...

  8. Rigidly framed earth retaining structures thermal soil structure interaction of buildings supporting unbalanced lateral earth pressures

    CERN Document Server

    Aboumoussa, Walid

    2014-01-01

    Structures placed on hillsides often present a number of challenges and a limited number of economical choices for site design. An option sometimes employed is to use the building frame as a retaining element, comprising a Rigidly Framed Earth Retaining Structure (RFERS). The relationship between temperature and earth pressure acting on RFERS, is explored in this monograph through a 4.5 year monitoring program of a heavily instrumented in service structure. The data indicated that the coefficient of earth pressure behind the monitored RFERS had a strong linear correlation with temperature. The study also revealed that thermal cycles, rather than lateral earth pressure, were the cause of failure in many structural elements. The book demonstrates that depending on the relative stiffness of the retained soil mass and that of the structural frame, the developed lateral earth pressure, during thermal expansion, can reach magnitudes several times larger than those determined using classical earth pressure theories....

  9. Earth in the balance. Ecology and the human spirit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book is the translation of the original American edition ''earth in the balance''. When Earth in the Balance first came out, it caused quite a stir and for good reason. It convincingly makes the case that a crisis of epidemic proportions is nearly upon us and that if the world does not get its act together soon and agree to some kind of 'Global Marshall Plan' to protect the environment, we're all up a polluted creek without a paddle. Myriad plagues are upon us, but the worst include the loss of biodiversity, the depletion of the ozone layer, the slash-and-burn destruction of rain forests, and the onset of global warming. None of this is new, of course, nor was it new in 1992. But most environmentalists will still get a giddy feeling reading such a call to action as written by a prominent politician. The book is arranged into three sections: the first describes the plagues; the second looks at how we got ourselves into this mess; and the final chapters present ways out. Gore gets his points across in a serviceable way, though he could have benefited from a firmer editor's hand; at times the analogies are arcane and the pacing is odd kind of like a Gore speech that climaxes at weird points and then sinks just as the audience is about to clap. Still, at the end you understand what's been said. Gore believes that if we apply some American ingenuity, the twin engines of democracy and capitalism can be rigged to help us stabilize world population growth, spread social justice, boost education levels, create environmentally appropriate technologies, and negotiate international agreements to bring us back from the brink. For example, a worldwide shift to clean, renewable energy sources would create huge economic opportunities for companies large and small to design, build, and maintain solar panels, wind turbines, fuel cells, and other eco friendly innovations

  10. Journey to the Center of the Earth: Exploring High Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, Wendy

    2009-09-29

    The deeper we go into the Earth, the higher the pressure. At the pressures found within the center of our planet, minerals do not simply compress. Pressure dramatically alters all materials properties, in the process creating numerous novel phases not found on the surface. This lecture will describe how we simulate the conditions found in planetary interiors in the lab, what kinds of new behavior we find, and how these observations can explain what is going on within the Earth. High pressure explorations also lead to discoveries of novel materials with potential for practical applications in our low-pressure, environment.

  11. Pressure balance between a magnetized plasma and a low pressure neutral gas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The steady state pressure balance between a plasma and a low pressure neutral gas is calculated by the continuum approach in order to predict the critical density of a neutral gas above which the plasma is drastically affected. The diffusion in the plasma-neutral gas boundary induces a large diamagnetic current which also induces the large pressure difference between a plasma and a neutral gas. This means that a plasma may be affected even by a low density neutral gas. (orig.)

  12. Why is the earth not burning ? The earth radiative energy balance

    OpenAIRE

    Bret, A

    2011-01-01

    The concept of energy balance is a key one in climate science. Yet, students may find it counterintuitive: while it is obvious that some energy comes in from the sun, the part coming out is more elusive. Asking them why the earth is not burning after billions of years of exposure to the sun, takes them to the question "where does the energy goes?" A series of Fermi like calculations then convinces them that storage capabilities are negligible compared to the amount of energy...

  13. Reliability of Center of Pressure Measures During Dynamic Balance Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Sanjary

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aim: Few studies have assessed the reliability of postural balance measures during dynamic balance performance that introduce additional challenging to postural control system. In addition sometimes in the static conditions some deficiencies of the postural control system may not be revealed obviously therefore the aim of this study was to assess the reliability of postural control parameters during functional performance on force plate in healthy subjects.Materials and Methods: Ten healthy male subjects (mean age: 25.4 years, weight: 68.2 kg height:176.9cm participated in this study. None of the subjects were involved in sport activities. Every subject performed three 15seconds trials of eyes open single leg stance on a force plate during dynamic balance task. Participants grasped object with hand at their waist level and release it at above shoulder level. The reproducibility of the center of pressure (COP deviations (average speed &length of path was assessed. All participants were tested on 2 sessions with an inter-measurement interval of 7 days. COP data was collected for each trial. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC was used as parameter of intra-session and inter-session (Test-Retest reliability.Results: The ICCs for intra-session reliability of average speed and length of COP path were 0.89 and 0.91 respectively. The ICCs for inter-session reliability were 0.95 and 0.96 respectively.Conclusion: The study showed high and very high reliability for center of pressure measures during dynamic balance task. Therefore this dynamic performance can be used as a balance pattern in postural control assessment. These can be used as reliable parameters in dynamic postural control assessment due to high reliability of average speed and length of COP path.

  14. Physical Limitations of Empirical Field Models: Force Balance and Plasma Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorin Zaharia; C.Z. Cheng

    2002-06-18

    In this paper, we study whether the magnetic field of the T96 empirical model can be in force balance with an isotropic plasma pressure distribution. Using the field of T96, we obtain values for the pressure P by solving a Poisson-type equation {del}{sup 2}P = {del} {center_dot} (J x B) in the equatorial plane, and 1-D profiles on the Sun-Earth axis by integrating {del}P = J x B. We work in a flux coordinate system in which the magnetic field is expressed in terms of Euler potentials. Our results lead to the conclusion that the T96 model field cannot be in equilibrium with an isotropic pressure. We also analyze in detail the computation of Birkeland currents using the Vasyliunas relation and the T96 field, which yields unphysical results, again indicating the lack of force balance in the empirical model. The underlying reason for the force imbalance is likely the fact that the derivatives of the least-square fitted model B are not accurate predictions of the actual magnetospheric field derivatives. Finally, we discuss a possible solution to the problem of lack of force balance in empirical field models.

  15. Physical Limitations of Empirical Field Models: Force Balance and Plasma Pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, we study whether the magnetic field of the T96 empirical model can be in force balance with an isotropic plasma pressure distribution. Using the field of T96, we obtain values for the pressure P by solving a Poisson-type equation (gradient)2P = (gradient) · (J x B) in the equatorial plane, and 1-D profiles on the Sun-Earth axis by integrating (gradient)P = J x B. We work in a flux coordinate system in which the magnetic field is expressed in terms of Euler potentials. Our results lead to the conclusion that the T96 model field cannot be in equilibrium with an isotropic pressure. We also analyze in detail the computation of Birkeland currents using the Vasyliunas relation and the T96 field, which yields unphysical results, again indicating the lack of force balance in the empirical model. The underlying reason for the force imbalance is likely the fact that the derivatives of the least-square fitted model B are not accurate predictions of the actual magnetospheric field derivatives. Finally, we discuss a possible solution to the problem of lack of force balance in empirical field models

  16. Numerical and comparative analysis of earth passive pressure acting.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koudelka, Petr; Koudelka, T.

    Vol. 75. Amsterdam : IS SMGE/TC 28, 2005 - (Bakker, K.), s. 579-585 ISBN 0-415-39124-5. [IS Geotechnical aspects of Underground Construction in Soft Ground 2005 /5./. Amsterdam (NL), 15.06.2005-16.06.2005] R&D Projects: GA AV ?R(CZ) IAA2071302; GA ?R(CZ) GA103/05/2130 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : passive earth pressure * pressure at rest * residual earth pressure Subject RIV: JN - Civil Engineering

  17. Measurement of pressures up to 7?MPa applying pressure balances for dielectric-constant gas thermometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandt, Thorsten; Sabuga, Wladimir; Gaiser, Christof; Fellmuth, Bernd

    2015-10-01

    For the determination of the Boltzmann constant by dielectric-constant gas thermometry, the uncertainty of pressure measurements in helium up to 7?MPa has been decreased compared with previous achievements (Sabuga 2011 PTB-Mitt. 121 247-55). This was possible by performing comprehensive cross-float experiments with a system of six special pressure balances and the synchronization of their effective areas. It is now possible to measure a helium pressure of 7?MPa with a relative standard uncertainty of 1.0?ppm applying a 2?cm2 piston-cylinder unit, the calibration of which is traceable to the SI base units.

  18. Dual shell pressure balanced reactor vessel. Final project report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Energy's Office of Energy Research (OER) has previously provided support for the development of several chemical processes, including supercritical water oxidation, liquefaction, and aqueous hazardous waste destruction, where chemical and phase transformations are conducted at high pressure and temperature. These and many other commercial processes require a pressure vessel capable of operating in a corrosive environment where safety and economy are important requirements. Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) engineers have recently developed and patented (U.S. patent 5,167,930 December 1, 1992) a concept for a novel Dual Shell Pressure Balanced Vessel (DSPBV) which could solve a number of these problems. The technology could be immediately useful in continuing commercialization of an R ampersand D 100 award-winning technology, Sludge-to-oil Reactor System (STORS), originally developed through funding by OER. Innotek Corporation is a small business that would be one logical end-user of the DSPBV reactor technology. Innotek is working with several major U.S. engineering firms to evaluate the potential of this technology in the disposal of wastes from sewage treatment plants. PNL entered into a CRADA with Innotek to build a bench-scale demonstration reactor and test the system to advance the economic feasibility of a variety of high pressure chemical processes. Hydrothermal processing of corrosive substances on a large scale can now be made significantly safer and more economical through use of the DSPBV. Hydrothermal chemical reactions such as wet-air oxidation and supercritical water oxidation occur in a highly corrosive environment inside a pressure vessel. Average corrosion rates from 23 to 80 miles per year have been reported by Rice (1994) and Latanision (1993)

  19. High pressure ?SR studies: rare earths and related materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a short introduction to ?SR with respect to the study of magnetic properties, followed by a brief outline of the principle of the high pressure-low temperature ?SR spectrometer installed at the Paul Scherrer Institute, we discuss some measurements on rare earth materials employing this instrument. They are concerned with: (1) The pressure dependence of the spin turning process in ferromagnetic Gd. (2) The volume dependence of the internal magnetic field in the heavy rare earth metals Gd, Dy, and Ho in their ordered magnetic states. (3) The response of the (first order) magnetic transition in the frustrated antiferromagnets of type RMn2 (R = Y,Gd) to pressure. (4) The variation of magnetic parameters with pressure in La2CuO4 (powder sample), the antiferromagnetic parent compound of the high TC superconductors of type La2-x(Sr, Ba)xCuO4. In conclusion a short outlook on further developments is given

  20. Performance of earth pressure cell as grain pressure transducer in a model silo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Horabik

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerous methods have been proposed for determining the pressure exerted by grain at discrete locations in a storage structure, but few satisfactory solutions have been found. Earth pressure cells were tested as potential measurement devices for grain bins. Earth pressure cells are commercial transducers designed for geotechnical applications. Calibration of the earth pressure cell was performed in a pressurized chamber filled with wheat under normal load as well as shear load. The cell was tested in a model grain silo 1.83 m in diameter d with a height hc of 5.75 m. Vertical floor pressures and horizontal wall pressures were measured at different points in the model bin. The vertical floor pressure pvi was measured at two different radial locations and horizontal wall pressure ph was measured at four different wall heights. The vertical floor pressure obtained using the earth pressure cell was in good agreement with the mean floor pressure pv calculated using load cells that supported the entire floor or the bin. Considerable variation in the vertical floor pressure along the silo floor radius was observed. The variation of the lateral-to-vertical pressure ratio, K, was monitored during each fill-unload cycle of the model silo. In the case of the maximum h/d ratio of 2, K increased during filling and stabilized after reaching a grain h/d ratio of 1.3. At the onset of discharge, the pressure ratio immediately increased up to value of approximately 0.7, and remained stable during unloading down to a h/d ratio of approximately 0.65 when K decreased rapidly.

  1. Elastic properties of alkaline earth oxides under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A phenomenological theory has been developed to describe the elastic behavior of alkaline earth oxide solids under high pressure. The values of second order elastic constants, Cauchy's deviation and Zener anisotropy ratio at different pressures have been computed for MgO, CaO, SrO, and BaO. The results were found to be satisfactory and in agreement with available experimental and other theoretical results

  2. Risks of analyses with lateral earth pressure load.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koudelka, Petr

    London : Taylor and Francis Group, 2011 - (Faber, M.; Kohler, J.; Nishijima, K.), s. 842-848 ISBN 978-0-415-66986-3. [IC on Application of statistics in civil engineering /11./. Zurich (CH), 01.08.2011-04.08.2011] Grant ostatní: GA?R(CZ) GAP105/11/1160 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : earth pressure * active / passive pressure * EUROCODE 7-1 * design risk Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  3. Earth Pressure Model with Curved Slip Surfaces by AIM.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koudelka, Petr

    Rotterdam : A.A.Balkema, 1999 - (Fujita, F.), s. 377-382 [Conf. of Geotechnical Aspects of Underground Construction in Soft Ground. Tokyo (JP), 07.07.1999-10.07.1999] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA103/98/0632 Keywords : Earth (lateral) pressure * apriori integration method * shear surface * slip surface * minimization Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering

  4. Economics as if the earth really mattered. Putting balance back on the balance sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, D

    1991-09-01

    Some of the thinking in the economic realm which affects the relationship between the economy and the environment is discussed. The standard economic model inherently conflicts with the environment. Humans as consumers have their needs met by maximizing production and efficiency in a free market economy, where an invisible hand guides to profit. The question is raised as to what the environmental impact is for economic growth. The need for clean air, water, and preservation of other living things is not met. It is argued that pollution is a necessary byproduct of production. Economic progress as measured by gross national product (GNP) cannot account for the degradation of nature, e.g., the Alaskan oil spill actually increased GNP. Traditional economics also tell little about the maldistribution of wealth. It is pointed out that Americans spend $5 billion a year on special diets while 400 million around the world are undernourished. Limits to natural resources are also not accounted for by economic theorists, or the value of the seemingly free life-sustaining services performed by a forest in purifying air, preventing erosion and flooding, regulating climate, and supporting biological diversity. It is pointed out that restructuring must occur if the capacity of the Earth to support life is classed in economic terms as an externality. Steady state economic models consider the cycles of production and consumption in the context of the surrounding ecosystem of waste and raw materials and try to achieve a state of equilibrium. Despite the 1972 President's Commission on Population Growth and the American Future's statement that population growth is not necessary for a vital economy, the mythology exists that the economy will collapse, personal income will drop, and business will decline without an ever-growing population. A summary on positive outcomes of zero population growth is given. The economist Julian Simon promotes the view that there is no environmental degradation and technological fixes and human ingenuity will keep prosperity growing. Economic growth is seen as the cure for poverty, unemployment, and other ills. Technology has its shortcomings as pesticides and soil depletion have shown. Food supplies have dropped. Sustainability with all its lack of specificity has come to mean more rapid economic growth in both developed and developing countries, with assumptions of an infinite universe and economic expansion. A steady state economy aims to reduce overconsumption and stop population growth in order to balance the economic system in the ecosystem. PMID:12284468

  5. Precariousness and hazard of lateral earth pressure theory.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koudelka, Petr

    Reston : American Society of Civil Engineers, 2014 - ( Beer , M.; Au, S.; Hall, J.), s. 2765-2779 ISBN 978-0-7844-1360-9. [International Conference on vulnerability and risk analysis and management /2./. Liverpool (GB), 13.07.2014-16.07.2014] Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : earth pressure * EUROCODE 7-1 * soils Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering http://ascelibrary.org/doi/abs/10.1061/9780784413609.279

  6. G-endurance during heat stress and balanced pressure breathing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balldin, U I; Siegborn, J

    1992-03-01

    The effect of heat stress and balanced pressure breathing during G (PBG) on G-endurance was investigated. Ten fighter pilots wearing anti-G-suits with increased bladder coverage were warmed to 38.2 degrees C and exposed to 15-s periods at 4.5 and 7 G in a heated human centrifuge gondola until exhaustion during PBG and normal breathing (NB). During both NB and PBG, the rectal temperature rose to a mean of 38.3 degrees C, and the dehydration was about 1.2 kg. With NB the endurance was a mean of 254 s, while it was 300 s with PBG (n.s.). Oxygen saturation and ratings of perceived exertion were mainly unchanged, while the maximum heart rate decreased by a mean of 13 bpm during PBG. In conclusion, the G-endurance was not deteriorated with PBG, in comparison with NB, during heat stress. In conjunction with experiences from other studies, however, it emphasizes the importance of avoiding heat stress and dehydration during G-loads, even with PBG. PMID:1567317

  7. EDITORIAL: The Earth radiation balance as driver of the global hydrological cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Martin; Liepert, Beate

    2010-06-01

    Variations in the intensity of the global hydrological cycle can have far-reaching effects on living conditions on our planet. While climate change discussions often revolve around possible consequences of future temperature changes, the adaptation to changes in the hydrological cycle may pose a bigger challenge to societies and ecosystems. Floods and droughts are already today amongst the most damaging natural hazards, with floods being globally the most significant disaster type in terms of loss of human life (Jonkman 2005). From an economic perspective, changes in the hydrological cycle can impose great pressures and damages on a variety of industrial sectors, such as water management, urban planning, agricultural production and tourism. Despite their obvious environmental and societal importance, our understanding of the causes and magnitude of the variations of the hydrological cycle is still unsatisfactory (e.g., Ramanathan et al 2001, Ohmura and Wild 2002, Allen and Ingram 2002, Allan 2007, Wild et al 2008, Liepert and Previdi 2009). The link between radiation balance and hydrological cycle Globally, precipitation can be approximated by surface evaporation, since the variability of the atmospheric moisture storage is negligible. This is the case because the fluxes are an order of magnitude larger than the atmospheric storage (423 x 1012 m3 year-1 versus 13 x 1012 m3 according to Baumgartner and Reichel (1975)), the latter being determined by temperature (Clausius-Clapeyron). Hence the residence time of evaporated water in the atmosphere is not more than a few days, before it condenses and falls back to Earth in the form of precipitation. Any change in the globally averaged surface evaporation therefore implies an equivalent change in precipitation, and thus in the intensity of the global hydrological cycle. The process of evaporation requires energy, which it obtains from the surface radiation balance (also known as surface net radiation), composed of the absorbed solar and net thermal radiative exchanges at the Earth's surface. Globally averaged, this surface radiation balance is positive, since radiative absorption, scattering and emission in the climate system act to generate an energy surplus at the surface and an energy deficit in the atmosphere (Liepert 2010). Evaporation, or more precisely its energy equivalent, the latent heat flux, is the main process that compensates for this imbalance between surface and atmosphere, since the latent heat dominates the convective energy flux over sensible heating. The radiative energy surplus at the surface is thus mainly consumed by evaporation and moist convection and subsequently released in the atmosphere through condensation. This implies that any alterations in the available radiative energy will induce changes in the water fluxes. Our focus in this editorial is therefore on the surface radiation balance as the principal driver of the global hydrological cycle. Note that this energetic view is in agreement with that of Richter and Xie (2008) who argue that the spatial and temporal behaviour of the process of evaporation is controlled by surface and atmospheric properties such as atmospheric stability, wind speed, moisture deficit and moisture availability. From radiation theory it is expected that with increasing radiative absorption due to abundance of anthropogenic greenhouse gases in the atmosphere and consequent warming, the emission of thermal energy from the atmosphere towards the surface is increasing (known as downward thermal radiation). This enhances the radiative energy surplus at the surface, and, where surface water is not limited, fuels evaporation besides warming the Earth's surface. The enhanced greenhouse effect therefore tends to accelerate the hydrological cycle, as also shown in many climate model simulations with increasing levels of greenhouse gases (e.g., IPCC 2007, but also see Yang et al 2003, Andrews et al 2009). We can assume that the increase in greenhouse gases since preindustrial times had already led to a substantial increase of downw

  8. Earth in the balance - ecology and the human spirit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book by Senator Albert Gore presents a global prospective on the environmental crisis facing the Earth. The chapters are framed in the twin ideas of the threat posed by human civilization to the global environment and the threat to human civilization posed by changes in the global environment. Gore first looks at evidence of risk in the environment: historical aspects of climate and civilization; ozone layer; water; land use; food supply; waste disposal. In Part II different aspects of our current approaches to the environment are described: politics; economics; technology; social problems; environmentalism of the human spirit. Finally in Part III, Gore presents his approach to the global environmental crisis, first presenting a section about a global sense of responsibility and purpose and then describing his ideas for A Global Marshal Plan. 169 refs., 4 figs

  9. Effect of revised high-heeled shoes on foot pressure and static balance during standing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Young-Hyeon; Ko, Mansoo; Park, Young-Soul; Lee, Suk-Min

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of revised high-heeled shoes on the foot pressure ratio and static balance during standing. [Subjects and Methods] A single-subject design was used, 15 healthy women wearing revised high-heeled shoes and general high-heeled shoes in a random order. The foot pressure ratio and static balance scores during standing were measured using a SpaceBalance 3D system. [Results] Forefoot and rearfoot pressures were significantly different between the 2 types of high-heeled shoes. Under the 3 conditions tested, the static balance score was higher for the revised high-heeled shoes than for the general high-heeled shoes, but this difference was not statistically significant. [Conclusion] Revised high-heeled shoes are preferable to general high-heeled shoes, as they result in normalization of normalized foot pressure and a positive effect on static balance. PMID:25995572

  10. THE HABITABLE ZONE OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS WITH DIFFERENT LEVELS OF ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vladilo, Giovanni; Murante, Giuseppe; Silva, Laura [INAF-Trieste Astronomical Observatory, Trieste (Italy); Provenzale, Antonello [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate-CNR, Torino (Italy); Ferri, Gaia; Ragazzini, Gregorio, E-mail: vladilo@oats.inaf.it [Department of Physics, University of Trieste, Trieste (Italy)

    2013-04-10

    As a contribution to the study of the habitability of extrasolar planets, we implemented a one-dimensional energy balance model (EBM), the simplest seasonal model of planetary climate, with new prescriptions for most physical quantities. Here we apply our EBM to investigate the surface habitability of planets with an Earth-like atmospheric composition but different levels of surface pressure. The habitability, defined as the mean fraction of the planet's surface on which liquid water could exist, is estimated from the pressure-dependent liquid water temperature range, taking into account seasonal and latitudinal variations of surface temperature. By running several thousands of EBM simulations we generated a map of the habitable zone (HZ) in the plane of the orbital semi-major axis, a, and surface pressure, p, for planets in circular orbits around a Sun-like star. As pressure increases, the HZ becomes broader, with an increase of 0.25 AU in its radial extent from p = 1/3 to 3 bar. At low pressure, the habitability is low and varies with a; at high pressure, the habitability is high and relatively constant inside the HZ. We interpret these results in terms of the pressure dependence of the greenhouse effect, the efficiency of horizontal heat transport, and the extent of the liquid water temperature range. Within the limits discussed in the paper, the results can be extended to planets in eccentric orbits around non-solar-type stars. The main characteristics of the pressure-dependent HZ are modestly affected by variations of planetary properties, particularly at high pressure.

  11. THE HABITABLE ZONE OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS WITH DIFFERENT LEVELS OF ATMOSPHERIC PRESSURE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As a contribution to the study of the habitability of extrasolar planets, we implemented a one-dimensional energy balance model (EBM), the simplest seasonal model of planetary climate, with new prescriptions for most physical quantities. Here we apply our EBM to investigate the surface habitability of planets with an Earth-like atmospheric composition but different levels of surface pressure. The habitability, defined as the mean fraction of the planet's surface on which liquid water could exist, is estimated from the pressure-dependent liquid water temperature range, taking into account seasonal and latitudinal variations of surface temperature. By running several thousands of EBM simulations we generated a map of the habitable zone (HZ) in the plane of the orbital semi-major axis, a, and surface pressure, p, for planets in circular orbits around a Sun-like star. As pressure increases, the HZ becomes broader, with an increase of 0.25 AU in its radial extent from p = 1/3 to 3 bar. At low pressure, the habitability is low and varies with a; at high pressure, the habitability is high and relatively constant inside the HZ. We interpret these results in terms of the pressure dependence of the greenhouse effect, the efficiency of horizontal heat transport, and the extent of the liquid water temperature range. Within the limits discussed in the paper, the results can be extended to planets in eccentric orbits around non-solar-type stars. The main characteristics of the pressure-dependent HZ are modestly affected by variations of planetary properties, particularly at high pressure.

  12. How reliable are latitudinal energy balance models for habitability calculations when using Earth's radiative properties?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmore, James B.

    2014-05-01

    Exoplanet habitability studies are often performed using simple energy balance models (EBMs), which rely on an understanding of a planet's radiative properties. However, knowledge of these properties is currently limited. Here, I use Earth as a testbed for examining habitability and model uncertainty in a diffusive latitudinal EBM. Using an empirical approach, I parametrize Earth's radiative properties - top of atmosphere albedo and outgoing infrared radiation - as a function of surface temperature, using measurements from the NASA Clouds and Earth's Radiant Energy System instruments. When using surface temperature to construct these functions, a bias analysis shows only small global biases of 3 and - 0.3 W m-2 are introduced for the albedo and infrared functions, respectively. I also show there is a very fine balance between Earth's incoming solar and outgoing infrared radiation in the observational data, which is substantially smaller than previously assumed in this model. Using observationally derived radiative functions for an Earth-like planet, the snowball transition can be determined within a semimajor axis of ˜3 per cent, with a structural uncertainty of ˜2 per cent in the radiative function construction. This work shows that diffusive EBMs can be successfully used to identify habitable exo-Earths within ˜3 per cent if the radiative properties are known.

  13. The habitable zone of Earth-like planets with different levels of atmospheric pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Vladilo, Giovanni; Silva, Laura; Provenzale, Antonello; Ferri, Gaia; Ragazzini, Gregorio

    2013-01-01

    As a contribution to the study of the habitability of extrasolar planets, we implemented a 1-D Energy Balance Model (EBM), the simplest seasonal model of planetary climate, with new prescriptions for most physical quantities. Here we apply our EBM to investigate the surface habitability of planets with an Earth-like atmospheric composition but different levels of surface pressure. The habitability, defined as the mean fraction of the planet's surface on which liquid water could exist, is estimated from the pressure-dependent liquid water temperature range, taking into account seasonal and latitudinal variations of surface temperature. By running several thousands of EBM simulations we generated a map of the habitable zone (HZ) in the plane of the orbital semi-major axis, a, and surface pressure, p, for planets in circular orbits around a Sun-like star. As pressure increases, the HZ becomes broader, with an increase of 0.25 AU in its radial extent from p=1/3 bar to p=3 bar. At low pressure, the habitability is...

  14. High pressure behaviour of heavy rare earth mono antimonides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pagare, Gitanjali [Department of Physics, Govt. M.L.B. Girls P.G. College, Bhopal 462 002 (India); Sen, Deepti [Govt. Girls College, Raisen (India); Srivastava, Vipul; Sanyal, S P, E-mail: gita_pagare@yahoo.co.i [Condensed Matter Physics Lab, Department of Physics, Barkatullah University Bhopal 462 026 (India)

    2010-03-01

    We have investigated theoretically the high-pressure structural phase transition and cohesive properties of two heavy rare earth mono antimonides (RESb; RE = Dy and Lu) by using two body interionic potential with necessary modifications to include the effect of Coulomb screening by the delocalized 4f electrons of the RE ion. The peculiar properties of these compounds have been interpreted in terms of the hybridization of f electrons with the conduction band and strong mixing of f states of RE ion with the p orbital of neighboring pnictogen ion. These compounds exhibit first order crystallographic phase transition from their NaCl (B{sub 1}) phase to CsCl (B{sub 2}) phase at 23.6 GPa and 25.4 GPa respectively. The bulk modulii of RESb compounds are obtained from the P-V curve fitted by the Birch equation of state. We also calculated the RE-RE distance as a function of pressure. Elastic properties of these compounds have also been studied and their second order elastic constants are calculated.

  15. Frequency domain mediolateral balance assessment using a center of pressure tracking task

    OpenAIRE

    Cofré Lizama, L Eduardo; Pijnappels, Mirjam; Reeves, N Peter; Verschueren, Sabine; van Dieën, Jaap H

    2013-01-01

    Since impaired mediolateral balance can increase fall risk, especially in the elderly, its quantification and training might be a powerful preventive tool. We propose a visual tracking task (VTT) with increasing frequencies (.3-2.0Hz) and with center of pressure as visual feedback as an assessment method. This mediolateral balance assessment (MELBA) consists of two tasks, tracking a predictable target signal to determine physical capacity and tracking an unpredictable target signal to determi...

  16. Between-day reliability of centre of pressure measures for balance assessment in hemiplegic stroke patients

    OpenAIRE

    Gasq, David; Labrunée, Marc; Amarantini, David; Dupui, Philippe; Montoya, Richard; Marque, Philippe

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Stroke patients have impaired postural balance that increases the risk of falls and impairs their mobility. Assessment of postural balance is commonly carried out by recording centre of pressure (CoP) displacements, but the lack of data concerning reliability of these measures compromises their interpretation. The purpose of this study was to investigate the between-day reliability of six CoP-based variables, in order to provide i) reliability data for monitoring postural sway and...

  17. Seismic Earth Pressure Development in Sheet Pile Retaining Walls: A Numerical Study

    CERN Document Server

    Rajeev, P; Sivakugan, N

    2015-01-01

    The design of retaining walls requires the complete knowledge of the earth pressure distribution behind the wall. Due to the complex soil-structure effect, the estimation of earth pressure is not an easy task; even in the static case. The problem becomes even more complex for the dynamic (i.e., seismic) analysis and design of retaining walls. Several earth pressure models have been developed over the years to integrate the dynamic earth pressure with the static earth pressure and to improve the design of retaining wall in seismic regions. Among all the models, MononobeOkabe (M-O) method is commonly used to estimate the magnitude of seismic earth pressures in retaining walls and is adopted in design practices around the world (e.g., EuroCode and Australian Standards). However, the M-O method has several drawbacks and does not provide reliable estimate of the earth pressure in many instances. This study investigates the accuracy of the M-O method to predict the dynamic earth pressure in sheet pile wall. A 2D pl...

  18. Mathematical model of Lame Problem for Simplified Elastic Theory applied to Controlled-Clearance Pressure Balances

    CERN Document Server

    Silvano, Saragosa

    2010-01-01

    This paper is based on the original work of the master degree thesis [1] and also represents a revision of the models and the correlations with the analytical solutions given by other authors in the previous publications from 2003 to 2007. All the publications from 2003 to 2007 about simplified analytical methods applied to controlled-clearance pressure balances are not original re-elaborations (with some errors) of the thesis[1]. The analysis described in this paper starts with the mathematical model of thick-walled cylinder based on the solution of the Lame Equations applied to Mechanical theory of elastic equilibrium [5] for the formulation of the so called Simplified Elastic Theory that represents an analytical approach used in the study of the pressure balances. This analysis is well known as Lame problem. The solution of the Lame problem is used to determine the pressure distortion coefficient of controlled-clearance pressure balances. The analysis in this paper includes the case of pressure balances wi...

  19. Seismic response analysis of nuclear pressure vessel model with ADVENTRUE system on the earth simulator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have been developing an advanced general-purpose computational mechanics system, named ADVENTURE, which is designed to be able to analyze a three dimensional finite element model of arbitrary shape over 100 million Degrees Of Freedom (DOF) mesh. The one of main process modules for solid analysis, named ADVENTURE Solid, is based the hierarchical domain decomposition parallel algorithm and employs the balancing domain decomposition as a solution technique for linearized equations. The ADVENTURE Solid has been successfully implemented on a single PC, PC clusters and MPPs with high parallel performances. In order to realize a virtual demonstration test, the solid module is implemented on the Earth Simulator with minor modification for a vector processor and applied for an implicit dynamic elastic analysis such as seismic response of a precise nuclear pressure vessel model of 35 million DOF mesh with 128 nodes (1,024 Processing Elements), and succeeded in solving 300 unsteady steps in about 4.3 hours. Furthermore, the system is applied for a static elastic analysis of a nuclear pressure vessel model of 100 million DOF mesh in about 8.5 minutes on the 256 nodes (2,048 PEs), and archived 5.08 TFLOPS, which is 31.75% of the peak performance. (author)

  20. Mathematical model of the Lame' Problem for Simplified Elastic Theory applied to Controlled-Clearance Pressure Balances

    OpenAIRE

    Silvano, Saragosa

    2010-01-01

    In order to obtain more accurate measurements, the use of pressure balances with the controlled-clearance system is well known in the history of high pressures metrology. Furthermore, the introduction of assemblies with cylinders made up of two materials to the construction of controlled-clearance pressure balances, is one of the most important developments in the field of high pressure measurements. The use of some analytical procedures for the characterization of the press...

  1. Experimental study on the instability of Pressure Balance Injection System (PBIS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Passive Safety Reactor has been developed to reduce the construction cost and to improve the safety. Japan Atomic Energy Research institute (JAERI) proposed the System-Integrated Pressurized Water Reactor (SPWR) as a Passive Safety Reactor. In the SPWR design, the Pressure Balanced Injection System (PBIS) was introduced for the passive safety concept. The water with boron in a containment vessel were passively injected into the core by the pressure difference between the containment vessel and reactor vessel at a severe accidental condition. However there are few studies on the thermo-hydraulic characteristics of the PBIS. In this study, the thermal hydraulics of the PBIS are experimentally investigated using the small scale model. The instability of the injected flow was observed in the adiabatic experiment. The instability was caused by the pressure balance between the two vessels. The mechanism of the instability are discussed, resulting in the good agreement with the experimental results. In the steam experiment, another instability was observed, which was caused by the heat balance in the main tank

  2. The energy balance of the material breaking under the action of the high pressure water jet

    OpenAIRE

    Dumitru, G.; Zgura, G.

    1994-01-01

    For a correct determination of the cutting process parameters by high pressure water jet, it is necessary to study the breaking mechanism of the material under the action of the water jet. From the analysis of the material behavior under high pressure water jet, moving at supersonic speed, it appears like a micro-erosive process. We study the energy balance of the micro-erosive breaking of the material taking into account the nucleation energy of the micro-cracking, the internal energy variat...

  3. Roles of Renal Proximal Tubule Transport in Acid/Base Balance and Blood Pressure Regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Motonobu Nakamura; Ayumi Shirai; Osamu Yamazaki; Nobuhiko Satoh; Masashi Suzuki; Shoko Horita; Hideomi Yamada; George Seki

    2014-01-01

    Sodium-coupled bicarbonate absorption from renal proximal tubules (PTs) plays a pivotal role in the maintenance of systemic acid/base balance. Indeed, mutations in the Na+-HCO3? cotransporter NBCe1, which mediates a majority of bicarbonate exit from PTs, cause severe proximal renal tubular acidosis associated with ocular and other extrarenal abnormalities. Sodium transport in PTs also plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. For example, PT transport stimulation by insulin...

  4. HII Regions in hydrostatic balance between gas pressure, radiation pressure and gravity

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    A. G., Raga; J., Cantó; G., Mellema; A., Rodríguez-González; A., Esquivel.

    Full Text Available Estudiamos las soluciones de una versión modificada de la ecuación de Lane-Emden isotérmica, la cual incorpora el efecto de la presión de radiación (dirigida hacia afuera) asociada a las fotoionizaciones. Estas soluciones son relevantes para regiones HII alrededor de un cúmulo con ?500 estrellas O, [...] que puede fotoionizar el gas hasta distancias de ? 200 ?10 cm-3n0 pc (siendo n0 la densidad central del gas), donde son importantes los efectos tanto de la autogravedad como de la presión de radiación. Encontramos que las soluciones tienen una transición de un régimen "dominado por gravedad" (en el que las soluciones convergen a radios grandes a la solución de la esfera isotérmica autogravitante no singular) a uno "dominado por presión de radiación" (en el que la densidad diverge a un radio finito) para regiones HII con densidades centrales mayores que n crit = 100 cm -3. Argumentamos que las soluciones con densidades centrales altas, dominadas por presión de radiación, no ocurrirán en muchas de las situaciones astrofísicamente relevantes, dada la ausencia de un posible medio confinador de presión suficientemente alta. Abstract in english We study the solutions of a modified version of the isothermal Lane-Emden equation, which incorporates the effect of the (owtwards directed) radiation pressure resulting from photoionizations. These solutions are relevant for HII regions around a cluster with over ?500 O stars, which can photoionize [...] gas out to ? 200 ?10 cm-3n0 pc (where no is the central gas density), where the effects of the self-gravity and the radiation pressure become important. We find that the solutions have a transition from a "gravity dominated" regime (in which the solutions converge at large radii to the non-singular, isothermal sphere solution) to a "radiation pressure dominated" regime (in which the density diverges at a finite radius) for central HII region densities above n crit = 100 cm-3. We argue that the high central density, radiation pressure dominated solutions will not occur in most astrophysically relevant situations, because of the absence of a possible confining environment with a high enough pressure.

  5. A THEORY OF BIMODAL ACCELERATION OF PICKUP IONS BY COMPRESSIVE SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE UNDER PRESSURE BALANCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, it was demonstrated that stochastic acceleration of particles going through a series of compressive plasma waves can be efficient and fast. It could be too fast so that the pressure built up by the accelerated particles may in turn modify the amplitude of waves to prevent the particles from having an exploding pressure. We call this condition pressure balance. In this paper, we take into account the fact that active acceleration of particles only occupies a limited volume of space due to a possible intermittent nature of plasma waves or turbulence. We develop a bimodal acceleration theory that treats the populations of particles in the active and inactive acceleration regions separately and allows the two populations to exchange particles efficiently. Under the requirement of the pressure balance condition, we show that the system automatically produces a solution of v –5 steady state distribution for the accelerated particles. It is found that the v –5 distribution is more robust and easier to achieve with a small volume of intense particle acceleration. These properties explain why the v –5 distribution is commonly observed in space. We apply our model to pickup ion propagation and acceleration throughout the entire heliosphere. Our results can reproduce various observations in some great detail. We also found that this mechanism could be responsible for producing anomalous cosmic rays deep in the heliosheath.

  6. Earth radiation balance as observed and represented in CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wild, Martin; Folini, Doris; Schär, Christoph; Loeb, Norman; König-Langlo, Gert

    2014-05-01

    The genesis and evolution of Earth's climate is largely regulated by the Earth radiation balance. Despite of its key role in the context of climate change, substantial uncertainties still exist in the quantification of the magnitudes of its different components, and its representation in climate models. While the net radiative energy flows in and out of the climate system at the top of atmosphere are now known with considerable accuracy from new satellite programs such as CERES and SORCE, the energy distribution within the climate system and at the Earth's surface is less well determined. Accordingly, the magnitudes of the components of the surface energy balance have recently been controversially disputed, and potential inconsistencies between the estimated magnitudes of the global energy and water cycle have been emphasized. Here we summarize this discussion as presented in Chapter 2.3 of the 5th IPCC assessment report (AR5). In this context we made an attempt to better constrain the magnitudes of the surface radiative components with largest uncertainties. In addition to satellite observations, we thereby made extensive use of the growing number of surface observations to constrain the radiation balance not only from space, but also from the surface. We combined these observations with the latest modeling efforts performed for AR5 (CMIP5) to infer best estimates for the global mean surface radiative components. Our analyses favor global mean values of downward surface solar and thermal radiation near 185 and 342 Wm-2, respectively, which are most compatible with surface observations (Wild et al. 2013). These estimates are on the order of 10 Wm-2 lower and higher, respectively, than in some of the previous global energy balance assessments, including those presented in previous IPCC reports. It is encouraging that these estimates, which make full use of the information contained in the surface networks, coincide within 2 Wm-2 with the latest satellite-derived estimates (Kato et al. 2013), which are completely independently determined. This enhances confidence in these recent surface flux estimates. IPCC AR5 further presents increasing evidence from direct observations that the surface radiative fluxes undergo significant changes on decadal timescales, not only in their thermal components as expected from the increasing greenhouse effect, but also in the amount of solar radiation that reaches the Earth surface. In the thermal range, surface observations suggest an overall increase of downward thermal radiation in line with latest projections from the CMIP5 models and expectations from an increasing greenhouse effect. On the other hand the strong decadal changes in surface solar radiation seen in the observations ("dimming/brightening") are not fully captured by current climate models. These decadal changes in surface solar radiation may largely affect various aspects of climate change. Selected related references: Hartmann, D.L., A.M.G. Klein Tank, M. Rusticucci, L. Alexander, S. Brönnimann, Y. Charabi, F. Dentener, E. Dlugokencky, D. Easterling, A. Kaplan, B. Soden, P. Thorne, M. Wild and P.M. Zhai, 2013: Observations: Atmosphere and Surface. In: Climate Change 2013: The Physical Science Basis. Contribution of Working Group I to the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change [Stocker, T.F., D. Qin, G.-K. Plattner, M. Tignor, S.K. Allen, J. Boschung, A. Nauels, Y. Xia, V. Bex and P.M. Midgley (eds.)]. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, United Kingdom and New York, NY, USA. Kato, S., Loeb, N.G., Rose, F.G., Doelling, D.R., Rutan, D.A., Caldwell, T.E., Yu, L.S, and Weller, R.A., 2013: Surface irradiances consistent with CERES-derived top-of-atmosphere shortwave and longwave irradiances. Journal of Climate 26 (9):2719-2740. doi:Doi 10.1175/Jcli-D-12-00436.1 Wild, M., 2012: New Directions: A facelift for the picture of the global energy balance. Atmospheric Environment, 55, 366-367. Wild, M. 2012: Enlightening Global Dimming and Brightening. Bull. Amer. Meteor. Soc., 93, 27-37, d

  7. Pressure balanced type membrane covered polarographic oxygen detectors for use in high temperature-high pressure water, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Performance tests of a pressure balanced type membrane covered polarographic oxygen detector were carried out in water at 2850C (BWR operating conditions) to determine the effects of environmental factors. Dependencies of detector current on pressure and sample water flow velocity were ascertained and response time of the detector was determined. Effects of H2 present in the water were also examined. The following conclusions were obtained: (1) The detector current increased in proportion to the 0.67th power of the flow velocity, but was independent of the pressure. (2) Response time was about 7s. (3) Hydrogen caused a decrease in the current at cathode potentials more positive than -0.75V against the Ag/AgCl electrode. However, at more negative potentials, the current was independent of H2 concentration and in proportion to O2 concentration. Oxygen concentrations in water containing H2 at 2850C could be determined by the detector under the measurement conditions of constant flow velocity and cathode potentials more negative than -0.75V. (author)

  8. Water balance in irrigation districts. Uncertainty in on-demand pressurized networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Calvo, Raúl; Rodríguez-Sinobas, Leonor; Juana, Luis; Laguna, Francisco Vicente

    2015-04-01

    In on-demand pressurized irrigation distribution networks, applied water volume is usually controlled opening a valve during a calculated time interval, and assuming constant flow rate. In general, pressure regulating devices for controlling the discharged flow rate by irrigation units are needed due to the variability of pressure conditions. A pressure regulating valve PRV is the commonly used pressure regulating device in a hydrant, which, also, executes the open and close function. A hydrant feeds several irrigation units, requiring a wide range in flow rate. In addition, some flow meters are also available, one as a component of the hydrant and the rest are placed downstream. Every land owner has one flow meter for each group of field plots downstream the hydrant. Ideal PRV performance would maintain a constant downstream pressure. However, the true performance depends on both upstream pressure and the discharged flow rate. Theoretical flow rates values have been introduced into a PRV behavioral model, validated in laboratory, coupled with an on-demand irrigation district waterworks, composed by a distribution network and a multi-pump station. Variations on flow rate are simulated by taking into account the consequences of variations on climate conditions and also decisions in irrigation operation, such us duration and frequency application. The model comprises continuity, dynamic and energy equations of the components of both the PRV and the water distribution network. In this work the estimation of water balance terms during the irrigation events in an irrigation campaign has been simulated. The effect of demand concentration peaks has been estimated.

  9. Center of pressure control for balance maintenance during lateral waist-pull perturbations in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Masahiro; Bair, Woei-Nan; Rogers, Mark W

    2015-04-13

    When balance is disturbed, location of the center of pressure (COP) contributes to a person's ability to recover from a perturbation. This study investigated COP control prior to first step lift-off (FSLO) during lateral perturbations in older non-fallers and fallers. 38 non-fallers and 16 fallers received lateral waist-pulls at 5 different intensities. Crossover stepping responses at the intensity level where the largest number of subjects responded with crossover steps were analyzed. Whole-body center of mass (COM) and COP positions in the medio-lateral (ML) direction with respect to the base of support (BOS), and COP velocity were calculated. An inverted pendulum model was used to define the BOS stability boundary at FSLO, which was also adjusted using the COP position at FSLO (functional boundary). No significant differences were found in the COP velocities between fallers and non-fallers (p>.093). However, the COP positions for fallers were located significantly more medial at FSLO (p?.01), resulting in a significantly reduced functional boundary. Although the stability margins, measures of stability based on the BOS, were significantly larger than zero for fallers (p?.004), they were not significantly different from zero for the functional boundary, i.e., reaching the functional stability limit. Fallers had reduced functional limits of stability in the ML direction, which would predispose them to more precarious stability conditions than non-fallers. This could be a cause for taking more steps than non-fallers for balance recovery as we observed. The functional boundary estimation may be a more sensitive marker of balance instability than the BOS boundary. PMID:25728580

  10. A Plantar-pressure Based Tongue-placed Tactile Biofeedback System for Balance Improvement

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Pinsault, Nicolas; Fleury, Anthony; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    Maintaining an upright stance represents a complex task, which is achieved by integrating sensory information from the visual, vestibular and somatosensory systems. When one of these sensory inputs becomes unavailable and/or inaccurate and/or unreliable, postural control generally is degraded. One way to solve this problem is to supplement and/or substitute limited/altered/missing sensory information by providing additional sensory information to the central nervous system via an alternative sensory modality. Along these lines, we developed an original biofeedback system [1] whose underlying principle consists in supplying the user with supplementary sensory information related to foot sole pressure distribution through a tongue-placed output device (Tongue Display Unit, "TDU" [2]). The purpose of the present experiment was to assess its effectiveness in improving balance in young healthy adults.

  11. Neutral gas density depletion due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance in an inductively coupled plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatial distribution of neutral gas temperature and total pressure have been measured for pure N2, He/5%N2 and Ar/5%N2 in an inductively coupled plasma (ICP) reactor, and a significant rise in the neutral gas temperature has been observed. When thermal transpiration is used to correct total pressure measurements, the total pressure remains constant regardless of the plasma condition. Neutral pressure is depleted due to the pressure balance when the plasma pressure (mainly electron pressure) becomes comparable to the neutral pressure in high density plasma. Since the neutral gas follows the ideal gas law, the neutral gas density profile was obtained from the neutral gas temperature and the corrected neutral pressure measurements. The results show that the neutral gas density at the centre of the plasma chamber (factor of 2-4 x) decreases significantly in the presence of a plasma discharge. Significant spatial variation in neutral gas uniformity occurs in such plasmas due to neutral gas heating and pressure balance

  12. Smoothly waning, symmetrically expanding, cavity-pressure loads in earth materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approximate solution for the pressure loading required to expand a spherical cavity in rock and soil targets is derived. A dual characterization of fracture and flow material model is used. Frictional resistance to flow is also included. Non-linear volumetric strain hardening is modeled with bi-linear curves and unloading is assumed to be non-dilative. Applications of this solution form to the prediction of pressure loading on slender, convex-nosed earth penetrators and on spherically-nosed water entry vehicles are discussed

  13. Digitalis-like activity in human plasma: Relation to blood pressure and sodium balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PURPOSE: On the assumption that renal tubular cells are more important as the target cells for a natriuretic factor than blood cells, we used a well-characterized cultured renal tubular cell line, Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK), cells to monitor the circulating digitalis-like factor in human plasma and examine its role in the regulation of blood pressure and sodium balance. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We investigated the effects of plasma on binding of radioactive ouabain to monolayered MDCK cells in order to determine the level of a circulating digitalis-like factor. First, we measured specific 3H-ouabain binding to MDCK cells in the presence of plasma from 71 outpatients (34 normotensive subjects and 37 hypertensive patients) after incubation for 4 hours. Second, we measured specific 3H-ouabain binding after incubation of cells with plasma from 16 hospitalized subjects (eight normotensive subjects and eight hypertensive patients) receiving low and high sodium diets. RESULTS: In Study 1, ouabain binding was lower by 30% with plasma from hypertensive patients than with plasma from normotensive subjects (p less than 0.01). There was a significant negative correlation between individual subject's systolic or mean blood pressure and ouabain binding (r = -0.34, p less than 0.01 or r = -0.29, p less than 0.01). In Study 2, ouabain binding was also significantly reduced by 25% in the presence of plasma from hypertensive subjects as compared with plasma from normotensive subjects irrespective of sodium intake (p less than 0.01). A significant negative correlation was also found for all subjects between either systolic, diastolic, or mean blood pressure and ouabain binding (r = -0.58, p less than 0.01, r = -0.51, p less than 0.01, or r = -0.55, p less than 0.01, respectively)

  14. Iron under Earth's core conditions: Liquid-state thermodynamics and high-pressure melting curve

    OpenAIRE

    Alfe, D.; Price, G D; Gillan, M. J.

    2001-01-01

    {\\em Ab initio} techniques based on density functional theory in the projector-augmented-wave implementation are used to calculate the free energy and a range of other thermodynamic properties of liquid iron at high pressures and temperatures relevant to the Earth's core. The {\\em ab initio} free energy is obtained by using thermodynamic integration to calculate the change of free energy on going from a simple reference system to the {\\em ab initio} system, with thermal aver...

  15. Physical and numerical modelling of earth pressure on anchored sheet pile walls in sand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogsbøll, Anette Susanne; Fuglsang, Leif D

    2006-01-01

    The influence of wall flexibility on earth pressure, bending moments and failure modes is studied. Numerical models are compared to results from model tests carried out in a geotechnical centrifuge. The back-fill is dry sand and failure is introduced by allowing the wall to rotate around the anchor level. The Finite element program PLAXIS is used and two material models are evaluated, the Mohr-Coulomb model and the Hardening Soil model. The differences between the two concern the deformation pro...

  16. Previously hidden low-energy ions: a better map of near-Earth space and the terrestrial mass balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    André, Mats

    2015-12-01

    This is a review of the mass balance of planet Earth, intended also for scientists not usually working with space physics or geophysics. The discussion includes both outflow of ions and neutrals from the ionosphere and upper atmosphere, and the inflow of meteoroids and larger objects. The focus is on ions with energies less than tens of eV originating from the ionosphere. Positive low-energy ions are complicated to detect onboard sunlit spacecraft at higher altitudes, which often become positively charged to several tens of volts. We have invented a technique to observe low-energy ions based on the detection of the wake behind a charged spacecraft in a supersonic ion flow. We find that low-energy ions usually dominate the ion density and the outward flux in large volumes in the magnetosphere. The global outflow is of the order of 1026 ions s–1. This is a significant fraction of the total number outflow of particles from Earth, and changes plasma processes in near-Earth space. We compare order of magnitude estimates of the mass outflow and inflow for planet Earth and find that they are similar, at around 1 kg s?1 (30 000 ton yr?1). We briefly discuss atmospheric and ionospheric outflow from other planets and the connection to evolution of extraterrestrial life.

  17. Reliability and Sex Differences in the Foot Pressure Load Balance Test and Its Relationship to Physical Characteristics in Preschool Children

    OpenAIRE

    Kosho Kasuga; Hiroki Sugiura; Shinichi Demura; Shigeki Matsuda

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to examine the trial-to-trial reliability and sex differences in a foot pressure load balance test and its relationship to physical characteristics in 396 preschool children (201 boys and 195 girls). The subjects were asked to maintain an upright standing posture for 10 seconds three times on the Footview Clinic, an instrument designed to calculate the right-left and anterior-posterior ratios of foot pressure load. The ratios of the left and anterior foot pressure loads in ri...

  18. Pressure and energy balance of stagnating plasmas in z-pinch experiments: implications to current flow at stagnation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Y; Starobinets, A; Fisher, V I; Kroupp, E; Osin, D; Fisher, A; Deeney, C; Coverdale, C A; Lepell, P D; Yu, E P; Jennings, C; Cuneo, M E; Herrmann, M C; Porter, J L; Mehlhorn, T A; Apruzese, J P

    2013-07-19

    Detailed spectroscopic diagnostics of the stagnating plasma in two disparate z pinches allow, for the first time, the examination of the plasma properties within a 1D shock wave picture, demonstrating a good agreement with this picture. The conclusion is that for a wide range of imploding-plasma masses and current amplitudes, in experiments optimizing non-Planckian hard radiation yields, contrary to previous descriptions the stagnating plasma pressure is balanced by the implosion pressure, and the radiation energy is provided by the imploding-plasma kinetic energy, rather than by the magnetic-field pressure and magnetic-field-energy dissipation, respectively. PMID:23909333

  19. Novel Techniques for High Pressure Falling Sphere Viscosimetry under Simulated Earth's Mantle Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, H. J.; Beckmann, F.; Dobson, D. P.; Hunt, S. A.; Secco, R.; Lauterjung, J.; Lathe, C.

    2014-12-01

    Viscosity data of melts measured under in situ high pressure conditions are crucial for the understanding of Earth's lower mantle and the interior of terrestrial and extrasolar Super-Earth planets. We report recent technical advances and techniques enabling falling sphere viscosity measurements in single- and double-stage DIA-type multi-anvil apparatus. For the experiments we used presses with a maximum load of 250 tons and 1750 tons. We anticipate that our system will enable viscosity measurements up to the maximum pressure for non-diamond anvils, i.e. pressures up to some 30 GPa. For the development of the new set ups the deformation of the cell assemblies were analyzed by X-ray absorption tomography at beamline W II at DESY/HASYLAB after the high pressure runs. These analysis gave considerable insights into strategies for improving the cell assembly with the result that the optimized assemblies could be used at much higher pressures without blow-outs. We think this approach is much faster and more beneficial than the classical way of trial and error. Additionally to prevent high pressure blow outs the task was to make the whole melting chamber accessible for the high pressure X-radiography system up to the maximum pressures. This way the accuracy and reliability of the measurements can be improved. For this goal we used X-ray transparent cBN-anvils at the single-stage DIA large volume press. Because this material is recently not available for the cube size of 32 mm this aproach did not work for the double-stage DIA. As a very useful and economical alternative we used slotted carbide anvils filled with fired pyrophyllite bars. To improve the frame quality of the platinum spheres taken by the CCD-camera the energy of the monochromatic X-rays had to be increased to 100 keV. The resulting ascent of scattered radiation required a new design of the X-radiography unit. Our results are demonstrated with viscosity measurements following Stokes law by evaluation of X-radiography sequences taken by a CCD-camera at pressures of 5 GPa as well as 10 GPa and temperatures of 1890 K. As the first result we could increase the maximum pressure range of published viscosity measurements with dacite melts by almost factor 1.5 (see Tinker et al., 2004).

  20. THE INFLUENCE OF PRESSURE-DEPENDENT VISCOSITY ON THE THERMAL EVOLUTION OF SUPER-EARTHS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stamenkovic, Vlada; Noack, Lena; Spohn, Tilman [Institute of Planetology, Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 10, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Breuer, Doris, E-mail: Vlada.Stamenkovic@dlr.de, E-mail: Lena.Noack@dlr.de, E-mail: Doris.Breuer@dlr.de, E-mail: Tilman.Spohn@dlr.de [Institute of Planetary Research, German Aerospace Center DLR, Rutherfordstrasse 2, 12489 Berlin (Germany)

    2012-03-20

    We study the thermal evolution of super-Earths with a one-dimensional (1D) parameterized convection model that has been adopted to account for a strong pressure dependence of the viscosity. A comparison with a 2D spherical convection model shows that the derived parameterization satisfactorily represents the main characteristics of the thermal evolution of massive rocky planets. We find that the pressure dependence of the viscosity strongly influences the thermal evolution of super-Earths-resulting in a highly sluggish convection regime in the lower mantles of those planets. Depending on the effective activation volume and for cooler initial conditions, we observe with growing planetary mass even the formation of a conductive lid above the core-mantle boundary (CMB), a so-called CMB-lid. For initially molten planets our results suggest no CMB-lids but instead a hot lower mantle and core as well as sluggish lower mantle convection. This implies that the initial interior temperatures, especially in the lower mantle, become crucial for the thermal evolution-the thermostat effect suggested to regulate the interior temperatures in terrestrial planets does not work for massive planets if the viscosity is strongly pressure dependent. The sluggish convection and the potential formation of the CMB-lid reduce the convective vigor throughout the mantle, thereby affecting convective stresses, lithospheric thicknesses, and heat fluxes. The pressure dependence of the viscosity may therefore also strongly affect the propensity of plate tectonics, volcanic activity, and the generation of a magnetic field of super-Earths.

  1. Earth Pressure at rest of Søvind Marl – a highly overconsolidated Eocene clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    GrØnbech, Gitte Lyng; Ibsen, Lars Bo

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated earth pressure at rest, K0, in highly overconsolidated Eocene clay called Søvind Marl, which exhibits extremely high plasticity indices of up to 300%, a highly fissured structure, and preconsolidation stresses up to 6,800 kPa. Continuous Loading Oedometer (CLO) tests with a constant rate of strain were conducted on Søvind Marl in the Danish Continuous Loading Oedometer Apparatus, which enables test water to be applied at 200 kPa, and measures the horizontal stresses via pressure gauges placed in a stiff oedometer ring. The horizontal and vertical stresses were measured from in situ stresses to various stress levels to estimate continuous K0 development in this highly overconsolidated clay. The normally consolidated earth pressure at rest was found for two different sample ages of Søvind Marl to be between 0.42 and 0.68. Results indicated the overconsolidated K0 reached values as high as 6 to 8 in the in situ stress range. Meyerhof’s (1976) reported correlation between K0(oc) and OCR was found inconsistent with K0(oc) development of in Søvind Marl. However, the development of OCRlab dependent on previous test stresses, as an alternative to preconsolidation stresses, showed congruent results using ? = 1.05 independent of sample age.

  2. Prediction of Satellite Motion under the Effects of the Earth’s Gravity, Drag Force and Solar Radiation Pressure in terms of the KS-regularized Variables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hany R. Dwidar

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with an orbit prediction using one of the best regular theories (KS-regularized variables. Perturbations due to the Earth’s gravitational field with axial symmetry up to the fourth order zonal harmonic, atmospheric drag (variation in density model with height and solar radiation pressure are considered. Applications of the problem with a comparison between the perturbations effect will be illustrated by numerical and graphical example.

  3. Evolution of the Oxidation State of the Earth's Mantle: Challenges of High Pressure Quenching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielson, L. R.; Righter, K.; Keller, L.; Christoffersen, R.; Rahman, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The oxidation state of the Earth's mantle during formation remains an unresolved question, whether it was constant throughout planetary accretion, transitioned from reduced to oxidized, or from oxidized to reduced. We investigate the stability of Fe3+ at depth, in order to constrain processes (water, late accretion, dissociation of FeO) which may reduce or oxidize the Earth's mantle. Experiments of more mafic compositions and at higher pressures commonly form a polyphase quench intergrowth composed primarily of pyroxenes, with interstitial glass which hosts nearly all of the more volatile minor elements. In our previous experiments on shergottite compositions, variable fO2, T, and P is less than 4 GPa, Fe3+/TotFe decreased slightly with increasing P, similar to terrestrial basalt. For oxidizing experiments less than 7GPa, Fe3+/TotFe decreased as well, but it's unclear from previous modelling whether the deeper mantle could retain significant Fe3+. Our current experiments expand our pressure range deeper into the Earth's mantle and focus on compositions and conditions relevant to the early Earth. Experiments with Knippa basalt as the starting composition were conducted at 1-8 GPa and 1800 C, using a molybdenum capsule to set the fO2 near IW, by buffering with Mo-MoO3. TEM and EELS analyses revealed the run products from 7-8 GPa quenched to polycrystalline phases, with the major phase pyroxene containing approximately equal Fe3+/2+. A number of different approaches have been employed to produce glassy samples that can be measured by EELS and XANES. A more intermediate andesite was used in one experiment, and decompression during quenching was attempted after, but both resulted in a finer grained polyphase texture. Experiments are currently underway to test different capsule materials may affect quench texture. A preliminary experiment using liquid nitrogen to greatly enhance the rate of cooling of the assembly has also been attempted and this technique will be refined in further experiments.

  4. Satellite Earth observation data to identify anthropogenic pressures in selected protected areas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagendra, Harini; Mairota, Paola; Marangi, Carmela; Lucas, Richard; Dimopoulos, Panayotis; Honrado, João Pradinho; Niphadkar, Madhura; Mücher, Caspar A.; Tomaselli, Valeria; Panitsa, Maria; Tarantino, Cristina; Manakos, Ioannis; Blonda, Palma

    2015-05-01

    Protected areas are experiencing increased levels of human pressure. To enable appropriate conservation action, it is critical to map and monitor changes in the type and extent of land cover/use and habitat classes, which can be related to human pressures over time. Satellite Earth observation (EO) data and techniques offer the opportunity to detect such changes. Yet association with field information and expert interpretation by ecologists is required to interpret, qualify and link these changes to human pressure. There is thus an urgent need to harmonize the technical background of experts in the field of EO data analysis with the terminology of ecologists, protected area management authorities and policy makers in order to provide meaningful, context-specific value-added EO products. This paper builds on the DPSIR framework, providing a terminology to relate the concepts of state, pressures, and drivers with the application of EO analysis. The type of pressure can be inferred through the detection of changes in state (i.e. changes in land cover and/or habitat type and/or condition). Four broad categories of changes in state are identified, i.e. land cover/habitat conversion, land cover/habitat modification, habitat fragmentation and changes in landscape connectivity, and changes in plant community structure. These categories of change in state can be mapped through EO analyses, with the goal of using expert judgement to relate changes in state to causal direct anthropogenic pressures. Drawing on expert knowledge, a set of protected areas located in diverse socio-ecological contexts and subject to a variety of pressures are analysed to (a) link the four categories of changes in state of land cover/habitats to the drivers (anthropogenic pressure), as relevant to specific target land cover and habitat classes; (b) identify (for pressure mapping) the most appropriate spatial and temporal EO data sources as well as interpretations from ecologists and field data useful in connection with EO data analysis. We provide detailed examples for two protected areas, demonstrating the use of EO data for detection of land cover/habitat change, coupled with expert interpretation to relate such change to specific anthropogenic pressures. We conclude with a discussion of the limitations and feasibility of using EO data and techniques to identify anthropogenic pressures, suggesting additional research efforts required in this direction.

  5. Lateral Earth Pressure at Rest and Shear Modulus Measurements on Hanford Sludge Simulants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wells, Beric E.; Jenks, Jeromy WJ; Boeringa, Gregory K.; Bauman, Nathan N.; Guzman, Anthony D.; Arduino, P.; Keller, P. J.

    2010-09-30

    This report describes the equipment, techniques, and results of lateral earth pressure at rest and shear modulus measurements on kaolin clay as well as two chemical sludge simulants. The testing was performed in support of the problem of hydrogen gas retention and release encountered in the double- shell tanks (DSTs) at the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Wastes from single-shell tanks (SSTs) are being transferred to double-shell tanks (DSTs) for safety reasons (some SSTs are leaking or are in danger of leaking), but the available DST space is limited.

  6. Earth Pressure at rest of Søvind Marl – a highly overconsolidated Eocene clay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbech, Gitte Lyng; Ibsen, Lars Bo; Nielsen, Benjaminn Nordahl

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated earth pressure at rest, K0, in highly overconsolidated Eocene clay called Søvind Marl, which exhibits extremely high plasticity indices of up to 300%, a highly fissured structure, and preconsolidation stresses up to 6,800 kPa. Continuous Loading Oedometer (CLO) tests with a constant rate of strain were conducted on Søvind Marl in the Danish Continuous Loading Oedometer Apparatus, which enables test water to be applied at 200 kPa, and measures the horizontal stresses v...

  7. High Pressure Effects on the Superconductivity in Rare-Earth Doped CaFe2As2

    OpenAIRE

    Cargill, Dan; Uhoya, Walter; Krzysztof, Gofryk; Tsoi, Georgiy M.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Sefat, Athena S; Weir, S. T.

    2013-01-01

    High-pressure superconductivity in a rare-earth doped Ca0.86Pr0.14Fe2As2 single crystalline sample has been studied up to 12 GPa and temperatures down to 11 K using designer diamond anvil cell under a quasi-hydrostatic pressure medium. The electrical resistance measurements were complemented by high pressure and low temperature x-ray diffraction studies at a synchrotron source. The electrical resistance measurements show an intriguing observation of superconductivity under p...

  8. Validating and calibrating the Nintendo Wii balance board to derive reliable center of pressure measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, Julia M; Mancini, Martina; Peterka, Robert J; Hayes, Tamara L; Horak, Fay B

    2014-01-01

    The Nintendo Wii balance board (WBB) has generated significant interest in its application as a postural control measurement device in both the clinical and (basic, clinical, and rehabilitation) research domains. Although the WBB has been proposed as an alternative to the "gold standard" laboratory-grade force plate, additional research is necessary before the WBB can be considered a valid and reliable center of pressure (CoP) measurement device. In this study, we used the WBB and a laboratory-grade AMTI force plate (AFP) to simultaneously measure the CoP displacement of a controlled dynamic load, which has not been done before. A one-dimensional inverted pendulum was displaced at several different displacement angles and load heights to simulate a variety of postural sway amplitudes and frequencies (<1 Hz). Twelve WBBs were tested to address the issue of inter-device variability. There was a significant effect of sway amplitude, frequency, and direction on the WBB's CoP measurement error, with an increase in error as both sway amplitude and frequency increased and a significantly greater error in the mediolateral (ML) (compared to the anteroposterior (AP)) sway direction. There was no difference in error across the 12 WBB's, supporting low inter-device variability. A linear calibration procedure was then implemented to correct the WBB's CoP signals and reduce measurement error. There was a significant effect of calibration on the WBB's CoP signal accuracy, with a significant reduction in CoP measurement error (quantified by root-mean-squared error) from 2-6 mm (before calibration) to 0.5-2 mm (after calibration). WBB-based CoP signal calibration also significantly reduced the percent error in derived (time-domain) CoP sway measures, from -10.5% (before calibration) to -0.05% (after calibration) (percent errors averaged across all sway measures and in both sway directions). In this study, we characterized the WBB's CoP measurement error under controlled, dynamic conditions and implemented a linear calibration procedure for WBB CoP signals that is recommended to reduce CoP measurement error and provide more reliable estimates of time-domain CoP measures. Despite our promising results, additional work is necessary to understand how our findings translate to the clinical and rehabilitation research domains. Once the WBB's CoP measurement error is fully characterized in human postural sway (which differs from our simulated postural sway in both amplitude and frequency content), it may be used to measure CoP displacement in situations where lower accuracy and precision is acceptable. PMID:25268919

  9. A theoretical and experimental study of the deformation of the piston-cylinder unit of a metrological pressure balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares Júnior, L.; da Silva Júnior, F. I.; Lamary, P.

    2015-10-01

    Pressure balance is a measuring system widely used in metrology as a reference standard. The common procedure is to estimate the pressure from an analytical formula involving a set of phenomenological parameters. These parameters are determined experimentally by calibration tests of the balance. In particular, the piston-cylinder deformation is taking into account by the use of a global distortion coefficient and by the use of an effective area of the piston. In order to analyze the possible influence of local deformation on the pressure estimation, a Finite Element (FE) model has been developed using OpenCavok FE code. For a given position of the piston in the cylinder chamber, for a given initial gap between of the cylinder and the chamber, a coupled fluid-structure calculation is carried out. From the local fields, mean values are calculated from which the effective area of the piston-cylinder unit. The analysis is conducted for several engagement lengths of the piston in the chamber and for several loads. The first results obtained show that the local deformation play a role and that FE models could help for precise calculation of the measured pressure.

  10. X-ray absorption experiments on rare earth and uranium compounds under high pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After an introduction into the phenomenon of the mixed valency and the method of measuring the microstructures by X-ray absorption spectroscopy in the area of the L edges under pressure, the results of investigations at selected substitutes of the chalcogenides and puictides of the rare earths and the uranium were given. Thus, pressure-induced valency transitions in YbS and YbTe, instabilities in valency and structural phase transitions in EUS and SmTe as well as the change in the electron structure in USb under pressure were investigated in order to answer questions of solid state physics (e.g. semiconductor-metal transitions, correlation between valency and structural phase transitions). Hybridization effects in LIII spectra of formally tetravalent Ca are analyzed at CeF4 and CeO2 (insulators) and the role of final state effects in the LIII spectra are analyzed at EuP2P2 and TmSe-TmTe (semiconductor systems). (RB)

  11. Stress in highly demanding IT jobs: transformational leadership moderates the impact of time pressure on exhaustion and work-life balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrek, Christine J; Apostel, Ella; Antoni, Conny H

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this article is to investigate transformational leadership as a potential moderator of the negative relationship of time pressure to work-life balance and of the positive relationship between time pressure and exhaustion. Recent research regards time pressure as a challenge stressor; while being positively related to motivation and performance, time pressure also increases employee strain and decreases well-being. Building on the Job Demand-Resources model, we hypothesize that transformational leadership moderates the relationships between time pressure and both employees' exhaustion and work-life balance such that both relationships will be weaker when transformational leadership is higher. Of seven information technology organizations in Germany, 262 employees participated in the study. Established scales for time pressure, transformational leadership, work-life balance, and exhaustion were used, all showing good internal consistencies. The results support our assumptions. Specifically, we find that under high transformational leadership the impact of time pressure on exhaustion and work-life balance was less strong. The results of this study suggest that, particularly under high time pressure, transformational leadership is an important factor for both employees' work-life balance and exhaustion. PMID:23834443

  12. Validating and Calibrating the Nintendo Wii Balance Board to Derive Reliable Center of Pressure Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia M. Leach

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The Nintendo Wii balance board (WBB has generated significant interest in its application as a postural control measurement device in both the clinical and (basic, clinical, and rehabilitation research domains. Although the WBB has been proposed as an alternative to the “gold standard” laboratory-grade force plate, additional research is necessary before the WBB can be considered a valid and reliable center of pressure (CoP measurement device. In this study, we used the WBB and a laboratory-grade AMTI force plate (AFP to simultaneously measure the CoP displacement of a controlled dynamic load, which has not been done before. A one-dimensional inverted pendulum was displaced at several different displacement angles and load heights to simulate a variety of postural sway amplitudes and frequencies (<1 Hz. Twelve WBBs were tested to address the issue of inter-device variability. There was a significant effect of sway amplitude, frequency, and direction on the WBB’s CoP measurement error, with an increase in error as both sway amplitude and frequency increased and a significantly greater error in the mediolateral (ML (compared to the anteroposterior (AP sway direction. There was no difference in error across the 12 WBB’s, supporting low inter-device variability. A linear calibration procedure was then implemented to correct the WBB’s CoP signals and reduce measurement error. There was a significant effect of calibration on the WBB’s CoP signal accuracy, with a significant reduction in CoP measurement error (quantified by root-mean-squared error from 2–6 mm (before calibration to 0.5–2 mm (after calibration. WBB-based CoP signal calibration also significantly reduced the percent error in derived (time-domain CoP sway measures, from ?10.5% (before calibration to ?0.05% (after calibration (percent errors averaged across all sway measures and in both sway directions. In this study, we characterized the WBB’s CoP measurement error under controlled, dynamic conditions and implemented a linear calibration procedure for WBB CoP signals that is recommended to reduce CoP measurement error and provide more reliable estimates of time-domain CoP measures. Despite our promising results, additional work is necessary to understand how our findings translate to the clinical and rehabilitation research domains. Once the WBB’s CoP measurement error is fully characterized in human postural sway (which differs from our simulated postural sway in both amplitude and frequency content, it may be used to measure CoP displacement in situations where lower accuracy and precision is acceptable.

  13. Establishment of a force balanced piston gauge for very low gauge and absolute pressure measurements at NPL, India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    National Physical Laboratory, the National Metrology Institute (NMI) of India is maintaining Primary standards of pressure that cover several decades of pressure, starting from 3.0E-06 Pa to 1.0 GPa. Among which a recent addition is a Force Balanced Piston Gauge, the non-rotating piston type, having better resolution and zero stability compared to any other primary pressure standards commercially available in the range 1.0 Pa to 15.0 kPa (abs and gauge). The characterization of this FPG is done against Ultrasonic Interferometer Manometer (UIM), the National Primary pressure standard, working in the range 1.0 Pa to 130.0 kPa (abs and diff) and Air Piston Gauge (APG), a Transfer Pressure Standard, working in the range 6.5 kPa to 360 kPa (abs and gauge), in their overlapping pressure regions covering both absolute and gauge pressures. As NPL being one of the signatories to the CIPM MRA, the Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMC) of both the reference standards (UIM and APG), are Peer reviewed and notified in the Key Comparison Data Base (KCDB) of BIPM. The estimated mean effective area of the Piston Cylinder assembly of this FPG against UIM (980.457 mm2) and APG (980.463 mm2) are well within 4 ppm and 10 ppm agreement respectively, with the manufacturer's reported value (980.453 mm2). The expanded uncertainty of this FPG, Q(0.012 Pa, 0.0025% of reading), evaluated against UIM as reference standard, is well within the reported value of the manufacturer, Q(0.008 Pa, 0.003% of reading) at k = 2. The results of the characterization along with experimental setup and measurement conditions (for gauge and absolute pressure measurements), uncertainty budget preparation and evaluation of measurement uncertainty are discussed in detail in this paper.

  14. Establishment of a force balanced piston gauge for very low gauge and absolute pressure measurements at NPL, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayakumar, D. Arun; Prakash, Om; Sharma, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    National Physical Laboratory, the National Metrology Institute (NMI) of India is maintaining Primary standards of pressure that cover several decades of pressure, starting from 3.0E-06 Pa to 1.0 GPa. Among which a recent addition is a Force Balanced Piston Gauge, the non-rotating piston type, having better resolution and zero stability compared to any other primary pressure standards commercially available in the range 1.0 Pa to 15.0 kPa (abs and gauge). The characterization of this FPG is done against Ultrasonic Interferometer Manometer (UIM), the National Primary pressure standard, working in the range 1.0 Pa to 130.0 kPa (abs and diff) and Air Piston Gauge (APG), a Transfer Pressure Standard, working in the range 6.5 kPa to 360 kPa (abs and gauge), in their overlapping pressure regions covering both absolute and gauge pressures. As NPL being one of the signatories to the CIPM MRA, the Calibration and Measurement Capabilities (CMC) of both the reference standards (UIM & APG), are Peer reviewed and notified in the Key Comparison Data Base (KCDB) of BIPM. The estimated mean effective area of the Piston Cylinder assembly of this FPG against UIM (980.457 mm2) and APG (980.463 mm2) are well within 4 ppm and 10 ppm agreement respectively, with the manufacturer's reported value (980.453 mm2). The expanded uncertainty of this FPG, Q(0.012 Pa, 0.0025% of reading), evaluated against UIM as reference standard, is well within the reported value of the manufacturer, Q(0.008 Pa, 0.003% of reading) at k = 2. The results of the characterization along with experimental setup & measurement conditions (for gauge and absolute pressure measurements), uncertainty budget preparation and evaluation of measurement uncertainty are discussed in detail in this paper.

  15. Unusual pressure dependence of the crystallographic structure in RNiO{sub 3} perovskites (R = rare earth)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medarde, M.; Mesot, J.; Rosenkranz, S. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Lacorre, P. [Lab. Fluorures, Le Mans (France); Marshall, W.; Loveday, J.S. [Edinburgh Univ. (United Kingdom); Klotz, S.; Hamel, G. [Paris-6 Univ., 75 (France)

    1997-09-01

    We report the first experimental observation of a pressure-induced structural phase transition in the RNiO{sub 3} series (R = rare earth). At {approx_equal} 40 kbar, the space group of NdNiO{sub 3} changes from Pbnm(orthorhombic) to the PrNiO{sub 3} indicating that the symmetry of the structure increases with pressure. (author) 1 fig., 7 refs.

  16. Global mechanisms in atmosphere models and a balance of the Earth angle moment. Atmosphere radio-waveguides and teleconnection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. The satellite data and data of observing the radio-waveguide parameters (especially in the low troposphere layers) by means of radio-technical devices (in the ultra short-wave diapason) is the informative basis of the modern atmosphere long-termed forecasts. As any water quantities in atmosphere are formed on the basis of the cycle- and front-genesis (or in the convective non-stability lines) one can introduce the corresponding model on the basis of thermodynamics and hydro-mechanics of the corresponding processes [1,2]. For example, physics of these processes can coincide with the soliton mechanics, which has the long-periodical basis of the energy support. The action mechanics of such a soliton defines the key thermo-hydro-dynamical parameters of the atmosphere ultra-short-wave radio-waveguide. We present new approach to modeling a role of the atmosphere circulations forms in definition of the long-periodical processes in atmosphere, parameters of the troposphere ultra-short-wave radio-waveguides and the Earth angle momentum balance. We carried out a series of the computer experiments to provide new predictors for the long-termed and super long-termed forecasts of the low frequency atmospheric processes. Besides, we have adapted the modified theory of the macro-turbulence for possible using the atmosphere radio-waveguides as a special effective predictors in the long-termed plan.

  17. Study on passive earth pressure acting on the embedment of an earth retaining wall for braced excavation work in cohesive soil; Nenseido jiban ni okeru kussaku dodomeheki neirebu no judo doatsu ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakamura, H. [Pacific Consultants K.K., Tokyo (Japan); Hirashima, K. [Yamanashi University, Yamanashi (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1995-12-15

    Passive earth pressure exerts a great influence on the stress and deformation of earth retaining walls in braced excavation. To calculate this pressure, conventional ultimate earth pressure equation, or Rankine-Resals and Coulomb`s equation, are currently applied respectively to cohesive and sandy soil. However, these intentional equation to determine passive earth pressure do not adequately take into account the excavation width during work and the shearing resistance on the earth retaining wall surface. This paper deals with cohesive soil only, deriving a calculation equation for passive earth pressure, which takes into account excavation width and the shearing resistance of the earth retaining wall surface. Then, constants in this equation are determined using the calculation results obtained from the finite element method with blasts-plastic elements. The calculation results are also compared with measured values in the model test in order to check the applicability of the calculation equation for passive earth pressure thus obtained. Finally, this paper proposes a practicable calculation equation for passive earth pressure. 13 refs., 10 figs., 10 tabs.

  18. Systems Engineering of Chemical Hydrogen Storage, Pressure Vessel and Balance of Plant for Onboard Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brooks, Kriston P.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Weimar, Mark R.

    2014-09-02

    This is the annual report for the Hydrogen Storage Engineering Center of Excellence project as required by DOE EERE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office. We have been provided with a specific format. It describes the work that was done with cryo-sorbent based and chemical-based hydrogen storage materials. Balance of plant components were developed, proof-of-concept testing performed, system costs estimated, and transient models validated as part of this work.

  19. Potassium modulates electrolyte balance and blood pressure through effects on distal cell voltage and chloride.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terker, Andrew S; Zhang, Chong; McCormick, James A; Lazelle, Rebecca A; Zhang, Chengbiao; Meermeier, Nicholas P; Siler, Dominic A; Park, Hae J; Fu, Yi; Cohen, David M; Weinstein, Alan M; Wang, Wen-Hui; Yang, Chao-Ling; Ellison, David H

    2015-01-01

    Dietary potassium deficiency, common in modern diets, raises blood pressure and enhances salt sensitivity. Potassium homeostasis requires a molecular switch in the distal convoluted tubule (DCT), which fails in familial hyperkalemic hypertension (pseudohypoaldosteronism type 2), activating the thiazide-sensitive NaCl cotransporter, NCC. Here, we show that dietary potassium deficiency activates NCC, even in the setting of high salt intake, thereby causing sodium retention and a rise in blood pressure. The effect is dependent on plasma potassium, which modulates DCT cell membrane voltage and, in turn, intracellular chloride. Low intracellular chloride stimulates WNK kinases to activate NCC, limiting potassium losses, even at the expense of increased blood pressure. These data show that DCT cells, like adrenal cells, sense potassium via membrane voltage. In the DCT, hyperpolarization activates NCC via WNK kinases, whereas in the adrenal gland, it inhibits aldosterone secretion. These effects work in concert to maintain potassium homeostasis. PMID:25565204

  20. Pressure sensor-based tongue-placed electrotactile biofeedback for balance improvement - Biomedical application to prevent pressure sores formation and falls

    CERN Document Server

    Vuillerme, Nicolas; Pinsault, Nicolas; Moreau-Gaudry, Alexandre; Fleury, Anthony; Demongeot, Jacques; Payan, Yohan

    2007-01-01

    We introduce the innovative technologies, based on the concept of "sensory substitution", we are developing in the fields of biomedical engineering and human disability. Precisely, our goal is to design, develop and validate practical assistive biomedical and/or technical devices and/or rehabilitating procedures for persons with disabilities, using artificial tongue-placed tactile biofeedback systems. Proposed applications are dealing with: (1) pressure sores prevention in case of spinal cord injuries (persons with paraplegia, or tetraplegia); and (2) balance control improvement to prevent fall in older and/or disabled adults. This paper describes the architecture and the functioning principle of these biofeedback systems and presents preliminary results of two feasibility studies performed on young healthy adults.

  1. In-situ response time testing of force-balance pressure transmitters in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on recommendations for response time testing of safety system pressure transmitters in nuclear power plants that are found in Regulatory Guide 1.118 and requirements are defined in plant technical specifications. The conventional testing method involves simultaneously applying a pressure ramp signal to the process transmitter and to a fast-response reference transmitter. The time delay between the response of the two transmitters, when they obtain a predetermined value, is called the process transmitter response time. This method is referred to as the ramp test. Although the ramp test is an accepted method, large variations in its results are sometimes encountered because of empirical difficulties associated with the test. This test requires access to each transmitter, and it must be performed inside the containment during shutdown. The in-situ test is accomplished by interrupting the power to the transmitter for a few seconds. It is referred to as the Power Interrupt (PI) test, and it can be conducted while the plant is operating. The test includes the entire electromechanical system and the response time is obtained by analyzing the transient response following the restoration of power to the transmitter. Response times obtained from the PI test and the ramp test are in good agreement and usually differ by less than 50 ms

  2. Chaotic behavior of water column oscillator simulating pressure balanced injection system in passive safety reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) proposed a passive safety reactor called the System-integrated Pressurized Water Reactor (SPWR). In a loss of coolant accident, the Pressurizing Line (PL) and the Injection Line (IL) are passively opened. Vapor generated by residual heat pushes down the water level in the Reactor Vessel (RV). When the level is lower than the inlet of the PL, the vapor is ejected into the Containment Vessel (CV) through the PL. Then boronized water in the CV is injected into the RV through the IL by the static head. In an experiment using a simple apparatus, gas ejection and water injection were found to occur alternately under certain conditions. The gas ejection interval was observed to fluctuate considerably. Though stochastic noise affected the interval, the experimental results suggested that the large fluctuation was produced by an inherent character in the system. A set of piecewise linear differential equations was derived to describe the experimental result. The large fluctuation was reproduced in the analytical solution. Thus it was shown to occur even in a deterministic system without any source of stochastic noise. Though the derived equations simulated the experiment well, they had ten independent parameters governing the behavior of the solution. There appeared chaotic features and bifurcation, but the analytical model was too complicated to examine the features and mechanism of bifurcation. In this study, a new simple model is proposed which consists of a set of piecewise linear ordinary differential equations with only four independent parameters. (authors)

  3. Chaotic behavior of water column oscillator simulating pressure balanced injection system in passive safety reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morimoto, Y.; Madarame, H.; Okamoto, K. [Tokyo Univ., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Nuclear Engineering Research Lab.

    2001-07-01

    Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) proposed a passive safety reactor called the System-integrated Pressurized Water Reactor (SPWR). In a loss of coolant accident, the Pressurizing Line (PL) and the Injection Line (IL) are passively opened. Vapor generated by residual heat pushes down the water level in the Reactor Vessel (RV). When the level is lower than the inlet of the PL, the vapor is ejected into the Containment Vessel (CV) through the PL. Then boronized water in the CV is injected into the RV through the IL by the static head. In an experiment using a simple apparatus, gas ejection and water injection were found to occur alternately under certain conditions. The gas ejection interval was observed to fluctuate considerably. Though stochastic noise affected the interval, the experimental results suggested that the large fluctuation was produced by an inherent character in the system. A set of piecewise linear differential equations was derived to describe the experimental result. The large fluctuation was reproduced in the analytical solution. Thus it was shown to occur even in a deterministic system without any source of stochastic noise. Though the derived equations simulated the experiment well, they had ten independent parameters governing the behavior of the solution. There appeared chaotic features and bifurcation, but the analytical model was too complicated to examine the features and mechanism of bifurcation. In this study, a new simple model is proposed which consists of a set of piecewise linear ordinary differential equations with only four independent parameters. (authors)

  4. South Dakota Space Grant Consortium: Balancing Indigenous Earth System and Space Science with Western/Contemporary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolman, J.; Nall, J.

    2005-05-01

    The South Dakota Space Grant Consortium (SDSGC) was established March 1, 1991 by a NASA Capability Enhancement Grant. Since that time SDSGC has worked to provide earth system and space science education, outreach and services to all students across South Dakota. South Dakota has nine tribes and five Tribal Colleges. This has presented a tremendous opportunity to develop sustainable equitable partnerships and collaborations. SDSGC believes strongly in developing programs and activities that highlight and reinforce the balance of Indigenous science and ways of knowing with current findings in Western/Contemporary Science. This blending of science and culture creates a learning community where individuals especially students, can gain confidence and pride in their unique skills and abilities. Universities are also witnessing the accomplishments and achievements of students who are able to experience a tribal environment and then carry that experience to a college/university/workplace and significantly increase the learning achievement of all. The presentation will highlight current Tribal College and Tribal Community partnerships with the Rosebud Sioux Reservation (Sinte Gleska University), Pine Ridge Indian Reservation (Oglala Lakota College), Standing Rock Sioux Reservation (Sitting Bull College) and Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation (Si Tanka) amongst others. Programs and activities to be explained during the presentation include but not limited to: NASA Workforce Native Connections, Scientific Knowledge for Indian Learning and Leadership (SKILL), NSF "Bridges to Success" Summer Research Program, NSF "Fire Ecology" Summer Research Experience, as well as geospatial and space science programs for students and general community members. The presentation will also cover the current initiatives underway through NASA Workforce Development. These include: partnering with the Annual He Sapa Wacipi (Black Hills Pow Wow - attendance of 14,000 Natives) to host Native Space Days 2005 (October 2005), NASA research and internship programs, and the NASA Student Fellowship Summit. An overview of recent American Indian student success will conclude the presentation. The South Dakota School of Mines and Technology has struggled over many years to develop and implement sustainable successful initiatives with Tribal Colleges and Communities. The motivating philosophy is the betterment of all people in South Dakota and the nation through developing a worldview and understanding of the integrated nature of all things, especially earth system and space science. If people are provided equity and access, there is no limit to what they can accomplish. SDSM&T in the last three years has graduated nineteen Natives with degrees in engineering, many of those students Tribal College transfers. This is a significant increase, as only forty Natives had graduated from SDSM&T between the years of 1970 and 2000. SDSM&T has seen a number of "historical firsts" in the past five years. We see this as being a direct result of creating for students an educational philosophy and process where Indigenous understanding and connections become the foundation on which to build a STEM degree program. NASA's presence on the SDSM&T campus and in South Dakota has provided the necessary focus and encouragement for success to take place. We are building bridges in South Dakota and the builders are from Indian Country.

  5. Pressure effects on magnetic properties of R(Fe, M)12 single crystals (R = rare earth, M = Ti, Mi).

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kamarád, Ji?í; García-Landa, B.; Mikulina, Olga; Arnold, Zden?k; Ibarra, M. R.; Algarabel, P. A.

    226-230, - (2001), s. 1446-1448. ISSN 0304-8853. [International Conference on Magnetism. Recife, 06.08.2000-11.08.2000] R&D Projects: GA ?R GA202/99/0184; GA AV ?R IAA1010811 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : magnetization * high pressure * rare-earth intermetallics * anisotropy * magnetocrystalline * magnetic transition Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 1.329, year: 2001

  6. SMALL-SCALE PRESSURE-BALANCED STRUCTURES DRIVEN BY OBLIQUE SLOW MODE WAVES MEASURED IN THE SOLAR WIND

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, small-scale pressure-balanced structures (PBSs) were identified in the solar wind, but their formation mechanism remains unclear. This work aims to reveal the dependence of the properties of small-scale PBSs on the background magnetic field (B0) direction and thus to corroborate the in situ mechanism that forms them. We analyze the plasma and magnetic field data obtained by WIND in the quiet solar wind at 1 AU. First, we use a developed moving-average method to obtain B0(s, t) for every temporal scale (s) at each time moment (t). By wavelet cross-coherence analysis, we obtain the correlation coefficients between the thermal pressure Pth and the magnetic pressure PB, distributing against the temporal scale and the angle ?xB between B0(s, t) and Geocentric Solar Ecliptic coordinates (GSE)-x. We note that the angle coverage of a PBS decreases with shorter temporal scale, but the occurrence of the PBSs is independent of ?xB. Suspecting that the isolated small PBSs are formed by compressive waves in situ, we continue this study by testing the wave modes forming a small-scale PBS with B0(s, t) quasi-parallel to GSE-x. As a result, we identify that the cross-helicity and the compressibility attain values for a slow mode from theoretical calculations. The wave vector is derived from minimum variance analysis. Besides, the proton temperatures obey T ? derived from the velocity distribution functions, excluding a mirror mode, which is the other candidate for the formation of PBSs in situ. Thus, a small-scale PBS is shown to be driven by oblique, slow-mode waves in the solar wind

  7. SMALL-SCALE PRESSURE-BALANCED STRUCTURES DRIVEN BY OBLIQUE SLOW MODE WAVES MEASURED IN THE SOLAR WIND

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao Shuo [School of Geophysics and Information Technology, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083 (China); He, J.-S.; Tu, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-H. [Department of Geophysics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Marsch, E., E-mail: yaoshuo@cugb.edu.cn [Christian Albrechts University at Kiel, Kiel (Germany)

    2013-09-01

    Recently, small-scale pressure-balanced structures (PBSs) were identified in the solar wind, but their formation mechanism remains unclear. This work aims to reveal the dependence of the properties of small-scale PBSs on the background magnetic field (B{sub 0}) direction and thus to corroborate the in situ mechanism that forms them. We analyze the plasma and magnetic field data obtained by WIND in the quiet solar wind at 1 AU. First, we use a developed moving-average method to obtain B{sub 0}(s, t) for every temporal scale (s) at each time moment (t). By wavelet cross-coherence analysis, we obtain the correlation coefficients between the thermal pressure P{sub th} and the magnetic pressure P{sub B}, distributing against the temporal scale and the angle {theta}{sub xB} between B{sub 0}(s, t) and Geocentric Solar Ecliptic coordinates (GSE)-x. We note that the angle coverage of a PBS decreases with shorter temporal scale, but the occurrence of the PBSs is independent of {theta}{sub xB}. Suspecting that the isolated small PBSs are formed by compressive waves in situ, we continue this study by testing the wave modes forming a small-scale PBS with B{sub 0}(s, t) quasi-parallel to GSE-x. As a result, we identify that the cross-helicity and the compressibility attain values for a slow mode from theoretical calculations. The wave vector is derived from minimum variance analysis. Besides, the proton temperatures obey T < T{sub Parallel-To} derived from the velocity distribution functions, excluding a mirror mode, which is the other candidate for the formation of PBSs in situ. Thus, a small-scale PBS is shown to be driven by oblique, slow-mode waves in the solar wind.

  8. Contrasting effects of vasodilators on blood pressure and sodium balance in the hypertension of autonomic failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, J.; Shannon, J. R.; Pohar, B.; Paranjape, S. Y.; Robertson, D.; Robertson, R. M.; Biaggioni, I.

    1999-01-01

    Supine hypertension, which is very common in patients with autonomic failure, limits the use of pressor agents and induces nighttime natriuresis. In 13 patients with severe orthostatic hypotension due to autonomic failure (7 women, 6 men, 72 +/- 3 yr) and supine hypertension, the effect of 30 mg nifedipine (n = 10) and 0.025 to 0.2 mg/h nitroglycerin patch (n = 11) on supine BP, renal sodium handling, and orthostatic tolerance was determined. Medications were given at 8 p.m.; patients stood up at 8 a.m. Nitroglycerin was removed at 6 a.m. Compared with placebo, nifedipine and nitroglycerin decreased systolic BP during the night by a maximum of 37 +/- 9 and 36 +/- 10 mmHg, respectively (P effective in controlling supine hypertension in patients with autonomic failure. However, nifedipine has a prolonged depressor effect and worsens orthostatic hypotension in the morning. The decrease in pressure natriuresis that would be expected with the substantial decrease in BP obtained with nitroglycerin and nifedipine may be offset by a direct effect of both drugs on renal sodium handling.

  9. Heliotropic orbits at oblate asteroids: balancing solar radiation pressure and J2 perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lantukh, Demyan; Russell, Ryan P.; Broschart, Stephen

    2015-02-01

    The combined effect of significant solar radiation pressure and perturbations on spacecraft orbits is investigated using both singly and doubly-averaged disturbing potentials with the Lagrange Planetary Equations. The resulting dynamics are applied to a spacecraft around an oblate asteroid. Several Sun-frozen families of orbits are identified using the singly-averaged potential, including two new families of orbits and a previously-discovered equatorial heliotropic orbit family. Families of both stable and unstable Sun-frozen orbits are mapped and characterized in the singly-averaged case. In addition, a heliotropic constraint is implemented to locate heliotropic orbits out of the equatorial plane using a constrained, doubly-averaged potential. Dynamic bounds for these 3D heliotropic orbits are shown to have an inclination limit of approximately 46 degrees for oblate bodies, and this limit is independent of the value of and radiation parameters. The resulting heliotropic and related periodic families of orbits are good candidates to consider for low-altitude science orbits around small oblate bodies with low or near-180 degree obliquity like Bennu, the target for the OSIRIS-REx mission.

  10. A Balancing Act in the Third Space: Graduate-Level Earth Science in an Urban Teacher-Residency Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zirakparvar, N. Alex

    2015-01-01

    This article describes a museum-based urban teacher-residency (UTR) program's approach to building subject-specific content knowledge and research experience in Earth Science teacher candidates. In the museum-based program, graduate-level science courses and research experiences are designed and implemented specifically for the UTR by active Earth

  11. Inclusion of electronic polarizability effect in high pressure structural properties of alloy of rare-earth antimonides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yaduvanshi, Namrata, E-mail: namrata-yaduvanshi@yahoo.com; Kapoor, Shilpa; Singh, Sadhna [High Pressure Research Lab. Department of Physics, Barkatullah University, Bhopal (M.P.) India-462026 (India)

    2015-05-15

    In the present paper, we have investigated the high-pressure structural phase transition of rare-earth antimonides (NdSb and DySb). We studied theoretically the structural properties of alloy of these compounds (NdSb and DySb) by using the three-body potential model with the effect of electronic polarizability (TBIPE{sub P}). These compounds exhibit first order crystallographic phase transition from NaCl (B{sub 1}) to CsCl (B{sub 2}) phase at 17.8?GPa and 22.6?GPa respectively. The study has been extended to mixed crystals and the effect of composition on transition pressure and volume change is investigated. The phase transition pressures and associated volume collapse obtained from present potential model (TBIPE{sub P}) show a good agreement with available experimental data.

  12. Jump conditions for pressure anisotropy and comparison with the Earth's bow shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. F. Vogl

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Taking into account the pressure anisotropy in the solar wind, we study the magnetic field and plasma parameters downstream of a fast shock, as functions of upstream parameters and downstream pressure anisotropy. In our theoretical approach, we model two cases: a the perpendicular shock and b the oblique shock. We use two threshold conditions of plasma instabilities as additional equations to bound the range of pressure anisotropy. The criterion of the mirror instability is used for pressure anisotropy p perp /pparrallel > 1. Analogously, the criterion of the fire-hose instability is taken into account for pressure anisotropy p perp /pparrallel < 1. We found that the variations of the parallel pressure, the parallel temperature, and the tangential component of the velocity are most sensitive to the pressure anisotropy downstream of the shock. Finally, we compare our theory with plasma and magnetic field parameters measured by the WIND spacecraft.

  13. Spin crossover and Mott—Hubbard transition under high pressure and high temperature in the low mantle of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovchinnikov, S. G.; Ovchinnikova, T. M.; Plotkin, V. V.; Dyad'kov, P. G.

    2015-11-01

    Effect of high pressure induced spin crossover on the magnetic, electronic and structural properties of the minerals forming the Earth's low mantle is discussed. The low temperature P, T phase diagram of ferropericlase has the quantum phase transition point Pc = 56 GPa at T = 0 confirmed recently by the synchrotron Mössbauer spectroscopy. The LDA+GTB calculated phase diagram describes the experimental data. Its extension to the high temperature resulted earlier in prediction of the metallic properties of the Earth's mantle at the depth 1400 km electrical conductivity based on the percolation theory is given. We discuss also the thermodynamic properties and structural anomalies resulting from the spin crossover and metal-insulator transition and compare them with the experimental seismic and geomagnetic field data.

  14. The etching process of boron nitride by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides under high pressure and high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Appropriate etch processes of hBN and cBN under HPHT are proposed. • The degree of the crystallization of hBN was decreased. • A special cBN growth mechanism with a triangular unit is proposed. • Plate-shape cBN crystals with large ratio of length to thickness were obtained. • A strategy provides useful guidance for controlling the cBN morphology. - Abstract: Some new etching processes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and cubic boron nitride (cBN) under high pressure and high temperature in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth fluorides have been discussed. It is found that hBN is etched distinctly by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the morphology of hBN is significantly changed from plate-shape to spherical-shape. Based on the “graphitization index” values of hBN, the degree of the crystallization of hBN under high pressure and high temperature decreases in the sequence of LiF > CaF2 > MgF2. This facilitates the formation of high-quality cBN single crystals. Different etch steps, pits, and islands are observed on cBN surface, showing the strong etching by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the tendency of layer-by-layer growth. A special layer growth mechanism of cBN with a triangular unit has been found. Furthermore, the morphologies of cBN crystals are apparently affected by a preferential surface etching of LiF, CaF2 and MgF2. Respectively, the plate-shape and tetrahedral cBN crystals can be obtained in the presence of different alkali and alkaline earth fluorides

  15. The etching process of boron nitride by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides under high pressure and high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, W., E-mail: guowei1982cry@163.com [College of Physics and Optoelectronics, Taiyuan University of Technology, Taiyuan 030024 (China); National Key Lab of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China); Ma, H.A.; Jia, X. [National Key Lab of Superhard Materials, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Appropriate etch processes of hBN and cBN under HPHT are proposed. • The degree of the crystallization of hBN was decreased. • A special cBN growth mechanism with a triangular unit is proposed. • Plate-shape cBN crystals with large ratio of length to thickness were obtained. • A strategy provides useful guidance for controlling the cBN morphology. - Abstract: Some new etching processes of hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and cubic boron nitride (cBN) under high pressure and high temperature in the presence of alkali and alkaline earth fluorides have been discussed. It is found that hBN is etched distinctly by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the morphology of hBN is significantly changed from plate-shape to spherical-shape. Based on the “graphitization index” values of hBN, the degree of the crystallization of hBN under high pressure and high temperature decreases in the sequence of LiF > CaF{sub 2} > MgF{sub 2}. This facilitates the formation of high-quality cBN single crystals. Different etch steps, pits, and islands are observed on cBN surface, showing the strong etching by alkali and alkaline earth fluorides and the tendency of layer-by-layer growth. A special layer growth mechanism of cBN with a triangular unit has been found. Furthermore, the morphologies of cBN crystals are apparently affected by a preferential surface etching of LiF, CaF{sub 2} and MgF{sub 2}. Respectively, the plate-shape and tetrahedral cBN crystals can be obtained in the presence of different alkali and alkaline earth fluorides.

  16. BLOOD PRESSURE, HEART RATE AND MELATONIN CYCLES SYNCHRONIZATION WITH THE SEASON, EARTH MAGNETISM AND SOLAR FLARES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornélissen, G; Halberg, F; Sothern, R B; Hillman, D C; Siegelová, J

    2010-01-01

    Three spectral components with periods of about (~) 0.41, ~0.5 and ~1.0 year had been found with serially independent sampling in human circulating melatonin. The time series consisted of around-the-clock samples collected for 24 hours at 4-hour intervals from different patients over several years. Some of these components had been found to be circadian stage-dependent, the daytime measurements following mostly a circannual variation, whereas a half-year characterized the nighttime samples. The latter were incorporated into a circasemiannual map. The relative brevity of the series prevented a check for the coexistence of all three spectral components, even if each component seemed to have a raison d'être. In time series of transdisciplinary data, a 1.00-year synchronized component is interpreted as representing the seasons. The half-year may qualify the circannual waveform, but it is also a signature of geomagnetics. An ~0.41-year (~5-month) component is the signature of solar flares. It has been called a cis-half-year (cis = on this side of a half-year) and may be detected only intermittently. Charles L. Wolff predicted the existence, among others, of ~0.42- and ~0.56-year components as beat periods of rotations at different solar latitudes.The multiple components characterizing circulating melatonin could also be found in a (to our knowledge unique) data set of a clinically healthy scientist (RBS). Herein, we focus on vascular data self-measured by RBS as he aged from ~20 to ~60 years. A multi-component model consisting of cosine curves with periods of 0.41, 0.50 and 1.00 year was fitted to weekly means of systolic (S) and diastolic (D) blood pressure (BP) and heart rate (HR) collected ~5 times a day over 39 years by RBS. All three components can coexist for a while, although all of them are nonstationary in their characteristics and come and go by the criterion of statistical significance.Intermittently, BP and HR are synchronized selectively with one or the other aspect of RBS' physical environment, namely the seasons (at ~1.0 year), earth magnetism (at ~0.5 year) and/or solar flares (at ~0.42 year). Cosmic-biotic transfer of information, albeit hardly of energy (the biospheric amplitudes are very small) may be mediated in this set of frequency windows. As found earlier, RBS' circulation is also frequency-trapped environmentally in multidecadal windows, HR being locked into the transtridecadal Brückner, or rather Brückner-Egeson-Lockyer, BEL sunspot and terrestrial weather cycle, while his BP follows Hale's didecadal cycle in the changing polarity of sunspots.The ~0.41-year HR cycle may be associated with changes in solar flares, the cis-half-year amplitude of HR showing a cross-correlation coefficient of 0.79 with the total solar flare index (from both solar hemispheres) at a lag of ~3.2 years. The superposed time courses of these two variables indicate the presence of a shared Horrebow-Arago-Schwabe sunspot cycle of ~11 years, the cis-half-year in HR being more prominent after the total solar flare index reaches its ~11-year peak. Differences in the time-varying behavior of BP vs. HR are also described. PMID:21566725

  17. Pressure-induced novel superconductivity and heavy fermion state in rare earth compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have carried out the electrical resistivity measurements under high pressures up to 24 GPa for CeTX3 (T: Co and Ir, X: Si and Ge), CePd5Al2 and YbIr2Zn20 in order to investigate quantum criticality and superconductivity. Antiferromagnets CeTX3 with the non-centrosymmetric tetragonal structure show superconductivity under high pressures and reveal a huge upper critical field for H? [001]. An antiferromagnet CePd5Al2, which is an isostructural family of a heavy fermion superconductor NpPd5Al2, also shows superconductivity under high pressures. In these compounds, superconductivity appears in the vicinity of quantum critical point. On the other hand, YbIr2Zn20 without magnetic ordering approaches to the quantum critical point with increasing pressure and exhibits a super-heavy fermion state exceeding 10 J/(K2· mol).

  18. Hydrogen and deuterium sorption by selected rare earth intermetallic compounds at pressures up to 1500 atm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A limited survey was conducted of hydrogen and deuterium sorption by 13 selected ABsub(x) alloys (A equivalent to La, Ce, Pr, Er; B equivalent to Co, Ni). A structural analysis showed that AB5 hydrides share essentially the same structure, with a maximum of nine sites per AB5 unit available for hydrogen storage. To determine whether all nine sites could be filled at pressures higher than those previously studied, pressure-composition isotherms were obtained at 21 0C and up to 1500 atm for each of the alloys under study. The effect on the pressure-composition isotherm of substituting one A or B element for another (neodymium or manganese) was also explored. The pressure plateaus were usually shifted by these substitutions. (Auth.)

  19. Thermal and Pressure Characterization of a Wind Tunnel Force Balance Using the Single Vector System. Experimental Design and Analysis Approach to Model Pressure and Temperature Effects in Hypersonic Wind Tunnel Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Keith C.; Commo, Sean A.; Johnson, Thomas H.; Parker, Peter A,

    2011-01-01

    Wind tunnel research at NASA Langley Research Center s 31-inch Mach 10 hypersonic facility utilized a 5-component force balance, which provided a pressurized flow-thru capability to the test article. The goal of the research was to determine the interaction effects between the free-stream flow and the exit flow from the reaction control system on the Mars Science Laboratory aeroshell during planetary entry. In the wind tunnel, the balance was exposed to aerodynamic forces and moments, steady-state and transient thermal gradients, and various internal balance cavity pressures. Historically, these effects on force measurement accuracy have not been fully characterized due to limitations in the calibration apparatus. A statistically designed experiment was developed to adequately characterize the behavior of the balance over the expected wind tunnel operating ranges (forces/moments, temperatures, and pressures). The experimental design was based on a Taylor-series expansion in the seven factors for the mathematical models. Model inversion was required to calculate the aerodynamic forces and moments as a function of the strain-gage readings. Details regarding transducer on-board compensation techniques, experimental design development, mathematical modeling, and wind tunnel data reduction are included in this paper.

  20. A laboratory method for modeling synthesis of coesite in the earth's surface by combining local mechanical collision with shear stress and high static pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Wen-Hui; Liu, Shu-E.; Xu, Da-Peng; Wang, Wei-Ran; Liu, Xiao-Mei

    2006-03-01

    A laboratory method of combining the high-energy mechanical ball milling and high static pressure has been suggested for modeling synthesis of coesite in the earth's surface. A window of milling time, a mechanical collision-induced intermediate phase of ?-quartz and its condition of easily crystallizing into coesite induced by high static pressure 3.0 GPa, 923 K, static pressure in laboratory.

  1. Luminescence of high pressure phases of Eu2+-activated alkaline earth borates and silicates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High pressure phases of EuB2O4, MB2O4-Eu2+ (M=Ca, Sr), EuSiO3 and MSiO3-Eu2+ were synthesized at pressures of 30-150 kbar. The pressure-temperature phase diagram of EuB2O4 consists of the following four regions: phases I, III and IV, and a region of phase separation into EuB4O7 and Eu2B2O5. The band emissions of the high pressure phases of EuB2O4 and SrB2O4-Eu2+ are assigned to (4f)7-(4f)6(5d) transitions of the Eu2+ ions. The emission intensity increases on transformation into phase IV. In particular, the relative emission intensity of phase IV of SrB2O4-Eu2+ is about 100 times higher than that of phase I of the corresponding borate. This is firstly due to the fact that the Eu2+ ions in phase IV are effectively surrounded by BO4 tetrahedra of the three dimensional B3O6 network such that their interaction with neighbouring Eu2+ ions is restricted. Secondly, the phase transformation appears to reduce the lattice vibration of the borate network, thus decreasing non-radiative processes. The application of pressures of up to 150 kbar on EuSiO3 resulted in the formation of the new high pressure phases delta and delta'. The emission intensities of CaSiO3-Eu2+ and SrSiO3-Eu2+ also increased appreciably (by a factor of 20-40) when the host lattices transformed into delta-CaSiO3 and delta'-SrSiO3. (Auth.)

  2. The temperature dependence of saturated vapor pressure over alkaline-earth metal pivaloyltrifluoroacetonate complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimova, Yu. A.; Abakumov, G. A.; Petrov, B. I.; Pochekutova, T. S.; Khamylov, V. K.

    2008-11-01

    The temperature dependences of saturated vapor pressure over M(PTA)2 · 15-crown-5, where M = Ca, Sr, or Ba and PTA is the pivaloyltrifluoroacetonate anion, were studied by the Knudsen effusion method, and the enthalpies of compound sublimation were calculated. Changes in volatility depending on the central metal atom were determined.

  3. Balance Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rate and blood pressure, and fear, anxiety, or panic. Symptoms may come and go over short time ... the-counter medicine, such as aspirin, antihistamines, or sleep aids): Name of medicine: ... on balance disorders? Findings from animal studies may help researchers determine ...

  4. Elastic anisotropy in hcp metals at high pressure and the sound wave anisotropy of the Earth's inner core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonangeli, Daniele; Merkel, Sébastien; Farber, Daniel L.

    2006-12-01

    We compare the elastic anisotropy in hcp metals at high pressure obtained by radial diffraction measurements with those determined by other experiments and calculations. Our analysis demonstrates that in non-hydrostatically compressed hcp metals the assumption of a single uniform macroscopic stress applied to all grains in the polycrystal for the inversion of the lattice strain equations is violated due to plastic deformation. In addition, the derived apparent moduli and elastic anisotropy differ significantly from those derived from single crystals. We propose that for cobalt, rhenium and iron, the elastic anisotropy in the meridian plane is best described by a sigmoidal shape for the longitudinal velocity, with the fastest direction along the c-axis. Based on these results, we suggest that preferential alignment of the c-axis of iron crystallites along the Earth's rotation axis is the most plausible explanation for the observed P-wave travel time anomalies in the inner core.

  5. From Science Reserves to Sustainable Multiple Uses beyond Earth orbit: Evaluating Issues on the Path towards Balanced Environmental Management on Planetary Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Race, Margaret

    Over the past five decades, our understanding of space beyond Earth orbit has been shaped by a succession of mainly robotic missions whose technologies have enabled scientists to answer diverse science questions about celestial bodies across the solar system. For all that time, exploration has been guided by planetary protection policies and principles promulgated by COSPAR and based on provisions in Article IX of the Outer Space Treaty of 1967. Over time, implementation of the various COSPAR planetary protection policies have sought to avoid harmful forward and backward contamination in order to ensure the integrity of science findings, guide activities on different celestial bodies, and appropriately protect Earth whenever extraterrestrial materials have been returned. The recent increased interest in extending both human missions and commercial activities beyond Earth orbit have prompted discussions in various quarters about the need for updating policies and guidelines to ensure responsible, balanced space exploration and use by all parties, regardless whether activities are undertaken by governmental or non-governmental entities. Already, numerous researchers and workgroups have suggested a range of different ways to manage activities on celestial environments (e.g, wilderness parks, exclusion zones, special regions, claims, national research bases, environmental impact assessments, etc.). While the suggestions are useful in thinking about how to manage future space activities, they are not based on any systematically applied or commonly accepted criteria (scientific or otherwise). In addition, they are borrowed from terrestrial approaches for environmental protection, which may or may not have direct applications to space environments. As noted in a recent COSPAR-PEX workshop (GWU 2012), there are no clear definitions of issues such as harmful contamination, the environment to be protected, or what are considered reasonable activity or impacts for particular locations—and over what time frames. Likewise, there are no guidelines for how to deal with the potential conflict between economic viability for commercial space activity and the need for reasonable planetary protection measures and standards. Before creating guidelines for particular locations or developing a international environmental regime for blending space exploration and use, it is advisable to have at least have a cursory overview of what lies ahead in the technical, scientific, commercial, environmental and policy realms. To develop such an overview, I undertook a preliminary analysis of the proposed activities, stakeholders, timeframes, and potential environmental impacts anticipated in coming years for robotic and human missions, particularly for the Moon and Mars. Hopefully, this type of information will be useful as the international community works towards updating policies and guidelines for responsible, balanced space exploration and use by all parties.

  6. Correlation between sway parameters of center of pressure in quiet standing with eyes open and eyes closed, functional balance tests and symmetry index in chronic hemiparesis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorsa Hamedi

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background and Aim: Proprioceptive problems, visuospatial deficits and muscle weakness are the main causes of weight bearing asymmetry and postural control impairment in chronic hemiparesis patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the correlation between center of pressure parameters in quiet standing with eyes open and closed and functional balance tests and symmetry index in these patients. Materials and Methods: In this correlation study, 16 stroke patients (mean age: 52.937±10.109 years, were selected by simple non-probability sapling. Force plate, Functional Reach and Timed Up and Go tests and scales were used in order to investigate postural sway parameters in quiet standing, functional balance and symmetry index, respectively. Results: Moderate to high significant correlation was obtained between Timed Up and Go test and symmetry index and most of the postural sway parameters in eyes closed condition, while Functional Reach test had only moderate significant correlation with standard deviation of velocity (anterior-posterior and phase plane total. Also symmetry index showed moderate correlation with most of the postural sway parameters. Conclusion: Current study demonstrates the role of vision and task in correlation between center of pressure parameters, balance tests and symmetry index. Key words: Correlation, Symmetric weight bearing, Postural sway, Functional Reach, Timed Up and Go, Force plate, Quiet standing

  7. Windsock memory conditioned RAM (Co-Ram) pressure effect: forced reconnection in the Earth's magnetotail

    CERN Document Server

    Vörös, Z; Khodachenko, M; Honkonen, I; Janhunen, P; Palmroth, M

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic reconnection (MR) is a key physical concept explaining the addition of magnetic flux to the magnetotail and closed flux lines back-motion to the dayside magnetosphere. This scenario elaborated by \\citet{dung63}, can explain many aspects of solar wind-magnetosphere interaction processes, including substorms. However, neither the Dungey model nor its numerous modifications were able to explain fully the onset conditions for MR in the tail. In this paper, we introduce new onset conditions for forced MR in the tail. We call our scenario the "windsock memory conditioned ram pressure effect". Our non-flux-transfer associated forcing is introduced by a combination of large-scale windsock motions exhibiting memory effects and solar wind dynamic pressure actions on the nightside magnetopause during northward oriented IMF. Using global MHD GUMICS-4 simulation results, upstream data from WIND, magnetosheath data from Cluster-1 and distant-tail data from the two-probe ARTEMIS mission, we show that the simultaneo...

  8. 3-D Force-balanced Magnetospheric Configurations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sorin Zaharia; C.Z. Cheng; K. Maezawa

    2003-02-10

    The knowledge of plasma pressure is essential for many physics applications in the magnetosphere, such as computing magnetospheric currents and deriving magnetosphere-ionosphere coupling. A thorough knowledge of the 3-D pressure distribution has however eluded the community, as most in-situ pressure observations are either in the ionosphere or the equatorial region of the magnetosphere. With the assumption of pressure isotropy there have been attempts to obtain the pressure at different locations by either (a) mapping observed data (e.g., in the ionosphere) along the field lines of an empirical magnetospheric field model or (b) computing a pressure profile in the equatorial plane (in 2-D) or along the Sun-Earth axis (in 1-D) that is in force balance with the magnetic stresses of an empirical model. However, the pressure distributions obtained through these methods are not in force balance with the empirical magnetic field at all locations. In order to find a global 3-D plasma pressure distribution in force balance with the magnetospheric magnetic field, we have developed the MAG-3D code, that solves the 3-D force balance equation J x B = (upside-down delta) P computationally. Our calculation is performed in a flux coordinate system in which the magnetic field is expressed in terms of Euler potentials as B = (upside-down delta) psi x (upside-down delta) alpha. The pressure distribution, P = P(psi,alpha), is prescribed in the equatorial plane and is based on satellite measurements. In addition, computational boundary conditions for y surfaces are imposed using empirical field models. Our results provide 3-D distributions of magnetic field and plasma pressure as well as parallel and transverse currents for both quiet-time and disturbed magnetospheric conditions.

  9. Effects of chemical and hydrostatic pressures on structural, magnetic, and electronic properties of R2NiMn O6 (R =rare -earth ion ) double perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hong Jian; Liu, Xiao Qiang; Chen, Xiang Ming; Bellaiche, L.

    2014-11-01

    The effects of chemical and hydrostatic pressures on structural, magnetic, and electronic properties of R2NiMn O6 double perovskites, with R being a rare-earth ion, have been systematically studied by using specific first-principles calculations. These latter reproduce well the correlation between several properties (e.g., lattice parameters, Ni-O-Mn bond angles, magnetic Curie temperature, and electronic band gap) and the rare-earth ionic radius (i.e., the chemical pressure). They also provide novel predictions awaiting experimental confirmation, such as (i) that many physical quantities respond in dramatically different manners to chemical versus hydrostatic pressure, unlike as commonly thought for perovskites containing rare-earth ions, and (ii) a dependence of antipolar displacements on chemical and hydrostatic pressures, which would further explain why the recently predicted electrical polarization of L a2NiMn O6/R2NiMn O6 superlattices [H. J. Zhao, W. Ren, Y. Yang, J. Íñiguez, X. M. Chen, and L. Bellaiche, Nat. Commun. 5, 4021 (2014), 10.1038/ncomms5021] can be created and controlled by playing with the rare-earth element.

  10. Earth in the balance. Ecology and the human spirit; Urgence Planete Terre. L'esprit humain face a la crise ecologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al Gore

    2007-07-01

    This book is the translation of the original American edition 'earth in the balance'. When Earth in the Balance first came out, it caused quite a stir and for good reason. It convincingly makes the case that a crisis of epidemic proportions is nearly upon us and that if the world does not get its act together soon and agree to some kind of 'Global Marshall Plan' to protect the environment, we're all up a polluted creek without a paddle. Myriad plagues are upon us, but the worst include the loss of biodiversity, the depletion of the ozone layer, the slash-and-burn destruction of rain forests, and the onset of global warming. None of this is new, of course, nor was it new in 1992. But most environmentalists will still get a giddy feeling reading such a call to action as written by a prominent politician. The book is arranged into three sections: the first describes the plagues; the second looks at how we got ourselves into this mess; and the final chapters present ways out. Gore gets his points across in a serviceable way, though he could have benefited from a firmer editor's hand; at times the analogies are arcane and the pacing is odd kind of like a Gore speech that climaxes at weird points and then sinks just as the audience is about to clap. Still, at the end you understand what's been said. Gore believes that if we apply some American ingenuity, the twin engines of democracy and capitalism can be rigged to help us stabilize world population growth, spread social justice, boost education levels, create environmentally appropriate technologies, and negotiate international agreements to bring us back from the brink. For example, a worldwide shift to clean, renewable energy sources would create huge economic opportunities for companies large and small to design, build, and maintain solar panels, wind turbines, fuel cells, and other eco friendly innovations.

  11. Quantifying Uncertainty in the Predictions of the SimSphere Land Biosphere Model in Simulating Key Parameters Characterising Earth's Energy Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Matthew; Petropoulos, George

    2014-05-01

    Soil Vegetation Atmosphere Transfer (SVAT) models are becoming the preferred scientific tool to assess land surface energy fluxes due to their computational efficiency, accuracy and ability to provide results at fine temporal scales. An all-inclusive validation of those models is a fundamental step before those can be confidently used for any practical application or research purpose alike. SimSphere is an example of a SVAT model, simulating a large array of parameters characterising various land surface interactions over a 24 hour cycle at a 1-D vertical profile. Being able to appreciate the uncertainty of SimSphere predictions, is of vital importance towards increasing confidence in the models' overall use and ability to represent accurate land surface interactions. This is particularly important, given that its use either as a stand-alone tool or synergistically with Earth Observation (EO) data is currently expanding worldwide. In the present study, uncertainty in the SimSphere's predictions is evaluated at seven European sites, representative of a range of ecosystem conditions and biomes types for which in-situ data from the CarboEurope IP operational network acquired during 2011 were available. Selected sites are characterised by varying topographical characteristics, which further allow developing a comprehensive understanding on how topography can affect the models' ability to reproduce the variables which are evaluated. Model simulations are compared to in-situ data collected on cloud free days and on days with high Energy Balance Ratio. We focused here specifically on evaluating SimSphere capability in predicting selected variables of the energy balance, namely the Latent Heat (LE), Sensible heat (H) and Net Radiation (Rn) fluxes. An evaluation of the uncertainty in the model predictions was evaluated on the basis of extensive statistical analysis that was carried out by computing a series of relevant statistical measures. Results obtained confirmed the correspondence of the model structure to real conditions for which it had been parameterised, evidencing its ability to reproduce reasonably satisfactory the examined parameters, particularly so over flat terrain sites and specific land cover types. Given the very small number of SimSphere validation studies, our work contributes decisively towards obtaining a better understanding of the model structure and correspondence to a real world system. The latter, not only provides very important information to future model users but also is of potential key value to efforts ongoing at present by different Space Agencies examining the use of SimSphere synergistically with Earth Observation data in developing operational products at a global scale. KEYWORDS: SimSphere, Latent Heat flux, Sensible Heat fulx, Net Radiation, SVAT; Land Surface Interactions, CarboEurope.

  12. Estudio experimental del empuje sobre estructuras de contención en suelos reforzados con geomallas / Experimental study of the lateral earth pressure on retaining structures in soils reinforced with geogrids

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Lissette, Ruiz-Tagle; Felipe, Villalobos.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Este artículo presenta un estudio experimental de la variación de las tensiones de empuje sobre una pared que soporta un suelo reforzado con geomallas. Para ello se utilizó un equipo diseñado y construido especialmente para ejecutar ensayos de empuje bajo condiciones de deformación plana. Se describ [...] e el equipo de ensayo y los instrumentos de medición, así como el suelo y la preparación de las muestras de arena y la geomalla utilizada. En la primera etapa de la investigación se ensayan muestras sin reforzar y se comparan los resultados con aquellos provenientes de las teorías clásicas de empuje. Posteriormente se presentan los resultados de ensayos de empuje en suelo reforzado con una, dos, tres y cuatro geomallas. Se concluye que la incorporación de geomallas como refuerzo en el suelo disminuye el empuje ejercido por el suelo sobre la estructura de contención. Esta disminución del empuje es de aproximadamente un 25% cuando se usa una geomalla, un 50% con dos o tres geomallas y de un 75% con cuatro geomallas para los espaciamientos, sobrecargas e incremento de desplazamientos usados. Resultó posible identificar que la distribución de la tensión de empuje con la profundidad no sólo no sigue la variación triangular sino que se desarrollan arcos de tensiones en el suelo entre las geomallas. Abstract in english This article presents an experimental study on the variation with depth of the stresses due to lateral earth pressure on a wall retaining a soil reinforced with geogrids. To this end, an apparatus was designed and constructed especially tailored for performing lateral earth pressure tests under plai [...] n strain conditions. The experimental apparatus and the measurement instruments as well as the soil and the sample preparation and the geogrids used, are described. In a first stage of research, samples without reinforcing are tested and the results are compared with those from classic earth pressure theories. Subsequently, results from lateral earth pressure tests in soils reinforced with one, two, three and four geogrids are presented. It is concluded that the inclusion of geogrids as soil reinforcement reduces the earth pressure on the retaining structure. This lateral earth pressure reduction is approximately of 25% when one geogrid is used, 50% with two or three geogrids and 75% with four geogrids for the spacing, surcharges and displacement increments used. It was possible to identify that the lateral earth pressure distribution with depth not only does not follow a triangular variation, but it develops stress arching in the soil and between the geogrids.

  13. X-ray Raman scattering study of MgSiO3 glass at high pressure: implication for triclustered MgSiO3 melt in Earth's mantle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung Keun; Lin, Jung-Fu; Cai, Yong Q; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Eng, Peter J; Okuchi, Takuo; Mao, Ho-Kwang; Meng, Yue; Hu, Michael Y; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Li, Baosheng; Fukui, Hiroshi; Lee, Bum Han; Kim, Hyun Na; Yoo, Choong-Shik

    2008-06-10

    Silicate melts at the top of the transition zone and the core-mantle boundary have significant influences on the dynamics and properties of Earth's interior. MgSiO3-rich silicate melts were among the primary components of the magma ocean and thus played essential roles in the chemical differentiation of the early Earth. Diverse macroscopic properties of silicate melts in Earth's interior, such as density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, depend on their electronic and short-range local structures at high pressures and temperatures. Despite essential roles of silicate melts in many geophysical and geodynamic problems, little is known about their nature under the conditions of Earth's interior, including the densification mechanisms and the atomistic origins of the macroscopic properties at high pressures. Here, we have probed local electronic structures of MgSiO3 glass (as a precursor to Mg-silicate melts), using high-pressure x-ray Raman spectroscopy up to 39 GPa, in which high-pressure oxygen K-edge features suggest the formation of tricluster oxygens (oxygen coordinated with three Si frameworks; 3O) between 12 and 20 GPa. Our results indicate that the densification in MgSiO3 melt is thus likely to be accompanied with the formation of triculster, in addition to a reduction in nonbridging oxygens. The pressure-induced increase in the fraction of oxygen triclusters >20 GPa would result in enhanced density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, and reduced element diffusivity in the MgSiO3 melt toward deeper part of the Earth's lower mantle. PMID:18535140

  14. Postural balance in low back pain patients : Intra-session reliability of center of pressure on a portable force platform and of the one leg stand test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; Stengaard-Pedersen, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) patients have poorer postural control compared to healthy controls, and the importance of assessing and addressing balance is a matter of debate. In the clinic, balance is often tested by means of the one leg stand test (OLST) while research often employs center of pressure (CoP) on a force platform. Portable force platforms might be of clinical relevance, but their reliability for LBP patients in a clinical setting has not been demonstrated. As LBP patients are more dependent on vision compared to healthy controls, the ratio of tests performed with eyes open and eyes closed (Romberg Ratio) might be of clinical interest. This study aimed to assess postural balance in LBP patients by analyzing intra-session reliability of CoP parameters on a portable force platform, the Romberg Ratio, and the OLST. Furthermore, we aimed to determine whether CoP parameters and OLST measure identical aspects of postural stability. We examined 49 LBP patients and found acceptable reliability of the CoP parameters' trace length and velocity, whereas reliability regarding C90 area, the Romberg Ratio, and the OLST was poor. Correlations between the CoP parameters and OLST were insignificant. Reliability of trace length and velocity is acceptable and can be used as parameters when assessing CoP in LBP patients.

  15. Chaotic behavior in a system simulating the pressure balanced injection system. Analysis of passive safety reactor behavior. JAERI's nuclear research promotion program, H12-012 (Contract research)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pressure Balanced Injection System (PBIS) was proposed in a passive safety reactor. Pressurizing Line (PL) connects the Reactor Vessel (RV) and the gas area in the Contain Vessel (CV), and Injected Line (IL) connects two vessels at relatively lower position. In an accident, the two lines are passively opened. The vapor generated by the residual heat pressed downward the water level in the RV. When the level is lower than the inlet of the PL, vapor is ejected into the CV through the PL attaining the pressure balance between the vessels. Then boron water in the CV is injected into the RV through the IL by the static head. This process is repeated by the succeeding vapor generation. In an experiment, the oscillating system was replaced by water column in a U-shaped duct. The vapor generation was simulated by cover gas supply to one end of the duct, while the other end was open to the atmosphere. When the water level reached a certain level, electromagnetic valves opened and the cover gas was ejected. The gas pressure decreased rapidly, resulting in a surface rise. When the water level reached another level, the valves closed. The cover gas pressure increased again, thus, gas ejection occurred intermittently. The interval of the gas ejection was not constant but fluctuated widely. Mere stochastic noise could hardly explain the large amplitude. Then was expressed the system using a set of linear equations. Various types of piecewise linear model were developed to examine the cause of the fluctuation. There appeared tangential bifurcation, period-doubling bifurcation, period-adding bifurcation and so on. The calculated interval exhibited chaotic features. Thus the cause of the fluctuation can be attributed to chaotic features of the system having switching. Since the piecewise linear model was highly simplified the behavior, a quantitative comparison between the calculation and the experiment was difficult. Therefore, numerical simulation code considering nonlinear effect was developed to describe the system behavior in the case there was no stochastic noise. The comparison between the simulation and the experiment revealed that there are some bifurcation-like phenomena being not real bifurcations. Real bifurcations are discovered in the simulation as well as in the experiment. Confirmation of chaotic behavior of the system in the experiment is a subject for a future study. (author)

  16. Anomalous pressure dependences of the superconducting transition temperature of dilute alloys of LaSn3 containing light rare earth impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial depressions of the superconducting transition temperature T/sub c/ of LaSn3 by rare earth (RE) impurities are known to be anomalous. In an attempt to clarify this behavior, we have measured the pressure dependence of the T/sub c/ of (LaRE)Sn3 alloys (RE3 alloys containing RE impurities with partially filled 4f electron shells decreases monotonically with increasing RE atomic number. A general discussion of existing zero- and high-pressure data for various physical properties of (LaRE)Sn3 alloys demonstrates that the association of large pressure dependences of T/sub c/ with the occurrence of unstable impurity 4f shells (the Kondo effect) should be made with caution. The experimental high-pressure results are analyzed in terms of appropriate theoretical models for magnetic and nonmagnetic localized impurity states in superconductors

  17. Effects of supplementing rare earth element cerium on rumen fermentation, nutrient digestibility, nitrogen balance and plasma biochemical parameters in beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, S X; Wei, C; Zhao, G Y; Zhang, T T; Yang, K

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of the trial were to investigate the effects of supplementing rare earth element (REE) cerium (Ce) on rumen fermentation, nutrient digestibility, methane (CH4 ) production, nitrogen (N) balance and plasma biochemical parameters in beef cattle. Four Simmental male cattle, aged at 14 months, with initial liveweight of 355 ± 8 kg and fitted with permanent rumen cannulas, were used as experimental animals. The cattle were fed with a total mixed ration (TMR) composed of concentrate mixture and corn silage. Four levels of cerium chloride (CeCl3 ·7H2 O, purity 99.9%), that is 0, 80, 160 and 240 mg CeCl3 /kg DM, were added to basal ration in a 4 × 4 Latin square design. Each experimental period lasted 15 days, of which the first 12 days were for pre-treatment and the last 3 days were for sampling. The results showed that supplementing CeCl3 at 160 or 240 mg/kg DM increased neutral detergent fibre (NDF) digestibility (p < 0.05) and tended to increased acid detergent fibre (ADF) digestibility (p = 0.083). Supplementing CeCl3 at 80, 160 or 240 mg/kg DM decreased the molar ratio of rumen acetate to propionate linearly (p < 0.05). Supplementing CeCl3 at 160 or 240 mg/kg DM decreased total N excretion, urinary N excretion and increased N retention (p < 0.05), increased excretion of total urinary purine derivatives (PD) (p < 0.05) and decreased CH4 /kg DMI (p < 0.05). In conclusion, supplementing CeCl3 at 160 or 240 mg/kg DM in the ration of beef cattle increased the digestibility of NDF, decreased the molar ratio of rumen acetate to propionate, increased N retention and microbial N flow and decreased CH4 /kg DMI. PMID:25787979

  18. Stability and properties of liquid CO2 at high pressure and high temperature: Implications for electrical conductivities in Earth's lower mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min; Tse, John S.; Pan, Yuanming

    2015-07-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2), one of the most important planetary materials, has been the subject of extensive experimental and theoretical studies. However, the stabilities and properties of CO2 at high pressures and temperatures relevant to Earth's mantle and core remain controversial. We have studied the molten structures of CO2-V with first-principles molecular dynamic calculations at 60 GPa and different temperatures. The formation of oxygen molecules in the melt is consistent with experimental observations. In particular, the melting transition is accompanying by metallization. The metallic behavior is shown to originate from electron delocalization between oxygen via the overlap of the ? orbitals from the dissociated oxygen-rich species. Metallic molten CO2 is a potential candidate to explain the high conductivities of the Earth's lower mantle. Furthermore, theoretical results do not support the existence of the proposed ionic solid phase of CO2 at high temperature and high pressure.

  19. Separation of rare earth, nuclear-fuel burn-up monitors in the 10-9 mole range by high-pressure liquid chromatography with UV-detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anion-exchange chromatography of the rare earth (Sm, Nd, Pr, Ce) ions in methanol-nitric acid-water media is performed using high-pressure liquid chromatography. The separation method is especially designed for determination of 148Nd in nuclear fuel cycle in order to find precise burn-up values. While commonly used for rare earth separation at low pressure and hence low flow rate, this separation system has not been described using HPLC. The samples injected on the column contain typically 10 nmole of the nitrates of Sm, Nd, Pr and Ce. Furthermore, some experiments with a large excess of uranyl nitrate were carried out in order to simulate the conditions in solutions of irradiated nuclear fuel. After equilibration of the column to the desired elution composition, 20-25x?l of sample was injected. The sample concentration was typically 4x10-4 M for the ions of Sm, Pr, Nd and Ce. In the separations with added uranyl nitrate, the uranium concentrations were varied 1-125 times the concentrations of the individual rare earths. By adjusting the pressure between 300 and 600 psi, the flow rate was kept in the range 0.5-1.0 cm3/min. As no changes in the separation were observed as a result of this variation, 1.0 cm3/min was used throughout. The high-pressure liquid chromatography method presented here is very fast, gives high resolutions, and enables collection of selected fractions containing nmoles of rare earth by UV monitoring at 280 nm of the eluate. (T.G.)

  20. Multiband observations of Cygnus A: A study of pressure balance in the core of a powerful radio galaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cygnus A is a powerful double radio source associated with a giant elliptical galaxy at the center of a poor cluster of galaxies. The radio source also sits within the core radius of a dense, cooling flow, x ray emitting cluster gas. Optical spectroscopy and narrow band imaging have revealed copious amounts of narrow line emission from the inner 20 kpc of the associated galaxy. Researchers assume H sub o = 75 km sec (-1) Mpc(-1). Discussed here are the pressures in the three components of the Interstellar Medium (ISM) (i.e., the radio, x ray, and line emitting fluids) within a radius of about 15 kpc of the active nucleus of the Cygnus A galaxy

  1. Immobilization-induced increases of systolic blood pressure and dysregulation of electrolyte balance in ethanol-treated rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin, Farzana; Haque, Zeba; Ikram, Huma; Haleem, Darakhshan Jabeen

    2015-07-01

    Clinical and experimental studies revealed that alcohol drinking and life event stresses are predisposing factors to hypertension. Intra and extra cellular levels of electrolytes may play important role in the pathogenesis and treatment of hypertension. Dietary intake of sodium, potassium, calcium and magnesium is suggested to have a role in the regulation of blood pressure. The present study was designed to monitor the effects of acute exposure to 2h immobilization stress and ethanol administration at a dose of 2.5g/kg body weight (i.p.) and combined effect of acute administration of ethanol and immobilization stress on systolic blood pressure (SBP), intraerythrocyte, serum and tissue electrolytes in rats. Results showed that acute exposure to 2h immobilization increased SBP, intraerythrocyte sodium and decreased intraerythrocyte potassium in water as well as in ethanol injected rats. The concentration of Na(+) and Ca(2+) increased while that of K(+) and Mg(2+) decreased in the heart and kidney tissue. Ethanol administration also increased Na(+) and Ca(2+)levelsand decreased K(+) and Mg(2+) levels in the heart and kidney tissue. Restraint stress decreased serum levels of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), P, and Cl(-) and increased serum Mg(2+), glucose and haematocrit. Ethanol administration also decreased serum levels of Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), P, and Cl(-) and increased serum Mg(2+), glucose and haematocrit. The effects of ethanol and stress on the changes of blood and tissues electrolytes were additive and may be involved in the greater occurrence of hypertension in alcoholics. Our results suggested an important role of intra and extra cellular electrolytes in both stress and ethanol-induced hypertension. The findings may help to develop strategies for the treatment of hypertension in alcoholics. PMID:26142527

  2. SPES-2, AP600 intergral system test S01007 2 inch CL to core make-up tank pressure balance line break

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SPES-2 is a full height, full pressure experimental test facility reproducing the Westinghouse AP600 reactor with a scaling factor of 1/395. The experimental plant, designed and operated by SIET in Piacenza, consists of a full simulation of the AP600 primary core cooling system including all the passive and active safety systems. In 1992, Westinghouse, in cooperation with ENEL (Ente Nazionale per l' Energia Elettrica), ENEA (Enter per le numove Technlogie, l' Energia e l' Ambient), Siet (Societa Informazioni Esperienze Termoidraulich) and ANSALDO developed an experimental program to test the integrated behaviour of the AP600 passive safety systems. The SPES-2 test matrix, concluded in November 1994, has examined the AP600 passive safety system response for a range of small break LOCAs at different locations on the primary system and on the passive system lines; single steam generator tube ruptures with passive and active safety systems and a main steam line break transient to demonstrate the boration capability of passive safety systems for rapid cooldown. Each of the tests has provided detailed experimental results for verification of the capability of the analysis methods to predict the integrated passive safety system behaviour. Cold and hot shakedown tests have been performed on the facility to check the characteristics of the plant before starting the experimental campaign. The paper first presents a description of the SPES-2 test facility then the main results of S01007 test open-quotes 2close quotes Cold Leg (CL) to Core Make-up Tank (CMT) pressure balance line breakclose quotes are reported and compared with predictions performed using RELAP5/mod3/80 obtained by ANSALDO through agreement with U.S.N.R.C. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission). The SPES-2 nodalization and all the calculations here presented were performed by ANSALDO and sponsored by ENEL as a part of pre-test predictions for SPES-2

  3. SPES-2, AP600 intergral system test S01007 2 inch CL to core make-up tank pressure balance line break

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacchiani, M.; Medich, C.; Rigamonti, M. [SIET S.p.A. Piacenza (Italy)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    The SPES-2 is a full height, full pressure experimental test facility reproducing the Westinghouse AP600 reactor with a scaling factor of 1/395. The experimental plant, designed and operated by SIET in Piacenza, consists of a full simulation of the AP600 primary core cooling system including all the passive and active safety systems. In 1992, Westinghouse, in cooperation with ENEL (Ente Nazionale per l` Energia Elettrica), ENEA (Enter per le numove Technlogie, l` Energia e l` Ambient), Siet (Societa Informazioni Esperienze Termoidraulich) and ANSALDO developed an experimental program to test the integrated behaviour of the AP600 passive safety systems. The SPES-2 test matrix, concluded in November 1994, has examined the AP600 passive safety system response for a range of small break LOCAs at different locations on the primary system and on the passive system lines; single steam generator tube ruptures with passive and active safety systems and a main steam line break transient to demonstrate the boration capability of passive safety systems for rapid cooldown. Each of the tests has provided detailed experimental results for verification of the capability of the analysis methods to predict the integrated passive safety system behaviour. Cold and hot shakedown tests have been performed on the facility to check the characteristics of the plant before starting the experimental campaign. The paper first presents a description of the SPES-2 test facility then the main results of S01007 test {open_quotes}2{close_quotes} Cold Leg (CL) to Core Make-up Tank (CMT) pressure balance line break{close_quotes} are reported and compared with predictions performed using RELAP5/mod3/80 obtained by ANSALDO through agreement with U.S.N.R.C. (U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission). The SPES-2 nodalization and all the calculations here presented were performed by ANSALDO and sponsored by ENEL as a part of pre-test predictions for SPES-2.

  4. 3-D force-balanced magnetospheric configurations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zaharia

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The knowledge of plasma pressure is essential for many physics applications in the magnetosphere, such as computing magnetospheric currents and deriving mag-netosphere-ionosphere coupling. A thorough knowledge of the 3-D pressure distribution has, however, eluded the community, as most in situ pressure observations are either in the ionosphere or the equatorial region of the magnetosphere. With the assumption of pressure isotropy there have been attempts to obtain the pressure at different locations,by either (a mapping observed data (e.g. in the ionosphere along the field lines of an empirical magnetospheric field model, or (b computing a pressure profile in the equatorial plane (in 2-D or along the Sun-Earth axis (in 1-D that is in force balance with the magnetic stresses of an empirical model. However, the pressure distributions obtained through these methods are not in force balance with the empirical magnetic field at all locations. In order to find a global 3-D plasma pressure distribution in force balance with the magnetospheric magnetic field, we have developed the MAG-3-D code that solves the 3-D force balance equation ${vec J} times {vec B} = nabla P$ computationally. Our calculation is performed in a flux coordinate system in which the magnetic field is expressed in terms of Euler potentials as ${vec B} = nabla psi times nabla alpha$. The pressure distribution, $P = P(psi, alpha$, is prescribed in the equatorial plane and is based on satellite measurements. In addition, computational boundary conditions for ? surfaces are imposed using empirical field models. Our results provide 3-D distributions of magnetic field, plasma pressure, as well as parallel and transverse currents for both quiet-time and disturbed magnetospheric conditions.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (magnetospheric configuration and dynamics; magnetotail; plasma sheet

  5. Postural balance in low back pain patients : criterion-related validity of centre of pressure assessed on a portable force platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maribo, Thomas; SchiØttz-Christensen, Berit

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Altered postural control has been observed in low back pain (LBP) patients. They seem to be more dependent on vision when standing. The objective of the study was to determine concurrent and predictive validity of measures of postural stability in LBP patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Centre of Pressure (CoP) measurements were tested against pain, fear of pain, and physical function. Velocity, anterior-posterior displacement, and the Romberg Ratio obtained on a portable force platform were used as measures of postural stability. RESULTS: Baseline and 12-week follow-up results of 97 LBP patients were evaluated. The correlations between CoP measurements and pain, fear of pain, and physical function were poor. There were no significant differences in CoP measurements between patients with no change or deterioration and patients with improvement in pain and back-specific function. CONCLUSION: This first study of concurrent and predictive validity of postural balance in LBP patients revealed no association between CoP measures and pain, fear of pain, and physical function.

  6. Russia - Nato. The military balance

    OpenAIRE

    Daugaard, Søren Bech; Jacobsen, Karen Vestergård; Aigro, Signe; Skarequist, Anne

    2010-01-01

    This project aims to explain how the military balancing of Russia against NATO can be explained from a neoclassical realist framework. The project consists in three analytical parts of respectively, 1: The military capabilities balance between NATO and Russia; 2: How the international system puts pressure on Russia; and 3: How the strategic culture of Russia can explain its balancing.

  7. Análise da pressão plantar e do equilíbrio postural em diferentes fases da gestação / Analysis of plantar pressure and postural balance during different phases of pregnancy

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    SI, Ribas; ECO, Guirro.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a pressão plantar e o equilíbrio postural nos três trimestres de gravidez, bem como a correlação com as características antropométricas. METODOLOGIA: 60 voluntárias com idade média de 23,3 ± 5,5 anos, sendo 15 mulheres em cada grupo: não-gestantes (C), primeiro (1T), segundo (2T) [...] e terceiro trimestre (3T). A avaliação foi efetuada por meio de plataforma de pressão na posição bipodal com os olhos abertos. As variáveis analisadas nos pés direito e esquerdo foram: pico de pressão em todo o pé (PT), no antepé (PA) e no retropé (PR); distância entre a borda medial dos pés (largura da base de suporte); distância do centro de força ao limite anterior (CFF) e posterior (CFC) dos pés; deslocamento ântero-posterior (AP) e médio--lateral (ML) do centro de força; e área de contato (AC). RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença no pico de pressão de contato e na distância CFF e CFC entre os grupos. O deslocamento AP foi maior (p 0,05) entre os grupos para o deslocamento ML. Houve correlação positiva entre peso ganho durante a gestação com AC para o grupo 2T e com PT no pé direito do grupo 1T. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados demonstram a influência das mudanças anatômicas e fisiológicas inerentes à gestação na pressão plantar, além de sugerir uma redução do equilíbrio postural no 3T, relacionada ao maior deslocamento AP nessa fase. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: To analyze plantar pressure and postural balance during the three trimesters of pregnancy, and also to correlate these with anthropometric characteristics. METHOD: Sixty volunteers participated in this study, with a mean age of 23.3 ± 5.5 years. There were 15 subjects in each group: non-p [...] regnant (C), first trimester (1T), second trimester (2T) and third trimester (3T). Evaluations were performed in bipedal stance with open eyes, using a pressure platform. The following variables were analyzed in the right and left feet: peak pressures in the whole foot (WFP), forefoot (FFP) and hindfoot (HFP); distance between the medial borders of the foot (width of support base); the distance from the center of force to the anterior (COF-A) and posterior (COF-P) limits of the foot; anteroposterior (AP) and mediolateral (ML) COF displacements; and the contact area (CA). RESULTS: There were no differences in peak contact pressures and COF-A and COF-P distances between the groups. The AP displacement was greater (p 0.05) between the groups regarding ML displacement. There was a positive correlation between weight gained during pregnancy and CA for the 2T group, and between weight gain and WFP in the right feet in the 1T group. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate the influence of the anatomical and physiological changes inherent to pregnancy on plantar pressure. They also suggest that postural equilibrium decreases in the third trimester, associated with greater AP displacement during this phase.

  8. Análise da pressão plantar e do equilíbrio postural em diferentes fases da gestação Analysis of plantar pressure and postural balance during different phases of pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SI Ribas

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar a pressão plantar e o equilíbrio postural nos três trimestres de gravidez, bem como a correlação com as características antropométricas. METODOLOGIA: 60 voluntárias com idade média de 23,3 ± 5,5 anos, sendo 15 mulheres em cada grupo: não-gestantes (C, primeiro (1T, segundo (2T e terceiro trimestre (3T. A avaliação foi efetuada por meio de plataforma de pressão na posição bipodal com os olhos abertos. As variáveis analisadas nos pés direito e esquerdo foram: pico de pressão em todo o pé (PT, no antepé (PA e no retropé (PR; distância entre a borda medial dos pés (largura da base de suporte; distância do centro de força ao limite anterior (CFF e posterior (CFC dos pés; deslocamento ântero-posterior (AP e médio--lateral (ML do centro de força; e área de contato (AC. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença no pico de pressão de contato e na distância CFF e CFC entre os grupos. O deslocamento AP foi maior (p 0,05 entre os grupos para o deslocamento ML. Houve correlação positiva entre peso ganho durante a gestação com AC para o grupo 2T e com PT no pé direito do grupo 1T. CONCLUSÃO: Os resultados demonstram a influência das mudanças anatômicas e fisiológicas inerentes à gestação na pressão plantar, além de sugerir uma redução do equilíbrio postural no 3T, relacionada ao maior deslocamento AP nessa fase.OBJECTIVE: To analyze plantar pressure and postural balance during the three trimesters of pregnancy, and also to correlate these with anthropometric characteristics. METHOD: Sixty volunteers participated in this study, with a mean age of 23.3 ± 5.5 years. There were 15 subjects in each group: non-pregnant (C, first trimester (1T, second trimester (2T and third trimester (3T. Evaluations were performed in bipedal stance with open eyes, using a pressure platform. The following variables were analyzed in the right and left feet: peak pressures in the whole foot (WFP, forefoot (FFP and hindfoot (HFP; distance between the medial borders of the foot (width of support base; the distance from the center of force to the anterior (COF-A and posterior (COF-P limits of the foot; anteroposterior (AP and mediolateral (ML COF displacements; and the contact area (CA. RESULTS: There were no differences in peak contact pressures and COF-A and COF-P distances between the groups. The AP displacement was greater (p 0.05 between the groups regarding ML displacement. There was a positive correlation between weight gained during pregnancy and CA for the 2T group, and between weight gain and WFP in the right feet in the 1T group. CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate the influence of the anatomical and physiological changes inherent to pregnancy on plantar pressure. They also suggest that postural equilibrium decreases in the third trimester, associated with greater AP displacement during this phase.

  9. Giant spin-driven ferroelectric polarization and magnetoelectric effect in perovskite rare-earth maganites under high pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Tsuyoshi

    2015-03-01

    The discovery of ferroelectricity in TbMnO3 triggered extensive studies on a type of multiferroics, ``spin-driven ferroelectrics.'' Unlike conventional ferroelectrics such as BaTiO3, spin-driven ferroelectrics exhibit remarkable magnetoelectric (ME) effects. However, the ferroelectric polarization P in spin-driven ferroelectrics ever reported (multiferroics. In this study, we utilized the ``high-pressure'' to attain a magnetically-controllable spin-driven P with its magnitude being comparable to that in conventional ferroelectrics [T. Aoyama et al., Nature Commun. 5, 4927 (2014)]. With a home-made high-pressure measurement system with a diamond anvil cell, we investigated high-pressure effects on ME properties of perovskite RMnO3 (R = Gd, Tb, and Dy). Our study revealed that these manganites exhibit a pressure-induced ME phase transition and that the high-pressure phase shows the largest P (e.g., 1 ?C/cm2 in TbMnO3) among spin-driven ferroelectrics ever reported. Moreover, P is further enhanced by applying a magnetic field. Our study demonstrates that it is possible to attain giant spin-driven ferroelectric polarization which comes close to that in conventional ferroelectrics, and to control it magnetically.

  10. Structural, electronic, elastic and high-pressure properties of some alkaline-earth chalcogenides: An ab initio study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method (FP-LAPW) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) is used to calculate the electronic band structures and the total energies of BaS, CaSe and CaTe in NaCl and CsCl-type structures. The latter provide us with the ground states properties such as lattice parameter, bulk modulus and its pressure derivative, elastic constants and the structural phase stability of these compounds. The transition pressures at which these compounds undergo the structural phase transition from NaCl to CsCl phase are calculated. The energy band gaps and their volume dependence in NaCl and CsCl type-structures are investigated. The pressure and the volume at which band overlap metallization occurs are also determined. The ground state properties, the transition and metallization pressures (volumes) are found to agree with the experimental and other theoretical results. The elastic constants at equilibrium in both NaCl and CsCl structures are calculated and compared with the available theoretical results for CaSe, while for BaS and CaTe the elastic constants are not available

  11. Structural, electronic, elastic and high-pressure properties of some alkaline-earth chalcogenides: An ab initio study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khenata, R. [Applied Materials Laboratory (AML), Electronics Department, University of Sidi-Bel-Abbes, 22 000 (Algeria) and Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et de Modelisation Mathematique de la Matiere (LPQ3 M), Departement de Technologie, Universite de Mascara, 29 000 (Algeria)]. E-mail: khenata_rabah@yahoo.fr; Sahnoun, M. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et de Modelisation Mathematique de la Matiere (LPQ3 M), Departement de Technologie, Universite de Mascara, 29 000 (Algeria)]. E-mail: mohammed.sahnoun@unifr.ch; Baltache, H. [Laboratoire de Physique Quantique et de Modelisation Mathematique de la Matiere (LPQ3 M), Departement de Technologie, Universite de Mascara, 29 000 (Algeria); Rerat, M. [Laboratoire de Chimie Structurale UMR 5624, I.F.R rue Jules Ferry, Universite de Pau, 64 000 (France); Rached, D. [Applied Materials Laboratory (AML), Electronics Department, University of Sidi-Bel-Abbes, 22 000 (Algeria); Driz, M. [Applied Materials Laboratory (AML), Electronics Department, University of Sidi-Bel-Abbes, 22 000 (Algeria); Bouhafs, B. [Modeling and simulation in Material Science Laboratory, Physics Department, University of Sidi-Bel-Abbes, 22 000 (Algeria)

    2006-01-15

    The full-potential linearized augmented plane wave method (FP-LAPW) within the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) is used to calculate the electronic band structures and the total energies of BaS, CaSe and CaTe in NaCl and CsCl-type structures. The latter provide us with the ground states properties such as lattice parameter, bulk modulus and its pressure derivative, elastic constants and the structural phase stability of these compounds. The transition pressures at which these compounds undergo the structural phase transition from NaCl to CsCl phase are calculated. The energy band gaps and their volume dependence in NaCl and CsCl type-structures are investigated. The pressure and the volume at which band overlap metallization occurs are also determined. The ground state properties, the transition and metallization pressures (volumes) are found to agree with the experimental and other theoretical results. The elastic constants at equilibrium in both NaCl and CsCl structures are calculated and compared with the available theoretical results for CaSe, while for BaS and CaTe the elastic constants are not available.

  12. The effect of compression on Individual Pressure Vessel Nickel/Hydrogen components. [for energy storage in low earth orbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Michelle A.; Perez-Davis, Marla E.

    1988-01-01

    Compression tests were performed on representative Individual Pressure Vessel (IPV) Nickel/Hydrogen cell components in an effort to better understand the effects of force on component compression and the interactions of components under compression. It appears that the separator is the most easily compressed of all of the stack components. It will typically partially compress before any of the other components begin to compress. The compression characteristics of the cell components in assembly differed considerably from what would be predicted based on individual compression characteristics. Component interactions played a significant role in the stack response to compression. The results of the compression tests were factored into the design and selection of Belleville washers added to the cell stack to accommodate nickel electrode expansion while keeping the pressure on the stack within a reasonable range of the original preset.

  13. Blood pressure, magnesium and other mineral balance in two rat models of salt-sensitive, induced hypertension: effects of a non-peptide angiotensin II receptor type 1 antagonist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rondón, Lusliany Josefina; Marcano, Eunice; Rodríguez, Fátima; del Castillo, Jesús Rafael

    2014-01-01

    The renin-angiotensin system is critically involved in regulating arterial blood pressure (BP). Inappropriate angiotensin type-1 receptor activation by angiotensin-II (Ang-II) is related to increased arterial BP. Mg has a role in BP; it can affect cardiac electrical activity, myocardial contractility, and vascular tone. To evaluate the relationship between high BP induced by a high sodium (Na) diet and Mg, and other mineral balances, two experimental rat models of salt-sensitive, induced-hypertension were used: Ang-II infused and Dahl salt-sensitive (SS) rats. We found that: 1) Ang-II infusion progressively increased BP, which was accompanied by hypomagnesuria and signs of secondary hyperaldosteronism; 2) an additive effect between Ang-II and a high Na load may have an effect on strontium (Sr), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) balances; 3) Dahl SS rats fed a high Na diet had a slow pressor response, accompanied by altered Mg, Na, potassium (K), and phosphate (P) balances; and 4) losartan prevented BP increases induced by Ang II-NaCl, but did not modify mineral balances. In Dahl SS rats, losartan attenuated high BP and ameliorated magnesemia, Na and K balances. Mg metabolism maybe considered a possible defect in this strain of rat that may contribute to hypertension. PMID:25560239

  14. Tunnel construction work under high earth pressure and springwater flouing condition. Construction details of a pioneer drift for Hida tunnel, Tokai-Hokuriku expressway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tunnels such as those planned for the International Linear Collider (ILC) Project are long and narrow structures under the ground. In the construction of these tunnels, various circumstances sometimes restrict the initial surveys from obtaining detailed geological information. In Japan, complicated geological structure composed of discontinuous plate tectonics can be found. Therefore, in order to ensure effective construction planning and execution, it is important that precise geological information be acquired through initial survey and then verified with investigation results during the construction. Hida Tunnel of Tokai Hokuriku Expressway, which is 10.7 km long and took more than 11 years to finish, is the second longest highway tunnel in Japan. The tunnel was constructed using the TBM method in the beginning. Later the method was replaced with NATM because of hostile construction conditions, which include existences of springwater and massive earth pressure due to more than 1000 m of earth loading on top, as well as weak zones consisted of active faults. This paper reports on the geological structure and construction details of a pioneer drift for Hida Tunnel, which was completed by overcoming complicated and poor geological conditions. At the same time, we will mention the ideal method of the geological survey in future ILC plan. (author)

  15. Quantifying the role of fire in the Earth system - Part 2: Impact on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, F.; Bond-Lamberty, B.; Levis, S.

    2014-03-01

    Fire is the primary form of terrestrial ecosystem disturbance on a global scale. It affects the net carbon balance of terrestrial ecosystems by emitting carbon directly and immediately into the atmosphere from biomass burning (the fire direct effect), and by changing net ecosystem productivity and land-use carbon loss in post-fire regions due to biomass burning and fire-induced vegetation mortality (the fire indirect effect). Here, we provide the first quantitative assessment of the impact of fire on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems during the 20th century, and investigate the roles of fire's direct and indirect effects. This is done by quantifying the difference between the 20th century fire-on and fire-off simulations with the NCAR Community Land Model CLM4.5 (prescribed vegetation cover and uncoupled from the atmospheric model) as a model platform. Results show that fire decreases the net carbon gain of global terrestrial ecosystems by 1.0 Pg C yr-1 averaged across the 20th century, as a result of the fire direct effect (1.9 Pg C yr-1) partly offset by the indirect effect (-0.9 Pg C yr-1). Post-fire regions generally experience decreased carbon gains, which is significant over tropical savannas and some North American and East Asian forests. This decrease is due to the direct effect usually exceeding the indirect effect, while they have similar spatial patterns and opposite sign. The effect of fire on the net carbon balance significantly declines until ?1970 with a trend of 8 Tg C yr-1 due to an increasing indirect effect, and increases subsequently with a trend of 18 Tg C yr-1 due to an increasing direct effect. These results help constrain the global-scale dynamics of fire and the terrestrial carbon cycle.

  16. Quantifying the role of fire in the Earth system - Part 2: Impact on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Fang; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Levis, Samuel

    2014-03-07

    Fire is the primary terrestrial ecosystem disturbance agent on a global scale. It affects carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems by emitting carbon to atmosphere directly and immediately from biomass burning (i.e., fire direct effect), and by changing net ecosystem productivity and land-use carbon loss in post-fire regions due to biomass burning and fire-induced vegetation mortality (i.e., fire indirect effect). Here, we provide the first quantitative assessment about the impact of fire on the net carbon balance of global terrestrial ecosystems for the 20th century, and investigate the roles of fire direct and indirect effects. This study is done by quantifying the difference between the 20th century fire-on and fire-off simulations with NCAR community land model CLM4.5 as the model platform. Results show that fire decreases net carbon gain of the global terrestrial ecosystems by 1.0 Pg C yr-1 average across the 20th century, as a results of fire direct effect (1.9 Pg C yr-1) partly offset by indirect effect (-0.9 Pg C yr-1). Fire generally decreases the average carbon gains of terrestrial ecosystems in post-fire regions, which are significant over tropical savannas and part of forests in North America and the east of Asia. The general decrease of carbon gains in post-fire regions is because fire direct and indirect effects have similar spatial patterns and the former (to decrease carbon gain) is generally stronger. Moreover, the effect of fire on net carbon balance significantly declines prior to ~1970 with trend of 8 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire indirect effect and increases afterward with trend of 18 Tg C yr-1 due to increasing fire direct effect.

  17. Indoor seismology by probing the Earth's interior by using sound velocity measurements at high pressures and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The adiabatic bulk (K S) and shear (G) moduli of mantle materials at high pressure and temperature can be obtained directly by measuring compressional and shear wave velocities in the laboratory with experimental techniques based on physical acoustics. We present the application of the current state-of-the-art experimental techniques by using ultrasonic interferometry in conjunction with synchrotron x radiation to study the elasticity of olivine and pyroxenes and their high-pressure phases. By using these updated thermoelasticity data for these phases, velocity and density profiles for a pyrolite model are constructed and compared with radial seismic models. We conclude that pyrolite provides an adequate explanation of the major seismic discontinuities at 410- and 660-km depths, the gradient in the transition zone, as well as the velocities in the lower mantle, if the uncertainties in the modeling and the variations in different seismic models are considered. The characteristics of the seismic scaling factors in response to thermal anomalies suggest that anticorrelations between bulk sound and shear wave velocities, as well as the large positive density anomalies observed in the lower mantle, cannot be explained fully without invoking chemical variations

  18. Formation and evolution of high-plasma-pressure region in the near-Earth plasma sheet: Precursor and postcursor of substorm expansion onset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Y.; Ebihara, Y.; Tanaka, T.

    2015-08-01

    Cause of substorm expansion onset is one of the major problems in the magnetospheric study. On the basis of a global magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulation, Tanaka et al. (2010) suggested that formation and evolution of a high-pressure region (HPR) in the near-Earth plasma sheet could result in sudden intensification of the Region 1 field-aligned current and the westward auroral electrojet. In this sense, the formation and evolution of the HPR are a key in understanding the cause of the onset. On 5 April 2009, three probes of the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) were located at XGSM~-11 Re around the equator, which provide unique opportunity to investigate the spatial-temporal evolution of the HPR near the substorm expansion onset. Just before the onset, a positive excursion of the plasma pressure appeared at the outermost probe first, followed by the inner ones. Just after the onset, the opposite sequence took place. A positive excursion of the Y component of the current density was observed near the onset by the THEMIS probes and followed by a decrease trend. A similar variation was also found in the MHD simulation. All these features are consistent with the simulation result that a squeeze of the plasma from the plasma sheet results in the formation of the HPR before the onset and that the accumulated plasma spreads outward after the onset. The HPR is shown to be important for the dynamics of the magnetosphere during a substorm.

  19. Fault-related-folding structure and reflection seismic sections. Construction of earth model using balanced cross section; Danso ga kaizaisuru shukyoku kozo no keitai to jishin tansa danmen. 1. Balanced cross section wo mochiita chika model no kochiku

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuoka, T.; Tamagawa, T. [Japan Petroleum Exploration Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Tsukui, R. [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Technology Research Center

    1997-05-27

    Pre-stacking depth migration treatment is studied for the estimation of the fold configuration from seismic survey cross sections. The estimation of a velocity structure is necessary for the execution of such treatment, and the utilization of structural-geological knowledge is required for its interpretation. The concept of balanced cross section in relation to the fault-bend fold constructs a stratum structure model under conditions that the deformation during fold and fault formation is a planar strain, that there is no change in volume due to deformation, and that a fold is a parallel fold. In addition to the above geometric and kinetic approach, there is another fold formation process simulation model using a Newtonian fluid for study from the viewpoint of dynamics. This simulation stands on the presumption that the boundary contains a ramp that had been in presence before fold formation and that an incompressible viscous matter is mounted on the top surface. The viscous matter flows and deforms for the formation of an anticline on the ramp. Such enables the reproduction of a fault-bend fold formation process, and helpful discussion may be furthered on the dynamic aspect of this simulation. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Microstructual investigation of mixed rar earth iron boron processed vis melt-spinning and high-pressure gas-atomization for isotrophic bonded permanent magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buelow, Nicholas Lee

    2005-08-01

    A solid solution of three rare earths (RE) in the RE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B structure have been combined to create the novel mixed rare earth iron boron (MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B) alloy family. MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B exhibits reduced temperature dependent magnetic properties; remanence and coercivity. The desired form of MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B is a powder that can be blended with a polymer binder and compression or injection molded to form an isotropic polymer bonded permanent magnet (PBM). Commercially, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B is the alloy of choice for PBMs. Powders of Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B are made via melt-spinning as can be MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B which allows for direct comparisons. MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B made using melt-spinning at high wheel speeds is overquenched and must be annealed to an optimal hard magnetic state. Due to the rare earth content in the MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B powders, they must be protected from the environment in which they operate. This protection is accomplished by using a modified fluidized bed process to grow a protective fluoride coating nominally 15nm thick, to reduce air oxidation. MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B has demonstrated reduced temperature dependent magnetic properties in ribbon and PBM form. The real challenge has been modifying alloy designs that were successfully melt-spun to be compatible with high-pressure gas-atomization (HPGA). The cooling rates in HPGA are lower than melt-spinning, as the powders are quenched via convective cooling, compared to melt-spinning, which quenches initially by conductive cooling. Early alloy designs, in gas atomized and melt-spun form, did not have similar phase compositions or microstructures. Alloy additions, such as the addition of zirconium as a nucleation catalyst, were successful in creating similar phases and microstructures in the HPGA powders and melt-spun ribbon of the same MRE{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B composition.

  1. Balancing Work and Family: A Panel Analysis of the Impact of Part-Time Work on the Experience of Time Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurijssen, Ilse; Glorieux, Ignace

    2013-01-01

    In this article we consider the consequences of work-family reconciliation, in terms of the extent to which the adjustment of the labour market career to family demands (by women) contributes to a better work-life balance. Using the Flemish SONAR-data, we analyse how changes in work and family conditions between the age of 26 and 29 are related to…

  2. High-pressure synthesis and characterization of the rare-earth fluoride borate LaB{sub 2}O{sub 4}F

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinteregger, Ernst; Kocsis, Krisztina; Hofer, Thomas S.; Heymann, Gunter; Huppertz, Hubert [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie; Perfler, Lukas [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Mineralogie und Petrographie

    2013-09-15

    The rare-earth fluoride borate LaB{sub 2}O{sub 4}F was synthesized under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions of 1.1 GPa and 1300 C in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus from lanthanum oxide, lanthanum fluoride, and boron oxide. The single-crystal structure determination revealed that LaB{sub 2}O{sub 4}F is isotypic to CeB{sub 2}O{sub 4}F. The compound crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca (no. 61) with eight formula units and the lattice parameters a = 8.2493(9), b = 12.6464(6), c = 7.3301(5) A, V = 764.7(2) A{sup 3}, R{sub 1} = 0.0354, and wR{sub 2} = 0.0474 (all data). The structure exhibits a 9+1 coordinated lanthanum cation, one threefold coordinated fluoride ion and a chain of corner-sharing [BO{sub 3}]{sup 3-} groups. In addition to the IR- and Raman-spectroscopic investigations, DFT calculations were performed to support the assignment of the vibrational bands. (orig.)

  3. Intra-session test-retest reliability of magnitude and structure of center of pressure from the Nintendo Wii Balance Board™ for a visually impaired and normally sighted population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeter, Pamela E; Wang, Jiangxia; Gu, Jialiang; Barry, Michael P; Roach, Crystal; Corson, Marilyn; Yang, Lindsay; Dagnelie, Gislin

    2015-02-01

    Individuals with visual impairment (VI) have irreparable damage to one of the input streams contributing to postural stability. Here, we evaluated the intra-session test-retest reliability of the Wii Balance Board (WBB) for measuring Center of Pressure (COP) magnitude and structure, i.e. approximate entropy (ApEn) in fourteen legally blind participants and 21 participants with corrected-to-normal vision. Participants completed a validated balance protocol which included four sensory conditions: double-leg standing on a firm surface with eyes open (EO-firm); a firm surface with eyes closed (EC-firm); a foam surface with EO (EO-foam); and a foam surface with EC (EC-foam). Participants performed the full balance protocol twice during the session, separated by a period of 15min, to determine the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). Absolute reliability was determined by the standard error of measurement (SEM). The minimal difference (MD) was estimated to determine clinical significance for future studies. COP measures were derived from data sent by the WBB to a laptop via Bluetooth. COP scores increased with the difficulty of sensory condition indicating WBB sensitivity (all p<0.01). ICCs in the VI group ranged from 0.73 to 0.95, indicating high to very high correlations, and the normal group showed moderate to very high ICCs (0.62-0.94). The SEM was comparable between groups regardless of between-subject variability. The reliability of the WBB makes it practical to screen for balance impairment among VI persons. PMID:25555361

  4. Microstructure and property evaluation of high-pressure die-cast Mg–La–rare earth (Nd, Y or Gd) alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gavras, Serge, E-mail: serge.gavras@monash.edu [CAST CRC, Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Easton, Mark A. [CAST CRC, Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Gibson, Mark A. [CAST CRC, CSIRO Process Science and Engineering, Clayton South 3168 (Australia); Zhu, Suming; Nie, Jian-Feng [CAST CRC, Department of Materials Engineering, Monash University, Victoria 3800 (Australia)

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • Different rare earth elements have remarkably different effects on Mg castability. • For the addition of each RE element, the alloy castability follows a unique pattern. • The effects of RE elements on the castability can be modelled. - Abstract: Microstructure, castability and tensile properties were investigated in high-pressure die-cast Mg–La–Nd, Mg–La–Y and Mg–La–Gd alloy series, with a constant La concentration at approximately 2.5 wt.% and the concentrations of Nd, Y or Gd were varied. All three alloy series had a dendritic microstructure with a Mg–La-rich eutectic with increasing Nd, Y or Gd content and containing a Mg{sub 12}RE intermetallic phase. The morphology of the eutectic at ternary alloying additions of equal to or less than 1.0 wt.% was lamellar but became increasingly divorced at higher ternary concentrations. This was however more obvious in Mg–La–Y and Mg–La–Gd than Mg–La–Nd alloys. The hot tearing susceptibility in all three alloy series increased markedly with even micro-alloying additions of Nd, Y or Gd, and began to decrease again in alloys with more than 0.5 wt.% Y or 1.0 wt.% Gd, but did not decrease significantly for Mg–La–Nd. A model using the temperature–fraction solid curves as input parameters was used to estimate hot tearing susceptibility for Mg–La–Nd alloys. Tensile testing at room temperature showed that Mg–La–Nd alloy series had higher 0.2% proof stress and lower elongation to failure than either the Mg–La–Y or the Mg–La–Gd alloy series for Nd concentrations greater than 1 wt.% due to a greater effectiveness of grain boundary reinforcement.

  5. Microstructure and property evaluation of high-pressure die-cast Mg–La–rare earth (Nd, Y or Gd) alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Different rare earth elements have remarkably different effects on Mg castability. • For the addition of each RE element, the alloy castability follows a unique pattern. • The effects of RE elements on the castability can be modelled. - Abstract: Microstructure, castability and tensile properties were investigated in high-pressure die-cast Mg–La–Nd, Mg–La–Y and Mg–La–Gd alloy series, with a constant La concentration at approximately 2.5 wt.% and the concentrations of Nd, Y or Gd were varied. All three alloy series had a dendritic microstructure with a Mg–La-rich eutectic with increasing Nd, Y or Gd content and containing a Mg12RE intermetallic phase. The morphology of the eutectic at ternary alloying additions of equal to or less than 1.0 wt.% was lamellar but became increasingly divorced at higher ternary concentrations. This was however more obvious in Mg–La–Y and Mg–La–Gd than Mg–La–Nd alloys. The hot tearing susceptibility in all three alloy series increased markedly with even micro-alloying additions of Nd, Y or Gd, and began to decrease again in alloys with more than 0.5 wt.% Y or 1.0 wt.% Gd, but did not decrease significantly for Mg–La–Nd. A model using the temperature–fraction solid curves as input parameters was used to estimate hot tearing susceptibility for Mg–La–Nd alloys. Tensile testing at room temperature showed that Mg–La–Nd alloy series had higher 0.2% proof stress and lower elongation to failure than either the Mg–La–Y or the Mg–La–Gd alloy series for Nd concentrations greater than 1 wt.% due to a greater effectiveness of grain boundary reinforcement

  6. Separation of the rare earths by high pressure liquid chromatography and the fission yield on sup(148m)Pm and sup(148g)Pm using thermal neutron induced fission of 233U and 239Pu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is in two parts: in the first part, the method of high pressure liquid chromatography is described with particular reference to rare earth nuclei produced in nuclear reactions; in the second part, the results of a study of the fission yield of sup(148m)Pm and sup(148g)Pm from the thermal fission of 233U and 239Pu are presented. (G.T.H.)

  7. X-ray Raman scattering study of MgSiO3 glass at high pressure: Implication for triclustered MgSiO3 melt in Earth's mantle

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sung Keun; Lin, Jung-Fu; Cai, Yong Q.; Hiraoka, Nozomu; Eng, Peter J.; Okuchi, Takuo; Mao, Ho-kwang; Meng, Yue; Hu, Michael Y.; Chow, Paul; Shu, Jinfu; Li, Baosheng; FUKUI, HIROSHI; Lee, Bum Han; Kim, Hyun Na

    2008-01-01

    Silicate melts at the top of the transition zone and the core-mantle boundary have significant influences on the dynamics and properties of Earth's interior. MgSiO3-rich silicate melts were among the primary components of the magma ocean and thus played essential roles in the chemical differentiation of the early Earth. Diverse macroscopic properties of silicate melts in Earth's interior, such as density, viscosity, and crystal-melt partitioning, depend on their electronic and short-range loc...

  8. Chaotic behavior in a system simulating the pressure balanced injection system. Analysis of passive safety reactor behavior. JAERI's nuclear research promotion program, H12-012 (Contract research)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Madarame, Haruki; Okamoto, Koji; Tanaka, Gentaro; Morimoto, Yuichiro [Tokyo Univ., School of Engineering, Tokyo (Japan); Sato, Akira [Yamagata Univ., Faculty of Engineering, Yonezawa, Yamagata (Japan); Kondou, Masaya [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    2003-03-01

    The pressure Balanced Injection System (PBIS) was proposed in a passive safety reactor. Pressurizing Line (PL) connects the Reactor Vessel (RV) and the gas area in the Contain Vessel (CV), and Injected Line (IL) connects two vessels at relatively lower position. In an accident, the two lines are passively opened. The vapor generated by the residual heat pressed downward the water level in the RV. When the level is lower than the inlet of the PL, vapor is ejected into the CV through the PL attaining the pressure balance between the vessels. Then boron water in the CV is injected into the RV through the IL by the static head. This process is repeated by the succeeding vapor generation. In an experiment, the oscillating system was replaced by water column in a U-shaped duct. The vapor generation was simulated by cover gas supply to one end of the duct, while the other end was open to the atmosphere. When the water level reached a certain level, electromagnetic valves opened and the cover gas was ejected. The gas pressure decreased rapidly, resulting in a surface rise. When the water level reached another level, the valves closed. The cover gas pressure increased again, thus, gas ejection occurred intermittently. The interval of the gas ejection was not constant but fluctuated widely. Mere stochastic noise could hardly explain the large amplitude. Then was expressed the system using a set of linear equations. Various types of piecewise linear model were developed to examine the cause of the fluctuation. There appeared tangential bifurcation, period-doubling bifurcation, period-adding bifurcation and so on. The calculated interval exhibited chaotic features. Thus the cause of the fluctuation can be attributed to chaotic features of the system having switching. Since the piecewise linear model was highly simplified the behavior, a quantitative comparison between the calculation and the experiment was difficult. Therefore, numerical simulation code considering nonlinear effect was developed to describe the system behavior in the case there was no stochastic noise. The comparison between the simulation and the experiment revealed that there are some bifurcation-like phenomena being not real bifurcations. Real bifurcations are discovered in the simulation as well as in the experiment. Confirmation of chaotic behavior of the system in the experiment is a subject for a future study. (author)

  9. High-pressure syntheses and characterization of the rare-earth fluoride borates RE{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3} (RE = Tb, Dy, Ho)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hinteregger, Ernst; Pitscheider, Almut; Wurst, Klaus; Heymann, Gunter; Huppertz, Hubert [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie; Enders, Michael [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Pharmazie

    2013-11-15

    The new rare-earth fluoride borates RE{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3} (RE = Tb, Dy, Ho) were synthesized under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions of 1.5 GPa/1200 C for Tb{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3} and 3.0 GPa/900 C for Dy{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3} and Ho{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3} in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus from the corresponding rare-earth sesquioxides, rare-earth fluorides, and boron oxide. The single-crystal structure determinations revealed that the new compounds are isotypic to the known rare-earth fluoride borate Gd{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}. The new rare-earth fluoride borates crystallize in the monoclinic space group P2{sub 1}/c (Z = 8) with the lattice parameters a = 16.296(3), b = 6.197(2), c = 8.338(2) A, {beta} = 93.58(3) for Tb{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}, a = 16.225(3), b = 6.160(2), c = 8.307(2) A, {beta} = 93.64(3) for Dy{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}, and a = 16.189(3), b = 6.124(2), c = 8.282(2) A, {beta} = 93.69(3) for Ho{sub 2}(BO{sub 3})F{sub 3}. The four crystallographically different rare-earth cations (CN = 9) are surrounded by oxygen and fluoride anions. All boron atoms form isolated trigonal-planar [BO{sub 3}]{sup 3-} groups. The six crystallographically different fluoride anions are in a nearly planar coordination by three rare-earth cations. (orig.)

  10. New high pressure rare earth tantalates RExTa2O5+1.5x (RE=La, Eu, Yb)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rare earth tantalates La0.075Ta2O5.113, Eu0.089Ta2O5.134 and Yb0.051Ta2O5.077 have been prepared by solid state reaction at P=7.0 GPa and T=1050–1100 °C and studied by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and electron microscopy. Low hydrated amorphous tantalum, lanthanum, europium and ytterbium hydroxides were used as starting materials. Aqueous as well as anhydrous compounds were obtained. Title tantalates are crystallized in the structure type of F–Ta2O5 [Zibrov et al. Russ. J. Inorg. Chem. 48 (2003) 464–471] [5]. The structure was refined by the Rietveld method from X-ray powder diffractometer data: La0.075Ta2O5.113, a=10.5099(2), b=7.2679(1), c=6.9765(1) Å, V=532.90(1) Å3, Z=6, space group Ibam; Eu0.089Ta2O5.134, a=10.4182(3), b=7.2685(1), c=6.9832(1) Å, V=528.80(2) Å3, Z=6, space group Ibam; Yb0.051Ta2O5.077, a=10.4557(2), b=7.3853(1), c=6.8923(1) Å, V=532.21(1) Å3, Z=6, space group Ibam. RE atoms do not replace the tantalum in its positions but the only water in the channels of the structure. Highly charged cations RE+3 compress the unit cell so that its volume becomes less than that of F–Ta2O5. Significant decrease of the unit cell volume after water removal from the structure is possible due to the puckering of pentagonal bipyramid layers and change of the corrugation angle in the layer. - Graphical abstract: The structure of RExTa2O5+1.5x and its HRTEM image (“A” arrows show empty channel, “B” arrows show filled channel). - Highlights: • We synthesized new tantalates of RE under high pressure high temperature conditions. • RE atoms replace water molecules in the channels of the structure. • Aqueous as well as anhydrous tantalates were obtained. • Highly charged cations RE+3 compress the unit cell decreasing RE–O distances

  11. New high pressure rare earth tantalates RE{sub x}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5+1.5x} (RE=La, Eu, Yb)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zibrov, Igor P., E-mail: zibrov@mail.ru [Institute for High Pressure Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kaluzhskoe Highway 14, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Filonenko, Vladimir P., E-mail: filv@hppi.troitsk.ru [Institute for High Pressure Physics, Russian Academy of Sciences, Kaluzhskoe Highway 14, Troitsk, Moscow 142190 (Russian Federation); Zakharov, Nikolai D., E-mail: zakharov@mpi-halle.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle/Saale (Germany); Werner, Peter, E-mail: werner@mpi-halle.mpg.de [Max Planck Institute for Microstructure Physics, Weinberg 2, D-06120 Halle/Saale (Germany); Drobot, Dmitrii V., E-mail: dvdrobot@mail.ru [Lomonosov Moscow University of Fine Chemical Technology, Prospect Vernadskogo 86, Moscow 119571 (Russian Federation); Nikishina, Elena E.; Lebedeva, Elena N., E-mail: helena_nick@mail.ru [Lomonosov Moscow University of Fine Chemical Technology, Prospect Vernadskogo 86, Moscow 119571 (Russian Federation)

    2013-07-15

    Rare earth tantalates La{sub 0.075}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5.113}, Eu{sub 0.089}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5.134} and Yb{sub 0.051}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5.077} have been prepared by solid state reaction at P=7.0 GPa and T=1050–1100 °C and studied by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and electron microscopy. Low hydrated amorphous tantalum, lanthanum, europium and ytterbium hydroxides were used as starting materials. Aqueous as well as anhydrous compounds were obtained. Title tantalates are crystallized in the structure type of F–Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5} [Zibrov et al. Russ. J. Inorg. Chem. 48 (2003) 464–471] [5]. The structure was refined by the Rietveld method from X-ray powder diffractometer data: La{sub 0.075}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5.113}, a=10.5099(2), b=7.2679(1), c=6.9765(1) Å, V=532.90(1) Å{sup 3}, Z=6, space group Ibam; Eu{sub 0.089}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5.134}, a=10.4182(3), b=7.2685(1), c=6.9832(1) Å, V=528.80(2) Å{sup 3}, Z=6, space group Ibam; Yb{sub 0.051}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5.077}, a=10.4557(2), b=7.3853(1), c=6.8923(1) Å, V=532.21(1) Å{sup 3}, Z=6, space group Ibam. RE atoms do not replace the tantalum in its positions but the only water in the channels of the structure. Highly charged cations RE{sup +3} compress the unit cell so that its volume becomes less than that of F–Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5}. Significant decrease of the unit cell volume after water removal from the structure is possible due to the puckering of pentagonal bipyramid layers and change of the corrugation angle in the layer. - Graphical abstract: The structure of RE{sub x}Ta{sub 2}O{sub 5+1.5x} and its HRTEM image (“A” arrows show empty channel, “B” arrows show filled channel). - Highlights: • We synthesized new tantalates of RE under high pressure high temperature conditions. • RE atoms replace water molecules in the channels of the structure. • Aqueous as well as anhydrous tantalates were obtained. • Highly charged cations RE{sup +3} compress the unit cell decreasing RE–O distances.

  12. Balance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-01

    TherEx Inc.'s AT-1 Computerized Ataxiameter precisely evaluates posture and balance disturbances that commonly accompany neurological and musculoskeletal disorders. Complete system includes two-strain gauged footplates, signal conditioning circuitry, a computer monitor, printer and a stand-alone tiltable balance platform. AT-1 serves as assessment tool, treatment monitor, and rehabilitation training device. It allows clinician to document quantitatively the outcome of treatment and analyze data over time to develop outcome standards for several classifications of patients. It can evaluate specifically the effects of surgery, drug treatment, physical therapy or prosthetic devices.

  13. Indicator system provides complete data of engine cylinder pressure variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Jones, R. W.; Morgan, N. E.

    1966-01-01

    Varying reference pressure used together with a balanced pressure pickup /a diaphragm switch/ to switch the electric output of the pressure transducer in a reference pressure line obtains precise engine cylinder pressure data from a high speed internal combustion engine.

  14. Development of high temperature reference electrodes for in-pile application: Part I. Feasibility study of the external pressure balanced Ag/AgCl reference electrode (EPBRE) and the cathodically charged Palladium hydrogen electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosch, R.W.; Van Nieuwenhove, R

    1998-10-01

    The main problems connected with corrosion potential measurements at elevated temperatures and pressures are related to the stability and lifetime of the reference electrode and the correct estimation of the potential related to the Standard Hydrogen Scale (SHE). Under Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) conditions of 300 degrees Celsius and 150 bar, the choice of materials is also a limiting factor due to the influence of radiation. Investigations on two reference electrodes that can be used under PWR conditions are reported: the cathodically charged palladium hydrogen electrode, and the external pressure balanced silver/silver chloride electrode. Preliminary investigations with the Pd-electrode were focused on the calculation of the required charging time and the influence of dissolved oxygen. High temperature applications are discussed on the basis of results reported in the literature. Investigations with the silver/silver chloride reference electrode mainly dealt with the salt bridge which is necessary to connect the reference electrode with the testing solution. It is shown that the thermal junction potential is independent of the length of the salt bridge. In addition, the high temperature contributes to an increase of the conductivity of the solution, which is beneficial for the salt bridge connection.

  15. Internal combustion engine cylinder-to-cylinder balancing with balanced air-fuel ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Ralph E.; Bourn, Gary D.; Smalley, Anthony J.

    2006-01-03

    A method of balancing combustion among cylinders of an internal combustion engine. For each cylinder, a normalized peak firing pressure is calculated as the ratio of its peak firing pressure to its combustion pressure. Each cylinder's normalized peak firing pressure is compared to a target value for normalized peak firing pressure. The fuel flow is adjusted to any cylinder whose normalized peak firing pressure is not substantially equal to the target value.

  16. Lesson "Balance in Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapanova, V.

    2012-04-01

    Lesson "Balance in Nature" This simulation game-lesson (Balance in Nature) gives an opportunity for the students to show creativity, work independently, and to create models and ideas. It creates future-oriented thought connected to their experience, allowing them to propose solutions for global problems and personal responsibility for their activities. The class is divided in two teams. Each team chooses questions. 1. Question: Pollution in the environment. 2. Question: Care for nature and climate. The teams work on the chosen tasks. They make drafts, notes and formulate their solutions on small pieces of paper, explaining the impact on nature and society. They express their points of view using many different opinions. This generates alternative thoughts and results in creative solutions. With the new knowledge and positive behaviour defined, everybody realizes that they can do something positive towards nature and climate problems and the importance of individuals for solving global problems is evident. Our main goal is to recover the ecological balance, and everybody explains his or her own well-grounded opinions. In this work process the students obtain knowledge, skills and more responsible behaviour. This process, based on his or her own experience, dialogue and teamwork, helps the participant's self-development. Making the model "human? nature" expresses how human activities impact the natural Earth and how these impacts in turn affect society. Taking personal responsibility, we can reduce global warming and help the Earth. By helping nature we help ourselves. Teacher: Veselina Boycheva-Chapanova " Saint Patriarch Evtimii" Scholl Str. "Ivan Vazov"-19 Plovdiv Bulgaria

  17. Balancing Risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nygaard, Lene; Rossen, Camilla Blach; Buus, Niels

    2015-01-01

    This study explored how eight pregnant women diagnosed with depression managed the decision whether or not to take antidepressants during pregnancy. In total, 11 interviews were conducted and analysed by means of constructivist grounded theory. The major category constructed was Balancing risk, with two minor categories: Assessing depression and antidepressants and Evaluating the impact of significant others. The participants tried to make the safest decision, taking all aspects of their life in...

  18. Effect of mass disorder on the lattice thermal conductivity of MgO periclase under pressure

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas Allen Dalton; Wen-Pin Hsieh; Gregory T. Hohensee; David G. Cahill; Goncharov, Alexander F.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of mantle materials controlling the heat balance and thermal evolution of the Earth remains poorly constrained as the available experimental and theoretical techniques are limited in probing minerals under the relevant conditions. We report measurements of thermal conductivity of MgO at high pressure up to 60?GPa and 300?K via diamond anvil cells using the time-domain thermoreflectance technique. These measurements are complemented by model calculations which take into ac...

  19. Ballet Balance Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Camilla; Erleben, Kenny

    2006-01-01

    Animating physically realistic human characters is challenging, since human observers are highly tuned to recognize human cues such as emotion and gender from motion patterns. The main contribution of this paper is a new model firmly based on biomechanics, which is used to animate balance and basic movements of a ballet dancers. It is supported by computer simulated experiments and it is in good agreement with biomechanical measurements of real-life dancers. Our results questions the previous approaches in dynamic animation, which only uses the center of gravity strategy, and instead demonstrate the viability of the center of pressure strategy.

  20. Chemical earth models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javoy, Marc

    1999-10-01

    This article presents a critical review of method, concepts and prejudices used bv modelists of the Earth's chemical composition over approximate the last fifty years and of the resulting compositions. Brief descriptions are given of admitted accretion mechanisms, of the starting materials most often considered and of the major parameters and recurrent concepts: 'reduced" state, mantle homogeneity vs heterogeneity, 'low pressure' core formation, 'great impact', refractory, lithophile, siderophile, compatible, incompatible character of elements, depleted and degassed mantle, Urey ratio, as well as the description of a commonly-used instrument, possibly harmful to Iogic, the famous Ockham's razor. Differences between models are now restricted to the lower mantle composition:the 'primary' (before crust differentiation) upper mentle varies little from model to model and the idea of a 10-15% combined Si-O-S concentration as representing the necessary light elements in the core is gaining more and more ground. The dominant type of model derives more or less directly from the CI cabonaceous composition by complete devolatilization and reduction. Its mantle is homogeneous and convecting mainly in a one-level mode, in accordence with dominant geophysicists' views but in rather strong disagreement with geochemical data and models which insist on the strong decoupling between lower and upper mantle. Its low Si excess is generally supposed to have been absorbed by the core, whereas its high refractory lithophile element (RLE) content creates mass balance problems relative to presently observed mantle and crust concentrations. The alternative type is a two-lavel mantle with a Si and Fe-rich, RLE-poor, lower mantle, previously based mainly on seismic and mineral physics data, and now also on geochemical and cosmochemical arguments.

  1. Social Balance Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Khanafiah, Deni; Situngkir, Hokky

    2004-01-01

    We construct a model based on social balance theory proposed by Fritz Heider to analyze the interpersonal network among social agents. The model of social balance theory provides us an interesting tool to see how a social group evolves to the possible balance state. We introduce the balance index that can be used to measure social balance in macro structure level (global balance index) or in micro structure (local balance index) to see how the local balance index influences ...

  2. Effects of diving on hearing and balance

    OpenAIRE

    Goplen, Frederik Kragerud

    2011-01-01

    Diving has profound effects on the human body including the inner ear, which contains the organs of hearing and balance. Ear injury is the most common medical problem in diving. The aim of this work was to explore the short and long-term effects of diving on hearing and balance through a simulated deep saturation dive and two epidemiological studies on commercial divers. The first study explored short-term effects of absolute pressure on the body. The high-pressure neurologi...

  3. Estudio experimental y numérico del desplazamiento y rotación de suelo reforzado con geomallas bajo empuje activo Experimental and numerical study of the displacement and rotation of geogrid reinforced soil under active lateral earth pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lissette Ruiz-Tagle

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Se presenta un estudio experimentaly numérico de desplazamiento y rotación de suelo sin y con refuerzo de geomallas bajo la acción del empuje activo. Para ello se ha usado la técnica de medición PIV con la cual se procesan imágenes digitales para la obtención de campos de desplazamiento y rotación. El equipo de ensayo de empuje posee una ventana transparente que permite registrar el movimiento del suelo. Los resultados medidos de movimiento del suelo permiten determinar áreas de suelo que fluyen y no fluyen debido a la acción del empuje activo. De esta manera se puede determinar la posición y geometría de la superficie de falla, la cual se puede comparar con la definida por la teoría de la plasticidad de empuje activo de Rankine. Esta comparación resulta solo posible para el caso sin geomallas, dado que con geomallas la zona de suelo en fluencia cambia significativamente. La presencia de geomallas puede reducir hasta dos veces el volumen de suelo que entra en fluencia debido al empuje activo. Esta conclusión relacionada con la deformación del suelo está en directa relación con la disminución de la tensión de empuje activo al utilizar geomallas como elementos de refuerzo. También se presenta un análisis numérico usando el programa computacional Plaxis para estimar los desplazamientos horizontales. Los resultados numéricos entregan estimaciones que se aproximan a los resultados medidos de desplazamientos horizontales en términos de la forma de la zona de suelo en fluencia. Sin embargo, no son capaces de reproducir en detalle la geometría de la superficie de falla.An experimental and numerical study is presented related to displacement and rotation of soil with and without geogrid reinforcement under the application of active lateral earth pressure. To this end, the measurement technique PIV has been used, with which digital images are processed to obtain displacement and rotation fields. The experimental earth pressure equipment has a transparent window which allows the recording of soil movements. Through the process and analysis of the measured soil movement, soil areas which yielded and did not yield due to the active earth pressure, were defined. In this form, the position and geometry of the failure surface can be determined and compared with the defined by the plasticity theory of active Rankine states. This comparison is only possible for the case without geogrids since the presence of geogrids change significantly the zone of soil yielding. Geogrids can reduce up to twice the volume of soil yielding due to the active lateral earth pressure. This conclusion related with the soil deformation is in direct relation with the active lateral earth pressure reduction when geogrids are used as reinforced elements. In addition, a numerical analysis using the computational program Plaxis is presented to estimate horizontal displacements. The numerical results estimate reasonably well the horizontal displacements measured in terms of the shape of the soil yielding area. However, they do not reproduce in detail the geometry of the failure surface.

  4. Estudio experimental y numérico del desplazamiento y rotación de suelo reforzado con geomallas bajo empuje activo / Experimental and numerical study of the displacement and rotation of geogrid reinforced soil under active lateral earth pressure

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    Lissette, Ruiz-Tagle; Felipe, Villalobos.

    Full Text Available Se presenta un estudio experimentaly numérico de desplazamiento y rotación de suelo sin y con refuerzo de geomallas bajo la acción del empuje activo. Para ello se ha usado la técnica de medición PIV con la cual se procesan imágenes digitales para la obtención de campos de desplazamiento y rotación. [...] El equipo de ensayo de empuje posee una ventana transparente que permite registrar el movimiento del suelo. Los resultados medidos de movimiento del suelo permiten determinar áreas de suelo que fluyen y no fluyen debido a la acción del empuje activo. De esta manera se puede determinar la posición y geometría de la superficie de falla, la cual se puede comparar con la definida por la teoría de la plasticidad de empuje activo de Rankine. Esta comparación resulta solo posible para el caso sin geomallas, dado que con geomallas la zona de suelo en fluencia cambia significativamente. La presencia de geomallas puede reducir hasta dos veces el volumen de suelo que entra en fluencia debido al empuje activo. Esta conclusión relacionada con la deformación del suelo está en directa relación con la disminución de la tensión de empuje activo al utilizar geomallas como elementos de refuerzo. También se presenta un análisis numérico usando el programa computacional Plaxis para estimar los desplazamientos horizontales. Los resultados numéricos entregan estimaciones que se aproximan a los resultados medidos de desplazamientos horizontales en términos de la forma de la zona de suelo en fluencia. Sin embargo, no son capaces de reproducir en detalle la geometría de la superficie de falla. Abstract in english An experimental and numerical study is presented related to displacement and rotation of soil with and without geogrid reinforcement under the application of active lateral earth pressure. To this end, the measurement technique PIV has been used, with which digital images are processed to obtain dis [...] placement and rotation fields. The experimental earth pressure equipment has a transparent window which allows the recording of soil movements. Through the process and analysis of the measured soil movement, soil areas which yielded and did not yield due to the active earth pressure, were defined. In this form, the position and geometry of the failure surface can be determined and compared with the defined by the plasticity theory of active Rankine states. This comparison is only possible for the case without geogrids since the presence of geogrids change significantly the zone of soil yielding. Geogrids can reduce up to twice the volume of soil yielding due to the active lateral earth pressure. This conclusion related with the soil deformation is in direct relation with the active lateral earth pressure reduction when geogrids are used as reinforced elements. In addition, a numerical analysis using the computational program Plaxis is presented to estimate horizontal displacements. The numerical results estimate reasonably well the horizontal displacements measured in terms of the shape of the soil yielding area. However, they do not reproduce in detail the geometry of the failure surface.

  5. Burnup of UO2-Gd2O3 nuclear fuel elements. Separation of gadolinium from rare earths by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the framework of a research project on burnable poisons, a technique to separate gadolinium from irradiated samples of (U-Gd)O2+x has been developed in order to determine the burnup of mixed oxides fuel elements. The separation of Gd from the other rare earths (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) has been carried out by HPLC after uranium extraction with TBP. The procedure can be applied as a step to determine the burnup of spent nuclear fuels

  6. Momentum balance in wall jets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, T. Gunnar; Mehdi, Faraz; Naughton, Jonathan W.

    2012-11-01

    A plane wall jet experiment has been done to study its momentum balance. Two component laser Doppler anemometry was used to simultaneously measure the axial and wall-normal velocity components in 6 axial positions (x/H= 25, 50, 75, 100, 125 and 150) spanning from the wall all the way well into the ambient stagnant area. In this way not only the mean velocity components and Reynolds normal and shear stresses but also all their spatial derivatives were determined. In addition the wall shear stress was measured in all six axial positions using oil film interferometry. From these data all terms in the x-momentum equation, except the pressure term, could be evaluated. Later also the pressure was measured in the same profiles, and thereby also the pressure term was included in the balance. Contrary to common belief it was found that the pressure was not constant in the wall jet. The complete momentum balance is discussed and used to evaluate the roles played by the different contributing terms in different regions of the flow field in an effort to improve on our understanding of the mechanics of wall jets.

  7. A Balancing Act: A Quantitative Analysis of the Influence of Work/Life Balance and Work Atmosphere on Personal and Professional Success of Women Scientists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archie, T.; Laursen, S. L.; Kogan, M.

    2012-12-01

    Despite an increase in advanced degrees awarded to women in the geosciences, scientific leaders in academia remain dominantly male. Women are underrepresented in tenure-track positions in Earth science departments at research universities and are less likely to have more senior positions within their academic institutions. Our empirical study analyzes factors that influence personal and professional success for women scientists. Prior research has shown that women are subjected to unintended and unrecognized biases that can have an ultimate impact on their productivity, advancement, and success. We used an electronic survey to collect data from 662 early-career geoscientists who are members of the Earth Science Women's Network and/or the network's Earth Science Jobs list. We asked respondents to self-report their perceptions of work/life balance, professional atmosphere and other variables indicative and/or predictive of personal and professional success. In a previous analysis (Kogan & Laursen, 2011) we found that women consistently rated the professional atmosphere in their departments and their interactions with colleagues less favorably than men. Women indicated lower rates of collaboration with colleagues in their unit compared to their male peers. We also found work/life balance is of particular concern to early-career scientists, especially since tenure clock and the biological clock function on similar timetables. Women reported more caregiving responsibilities than men, further complicating the balance between work and personal life. We hypothesize that the work life balance and professional atmosphere influences productivity, advancement, and career/job satisfaction. We now investigate how work/life balance, atmosphere within the work unit, and mentoring influence productivity, job and career satisfaction, and career advancement. We introduce a structural equation model that seeks to explain how these relationships vary dependent upon gender, career level, caretaking responsibilities, and other variables. Our data indicate strong positive correlations between professional climate and job satisfaction, and between work/life balance and productivity. Our results suggest that the uneven pressures experienced by women influence their ability to achieve personal and professional success. However, our model implies that positive changes in women's work/life balance and professional atmosphere have the potential to help them become more successful both professionally and personally.

  8. High-pressure densified solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides (Ca/Sr, Ca/Ba, Sr/Ba) and their high-temperature thermoelectric properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gürsoy, M.; Takeda, M.; Albert, B.

    2015-01-01

    Solid solutions of alkaline earth hexaborides were synthesized and densified by spark plasma sintering at 100 MPa. The high-temperature thermoelectric properties (Seebeck coefficients, electrical and thermal diffusivities, heat capacities) were measured between room temperature and 1073 K. CaB6, SrB6, BaB6 and the ternary hexaborides CaxSr1-xB6, CaxBa1-xB6, SrxBa1-xB6 (x = 0.25, 0.5, 0.75) are n-type conducting compounds over the whole compositional and thermal ranges. The values of the figure of merit ZT for CaB6 (ca. 0.3 at 1073 K) were found to be significantly increased compared to earlier investigations which is attributed to the densification process.

  9. Delamination in super-Earths extrapolated from the Earth model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoji, D.; Kurita, K.

    2015-05-01

    It is suggested that the delamination process, in which the mantle lithosphere is peeled into the asthenosphere, contributes to the topographies and magmatism of the Earth. We investigated the vigorousness of the delamination in super-Earths by applying the Earth model to planets of heavy mass. Delamination is induced in planets of mass 5M? by the negative buoyancy of the mantle lithosphere. However, assuming pressure dependent rheology, the thermal Rayleigh number decreases due to the high pressure in super-Earths and thus the magnitude of convection in the Moho decreases. Because reduced convection in the Moho weakens the peeling of the mantle lithosphere, the delaminated area is narrower. The magnitude of the heat flux caused by the delamination process is also reduced in planets large in size compared with Earth. Although further work is needed, our model indicates that delamination can transfer more heat than the conduction of the lithosphere if the planet's mass is less than 5M?.

  10. Human Balance System

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cellular fluid balance. “A little spc-flakes at breakfast relieves me of my dizziness.” - Meniere’s Patient Click ... and vision problems, and difficulty with concentration and memory. What is balance? Balance is the ability to ...

  11. Spooky sodium balance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titze, Jens; Dahlmann, Anke; Lerchl, Kathrin; Kopp, Christoph; Rakova, Natalia; Schröder, Agnes; Luft, Friedrich C

    2014-04-01

    Current teaching states that when sodium intake is increased from low to high levels, total-body sodium (TBNa) and water increase until daily sodium excretion again equals intake. When sodium intake is reduced, sodium excretion briefly exceeds intake until the excess TBNa and water are eliminated, at which point sodium excretion again equals intake. However, careful balance studies oftentimes conflict with this view and long-term studies suggest that TBNa fluctuates independent of intake or body weight. We recently performed the opposite experiment in that we fixed sodium intake for several weeks at three levels of sodium intake and collected all urine made. We found weekly (circaseptan) patterns in sodium excretion that were inversely related to aldosterone and directly to cortisol. TBNa was not dependent on sodium intake but instead exhibited far longer (? monthly) infradian rhythms independent of extracellular water, body weight, or blood pressure. The findings are consistent with our ideas on tissue sodium storage and its regulation that we developed on the basis of animal research. We are implementing (23)Na-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to pursue open questions on sodium balance in patients. Our findings could be relevant to therapeutic strategies for hypertension and target-organ damage. PMID:24107854

  12. Ce{sub 2}B{sub 8}O{sub 15}. High-pressure synthesis and crystal structure determination of a rare-earth polyborate exhibiting a new 'Fundamental Building Block'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glaetzle, Matthias; Heymann, Gunter; Huppertz, Hubert [Innsbruck Univ. (Austria). Inst. fuer Allgemeine, Anorganische und Theoretische Chemie

    2013-10-01

    The new cerium polyborate Ce{sub 2}B{sub 8}O{sub 15} was synthesized under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions of 6 GPa and 1050 C in a Walker-type multianvil apparatus. The single-crystal structure determination revealed that the new compound crystallizes in the space group P2/c with the lattice parameters a = 916.6(2), b = 421.0(1), c = 1248.9(3) pm, {beta} = 116.7(1) , V = 0.4303(2) nm{sup 3}, R1 = 0.0356, and wR2 = 0.0504. The crystal structure of Ce{sub 2}B{sub 8}O{sub 15} exhibits a new fundamental building block (FBB) in borate chemistry that consists of four BO{sub 4} tetrahedra and can be written as 4{open_square}: [{Phi}] left angle 3{open_square} right angle vertical stroke {open_square} vertical stroke. These FBB are interconnected via common corners, forming a complex threedimensional network that contains the Ce{sup 3+} cations. Ce{sub 2}B{sub 8}O{sub 15} represents the most boron rich rare-earth borate synthesized under high-pressure/high-temperature conditions so far. We report about the synthetic conditions, structural details, thermal behaviour, and the IR/Raman spectra of Ce{sub 2}B{sub 8}O{sub 15}. (orig.)

  13. Earth\\'s Mass Variability

    OpenAIRE

    Mawad, Ramy

    2014-01-01

    The perturbation of the Earth caused by variability of mass of Earth as additional reason with gravity of celestial bodies and shape of the Earth. The Earth eating and collecting matters from space and loss or eject matters to space through its flying in the space around the Sun. The source of the rising in the global sea level is not closed in global warming and icebergs, but the outer space is the additional important source for this rising. The Earth eats waters from spac...

  14. Re-entry dynamics of high area-to-mass ratio objects in eccentric Earth orbits considering drag and solar radiation pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The discovery of a new population of objects with high area-to-mass ratios (HAMR) in orbits near the geostationary ring has motivated recent research seeking to understand the behaviour of those debris under the influence of certain types of disturbances, such as solar radiation pressure and atmospheric drag. Based on a series of selection criteria, it was made from the NORAD catalogue a list of potential candidates for study. As we developed an orbital propagator that takes into account the major disturbances, it was possible to study the behaviour and variation of orbital parameters during decay of the HAMR objects. The results obtained for two cases studied exhibit the dynamic behaviour of all orbital parameters and show good agreement with the observed decay times

  15. New high pressure rare earth tantalates RExTa2O5+1.5x (RE=La, Eu, Yb)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zibrov, Igor P.; Filonenko, Vladimir P.; Zakharov, Nikolai D.; Werner, Peter; Drobot, Dmitrii V.; Nikishina, Elena E.; Lebedeva, Elena N.

    2013-07-01

    Rare earth tantalates La0.075Ta2O5.113, Eu0.089Ta2O5.134 and Yb0.051Ta2O5.077 have been prepared by solid state reaction at P=7.0 GPa and T=1050-1100 °C and studied by X-ray diffraction, thermal analysis and electron microscopy. Low hydrated amorphous tantalum, lanthanum, europium and ytterbium hydroxides were used as starting materials. Aqueous as well as anhydrous compounds were obtained. Title tantalates are crystallized in the structure type of F-Ta2O5 [Zibrov et al. Russ. J. Inorg. Chem. 48 (2003) 464-471] [5]. The structure was refined by the Rietveld method from X-ray powder diffractometer data: La0.075Ta2O5.113, a=10.5099(2), b=7.2679(1), c=6.9765(1) Å, V=532.90(1) Å3, Z=6, space group Ibam; Eu0.089Ta2O5.134, a=10.4182(3), b=7.2685(1), c=6.9832(1) Å, V=528.80(2) Å3, Z=6, space group Ibam; Yb0.051Ta2O5.077, a=10.4557(2), b=7.3853(1), c=6.8923(1) Å, V=532.21(1) Å3, Z=6, space group Ibam. RE atoms do not replace the tantalum in its positions but the only water in the channels of the structure. Highly charged cations RE+3 compress the unit cell so that its volume becomes less than that of F-Ta2O5. Significant decrease of the unit cell volume after water removal from the structure is possible due to the puckering of pentagonal bipyramid layers and change of the corrugation angle in the layer.

  16. Toroidal and poloidal Alfvén waves with arbitrary azimuthal wavenumbers in a finite pressure plasma in the Earth's magnetosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Yu. Klimushkin

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, in terms of an axisymmetric model of the magnetosphere, we formulate the criteria for which the Alfvén waves in the magnetosphere can be toroidally and poloidally polarized (the disturbed magnetic field vector oscillates azimuthally and radially, respectively. The obvious condition of equality of the wave frequency ? to the toroidal (poloidal eigenfrequency ?TN (?PN is a necessary and sufficient one for the toroidal polarization of the mode and only a necessary one for the poloidal mode. In the latter case we must also add to it a significantly stronger condition ??TN–?PN?/?TN ? m–1 where m is the azimuthal wave number, and N is the longitudinal wave number. In cold plasma (the plasma to magnetic pressure ratio ? = 0 the left-hand side of this inequality is too small for the routinely recorded (in the magnetosphere second harmonic of radially polarized waves, therefore these waves must have nonrealistically large values of m. By studying several models of the magnetosphere differing by the level of disturbance, we found that the left-hand part of the poloidality criterion can be satisfied by taking into account finite plasma pressure for the observed values of m ? 50 – 100 (and in some cases, for even smaller values of the azimuthal wave numbers. When the poloidality condition is satisfied, the existence of two types of radially polarized Alfvén waves is possible. In magnetospheric regions, where the function ?PN is a monotonic one, the mode is poloidally polarized in a part of its region of localization. It propagates slowly across magnetic shells and changes its polarization from poloidal to toroidal. The other type of radially polarized waves can exist in those regions where this function reaches its extreme values (ring current, plasmapause. These waves are standing waves across magnetic shells, having a poloidal polarization throughout the region of its existence. Waves of this type are likely to be exemplified by giant pulsations. If the poloidality condition is not satisfied, then the mode is toroidally polarized throughout the region of its existence. Furthermore, it has a resonance peak near the magnetic shell, the toroidal eigenfrequency of which equals the frequency of the wave.

    Key words. Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere; MHD waves and instabilities – Space plasma physics (kinetic and MHD theory

  17. Balance Disorders (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What's in this article? How Balance Works Symptoms Types of Balance Disorders Causes Diagnosis Treatment When to See a Doctor When you think about balance, the role that ears play might not come to mind. But ears are crucial to maintaining balance thanks ...

  18. High-pressure, temperature elasticity of Fe- and Al-bearing MgSiO3: implications for the Earth's lower mantle

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Shuai; Liu, Tao; Stackhouse, Stephen; Militzer, Burkhard

    2015-01-01

    Fe and Al are two of the most important rock-forming elements other than Mg, Si, and O. Their presence in the lower mantle's most abundant minerals, MgSiO_3 bridgmanite, MgSiO_3 post-perovskite and MgO periclase, alters their elastic properties. However, knowledge on the thermoelasticity of Fe- and Al-bearing MgSiO_3 bridgmanite, and post-perovskite is scarce. In this study, we perform ab initio molecular dynamics to calculate the elastic and seismic properties of pure, Fe^{3+}- and Fe^{2+}-, and Al^{3+}-bearing MgSiO_3 perovskite and post-perovskite, over a wide range of pressures, temperatures, and Fe/Al compositions. Our results show that a mineral assemblage resembling pyrolite fits a 1D seismological model well, down to, at least, a few hundred kilometers above the core-mantle boundary, i.e. the top of the D'' region. In D'', a similar composition is still an excellent fit to the average velocities and fairly approximate to the density. We also implement polycrystal plasticity with a geodynamic model to ...

  19. Earth\\'s Mass Variability

    CERN Document Server

    Mawad, Ramy

    2014-01-01

    The perturbation of the Earth caused by variability of mass of Earth as additional reason with gravity of celestial bodies and shape of the Earth. The Earth eating and collecting matters from space and loss or eject matters to space through its flying in the space around the Sun. The source of the rising in the global sea level is not closed in global warming and icebergs, but the outer space is the additional important source for this rising. The Earth eats waters from space in unknown mechanism. The mass of the Earth become greater in November i.e. before transit apoapsis two months, and become latter in February i.e. after transit apoapsis to two months.

  20. Titan's Greenhouse Effect And Climate: Lessons From The Earth's Cooler Cousin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, Conor A.; Titan Climate White Paper Proposal Team

    2009-12-01

    We argue that continuing scientific study of Earth's `distant cousin’ Titan can provide a greater understanding and insight into the energy balance of our own planet's atmosphere. Titan's Earth-like properties have been recognized for some time, from the discovery of its atmosphere in 1907, through the Voyager 1 encounter in 1980 that showed Titan's atmosphere is mostly nitrogen gas with a surface pressure within a factor of two of terrestrial. Calculation shows that Titan's atmosphere causes `greenhouse’ warming of the surface, an effect similar to that seen on the Earth, Mars, and Venus. In the 1990s, direct imaging from the Earth by adaptive optics revealed that Titan's ubiquitous haze layer is slowly changing in apparent response to the seasons that occur due to the Saturn system's obliquity. The NASA Cassini mission that arrived in Saturnian orbit in 2004, and the ESA Huygens Titan probe of 2005, have returned a flood of new data regarding this intriguing world. For the first time, we are building a detailed picture of weather in the lower atmosphere, where condensable methane takes on the role played by water in the Earth's atmosphere, leading to methane rainfall, rivers and lakes. We examine parallels between the atmospheres of Earth and of Titan, including the possibilities for dramatic climate change. Extending the duration of the Cassini spacecraft mission during the next decade will provide part of the needed picture, but in addition we urge planning for a future new mission focused on Titan's climate, and other measures.

  1. Balance control impairment in obese individuals is caused by larger balance motor commands variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simoneau, Martin; Teasdale, Normand

    2015-01-01

    It is acknowledged that various factors impaired balance control. Among them, heavy body weight is associated with poor balance control because the location of the center of mass is further away from the ankle joint. Thus, a larger active ankle torque is required to counter the greater gravitational torque. Because balance motor commands have signal-dependent noise whose standard deviation increases with the absolute value of the neural control signal, it was hypothesized that faster center of pressure speed observed in obese individuals would be related to larger balance motor commands variability. A feedback-control model and parametric system identification technique was used to estimate the variability in the balance motor commands and neural controller parameters based on previously published experimental data. Results of the neuromechanical model confirmed that the balance motor commands of obese individuals are more variable than that of lean individuals. PMID:25455209

  2. Social Balance Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Khanafiah, D; Khanafiah, Deni; Situngkir, Hokky

    2004-01-01

    We construct a model based on social balance theory proposed by Fritz Heider to analyze the interpersonal network among social agents. The model of social balance theory provides us an interesting tool to see how a social group evolves to the possible balance state. We introduce the balance index that can be used to measure social balance in macro structure level (global balance index) or in micro structure (local balance index) to see how the local balance index influences the global balance structure. Several experiments are done and we discover how the social group can form separation of subgroups in a group or strengthening a social group while emphasizing the structure theorem and social mitosis previously introduced.

  3. Rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conference was held from September 12 to 13, 1984 in Jetrichovice, Czechoslovakia. The participants heard 16 papers of which 4 were inputted in INIS. These papers dealt with industrial separation processes of rare earths, the use of chemical methods of separation from the concentrate of apatite and bastnesite, the effect of the relative permittivity of solvents in the elution of rare earth elements from a cation exchanger, and the determination of the content of different rare earth elements using X-ray fluorescence analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy. (E.S.)

  4. Random walk and balancing

    CERN Document Server

    Borg, F G

    2004-01-01

    Presents a minireview of topics concerned with balancing in quiet (bipedal) standing, and balancing of a stick. In the focus is the apparent stochastic nature of the swaying of the human inverted pendulum.

  5. ISLSCP II Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) Monthly Albedo, 1986-1990

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The goals of the Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) are (1) to understand the radiation balance between the Sun, Earth, atmosphere, and space and...

  6. Preparation process of an yttrium (or one rare earth), one alkaline earth metal, copper and oxygen superconductive compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention describes the fabrication at atmospheric pressure of a compound based on yttrium (or a rare earth), one alkaline earth metal, copper, and oxygen so as to get a high-tc superconductor material. 2 refs

  7. Preseason and midseason balance ability of professional Australian footballers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrysomallis, Con

    2008-01-01

    Balance ability has been shown to be important for sports performance and injury prevention. It is unclear whether balance ability changes due to sports participation and regular training without specific balance training. It has not been shown whether certain sports such as the various football codes that often involve single limb stance and balance as part of kicking, running, rapid changes of direction, jumping, and landing actually influence balance ability. The aim of this study was to determine whether there was a difference in balance ability measured at preseason and during the competitive season for elite footballer. Twenty-eight professional Australian footballers who did not undertake any specific balance training took part in this study. Postural sway from single limb balance on a force platform was measured for both limbs 1 week before the start and midway through a 22-week competitive season. The subjects were required to step onto a balance mat on top of the force platform and maintain balance for 20 seconds. The maximum sway of the center of pressure in the mediolateral direction was used as the balance score. It was found that there was not a significant difference in the balance ability measurement at the start and during the competitive season. Sports participation and regular training did not influence balance ability in this cohort of athletes. PMID:18296977

  8. Role of the Earth's rotation in global geodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlenkova, N.

    2009-04-01

    Role of the Earth's rotation in the global geodynamics. Pavlenkova N.I., Institute of Physics of the Earth of Russian Academy of Science, B.Grusinskaja 10, 123995, Moscow, ninapav@ifz.ru Geophysical studies show several regularities in Earth's structures which are not explained by the traditional global tectonics conceptions. (1) The surface of the Earth, as well as a surface of other planets, precisely shares on two hemispheres with a different relief and structure of an earth's crust: on the Pacific (oceanic) hemisphere with the lowered relief and a thin oceanic crust, and a continental hemisphere with prevalence of the raised relief and a thick continental crust. (2) There is a regular system of global lineaments and ring structures which are stretched on thousand kilometers, covering continents and oceans. As one of examples it is possible to result system of rift zones (mid-oceanic ridges), forming a ring around of the Antarctica with rift branches from it through everyone of 90 degrees. (3) Asymmetry with a relief of a day time surface when to each raised structure there corresponds the lowered surface on the opposite side of globe is observed. (4) The continental and oceanic mantles have different compositions and deep roots (>300 km) beneath the continents are prominent as regions with relatively high seismic velocities. There are regular connections between geological structures and deep mantle roots. (5) The classical lithosphere-asthenosphere model is not confirmed by seismic data. The asthenosphere can not be traced as a continuous layer, there are disconnected lenses (asthenolenses) even beneath mid-oceanic ridges. Significant horizontal movements of the lithosphere, as proposed by the global plate tectonics, would destroy all these regularities and crust-mantle interaction. To make an agreement between all observed data, the fluids-rotation hypothesis is proposed. The hypothesis supposes two main energy sources of the global tectonics: the degasification of the Earth (the fluids advection) and changes in the Earth rotation. At formation of the core there was the Earth's expansion and was formed system of global lineaments and the Pacific ring. Bipolar convection in the core has created a magnetic field and the increased advection of deep fluids in the southern hemisphere. The last promoted formation of thick continental lithosphere in this hemisphere in Archean-Proterozoi. This thick lithosphere has led to asymmetry of the planet and to relative displacement of the mass centers of the Earth's spheres. It produced high pressure between the spheres (Barkin, 2002) and could have initiated their relative displacements. As a uniform asthenosphere does not exist and the continents have deep roots such displacements were most probable on a surface of a liquid outer core. The marked mass centre dislocation has caused the turning of the mantle around the core with movement of the continental hemisphere from South Pole to the equator. It corresponds to the data on movement of paleomagnetic and paleoclimate poles that took place in Paleozoic era. The rotation of the mantle around the core passed non-uniformly: the tidal forces connected to periodic change of Earth's rotation axis position in system the Earth-Lund-Sun (Avsyuk, 1996) were imposed on the basic moving forces restoring the mass center balance. The periodic displacements of the mantle created conditions for alternation of tectonic activity epochs. Rotation of the mantle around the core created a new nonequilibrium system. Therefore in Mesozoic era a new stage begins: an expansion of the southern hemisphere which radius is now bigger, than the northern one. Such expansion created the regular system of the mid-oceanic ridges forming a ring around Antarctica with the symmetric Mid-Atlantic, Indian and Pacific ridges. Supposedly at the last stage the formation of the continent on South Pole (Antarctica) and destruction of a continental crust on the northern hemisphere (formation of the Arctic ocean) took place to mount on the mass center balance.

  9. Future Satellite Gravimetry and Earth Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Flury, Jakob

    2005-01-01

    Currently, a first generation of dedicated satellite missions for the precise mapping of the Earth’s gravity field is in orbit (CHAMP, GRACE, and soon GOCE). The gravity data from these satellite missions provide us with very new information on the dynamics of planet Earth. In particular, on the mass distribution in the Earth’s interior, the entire water cycle (ocean circulation, ice mass balance, continental water masses, and atmosphere), and on changes in the mass distribution. The results are fascinating, but still rough with respect to spatial and temporal resolution. Technical progress in satellite-to-satellite tracking and in gravity gradiometry will allow more detailed results in the future. In this special issue, Earth scientists develop visions of future applications based on follow-on high-precision satellite gravimetry missions.

  10. A seismologically consistent compositional model of Earth’s core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badro, James; Côté, Alexander S.; Brodholt, John P.

    2014-01-01

    Earth’s core is less dense than iron, and therefore it must contain “light elements,” such as S, Si, O, or C. We use ab initio molecular dynamics to calculate the density and bulk sound velocity in liquid metal alloys at the pressure and temperature conditions of Earth's outer core. We compare the velocity and density for any composition in the (Fe–Ni, C, O, Si, S) system to radial seismological models and find a range of compositional models that fit the seismological data. We find no oxygen-free composition that fits the seismological data, and therefore our results indicate that oxygen is always required in the outer core. An oxygen-rich core is a strong indication of high-pressure and high-temperature conditions of core differentiation in a deep magma ocean with an FeO concentration (oxygen fugacity) higher than that of the present-day mantle. PMID:24821817

  11. Medical Devices Assess, Treat Balance Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    You may have heard the phrase as difficult as walking and chewing gum as a joking way of referring to something that is not difficult at all. Just walking, however, is not all that simple physiologically speaking. Even standing upright is an undertaking requiring the complex cooperation of multiple motor and sensory systems including vision, the inner ear, somatosensation (sensation from the skin), and proprioception (the sense of the body s parts in relation to each other). The compromised performance of any of these elements can lead to a balance disorder, which in some form affects nearly half of Americans at least once in their lifetimes, from the elderly, to those with neurological or vestibular (inner ear) dysfunction, to athletes with musculoskeletal injuries, to astronauts returning from space. Readjusting to Earth s gravity has a significant impact on an astronaut s ability to balance, a result of the brain switching to a different "model" for interpreting sensory input in normal gravity versus weightlessness. While acclimating, astronauts can experience headaches, motion sickness, and problems with perception. To help ease the transition and study the effects of weightlessness on the body, NASA has conducted many investigations into post-flight balance control, realizing this research can help treat patients with balance disorders on Earth as well. In the 1960s, the NASA-sponsored Man Vehicle Laboratory at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) studied the effects of prolonged space flight on astronauts. The lab s work intrigued MIT doctoral candidate Lewis Nashner, who began conducting NASA-funded research on human movement and balance under the supervision of Dr. Larry Young in the MIT Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics. In 1982, Nashner s work resulted in a noninvasive clinical technique for assessing the cooperative systems that allow the body to balance, commonly referred to as computerized dynamic posturography (CDP). CDP employs a series of dynamic protocols to isolate and assess balance function deficiencies. The technology was based on Nashner s novel, engineering-inspired concept of balance as an adaptable collaboration between multiple sensory and motor systems. CDP proved useful not only for examining astronauts, but for anyone suffering from balance problems. Today, CDP is the standard medical tool for objectively evaluating balance control.

  12. Procedure for Balancing an Air Distribution System with Decentralised Fan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunner, Amalie; Hultmark, Göran; Vorre, Anders; Afshari, Alireza; Bergsøe, Niels Christian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results from an on-going project concerning new design procedures for mechanical ventilation systems with low energy use. Conventional constant air volume (CAV) systems are usually balanced using flat plate dampers. The purpose of using balancing dampers is to intentionally introduce pressure drops in the duct system thus nominal airflows are achieved throughout the ductwork within specified tolerances. However, introduction of pressure drops will increase energy requirement ...

  13. Digital Earth - A sustainable Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahavir

    2014-02-01

    All life, particularly human, cannot be sustainable, unless complimented with shelter, poverty reduction, provision of basic infrastructure and services, equal opportunities and social justice. Yet, in the context of cities, it is believed that they can accommodate more and more people, endlessly, regardless to their carrying capacity and increasing ecological footprint. The 'inclusion', for bringing more and more people in the purview of development is often limited to social and economic inclusion rather than spatial and ecological inclusion. Economic investment decisions are also not always supported with spatial planning decisions. Most planning for a sustainable Earth, be at a level of rural settlement, city, region, national or Global, fail on the capacity and capability fronts. In India, for example, out of some 8,000 towns and cities, Master Plans exist for only about 1,800. A chapter on sustainability or environment is neither statutorily compulsory nor a norm for these Master Plans. Geospatial technologies including Remote Sensing, GIS, Indian National Spatial Data Infrastructure (NSDI), Indian National Urban Information Systems (NUIS), Indian Environmental Information System (ENVIS), and Indian National GIS (NGIS), etc. have potential to map, analyse, visualize and take sustainable developmental decisions based on participatory social, economic and social inclusion. Sustainable Earth, at all scales, is a logical and natural outcome of a digitally mapped, conceived and planned Earth. Digital Earth, in fact, itself offers a platform to dovetail the ecological, social and economic considerations in transforming it into a sustainable Earth.

  14. Geoelectromagnetic investigation of the earth’s crust and mantle

    CERN Document Server

    Rokityansky, Igor I

    1982-01-01

    Electrical conductivity is a parameter which characterizes composition and physical state of the Earth's interior. Studies of the state equations of solids at high temperature and pressure indicate that there is a close relation be­ tween the electrical conductivity of rocks and temperature. Therefore, measurements of deep conductivity can provide knowledge of the present state and temperature of the Earth's crust and upper mantle matter. Infor­ mation about the temperature of the Earth's interior in the remote past is derived from heat flow data. Experimental investigation of water-containing rocks has revealed a pronounced increase of electrical conductivity in the temperature range D from 500 to 700 DC which may be attributed to the beginning of fractional melting. Hence, anomalies of electrical conductivity may be helpful in identitying zones of melting and dehydration. The studies of these zones are perspective in the scientific research of the mobile areas of the Earth's crust and upper mantle where t...

  15. Balances instruments, manufacturers, history

    CERN Document Server

    Robens, Erich; Kiefer, Susanne

    2014-01-01

    The book deals mainly with direct mass determination by means of a conventional balances. It covers the history of the balance from the beginnings in Egypt earlier than 3000 BC to recent developments. All balance types are described with emphasis on scientific balances. Methods of indirect mass determination, which are applied to very light objects like molecules and the basic particles of matter and celestial bodies, are included.  As additional guidance, today’s manufacturers are listed and the profile of important companies is reviewed. Several hundred photographs, reproductions and drawings show instruments and their uses. This book includes commercial weighing instruments for merchandise and raw materials in workshops as well as symbolic weighing in the ancient Egyptian’s ceremony of ‘Weighing of the Heart’, the Greek fate balance, the Roman  Justitia, Juno Moneta and Middle Ages scenes of the Last Judgement with Jesus or St. Michael and of modern balances. The photographs are selected from the...

  16. Plasma pressure and anisotropy inferred from the Tsyganenkomagnetic field model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Cao

    Full Text Available A numerical procedure has been developed to deduce the plasma pressure and anisotropy from the Tsyganenko magnetic field model. The Tsyganenko empirical field model, which is based on vast satellite field data, provides a realistic description of magnetic field configuration in the magnetosphere. When the force balance under the static condition is assumed, the electromagnetic J×B force from the Tsyganenko field model can be used to infer the plasma pressure and anisotropy distributions consistent with the field model. It is found that the J×B force obtained from the Tsyganenko field model is not curl-free. The curl-free part of the J×B force in an empirical field model can be balanced by the gradient of the isotropic pressure, while the nonzero curl of the J×B force can only be associated with the pressure anisotropy. The plasma pressure and anisotropy in the near-Earth plasma sheet are numerically calculated to obtain a static equilibrium consistent with the Tsyganenko field model both in the noon-midnight meridian and in the equatorial plane. The plasma pressure distribution deduced from the Tsyganenko 1989 field model is highly anisotropic and shows this feature early in the substorm growth phase. The pressure anisotropy parameter ?P, defined as ?P=1-PVertP, is typically ~0.3 at x ? -4.5RE and gradually decreases to a small negative value with an increasing tailward distance. The pressure anisotropy from the Tsyganenko 1989 model accounts for 50% of the cross-tail current at maximum and only in a highly localized region near xsim-10RE. In comparison, the plasma pressure anisotropy inferred from the Tsyganenko 1987 model is much smaller. We also find that the boundary conditions have significant effects on the plasma pressure distributions and have to be considered carefully.

  17. Windowless High-Pressure Solar Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramohalli, K. N. R.

    1985-01-01

    Obscuration by reaction products eliminated. Chemical reactor heated by Sunlight employs rocket technology to maintain internal pressure. Instead of keeping chamber tightly closed, pressure maintained by momentum balance between incoming and outgoing materials. Windowless solar reactor admits concentrated Sunlight through exhaust aperture. Pressure in reactor maintained dynamically.

  18. Procedure for Balancing an Air Distribution System with Decentralised Fan

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunner, Amalie; Hultmark, Göran

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents results from an on-going project concerning new design procedures for mechanical ventilation systems with low energy use. Conventional constant air volume (CAV) systems are usually balanced using flat plate dampers. The purpose of using balancing dampers is to intentionally introduce pressure drops in the duct system thus nominal airflows are achieved throughout the ductwork within specified tolerances. However, introduction of pressure drops will increase energy requirement for the ventilation system and in addition, balancing a duct system is a time consuming task and often flawed. This paper presents a new procedure for balancing of CAV systems in combination with decentralised fans. The new system was based on replacing the balancing dampers with decentralised fans. By replacing the balancing dampers with decentralised fans, airflows can be balanced by adjusting the speed of the fans. In conventional air distribution systems the fan provides the necessary pressure to overcome the resistance in the branch with the highest pressure resistance. This gives an unnecessary overpressure in the remaining branches that does not provide any useful purpose. In order to decrease the fan pressure requirements the fan was dimensioned for the branch with the least pressure resistance. The decentralised fans then provided sufficient pressure to overcome the exact resistance in the corresponding branch. The results show that by using decentralised fans in duct systems instead of dampers there is a potential for energy saving. In this study the calculated saving in the power consumption for the main fan was found to be 40%. The results also show that when dampers are replaced with decentralised fans with the same efficiency the overall power saving potential was 16%. In the study a mock-up of the calculated ventilation system was tested. Results from the calculations and the measurements showed a good correlation and the balancing procedure was acceptable

  19. Keeping Earth at work: Using thermodynamics to develop a holistic theory of the Earth system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleidon, Axel

    2010-05-01

    The Earth system is unique among terrestrial planets in that it is maintained in a state far from thermodynamic equilibrium. Practically all processes are irreversible in their nature, thereby producing entropy, and these would act to destroy this state of disequilibrium. In order to maintain disequilibrium in steady state, driving forces are required that perform the work to maintain the Earth system in a state far from equilibrium. To characterize the functioning of the Earth system and the interactions among its subsystems we need to consider all terms of the first and second law of thermodynamics. While the global energy balance is well established in climatology, the global entropy and work balances receive little, if any, attention. Here I will present first steps in developing a holistic theory of the Earth system including quantifications of the relevant terms that is based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics. This theory allows us to compare the significance of different processes in driving and maintaining disequilibrium, allows us to explore interactions by investigating the role of power transfer among processes, and specifically illustrate the significance of life in driving planetary disequilibrium. Furthermore, the global work balance demonstrates the significant impact of human activity and it provides an estimate for the availability of renewable sources of free energy within the Earth system. Hence, I conclude that a holistic thermodynamic theory of the Earth system is not just some academic exercise of marginal use, but essential for a profound understanding of the Earth system and its response to change.

  20. High-pressure neutron diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Hongwu [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2011-01-10

    This lecture will cover progress and prospect of applications of high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques to Earth and materials sciences. I will first introduce general high-pressure research topics and available in-situ high-pressure techniques. Then I'll talk about high-pressure neutron diffraction techniques using two types of pressure cells: fluid-driven and anvil-type cells. Lastly, I will give several case studies using these techniques, particularly, those on hydrogen-bearing materials and magnetic transitions.

  1. Earth Radiation Budget Experiment instrument design status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopia, L. P.; Luther, M. R.

    1981-01-01

    The design configuration of Earth Radiation Budget Experiment (ERBE) instruments are presented. The ERBE scanners and nonscanners are discussed in terms of hardware and optical development, operational parameters, and calibration plans for ground and flight systems. The various instrument designs are given and described in detail. It is emphasized that the design goal is to approach state-of-the-art laboratory radiometric accuracies with spaceflight qualified hardware in an earth orbit environment with a projected operational lifetime of over two years. Accurate inputs to models of weather and climate are expected which will allow a better understanding of radiation transfer and the energy balance of the earth.

  2. Identifying Balance in a Balanced Scorecard System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aravamudhan, Suhanya; Kamalanabhan, T. J.

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, strategic management concepts seem to be gaining greater attention from the academicians and the practitioner's alike. Balanced Scorecard (BSC) concept is one such management concepts that has spread in worldwide business and consulting communities. The BSC translates mission and vision statements into a comprehensive set of…

  3. Leadership: A Balancing Act

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining balance in leadership can be difficult because balance is affected by the personality, strengths, and attitudes of the leader as well as the complicated environment within and outside the community college itself. This article explores what being a leader at the community college means, what the threats are to effective leadership, and…

  4. Conclusion: The balanced company

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, John Damm; Jensen, Inger

    2013-01-01

    This concluding chapter brings together the various research findings of the book "The balanced company - organizing for the 21st Century" and develops a general overview of their implications for our understanding of the balancing processes unfolding in companies and organizations.

  5. Martian Atmospheric Pressure Static Charge Elimination Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A Martian pressure static charge elimination tool is currently in development in the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory (ESPL) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. In standard Earth atmosphere conditions, static charge can be neutralized from an insulating surface using air ionizers. These air ionizers generate ions through corona breakdown. The Martian atmosphere is 7 Torr of mostly carbon dioxide, which makes it inherently difficult to use similar methods as those used for standard atmosphere static elimination tools. An initial prototype has been developed to show feasibility of static charge elimination at low pressure, using corona discharge. A needle point and thin wire loop are used as the corona generating electrodes. A photo of the test apparatus is shown below. Positive and negative high voltage pulses are sent to the needle point. This creates positive and negative ions that can be used for static charge neutralization. In a preliminary test, a floating metal plate was charged to approximately 600 volts under Martian atmospheric conditions. The static elimination tool was enabled and the voltage on the metal plate dropped rapidly to -100 volts. This test data is displayed below. Optimization is necessary to improve the electrostatic balance of the static elimination tool.

  6. Acceleration-compensated pressure transducer has fast response

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    Flush-diaphragm transducer accurately measures small dynamic pressures when it is subjected to high accelerations and severe temperature environments. The transducer uses piezoelectric crystals for measuring the pressure and balancing out acceleration forces.

  7. Pressure Dome for High-Pressure Electrolyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, Timothy; Schmitt, Edwin

    2012-01-01

    A high-strength, low-weight pressure vessel dome was designed specifically to house a high-pressure [2,000 psi (approx. = 13.8 MPa)] electrolyzer. In operation, the dome is filled with an inert gas pressurized to roughly 100 psi (approx. = 690 kPa) above the high, balanced pressure product oxygen and hydrogen gas streams. The inert gas acts to reduce the clamping load on electrolyzer stack tie bolts since the dome pressure acting axially inward helps offset the outward axial forces from the stack gas pressure. Likewise, radial and circumferential stresses on electrolyzer frames are minimized. Because the dome is operated at a higher pressure than the electrolyzer product gas, any external electrolyzer leak prevents oxygen or hydrogen from leaking into the dome. Instead the affected stack gas stream pressure rises detectably, thereby enabling a system shutdown. All electrical and fluid connections to the stack are made inside the pressure dome and require special plumbing and electrical dome interfaces for this to be accomplished. Further benefits of the dome are that it can act as a containment shield in the unlikely event of a catastrophic failure. Studies indicate that, for a given active area (and hence, cell ID), frame outside diameter must become ever larger to support stresses at higher operating pressures. This can lead to a large footprint and increased costs associated with thicker and/or larger diameter end-plates, tie-rods, and the frames themselves. One solution is to employ rings that fit snugly around the frame. This complicates stack assembly and is sometimes difficult to achieve in practice, as its success is strongly dependent on frame and ring tolerances, gas pressure, and operating temperature. A pressure dome permits an otherwise low-pressure stack to operate at higher pressures without growing the electrolyzer hardware. The pressure dome consists of two machined segments. An O-ring is placed in an O-ring groove in the flange of the bottom segment and is trapped by the flange on the top dome segment when these components are bolted together with high-strength bolts. The pressure dome has several unique features. It is made (to ASME Pressure Vessel guidelines) in a high-strength aluminum alloy with the strength of stainless steel and the weight benefits of aluminum. The flange of the upper dome portion contains specially machined flats for mounting the dome, and other flats dedicated to the special feedthroughs for electrical connections. A pressure dome can be increased in length to house larger stacks (more cells) of the same diameter with the simple addition of a cylindrical segment. To aid in dome assembly, two stainless steel rings are employed. One is used beneath the heads of the high-strength bolts in lieu of individual hardened washers, and another is used instead of individual nuts. Like electrolyzers could be operated at low or high pressures simply by operating the electrolyzer outside or inside a pressurized dome.

  8. Statistics of pressure and of pressure-velocity correlations in isotropic turbulence

    OpenAIRE

    Biferale, L.; Gualtieri, P; Toschi, F.

    2000-01-01

    Some pressure and pressure-velocity correlation in a direct numerical simulations of a three-dimensional turbulent flow at moderate Reynolds numbers have been analyzed. We have identified a set of pressure-velocity correlations which posseses a good scaling behaviour. Such a class of pressure-velocity correlations are determined by looking at the energy-balance across any sub-volume of the flow. According to our analysis, pressure scaling is determined by the dimensional ass...

  9. Balance Evaluation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    NeuroCom's Balance Master is a system to assess and then retrain patients with balance and mobility problems and is used in several medical centers. NeuroCom received assistance in research and funding from NASA, and incorporated technology from testing mechanisms for astronauts after shuttle flights. The EquiTest and Balance Master Systems are computerized posturography machines that measure patient responses to movement of a platform on which the subject is standing or sitting, then provide assessments of the patient's postural alignment and stability.

  10. Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may form. Pressure sores are also called bedsores, pressure ulcers and decubitus ulcers. Symptoms What are the symptoms of a ... put in a vein) or orally (by mouth). Prevention How can pressure sores be prevented? The most ...

  11. Energy Balance and Obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies of energy balance and obesity as they relate to cancer. Aspects include the effects of body mass index (BMI), body composition (waist circumference, etc) dietary intake, and physical activity.

  12. Dizziness and Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... eyes, the inner ear (vestibular system), and the sensory systems of the body (such as the skin, muscles, ... function • How vision, the inner ear, and other sensory systems affect functional balance Some of the tests of ...

  13. National Energy Balance - 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Energy Balance - 1985 shows energy fluxes of several primary and secondary energy sources, since the production to the final consumption in the main economic sectors, since 1974 to 1984 (E.G.)

  14. National Energy Balance - 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Energy Balance - 1984 shows energy fluxes of several primary and secondary energy sources, since the productions to final consumption in the main economic sectors, since 1973 to 1983. (E.G.)

  15. National Energy Balance-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Energy Balance - 1987 showns energy fluxes of several primary and secondary energy sources, since the production to final consumption in the main economic sectors, since 1971 to 1986. (E.G.)

  16. Energy Balance and Obesity

    OpenAIRE

    Hill, James O.; Wyatt, Holly R.; Peters, John C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the interplay among energy intake, energy expenditure and body energy stores and illustrates how an understanding of energy balance can help develop strategies to reduce obesity. First, reducing obesity will require modifying both energy intake and energy expenditure and not simply focusing on either alone. Food restriction alone will not be effective in reducing obesity if human physiology is biased toward achieving energy balance at a high energy flux (i.e. at a high le...

  17. Bruhat and balanced graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Ehrenborg, Richard; Readdy, Margaret A.

    2013-01-01

    We generalize chain enumeration in graded partially ordered sets by relaxing the graded, poset and Eulerian requirements. The resulting balanced digraphs, which include the classical Eulerian posets having an R-labeling, implies the existence of the (non-homogeneous) cd-index, a key invariant for studying inequalities for the flag vector of polytopes. Mirroring Alexander duality for Eulerian posets, we show an analogue of Alexander duality for balanced digraphs. For Bruhat g...

  18. Balancing Trust and Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, Søren

    2010-01-01

    This paper focuses on the leadership challenge of balancing trust and control. The relation between trust and control has for a long time been a puzzling issue for management researchers. In the paper I first show that there has been a dramatic change in the way the relation between trust and control has been conceptualized in trust research. While the relation between trust and control earlier was conceptualized as a more or less stable balance between trust and control, more recent research co...

  19. The Balance Evaluation Systems Test (BESTest) to Differentiate Balance Deficits

    OpenAIRE

    Horak, Fay B; Wrisley, Diane M.; Frank, James

    2009-01-01

    Background: Current clinical balance assessment tools do not aim to help therapists identify the underlying postural control systems responsible for poor functional balance. By identifying the disordered systems underlying balance control, therapists can direct specific types of intervention for different types of balance problems.

  20. Blood pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure is considered to be a systolic blood pressure of 115 millimeters of mercury a diastolic pressure of 70 millimeters of mercury (stated as "115 over 70"). If an individual were to have a consistent blood pressure reading of 140 over 90, he would ...

  1. Free oscillation of the Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Abedini

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available   This work is a study of the Earths free oscillations considering a merge of solid and liquid model. At the turn of 19th century Geophysicists presented the theory of the free oscillations for a self-gravitating, isotropic and compressible sphere. Assuming a steel structure for an Earth size sphere, they predicted a period of oscillation of about 1 hour. About 50 years later, the free oscillations of stars was studied by Cowling and others. They classified the oscillation modes of the stars into acoustic and gravity modes on the basis of their driving forces. These are pressure and buoyancy forces respectively. The earliest measurements for the period of the free oscillations of the Earth was made by Benyove from a study of Kamchathca earthquake. Since then, the Geophysicists have been trying to provide a theoretical basis for these measurements. Recently, the theory concerning oscillations of celestial fluids is extended by Sobouti to include the possible oscillations of the Earthlike bodies. Using the same technique, we study the free oscillations of a spherically symmetric, non-rotating and elastic model for the Earth.   We used the actual data of the Earths interior structure in our numerical calculations. Numerical results show that there exist three distinct oscillation modes namely acoustic, gravity and toroidal modes. These modes are driven by pressure, buoyancy and shear forces respectively. The shear force is due to the elastic properties of the solid part of the Earth. Our numerical results are consistent with the seismic data recorded from earthquake measurements.

  2. Balanced Integrated Regulatory Oversight

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reactor safety, protecting the public health and safety, and protecting the environment must always be the nuclear regulator's top priorities. Enabling the use of nuclear power for the benefit of society, while protecting the public and the environment requires the regulator to balance many factors. In addition, the regulator is only one part of the overall government that must consider many factors as it carries out its societal responsibilities. Some of the factors that must be balanced and the practical impacts on how the regulator carries out its responsibilities will be addressed. The first International Conference on Effective Regulatory Systems, held in Moscow, Russian Federation, in 2006, focused on safety and security challenges with a goal of improving regulatory effectiveness through cooperation and sharing of information and best practices. The challenge of meeting both safety and security objectives is one example of potentially competing programmes that must be balanced. Other balances that must be evaluated include the benefits of safety improvements compared to the cost of implementation, the use of deterministic and probabilistic approaches, communication openness balanced with the protection of information that could be used for detrimental purposes, and timeliness of regulatory decision making balanced with the need to perform quality work in support of oversight responsibilities. A balanced and integrated approach to regulatory oversight is vital to ensuring that the regulatory body remains effective in its mission to enable the use of nuclear power while protecting the public and the environment. This concept is applicable to nations beginning a nuclear programme as well as established and experienced regulatory bodies. (author)

  3. Nuclear reactor pressure vessels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reference is made to gas cooled reactors having pre-stressed concrete pressure vessels. Such pressure vessels entail the use of high grade thermal insulation, capable of satisfactory use in high pressure gas environments, in order to combat the sensitivity of concrete to high temperature. Temperature limitations both in regard to absolute temperature and allowable gradients through the vessel walls require the use of a protective thermal barrier on the inside of the pressure vessel wall to separate the gas coolant from the concrete. This barrier must also be designed to withstand, or be isolated from, the intense noise arising from the gas circulators. In the arrangement described the thermal barrier system comprises a metal liner to which is fixed an impervious inner metal membrane having flexible corrugated thinner metal portions. Heat resistant ilsultation is held between the metal liner and the inner membrane, and fitted vents are located between the insulation and the interior of the vessel for balancing the the pressure within the insulation and to provide controlled maximum pressure differential porting. The studs fixing the inner metal membrane to the metal liner may be hollow and act as the filter vents. (U.K.)

  4. Application of Pascal Principle in Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi Namin, M.

    2009-12-01

    The Pascal experiment is interpreted and the chamber is roughly defined. Pascal experiment in relation to Pascal principle compared with a chamber in the earth crust. It is conclude that: 1: The pressure (P) inside the Pascal's cylinder is the combination of two pressure; the external pressure (P1) and the hydraulic pressure (P2). Pc=P1+P2 The direction of the force is from top to bottom. In the case of the chamber the pressure is Pch=P1-P2 and its positive direction is regarded to be from bottom to top. P1 is the external pressure, and is the maximum pressure applied to chamber .The external pressure creates a constant internal pressure throughout the chamber .The magnitude of the constant pressure is based on the litho static pressure of the bottom of the chamber; because it is the maximum pressure that the chamber is connected. P1=?1gH+?2gh Where H is the overburden thickness, h is the highness of the chamber, ?1 is the density of the overburden and ?2 is density of country rock. The hydrostatic pressure within the chamber is P2=?3gh. Also ?3 is the density of the chamber. So the pressure inside the chamber would be: Pch=P1-P2 then Pch=?1gH+(?2-?3)gh. The equation above means that, the chamber pressure equals to the overburden pressure plus Archimedes pressure. 2: The word squeezing which is a vulgar word has an important physical meaning that is ((Pascal principle driving movement)).In another word, almost all movements, related to chambers, within the earth are a squeezing event which's, driving force is the steady constant pressure mentioned above. Any change in this pressure depends on the rupturing of the chamber and the behavior of the movement of the chamber matter. 3: If we provide a safety valve on piston of the Pascal's cylinder and increase the load we see the safety valve bursts and the matter inside the cylinder squeeze out .The pressure is from top to bottom but the movement is from bottom to top. The direction of force has changed 180° degree. This is Pascal's miracle and displays the all movements that pierce the earth surface and let the matter squeeze out.

  5. Water and sodium balance in space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Drummer, C; Norsk, P; Heer, M

    2001-01-01

    We have previously shown that fluid balances and body fluid regulation in microgravity (microG) differ from those on Earth (Drummer et al, Eur J Physiol 441:R66-R72, 2000). Arriving in microG leads to a redistribution of body fluid-composed of a shift of fluid to the upper part of the body and an exaggerated extravasation very early in-flight. The mechanisms for the increased vascular permeability are not known. Evaporation, oral hydration, and urinary fluid excretion, the major components of wa...

  6. Thermodynamics of the Earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applications of elementary thermodynamic principles to the dynamics of the Earth lead to robust, quantitative conclusions about the tectonic effects that arise from convection. The grand pattern of motion conveys deep heat to the surface, generating mechanical energy with a thermodynamic efficiency corresponding to that of a Carnot engine operating over the adiabatic temperature gradient between the heat source and sink. Referred to the total heat flux derived from the Earth's silicate mantle, the efficiency is 24% and the power generated, 7.7 x 1012 W, causes all the material deformation apparent as plate tectonics and the consequent geological processes. About 3.5% of this is released in seismic zones but little more than 0.2% as seismic waves. Even major earthquakes are only localized hiccups in this motion. Complications that arise from mineral phase transitions can be used to illuminate details of the motion. There are two superimposed patterns of convection, plate subduction and deep mantle plumes, driven by sources of buoyancy, negative and positive respectively, at the top and bottom of the mantle. The patterns of motion are controlled by the viscosity contrasts (>104 : 1) at these boundaries and are self-selected as the least dissipative mechanisms of heat transfer for convection in a body with very strong viscosity variation. Both are subjects of the thermodynamic efficiency argument. Convection also drives the motion in the fluid outer core that generates the geomagnetic field, although in that case there is an important energy contribution by compositional separation, as light solute is rejected by the solidifying inner core and mixed into the outer core, a process referred to as compositional convection. Uncertainty persists over the core energy balance because thermal conduction is a drain on core energy that has been a subject of diverse estimates, with attendant debate over the need for radiogenic heat in the core. The geophysical approach to thermal physics, especially thermal expansion and the Grueneisen parameter, invokes insights that have disappeared from view in 'mainstream' physics.

  7. Improving Balance Function Using Low Levels of Electrical Stimulation of the Balance Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, Jacob; Reschke, Millard; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Wood, Scott; Serrador, Jorge; Fiedler, Matthew; Kofman, Igor; Peters, Brian T.; Cohen, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Crewmembers returning from long-duration space flight face significant challenges due to the microgravity-induced inappropriate adaptations in balance/ sensorimotor function. The Neuroscience Laboratory at JSC is developing a method based on stochastic resonance to enhance the brain s ability to detect signals from the balance organs of the inner ear and use them for rapid improvement in balance skill, especially when combined with balance training exercises. This method involves a stimulus delivery system that is wearable/portable providing imperceptible electrical stimulation to the balance organs of the human body. Stochastic resonance (SR) is a phenomenon whereby the response of a nonlinear system to a weak periodic input signal is optimized by the presence of a particular non-zero level of noise. This phenomenon of SR is based on the concept of maximizing the flow of information through a system by a non-zero level of noise. Application of imperceptible SR noise coupled with sensory input in humans has been shown to improve motor, cardiovascular, visual, hearing, and balance functions. SR increases contrast sensitivity and luminance detection; lowers the absolute threshold for tone detection in normal hearing individuals; improves homeostatic function in the human blood pressure regulatory system; improves noise-enhanced muscle spindle function; and improves detection of weak tactile stimuli using mechanical or electrical stimulation. SR noise has been shown to improve postural control when applied as mechanical noise to the soles of the feet, or when applied as electrical noise at the knee and to the back muscles.

  8. A Simple Approach to Dynamic Material Balance in Gas-Condensate Reservoirs

    OpenAIRE

    Heidari Sureshjani M.; Gerami S.; Emadi M.A.

    2013-01-01

    In traditional material balance calculations, shut-in well pressure data are used to determine average reservoir pressure while recent techniques do not require the well to be shut-in and use instead flowing well pressure-rate data. These methods, which are known as “dynamic” material balance, are developed for single-phase flow (oil or gas) in reservoirs. However, utilization of such methods for gas-condensate reservoirs may create ...

  9. Cycle power balance analysis for liquid rocket engine with LO2/RP-1 propellant combination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jie; Wang, Kechang; Chen, Qizhi

    1992-06-01

    The gas generator cycle and staged combustion cycle with LO2/RP-1 propellants combination have been analyzed in this paper. The maximum combustion chamber pressure for various cycles has been found. The effect of combustion chamber pressure, sea level thrust, chamber mixture ratio, nozzle exit diameter on engine specific impulse and system balance parameters is given. The sensitivity dependences of efficiences, turbine pressure ratio, gas generator (or preburner) mixture ratio, and other design parameters on balance parameters, have been investigated.

  10. Solar influence on Earth’s climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiéblemont, Rémi; Matthes, Katja

    2015-08-01

    Understanding the influence of solar variability on the Earth’s climate requires knowledge of solar variability, solar-terrestrial interactions and observations, as well as mechanisms determining the response of the Earth’s climate system. A summary of our current understanding from observational and modeling studies will be presented with special focus on the top-down stratospheric UV and the bottom-up air-sea coupling mechanisms to discuss the influence of the solar forcing on climate natural variability.

  11. Multidimensional spectral load balancing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hendrickson, B.; Leland, R.

    1993-01-01

    We describe an algorithm for the static load balancing of scientific computations that generalizes and improves upon spectral bisection. Through a novel use of multiple eigenvectors, our new spectral algorithm can divide a computation into 4 or 8 pieces at once. These multidimensional spectral partitioning algorithms generate balanced partitions that have lower communication overhead and are less expensive to compute than those produced by spectral bisection. In addition, they automatically work to minimize message contention on a hypercube or mesh architecture. These spectral partitions are further improved by a multidimensional generalization of the Kernighan-Lin graph partitioning algorithm. Results on several computational grids are given and compared with other popular methods.

  12. Finding Your Balance

    CERN Document Server

    (CCL), Center for Creative Leadership; Patterson, Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Balance isn't an issue of time, but an issue of choice. It's about living your values by aligning your behavior with what you believe is really important. Aligning your behavior with your values is much like any other developmental experience; the basic process involves assessment, challenge, and support. You need to determine where you are, define where you want to go, and then put into place the tools you need to get there.Balance is about more than how you spend your time. It's about how you live your life. It's about recognizing that you have control over the choices you make and aligning

  13. Getting the balance right

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This 8 page leaflet is published by the Nuclear Electricity Information Group (NEIG) which is made up of eight different bodies working within the nuclear industry. It aims to present a balanced outline of the facts needed to form an opinion about energy policy in the UK. It looks at the price of electricity, other sources of electricity, (oil and coal, solar power, wind power, water power), safety in the nuclear industry, nuclear waste disposal and risks from radiation. The NEIG is in favour of a balanced energy programme with nuclear energy being only a part of the overall scheme. (U.K.)

  14. The Earth's atmosphere its physics and dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Saha, Kshudiram

    2008-01-01

    The book entitled ""Atmospheric science and Global Warming"" covers a wide area of the atmospheric science, focusing particularly on those physical and dynamical aspects of our environment which tend to create heat sources and sinks in the earth-atmosphere system and which it seeks to balance through circulation at different time and space scales. The processes of heat transfer in the atmosphere and ocean by general circulation and by waves and oscillations are discussed in detail. The heat balance of the atmosphere is discussed after taking into consideration the role of various types of gree

  15. The balanced scorecard: sustainable performance assessment for forensic laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houck, Max; Speaker, Paul J; Fleming, Arron Scott; Riley, Richard A

    2012-12-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the concept of the balanced scorecard into the laboratory management environment. The balanced scorecard is a performance measurement matrix designed to capture financial and non-financial metrics that provide insight into the critical success factors for an organization, effectively aligning organization strategy to key performance objectives. The scorecard helps organizational leaders by providing balance from two perspectives. First, it ensures an appropriate mix of performance metrics from across the organization to achieve operational excellence; thereby the balanced scorecard ensures that no single or limited group of metrics dominates the assessment process, possibly leading to long-term inferior performance. Second, the balanced scorecard helps leaders offset short term performance pressures by giving recognition and weight to long-term laboratory needs that, if not properly addressed, might jeopardize future laboratory performance. PMID:23068771

  16. NASA Earth Exchange (NEX)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The NASA Earth Exchange (NEX) represents a new platform for the Earth science community that provides a mechanism for scientific collaboration and knowledge...

  17. Peer Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... She'd just had a big dose of peer pressure. Who Are Your Peers? When you were a ... adults — parents, teachers, guidance counselors, etc. — talk about peer pressure more than the benefits of belonging to a ...

  18. Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressure sores are areas of damaged skin caused by staying in one position for too long. They commonly ... wheelchair, or are unable to change your position. Pressure sores can cause serious infections, some of which are ...

  19. Pressure ulcer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... area forms a blister, then an open sore Pressure sores most commonly occur on the Buttocks Elbow Hips Heels Ankles Shoulders Back Back of head Pressure sores categorized as deep tissue injury may be purple ...

  20. National Energy Balance - 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Energy Balance - 1981, shows a new metodology and information in level of several economic sectors, as well as a separation of primary and secondary energy sources, its energy fluxes, i.e. production, imports, exports, consumption, etc...(E.G.)

  1. National Energy Balance - 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Energy Balance - 1986 shows energy fluxes of several primary and secondary energy sources, since the production to the final consumption in the main economic sectors, since 1970 to 1985. The incorporation of a new brazilian information is done. (E.G.)

  2. Balancing through episodic learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheuer, John Damm

    2013-01-01

    Peter Jarvis’s theory about learning suggests that human beings learn and change as a result of hearing, seeing, smelling, tasting, touching, and feeling. They change and learn by interacting with other humans, things, and events in certain time-space contexts and by reflecting upon these, as well as upon wished-for future states or past experiences, knowledge, and history, and upon what these experiences mean to one’s own self and identity. This chapter explores how female top managers have to reflect and find a balance in their work-family lives on the basis of interaction with, and inputs from, all these human and nonhuman elements. It shows how they have to overcome relational inertia related to all of them in order to succeed in obtaining such a balance. If a certain degree of balance between elements is achieved at work, as well as on the home front, the female top manager may experience being in a state of balance.

  3. Macronutrient balance and lifespan

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Stephen J.; David RAUBENHEIMER

    2009-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition is widely regarded to be a universal mechanism for prolonging lifespan. It is generally believed that the benefits of DR arise from eating fewer calories (termed caloric restriction, CR). Here we argue that, rather than calories, the key determinant of the relationship between diet and longevity is the balance ...

  4. National energy balance - 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The national energy balance of the 1976 shows several modifications in relation to the last year. The historical serie is based in more confiable information, from several energy companies. The most greater modifications are on energy source of hard control, such as lignite and charcoal for non-siderurgic uses. (E.G.)

  5. National energy balance - 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The national energy balance of 1978 shows some modifications in relation to the last year. New tables were included aiming to show the brazilian energy situation, such as the hydraulic potential and the non-renewable energy resources. (E.G.)

  6. 1992 provisional energy balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper gives a provisional energy balance in France in 1992. After a brief study of economical and energy context in world wide, this paper gives informations about energy dependence ratio and evolutions of energy sources (electric power, coal, petroleum, natural gas), evolution of energy consumption. 1 fig,. 4 tab

  7. Monitoring Earth's Climate with Shortwave Hyperspectral Reflectance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilewskie, Peter

    The Sun provides nearly all the energy that fuels the dynamical, chemical, and biological processes in the Earth system. Absorbed solar radiation, the difference between incoming and reflected sunlight, defines Earth’s equilibrium temperature and, along with the emitted infrared radiation, determines the climate state of the planet. The transfer of solar radiation through the atmosphere is modulated by wavelength-specific interactions that are unique for given surface types and the intervening atmospheric gases and condensed species. Reflected radiation that exits the Earth’s atmosphere carries with it the complex fingerprint of the Earth system state. How this signal varies temporally, spatially, and spectrally is a measure of those processes within the Earth system that affect climate change. Despite its importance to the basic energy balance between Earth and the solar-terrestrial environment in which it resides, a precise record of the nature of reflected solar spectral radiation over all climate-relevant time scales remains elusive. A primary goal of a climate observing system is to obtain climate benchmark data records with sufficient accuracy for identifying climate variability on decadal time scales and longer, and with sufficient information content to attribute change to underlying causes. Until recently, detecting climate change signatures in reflected solar radiance has been hindered by instrument accuracy and stability, insufficient spectral coverage and resolution, and inherent sampling limitations from low-Earth orbit observations. This talk will discuss the challenges to monitoring the shortwave energy budget from space. I will present new studies on methods to separate the various contributions in the top-of-atmosphere outgoing shortwave radiance using existing satellite (SCIAMACHY) data and explore methods to enhance trend detection in hyperspectral reflectance time series. Finally, I look ahead to the requirements for a climate observing system for monitoring shortwave hyperspectral reflectance, the Earth Climate Hyperspectral Observatory (ECHO).

  8. A balancing act: Physical balance, through arousal, influences size perception

    OpenAIRE

    Geuss, Michael N.; Stefanucci, Jeanine K.; de Benedictis-Kessner, Justin; Stevens, Nicholas R.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research demonstrates that manipulating vision influences balance. Here, we question whether manipulating balance can influence vision and how it may influence vision, specifically the perception of width. In Experiment 1, participants estimated the width of beams while balanced and unbalanced. When unbalanced, participants judged the widths to be smaller. One possible explanation is that unbalanced participants did not view the stimulus as long as when balanced because they were foc...

  9. Why Earth Science?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael J.

    2004-01-01

    This article briefly describes Earth science. The study of Earth science provides the foundation for an understanding of the Earth, its processes, its resources, and its environment. Earth science is the study of the planet in its entirety, how its lithosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and biosphere work together as systems and how they affect…

  10. Earth magnetism and the economic behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Melo, L

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides an analysis of how the current economic crisis and the changes in the earth magnetism can be an opportunity to develop an economic system based on more balanced economic relationships. Consciousness is fundamental to achieve this. A practical example, examined in the article, to understand how consciousness and the belief systems affect the observed reality, is associated with the effect that the credibility of economic authorities and individuals’ expectations have on the...

  11. Modeling the Surface Temperature of Earth-like Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladilo, Giovanni; Silva, Laura; Murante, Giuseppe; Filippi, Luca; Provenzale, Antonello

    2015-05-01

    We introduce a novel Earth-like planet surface temperature model (ESTM) for habitability studies based on the spatial-temporal distribution of planetary surface temperatures. The ESTM adopts a surface energy balance model (EBM) complemented by: radiative-convective atmospheric column calculations, a set of physically based parameterizations of meridional transport, and descriptions of surface and cloud properties more refined than in standard EBMs. The parameterization is valid for rotating terrestrial planets with shallow atmospheres and moderate values of axis obliquity (? ? 45{}^\\circ ). Comparison with a 3D model of atmospheric dynamics from the literature shows that the equator-to-pole temperature differences predicted by the two models agree within ? 5 K when the rotation rate, insolation, surface pressure and planet radius are varied in the intervals 0.5? {? }/{{{? }}\\oplus }? 2, 0.75? S/{{S}\\circ }? 1.25, 0.3? p/(1 bar)? 10, and 0.5? R/{{R}\\oplus }? 2, respectively. The ESTM has an extremely low computational cost and can be used when the planetary parameters are scarcely known (as for most exoplanets) and/or whenever many runs for different parameter configurations are needed. Model simulations of a test-case exoplanet (Kepler-62e) indicate that an uncertainty in surface pressure within the range expected for terrestrial planets may impact the mean temperature by ˜ 60 K. Within the limits of validity of the ESTM, the impact of surface pressure is larger than that predicted by uncertainties in rotation rate, axis obliquity, and ocean fractions. We discuss the possibility of performing a statistical ranking of planetary habitability taking advantage of the flexibility of the ESTM.

  12. An ideal balance?

    OpenAIRE

    Mair, Jane

    2013-01-01

    Considers the intersection between employment policy and family law, and the changes in work and family regarding traditional gender roles. Examines UK and EU policy initiatives aimed at achieving a better work/life balance for employees with children. Argues that many of the policy aspirations are predicated on an equal opportunities employment model that may not exist in practice and also fail to reflect the realities of family life.

  13. Striking a “perfect” balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    Sixty seconds. That's one that features Patrick Stewart, the actor most well-known for his portrayal of Captain Jean-Luc Picard on “Star Trek.” Another, a 30-second spot, includes a voice-over by film star Linda Hunt.These film “trailers,” called “Perfect Balance,” are public service announcements (PSAs) that call attention to the potential threat of global climate change. Movie theaters in at least 60 countries will air the spots beginning in October.

  14. Balancing beyond the horizon?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kluth, Michael Friederich; Pilegaard, Jess

    2011-01-01

    The present article seeks to make sense of recent European Union (EU) naval capability changes by applying neo-realist theory to the EU as a collective actor in the global balance of power. The paper compares two different strands of neorealist theory by deducing key predictions about the expected naval posture of the Union and the corresponding expected changes in capabilities. These predictions are subsequently held up against post-cold war data on naval acquisitions in the EU. The paper concl...

  15. Energy balance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhurandhar, N V; Schoeller, D; Brown, A W; Heymsfield, S B; Thomas, D; Sørensen, T I A; Speakman, J R; Jeansonne, M; Allison, D B

    2015-01-01

    Energy intake (EI) and physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) are key modifiable determinants of energy balance, traditionally assessed by self-report despite its repeated demonstration of considerable inaccuracies. We argue here that it is time to move from the common view that self-reports of EI and PAEE are imperfect, but nevertheless deserving of use, to a view commensurate with the evidence that self-reports of EI and PAEE are so poor that they are wholly unacceptable for scientific re...

  16. Energy balance measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dhurandhar, N V; Schoeller, D; Brown, A W; Heymsfield, S B; Thomas, D; Sørensen, T I A; Speakman, J R; Jeansonne, M; Allison, D B

    2014-01-01

    Energy intake (EI) and physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) are key modifiable determinants of energy balance, traditionally assessed by self-report despite its repeated demonstration of considerable inaccuracies. We argue here that it is time to move from the common view that self-reports of EI and PAEE are imperfect, but nevertheless deserving of use, to a view commensurate with the evidence that self-reports of EI and PAEE are so poor that they are wholly unacceptable for scientific re...

  17. National energy balance - 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on available data from IBGE, CNP/Petrobras, Eletrobras, Nuclebras and other governmental enterprises the National Energy Balance was done. This publication covers since 1965 to 1975. In conformity to the international rules, the energy resources used for non-energy purposes were excluded. The energy production and consumption for the next ten years were forecasted, considering the actual brazilian energy policy. (E.G.)

  18. Analysis of Balancing Markets

    OpenAIRE

    Kiener, Elsa

    2006-01-01

    During the 20th century, most countries had their electricity production, transport and distribution organised as vertically integrated monopoly. Since the 90s more and more countries, especially in Europe, have replaced their state monopoly by an open market to manage their electrical power system. In order to settle a deregulated market of electricity, countries must adopt new methods and rules for trading electricity, planning production and managing the balance between electricity product...

  19. Balance-bot

    OpenAIRE

    Abreu, Victor Vicente

    2009-01-01

    Research on inverted pendulum has gained momentum over the last decade on a number of robotic laboratories over the world; due to its unstable proprieties is a good example for control engineers to verify a control theory. To verify that the pendulum can balance we can make some simulations using a closed-loop controller method such as the linear quadratic regulator or the proportional–integral–derivative method. Also the idea of robotic teleoperation is gaining ground. Control...

  20. Kin Selection - Mutation Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dyken, J. David Van; Linksvayer, Timothy Arnold; Wade, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Social conflict, in the form of intraspecific selfish "cheating" has been observed in a number of natural systems. However, a formal, evolutionary genetic theory of social cheating that provides an explanatory, predictive framework for these observations is lacking. Here we derive the kin selection-mutation balance, which provides an evolutionary null hypothesis for the statics and dynamics of cheating. When social interactions have linear fitness effects and Hamilton´s rule is satisfie...

  1. Ballet Balance Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Camilla; Erleben, Kenny; Sporring, Jon

    2006-01-01

    Animating physically realistic human characters is challenging, since human observers are highly tuned to recognize human cues such as emotion and gender from motion patterns. The main contribution of this paper is a new model firmly based on biomechanics, which is used to animate balance and basic movements of a ballet dancers. It is supported by computer simulated experiments and it is in good agreement with biomechanical measurements of real-life dancers. Our results questions the previous ap...

  2. Explosive Target Balances

    OpenAIRE

    Potrafke, Niklas; Reischmann, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Using the new unit root test by Phillips et al. (2011) we show that the Target balances of the German Bundesbank have been exploding from the beginning of 2009 to the beginning of 2013. By implementing a full-allotment policy and reducing the required minimum quality of collaterals in October 2008, the European Central Bank (ECB) refinanced credits in the GIIPS countries to a large extent. Private capital flowed out of the GIIPS countries (Greece, Italy, Ireland, Portugal and Spain), and the ...

  3. The Balanced Company

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Controlling the sustainability of production processes and ethical employment of the work force in suppliers' production facilities far away from the home country has resulted in new challenges for managers. They now have to consider how important it is for customers, investors and employees to see that a company is respected in wider society and behaves according to ethical standards. Strategists and Leaders need to make balanced choices about long-term goals and the allocation of resources. Th...

  4. Balancing mechanism status: May 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RTE ensures the real-time balance between production and consumption and deals with congestion on the French electricity system. The Balancing Mechanism assists in the accomplishment of this task. As in many countries, and after extensive dialogue with representatives from the market's various players, RTE proposes a Balancing Mechanism in the form of a permanent and transparent system of calls for tender. The system is open to everyone and provides a real-time reserve of power that can be used for balancing either upward or downward. RTE takes advantage of these offers according to economic precedence, taking into account the system's operating conditions. It pays for them at the offer price. There are two types of offer: - Upward offer: increase in production, decrease in consumption, imports, - Downward offer: decrease in production, increase in consumption, exports. For a Balancing Entity, an offer systematically consists of: a balancing direction (upward/downward), a time period, a price that may vary according to six time slots. RTE publishes each month a Balancing Mechanism Report. which includes the following information: - energy volumes activated to ensure the balance of the system and to resolve congestion; - minimum and maximum prices of offers activated to balance the system; - daily trends calculated according to the predominant value of the overall upward or downward trend; - balancing shares by technology (nuclear, thermal, hydraulic); - characteristics of the five most activated balancing entities; - balances/imbalances accounts and production/consumption overcharge; - congestion curbing costs on the French electricity system; - energy volumes activated to ensure the balance of the system according to contracts between RTE and other Balance Responsible entities (UK, Belgium, Italy, Germany, Switzerland); - reliability of the provisional data supplied by RTE about the balancing trend; - availability of RTE's information services (planning, balancing mechanism, block exchange notification, market indicators). This report presents the above information for May 2009. (J.S.)

  5. Balancing mechanism status: October 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RTE ensures the real-time balance between production and consumption and deals with congestion on the French electricity system. The Balancing Mechanism assists in the accomplishment of this task. As in many countries, and after extensive dialogue with representatives from the market's various players, RTE proposes a Balancing Mechanism in the form of a permanent and transparent system of calls for tender. The system is open to everyone and provides a real-time reserve of power that can be used for balancing either upward or downward. RTE takes advantage of these offers according to economic precedence, taking into account the system's operating conditions. It pays for them at the offer price. There are two types of offer: - Upward offer: increase in production, decrease in consumption, imports, - Downward offer: decrease in production, increase in consumption, exports. For a Balancing Entity, an offer systematically consists of: a balancing direction (upward/downward), a time period, a price that may vary according to six time slots. RTE publishes each month a Balancing Mechanism Report. which includes the following information: - energy volumes activated to ensure the balance of the system and to resolve congestion; - minimum and maximum prices of offers activated to balance the system; - daily trends calculated according to the predominant value of the overall upward or downward trend; - balancing shares by technology (nuclear, thermal, hydraulic); - characteristics of the five most activated balancing entities; - balances/imbalances accounts and production/consumption overcharge; - congestion curbing costs on the French electricity system; - energy volumes activated to ensure the balance of the system according to contracts between RTE and other Balance Responsible entities (UK, Belgium, Italy, Germany, Switzerland); - reliability of the provisional data supplied by RTE about the balancing trend; - availability of RTE's information services (planning, balancing mechanism, block exchange notification, market indicators). This report presents the above information for October 2009. (J.S.)

  6. Balancing mechanism status: July 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RTE ensures the real-time balance between production and consumption and deals with congestion on the French electricity system. The Balancing Mechanism assists in the accomplishment of this task. As in many countries, and after extensive dialogue with representatives from the market's various players, RTE proposes a Balancing Mechanism in the form of a permanent and transparent system of calls for tender. The system is open to everyone and provides a real-time reserve of power that can be used for balancing either upward or downward. RTE takes advantage of these offers according to economic precedence, taking into account the system's operating conditions. It pays for them at the offer price. There are two types of offer: - Upward offer: increase in production, decrease in consumption, imports, - Downward offer: decrease in production, increase in consumption, exports. For a Balancing Entity, an offer systematically consists of: a balancing direction (upward/downward), a time period, a price that may vary according to six time slots. RTE publishes each month a Balancing Mechanism Report. which includes the following information: - energy volumes activated to ensure the balance of the system and to resolve congestion; - minimum and maximum prices of offers activated to balance the system; - daily trends calculated according to the predominant value of the overall upward or downward trend; - balancing shares by technology (nuclear, thermal, hydraulic); - characteristics of the five most activated balancing entities; - balances/imbalances accounts and production/consumption overcharge; - congestion curbing costs on the French electricity system; - energy volumes activated to ensure the balance of the system according to contracts between RTE and other Balance Responsible entities (UK, Belgium, Italy, Germany, Switzerland); - reliability of the provisional data supplied by RTE about the balancing trend; - availability of RTE's information services (planning, balancing mechanism, block exchange notification, market indicators). This report presents the above information for July 2009. (J.S.)

  7. Balancing mechanism status: September 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RTE ensures the real-time balance between production and consumption and deals with congestion on the French electricity system. The Balancing Mechanism assists in the accomplishment of this task. As in many countries, and after extensive dialogue with representatives from the market's various players, RTE proposes a Balancing Mechanism in the form of a permanent and transparent system of calls for tender. The system is open to everyone and provides a real-time reserve of power that can be used for balancing either upward or downward. RTE takes advantage of these offers according to economic precedence, taking into account the system's operating conditions. It pays for them at the offer price. There are two types of offer: - Upward offer: increase in production, decrease in consumption, imports, - Downward offer: decrease in production, increase in consumption, exports. For a Balancing Entity, an offer systematically consists of: a balancing direction (upward/downward), a time period, a price that may vary according to six time slots. RTE publishes each month a Balancing Mechanism Report. which includes the following information: - energy volumes activated to ensure the balance of the system and to resolve congestion; - minimum and maximum prices of offers activated to balance the system; - daily trends calculated according to the predominant value of the overall upward or downward trend; - balancing shares by technology (nuclear, thermal, hydraulic); - characteristics of the five most activated balancing entities; - balances/imbalances accounts and production/consumption overcharge; - congestion curbing costs on the French electricity system; - energy volumes activated to ensure the balance of the system according to contracts between RTE and other Balance Responsible entities (UK, Belgium, Italy, Germany, Switzerland); - reliability of the provisional data supplied by RTE about the balancing trend; - availability of RTE's information services (planning, balancing mechanism, block exchange notification, market indicators). This report presents the above information for September 2009. (J.S.)

  8. Balancing mechanism status: January 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RTE ensures the real-time balance between production and consumption and deals with congestion on the French electricity system. The Balancing Mechanism assists in the accomplishment of this task. As in many countries, and after extensive dialogue with representatives from the market's various players, RTE proposes a Balancing Mechanism in the form of a permanent and transparent system of calls for tender. The system is open to everyone and provides a real-time reserve of power that can be used for balancing either upward or downward. RTE takes advantage of these offers according to economic precedence, taking into account the system's operating conditions. It pays for them at the offer price. There are two types of offer: - Upward offer: increase in production, decrease in consumption, imports, - Downward offer: decrease in production, increase in consumption, exports. For a Balancing Entity, an offer systematically consists of: a balancing direction (upward/downward), a time period, a price that may vary according to six time slots. RTE publishes each month a Balancing Mechanism Report. which includes the following information: - energy volumes activated to ensure the balance of the system and to resolve congestion; - minimum and maximum prices of offers activated to balance the system; - daily trends calculated according to the predominant value of the overall upward or downward trend; - balancing shares by technology (nuclear, thermal, hydraulic); - characteristics of the five most activated balancing entities; - balances/imbalances accounts and production/consumption overcharge; - congestion curbing costs on the French electricity system; - energy volumes activated to ensure the balance of the system according to contracts between RTE and other Balance Responsible entities (UK, Belgium, Italy, Germany, Switzerland); - reliability of the provisional data supplied by RTE about the balancing trend; - availability of RTE's information services (planning, balancing mechanism, block exchange notification, market indicators). This report presents the above information for January 2009. (J.S.)

  9. Balancing mechanism status: February 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RTE ensures the real-time balance between production and consumption and deals with congestion on the French electricity system. The Balancing Mechanism assists in the accomplishment of this task. As in many countries, and after extensive dialogue with representatives from the market's various players, RTE proposes a Balancing Mechanism in the form of a permanent and transparent system of calls for tender. The system is open to everyone and provides a real-time reserve of power that can be used for balancing either upward or downward. RTE takes advantage of these offers according to economic precedence, taking into account the system's operating conditions. It pays for them at the offer price. There are two types of offer: - Upward offer: increase in production, decrease in consumption, imports, - Downward offer: decrease in production, increase in consumption, exports. For a Balancing Entity, an offer systematically consists of: a balancing direction (upward/downward), a time period, a price that may vary according to six time slots. RTE publishes each month a Balancing Mechanism Report. which includes the following information: - energy volumes activated to ensure the balance of the system and to resolve congestion; - minimum and maximum prices of offers activated to balance the system; - daily trends calculated according to the predominant value of the overall upward or downward trend; - balancing shares by technology (nuclear, thermal, hydraulic); - characteristics of the five most activated balancing entities; - balances/imbalances accounts and production/consumption overcharge; - congestion curbing costs on the French electricity system; - energy volumes activated to ensure the balance of the system according to contracts between RTE and other Balance Responsible entities (UK, Belgium, Italy, Germany, Switzerland); - reliability of the provisional data supplied by RTE about the balancing trend; - availability of RTE's information services (planning, balancing mechanism, block exchange notification, market indicators). This report presents the above information for February 2009. (J.S.)

  10. Balancing mechanism status: April 2009

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    RTE ensures the real-time balance between production and consumption and deals with congestion on the French electricity system. The Balancing Mechanism assists in the accomplishment of this task. As in many countries, and after extensive dialogue with representatives from the market's various players, RTE proposes a Balancing Mechanism in the form of a permanent and transparent system of calls for tender. The system is open to everyone and provides a real-time reserve of power that can be used for balancing either upward or downward. RTE takes advantage of these offers according to economic precedence, taking into account the system's operating conditions. It pays for them at the offer price. There are two types of offer: - Upward offer: increase in production, decrease in consumption, imports, - Downward offer: decrease in production, increase in consumption, exports. For a Balancing Entity, an offer systematically consists of: a balancing direction (upward/downward), a time period, a price that may vary according to six time slots. RTE publishes each month a Balancing Mechanism Report. which includes the following information: - energy volumes activated to ensure the balance of the system and to resolve congestion; - minimum and maximum prices of offers activated to balance the system; - daily trends calculated according to the predominant value of the overall upward or downward trend; - balancing shares by technology (nuclear, thermal, hydraulic); - characteristics of the five most activated balancing entities; - balances/imbalances accounts and production/consumption overcharge; - congestion curbing costs on the French electricity system; - energy volumes activated to ensure the balance of the system according to contracts between RTE and other Balance Responsible entities (UK, Belgium, Italy, Germany, Switzerland); - reliability of the provisional data supplied by RTE about the balancing trend; - availability of RTE's information services (planning, balancing mechanism, block exchange notification, market indicators). This report presents the above information for April 2009. (J.S.)

  11. Balanced skills among nascent entrepreneurs

    OpenAIRE

    Stuetzer, Michael; Obschonka, Martin; Schmitt-Rodermund, Eva

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the effects and origins of balanced skills among nascent entrepreneurs. In a first step we apply Lazear’s jack-of-all-trades theory to investigate performance effects of a balanced skill set. Second, we investigate potential sources of balanced skills, thereby testing the investment hypothesis against the endowment hypothesis. Analyzing data on high-potential nascent projects, we find support for the notion that balanced skills are important for making progress in the vent...

  12. When Do States Balance Power?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hariri, Jacob Gerner; Wivel, Anders

    2010-01-01

    This paper explores the logic of balancing in structural realist theory. Arguably, the durability of the unipolar moment is a challenge to the logic of balancing. The paper uses the tools of microeconomics to build a mathematical model of structural realism. The simple model reiterates the structural realist prediction that the weaker states should balance the unipole. Under a slight model extension, it is shown that efforts to balance in separate capabilities always tends to offset each other. ...

  13. Optimized balance rehabilitation training strategy for the elderly through an evaluation of balance characteristics in response to dynamic motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, HoHyun; Chun, Keyoung Jin; Hong, Jaesoo; Lim, Dohyung

    2015-01-01

    Balance is important in daily activities and essential for maintaining an independent lifestyle in the elderly. Recent studies have shown that balance rehabilitation training can improve the balance ability of the elderly, and diverse balance rehabilitation training equipment has been developed. However, there has been little research into optimized strategies for balance rehabilitation training. To provide an optimized strategy, we analyzed the balance characteristics of participants in response to the rotation of a base plate on multiple axes. Seven male adults with no musculoskeletal or nervous system-related diseases (age: 25.5±1.7 years; height: 173.9±6.4 cm; body mass: 71.3±6.5 kg; body mass index: 23.6±2.4 kg/m2) were selected to investigate the balance rehabilitation training using customized rehabilitation equipment. Rotation of the base plate of the equipment was controlled to induce dynamic rotation of participants in the anterior–posterior, right-diagonal, medial–lateral, and left-diagonal directions. We used a three-dimensional motion capture system employing infrared cameras and the Pedar Flexible Insoles System to characterize the major lower-extremity joint angles, center of body mass, and center of pressure. We found statistically significant differences between the changes in joint angles in the lower extremities in response to dynamic rotation of the participants (P0.05). These results indicate that optimizing rotation control of the base plate of balance rehabilitation training equipment to induce anterior–posterior and medial–lateral dynamic rotation preferentially can lead to effective balance training. Additional tests with varied speeds and ranges of angles of base plate rotation are expected to be useful as well as an analysis of the balance characteristics considering a balance index that reflects the muscle activity and cooperative characteristics. PMID:26508847

  14. Pressure sensor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pressure sensor will be used for pressure measurement in high-temperature liquids, in particular for Na or K during fast breeder operation. It has a soft membrane which is unshielded at the pressure medium side and can actuate a rigid membrane an the other side by means of a botton element. The displacement of the rigid membrane is proportional to the difference between the liquid pressure and a reference gas pressure. The displacement can be measured by means of a capacity displacement measuring instrument, using a fixed plate as reference. Absolute calibration is performed by admitting pressurized gas into the zone between the membranes and into the zone between rigid membrane and fixed plate. The coupling between the soft and the rigid membrane is thus interrupted. (DG)

  15. Pressure transmitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An isolator or the like for nuclear power stations employed to separate two fluids or two pressures or other sensing instruments from the containment or elsewhere includes first and second fluid filled bellows having a fluid connection in between and which together provide a pressure transfer mechanism. Excessive travel of the bellows is prevented by overrange valves, one of which closes the pathway on application of high pressure. (author)

  16. Physical and Geochemical Conditions Required for the Initiation of Snowball Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajika, E.

    2001-03-01

    Condition for initiation of snowball Earth phenomena is studied by using a one-dimensional energy balance climate model and carbon geochemical cycle model. Critical condition for pCO2 to cause climate instability will be discussed.

  17. Investigating of relationship between balance parameters and balance lost of elite gymnastics on balance beam

    OpenAIRE

    Salih P?nar; Ufuk Alpkaya; Manolya Ak?n; Ay?e Oya Erkut At?lgan

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between balance lost on balance beam during the series performed by women gymnasts at International Bosphorus Gymnastics Tournament with anthropometric characteristics and static-dynamic balance test scores.19 female gymnasts (ages 14,53±2,20, training years9,0±3) participated in this research voluntarily. Before the competition, the static and dynamic balance score and anthropometrics values were taken by experienced researchers. In o...

  18. Reproducibility of calibration results by 0-A-0 pressurization procedures for hydraulic pressure transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Hiroaki; Kobata, Tokihiko

    2014-01-01

    This paper focuses on 0-A-0 pressurization for the calibration of electromechanical pressure gauges in order to obtain reproducible results by various procedures. In 0-A-0 pressurization, pressure is released to atmospheric pressure after finishing each measurement at each calibration pressure, and the output reading at atmospheric pressure is used for offset correction. Pressure gauges are calibrated under various pressure sequence and time interval conditions in the pressure range of 10 MPa to 100 MPa using a fully automated calibration system that uses a pressure balance as the standard device. Results for a quartz Bourdon-type pressure transducer are mainly reported. The hysteresis obtained by 0-A-0 pressurization is found to be nearly one-tenth of that obtained by stepwise pressurization. The effect of the previously applied pressure is less than 10 parts per million even for a random pressure sequence. Key points for calibration procedures are proposed from the calibration results for different time intervals. When the appropriate procedure is used, 0-A-0 pressurization largely reduces the effect of pressurization history, thus yielding highly reproducible calibration results.

  19. Pre-onset Azimuthal Pressure Gradient and Associated Auroral Intensifications Related to Dipolarization Fronts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, X.; Lyons, L. R.; Angelopoulos, V.; Zhou, X.; Donovan, E.; Larson, D. E.; Carlson, C. W.; Auster, U.

    2011-12-01

    The plasma pressure spatial distribution and the magnetic field in force balance with it determine the distribution of the Field-Aligned Current (FAC) in the quasi-static near-Earth plasma sheet. The time evolution of the azimuthal plasma pressure gradient during undisturbed periods is of particular importance in leading to the evolution of FACs, which strongly affect the ionospheric current circulation and the aurora formation before dynamical processes strike, e.g., substorms. Xing et al. (2011) demonstrated by case study that the plasma sheet pressure gradient at ~11 RE near the substorm onset meridian undergoes a substantial duskward enhancement shortly before the onset as identified from the auroral poleward expansion. The increased upward FAC driven by this pressure gradient enhancement leads to the thin onset arc intensification from which the poleward expansion initiates. The mechanism of the formation of such a transient duskward pressure gradient is still an open question. In the present study, we employ the multi-THEMIS spacecraft in azimuthal conjunction -at ~-11 RE and examine the ion flux and distributions during the period of pressure gradient enhancement. Strong field-aligned ion flux enhancements covering the energy range from several KeV to above 25KeV were observed by the spacecraft identifying the higher pressure increase, while at the same time the ion distributions show substantial field-aligned, mushroom-like shift in velocity space. These resemble the ion acceleration ahead of earthward moving dipolarization fronts in a highly stretched magnetic field during the late growth phase. The local plasma develops strong transient parallel anisotropy due to the ion acceleration. On the other hand, the spacecraft observing the lower pressure increase found weaker or no ion flux enhancements and had nearly isotropic distributions. Due to these spatial differences, similar transient pressure gradient enhancements in the dawnward direction were also found for some events. These suggest that the transient azimuthal pressure gradient enhancement near the onset meridian could result from the azimuthal difference of the ion acceleration caused by the localized dipolarization fronts that reach the near-Earth plasma sheet at the onset meridian. The associated transient upward FAC enhancement, which leads to the thin onset arc intensification, would thus be related to the current pair generated in the plasma compression region ahead of the dipolarization front. Thus the earthward penetrating plasma flow channels could play a dominant role in leading to substorm onset.

  20. Twelve weeks of BodyBalance® training improved balance and functional task performance in middle-aged and older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholson VP

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Vaughan P Nicholson, Mark R McKean, Brendan J Burkett School of Health and Sport Sciences, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sunshine Coast, QLD, Australia Purpose: The purpose of the study was to evaluate the effect of BodyBalance® training on balance, functional task performance, fear of falling, and health-related quality of life in adults aged over 55 years.Participants and methods: A total of 28 healthy, active adults aged 66±5 years completed the randomized controlled trial. Balance, functional task performance, fear of falling, and self-reported quality of life were assessed at baseline and after 12 weeks. Participants either undertook two sessions of BodyBalance per week for 12 weeks (n=15 or continued with their normal activities (n=13.Results: Significant group-by-time interactions were found for the timed up and go (P=0.038, 30-second chair stand (P=0.037, and mediolateral center-of-pressure range in narrow stance with eyes closed (P=0.017. There were no significant effects on fear of falling or self-reported quality of life.Conclusion: Twelve weeks of BodyBalance training is effective at improving certain balance and functional based tasks in healthy older adults. Keywords: postural control, yoga, tai chi, center of pressure, exercise

  1. Balancing innovation and evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, Jobeth W

    2015-01-01

    Nurse educators are encouraged to use evidence to guide their teaching strategies. However, evidence is not always available. How can educators make decisions regarding strategies when data are limited or absent? Where do innovation and creativity fit? How can innovation be balanced with evidence? This article provides a discussion regarding other sources of evidence, such as extrapolations, theories and principles, and collective expertise. Readers are encouraged to review the options and then analyze how they might be applied to innovation in education. PMID:25790361

  2. Strategic Balanced Scorecard Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steen; Nielsen, Erland Hejn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to show how a System Dynamics Modelling approach can be integrated into the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) for a case company with special focus on the handling of causality in a dynamic perspective. The case company’s BSC model includes five perspectives and a number of financial and non-financial measures. The overall idea of BSC is to make the strategy operational, as proposed by Kaplan and Norton (1992; 1996; 2007) and to use the strategy for simulation. Our results ...

  3. Deuterium inventory in Tore Supra: Coupled carbon–deuterium balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pégourié, B., E-mail: bernard.pegourie@cea.fr [CEA, IRFM, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Panayotis, S. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Languille, P.; Martin, C. [Laboratoire PIIM, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France); Dittmar, T. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Center for Energy Research, Univ. of California – San Diego, San Diego (United States); Gauthier, E.; Hatchressian, J.-C.; Pascal, J.-Y. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Roubin, P.; Ruffe, R. [Laboratoire PIIM, Aix-Marseille Université, CNRS UMR 7345, 13397 Marseille (France); Tsitrone, E.; Vartanian, S. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Wang, H. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Beauté, A.; Bouvet, J.; Brosset, C.; Bucalossi, J. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); Cabié, M. [Aix-Marseille Univ., CP2M, Marseille (France); Caprin, E.; Courtois, X. [CEA, IRFM, 13108 Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France); and others

    2013-07-15

    This paper presents an analysis of the carbon–deuterium circulation and the resulting balance in Tore Supra over the period 2002–2007. Carbon balance combines the estimation of carbon gross erosion from spectroscopy, net erosion and deposition using confocal microscopy, lock-in thermography and SEM, and a measure of the amount of deposits collected in the vacuum chamber. Fuel retention is determined from post-mortem (PM) analyses and gas balance (GB) measurements. Special attention was paid to the deuterium outgassed during the nights and weekends of the experimental campaign (vessel under vacuum, Plasma Facing Components at 120 °C) and during vents (vessel at atmospheric pressure, PFCs at room temperature). It is shown that this outgassing is the main process reconciling the PM and GB estimations of fuel retention, closing the coupled carbon–deuterium balance. In particular, it explains why the deuterium concentration in deposits decreases with increasing depth.

  4. Modeling the surface temperature of Earth-like planets

    CERN Document Server

    Vladilo, G; Murante, G; Filippi, L; Provenzale, A

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a novel Earth-like planet surface temperature model (ESTM) for habitability studies based on the spatial-temporal distribution of planetary surface temperatures. The ESTM adopts a surface Energy Balance Model complemented by: radiative-convective atmospheric column calculations, a set of physically-based parameterizations of meridional transport, and descriptions of surface and cloud properties more refined than in standard EBMs. The parameterization is valid for rotating terrestrial planets with shallow atmospheres and moderate values of axis obliquity (epsilon >= 45^o). Comparison with a 3D model of atmospheric dynamics from the literature shows that the equator-to-pole temperature differences predicted by the two models agree within ~5K when the rotation rate, insolation, surface pressure and planet radius are varied in the intervals 0.5 <= Omega/Omega_o <= 2, 0.75 <= S/S_o <= 1.25, 0.3 <= p/(1 bar) <= 10, and 0.5 <= R/R_o <= 2, respectively. The ESTM has an extremely l...

  5. EarthKAM

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Sponsored by NASA, EarthKAM (Earth Knowledge Acquired by Middle School Students) is an educational outreach program allowing middle school students to take pictures...

  6. Energy Balance, Climate, and Life - Work of M. Budyko

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cahalan, Robert F.

    2004-01-01

    This talk will review the work of Mikhail I. Budyko, author of "Climate and Life" and many other works, who died recently at age 81, in St Petersburg, Russia. He directed the Division for Climate Change Research at the State Hydrological Institute. We will explore Budyko's work in clarifying the role of energy balance in determining planetary climate, and the role of climate in regulating Earth s biosphere.

  7. Resource Balancing Control Allocation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Susan A.; Bodson, Marc

    2010-01-01

    Next generation aircraft with a large number of actuators will require advanced control allocation methods to compute the actuator commands needed to follow desired trajectories while respecting system constraints. Previously, algorithms were proposed to minimize the l1 or l2 norms of the tracking error and of the control effort. The paper discusses the alternative choice of using the l1 norm for minimization of the tracking error and a normalized l(infinity) norm, or sup norm, for minimization of the control effort. The algorithm computes the norm of the actuator deflections scaled by the actuator limits. Minimization of the control effort then translates into the minimization of the maximum actuator deflection as a percentage of its range of motion. The paper shows how the problem can be solved effectively by converting it into a linear program and solving it using a simplex algorithm. Properties of the algorithm are investigated through examples. In particular, the min-max criterion results in a type of resource balancing, where the resources are the control surfaces and the algorithm balances these resources to achieve the desired command. A study of the sensitivity of the algorithms to the data is presented, which shows that the normalized l(infinity) algorithm has the lowest sensitivity, although high sensitivities are observed whenever the limits of performance are reached.

  8. Thermal balance in infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, D P; Nelson, E A; Taylor, B J; Weatherall, I L

    1996-06-01

    A theoretical model of heat balance is presented that could clarify the matching of babies' wrapping with their environments. Best estimates of metabolic heat input and heat loss by all known routes are defined for 22 parts of the body surface. The variation of these with core temperature, posture, skin vasodilatation, and the onset of sweating are calculated: first, by using presumed skin temperatures and second, by following iterative calculation of the skin temperature and the consequent total heat losses. Calculation of the highest tolerable ambient temperature (HTAT) for a given set of clothes, underbedding, and covers shows that a well-wrapped baby lying face down could have an HTAT 10 degrees C lower than if he/she were lying supine. Representative values for highest and lowest tolerable temperatures (defined in text) are presented for the first 6 mo of life. Retrospective estimation of thermal balance from death-scene data on clothing and bedding can permit assessment of hyperthermia or hypothermia as a contributing cause of death. Recommendations are made on the avoidance of hyperthermia. PMID:8806935

  9. Negative leave balances

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    Members of the personnel entitled to annual leave and, where appropriate, saved leave and/or compensatory leave are requested to take note of the new arrangements described below, which were recommended by the Standing Concertation Committee (SCC) at its meeting on 1Â September 2005 and subsequently approved by the Director-General. The changes do not apply to members of the personnel participating in the Progressive Retirement Programme (PRP) or the Part-time Work as a pre-retirement measure, for whom the specific provisions communicated at the time of joining will continue to apply. Â Negative balances in annual leave, saved leave and/or compensatory leave accounts at the end of the leave year (30th September) and on the date on which bonuses are credited to the saved leave account (31st December): Where members of the personnel have a leave account with a negative balance on 30Â September and/or 31Â December, leave will automatically be transferred from one account to another on the relevant dates i...

  10. Negative leave balances

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    Members of the personnel entitled to annual leave and, where appropriate, saved leave and/or compensatory leave are requested to take note of the new arrangements described below, which were recommended by the Standing Concertation Committee (SCC) at its meeting on 1 September 2005 and subsequently approved by the Director-General. The changes do not apply to members of the personnel participating in the Progressive Retirement Programme (PRP) or the Part-time Work as a pre-retirement measure, for whom the specific provisions communicated at the time of joining will continue to apply.  Negative balances in annual leave, saved leave and/or compensatory leave accounts at the end of the leave year (30th September) and on the date on which bonuses are credited to the saved leave account (31st December): Where members of the personnel have a leave account with a negative balance on 30 September and/or 31 December, leave will automatically be transferred from one account to another on the relevant dates in or...

  11. Binary rare earth oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Adachi, G; Kang, ZC

    2006-01-01

    Introduces the unique characteristics of the binary rare earth oxides with their chemistry, physics and applicationsProvides a comprehensive review of all the characteristics of rare earth oxides, essential for scientists and engineers involved with rare earths, oxides, inorganic materials, ceramics, and structures

  12. The fate of Earth’s ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Bounama

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Questions of how water arrived on the Earth’s surface, how much water is contained in the Earth system as a whole, and how much water will be available in the future in the surface reservoirs are of central importance to our understanding of the Earth. To answer the question about the fate of the Earth’s ocean, one has to study the global water cycle under conditions of internal and external forcing processes. Modern estimates suggest that the transport of water to the surface is five times smaller than water movement to the mantle, so that the Earth will lose all its sea-water in one billion years from now. This straightforward extrapolation of subduction-zone fluxes into the future seems doubtful. Using a geophysical modelling approach it was found that only 27% of the modern ocean will be subducted in one billion years. Internal feedbacks will not be the cause of the ocean drying out. Instead, the drying up of surface reservoirs in the future will be due to the increase in temperature caused by a maturing Sun connected to hydrogen escape to outer space. Keywords: Surface water reservoir, water fluxes, regassing, degassing, global water cycle

  13. Improving Balance Function Using Low Levels of Electrical Stimulation of the Balance Organs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloomberg, Jacob; Reschke, Millard; Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Wood, Scott; Serrador, Jorge; Fiedler, Matthew; Kofman, Igor; Peters, Brian T.; Cohen, Helen

    2012-01-01

    Crewmembers returning from long-duration space flight face significant challenges due to the microgravity-induced inappropriate adaptations in balance/sensorimotor function. The Neuroscience Laboratory at JSC is developing a method based on stochastic resonance to enhance the brain's ability to detect signals from the balance organs of the inner ear and use them for rapid improvement in balance skill, especially when combined with balance training exercises. This method involves a stimulus delivery system that is wearable/portable and provides imperceptible electrical stimulation to the balance organs of the human body. Stochastic resonance (SR) is a phenomenon whereby the response of a nonlinear system to a weak periodic input signal is optimized by the presence of a particular non-zero level of noise. This phenomenon of SR is based on the concept of maximizing the flow of information through a system by a non-zero level of noise. Application of imperceptible SR noise coupled with sensory input in humans has been shown to improve motor, cardiovascular, visual, hearing, and balance functions. SR increases contrast sensitivity and luminance detection; lowers the absolute threshold for tone detection in normal hearing individuals; improves homeostatic function in the human blood pressure regulatory system; improves noise-enhanced muscle spindle function; and improves detection of weak tactile stimuli using mechanical or electrical stimulation. SR noise has been shown to improve postural control when applied as mechanical noise to the soles of the feet, or when applied as electrical noise at the knee and to the back muscles. SR using imperceptible stochastic electrical stimulation of the vestibular system (stochastic vestibular stimulation, SVS) applied to normal subjects has shown to improve the degree of association between the weak input periodic signals introduced via venous blood pressure receptors and the heart-rate responses. Also, application of SVS over 24 hours improves the long-term heart-rate dynamics and motor responsiveness as indicated by daytime trunk activity measurements in patients with multi-system atrophy, Parkinson s disease, or both, including patients who were unresponsive to standard therapy for Parkinson s disease. Recent studies conducted at the NASA JSC Neurosciences Laboratories showed that imperceptible SVS, when applied to normal young healthy subjects, leads to significantly improved balance performance during postural disturbances on unstable compliant surfaces. These studies have shown the benefit of SR noise characteristic optimization with imperceptible SVS in the frequency range of 0-30 Hz, and amplitudes of stimulation have ranged from 100 to 400 microamperes.

  14. The cardiac blood supply-workload balance in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Tomoaki; Takeda, Atsuhito; Takei, Kohta; Tateno, Shigeru; Kawasoe, Yasutaka; Niwa, Koichiro

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that the reflected pressure wave in small children returns earlier than that in adolescent. The reason of early return of the reflected pressure wave in infancy is their height. The short distance between heart and reflection point makes the reflected pressure wave returning to the heart earlier. In adult, the early return (during systole) of the reflected pressure wave means disadvantage to cardiac blood supply-workload balance. The purpose of this study was to clarify whether the early return of the reflected pressure wave in small children impairs the cardiac blood supply-workload balance. This study enrolled 37 small left-to-right shunt patients with normal aortic circulation below 15 years of age. The aortic pressure waveform was recorded using a pressure sensor mounted catheter, and augmentation index and subendocardial viability ratio were calculated. The age of patients was 6.1 ± 3.2 years. The augmentation index was 8.7 ± 14.3 % and the index had a negative correlation with patients' age (r = -0.6243, p positive relationship with patients' age (r = 0.6435, p reflection due to their short height. PMID:24989969

  15. A Distributed Model for Mountain Climate and Glacier mass Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrell, K. E.; Evans, I.; Donoghue, D.

    2006-12-01

    The cryosphere has responded to recent climatic variability and change but the precise causes of glacier mass balance changes remain elusive. Predicting the response of relatively small glaciers and ice caps to future climate variability and change is particularly important, since these have contributed more water to eustatic sea level rise in the last 100 years than the larger ice sheets, and are likely to do so for the next 100 years (Arendt et al.2002; Raper and Braithwaite, 2006). Recent research has shown that accurate sea level rise predictions require a greater understanding of glacier response to rising air temperatures and changes in precipitation receipt (Raper and Braithwaite, 2006). The continued shrinkage of relatively small glaciers also has important impacts on the local hydrology and ecology of glacier-fed streams and for water resource management. A regional scale mass balance model based on energy balance at the Earth's surface was developed to calculate accumulation areas in the Jotunheimen, Norway. Spatially distributed modelling used simulated local climate and energy balance data to drive monthly mass balance calculations. Our mass balance model uses spatially distributed climate data derived from 30 year normals (for air temperature, wind speed, cloudiness, albedo and precipitation) with a local energy balance model to predict spatially distributed accumulation and ablation at a 100 m spatial resolution and monthly temporal resolution. The modelled spatial distribution of snow-cover showed good agreement (up to 86 % accuracy) for topographically constrained glaciers in the Jotunheimen, Norway, where aspect, gradient and altitude impose dominant controls on snow and ice accumulation. Melt within accumulation areas was found to be most sensitive to air temperature, especially spring temperatures and cloud cover. A key conclusion identifies several topographic controls on local climate and accumulation as critical for predicting observed spatial variability in glacier mass balance.

  16. Are Social Networks Really Balanced?

    OpenAIRE

    Estrada, Ernesto; Benzi, Michele

    2014-01-01

    There is a long-standing belief that in social networks with simultaneous friendly/hostile interactions (signed networks) there is a general tendency to a global balance. Balance represents a state of the network with lack of contentious situations. Here we introduce a method to quantify the degree of balance of any signed (social) network. It accounts for the contribution of all signed cycles in the network and gives, in agreement with empirical evidences, more weight to th...

  17. Radar channel balancing with commutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-02-01

    When multiple channels are employed in a pulse-Doppler radar, achieving and maintaining balance between the channels is problematic. In some circumstances the channels may be commutated to achieve adequate balance. Commutation is the switching, trading, toggling, or multiplexing of the channels between signal paths. Commutation allows modulating the imbalance energy away from the balanced energy in Doppler, where it can be mitigated with filtering.

  18. Balancing Costs for Wind Power

    OpenAIRE

    Larssen, Marit

    2007-01-01

    Nordel is the organisation for the Nordel synchronous system, held by the Nordic Transmission System Operators. In their work to harmonise the Nordic electricity markets they have agreed upon harmonising the Nordic balance management. This will imply three large changes, firstly the settlement of the production balance will be done by a 2-price settlement, (instead of the 1-price settlement in Norway), and secondly there will be a new intraday market for settling the balances after 12- ...

  19. Pressure sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mee, David K.; Ripley, Edward B.; Nienstedt, Zachary C.; Nienstedt, Alex W.; Howell, Jr., Layton N.

    2015-09-29

    Disclosed is a passive, in-situ pressure sensor. The sensor includes a sensing element having a ferromagnetic metal and a tension inducing mechanism coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The tension inducing mechanism is operable to change a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal based on a change in pressure in the sensing element. Changes in pressure are detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal when subjected to an alternating magnetic field caused by the change in the tensile stress. The sensing element is embeddable in a closed system for detecting pressure changes without the need for any penetrations of the system for power or data acquisition by detecting changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  20. Capturing Near Earth Objects

    OpenAIRE

    Baoyin, Hexi; Chen, Yang; Li, Junfeng

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Near Earth Objects (NEOs) have been attracting great attention, and thousands of NEOs have been found to date. This paper examines the NEOs' orbital dynamics using the framework of an accurate solar system model and a Sun-Earth-NEO three-body system when the NEOs are close to Earth to search for NEOs with low-energy orbits. It is possible for such an NEO to be temporarily captured by Earth; its orbit would thereby be changed and it would become an Earth-orbiting ob...

  1. Pressure Alopecia

    OpenAIRE

    Davies, Kate E; Yesudian, PD

    2012-01-01

    Postoperative or pressure alopecia (PA) is an infrequently reported group of scarring and non-scarring alopecias. It has been reported after immobilization of the head during surgery and following prolonged stays on intensive care units, and may be analogous to a healed pressure ulcer. This review presents a summary of cases published in pediatrics and after cardiac, gynecological, abdominal and facial surgeries. PA may manifest as swelling, tenderness, and ulceration of the scalp in the firs...

  2. Work-life balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roche, Pat

    2011-03-15

    Gay Renouf has opted for a work/life balance; with a chemistry degree she joined the Saskatchewan Research Council out of graduate school in 1986. She first worked on understanding surfactants in emulsions and then dealt more with petroleum engineering issues like pipeline specifications. She is looking at waterfloods in heavy and medium gravity pools and has discovered factors helping to produce heavy oil waterfloods. But all Renouf's life is not devoted to her work: she has been working part-time, spending her free time being a parent, training for marathons and being a running coach. Renouf believes that her passion for running is consistent with her work as a scientist.

  3. Energy balance climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, G. R.; Cahalan, R. F.; Coakley, J. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    An introductory survey of the global energy balance climate models is presented with an emphasis on analytical results. A sequence of increasingly complicated models involving ice cap and radiative feedback processes are solved, and the solutions and parameter sensitivities are studied. The model parameterizations are examined critically in light of many current uncertainties. A simple seasonal model is used to study the effects of changes in orbital elements on the temperature field. A linear stability theorem and a complete nonlinear stability analysis for the models are developed. Analytical solutions are also obtained for the linearized models driven by stochastic forcing elements. In this context the relation between natural fluctuation statistics and climate sensitivity is stressed.

  4. Balancing Trust and Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jagd, SØren

    Dette papir fokuserer på ledelsesudfordringerne med at afbalancere tillid og kontrol. Forholdet mellem tillid og kontrol har i lang tid været en problem for ledelsesforskere. I papiret vises først at der har været en ændring i den måde, hvorpå forholdet mellem tillid og kontrol er blevet konceptualiseret i tillidsforskningen. Mens forholdet mellem tillid og kontrol tidligere blev set som et mere eller mindre stabil balance mellem tillid og kontrol, anskuer nyere forskning forholdet mellem tillid og kontrol som en dynamisk proces, der involverer en løbende afbalancering af forholdet mellem tillid og kontrol. For det andet, med udgangspunkt i en konceptualisering af balancen mellem tillid og kontrol som en interaktiv proces, drøftes udfordringerne for ledelsen i at håndtere denne mere subtile afbalancering af tillid og kontrol. Papiret konkluderer med at illustrere, hvordan denne mere detaljerede forståelse af samspillet mellem tillid og kontrol er nyttige for forståelsen af samspillet mellem tillid, kontrol ogselvkontrol i nye organisationsformer.

  5. Strategic Balanced Scorecard Simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Steen; Nielsen, Erland Hejn

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to show how a System Dynamics Modelling approach can be integrated into the Balanced Scorecard (BSC) for a case company with special focus on the handling of causality in a dynamic perspective. The case company’s BSC model includes five perspectives and a number of financial and non-financial measures. The overall idea of BSC is to make the strategy operational, as proposed by Kaplan and Norton (1992; 1996; 2007) and to use the strategy for simulation. Our results indicate that a company may gain great learning insight from such simulation studies. The whole article will be published in a coming issue of Journal of Business and Systems Research.

  6. Hypothesis concerning the commencement of the series of rare earth metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hypothesis is presented wherein Cs and Ba may be turned into nonmagnetic 4f-band metals at high pressure; that Cs and Ba may be pressure-induced rare earth metals. The new idea is that the rare earth series commences fairly gradually rather than abruptly. Some of the evidence for this proposal is reviewed

  7. Earth Science Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey

    1991-01-01

    An ESIC? An Earth Science Information Center. Don't spell it. Say it. ESIC. It rhymes with seasick. You can find information in an information center, of course, and you'll find earth science information in an ESIC. That means information about the land that is the Earth, the land that is below the Earth, and in some instances, the space surrounding the Earth. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) operates a network of Earth Science Information Centers that sell earth science products and data. There are more than 75 ESIC's. Some are operated by the USGS, but most are in other State or Federal agencies. Each ESIC responds to requests for information received by telephone, letter, or personal visit. Your personal visit.

  8. Contemporary state of the general lateral pressure theory - active pressure.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koudelka, Petr

    Praha : ÚTAM, 2009 - (Náprstek,, J.; Fischer, C.), s. 140-151 ISBN 978-80-86246-35-2. [Engineering mechanics 2009. Svratka (CZ), 11.05.2009-14.05.2009] R&D Projects: GA ?R(CZ) GA103/08/1617 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20710524 Keywords : granular material s * earth pressure * new theory Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism

  9. Snowball Earth: A thin-ice solution with flowing sea glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard, David; Kasting, James F.

    2005-07-01

    The late Neoproterozoic era, ˜600-800 Myr ago, was marked by at least two intervals of widespread cold that left glacial deposits at low paleolatitudes. Both "Snowball" solutions with global ice cover and "Slushball" solutions with ice-free tropical oceans have been proposed to explain the paleomagnetic data. The Snowball model is best able to explain the auxiliary geological evidence, particularly the existence of cap carbonates, but it implies drastic survival pressure on the photosynthetic biota if the ice cover was everywhere thick enough to prevent sunlight from reaching the underlying ocean. A "thin ice" solution that avoids this problem has been proposed but is thought to be inconsistent with realistic optical properties of sea ice and with the equatorward flow of sea glaciers. Here we use a coupled energy-balance climate/sea-glacier model to argue that these apparent difficulties can be overcome and that thin tropical ice may have prevailed during these remarkable glacial episodes. We also suggest that (1) some processes beyond the scope of zonal mean energy-balance models may significantly affect the solutions and (2) thin ice could have prevailed on low-latitude seas (or large lakes) protected from large-scale sea-glacier flow by surrounding land even if most of the Earth was in a "hard Snowball" state.

  10. Pressure correction schemes for compressible flows

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This thesis is concerned with the development of semi-implicit fractional step schemes, for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations; these schemes are part of the class of the pressure correction methods. The chosen spatial discretization is staggered: non conforming mixed finite elements (Crouzeix-Raviart or Rannacher-Turek) or the classic MA C scheme. An upwind finite volume discretization of the mass balance guarantees the positivity of the density. The positivity of the internal energy is obtained by discretizing the internal energy balance by an upwind finite volume scheme and b y coupling the discrete internal energy balance with the pressure correction step. A special finite volume discretization on dual cells is performed for the convection term in the momentum balance equation, and a renormalisation step for the pressure is added to the algorithm; this ensures the control in time of the integral of the total energy over the domain. All these a priori estimates imply the existence of a discrete solution by a topological degree argument. The application of this scheme to Euler equations raises an additional difficulty. Indeed, obtaining correct shocks requires the scheme to be consistent with the total energy balance, property which we obtain as follows. First of all, a local discrete kinetic energy balance is established; it contains source terms winch we somehow compensate in the internal energy balance. The kinetic and internal energy equations are associated with the dual and primal meshes respectively, and thus cannot be added to obtain a total energy balance; its continuous counterpart is however recovered at the limit: if we suppose that a sequence of discrete solutions converges when the space and time steps tend to 0, we indeed show, in 1D at least, that the limit satisfies a weak form of the equation. These theoretical results are comforted by numerical tests. Similar results are obtained for the baro-tropic Navier-Stokes equations. (author)

  11. Calibration and Data Analysis of the MC-130 Air Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Dennis; Ulbrich, N.

    2012-01-01

    Design, calibration, calibration analysis, and intended use of the MC-130 air balance are discussed. The MC-130 balance is an 8.0 inch diameter force balance that has two separate internal air flow systems and one external bellows system. The manual calibration of the balance consisted of a total of 1854 data points with both unpressurized and pressurized air flowing through the balance. A subset of 1160 data points was chosen for the calibration data analysis. The regression analysis of the subset was performed using two fundamentally different analysis approaches. First, the data analysis was performed using a recently developed extension of the Iterative Method. This approach fits gage outputs as a function of both applied balance loads and bellows pressures while still allowing the application of the iteration scheme that is used with the Iterative Method. Then, for comparison, the axial force was also analyzed using the Non-Iterative Method. This alternate approach directly fits loads as a function of measured gage outputs and bellows pressures and does not require a load iteration. The regression models used by both the extended Iterative and Non-Iterative Method were constructed such that they met a set of widely accepted statistical quality requirements. These requirements lead to reliable regression models and prevent overfitting of data because they ensure that no hidden near-linear dependencies between regression model terms exist and that only statistically significant terms are included. Finally, a comparison of the axial force residuals was performed. Overall, axial force estimates obtained from both methods show excellent agreement as the differences of the standard deviation of the axial force residuals are on the order of 0.001 % of the axial force capacity.

  12. Energy balance in critical illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plank, Lindsay D; Hill, Graham L

    2003-05-01

    Energy balance is the difference between energy consumed and total energy expended. Over a given period of time it expresses how much the body stores of fat, carbohydrate and protein will change. For the critically-ill patient, who characteristically exhibits raised energy expenditure and proteolysis of skeletal muscle, energy balance information is valuable because underfeeding or overfeeding may compromise recovery. However, there are formidable difficulties in measuring energy balance in these patients. While energy intake can be accurately recorded in the intensive care setting, the measurement of total energy expenditure is problematic. Widely used approaches, such as direct calorimetry or doubly-labelled water, are not applicable to the critically ill patient. Energy balance was determined over periods of 5-10 d in patients in intensive care by measuring changes in the fat, protein and carbohydrate stores of the body. Changes in total body fat were positively correlated with energy balance over the 5 d study periods in patients with severe sepsis (n 24, r 0.56, P = 0.004) or major trauma (n 24, r 0.70, P < 0.0001). Fat oxidation occurred in patients whose energy intake was insufficient to achieve energy balance. Changes in body protein were independent of energy balance. These results are consistent with those of other researchers who have estimated total energy requirements from measurements of O2 consumption and CO2 production. In critically-ill patients achievement of positive non-protein energy balance or total energy balance does not prevent negative N balance. Nutritional therapy for these patients may in the future focus on glycaemic control with insulin and specialised supplements rather than on energy balance per se. PMID:14506903

  13. Rare earths production and marketing opportunities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The rare earths (RE) market is relatively small. The total production during 1968 was only 10000 tons (REO) which rose to 27000 tons (REO) during 1985. The three major areas of application, which are volume market for ceric rare earths are catalysts, glass ceramics and metallurgy. Among the other uses of rare earths, the permanent magnets, lamp phosphors and fine ceramics have registered significant growth in RE consumption. Monazite and bastnasite are the main natural source for rare earths and processing of these for one of the rare earths in high demand leads to over production of some others not in demand, thus creating a balance problem. The growth in RE market has always been influenced by the technology shifts and product substitution. For example, the RE consumption during 1974/76 for desulfurization of steel had substantially decreased due to the usage of calcium. Similarly, 1985 had witnessed a drastic cut in the use of REs in fluid cracking due to the introduction of stabilized zeolites which contain less REO. Thus, the overall compound growth rate of demand was only 3.9 % per year during the period 1970-1985. At present, 37 % of the rare earths production goes to the glass/ceramics industry, 33 % for catalyst and 25 % to metallurgy. The price of REs constantly shows a downward trend. This trend coupled with the rapid changes taking place in the various technological fields, demands greater flexibility and high marketing skills from the RE producers. The key factor for future expansion of RE market will be the development of 'high volume' application of ceric rare earths. (author) 2 figs., 8 tabs

  14. Comparison of Static Balance and the Role of Vision in Elite Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Hammami, Raouf; Behm, David G; Chtara, Mokhtar; Ben Othman, Aymen; Chaouachi, Anis

    2014-01-01

    When prescribing balance exercises to athletes in different sports, it may be important to recognize performance variations. Indeed, how athletes from different sports perform on balance tests is not well understood. The goal of the present study was to compare static balance and the role of vision among elite sprinters, jumpers and rugby players. The modified clinical test of sensory interaction on balance (mCTSIB) was used to assess the velocity of the center-of-pressure (CoP) on a force pl...

  15. Pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety device provides that at a crack or rupture in the reactor pressure vessel the internal pressure can spread, but that it is prevented that larger fragments loosen themselves from the vessel. Therefore, the pressure vessel is surrounded by a network of cables. The cylindrical mid-section of the vessel is encompassed by vertically running single cable-ropes, lying parallel to each other, which are spanned between two brackets. The hemispherical top and bottom sections are covered by a checkerboardlike network of cable-ropes. They are also mounted on ring-shaped brackets. All the cable-ropes have tension links. For laterally acting forces which develop for instance when coolant is lost, there is in addition another set of anchor cables between the vessel and the supporting framework. (DG)

  16. Field reversing magnetotail current sheets: earth, Venus, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McComas, D.J.

    1986-09-01

    This dissertation examines the field reversing magnetotail current sheets at the earth, Venus, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner. In the near earth study a new analysis technique is developed to calculate the detailed current density distributions within the cross tail current sheet for the first time. This technique removes the effects of a variable sheet velocity by inverting intersatellite timings between the co-orbiting satellites ISEE-1 and -2. Case studies of three relatively geomagnetically quiet crossings are made; sheet thicknesses and peak current densities are approx.1-5 x 10/sup 4/ km and approx.5-50 nA/m/sup 2/. Current density distributions reveal a high density central region, lower density shoulders, and considerable fine structure throughout. In the Venus study another new analysis technique is developed to reconstruct the average tail configuration from a correlation between field magnitude and draping angle in a large statistical data set. In the comet study, high resolution magnetic field and plasma electron data from the ICE traversal of Giacobini-Zinner are combined for the first time to determine the tail/current sheet geometry and calculate certain important but unmeasured local ion and upstream properties. Pressure balance across the tail gives ion temperatures and betas of approx.1.2 x 10/sup 5/ K and approx.40 in the center of the current sheet to approx.1 x 10/sup 6/ K and approx.3 in the outer lobes. Axial stress balance shows that the velocity shear upstream near the nucleus is >6 (approx.1 at ICE), and that a region of strongly enhanced mass loading (ion source rate approx.24 times that upstream from lobes) exists upstream from the current sheet. The integrated downtail mass flux is approx.2.6 x 10/sup 26/ H/sub 2/O+/sec, which is only approx.1% of the independently determined total cometary efflux. 79 refs., 37 figs.

  17. Field reversing magnetotail current sheets: earth, Venus, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This dissertation examines the field reversing magnetotail current sheets at the earth, Venus, and Comet Giacobini-Zinner. In the near earth study a new analysis technique is developed to calculate the detailed current density distributions within the cross tail current sheet for the first time. This technique removes the effects of a variable sheet velocity by inverting intersatellite timings between the co-orbiting satellites ISEE-1 and -2. Case studies of three relatively geomagnetically quiet crossings are made; sheet thicknesses and peak current densities are ?1-5 x 104 km and ?5-50 nA/m2. Current density distributions reveal a high density central region, lower density shoulders, and considerable fine structure throughout. In the Venus study another new analysis technique is developed to reconstruct the average tail configuration from a correlation between field magnitude and draping angle in a large statistical data set. In the comet study, high resolution magnetic field and plasma electron data from the ICE traversal of Giacobini-Zinner are combined for the first time to determine the tail/current sheet geometry and calculate certain important but unmeasured local ion and upstream properties. Pressure balance across the tail gives ion temperatures and betas of ?1.2 x 105 K and ?40 in the center of the current sheet to ?1 x 106 K and ?3 in the outer lobes. Axial stress balance shows that the velocity shear upstream near the nucleus is >6 (?1 at ICE), and that a region of strongly enhanced mass loading (ion source rate ?24 times that upstream from lobes) exists upstream from the current sheet. The integrated downtail mass flux is ?2.6 x 1026 H2O+/sec, which is only ?1% of the independently determined total cometary efflux. 79 refs., 37 figs

  18. Análise de fases por difração de raios X de WC-10%Co dopado com terras-raras obtido sob alta pressão / Phase analysis by x-ray diffraction on the WC-10Co doped with rare-earth elements obtained under high pressure

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    C. M. F. G., Marques; G. S., Bobrovnitchii; J. N. F., Holanda.

    Full Text Available O carbeto cementado WC-Co também denominado de metal duro é um material de grande importância tecnológica produzido por metalurgia do pó através de sinterização por fase líquida, partindo-se da mistura dos pós de carbeto de tungstênio (WC) e de cobalto (Co) em moinho convencional. Entretanto, para o [...] btenção de metal duro com maior capacidade (produtividade, vida útil, etc.), uma nova rota alternativa de metalurgia do pó denominada de altas pressões e altas temperaturas vem sendo utilizada para produção destes materiais com resultados promissores. O presente trabalho tem como objetivo principal a análise de fases de WC-10Co dopado com terras-raras (La2O3, CeO2e Y2O3) preparadas sob condições de alta pressão. Esta liga de metal duro é um exemplo de material compósito largamente utilizado como ferramenta de corte e operações de usinagem em geral. Foram preparadas diversas misturas de WC-10Co contendo até 2 % em peso de terra-rara (La2O3, CeO2e Y2O3) da fase cobalto. Os pós previamente misturados foram compactados numa matriz cilíndrica (? = 7 mm) a uma pressão de 800 MPa e sinterizados a 1400 ºC durante 40 s sob alta pressão de 5,5 GPa. Os compósitos produzidos foram caracterizados por difração de raios X para identificação de fases cristalinas presentes. Além disso, foi feita análise comparativa entre o carbeto isento de terra-rara (amostras de referência) e carbetos dopados com elementos de terra-rara (La2O3, CeO2, e Y2O3). Para as condições estudadas os resultados mostraram que durante o processo de sinterização ocorreu à formação, mesmo que em pequenas quantidades, das fases Co3W3C2 e ? (carbeto tipo ?) nas peças de metal duro estudadas. Abstract in english The WC-Co cemented carbide also called hardmetal is a material of great technological importance, currently produced by powder metallurgy by liquid phase sintering, starting from the mixture of powdered tungsten carbide (WC) and cobalt (Co) using conventional mill. Seeking to obtain materials with h [...] igher capacity (productivity, life, etc.), an alternative route for powder metallurgy called High Pressure High Temperature (HPHT) has been used for the production of these materials with promising results. The main aim of this work is the phases analysis of the WC-10Co doped with rare-earths (La2O3, CeO2,and Y2O3) obtained under high pressure. This hardmetal alloy is an example of the composite material widely used as cutting tool and machining processes in general. Several WC-10Co mixtures containing up to 2 wt % La2O3,CeO2and Y2O3 of the cobalt phase were prepared. The mixed powders were pressed at 800 MPa in a cylindrical matrix (? = 7 mm) and sintered at 1400ºC during 40 s under high pressure (5.5 GPa). The identification of the crystalline phases was done by X-ray diffraction. In addition, comparative analysis between the free rare-earth and doped with rare-earths elements (La2O3, CeO2 and Y2O3) carbides was done. The results showed that, within the conditions studied during the sintering process, formation, even, small amounts, of the phases Co3W3C2 and ? (? carbide type) were observed in the carbide pieces studied.

  19. Distributed Selfish Load Balancing

    CERN Document Server

    Berenbrink, P; Goldberg, L A; Goldberg, P; Hu, Z; Martin, R; Berenbrink, Petra; Friedetzky, Tom; Goldberg, Leslie Ann; Goldberg, Paul; Hu, Zengjian; Martin, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Suppose that a set of m tasks are to be shared as equally as possible amongst a set of n resources. A game-theoretic mechanism to find a suitable allocation is to associate each task with a ``selfish agent'', and require each agent to select a resource, with the cost of a resource being the number of agents to select it. Agents would then be expected to migrate from overloaded to underloaded resources, until the allocation becomes balanced. Recent work has studied the question of how this can take place within a distributed setting in which agents migrate selfishly without any centralized control. In this paper we discuss a natural protocol for the agents which combines the following desirable features: It can be implemented in a strongly distributed setting, uses no central control, and has good convergence properties. We show using a martingale technique that the process converges in expected time O(\\log\\log m + n^4). We also give a lower bound of \\Omega(\\max{\\log\\log m, n}) for the convergence time, as wel...

  20. The right balance

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Over the course of her career as a physicist, Felicitas Pauss, currently responsible for CERN's External Relations, has often been the sole woman in an environment dominated by men. While she freely admits that being a woman physicist can have as many advantages as disadvantages, she thinks the best strategy is to maintain the right balance.   From a very early age, Felicitas Pauss always wanted to be involved in projects that interested and fascinated her. That's how she came to study physics. When she was a first-year university student in Austria in 1970, it was still fairly uncommon for women to go into physics research. "I grew up in Salzburg with a background in music. At that time, it was certainly considered more ‘normal’ for a woman to study music than to do research in physics. But already in high school I was interested in physics and technical instruments and wanted to know how things work and what they are made of”. At the beginning of her care...

  1. Interim balance: Ecology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subjects: The ecology problem - world wide. Sectoral balances: The examples of energy, transportation, chemistry, agriculture and food industry, water supply. Destruction of nature and human discord. Conservatives in our political parties and their views on environmental protection. Alliance between reds and 'greens', integration between reds and greens. The Rhine initiative. Lead respects no borders, experiences of citizens' action groups in Lothringia and the Saar district. International airport Munich-II/comments by a protestant. 'Give priority to life'/A hearing on environmental protection. 4:96 - 'greens' in the Bremen Senate. Policy in a hard-hearing world/psychology of citizens' action groups. Critical ecological research and scientific establishment. Full productivity and ecology. The deluge to follow/Hints on how to build an ark. Symbiosis is more than coexistence/Ecologists' social theory. Throwing in two hundred elementary particles/on the way to an ecological concept of science. Scientific journals. Alternative literature. Teaching model for a teaching subject 'ecology'. (orig.)

  2. Balancing "we" and "me".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congdon, Christine; Flynn, Donna; Redman, Melanie

    2014-10-01

    The open office is the dominant form of workspace design for good reason: It fosters collaboration, promotes learning, and nurtures strong culture. But what most companies fail to realize is that collaboration has a natural rhythm that requires both interaction and private contemplation. Companies have been trying for decades to find the balance between public and private workspace that best supports collaboration. In 1980 52% of U.S. employees lacked workspaces where they could concentrate without distraction. In response, high-walled cubicles took over the corporate landscape. By the late 1990s, the tide had turned, and only 23% of employees wanted more privacy, and 50% wanted more access to other people. Ever since, firms have been beefing up spaces that support collaboration and shrinking areas for individual work. But the pendulum seems to have swung too far: Once again, people feel a pressing need for privacy, not only to do heads-down work but to cope with the intensity of work today. To address these needs, according to the authors, we have to rethink our assumptions about privacy. Traditionally defined in physical terms, privacy is now about the individual's ability to control information and stimulation. In this article, the authors examine workspace design through the new lens of privacy and offer insights on how to foster teamwork and solitude. PMID:25509575

  3. Balancing Bounded Treewidth Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansen, Maurice; Sarma M. N., Jayalal

    We use algorithmic tools for graphs of small treewidth to address questions in complexity theory. For both arithmetic and Boolean circuits, we show that any circuit of size n O(1) and treewidth O(log i n) can be simulated by a circuit of width O(log i + 1 n) and size n c , where c = O(1), if i = 0, and c = O(loglogn) otherwise. For our main construction, we prove that multiplicatively disjoint arithmetic circuits of size n O(1) and treewidth k can be simulated by bounded fan-in arithmetic formulas of depth O(k 2logn). From this we derive an analogous statement for syntactically multilinear arithmetic circuits, which strengthens the central theorem of [14]. As another application, we derive that constant width arithmetic circuits of size n O(1) can be balanced to depth O(logn), provided certain restrictions are made on the use of iterated multiplication. Also from our main construction, we derive that Boolean bounded fan-in circuits of size n O(1) and treewidth k can be simulated by bounded fan-in formulas of depth O(k 2logn). This strengthens in the non-uniform setting the known inclusion that SC0 ? NC1. Finally, we apply our construction to show that Reachability and Circuit Value Problem for some treewidth restricted cases can be solved in LogDCFL.

  4. Balancing Bounded Treewidth Circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Jansen, Maurice

    2009-01-01

    Algorithmic tools for graphs of small treewidth are used to address questions in complexity theory. For both arithmetic and Boolean circuits, it is shown that any circuit of size $n^{O(1)}$ and treewidth $O(\\log^i n)$ can be simulated by a circuit of width $O(\\log^{i+1} n)$ and size $n^c$, where $c = O(1)$, if $i=0$, and $c=O(\\log \\log n)$ otherwise. For our main construction, we prove that multiplicatively disjoint arithmetic circuits of size $n^{O(1)}$ and treewidth $k$ can be simulated by bounded fan-in arithmetic formulas of depth $O(k^2\\log n)$. From this we derive the analogous statement for syntactically multilinear arithmetic circuits, which strengthens a theorem of Mahajan and Rao. As another application, we derive that constant width arithmetic circuits of size $n^{O(1)}$ can be balanced to depth $O(\\log n)$, provided certain restrictions are made on the use of iterated multiplication. Also from our main construction, we derive that Boolean bounded fan-in circuits of size $n^{O(1)}$ and treewidth $k...

  5. Paul Collier : Balancing beams

    CERN Multimedia

    2009-01-01

    As former head of AB Operations, Paul Collier and his group were in the ‘cockpit’ for the LHC’s maiden voyage - piloting the first beam around the ring. But now, as Head of the Beams Department, he will need his feet firmly on the ground in order to balance all the beam activities at CERN. "As Department Head, I’ll have less direct contact with the machines," Collier says with a hint of regret. "I’ll still obviously be very involved, but they won’t actually let me loose in front of the keyboard anymore!" As the new Head of the BE Department, Collier will be in charge of nearly 400 people, and will oversee all the beam activities, including the preparations for the longest period of beam operation in the history of CERN. In the new organization, the BE, TE and EN Departments have been grouped together in the Accelerator and Technology Sector. "‘Partnership’ is a key word for the three departments," says Collier. "The n...

  6. Par Pond water balance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A water budget for the Par Pond hydrologic system was established in order to estimate the rate of groundwater influx to Par Pond. This estimate will be used in modeling exercises to predict Par Pond reservoir elevation and spillway discharge in the scenario where Savannah River water is no longer pumped and discharged into Par Pond. The principal of conservation of mass was used to develop the water budget, where water inflow was set equal to water outflow. Components of the water budget were identified, and the flux associated with each was determined. The water budget was considered balanced when inflow and outflow summed to zero. The results of this study suggest that Par Pond gains water from the groundwater system in the upper reaches of the reservoir, but looses water to the groundwater system near the dam. The rate of flux of groundwater from the water table aquifer into Par Pond was determined to be 13 cfs. The rate of flux from Par Pond to the water table aquifer near the dam was determined to be 7 cfs

  7. Electrical Transport Experiments at High Pressure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weir, S

    2009-02-11

    High-pressure electrical measurements have a long history of use in the study of materials under ultra-high pressures. In recent years, electrical transport experiments have played a key role in the study of many interesting high pressure phenomena including pressure-induced superconductivity, insulator-to-metal transitions, and quantum critical behavior. High-pressure electrical transport experiments also play an important function in geophysics and the study of the Earth's interior. Besides electrical conductivity measurements, electrical transport experiments also encompass techniques for the study of the optoelectronic and thermoelectric properties of materials under high pressures. In addition, electrical transport techniques, i.e., the ability to extend electrically conductive wires from outside instrumentation into the high pressure sample chamber have been utilized to perform other types of experiments as well, such as high-pressure magnetic susceptibility and de Haas-van Alphen Fermi surface experiments. Finally, electrical transport techniques have also been utilized for delivering significant amounts of electrical power to high pressure samples, for the purpose of performing high-pressure and -temperature experiments. Thus, not only do high-pressure electrical transport experiments provide much interesting and valuable data on the physical properties of materials extreme compression, but the underlying high-pressure electrical transport techniques can be used in a number of ways to develop additional diagnostic techniques and to advance high pressure capabilities.

  8. Rare earth separation process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light rare earths including yttrium (i.e. Z<63) are separated from other rare earths by contacting an aqueous solution with an organic solution containing an extracting agent, which is a mixture of a carboxylic acid (water-insoluble and comprising more than 6 carbon atoms) and a neutral organic phosphorus compound or an alcohol with more than 6 carbon atoms. Heavy rare earths are re-extracted with an aqueous acid solution

  9. Earth observing system implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donohoe, M. J.; Walton, B. A.; Vane, D.

    1985-01-01

    The Earth Observing System (EOS) is a planned major earth science program initiative using the Polar Platforms of the Space Station. The Polar Platform resource capabilities will allow a multi-disciplinary, long term mission life approach to future earth science measurements. The EOS will be the subject of an Announcement of Opportunity (AO) in 1986. The EOS concept and the planned implementation approach is outlined.

  10. Near Earth Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The word planet comes from Greek planetes, wanderers, because the planets appear to wander across the celestial sphere, contrary to the fixed stars. This thesis presents several methods for using this motion to distinguish between stars and solar system objects in order to detect and track NEOs, Near Earth Objects: Asteroids and comets following paths that bring them near the Earth. NEOs have collided with the Earth since its formation, some causing local devastation, some causing global climate...

  11. The Earth's Magnetic Field

    OpenAIRE

    Edda Lína Gunnarsdóttir 1988

    2012-01-01

    The Earth's magnetic field is essential for life on Earth, as we know it, to exist. It forms a magnetic shield around the planet, protecting it from high energy particles and radiation from the Sun, which can cause damage to life, power systems, orbiting satellites, astronauts and spacecrafts. This report contains a general overview of the Earth's magnetic field. The different sources that contribute to the total magnetic field are presented and the diverse variations in the field are describ...

  12. The early Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Badro, James

    2015-01-01

    The Early Earth: Accretion and Differentiation provides a multidisciplinary overview of the state of the art in understanding the formation and primordial evolution of the Earth.  The fundamental structure of the Earth as we know it today was inherited from the initial conditions 4.56 billion years ago as a consequence of planetesimal accretion, large impacts among planetary objects, and planetary-scale differentiation. The evolution of the Earth from a molten ball of metal and magma to the tectonically active, dynamic, habitable planet that we know today is unique among the terrestrial plane

  13. Capturing near earth objects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, Near Earth Objects (NEOs) have been attracting great attention, and thousands of NEOs have been found to date. This paper examines the NEOs' orbital dynamics using the framework of an accurate solar system model and a Sun-Earth-NEO three-body system when the NEOs are close to Earth to search for NEOs with low-energy orbits. It is possible for such an NEO to be temporarily captured by Earth; its orbit would thereby be changed and it would become an Earth-orbiting object after a small increase in its velocity. From the point of view of the Sun-Earth-NEO restricted three-body system, it is possible for an NEO whose Jacobian constant is slightly lower than C1 but higher than C3 to be temporarily captured by Earth. When such an NEO approaches Earth, it is possible to change its orbital energy to nearly the zero velocity surface of the three-body system at point L1 and make the NEO become a small satellite of the Earth. Some such NEOs were found; the best example only required a 410 m s-1 increase in velocity. (letters)

  14. Capturing Near Earth Objects

    CERN Document Server

    Baoyin, Hexi; Li, Junfeng; 10.1088/1674-4527/10/6/008

    2011-01-01

    Recently, Near Earth Objects (NEOs) have been attracting great attention, and thousands of NEOs have been found to date. This paper examines the NEOs' orbital dynamics using the framework of an accurate solar system model and a Sun-Earth-NEO three-body system when the NEOs are close to Earth to search for NEOs with low-energy orbits. It is possible for such an NEO to be temporarily captured by Earth; its orbit would thereby be changed and it would become an Earth-orbiting object after a small increase in its velocity. From the point of view of the Sun-Earth-NEO restricted three-body system, it is possible for an NEO whose Jacobian constant is slightly lower than C1 and higher than C3 to be temporarily captured by Earth. When such an NEO approaches Earth, it is possible to change its orbit energy to close up the zero velocity surface of the three-body system at point L1 and make the NEO become a small satellite of the Earth. Some such NEOs were found; the best example only required a 410m/s increase in velocit...

  15. Thermal History of Planetary Objects: From Asteroids to super-Earths, from plate-tectonics to life (Runcorn-Florensky Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spohn, Tilman

    2013-04-01

    Convection in the interiors of planetesimals (asteroids), planets, and satellites is driving the thermal and chemical evolution of these bodies including the generation of possible magnetic fields. The wide size range induces a wide of range of time scales from hundreds of thousands of years for small planetesimals to a few tens of Gigayears for massive super-Earths. Evolution calculations are often based on energy (and entropy) balances parameterizing the transport properties of the interior in suitable ways. These thereby allow incorporating (in parameterized forms) interesting physical processes that depend in one way or another on the transport properties of the interior. The interior will usually be chemically layered in mantles and cores and include ice layers if icy satellites are considered. In addition to magnetic field generation calculated via energy balances of the core and using semi-empirical dynamo strength relations, processes that can be considered include sintering and compaction for small bodies and mantle (or ice) melting, differentiation and even continental growth for full-scaled terrestrial planets. The rheology of the interior is considered temperature and pressure dependent and the concentration of volatiles can be important. For super-Earths, probably the most critical consideration is how the mantle rheology would vary with pressure and thus with depth. It is possible that the increasing pressure will frustrate deep mantle convection thereby reducing the vigor of mantle convection. Possibly, the generation of a magnetic field in a putative iron-rich core will be impossible, if super-Earths at all have earth-like cores. On a much smaller scale, the decay of short-lived radioactives suffices to heat and melt planetesimals, the melting being helped by the low thermal conductivity of the initially porous body. This allows planets to form from pre-differentiated planetesimals thus helping to differentiate and form cores rapidly. On active planets - like the Earth - the volatile budget matters for the interior evolution. With plate tectonics, large-scale volatile cycles are invoked. On the Earth, even the biosphere is speculated to interact with the interior. It has been argued (e.g., Rosing et al. 2006; Sleep et al, 2012) that the formation of continents could be a consequence of bioactivity harvesting solar energy through photosynthesis to help build the continents and that the mantle should carry a chemical biosignature. A model is presented that includes mantle convection, mantle water vapor degassing at mid-oceanic ridges and regassing through subduction zones, continental crust formation and erosion and water storage and transport in a porous oceanic crust that includes hydrous mineral phases. The biosphere enters the model through its effect on continental erosion and through a reduction of the activation barrier to metamorphic reactions (e.g., Kim et al., 2004) in sediment layers. An abiotic world is found to have a much drier mantle than the present Earth but may have a similar surface coverage by continents. The reduced rate of continental crust production on the abiotic world would be balanced by a reduced rate of continent erosion. Through the effect of water on the mantle rheology, the biotic world would tend to be tectonically more active and have a more rapid long-term carbon-silicate cycle. J. Kim, H. Dong, J. Seabaugh, S. W. Newell, D. D. Eberl, Science 303, 830-832, 2004 N. H. Sleep, D. K. Bird, E. Pope, Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 40, 277-300, 2012 M. T. Rosing, D. K. Bird, N. H. Sleep, W. Glassley, F. Albarede, Paleo3 232, 90-113, 2006

  16. Independent effects of adding weight and inertia on balance during quiet standing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costello Kerry

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human balance during quiet standing is influenced by adding mass to the body with a backpack, with symmetrically-applied loads to the trunk, or with obesity. Adding mass to the body increases both the weight and inertia of the body, which theoretically could provide counteracting effects on body dynamics and balance. Understanding the independent effects of adding weight and inertia on balance may provide additional insight into human balance that could lead to novel advancements in balance training and rehabilitation. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the independent effects of adding weight and inertia on balance during quiet standing. Methods Sixteen normal-weight young adult participants stood as still as possible on a custom-built backboard apparatus under four experimental conditions: baseline, added inertia only, added weight only, and added inertia and weight. Results Adding inertia by itself had no measurable effect on center of pressure movement or backboard movement. Adding weight by itself increased center of pressure movement (indicated greater effort by the postural control system to stand as still as possible and backboard movement (indicating a poorer ability of the body to stand as still as possible. Adding inertia and weight at the same time increased center of pressure movement but did not increase backboard movement compared to the baseline condition. Conclusions Adding inertia and adding weight had different effects on balance. Adding inertia by itself had no effect on balance. Adding weight by itself had a negative effect on balance. When adding inertia and weight at the same time, the added inertia appeared to lessen (but did not eliminate the negative effect of adding weight on balance. These results improve our fundamental understanding of how added mass influences human balance.

  17. Human domination of earth`s ecosystems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vitousek, P.M.; Mooney, H.A.; Lubchenko, J.; Melillo, J.M. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1997-07-25

    Human alteration of Earth is substantial and growing. Between one-third and one-half of the land surface has been transformed by human action; the carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere has increased by nearly 30% since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution; more atmospheric nitrogen is fixed by humanity than by all natural terrestrial sources combined; more than half of all accessible surface fresh water is put to use by humanity; and about one-quarter of the bird species on Earth have been driven to extinction. By these and other standards, it is clear that we live on a human-dominated planet. 58 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Hydration study of rare earth trivalent ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work we confirm the fact that in the case of rare earth ions, the hydration process has an electrostatic character. We calculate with our theoretical model the local electrostatic field which is equivalent to an electrostriction pressure. The local density around an Ln3+ ions is obtained from the state equation of pure water at high pressure. The hydration numbers obtained by this model agree with the experimental results and show a progressive diminution of one molecule of water from La3+ to Lu3+

  19. Thermal balance testing of MSAT 2 spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samson, Serge; Choueiry, Elie

    1994-11-01

    The present work reports on the recently completed infrared thermal balance/thermal vacuum testing of a MSAT satellite, the first satellite to provide mobile communications service for all of continental North America. MSAT is a two spacecraft program, using a three-axis stabilized Hughes HS-601 series Bus as the vehicle for the Canadian designed Payload. The thermal tests which were performed at the Canadian Space Agency's David Florida Laboratory in Ottawa, Canada, lasted approximately 35 days. The infrared (IR) heating rig was designed to provide radiant heat inputs into seven spacecraft zones during Thermal Vacuum (TV) testing. The TV test was divided into multiple phases. It began with a thermal balance cold phase, followed by a thermal cold cycle and a hot balance phase, complemented by a thermal hot cycle to finish with a thermal cycle with continuous monitoring of the Bus and Payload. The spacecraft's external heat fluxes were provided by IR lamp sources. To ensure flux uniformity, highly reflective baffles and IR East and West faces; the Earth facing (Nadir); and the inside of the thrust cylinder. The aft-end panel heat fluxes were provided by a heated LN2 shroud. The radiation flux intensity on the spacecraft zones from the various rig elements was measured using Monitored Background Radiometers (MBR's) and compared with direct calculations and with pretest predictions. The temperature measurement system was based on Uniform Temperature References (UTR's) located inside the chamber such that all feedthroughs were copper-copper. This system was devised to achieve a temperature measurement accuracy of plus/minus 0.5 C for over 850 thermocouples used in the test. A PC-(QNX-based) based real-time data acquisition system was utilized to provide continuous monitoring of all channels based on a 30-second time scan. In addition, the data acquisition system was able to retrieve telemetry stream from the Satellite Test Equipments (STE) station for real-time data manipulation. Preliminary results showed the test to be successful from both the thermal balance side and the electrical testing side.

  20. Work–Life Balance: History, Costs, and Budgeting for Balance

    OpenAIRE

    Raja, Siva; Stein, Sharon L.

    2014-01-01

    The concept and difficulties of work–life balance are not unique to surgeons, but professional responsibilities make maintaining a work–life balance difficult. Consequences of being exclusively career focused include burn out, physical, and mental ailments. In addition, physician burn out may hinder optimal patient care and incur significant costs on health care in general. Assessing current uses of time, allocating goals catered to an individual surgeon, and continual self-assessment may hel...

  1. Balancing with Noise and Delay

    CERN Document Server

    Hosaka, T; Luciani, C; Cabrera, J L; Milton, J G; Hosaka, Tadaaki; Ohira, Toru; Luciani, Christian; Cabrera, Juan Luis; Milton, John G.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by recent studies in human balance control, we study a delayed random walk with an unstable fixed point. It is observed that the random walker moves away from the unstable fixed point more slowly than is observed in the absence of delay. It is shown that, for given a noise level, there exists an optimal delay to achieve the longest first passage time. Our observations support recent demonstrations that noise has a beneficial role for balance control and emphasize that predicitive strategies are not necessary to transiently control balance.

  2. Extremophiles: Link between earth and astrobiology

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanovi? Dejan B.; Fojkar Oliver; Drobac-?ik Aleksandra V.; ?ajko Kristina O.; Duli? Tamara I.; Svir?ev Zorica B.

    2008-01-01

    Astrobiology studies the origin, evolution, distribution and future of life in the universe. The most promising worlds in Solar system, beyond Earth, which may harbor life are Mars and Jovian moon Europa. Extremophiles are organisms that thrive on the edge of temperature, hypersalinity, pH extremes, pressure, dryness and so on. In this paper, some extremophile cyanobacteria have been discussed as possible life forms in a scale of astrobiology. Samples were taken from solenetz and solonchak ty...

  3. Earth System Science Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Sandra; Coffman, Margaret

    2004-01-01

    For several decades, science teachers have used bottles for classroom projects designed to teach students about biology. Bottle projects do not have to just focus on biology, however. These projects can also be used to engage students in Earth science topics. This article describes the Earth System Science Project, which was adapted and developed…

  4. Evolution and Earth's Entropy

    OpenAIRE

    Klauber, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Entropy decreases on the Earth due to day/night temperature differences. This decrease exceeds the decrease in entropy on the Earth related to evolution by many orders of magnitude. Claims by creationists that science is somehow inconsistent with regard to evolution are thus show to be baseless.

  5. Rare earth industries: Upstream business

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evidently, many factors contribute to the rush to invest in the unprecedented revival of rare earths. One major reason has to do with the rapidly growing world demand. The other reason relates to the attractive price of rare earths which is projected to stay strong in the coming years. This is because supply is predicted to have difficulty keeping pace with demand. Experts believe a major driver of global rare earths demand is the forecasted expansion in the green economy. Climate change is a major driver of the green economy. With climate change, there is concern that the uncontrolled emission of the greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide, can lead to catastrophic consequences for the world. This has been documented in countless studies and reports. Another important driver of the green economy is the growing shortfall in many resources. The world is now experiencing declines in key resources to meet a growing global demand. With more than 6 billion people now in the world and growing, the pressure exerted on global resources including energy, water and food is a major concern. Recent demand surge in China and India has dented the supply position of major world resources. The much quoted Stern Report from the UK has warned that, unless immediate steps are taken to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, it may be a costly exercise to undertake the corrections later. Since energy use, especially fossil fuels, is a major contributor to climate change, greener options are being sought. Add to that the fact that the fossil energy resources of the world are declining, the need to seek alternatives becomes even more urgent. One option is to change to renewable energy sources. These include such potentials as solar, wind and biomass. Rare earths have somehow become a critical feature of the technologies in such renewable. Another option is to improve the efficient use of energy in transport, buildings and all the other energy intensive industries. Again the technologies in energy efficiency rely a lot on the use of rare earths. These include applications in energy efficient lighting, new and more reliable energy storage batteries as well as more efficient energy distribution mechanism. The growing demand for more efficient communication systems, not only in the world of business but also in defence and the military, is another significant driver of the global demand for rare earths. Mobility and miniaturisation, which feature prominently in the current specifications for telecommunications equipment's, rely a lot on the deployment of powerful and efficient magnetic technology. And rare earths have become a much sought after material in the latest magnets used in mobile phones, defence equipment's and computer hardware's. With the rise in the global investments in smart cities and intelligent communities, the demand for such communication products is destined to witness equally prolific expansion. This would inadvertently translate into a rising demand for rare earths. (author)

  6. Energy Budget: Earth's Most Important and Least Appreciated Planetary Attribute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambers, Lin; Bethea, Katie

    2013-01-01

    The energy budget involves more than one kind of energy. People can sense this energy in different ways, depending on what type of energy it is. We see visible light using our eyes. We feel infrared energy using our skin (such as around a campfire). We know some species of animals can see ultraviolet light and portions of the infrared spectrum. NASA satellites use instruments that can "see" different parts of the electromagnetic spectrum to observe various processes in the Earth system, including the energy budget. The Sun is a very hot ball of plasma emitting large amounts of energy. By the time it reaches Earth, this energy amounts to about 340 Watts for every square meter of Earth on average. That's almost 6 60-Watt light bulbs for every square meter of Earth! With all of that energy shining down on the Earth, how does our planet maintain a comfortable balance that allows a complex ecosystem, including humans, to thrive? The key thing to remember is the Sun - hot though it is - is a tiny part of Earth's environment. Earth's energy budget is a critical but little understood aspect of our planetary home. NASA is actively studying this important Earth system feature, and sharing data and knowledge about it with the education community.

  7. Is the Earth Expanding ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, W.; Chen, W.; Li, J.

    2007-12-01

    Whether the Earth is expanding or contracting is an interesting problem in geoscience. The information of the secular change of the Earth's gravity field supports the conclusion that the Earth is expanding at least in recent years. The gravitational potential could be expressed as a spherical harmonic series outside the Earth. In practical applications, it could be approximately realized by a truncated series, e.g., EGM96 (the Earth Gravity Model 96), EIGEN-GL04C, etc. The principal moments of inertia of the Earth are related to the second-order coeffients of the spherical harmonic series. Based on EGM96 as well as EIGEN-GL04C, the principal moments of inertia and especially their temporal variations are determined. All the three principal moments of inertia are gradually increasing at almost the same rate in recent 10 years, which might be due to the following three causes: 1) the rise of the sea level; 2) the increase of the total mass of the Earth; 3) the expansion of the Earth in the general sense. Calculations show that the rise of the sea level has too week influence on the variation of the principal moments of inertia comparing with the actual observations, and consequently the cause 1) could be given up. As to the increase of the total mass of the Earth, there does not exist any definite evidence, especially, it has not been found that the geocentric constant GM (where G and M are gravitational constant and the total mass of the Earth respectively) varies with time by various satellite approaches. Hence, it is reasonable to assume that the increase of the principal moments of inertia is caused by the expansion of the interior of the Earth or at least the whole mantle. This clearly demonstrates that the Earth is expanding at least in recent 10 years. Preliminary numerical calculations show that the Earth is expanding at the rate around 0.6 mm/yr at least in recent 10 years. Taking into account the Dirac's large number postulate, it could be concluded that the Earth expansion has and will have happened continuously in a long geological history.

  8. Pressurized hopper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Secure Automated Fuel Fabrication Line is being developed to reduce personnel exposure and to improve safeguards. Fertile and fissile fuel powders are blended in the line for making fuel pellets. A pressurized hopper was developed for use not only as a blender, but also as a storage and feeding device. It works with or without injection tubes to produce a well-blended powder with reduced agglomerate population. Results of blending experiments using dry Kaolin clay and Tempra pigment are given

  9. An Oscillating Magnet Watt Balance

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmedov, H

    2015-01-01

    We establish the principles for a new generation of simplified and accurate watt balances in which an oscillating magnet generates Faraday's voltage in a stationary coil. A force measuring system and a mechanism providing vertical movements of the magnet are completely independent in an oscillating magnet watt balance. This remarkable feature allows to establish the link between the Planck constant and a macroscopic mass by a one single experiment. Weak dependence on variations of environmental and experimental conditions, weak sensitivity to ground vibrations and temperature changes, simple force measuring procedure, small sizes and other useful features offered by the novel approach considerably reduce the complexity of the experimental setup. We formulate the oscillating magnet watt balance principle and establish the measurement procedure for the Planck constant. We discuss the nature of oscillating magnet watt balance uncertainties and give a brief description of the National Metrology Institute (UME) wa...

  10. Are Social Networks Really Balanced?

    CERN Document Server

    Estrada, Ernesto

    2014-01-01

    There is a long-standing belief that in social networks with simultaneous friendly/hostile interactions (signed networks) there is a general tendency to a global balance. Balance represents a state of the network with lack of contentious situations. Here we introduce a method to quantify the degree of balance of any signed (social) network. It accounts for the contribution of all signed cycles in the network and gives, in agreement with empirical evidences, more weight to the shorter than to the longer cycles. We found that, contrary to what is believed, many signed social networks -- in particular very large directed online social networks -- are in general very poorly balanced. We also show that unbalanced states can be changed by tuning the weights of the social interactions among the agents in the network.

  11. Exercise to Improve Your Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the Go4Life website. As you progress in your exercise routine, try adding the following challenges to help ... steady on your feet, try doing the balance exercises with your eyes closed. Quick Tip In the ...

  12. How Our Balance System Works

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from your eyes, the inner ear, and the sensory systems of the body (such as the skin, muscles, ... function? How are vision, the inner ear, and sensory systems impacting functional balance? Some of the tests of ...

  13. Blood pressure measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diastolic blood pressure; Systolic blood pressure; Blood pressure reading; Measuring blood pressure ... or your health care provider will wrap the blood pressure cuff snugly around your upper arm. The lower ...

  14. Earth Science Informatics - Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.

    2015-01-01

    Over the last 10-15 years, significant advances have been made in information management, there are an increasing number of individuals entering the field of information management as it applies to Geoscience and Remote Sensing data, and the field of informatics has come to its own. Informatics is the science and technology of applying computers and computational methods to the systematic analysis, management, interchange, and representation of science data, information, and knowledge. Informatics also includes the use of computers and computational methods to support decision making and applications. Earth Science Informatics (ESI, a.k.a. geoinformatics) is the application of informatics in the Earth science domain. ESI is a rapidly developing discipline integrating computer science, information science, and Earth science. Major national and international research and infrastructure projects in ESI have been carried out or are on-going. Notable among these are: the Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), the European Commissions INSPIRE, the U.S. NSDI and Geospatial One-Stop, the NASA EOSDIS, and the NSF DataONE, EarthCube and Cyberinfrastructure for Geoinformatics. More than 18 departments and agencies in the U.S. federal government have been active in Earth science informatics. All major space agencies in the world, have been involved in ESI research and application activities. In the United States, the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP), whose membership includes nearly 150 organizations (government, academic and commercial) dedicated to managing, delivering and applying Earth science data, has been working on many ESI topics since 1998. The Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS)s Working Group on Information Systems and Services (WGISS) has been actively coordinating the ESI activities among the space agencies. Remote Sensing; Earth Science Informatics, Data Systems; Data Services; Metadata

  15. Balancer effects in opinion dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Cheon, Taksu

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a novel type of contrarian agent, the balancer, to Galam model of opinion dynamics, in order to account for the skepticism over one-sidedness and for the sense of fairness. We find that the inclusion of balancers along with floaters and inflexibles brings about a critical point on parametric plane of the dynamical system, which results in the new kind of stable final states of the opinion dynamics, that seem to capture several intriguing features found often in mature democracies.

  16. Electric power balance sheet 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of RTE, the French electricity Transportation grid, a public service assignment, is to balance the electricity supply and demand in real time. This report presents RTE's technical results for the year 2012: strong seasonal contrast of power consumption, rise of the renewable energies contribution in meeting the electricity demand, slight decay of the nuclear and thermal power generation, decrease of the export balance and change in trades structure, adaptation of RTE's network to the evolutions of the energy system

  17. Data needs for nutrient balances

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vinther, Finn Pilgaard

    2011-01-01

    One of the tools for evaluating the results of environmental action plans or EU directives related to nutrients in the agricultural sector is to follow the development of annually estimated nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) balances and surplus. Unlike greenhouse gas and ammonia emissions, countries are not required to report N and P balances for agriculture as part of any international conventions. As a consequence, there is no organisation equivalent to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Cha...

  18. Balanced Scorecard for Olvi Plc

    OpenAIRE

    Tarpio, Monica

    2013-01-01

    Company performance measurement is the most important factor of any business. Earlier the emphasis was on the financial factor, but nowadays the nonfinancial factors have emerged more. Balanced Scorecard is used to monitor business operations, because it has four different perspec-tives that originate from critical success factors. The thesis is divided into two parts. The first part includes the theory of Balanced Scorecard and other examples. The second part is a case study and it inclu...

  19. Balancing with Noise and Delay

    OpenAIRE

    Hosaka, Tadaaki; Ohira, Toru; Luciani, Christian; Cabrera, Juan Luis; Milton, John G.

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by recent studies in human balance control, we study a delayed random walk with an unstable fixed point. It is observed that the random walker moves away from the unstable fixed point more slowly than is observed in the absence of delay. It is shown that, for given a noise level, there exists an optimal delay to achieve the longest first passage time. Our observations support recent demonstrations that noise has a beneficial role for balance control and emphasize t...

  20. Form 6 - gas balancing agreement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1988, a special Committee of the Rocky Mountain Mineral Law Foundation undertook a project to draft a model from gas balancing agreement. This project was initiated at the request of a number of Foundation members who felt that a model form gas balancing agreement would facilitate the negotiation of operating agreement, since gas balancing issues had become sticking points in the process. The Committee was composed of attorneys representing a wide cross-section of the oil and gas industry including both major and independent oil companies, production companies with interstate pipeline affiliates, and private practitioners. The Committee attempted to address the more controversial issues in gas balancing with optional provisions in the Form. To facilitate the negotiation process, the number of optional provisions was minimized. This form may be used as an Appendix to the new A.A.P.L. Form 610-1989 Model Form Operating Agreement. This book includes provision of this Form which are: Ownership of gas production; Balancing of production accounts; Cash balancing upon depletion; Deliverability tests; Nominations; Statements; Payment of taxes; Operating expenses; Overproducing allowable; Payment of leasehold burdens; Operator's liability; Successors and assigns; Audits; Arbitration; and Operator's fees

  1. Chromium at High Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaramillo, Rafael

    2012-02-01

    Chromium has long served as the archetype of spin density wave magnetism. Recently, Jaramillo and collaborators have shown that Cr also serves as an archetype of magnetic quantum criticality. Using a combination of x-ray diffraction and electrical transport measurements at high pressures and cryogenic temperatures in a diamond anvil cell, they have demonstrated that the N'eel transition (TN) can be continuously suppressed to zero, with no sign of a concurrent structural transition. The order parameter undergoes a broad regime of exponential suppression, consistent with the weak coupling paradigm, before deviating from a BCS-like ground state within a narrow but accessible quantum critical regime. The quantum criticality is characterized by mean field scaling of TN and non mean field scaling of the transport coefficients, which points to a fluctuation-induced reconstruction of the critical Fermi surface. A comparison between pressure and chemical doping as means to suppress TN sheds light on different routes to the quantum critical point and the relevance of Fermi surface nesting and disorder at this quantum phase transition. The work by Jaramillo et al. is broadly relevant to the study of magnetic quantum criticality in a physically pure and theoretically tractable system that balances elements of weak and strong coupling. [4pt] [1] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. Wang & T. F. Rosenbaum. Signatures of quantum criticality in pure Cr at high pressure. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 107, 13631 (2010). [0pt] [2] R. Jaramillo, Y. Feng, J. C. Lang, Z. Islam, G. Srajer, P. B. Littlewood, D. B. McWhan & T. F. Rosenbaum. Breakdown of the Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer ground state at a quantum phase transition. Nature 459, 405 (2009).

  2. A new program in earth system science education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntress, Wesley; Kalb, Michael W.; Johnson, Donald R.

    1990-01-01

    A program aimed at accelerating the development of earth system science curricula at the undergraduate level and at seeding the establishment of university-based mechanisms for cooperative research and education among universities and NASA has been initiated by the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) in conjunction with NASA. Proposals were submitted by 100 U.S. research universities which were selected as candidates to participate in a three-year pilot program to develop undergraduate curricula in earth system science. Universities were then selected based upon peer review and considerations of overall scientific balance among proposed programs. The program will also aim to integrate a number of universities with evolving earth system programs, linking them with a cooperative curriculum, shared faculty, and NASA scientists in order to establish a stronger base for earth systems related education and interdisciplinary research collaboration.

  3. Visual biofeedback exercises for improving body balance control after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molka, Alicja Zyta; Lisi?ski, Przemys?aw; Huber, Juliusz

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To evaluate the effects of balance training after arthroscopic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen patients (mean 33 ± 8?years old) who underwent anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction three months prior to participating in a one-month rehabilitation program. The control group included 15 people aged 34 ± 4?years. Patients’ functional level was evaluated according to the Lysholm knee score, and balance quality was ascertained by static and dynamic tests. A balance platform was used to measure the center of foot pressure deflection. Two dynamic balance tests evaluated time of task execution. [Results] Lysholm knee score improved significantly after rehabilitation. Balance in the sagittal plane with eyes closed improved significantly after rehabilitation. The average velocity of center of foot pressure swing in both the frontal and sagittal planes with eyes closed differed significantly from those of controls. Execution time required for the two dynamic tests decreased significantly after rehabilitation and were significantly better than those in the controls. [Conclusion] Maintaining static balance with eyes closed is very challenging after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction. Maintaining balance in the sagittal plane is particularly difficult. A one-month rehabilitation program partially improves static and dynamic balance. PMID:26311983

  4. Electronic structure and properties of rare earth and actinide intermetallics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are 188 contributions, experimental and theoretical, a few on rare earth and actinide elements but mostly on rare earth and actinide intermetallic compounds and alloys. The properties dealt with include 1) crystal structure, 2) magnetic properties and magnetic structure, 3) magnetic phase transformations and valence fluctuations, 4) electrical properties and superconductivity and their temperature, pressure and magnetic field dependence. A few papers deal with crystal growth and novel measuring methods. (G.Q.)

  5. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Herndon, J. Marvin

    2005-01-01

    The principles of Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics are disclosed leading to a new way to interpret whole-Earth dynamics. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics incorporates elements of and unifies the two seemingly divergent dominant theories of continential displacement, plate tectonics theory and Earth expansion theory. Whole-Earth decompression is the consequence of Earth formation from within a Jupiter-like protoplanet with subsequent loss of gases and ices and concomitant...

  6. Project Earth Science

    CERN Document Server

    Holt, Geoff

    2011-01-01

    Project Earth Science: Astronomy, Revised 2nd Edition, involves students in activities that focus on Earth's position in our solar system. How do we measure astronomical distances? How can we look back in time as we gaze across vast distances in space? How would our planet be different without its particular atmosphere and distance to our star? What are the geometries among Earth, the Moon, and the Sun that yield lunar phases and seasons? Students explore these concepts and others in 11 teacher-tested activities.

  7. The Earth's Magnetic Interior

    CERN Document Server

    Petrovsky, Eduard; Harinarayana, T; Herrero-Bervera, Emilio

    2011-01-01

    This volume combines review and solicited contributions, related to scientific studies of Division I of IAGA presented recently at its Scientific Assembly in Sopron in 2009. The book is aimed at intermediate to advanced readers dealing with the Earth's magnetic field generation, its historical records in rocks and geological formations - including links to geodynamics and magnetic dating, with magnetic carriers in earth materials, electromagnetic induction and conductivity studies of the Earth interior with environmental applications of rock magnetism and electromagnetism. The aim of the book

  8. A reconciled estimate of ice-sheet mass balance.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shepherd, Andrew; Ivins, Erik R

    2012-01-01

    We combined an ensemble of satellite altimetry, interferometry, and gravimetry data sets using common geographical regions, time intervals, and models of surface mass balance and glacial isostatic adjustment to estimate the mass balance of Earth's polar ice sheets. We find that there is good agreement between different satellite methods--especially in Greenland and West Antarctica--and that combining satellite data sets leads to greater certainty. Between 1992 and 2011, the ice sheets of Greenland, East Antarctica, West Antarctica, and the Antarctic Peninsula changed in mass by -142 ± 49, +14 ± 43, -65 ± 26, and -20 ± 14 gigatonnes year(-1), respectively. Since 1992, the polar ice sheets have contributed, on average, 0.59 ± 0.20 millimeter year(-1) to the rate of global sea-level rise.

  9. A Reconciled Estimate of Ice-Sheet Mass Balance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Andrew; Ivins, Erik R.; Geruo, A.; Barletta, Valentia R.; Bentley, Mike J.; Bettadpur, Srinivas; Briggs, Kate H.; Bromwich, David H.; Forsberg, Rene; Galin, Natalia; Horwath, Martin; Jacobs, Stan; Joughin, Ian; King, Matt A.; Lenaerts, Jan T. M.; Li, Jilu; Ligtenberg, Stefan R. M.; Luckman, Adrian; Luthcke, Scott B.; McMillan, Malcolm; Meister, Rakia; Milne, Glenn; Mouginot, Jeremie; Muir, Alan; Nicolas,Julien P.; Paden, John; Payne, Antony J.; Pritchard, Hamish; Rignot, Eric; Rott, Helmut; Sorensen, Louise Sandberg; Scambos, Ted A.; Yi, Dohngui; Zwally, H. Jay

    2012-01-01

    We combined an ensemble of satellite altimetry, interferometry, and gravimetry data sets using common geographical regions, time intervals, and models of surface mass balance and glacial isostatic adjustment to estimate the mass balance of Earth's polar ice sheets. We find that there is good agreement between different satellite methods-especially in Greenland and West Antarctica-and that combining satellite data sets leads to greater certainty. Between 1992 and 2011, the ice sheets of Greenland, East Antarctica, West Antarctica, and the Antarctic Peninsula changed in mass by -142 plus or minus 49, +14 plus or minus 43, -65 plus or minus 26, and -20 plus or minus 14 gigatonnes year(sup -1), respectively. Since 1992, the polar ice sheets have contributed, on average, 0.59 plus or minus 0.20 millimeter year(sup -1) to the rate of global sea-level rise.

  10. Solar energy resources not accounted in Brazilian National Energy Balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinheiro, Paulo Cesar da Costa [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica], Emails: pinheiro@netuno.Lcc.ufmg.br, pinheiro@demec.ufmg.br

    2009-07-01

    The main development vector of a society is the energy. The solar energy is the main energy source on the planet earth. Brazil is a tropical country, and the incident solar energy on its soil (15 trillion MWh/year) is 20,000 times its annual oil production. Several uses of solar energy are part of our lives in a so natural way that it despised in the consumption and use energy balance. In Brazil, solar energy is used directly in many activities and not accounted for in Energy Balance (BEN 2007), consisting of a virtual power generation. This work aims to make a preliminary assessment of solar energy used in different segments of the Brazilian economy. (author)

  11. Distributed Traffic Balancing Routing for LEO Satellite Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Lu

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Satellite networks have been widely investigated both in the business and academia for many years, with many important routing algorithms reported in the literatures. However, fewer existing routing algorithms focus on the trade-off between the routing survivability and the routing computation and storage overheads. Due to topological dynamics, it is difficult to effectively apply the conventional routing protocols such as RIP or OSPF to Low Earth Orbit (LEO satellite networks. According to the virtual topology model based on virtual node, this paper propose a new fully distributed routing protocol for LEO satellite networks, called Distributed Traffic Balancing Routing (DTBR. The proposed protocol not only guarantees the routing survivability and provides the ability of traffic balancing, but also result in few additional computation and storage overheads only deriving from the information flooding of failed satellites. Simulation results demonstrate positive conclusions of our methods.

  12. Hybrid Inflatable Pressure Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raboin, Jasen; Valle, Gerard D.; Edeen, Gregg; DeLaFuente, Horacio M.; Schneider, William C.; Spexarth, Gary R.; Johnson, Christopher J.; Pandya, Shalini

    2004-01-01

    Figure 1 shows a prototype of a large pressure vessel under development for eventual use as a habitable module for long spaceflight (e.g., for transporting humans to Mars). The vessel is a hybrid that comprises an inflatable shell attached to a rigid central structural core. The inflatable shell is, itself, a hybrid that comprises (1) a pressure bladder restrained against expansion by (2) a web of straps made from high-strength polymeric fabrics. On Earth, pressure vessels like this could be used, for example, as portable habitats that could be set up quickly in remote locations, portable hyperbaric chambers for treatment of decompression sickness, or flotation devices for offshore platforms. In addition, some aspects of the design of the fabric straps could be adapted to such other items as lifting straps, parachute straps, and automotive safety belts. Figure 2 depicts selected aspects of the design of a vessel of this type with a toroidal configuration. The bladder serves as an impermeable layer to keep air within the pressure vessel and, for this purpose, is sealed to the central structural core. The web includes longitudinal and circumferential straps. To help maintain the proper shape upon inflation after storage, longitudinal and circumferential straps are indexed together at several of their intersections. Because the web is not required to provide a pressure seal and the bladder is not required to sustain structural loads, the bladder and the web can be optimized for their respective functions. Thus, the bladder can be sealed directly to the rigid core without having to include the web in the seal substructure, and the web can be designed for strength. The ends of the longitudinal straps are attached to the ends of the rigid structural core by means of clevises. Each clevis pin is surrounded by a roller, around which a longitudinal strap is wrapped to form a lap seam with itself. The roller is of a large diameter chosen to reduce bending of the fibers in the strap. The roller also serves to equalize the load in the portions of the strap on both sides of the clevis pin. The lap seam is formed near the clevis by use of a tapered diamond stitch: This stitch is designed specifically to allow fibers in the stitch and strap to relax under load in such a manner that the load becomes more nearly evenly distributed among all fibers in the stitch region. Thus, the tapered diamond stitch prevents load concentrations that could cause premature failure of the strap and thereby increases the strength of the strap/structural-core joint. The lap seam can be rated at >90 percent of the strength of the strap material.

  13. Effects of pressurization procedures on calibration results for precise pressure transducers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajikawa, Hiroaki; Kobata, Tokihiko

    2010-06-01

    The output of electromechanical pressure gauges depends on not only the currently applied pressure, but also the pressurization history. Thus, the calibration results of gauges are affected by the pressurization procedure. In this paper, among several important factors influencing the results, we report the effects of the interval between the calibration cycles and the effects of the preliminary pressurizations. In order to quantitatively evaluate these effects, we developed a fully automated system that uses a pressure balance to calibrate pressure gauges. Subsequently, gauges containing quartz Bourdon-type pressure transducers were calibrated in a stepwise manner for pressures between 10 MPa and 100 MPa. The typical standard deviation of the data over three cycles was reduced to a few parts per million (ppm). The interval between the calibration cycles, which ranges from zero to more than 12 h, exerts a strong influence on the results in the process of increasing the pressure, where at 10 MPa the maximum difference between the results was approximately 40 ppm. The preliminary pressurization immediately before the calibration cycle reduces the effects of the interval on the results in certain cases. However, in turn, the influence of the waiting time between the preliminary pressurization and the main calibration cycle becomes strong. In the present paper, we outline several possible measures for obtaining calibration results with high reproducibility.

  14. Gambling with the earth

    CERN Multimedia

    Muir, H

    2000-01-01

    The probability that dangerous Earth-devouring particles will be born at a new accelerator in the US may be tiny, but scientists have played down the devastating potential costs in their risk assessments according to a physicist (1 page).

  15. Hemimelitates of rare earths

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The conditions of formation of rare earth complexes with hemimelitic acid were studied. The compositions of lanthanons and yttrium hemimelitates were determined. The properties of obtained complexes were also investigated. (Z.R.)

  16. Rubidium and cesium in the earth and the moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John H.; Drake, Michael J.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to provide an alternative perspective on both the mass balance issue and on the issue of secular change in the Rb-Cs ratio in the earth mantle. In particular, it is argued that the apparent secular change in the Rb/Cs ratio may be simply an artifact of alteration of older rocks through weathering and/or metamorphism subsequent to formation. It is also shown that there is not necessarily a need for a hidden, undepleted reservoir, and the consistency of this result with other mass calculations is explored. New methods for estimating the Rb/Cs ratio of the bulk silicate earth are suggested.

  17. Comparison of Empirical Models of the Earth's Inner Magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkhoglyadova, O. P.; Panchenko, M. G.

    Comparison of empirical models of the magnetospheric magnetic field elaborated by Ostapenko and by Tsyganenko for the inner magnetosphere is made. Under conditions of weak disturbance, both models show good coincidence near the Earth's magnetic dipole equator plane for geocentric distances from 4 to 10 Earth radii (RE). The Ostapenko model predicts stronger fields up to the ring current region (8 RE), and the Tsyganenko model gives stronger fields outside the region. The models diverge in the subsolar region and near the Earth as the solar wind pressure increases.

  18. Venus as a more Earth-like planet.

    OpenAIRE

    Svedhem, H.; Titov, DV; Taylor, FW; Witasse, O.

    2007-01-01

    Venus is Earth's near twin in mass and radius, and our nearest planetary neighbour, yet conditions there are very different in many respects. Its atmosphere, mostly composed of carbon dioxide, has a surface temperature and pressure far higher than those of Earth. Only traces of water are found, although it is likely that there was much more present in the past, possibly forming Earth-like oceans. Here we discuss how the first year of observations by Venus Express brings into focus the evoluti...

  19. Afganistan and rare earths

    OpenAIRE

    Emilian M.DOBRESCU; Edith Mihaela Dobre

    2013-01-01

    On our planet, over a quarter of new technologies for the economic production of industrial goods, are using rare earths, which are also called critical minerals and industries that rely on these precious items being worth of an estimated nearly five trillion dollars, or 5 percent of world gross domestic product. In the near future, competition will increase for the control of rare earth minerals embedded in high-tech products. Rare minerals are in the twenty-first century what oil accounted ...

  20. 25th Space Simulation Conference. Environmental Testing: The Earth-Space Connection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packard, Edward

    2008-01-01

    Topics covered include: Methods of Helium Injection and Removal for Heat Transfer Augmentation; The ESA Large Space Simulator Mechanical Ground Support Equipment for Spacecraft Testing; Temperature Stability and Control Requirements for Thermal Vacuum/Thermal Balance Testing of the Aquarius Radiometer; The Liquid Nitrogen System for Chamber A: A Change from Original Forced Flow Design to a Natural Flow (Thermo Siphon) System; Return to Mercury: A Comparison of Solar Simulation and Flight Data for the MESSENGER Spacecraft; Floating Pressure Conversion and Equipment Upgrades of Two 3.5kw, 20k, Helium Refrigerators; Affect of Air Leakage into a Thermal-Vacuum Chamber on Helium Refrigeration Heat Load; Special ISO Class 6 Cleanroom for the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) Project; A State-of-the-Art Contamination Effects Research and Test Facility Martian Dust Simulator; Cleanroom Design Practices and Their Influence on Particle Counts; Extra Terrestrial Environmental Chamber Design; Contamination Sources Effects Analysis (CSEA) - A Tool to Balance Cost/Schedule While Managing Facility Availability; SES and Acoustics at GSFC; HST Super Lightweight Interchangeable Carrier (SLIC) Static Test; Virtual Shaker Testing: Simulation Technology Improves Vibration Test Performance; Estimating Shock Spectra: Extensions beyond GEVS; Structural Dynamic Analysis of a Spacecraft Multi-DOF Shaker Table; Direct Field Acoustic Testing; Manufacture of Cryoshroud Surfaces for Space Simulation Chambers; The New LOTIS Test Facility; Thermal Vacuum Control Systems Options for Test Facilities; Extremely High Vacuum Chamber for Low Outgassing Processing at NASA Goddard; Precision Cleaning - Path to Premier; The New Anechoic Shielded Chambers Designed for Space and Commercial Applications at LIT; Extraction of Thermal Performance Values from Samples in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar; Thermal (Silicon Diode) Data Acquisition System; Aquarius's Instrument Science Data System (ISDS) Automated to Acquire, Process, Trend Data and Produce Radiometric System Assessment Reports; Exhaustive Thresholds and Resistance Checkpoints; Reconfigurable HIL Testing of Earth Satellites; FPGA Control System for the Automated Test of MicroShutters; Ongoing Capabilities and Developments of Re-Entry Plasma Ground Tests at EADS-ASTRIUM; Operationally Responsive Space Standard Bus Battery Thermal Balance Testing and Heat Dissipation Analysis; Galileo - The Serial-Production AIT Challenge; The Space Systems Environmental Test Facility Database (SSETFD), Website Development Status; Simulated Reentry Heating by Torching; Micro-Vibration Measurements on Thermally Loaded Multi-Layer Insulation Samples in Vacuum; High Temperature Life Testing of 80Ni-20Cr Wire in a Simulated Mars Atmosphere for the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) Instrument Suit Gas Processing System (GPS) Carbon Dioxide Scrubber; The Planning and Implementation of Test Facility Improvements; and Development of a Silicon Carbide Molecular Beam Nozzle for Simulation Planetary Flybys and Low-Earth Orbit.

  1. Closing the balance (Louis Agassiz Medal Lecture)

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Broeke, Michiel

    2015-04-01

    The 4000 Gt of ice that has been lost since 2003 by the ice sheets of Greenland and West Antarctica accounts for about 1/3 of recent global mean sea level rise. Especially the Greenland ice sheet is far out of balance: each year, 30% more mass leaves the ice sheet than is gained by snowfall at its surface; in Antarctica, this imbalance is currently less than 10%. To make matters worse, the mass loss is accelerating: each year it increases by about 10%, making it likely that the ice sheets will soon become the main source of global mean sea level rise. Given their huge volumes, they could remain so for centuries to come. Thirty years ago, the concept of rapid melting of the large ice sheets was purely theoretical. But since that time, the evolution of remote sensing techniques (altimetry, gravimetry and interferometry), in situ observations (automatic weather stations, mass balance and ice velocity measurements) and climate models has revealed a surprising diversity of mass loss mechanisms. This ranges from the relatively steady acceleration of large West-Antarctic ice streams to the highly variable (in space and time) flow speed of outlet glaciers in Greenland. Moreover, both ice sheets experience large interannual fluctuations in snowfall and melt, temporarily masking or accentuating the mass loss. In spite of all the technological developments, there is still room for exciting discoveries. In April 2011, a reservoir of liquid water twice the size of the Netherlands was discovered in the firn in southeast Greenland. In July 2012, an extreme melt event affected the entire Greenland ice sheet, with meltwater runoff destroying infrastructure in west Greenland that had been in place since the 1950's. And in 2014, two separate studies concluded that the mass loss in West Antarctica appears to be irreversible. When will it be possible to model and robustly predict the fully coupled system of atmosphere, ocean, sea ice and ice sheets? To start answering that question, we explore possibilities and outstanding challenges in the application of Earth System Models to ice sheet mass balance on one hand, and the use of very-high-resolution regional models to individual glacier basins and fjord systems on the other. These models need observations! We show a newly developed suitcase automatic weather station (iWS) for easy deployment in remote, glaciated regions, without compromising measurement accuracy.

  2. Connections between the bulk composition, geodynamics and habitability of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jellinek, A. M.; Jackson, M. G.

    2015-08-01

    The bulk composition of the silicate part of Earth has long been linked to chondritic meteorites. Ordinary chondrites -- the most abundant meteorite class -- are thought to represent planetary building materials. However, a landmark discovery showed that the 142Nd/144Nd ratio of the accessible parts of the modern terrestrial mantle on Earth is greater than that of ordinary chondrites. If Earth was derived from these precursors, mass balance requires that a missing reservoir with 142Nd/144Nd lower than ordinary chondrites was isolated from the accessible mantle within 20 to 30 million years of accretion. This reservoir would host the equivalent of the modern continents' budget of radioactive heat-producing elements (uranium, thorium and potassium), yet has not been discovered. We argue that this reservoir could have been lost to space by ablation from early impactors. If so, Earth's radiogenic heat generation is between 18 and 45% lower than estimates based on a chondritic composition. Calculations of Earth's thermal history that incorporate such reduced radiogenic heating are consistent with a transition to the current plate tectonic mode in the past 2.5 billion years or so, a late onset of the dynamo and an evolving rate of volcanic outgassing consistent with Earth's long-term habitable climate. Reduced heat production compared with Venus and Mars could also explain aspects of the differences between the current climatic regimes of these planets and Earth.

  3. An Improved Hadoop Data Load Balancing Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Liu

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Data load balancing is one of the key problems of big data technology. As a big data application, Hadoop has had many successful applications. HDFS is Hadoop Distributed File System and has the load balancing procedure which can balance the storage load on each machine. However, this method cannot balance the overload rack preferentially, and so it is likely to cause the breakdown of overload machines. In this paper, we focus on the overload machines and propose an improved algorithm for balancing the overload racks preferentially. The improved method constructs Prior Balance List list which includes overload machines, For Balance List list and NextForBalanceList list by many factors and balances among the racks selected from these lists firstly. Experiments show that the improved method can balance the overload racks in time and reduce the possibility of breakdown of these racks

  4. SAVER: digital computer code to determine pressure drops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The SAVER code calculates the steady-state flow and pressure drop in all paths of an arbitrary flow network. SAVER calculates elevation and momentum recoverable pressure drops and the types of unrecoverable pressure drops encountered most often. The pressure drop in each path is the sum of the elevation, momentum, and unrecoverable pressure drops. The momentum and unrecoverable pressure drops are expressed as R x W2, where R is the resistance to flow and W is the flow rate. The elevation pressure drop is not a function of flow rate. The elevation pressure drop and the resistances to flow are calculated using the B and W standard methods. A set of flow and pressure drop equations is written using these values. First, N-1 flow balance equations are written, where N is the number of flow path junctions in the network. Then, all the unique pressure drop balance equations are written, considering that the pressure drop across each path through the network must equal the pressure drop imposed by the boundary conditions. These equations are then solved for the flow rate in each path. (auth)

  5. Conceptual radiometer design studies for Earth observations from low Earth orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Richard F.

    1994-01-01

    A conceptual radiometer design study was performed to determine the optimum design approach for spaceborne radiometers in low Earth orbit. Radiometric system configurations which included total power radiometers, unbalanced Dicke radiometers, and balanced Dicke, or as known as noise injection, radiometers were studied. Radiometer receiver configurations which were analyzed included the direct detection radiometer receiver, the double sideband homodyne radiometer receiver, and the single sideband heterodyne radiometer receiver. Radiometer system performance was also studied. This included radiometric sensitivity analysis of the three different radiometer system configurations studied. Both external and internal calibration techniques were analyzed. An accuracy analysis with and without mismatch losses was performed. It was determined that the balanced Dicke radiometer system configuration with direct detection receivers and external calibrations was optimum where frequent calibration such as once per minute were not feasible.

  6. Synchrotron facilities and the study of the Earth's deep interior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The combination of synchrotron x-ray facilities with high-pressure methods provides new experimental tools for addressing geophysical problems relevant to understanding the interior of the Earth and other planets. Among the important geophysical questions related to the Earth's silicate mantle are the origin of seismic discontinuities in the upper mantle, the rheological properties of mantle minerals and their influence on dynamic flow in the Earth, and the nature of the core-mantle boundary region. In the case of the Earth's core, key questions are centred on the identity of the light elements of the core and their effect on energetics and thermodynamic properties, the melting curve of iron and its alloys and the origin of seismic anisotropy in the inner core. Both new and established high-pressure synchrotron methods applied to the diamond anvil cell and large-volume apparatus are surveyed. Advances in synchrotron capabilities have been accompanied by new innovations in high-pressure technology. X-ray diffraction techniques are mature but continued improvements are leading to expanded pressure-temperature coverage and better ability to recover crystallographic details. Diffraction and absorption studies of the properties of liquids of silicate and iron alloy composition have expanded in response to new capabilities. Recently, methods for inelastic scattering and nuclear resonance probes have been developed at high pressures and these provide constraints on vibrational, electronic and magnetic properties, which were previously unattainable

  7. Towards magnetic sounding of the Earth's core by an adjoint method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, K.; Jackson, A.; Livermore, P. W.

    2013-12-01

    Earth's magnetic field is generated and sustained by the so called geodynamo system in the core. Measurements of the geomagnetic field taken at the surface, downwards continued through the electrically insulating mantle to the core-mantle boundary (CMB), provide important constraints on the time evolution of the velocity, magnetic field and temperature anomaly in the fluid outer core. The aim of any study in data assimilation applied to the Earth's core is to produce a time-dependent model consistent with these observations [1]. Snapshots of these ``tuned" models provide a window through which the inner workings of the Earth's core, usually hidden from view, can be probed. We apply a variational data assimilation framework to an inertia-free magnetohydrodynamic system (MHD) [2]. Such a model is close to magnetostrophic balance [3], to which we have added viscosity to the dominant forces of Coriolis, pressure, Lorentz and buoyancy, believed to be a good approximation of the Earth's dynamo in the convective time scale. We chose to study the MHD system driven by a static temperature anomaly to mimic the actual inner working of Earth's dynamo system, avoiding at this stage the further complication of solving for the time dependent temperature field. At the heart of the models is a time-dependent magnetic field to which the core-flow is enslaved. In previous work we laid the foundation of the adjoint methodology, applied to a subset of the full equations [4]. As an intermediate step towards our ultimate vision of applying the techniques to a fully dynamic mode of the Earth's core tuned to geomagnetic observations, we present the intermediate step of applying the adjoint technique to the inertia-free Navier-Stokes equation in continuous form. We use synthetic observations derived from evolving a geophysically-reasonable magnetic field profile as the initial condition of our MHD system. Based on our study, we also propose several different strategies for accurately determining the entire trajectory of Earth's geodynamo system. [1] A. Fournier, G. Hulot, D. Jault, W. Kuang, A. Tangborn, N. Gillet, E. Canet, J. Aubert, and F. Lhuillier. An introduction to data assimilation and predictability in geomagnetism. Space. Sci. Rev., 155:247-291, 2010. [2] G. A. Glatzmaier and P. H. Roberts. A three-dimensional convective dynamo solution with rotating and finitely conducting inner core and mantle. Phys. Earth Planet. Inter., 91:63-75, 1995. [3] J. B. Taylor. The magneto-hydrodynamics of a rotating fluid and the earth's dynamo problem. Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A, 274(1357):274-283, 1963. [4] K. Li, A. Jackson, and P. W. Livermore. Variational data assimilation for the initial value dynamo problem. Phys. Rev. E, 84:056321, 2011.

  8. Dairy Proteins and Energy Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Line Quist

    2015-01-01

    High protein diets affect energy balance beneficially through decreased hunger, enhanced satiety and increased energy expenditure. Dairy products are a major source of protein. Dairy proteins are comprised of two classes, casein (80%) and whey proteins (20%), which are both of high quality, but casein is absorbed slowly and whey is absorbed rapidly. The present PhD study investigated the effects of total dairy proteins, whey, and casein, on energy balance and the mechanisms behind any differences in the effects of the specific proteins. The results do not support the hypothesis that dairy proteins, whey or casein are more beneficial than other protein sources in the regulation of energy balance, and suggest that dairy proteins, whey or casein seem to play only a minor role, if any, in the prevention and treatment of obesity.

  9. The partial current balance method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new computational method for the solution of multidimensional neutron diffusion problems which is based on local balances of partial currents is described. After briefly motivating the ideas used in the method, the formalism is reviewed. The technique used for the solution of the final equations via local expansions is then described, and the resulting matrix equations are developed. The iteration schemes which were employed in the initial calculations are described. Computational results for two simple one-dimensional HTGR models and for a simple two-dimensional HTGR model are reported and compared with finite element and finite difference calculations for accuracy and computing time. In all cases studied, the partial current balance method compared very favorably with both of these widely used methods. Some advantages of the partial current balance formulation are discussed. (orig.)

  10. On the near surface momentum balance in the Yucatán Channel

    Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

    M, Marín; J, Candela; J, Sheinbaum; J, Ochoa; A, Badan.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Se analizó el balance horizontal de momento en la capa superior de Canal de Yucatán para un periodo de 22 meses de septiembre de 1999 a junio de 2001, usando datos de corrientes superficiales de mediciones de ADCPs de ocho anclajes localizados a través del canal, datos de presión de mediciones de se [...] nsores de presión a ambos lados del canal, vientos de QUICKSCAT y datos de altimetría de AVISO. El balance promedio entre Isla Mujeres, México, y Cabo San Antonio, Cuba, (a través del canal) es básicamente geostrófico con contribuciones de los términos ageostroficos, en particular de la fricción contra la capa inferior y en menor grado el flujo de Ekman en la superficie. Los términos advectivos así como el término de la aceleración local parecen no tener importancia en el balance promediado de lado a lado del canal. Es interesante notar que a lo largo del canal el balance promedio es principalmente geostrófico mientras que la fricción lineal, el flujo de Ekman, así como los términos de aceleración local y advectivos permanecen sin importancia. Realizando un análisis del balance de anclaje a anclaje a través del canal se encontró que en la zona donde la corriente de Yucatán oscila, los términos advectivos con derivadas en la dirección a través del canal si contribuyen significativamente al balance dinámico. Se obtuvieron FEOs de las anomalías del nivel del mar de altimetría y de los primeros 90 metros del flujo a lo largo del canal encontrando que existe relación entre ellos donde los primero modos (altimetría y flujo) parecen estar relacionados con la variabilidad del transporte a través del canal y también están asociados con el gradiente de presión a lo largo del canal y la oscilación del núcleo de la corriente, sugiriendo que existe una considerable interacción de remolinos con la corriente en el Canal. Abstract in english The horizontal momentum balance in the upper layers of the Yucatán Channel is examined for a period of 22 months, from September 1999 to June 2001, using subsurface currents from ADCP measurements at eight moorings across the channel, pressure measurements from coastal pressure sensors on both sides [...] of the channel, QuickSCAT winds and AVISO altimetry data. The averaged balance between Isla Mujeres, México, and Cabo San Antonio, Cuba, (across-channel axis) is basically geostrophic, but with contributions from ageostrophic terms, particularly friction against lower layers and to a lesser degree, the surface Ekman drift. Both the advective and the local acceleration terms appear unimportant in the side-to-side averaged balance. Interestingly, the averaged balance in along-channel axis is also mainly geostrophic; linear friction, Ekman drift, local acceleration and advective terms remain unimportant. An analysis of the balance from mooring to mooring across the channel indicates that in the region where the Yucatán current meanders, the advective terms with across-channel derivatives contribute significantly. The EOF modes of sea level anomalies from altimetry and the along-channel flow in the upper 90 m surface layer are correlated. Their two first modes are seemingly related to the transport fluctuations through the channel, but also to the along-channel pressure gradient and to the meandering of the Yucatán Current core, suggesting the presence of appreciable eddy-current interactions in the Channel.

  11. Balance control and anti?gravity muscle activity during the experience of fear at heights

    OpenAIRE

    Wuehr, Max; Kugler, Guenter; Schniepp, Roman; Eckl, Maria; Pradhan, Cauchy; Jahn, Klaus; Huppert, Doreen; Brandt, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Fear of heights occurs when a visual stimulus causes the apprehension of losing balance and falling. A moderate form of visual height intolerance (vHI) affects about one third of the general population and has relevant consequences for the quality of life. A quantitative evaluation of balance mechanisms in persons susceptible to vHI during height exposure is missing. VHI?related changes in postural control were assessed by center?of?pressure displacements and electromyographic recordings of s...

  12. "We are Always After that Balance" - Managing Innovation in the New Digital Media Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Sabine Hotho; Katherine Champion

    2010-01-01

    The pressure to innovate is growing as technology cycles change more rapidly. Organisations need to balance exploration and exploitation effectively if they are to heed the innovation imperative. Organisational ambidexterity is proposed as a means to achieve such balance with structural or contextual ambidexterity as possible choices. Yet how organisations become ambidextrous is an as yet underresearched area, and different industry sectors may pose different innovation challenges. Using the ...

  13. ANKLE DORSIFLEXOR STRENGTH RELATES TO THE ABILITY TO RESTORE BALANCE DURING A BACKWARD SUPPORT SURFACE TRANSLATION

    OpenAIRE

    Fujimoto, Masahiro; Hsu, Wei-Li; Woollacott, Marjorie; Chou, Li-Shan

    2013-01-01

    Functional base of support (FBOS), the effective area for center of pressure (COP) movement, decreases with aging, which would reduce one’s ability to restore balance during perturbed stance. We investigated the relationship between ankle muscle strength and FBOS as well as the threshold perturbation acceleration that required a heel-rise (HR) or step (STEP) to maintain balance. Standing posture of 16 young and 16 elderly adults was perturbed with a backward support surface translation with t...

  14. Adaptation to altered balance conditions in unilateral amputees due to atherosclerosis: a randomized controlled study

    OpenAIRE

    Bretz Éva; Csende Zsolt; Bretz Károly; Tihanyi József; Mayer Ágnes; Horváth Mónika

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Amputation impairs the ability to balance. We examined adaptation strategies in balance following dysvascularity-induced unilateral tibial amputation in skilled prosthetic users (SPU) and first fitted amputees (FFA) (N = 28). Methods Excursions of center of pressure (COP) were determined during 20 s quiet standing using a stabilometry system with eyes-open on both legs or on the non-affected leg(s). Main measures: COP trajectories and time functions; distribution of reacti...

  15. Dynamic Model of Pressure Regulating Valve

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmed Abed

    2014-01-01

    Pressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPressure regulatingPre...

  16. Pressure, Chaotic Magnetic Fields and MHD Equilibria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analyzes of plasma behavior often begin with a description of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium, this being the simplest model capable of approximating macroscopic force balance. Ideal force balance is when the pressure gradient is supported by the Lorentz force, (del)p = j x B. We discuss the implications of allowing for a chaotic magnetic field on the solutions to this equation. We argue that the solutions are pathological and not suitable for numerical calculations. If the pressure and magnetic Field are continuous, the only non-trivial solutions have an uncountable infinity of discontinuities in the pressure gradient and current. The problems arise from the arbitrarily small length scales in the structure of the field, and the consequence of ideal force balance that the pressure is constant along the Field-lines, B · (del)p = 0. A simple method to ameliorate the singularities is to include a small but Finite perpendicular diffusion. A self-consistent set of equilibrium equations is described and some algorithmic approaches aimed at solving these equations are discussed.

  17. Taking out method for reactor pressure vessel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After removing roofs of reactor buildings, a carrier stand is set at the removed portion, and a sealed vessel-like air lock having an openable partitioning hatch at a lower portion thereof is placed and secured. An ejector connected to the air lock is operated to exhaust the air in the air lock into a reactor building, and a hoisting wire having a balance at a lower end thereof is lowered by way of a sealing member mounted to a ceiling of the air lock, to lower the balance to the upper end of the reactor container. Then, after connecting the balance to a reactor pressure vessel to separate the pressure vessel from a pedestal which supports it, the hoisting wire is elevated to hoist the pressure vessel and then house it in the air lock. After supporting the pressure vessel in the air lock by a securing jig, the partitioning hatch is closed, the exhaust valve in the air lock is closed, and then the air lock separated from the carrier stand is transported outside of the reactor buildings. (N.H.)

  18. Pressure, Chaotic Magnetic Fields and MHD Equilibria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.R. Hudson & N. Nakajima

    2010-05-12

    Analyzes of plasma behavior often begin with a description of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium, this being the simplest model capable of approximating macroscopic force balance. Ideal force balance is when the pressure gradient is supported by the Lorentz force, ?p = j x B. We discuss the implications of allowing for a chaotic magnetic field on the solutions to this equation. We argue that the solutions are pathological and not suitable for numerical calculations. If the pressure and magnetic Field are continuous, the only non-trivial solutions have an uncountable infinity of discontinuities in the pressure gradient and current. The problems arise from the arbitrarily small length scales in the structure of the field, and the consequence of ideal force balance that the pressure is constant along the Field-lines, B • ?p = 0. A simple method to ameliorate the singularities is to include a small but Finite perpendicular diffusion. A self-consistent set of equilibrium equations is described and some algorithmic approaches aimed at solving these equations are discussed.

  19. The energy balance in Czechoslovakia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siba, V.

    1982-01-01

    Data are cited which characterize the dynamics in the demand for conventional fuel, the specific demands for primary energy carriers, the export and import balance of energy carriers and the structure of the fuel and energy balance in Czechoslovakia. The structure of the energy carriers used for the production of electric power and the cost indicators are analyzed. For 1977 to 1980 the growth in the production of electric power in Czechoslovakia was 3.5 percent. Recommendations for increasing the effectiveness of the power engineering are given.

  20. Balanced Unemployment in Polish Economy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamila Szyma?ska

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of balanced unemployment in relation to the Polish economy. This issue with its variety considerations and economic, social and political implications is today one of the most important matter. Author analyses this problem together with its reasons and refer it to the Polish economy. In first and second part of the text there are presented basic assumptions of natural unemployment theory and Non-Accelerating Inflation Rate of Unemployment. Third part is an analysis of balanced unemployment in the Polish economy

  1. Measuring the Earth’s Magnetic Field from Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Hulot, G.; Sabaka, T. J.

    2010-01-01

    Observations of the Earth’s magnetic field from low-Earth orbiting (LEO) satellites started very early on, more than 50 years ago. Continuous such observations, relying on more advanced technology and mission concepts, have however only been available since 1999. The unprecedented time-space coverage of this recent data set opened revolutionary new possibilities for monitoring, understanding and exploring the Earth’s magnetic field. In the near future, the three-satellite Swarm constellation con...

  2. Alkaline earth- and rare earth-transition metal complexes

    OpenAIRE

    Blake, Matthew Paul; Mountford, Philip

    2013-01-01

    This Thesis describes the synthesis and characterisation of new alkaline earth- and rare earth-transition metal complexes. Experimental and computational studies were performed to investigate the structure and bonding in these complexes. Their reactivity was also studied. Chapter 1 introduces metal-metal bonded complexes and current alkaline earth- and rare earth-transition metal bonded complexes. Chapter 2 describes experimental and computational studies of new alkaline earth- and la...

  3. PREFACE: The 2nd International Conference on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Sciences 2014 (AeroEarth 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumban Gaol, Ford; Soewito, Benfano

    2015-01-01

    The 2nd International Conference on Geological, Geographical, Aerospace and Earth Sciences 2014 (AeroEarth 2014), was held at Discovery Kartika Plaza Hotel, Kuta, Bali, Indonesia during 11 - 12 October 2014. The AeroEarth 2014 conference aims to bring together researchers and engineers from around the world. Through research and development, earth scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. Earth provides resources and the exact conditions to make life possible. However, with the advent of technology and industrialization, the Earth's resources are being pushed to the brink of depletion. Non-sustainable industrial practices are not only endangering the supply of the Earth's natural resources, but are also putting burden on life itself by bringing about pollution and climate change. A major role of earth science scholars is to examine the delicate balance between the Earth's resources and the growing demands of industrialization. Through research and development, earth scientists have the power to preserve the planet's different resource domains by providing expert opinion and information about the forces which make life possible on Earth. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 98 papers and after rigorous review, 17 papers were accepted. The participants come from eight countries. There are four Parallel Sessions and two invited Speakers. It is an honour to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Earth and Environmental Science (EES) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed the success of AeroEarth 2014. The Editors of the AeroEarth 2014 Proceedings Dr. Ford Lumban Gaol Dr. Benfano Soewito

  4. Body-Centered Cubic Iron-Nickel Alloy in Earth?s Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dubrovinsky, L.; Dubrovinskaia, N.; Narygina, O.; Kantor, I.; Kuznetzov, A.; Prakapenka, V.B.; Vitos, L.; Johansson, B.; Mikhaylushkin, A.S.; Simak, S.I.; Abrikosov, I.A. (Link); (Heidelberg); (Bayreuth); (UC); (RITS); (RISSPO)

    2012-04-17

    Cosmochemical, geochemical, and geophysical studies provide evidence that Earth's core contains iron with substantial (5 to 15%) amounts of nickel. The iron-nickel alloy Fe{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1} has been studied in situ by means of angle-dispersive x-ray diffraction in internally heated diamond anvil cells (DACs), and its resistance has been measured as a function of pressure and temperature. At pressures above 225 gigapascals and temperatures over 3400 kelvin, Fe{sub 0.9}Ni{sub 0.1} adopts a body-centered cubic structure. Our experimental and theoretical results not only support the interpretation of shockwave data on pure iron as showing a solid-solid phase transition above about 200 gigapascals, but also suggest that iron alloys with geochemically reasonable compositions (that is, with substantial nickel, sulfur, or silicon content) adopt the bcc structure in Earth's inner core.

  5. Balance control during the delivery stride in competitive older age lawn bowlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayers, Mark G L; Tweddle, Amanda L; Morris, Jessika

    2015-01-01

    This project assessed dynamic balance and stability in aged lawn bowlers during the delivery stride. Participants were divided into two groups: aged 65 years or less (n = 14) and aged over 65 years (n = 16). Standard balance-based center of pressure (CoP) and ground reaction force variables were recorded and a Dynamic Postural Stability Index (DPSI) was used for calculating during ten deliveries. None of the balance variables correlated significantly with age although years of bowling experience correlated with DPSI scores (r = -.42, P = .019). The over 65 group had significantly greater variance in the mediolateral CoP movements, with no other significant differences in balance or postural stability variables between groups. Analysis of covariance indicated that the DPSI data were influenced significantly by bowling experience regardless of age group. It was concluded that in older aged lawn bowlers, playing experience rather than age is a key determinant of balance control during the lawn bowls delivery action. PMID:24334308

  6. Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus (NPH) Tweet Normal pressure hydrocephalus is a brain disorder in which excess cerebrospinal fluid accumulates in ... About Symptoms Diagnosis Causes & risks Treatments About Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus Normal pressure hydrocephalus occurs when excess cerebrospinal ...

  7. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What is a pressure sore? What are the causes of pressure sores in people with spinal cord ... with a spinal cord injury to do to prevent pressure sores? Why is pressure relief so important ...

  8. Bedsores (Pressure Ulcers)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ulcer. Overview Bedsores (pressure ulcers), also known as pressure sores or decubitus ulcers, result from prolonged pressure that ... down. The skin is especially likely to develop pressure sores if it is exposed to rubbing (friction) and ...

  9. Understanding Blood Pressure Readings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Understanding Blood Pressure Readings Updated:Oct 22,2015 Blood pressure is typically recorded as two numbers, written as a ratio ... blood). What is the AHA recommendation for healthy blood pressure? This chart reflects blood pressure categories defined by ...

  10. Greenland ice sheet mass balance: a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shfaqat A.; Aschwanden, Andy; Bjørk, Anders A.; Wahr, John; Kjeldsen, Kristian K.; Kjær, Kurt H.

    2015-04-01

    Over the past quarter of a century the Arctic has warmed more than any other region on Earth, causing a profound impact on the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) and its contribution to the rise in global sea level. The loss of ice can be partitioned into processes related to surface mass balance and to ice discharge, which are forced by internal or external (atmospheric/oceanic/basal) fluctuations. Regardless of the measurement method, observations over the last two decades show an increase in ice loss rate, associated with speeding up of glaciers and enhanced melting. However, both ice discharge and melt-induced mass losses exhibit rapid short-term fluctuations that, when extrapolated into the future, could yield erroneous long-term trends. In this paper we review the GrIS mass loss over more than a century by combining satellite altimetry, airborne altimetry, interferometry, aerial photographs and gravimetry data sets together with modelling studies. We revisit the mass loss of different sectors and show that they manifest quite different sensitivities to atmospheric and oceanic forcing. In addition, we discuss recent progress in constructing coupled ice-ocean-atmosphere models required to project realistic future sea-level changes.

  11. Greenland ice sheet mass balance: a review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Aschwanden, Andy

    2015-01-01

    Over the past quarter of a century the Arctic has warmed more than any other region on Earth, causing a profound impact on the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) and its contribution to the rise in global sea level. The loss of ice can be partitioned into processes related to surface mass balance and to ice discharge, which are forced by internal or external (atmospheric/oceanic/basal) fluctuations. Regardless of the measurement method, observations over the last two decades show an increase in ice loss rate, associated with speeding up of glaciers and enhanced melting. However, both ice discharge and melt-induced mass losses exhibit rapid short-term fluctuations that, when extrapolated into the future, could yield erroneous long-term trends. In this paper we review the GrIS mass loss over more than a century by combining satellite altimetry, airborne altimetry, interferometry, aerial photographs and gravimetry data sets together with modelling studies. We revisit the mass loss of different sectors and show that theymanifest quite different sensitivities to atmospheric and oceanic forcing. In addition, we discuss recent progress in constructing coupled ice-ocean-atmosphere models required to project realistic future sea-level changes.

  12. Objective and subjective measures reflect different aspects of balance in multiple sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle H. Cameron, MD, PT

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to evaluate relationships between subjective and objective measures of balance in multiple sclerosis (MS. In 54 subjects with MS, balance was measured objectively with the Sensory Organization Test (SOT using dynamic posturography and subjectively with the Activities-specific Balance Confidence (ABC Scale and the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I. MS-related disability was assessed with the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS. Relationships between the magnitude (root mean square, range, and area as well as velocity of center of pressure sway (calculated from the center of pressure signal from the SOT, composite SOT, ABC Scale, FES-I, and EDSS scores were assessed. The magnitude and velocity of center of pressure sway was statistically significantly correlated with the ABC Scale (rho = –0.2 to –0.5, FES-I (rho = 0.3 to 0.5, and EDSS (rho = 0.3 to 0.4. The composite SOT was also statistically significantly correlated with the ABC Scale, FES-I, and EDSS. Objective balance measures, as reflected by posturography, were significantly related to subjective reports of imbalance and clinical measures of disability in MS. The relationships are moderate to weak, indicating that a comprehensive description of balance problems in people with MS likely requires both objective and subjective balance measures.

  13. Geo-neutrinos, Mantle Circulation and Silicate Earth

    OpenAIRE

    Fiorentini, Gianni; LISSIA, Marcello; Mantovani, Fabio; Vannucci, Riccardo

    2004-01-01

    In preparation to the experimental results which will be available in the future, we consider geo-neutrino production in greater detail than in [F. Mantovani et al., arXiv:hep-ph/0309013], putting the basis for a more refined model. We study geo-neutrino production for different models of matter circulation and composition in the mantle. By using global mass balance for the Bulk Silicate Earth, the predicted flux contribution from distant sources in the crust and in the mant...

  14. Particles in the earth's atmosphere: advantageous and disastrous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this lecture, the author discusses the influence of aerosols in the stratosphere on the energy balance of the earth's atmosphere. Volcano eruptions are shown to disturb the mean atmospheric extinction. Several eruptions in the past are considered. Next, effects of nuclear explosions are discussed, especially the glacial period of several weeks after a nuclear war is paid attention to. Until now, this nuclear winter is difficult to quantify. (G.J.P.)

  15. Evolving NASA's Earth Science Data Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, J.; Behnke, J.; Murphy, K. J.; Lowe, D. R.

    2013-12-01

    NASA's Earth Science Data and Information System Project (ESDIS) is charged with managing, maintaining, and evolving NASA's Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) and is responsible for processing, archiving, and distributing NASA Earth science data. The system supports a multitude of missions and serves diverse science research and other user communities. Keeping up with ever-changing information technology and figuring out how to leverage those changes across such a large system in order to continuously improve and meet the needs of a diverse user community is a significant challenge. Maintaining and evolving the system architecture and infrastructure is a continuous and multi-layered effort. It requires a balance between a "top down" management paradigm that provides a coherent system view and maintaining the managerial, technological, and functional independence of the individual system elements. This presentation will describe some of the key elements of the current system architecture, some of the strategies and processes we employ to meet these challenges, current and future challenges, and some ideas for meeting those challenges.

  16. Venus, Earth, Xenon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zahnle, K. J.

    2013-12-01

    Xenon has been regarded as an important goal of many proposed missions to Venus. This talk is intended to explain why. Despite its being the heaviest gas found in natural planetary atmospheres, there is more evidence that Xe escaped from Earth than for any element apart from helium: (i) Atmospheric Xe is very strongly mass fractionated (at about 4% per amu) from any known solar system source. This suggests fractionating escape that preferentially left the heavy Xe isotopes behind. (ii) Xe is underabundant compared to Kr, a lighter noble gas that is not strongly mass fractionated in air. (iii) Radiogenic Xe is strongly depleted by factors of several to ~100 compared to the quantities expected from radioactive decay of primordial solar system materials. In these respects Xe on Mars is similar to Xe on Earth, but with one key difference: Xe on Mars is readily explained by a simple process like hydrodynamic escape that acts on an initially solar or meteoritic Xe. This is not so for Earth. Earth's Xe cannot be derived by an uncontrived mass fractionating process acting on any known type of Solar System Xe. Earth is a stranger, made from different stuff than any known meteorite or Mars or even the Sun. Who else is in Earth's family? Comets? We know nothing. Father Zeus? Data from Jupiter are good enough to show that jovian Xe is not strongly mass-fractionated but not good enough to determine whether Jupiter resembles the Earth or the Sun. Sister Venus? Noble gas data from Venus are incomplete, with Kr uncertain and Xe unmeasured. Krypton was measured by several instruments on several spacecraft. The reported Kr abundances are discrepant and were once highly controversial. These discrepancies appear to have been not so much resolved as forgotten. Xenon was not detected on Venus. Upper limits were reported for the two most abundant xenon isotopes 129Xe and 132Xe. From the limited data it is not possible to tell whether Venus's affinities lie with the solar wind, or with the chondrites, with Earth, or with none of the above. Modern spacecraft mass spectrometers are at least 100-fold more sensitive to noble gases. Sending such an instrument to Venus may be the last best hope for decrypting what Earth's noble gases have been trying to tell us.

  17. A hypothesis of earth quake

    OpenAIRE

    Tsai, Yeong-Shyeong

    2008-01-01

    Without a model, it is impossible for a geophysicist to study the possibility of forecasting earth quakes. We will define a quantity, the event-degree, in the paper. This quantity plays an important role in the model of quakes forecasting. In order to make a simple model, we make a hypothesis of earth quakes. The hypothesis is: "(i) There are two kinds of earth quakes, one is the triggered breaking (earth quake), the other is spontaneous breaking (earth quake). (ii) Most maj...

  18. Geoneutrino and Hydridic Earth model

    CERN Document Server

    Bezrukov, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Uranium, Thorium and Potassium-40 abundances in the Earth were calculated in the frame of Hydridic Earth model. Terrestrial heat producton from U, Th and K40 decays was calculated also. We must admit the existance of Earth expansion process to understand the obtained large value of terrestrial heat producton. The geoneutrino detector with volume more than 5 kT (LENA type) must be constructed to definitely separate between Bulk Silicat Earth model and Hydridic Earth model.

  19. The Sun and Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopalswamy, Natchimuthuk

    2012-01-01

    Thus the Sun forms the basis for life on Earth via the black body radiation it emits. The Sun also emits mass in the form of the solar wind and the coronal mass ejections (CMEs). Mass emission also occurs in the form of solar energetic particles (SEPs), which happens during CMEs and solar flares. Both the mass and electromagnetic energy output of the Sun vary over a wide range of time scales, thus introducing disturbances on the space environment that extends from the Sun through the entire heliosphere including the magnetospheres and ionospheres of planets and moons of the solar system. Although our habitat is located in the neutral atmosphere of Earth, we are intimately connected to the non-neutral space environment starting from the ionosphere to the magnetosphere and to the vast interplanetary space. The variability of the solar mass emissions results in the interaction between the solar wind plasma and the magnetospheric plasma leading to huge disturbances in the geospace. The Sun ionizes our atmosphere and creates the ionosphere. The ionosphere can be severely disturbed by the transient energy input from solar flares and the solar wind during geomagnetic storms. The complex interplay between Earth's magnetic field and the solar magnetic field carried by the solar wind presents varying conditions that are both beneficial and hazardous to life on earth. This seminar presents some of the key aspects of this Sun-Earth connection that we have learned since the birth of space science as a scientific discipline some half a century ago.

  20. Rare earths and actinides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reviews the different properties of rare-earths and actinides, either as pure metals or as in alloys or compounds. Three different cases are considered: (i) First, in the case of 'normal' rare-earths which are characterized by a valence of 3, we discuss essentially the magnetic ordering, the coexistence between superconductivity and magnetism and the properties of amorphous rare-earth systems. (ii) Second, in the case of 'anomalous' rare-earths, we distinguish between either 'intermediate-valence' systems or 'Kondo' systems. Special emphasis is given to the problems of the 'Kondo lattice' (for compounds such as CeAl2,CeAl3 or CeB6) or the 'Anderson lattice' (for compounds such as TmSe). The problem of neutron diffraction in these systems is also discussed. (iii) Third, in the case of actinides, we can separate between the d-f hybridized and almost magnetic metals at the beginning of the series and the rare-earth like the metals after americium. (orig.)

  1. The earth's hydrological cycle

    CERN Document Server

    Bonnet, R-M; Calisto, M; Destouni, G; Gurney, R; Johannessen, J; Kerr, Y; Lahoz, WA; Rast, M

    2014-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive presentation of our present understanding of the Earth's Hydrological cycle and the problems, consequences and impacts that go with this topic. Water is a central component in the Earth's system. It is indispensable for life on Earth in its present form and influences virtually every aspect of our planet's life support system. On relatively short time scales, atmospheric water vapor interacts with the atmospheric circulation and is crucial in forming the Earth's climate zones. Water vapor is the most powerful of the greenhouse gases and serves to enhance the tropospheric temperature. The dominant part of available water on Earth resides in the oceans. Parts are locked up in the land ice on Greenland and Antarctica and a smaller part is estimated to exist as groundwater. If all the ice over the land and all the glaciers were to melt, the sea level would rise by some 80 m. In comparison, the total amount of water vapor in the atmosphere is small; it amounts to ~ 25 kg/m2, or the ...

  2. Earth and planetary sciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The earth is a dynamic body. The major surface manifestation of this dynamism has been fragmentation of the earth's outer shell and subsequent relative movement of the pieces on a large scale. Evidence for continental movement came from studies of geomagnetism. As the sea floor spreads and new crust is formed, it is magnetized with the polarity of the field at the time of its formation. The plate tectonics model explains the history, nature, and topography of the oceanic crust. When a lithospheric plate surmounted by continental crust collides with an oceanic lithosphere, it is the denser oceanic lithosphere that is subducted. Hence the ancient oceans have vanished and the knowledge of ancient earth will require deciphering the complex continental geological record. Geochemical investigation shows that the source region of continental rocks is not simply the depleted mantle that is characteristic of the source region of basalts produced at the oceanic ridges. The driving force of plate tectonics is convection within the earth, but much remains to be learned about the convection and interior of the earth. A brief discussion of planetary exploration is given

  3. Modeling the earth system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ojima, D. [ed.

    1992-12-31

    The 1990 Global Change Institute (GCI) on Earth System Modeling is the third of a series organized by the Office for Interdisciplinary Earth Studies to look in depth at particular issues critical to developing a better understanding of the earth system. The 1990 GCI on Earth System Modeling was organized around three themes: defining critical gaps in the knowledge of the earth system, developing simplified working models, and validating comprehensive system models. This book is divided into three sections that reflect these themes. Each section begins with a set of background papers offering a brief tutorial on the subject, followed by working group reports developed during the institute. These reports summarize the joint ideas and recommendations of the participants and bring to bear the interdisciplinary perspective that imbued the institute. Since the conclusion of the 1990 Global Change Institute, research programs, nationally and internationally, have moved forward to implement a number of the recommendations made at the institute, and many of the participants have maintained collegial interactions to develop research projects addressing the needs identified during the two weeks in Snowmass.

  4. Ankylosing Spondylitis and Postural Balance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmut Nafiz Akman

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: In this study, we aimed to investigate that, due to postural changes, the patients with ankylosing spondyilitis (AS have poorer postural balance than healthy subjects.Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with AS (19 female, 11 male and 20 healthy subjects (13 female, 7 male were tested by using the Tetrax Interactive Balance System. The general stability, Fourier analysis showing patterns of sway intensity within eight frequency bands between 0.1 and 3 Hz, and weight distribution index (WDI were evaluated. Data were also compared with disease duration and finger-floor distance, occiput-wall distance and Schober test. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS 11.0 for Windows program. Mann-Whitney U test was used to compare groups and Pearson Correlation analysis was used for correlation. Results: There was no statistically significant difference on general stability, Fourier analysis scores, WDI between patients with AS and healthy subjects. A negative correlation was found between Schober test and general stability score. (r=-0,390 p=0,03. No other correlations were found between stability scores, Fourier analyses scores, WDI and occiput-wall distance, finger-floor distance and disease duration.Conclusion: The patients with AS have good postural balance. Disease duration and quantitative measurements of posture do not affect postural balance.

  5. Going International: The Balanced Scorecard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Alicia M.

    2001-01-01

    Explains the balanced scorecard as a management system that provides a framework for strategic measurement which translates the vision and strategy of the organization in operational terms by four indicators: financial, process, employee and client satisfaction, and results. Also considers the importance of cultural differences in performance…

  6. Off-Balance Sheet Financing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Matthew C.

    1998-01-01

    Examines off-balance sheet financing, the facilities use of outsourcing for selected needs, as a means of saving operational costs and using facility assets efficiently. Examples of using outside sources for energy supply and food services, as well as partnering with business for facility expansion are provided. Concluding comments address tax…

  7. Mantle Dynamics in Super-Earths: Post-Perovskite Rheology and Self-Regulation of Viscosity

    CERN Document Server

    Tackley, Paul J; Brodholt, John P; Dobson, David P; Valencia, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Simple scalings suggest that super-Earths are more likely than an equivalent Earth-sized planet to be undergoing plate tectonics. Generally, viscosity and thermal conductivity increase with pressure while thermal expansivity decreases, resulting in lower convective vigor in the deep mantle. According to conventional thinking, this might result in no convection in a super-Earth's deep mantle. Here we evaluate this. First, we here extend the density functional theory (DFT) calculations of post-perovskite activation enthalpy of to a pressure of 1 TPa. The activation volume for diffusion creep becomes very low at very high pressure, but nevertheless for the largest super-Earths the viscosity along an adiabat may approach 1030 Pa s in the deep mantle. Second, we use these calculated values in numerical simulations of mantle convection and lithosphere dynamics of planets with up to ten Earth masses. The models assume a compressible mantle including depth-dependence of material properties and plastic yielding induce...

  8. Earth System Science Education Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, C.; Kaufman, C.; Humphreys, R. R.; Colgan, M. W.

    2009-12-01

    The College of Charleston is developing several new geoscience-based education modules for integration into the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA). These three new modules provide opportunities for science and pre-service education students to participate in inquiry-based, data-driven experiences. The three new modules will be discussed in this session. Coastal Crisis is a module that analyzes rapidly changing coastlines and uses technology - remotely sensed data and geographic information systems (GIS) to delineate, understand and monitor changes in coastal environments. The beaches near Charleston, SC are undergoing erosion and therefore are used as examples of rapidly changing coastlines. Students will use real data from NASA, NOAA and other federal agencies in the classroom to study coastal change. Through this case study, learners will acquire remotely sensed images and GIS data sets from online sources, utilize those data sets within Google Earth or other visualization programs, and understand what the data is telling them. Analyzing the data will allow learners to contemplate and make predictions on the impact associated with changing environmental conditions, within the context of a coastal setting. To Drill or Not To Drill is a multidisciplinary problem based module to increase students’ knowledge of problems associated with nonrenewable resource extraction. The controversial topic of drilling in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) examines whether the economic benefit of the oil extracted from ANWR is worth the social cost of the environmental damage that such extraction may inflict. By attempting to answer this question, learners must balance the interests of preservation with the economic need for oil. The learners are exposed to the difficulties associated with a real world problem that requires trade-off between environmental trust and economic well-being. The Citizen Science module challenges students to translate scientific information into words that are understandable and useful for policy makers and other stakeholders. The inability of scientists to effectively communicate with the public has been highlighted as a major reason for the anti-science attitude of a large segment of the public. This module, unlike other ESSEA modules, addresses this problem by first, investigating a global change environmental problem using Earth System Science methodologies, then developing several solutions to that problem, and finally writing a position paper for the policy makers to use. These three hands-on, real-world modules that engage students in authentic research share similar goals: 1) to use global change data sets to examine controversial environmental problems; 2) to use an earth system science approach to understand the complexity of global problems; and 3) to help students understand the political complexity of environmental problems where there is a clash between economic and ecological problems. The curriculum will meet National Standards in science, geography, math, etc.

  9. Radiation balance, transpiration and photosynthesis of an isolated tree

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation balance of an isolated walnut tree was measured using an experimental Whirligig device. The total amount of all-wave radiation absorbed by the tree canopy was used to estimate transpiration rates using a Penman-Monteith model. The results compared favourably with tree water use, measured by the heat-pulse technique. The total amount of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) absorbed by the tree canopy was combined with a photosynthetic light response curve to estimate net photosynthesis rates. The results compare favourably with published data from other tree canopies. Daily energy balance calculations showed that on average, about two-thirds of the total radiant energy absorbed by the tree canopy was dissipated as latent heat in the form of transpiration. The dominant environmental variable influencing transpiration was the vapour pressure deficit of the air. Almost two-thirds of the net latent heat flux was attributable to the vapour pressure deficit component, with the remainder owing to the radiation component. Daily transpiration-assimilation ratios varied from day to day in response to changing environmental conditions, but generally decreased with increasing net photosynthesis and with increasing transpiration. This appears to be the first time that such a direct measurement of the energy balance and photosynthesis of a single tree has been made. (author)

  10. Better Than Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Heller, René

    2015-01-01

    Do We Inhabit The Best O All Possible Worlds? German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz thought so, writing in 1710 that our planet, warts and all, must be the most optimal one imaginable. Leibniz's idea was roundly scorned as unscientific wishful thinking, most notably by French author Voltaire in his magnum opus, Candide. Yet Leibniz might find sympathy from at least one group of scientists - the astronomers who have for decades treated Earth as a golden standard as they search for worlds beyond our own solar system. Because earthlings still know of just one living world - our own - it makes some sense to use Earth as a template in the search for life elsewhere, such as in the most Earth-like regions of Mars or Jupiter's watery moon Europa. Now, however, discoveries of potentially habitable planets orbiting stars other than our sun - exoplanets, that is - are challenging that geocentric approach.

  11. Better Than Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, René

    2015-01-01

    Do we inhabit the best of all possible worlds? German mathematician Gottfried Leibniz thought so, writing in 1710 that our planet, warts and all, must be the most optimal one imaginable. Leibniz's idea was roundly scorned as unscientific wishful thinking, most notably by French author Voltaire in his magnum opus, Candide. Yet Leibniz might find sympathy from at least one group of scientists - the astronomers who have for decades treated Earth as a golden standard as they search for worlds beyond our own solar system. Because earthlings still know of just one living world - our own - it makes some sense to use Earth as a template in the search for life elsewhere, such as in the most Earth-like regions of Mars or Jupiter's watery moon Europa. Now, however, discoveries of potentially habitable planets orbiting stars other than our sun - exoplanets, that is - are challenging that geocentric approach.

  12. Dagik Earth and IUGONET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebisawa, K.; Koyama, Y.; Saito, A.; Sakamoto, S.; Ishii, M.; Kumano, Y.; Hazumi, Y.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper we introduce two independent projects in progress in Japan. Dagik Earth is a visualization project of the Earth and planets on a spherical screen using only a standard PC and a projector. Surface images of the Earth or planets (or whatever having spherical shape) in the equirectangular (plate carre) projection are projected on a spherical screen in the orthographic projection. As a result, the spherical screen becomes a virtual digital globe, which can be rotated using mouse or remote controller. Inter-university Upper atmosphere Global Observation NETwork (IUGONET) is a collaboration of five Japanese institutes to build a comprehensive database system for the metadata of the upper-atmospheric data taken by these institutes. We explain the IUGONET metadata database and iUgonet Data Analysis Software (UDAS) for upper atmospheric research.

  13. How Big is Earth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurber, Bonnie B.

    2015-08-01

    How Big is Earth celebrates the Year of Light. Using only the sunlight striking the Earth and a wooden dowel, students meet each other and then measure the circumference of the earth. Eratosthenes did it over 2,000 years ago. In Cosmos, Carl Sagan shared the process by which Eratosthenes measured the angle of the shadow cast at local noon when sunlight strikes a stick positioned perpendicular to the ground. By comparing his measurement to another made a distance away, Eratosthenes was able to calculate the circumference of the earth. How Big is Earth provides an online learning environment where students do science the same way Eratosthenes did. A notable project in which this was done was The Eratosthenes Project, conducted in 2005 as part of the World Year of Physics; in fact, we will be drawing on the teacher's guide developed by that project.How Big Is Earth? expands on the Eratosthenes project by providing an online learning environment provided by the iCollaboratory, www.icollaboratory.org, where teachers and students from Sweden, China, Nepal, Russia, Morocco, and the United States collaborate, share data, and reflect on their learning of science and astronomy. They are sharing their information and discussing their ideas/brainstorming the solutions in a discussion forum. There is an ongoing database of student measurements and another database to collect data on both teacher and student learning from surveys, discussions, and self-reflection done online.We will share our research about the kinds of learning that takes place only in global collaborations.The entrance address for the iCollaboratory is http://www.icollaboratory.org.

  14. Google Earth science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.; Secrest, Jeffery A.

    2015-03-01

    Google Earth has made a wealth of aerial imagery available online at no cost to users. We examine some of the potential uses of that data in illustrating basic physics and astronomy, such as finding the local magnetic declination, using landmarks such as the Washington Monument and Luxor Obelisk as gnomons, and showing how airport runways get their numbers. Close inspection of the images provided by Google Earth reveals that most of them are actually obtained via camera-equipped planes rather than satellites.

  15. Quantizing Earth surface deformations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. O. Bowin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The global analysis of Bowin (2010 used the global 14 absolute Euler pole set (62 Myr history from Gripp and Gordon (1990 and demonstrated that plate tectonics conserves angular momentum. We herein extend that analysis using the more detailed Bird (2003 52 present-day Euler pole set (relative to a fixed Pacific plate for the Earth's surface, after conversion to absolute Euler poles. Additionally, new analytical results now provide new details on upper mantle mass anomalies in the outer 200 km of the Earth, as well as an initial quantizing of surface deformations.

  16. Model Engine Performance Measurement From Force Balance Instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeracki, Robert J.

    1998-01-01

    A large scale model representative of a low-noise, high bypass ratio turbofan engine was tested for acoustics and performance in the NASA Lewis 9- by 15-Foot Low-Speed Wind Tunnel. This test was part of NASA's continuing Advanced Subsonic Technology Noise Reduction Program. The low tip speed fan, nacelle, and an un-powered core passage (with core inlet guide vanes) were simulated. The fan blades and hub are mounted on a rotating thrust and torque balance. The nacelle, bypass duct stators, and core passage are attached to a six component force balance. The two balance forces, when corrected for internal pressure tares, measure the total thrust-minus-drag of the engine simulator. Corrected for scaling and other effects, it is basically the same force that the engine supports would feel, operating at similar conditions. A control volume is shown and discussed, identifying the various force components of the engine simulator thrust and definitions of net thrust. Several wind tunnel runs with nearly the same hardware installed are compared, to identify the repeatability of the measured thrust-minus-drag. Other wind tunnel runs, with hardware changes that affected fan performance, are compared to the baseline configuration, and the thrust and torque effects are shown. Finally, a thrust comparison between the force balance and nozzle gross thrust methods is shown, and both yield very similar results.

  17. Time-of-day influences postural balance in older adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorgensen, M G; Rathleff, M S

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Postural balance assessments are performed in both clinical and basic research settings on a daily basis. During a 24-h time span our physiology and physical performance undergo radical changes as we are influenced by the circadian rhythm. The time-of-day interaction on postural balance is unknown in older adults. The aim of this study was to investigate the time-of-day effect on postural balance in older adults. METHODS: Center of pressure (CoP) excursion was measured (100Hz) by force plate analysis in 34 older adults during 30s of narrow quiet bilateral stance. Measurements were performed around 9a.m., 12.30p.m. and 4p.m. on the same day. Postural balance was quantified by velocity-moment, confidence ellipse area, total sway area and total sway length. RESULTS: An overall significant time-of-day (between 9a.m. and 4p.m.) effect was observed for velocity-moment (mm(2)/s) 57±27-65±29 (p=0.001), confidence ellipse area (mm(2)) 36±16-44±19 (p

  18. Charged dust in the earth's magnetosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have considered the electrodynamic effects on small A12O3 spherules dumped into the Earth's magnetosphere in large quantities during solid rocket propellant burns. The charges acquired by these grains in all regions of the terrestrial environment (plasmasphere, magnetosphere, and solar wind) are modest. Consequently electrodynamic effects are significant only at the lower end of the dust size spectrum (Rg approx-lt ?m). In that case, the electrodynamic forces conspire with solar radiation pressure to eliminate the grains from the magnetosphere in a comparatively short time. Although not studied here in detail, the authors anticipate a similar fate for fine micrometeroids entering the Earth's magnetosphere, with the electrodynamic effects playing an even more important role

  19. The Precession Index and a Nonlinear Energy Balance Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubincam, David

    2004-01-01

    A simple nonlinear energy balance climate model yields a precession index-like term in the temperature. Despite its importance in the geologic record, the precession index e sin (Omega)S, where e is the Earth's orbital eccentricity and (Omega)S is the Sun's perigee in the geocentric frame, is not present in the insolation at the top of the atmosphere. Hence there is no one-for-one mapping of 23,000 and 19,000 year periodicities from the insolation to the paleoclimate record; a nonlinear climate model is needed to produce these long periods. A nonlinear energy balance climate model with radiative terms of form T n, where T is surface temperature and n less than 1, does produce e sin (omega)S terms in temperature; the e sin (omega)S terms are called Seversmith psychroterms. Without feedback mechanisms, the model achieves extreme values of 0.64 K at the maximum orbital eccentricity of 0.06, cooling one hemisphere while simultaneously warming the other; the hemisphere over which perihelion occurs is the cooler. In other words, the nonlinear energy balance model produces long-term cooling in the northern hemisphere when the Sun's perihelion is near northern summer solstice and long-term warming in the northern hemisphere when the aphelion is near northern summer solstice. (This behavior is similar to the inertialess gray body which radiates like T 4, but the amplitude is much lower for the energy balance model because of its thermal inertia.) This seemingly paradoxical behavior works against the standard Milankovitch model, which requires cool northern summers (Sun far from Earth in northern summer) to build up northern ice sheets, so that if the standard model is correct it must be more efficient than previously thought. Alternatively, the new mechanism could possibly be dominant and indicate southern hemisphere control of the northern ice sheets, wherein the southern oceans undergo a long-term cooling when the Sun is far from the Earth during northern summer. The cold water eventually flows north, cooling the northern hemisphere. This might explain why the northern oceans lag the southern ones when it comes to orbital forcing.

  20. Solid Earth Science ESDR System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedar, S.; Bock, Y.; Moore, A. W.; Squibb, M. B.; Liu, Z.; Hasse, J.; Fang, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Solid Earth Science ESDR System (SESES) provides mature, long-term calibrated and validated Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) that support NASA's Earth Surface and Interiors (ESI) focus area, routinely processing data from Earthscope's Plate Boundary Observatory GPS network, NASA's Real-time Earthquake Analysis for Disaster Mitigation network (READI), as well as from several global GPS networks. The project, which was initiated in 2006, provides multi-decade calibrated and validated GPS-derived deformation time series and deformation vectors, based on daily GPS data. The time series are a unique product in terms of number of stations and duration (over 20 years), and have been modeled and catalogued for coseismic, postseismic and transient deformation, as well as instrumental offsets. Calibration and validation of the GPS measured deformation time series are done through a combined solution of two independently derived GPS position time series. Improved sensitivity to real signals is provided by a Principal Component Analysis tool that is routinely applied to the Western North America time series. At its current stage SESES is in the process of generating and distributing the following new ESDRs: (a) Troposphere delay time series for calibrating atmospheric delay errors in Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) that are one of the limiting InSAR error sources. (b) Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) time series for use in Probable Maximum Precipitation studies, historical weather event analysis, and studies of long-term water vapor trends. (c) Fusion of GPS and seismic measurements at collocated stations to estimate three-dimensional high-rate displacement time series with mm precision, during significant historic seismic events (e.g., 2003 Mw 8.3 Tokachi-oki earthquake in Japan; 2010 Mw 7.2 El Mayor-Cucapah earthquake in northern Baja California; 2011 Mw 9.0 Tohoku-oki earthquake in Japan) and new events during the project duration. Data sets to be used in constructing the new and expanded ESDRs include GPS and other GNSS data as they become available from multiple regional and global networks; seismic data (from broadband seismometer and accelerometers) collected at or near (1-2 km) of a GPS station; surface pressure and temperature data from onsite sensors, nearby weather stations, and weather models. All ESDR's will be accessible through NASA's Crustal Dynamics Data and Information System (CDDIS), and will also be archived at the project's database at UCSD's Scripps Orbit and Permanent Array Center (SOPAC), where they would be accessible through the project's GPS Explorer (http://geoapp03.ucsd.edu/gridsphere/gridsphere) web portal.

  1. Presentation, calibration and validation of the low-order, DCESS Earth System Model

    OpenAIRE

    Pedersen, J. O. P; S. Malsk?r Olsen; Shaffer, G.

    2008-01-01

    A new, low-order Earth system model is described, calibrated and tested against Earth system data. The model features modules for the atmosphere, ocean, ocean sediment, land biosphere and lithosphere and has been designed to simulate global change on time scales of years to millions of years. The atmosphere module considers radiation balance, meridional transport of heat and water vapor between low-mid latitude and high latitude zones, heat and gas exchange with the ocean and sea ice and snow...

  2. Presentation, calibration and validation of the low-order, DCESS Earth System Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaffer, G.; Olsen, S. Malskaer; Pedersen, Jens Olaf Pepke

    2008-01-01

    A new, low-order Earth system model is described, calibrated and tested against Earth system data. The model features modules for the atmosphere, ocean, ocean sediment, land biosphere and lithosphere and has been designed to simulate global change on time scales of years to millions of years. The atmosphere module considers radiation balance, meridional transport of heat and water vapor between low-mid latitude and high latitude zones, heat and gas exchange with the ocean and sea ice and snow co...

  3. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Herndon, J M

    2005-01-01

    The principles of Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics are disclosed leading to a new way to interpret whole-Earth dynamics. Whole-Earth Decompression Dynamics incorporates elements of and unifies the two seemingly divergent dominant theories of continential displacement, plate tectonics theory and Earth expansion theory. Whole-Earth decompression is the consequence of Earth formation from within a Jupiter-like protoplanet with subsequent loss of gases and ices and concomitant rebounding. The initial whole-Earth decompression is expected to result in a global system of major primary decompression cracks appearing in the rigid crust which persist as the basalt feeders for the global, mid-oceanic ridge system. As the Earth subsequently decompresses, the area of the Earth's surface increases by the formation of secondary decompression cracks, often located near the continental margins, presently identified as oceanic trenches. These secondary decompression cracks are subsequently in-filled with basalt, extruded fr...

  4. The radioactive earth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uranium, thorium and potassium are the main elements contributing to natural terrestrial radioactivity. The isotopes 238U, 235U, 232Th and 40K decay with half-lives so long that significant amounts remain in the earth, providing a continuing source of heat. The slow decay of these isotopes also provides the basis for radiometric age dating and isotopic modelling of the evolution of the earth and its crust. There is a complex interplay between their heat production and the processes involved in crust formation. Phenomena such as volcanism, earthquakes, and large-scale hydrothermal activity associated with ore deposition reflect the dissipation of heat energy from the earth, much of which is derived from natural radioactivity. The higher levels of radioactive elements during the early history of the earth resulted in higher heat flow. All three of the radioactive elements are strongly partitioned into the continental crust, but within the crust their distribution is determined by their different chemical properties. The behaviour of U, which has two commonly occurring oxidation states, is more complex than that of Th and K. Uranium deposits are diverse, and are mostly associated with granites, acid volcanics, or detrital sedimentary rocks. The most important U deposits economically are unconformity-type ores of Proterozoic age, in which U is enriched by up to 5 x 106 with respect to bulk earth values. In some cases spect to bulk earth values. In some cases natural radioactivity can be of environmental concern. The most significant risk is posed by accumulations of radon, the gaseous daughter product of U. (author)Uranium, thorium and potassium are the main elements contributing to natural terrestrial radioactivity. The isotopes 238U, 235U, 232Th and 40K decay with half-lives so long that significant amounts remain in the earth, providing a continuing source of heat. The slow decay of these isotopes also provides the basis for radiometric age dating and isotopic modelling of the evolution of the earth and its crust. There is a complex interplay between their heat production and the processes involved in crust formation. Phenomena such as volcanism, earthquakes, and large-scale hydrothermal activity associated with ore deposition reflect the dissipation of heat energy from the earth, much of which is derived from natural radioactivity. The higher levels of radioactive elements during the early history of the earth resulted in higher heat flow. All three of the radioactive elements are strongly partitioned into the continental crust, but within the crust their distribution is determined by their different chemical properties. The behaviour of U, which has two commonly occurring oxidation states, is more complex than that of Th and K. Uranium deposits are diverse, and are mostly associated with granites, acid volcanics, or detrital sedimentary rocks. The most important U deposits economically are unconformity-type ores of Proterozoic age, in which U is enriched by up to 5 x 106 with respect to bulk earth values. In some cases

  5. Study on rare earths and their recycling. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schueler, Doris; Buchert, Matthias; Liu, Ran; Dittrich, Stefanie; Merz, Cornelia

    2011-01-15

    The focus of this study for the Greens/EFA Group in the European Parliament lies on the development of a European strategy for a sustainable rare earth economy. It particularly addresses the recycling, the substitution and the efficient use of rare earths and develops a strategy towards a green rare earth economy. The rare earth elements under analysis in this study by Oeko-Institut include the 17 elements yttrium (Y), lanthanum (La), cerium (Ce), praseodymium (Pr), neodymium (Nd), promethium (Pm), samarium (Sm), europium (Eu), gadolinium (Gd), terbium (Tb), dysprosium (Dy), holmium (Ho), erbium (Er), thulium (Tm), ytterbium (Yb), lutetium (Lu) and scandium (Sc) and the role they play in the case of green technologies. The chapters 1 to 9 provide a comprehensive overview of methodological approaches to assess the criticality as well as global aspects such as rare earth mining, processing, trade, environmental impacts, applications, current and future demand and the expected demandsupply balance. Each chapter culminates in a conclusion, by means of which the reader can gain a quick overview of its contents. These data are not summarised in the executive summary. Instead, the executive summary focuses on the main target of the study, the development of a European strategy for a sustainable rare earth economy.

  6. Techniques of Elastic Properties Measurements under Simulated Earth's Mantle Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Hans J.; Lauterjung, Joern; Schilling, Frank R.; Lathe, Christian; Wehber, Michael

    2010-05-01

    The Earth's mantle has a mass of about 4.08 . 1021 tons and represents 68 % of the total mass of the Earth. It is only accessible by indirect methods, above all seismological studies. The interpretation of seismic data from the Earth's deep interior requires measurements of the physical properties of Earth materials under experimental simulated mantle conditions. The simulation of these in situ conditions require high pressure techniques - diamond anvil cells (DAC), multi-anvil devices (MAD) and mostly synthetical samples. MADs are more limited in pressure, but provide sample volumes 3 to 7 orders of magnitude bigger. They also offer small and even adjustable temperature gradients over the whole sample. The bigger samples make anisotropy and structural effects in complex systems accessible for measurements in principle. The measurement of both elastic wave velocities have also no limits for opaque and encapsulated samples.The ultrasonic interferometry allows the highly precise travel time measurement at a sample enclosed in a high-pressure multi-anvil device. Under high pressure conditions the influence of sample deformation is so important that ultrasonic interferometry requires the exact sample deformation measurement under in situ conditions using synchrotron radiation. There is a promising way to increase the maximum pressure of multi-anvil devices by multi-staging, i.e. implementation of additional sub-anvil set-ups resulting in a better distribution and limitation of the stress inside the anvils. Contrary to the common opinion of overshooting the maximum crushing strength most of the anvils fail in high pressure experiments due to the exceeding of the maximum tensile stress as a result of the lateral deformation. We present recent techniques and results of elastic properties measurements performed at different multi-anvil devices. That comprises standard-free pressure measurements, transient experiments, multi-cycle and multi-staging experiments as well as melt studies.

  7. Climate Stability of Habitable Earth-like Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Menou, Kristen

    2014-01-01

    The carbon-silicate cycle regulates the atmospheric $CO_2$ content of terrestrial planets on geological timescales through a balance between the rates of $CO_2$ volcanic outgassing and planetary intake from rock weathering. It is thought to act as an efficient climatic thermostat on Earth and, by extension, on other habitable planets. If, however, the weathering rate increases with the atmospheric $CO_2$ content, as expected on planets lacking land vascular plants, the carbon-silicate cycle feedback can become severely limited. Here we show that Earth-like planets receiving less sunlight than current Earth may no longer possess a stable warm climate but instead repeatedly cycle between unstable glaciated and deglaciated climatic states. This has implications for the search for life on exoplanets in the habitable zone of nearby stars.

  8. Climate stability of habitable Earth-like planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menou, Kristen

    2015-11-01

    The carbon-silicate cycle regulates the atmospheric CO2 content of terrestrial planets on geological timescales through a balance between the rates of CO2 volcanic outgassing and planetary intake from rock weathering. It is thought to act as an efficient climatic thermostat on Earth and, by extension, on other habitable planets. If, however, the weathering rate increases with the atmospheric CO2 content, as expected on planets lacking land vascular plants, the carbon-silicate cycle feedback can become severely limited. Here we show that Earth-like planets receiving less sunlight than current Earth may no longer possess a stable warm climate but instead repeatedly cycle between unstable glaciated and deglaciated climatic states. This has implications for the search for life on exoplanets in the habitable zone of nearby stars.

  9. Pressure correction schemes for compressible flows

    OpenAIRE

    Kheriji, Walid

    2011-01-01

    This thesis is concerned with the development of semi-implicit fractional step schemes, for the compressible Navier-Stokes equations; these schemes are part of the class of the pressure correction methods.The chosen spatial discretization is staggered: non conforming mixed finite elements (Crouzeix-Raviart or Rannacher-Turek) or the classic MAC scheme. An upwind finite volume discretization of the mass balanced guarantees the positivity of the density. The positivity of the internal energy is...

  10. Near Earth Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolff, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    The word planet comes from Greek planetes, wanderers, because the planets appear to wander across the celestial sphere, contrary to the fixed stars. This thesis presents several methods for using this motion to distinguish between stars and solar system objects in order to detect and track NEOs, Near Earth Objects: Asteroids and comets following paths that bring them near the Earth. NEOs have collided with the Earth since its formation, some causing local devastation, some causing global climate changes, yet the threat from a collision with a near Earth object has only recently been recognised and accepted. The European Space Agency mission Gaia is a proposed space observatory, designed to perform a highly accurate census of our galaxy, the Milky Way, and beyond. Through accurate measurement of star positions, Gaia is expected to discover thousands of extra-solar planets and follow the bending of starlight by the Sun, and therefore directly observe the structure of space-time. This thesis explores several aspects of the observation of NEOs with Gaia, emphasising detection of NEOs and the quality of orbits computed from Gaia observations. The main contribution is the work on motion detection, comprising a comparative survey of five different motion detection tests, one of which is proved to be optimal among all translation invariant and symmetric tests.

  11. Understanding Earth's Albedo Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Chuck

    2012-01-01

    Earth and space science in the middle school classroom are composed of intricately intertwined sets of conceptual systems (AAAS 1993; NRC 1996). Some systems of study, such as the water and rock cycles, are quite explicit and often found as stand-alone middle school science units. Other phenomena are not so apparent, yet they play an extremely…

  12. Earth System science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prinn, R. G.

    1992-01-01

    Recent research has solidified a view of the Earth as a global-scale interactive system with complex chemical, physical, biological and dynamical processes that link the ocean, atmosphere, land (soils, ice, snow) and marine and terrestrial living organisms. These processes both within and between the major parts of the system help determine global and regional climate and control the biogeochemical and hydrologic cycles essential to life. The study of the Earth System requires measurements ranging from the scales of the smallest processes to the global scale. An ambitious satellite observational program, the Earth Observing System (EOS), carried out along with the complementary and ongoing World Climate Research Program (WCRP) and International Geosphere-Biosphere Program (IGBP) represents a major international effort to understand this System and predict its future changes. The complex and intriguing nature of the Earth System is discussed along with a number of closely coupled processes occurring within it. These are: clouds, precipitation and vegetation; ocean circulation, sea-surface temperature and phytoplankton; coupled oceanic and atmospheric circulation (the Southern Oscillation); biological activity, atmospheric chemistry and climate; and biological emissions and the ozone layer.

  13. Trees for Mother Earth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greer, Sandy

    1993-01-01

    Describes Trees for Mother Earth, a program in which secondary students raise funds to buy fruit trees to plant during visits to the Navajo Reservation. Benefits include developing feelings of self-worth among participants, promoting cultural exchange and understanding, and encouraging self-sufficiency among the Navajo. (LP)

  14. Modeling Earth's Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallant, Amy; Lee, Hee-Sun; Pryputniewicz, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Systems thinking suggests that one can best understand a complex system by studying the interrelationships of its component parts rather than looking at the individual parts in isolation. With ongoing concern about the effects of climate change, using innovative materials to help students understand how Earth's systems connect with each other is…

  15. Google Earth Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, William H.; Padgett, Clifford W.; Secrest, Jeffery A.

    2015-01-01

    Google Earth has made a wealth of aerial imagery available online at no cost to users. We examine some of the potential uses of that data in illustrating basic physics and astronomy, such as finding the local magnetic declination, using landmarks such as the Washington Monument and Luxor Obelisk as gnomons, and showing how airport runways get…

  16. Sun-Earth Day

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Michael Sandras, a member of the Pontchartrain Astronomical Society, explains his solar telescope to students of Second Street in Bay St. Louis, Hancock County and Nicholson elementary schools in StenniSphere's Millennium Hall on April 10. The students participated in several hands-on activities at Stennis Space Center's Sun-Earth Day celebration.

  17. The rigidity of the Earth’s inner core

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith Edward Bullen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The evidence for the existence of significant rigidity in the Earth's inner core is summarised and discussed in the light of recent work. Quantum-mechanical calculations, based on a Thomas-Fermi-Dirac model, suggest that an earlier estimate of 3.6 × 10¹² dyn/cm² for this rigidity may need to be reduced by 0.5 × 10¹² dyn/cm². The theoretical travel-times of the phase PKJKP would then need to be increased by amounts ranging from zero to 40 seconds. It is shown that the use of Gutenberg's seismic data in place of that of Jeffreys would reduce the estimated rigidity of the inner core by a further 1.6 × 10¹² dyn/cm², approximately. It is suggested that Gutenberg's data lead to the lowest likely value for the rigidity of the inner core, namely 1.5 × 10¹² dyn/cm², so that, on all present evidence, it is improbable that the inner core is less than about twice as rigid as steel is at zero pressure.

  18. Universally Balanced Combinatorial Optimization Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaotie Deng

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article surveys studies on universally balanced properties of cooperative games defined in a succinct form. In particular, we focus on combinatorial optimization games in which the values to coalitions are defined through linear optimization programs, possibly combinatorial, that is subject to integer constraints. In economic settings, the integer requirement reflects some forms of indivisibility. We are interested in the classes of games that guarantee a non-empty core no matter what are the admissible values assigned to the parameters defining these programs. We call such classes universally balanced. We present characterization and complexity results on the universally balancedness property for some classes of interesting combinatorial optimization games. In particular, we focus on the algorithmic properties for identifying universally balancedness for the games under discussion.

  19. LOAD BALANCING WITH NEURAL NETWORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada M. Al Sallami

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses a proposed load balance technique based on artificial neural network. It distributes workload equally across all the nodes by using back propagation learning algorithm to train feed forward Artificial Neural Network (ANN. The proposed technique is simple and it can work efficiently when effective training sets are used. ANN predicts the demand and thus allocates resources according to that demand. Thus, it always maintains the active servers according to current demand, which results in low energy consumption than the conservative approach of over-provisioning. Furthermore, high utilization of server results in more power consumption, server running at higher utilization can process more workload with similar power usage. Finally the existing load balancing techniques in cloud computing are discussed and compared with the proposed technique based on various parameters like performance, scalability, associated overhead... etc. In addition energy consumption and carbon emission perspective are also considered to satisfy green computing.

  20. Balancing energy flexibilities through aggregation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valsomatzis, Emmanouil; Hose, Katja

    2014-01-01

    One of the main goals of recent developments in the Smart Grid area is to increase the use of renewable energy sources. These sources are characterized by energy fluctuations that might lead to energy imbalances and congestions in the electricity grid. Exploiting inherent flexibilities, which exist in both energy production and consumption, is the key to solving these problems. Flexibilities can be expressed as flex-offers, which due to their high number need to be aggregated to reduce the complexity of energy scheduling. In this paper, we discuss balance aggregation techniques that already during aggregation aim at balancing flexibilities in production and consumption to reduce the probability of congestions and reduce the complexity of scheduling. We present results of our extensive experiments.

  1. Double-yoke balanced compressor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A double-yoke balanced compressor for a cryogenic cooler that has only linear motion imparted to balanced piston and cylinder masses. A piston yoke is driven in the linear stroke direction by a piston axially offset crankshaft cam and a cylinder yoke is driven linearly by a cylinder axially offset crankshaft cam that is exactly offset 1800 from the other cam. A large circular bushing in the compressor housing covers the entire outer cylinder head during linear operation to prevent blow by and to guide the cylinder linearly. The lower portion of the piston and cylinder connecting rods fit into linear guides that are further comprised of low molecular weight gas filled cavities to provide additional air bearing smoothness to the linear motion of the piston and cylinder

  2. Entropy balance in holographic superconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Hartnoll, Sean A.; Pourhasan, Razieh

    2012-01-01

    In systems undergoing second order phase transitions, the temperature integral of the specific heat over temperature from zero to the critical temperature is the same in both the normal and ordered phases. This entropy balance relates the critical temperature to the distribution of degrees of freedom in the normal and ordered states. Quantum criticality and fractionalization can imply an increased number of low energy degrees of freedom in both the normal and ordered states....

  3. Universally Balanced Combinatorial Optimization Games

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaotie Deng; Gabrielle Demange

    2010-01-01

    This article surveys studies on universally balanced properties of cooperative games defined in a succinct form. In particular, we focus on combinatorial optimization games in which the values to coalitions are defined through linear optimization programs, possibly combinatorial, that is subject to integer constraints. In economic settings, the integer requirement reflects some forms of indivisibility. We are interested in the classes of games that guarantee a non-empty core no matter what ar...

  4. Load balancing of IP telephony

    OpenAIRE

    Montag, David

    2008-01-01

    In today's world, more and more phone calls are made over IP. This results in an increasing demand for scalable IP telephony equipment. Ingate Systems AB produces firewalls specialized in handling IP telephony. They have an inherent limit in the number of concurrent phone calls that they can handle. This can be a bottleneck at high loads. There is a load balancing solution available in the platform, but it has a number of drawbacks, such as media latency and client capability requirements, li...

  5. Energy balance of a vehicle

    OpenAIRE

    Gourdeau, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Simulation has become a very useful tool to predict the characteristics of a system and perform analysis of parameters without having to run too many tests. The advanced system engineering team of Continental Automotive uses a 0D simulation program, AMESim, to realize simulations of vehicle models. These simulations are used e.g. to predict the fuel consumption and CO2 emissions. A tool has been developed over the course of previous internships to realize the energy balance of AMESim vehicle ...

  6. Cell phone based balance trainer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee Beom-Chan; Kim Jeonghee; Chen Shu; Sienko Kathleen H

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background In their current laboratory-based form, existing vibrotactile sensory augmentation technologies that provide cues of body motion are impractical for home-based rehabilitation use due to their size, weight, complexity, calibration procedures, cost, and fragility. Methods We have designed and developed a cell phone based vibrotactile feedback system for potential use in balance rehabilitation training in clinical and home environments. It comprises an iPhone with an embedded...

  7. Balanced Unemployment in Polish Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Kamila Szyma?ska

    2009-01-01

    The article deals with the problem of balanced unemployment in relation to the Polish economy. This issue with its variety considerations and economic, social and political implications is today one of the most important matter. Author analyses this problem together with its reasons and refer it to the Polish economy. In first and second part of the text there are presented basic assumptions of natural unemployment theory and Non-Accelerating Inflation Rate of Unemployment. Third part is an a...

  8. LOAD BALANCING WITH NEURAL NETWORK

    OpenAIRE

    Nada M. Al Sallami; Ali Al daoud; Sarmad A. Al Alousi

    2013-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed load balance technique based on artificial neural network. It distributes workload equally across all the nodes by using back propagation learning algorithm to train feed forward Artificial Neural Network (ANN). The proposed technique is simple and it can work efficiently when effective training sets are used. ANN predicts the demand and thus allocates resources according to that demand. Thus, it always maintains the active servers according to current demand, ...

  9. Hypothalamic lipophagy and energetic balance

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Rajat

    2011-01-01

    Autophagy is a conserved cellular turnover process that degrades unwanted cytoplasmic material within lysosomes. Through “in bulk” degradation of cytoplasmic proteins and organelles, including lipid droplets, autophagy helps provide an alternative fuel source, in particular, when nutrients are scarce. Recent work demonstrates a role for autophagy in hypothalamic agouti-related peptide (AgRP) neurons in regulation of food intake and energy balance. The induction of autophagy in hypothalamic ne...

  10. Electric power balance sheet 2013

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of RTE, the French electricity Transportation grid, a public service assignment, is to balance the electricity supply and demand in real time. This report presents RTE's technical results for the year 2013: stabilisation of the electricity consumption in France, high level of hydropower generation, fast evolution of the European power network, electricity markets in a transition situation, adaptation of RTE's network to the evolutions of the energy system

  11. Balanced Identity in the Minimal Groups Paradigm

    OpenAIRE

    Dunham, Yarrow

    2013-01-01

    Balanced Identity Theory [1] formalizes a set of relationships between group attitude, group identification, and self-esteem. While these relationships have been demonstrated for familiar and highly salient social categories, questions remain regarding the generality of the balance phenomenon and its causal versus descriptive status. Supporting the generality and rapidity of cognitive balance, four studies demonstrate that the central predictions of balance are supported even for previously u...

  12. The balance principle in scientific research

    OpenAIRE

    Liang-ping Hu

    2012-01-01

    The principles of balance, randomization, control and repetition, which are closely related, constitute the four principles of scientific research. The balance principle is the kernel of the four principles which runs through the other three. However, in scientific research, the balance principle is always overlooked. If the balance principle is not well performed, the research conclusion is easy to be denied, which may lead to the failure of the whole research. Therefore, it is essential to ...

  13. An Improved Hadoop Data Load Balancing Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Kun Liu; Gaochao Xu; Jun’e Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Data load balancing is one of the key problems of big data technology. As a big data application, Hadoop has had many successful applications. HDFS is Hadoop Distributed File System and has the load balancing procedure which can balance the storage load on each machine. However, this method cannot balance the overload rack preferentially, and so it is likely to cause the breakdown of overload machines. In this paper, we focus on the overload machines and propose an improved algorithm for bala...

  14. Earth as an Exoplanet: Lessons in Recognizing Planetary Habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadows, Victoria; Robinson, Tyler; Misra, Amit; Ennico, Kimberly; Sparks, William B.; Claire, Mark; Crisp, David; Schwieterman, Edward; Bussey, D. Ben J.; Breiner, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Earth will always be our best-studied example of a habitable world. While extrasolar planets are unlikely to look exactly like Earth, they may share key characteristics, such as oceans, clouds and surface inhomogeneity. Earth's globally-averaged characteristics can therefore help us to recognize planetary habitability in data-limited exoplanet observations. One of the most straightforward ways to detect habitability will be via detection of 'glint', specular reflectance from an ocean (Robinson et al., 2010). Other methods include undertaking a census of atmospheric greenhouse gases, or attempting to measure planetary surface temperature and pressure, to determine if liquid water would be feasible on the planetary surface. Here we present recent research on detecting planetary habitability, led by the NASA Astrobiology Institute's Virtual Planetary Laboratory Team. This work includes a collaboration with the NASA Lunar Science Institute on the detection of ocean glint and ozone absorption using Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) Earth observations (Robinson et al., 2014). This data/model comparison provides the first observational test of a technique that could be used to determine exoplanet habitability from disk-integrated observations at visible and near-infrared wavelengths. We find that the VPL spectral Earth model is in excellent agreement with the LCROSS Earth data, and can be used to reliably predict Earth's appearance at a range of phases relevant to exoplanet observations. Determining atmospheric surface pressure and temperature directly for a potentially habitable planet will be challenging due to the lack of spatial-resolution, presence of clouds, and difficulty in spectrally detecting many bulk constituents of terrestrial atmospheres. Additionally, Rayleigh scattering can be masked by absorbing gases and absorption from the underlying surface. However, new techniques using molecular dimers of oxygen (Misra et al., 2014) and nitrogen (Schwieterman et al., 2014) may provide an alternative means to determine terrestrial atmospheric pressure for both transit transmission and direct imaging observations.

  15. Analysis of work-life balance from the viewpoint of Iranian accountants

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas Ghanbari; Morteza Ramazani; Majid Jalilinia

    2013-01-01

    Work-life balance (WLB) plays an essential role on having peaceful life. There has been a substantial growth of families where both husband and wife work. Despite enjoying advantages of role mixture, life style in family has been faced by tremendous pressures due to ignoring conventional division of work in family as well as making new and more commitments. One of these pressures is the conflict between work and life, which could lead to unfavorable impacts on social integrity of family funct...

  16. Pitfalls in Using the Balanced Scorecard

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    NØrreklit, Hanne; Jakobsen, Morten

    2008-01-01

    The balanced scorecard has quickly become a leading management tool. But business performance measurement is notoriously difficult, so any system, including the balanced scorecard, is likely to have unanticipated and often dysfunctional consequences. This article briefly reviews the main attractions of the balanced scorecard and then shows how these apparent advantages might lead to problems.

  17. Student Geoscientists Explore the Earth during Earth Science Week 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benbow, Ann E.; Camphire, Geoff

    2005-01-01

    Taking place October 9-15, Earth Science Week 2005 will celebrate the theme "Geoscientists Explore the Earth." The American Geological Institute (AGI) is organizing the event, as always, to help people better understand and appreciate the Earth sciences and to encourage stewardship of the planet. This year, the focus will be on the wide range of…

  18. Towards balanced development in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyatt, G

    1992-01-01

    Pakistan is a country whose economic growth is surprising in light of its social indicators. The aim of this article is to examine why conditions are such and to develop a framework for understanding the issues as an aid to redesigning policies. 5 sections are devoted to a summary of the main findings, the diagnosis of development and the impact on social sectors, a proposal for balanced development, and implications for policy changes. A sound macro economic context is needed with reforms economically in price and incentive systems, institutionally, and in the law and order sector. Public administration needs to be improved and individual opportunities need to be expanded. Internal security needs to be secured, so that law and order are restored. Economic growth has been high between 1960 and 1988, due to exploitation of natural resources and cheap unskilled labor, expansion of irrigated land, and growth of the unregulated informal sector. The major constraints on economic growth will come from a lack of fiscal discipline. 40% of government revenues are consumed by the military and 20% for servicing debt. Other constraints are the population growth rate in excess of 3%/year, an urban bias in allocation of resources, neglected primary education, and gender bias in education. There has been little incentive for provincial governments to balance budgets, and civil service has become disorganized. Balanced development entails recognizing human capital, natural resources, and infrastructure; accepting the status quo; and creating and maintaining an institutional framework to correct market failures and promote individual opportunities. The environmental polluter must pay. Income must be increased through higher wages, increasing the demand for labor, and transfers to households in the form of food rations, schooling, and medical care. Investment in women will increase household earnings, and improve living conditions and the health of themselves and their children. Balanced development must alleviate poverty. Policies can be evaluated in terms of access, delivery, training, and financing; discussion follows on the failings of and needs for family planning, health, and education, and the implications for institutional policy. Balanced development as optimum use of existing resources and investment in areas with the highest return is movement in the right direction, assumes equality of opportunity, but does not provide social security. PMID:12318400

  19. Mirador - Earth Surface and Interior

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Earth Science data access made simple. The goal of the Earth Surface and Interior focus area is to assess, mitigate and forecast the natural hazards that affect...

  20. Rare earth base superconducting composition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A superconductin mixed valence copper oxide with a perowskite structure is claimed. It comprises a valence 4 rare earth (Ce or Pr), an alkaline earth metal (Sr or Ba) and thallium. Chemical composition is given and synthesis is described

  1. Earth's energy imbalance and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Hansen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Improving observations of ocean heat content show that Earth is absorbing more energy from the sun than it is radiating to space as heat, even during the recent solar minimum. The inferred planetary energy imbalance, 0.59 ± 0.15 W m?2 during the 6-year period 2005–2010, confirms the dominant role of the human-made greenhouse effect in driving global climate change. Observed surface temperature change and ocean heat gain together constrain the net climate forcing and ocean mixing rates. We conclude that most climate models mix heat too efficiently into the deep ocean and as a result underestimate the negative forcing by human-made aerosols. Aerosol climate forcing today is inferred to be ?1.6 ± 0.3 W m?2, implying substantial aerosol indirect climate forcing via cloud changes. Continued failure to quantify the specific origins of this large forcing is untenable, as knowledge of changing aerosol effects is needed to understand future climate change. We conclude that recent slowdown of ocean heat uptake was caused by a delayed rebound effect from Mount Pinatubo aerosols and a deep prolonged solar minimum. Observed sea level rise during the Argo float era is readily accounted for by ice melt and ocean thermal expansion, but the ascendency of ice melt leads us to anticipate acceleration of the rate of sea level rise this decade.

    Humanity is potentially vulnerable to global temperature change, as discussed in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, 2001, 2007 reports and by innumerable authors. Although climate change is driven by many climate forcing agents and the climate system also exhibits unforced (chaotic variability, it is now widely agreed that the strong global warming trend of recent decades is caused predominantly by human-made changes of atmospheric composition (IPCC, 2007.

    The basic physics underlying this global warming, the greenhouse effect, is simple. An increase of gases such as CO2 makes the atmosphere more opaque at infrared wavelengths. This added opacity causes the planet's heat radiation to space to arise from higher, colder levels in the atmosphere, thus reducing emission of heat energy to space. The temporary imbalance between the energy absorbed from the sun and heat emission to space, causes the planet to warm until planetary energy balance is restored.

    The planetary energy imbalance caused by a change of atmospheric composition defines a climate forcing. Climate sensitivity, the eventual global temperature change per unit forcing, is known with good accuracy from Earth's paleoclimate history. However, two fundamental uncertainties limit our ability to predict global temperature change on decadal time scales.

    First, although climate forcing by human-made greenhouse gases (GHGs is known accurately, climate forcing caused by changing human-made aerosols is practically unmeasured. Aerosols are fine particles suspended in the air, such as dust, sulfates, and black soot (Ramanathan et al., 2001. Aerosol climate forcing is complex, because aerosols both reflect solar radiation to space (a cooling effect and absorb solar radiation (a warming effect. In addition, atmospheric aerosols can alter cloud cover and cloud properties. Therefore, precise composition-specific measurements of aerosols and their effects on clouds are needed to assess the aerosol role in climate change.

    Second, the rate at which Earth's surface temperature approaches a new equilibrium in response to a climate forcing depends on how efficiently heat perturbations are mixed into the deeper ocean. Ocean mixing is complex and not necessarily simulated well by climate models. Empirical data on ocean heat uptake are improving rapidly, but still suffer limitations.

    We summarize current understanding of this basic physics of global warming and note observations needed to narrow uncertainties. Appropriate measur

  2. Effect of Selected Balance Exercises on the Dynamic Balance of Children with Visual Impairments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jazi, Shirin Davarpanah; Purrajabi, Fatemeh; Movahedi, Ahmadreza; Jalali, Shahin

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Maintaining balance while walking is of utmost importance for individuals with visual impairments because deficits in dynamic balance have been associated with a high risk of falling. Thus, the primary aim of the study presented here was to determine whether balance training effects the dynamic balance of children with visual…

  3. Earth Science Multimedia Theater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasler, A. F.

    1998-01-01

    The presentation will begin with the latest 1998 NASA Earth Science Vision for the next 25 years. A compilation of the 10 days of animations of Hurricane Georges which were supplied daily on NASA to Network television will be shown. NASA's visualizations of Hurricane Bonnie which appeared in the Sept 7 1998 issue of TIME magazine. Highlights will be shown from the NASA hurricane visualization resource video tape that has been used repeatedly this season on network TV. Results will be presented from a new paper on automatic wind measurements in Hurricane Luis from 1 -min GOES images that will appear in the October BAMS. The visualizations are produced by the Goddard Visualization & Analysis Laboratory, and Scientific Visualization Studio, as well as other Goddard and NASA groups using NASA, NOAA, ESA, and NASDA Earth science datasets. Visualizations will be shown from the "Digital-HyperRes-Panorama" Earth Science ETheater'98 recently presented in Tokyo, Paris and Phoenix. The presentation in Paris used a SGI/CRAY Onyx Infinite Reality Super Graphics Workstation at 2560 X 1024 resolution with dual synchronized video Epson 71 00 projectors on a 20ft wide screen. Earth Science Electronic Theater '999 is being prepared for a December 1 st showing at NASA HQ in Washington and January presentation at the AMS meetings in Dallas. The 1999 version of the Etheater will be triple wide with at resolution of 3840 X 1024 on a 60 ft wide screen. Visualizations will also be featured from the new Earth Today Exhibit which was opened by Vice President Gore on July 2, 1998 at the Smithsonian Air & Space Museum in Washington, as well as those presented for possible use at the American Museum of Natural History (NYC), Disney EPCOT, and other venues. New methods are demonstrated for visualizing, interpreting, comparing, organizing and analyzing immense Hyperimage remote sensing datasets and three dimensional numerical model results. We call the data from many new Earth sensing satellites, Hyperimage datasets, because they have such high resolution in the spectral, temporal, spatial, and dynamic range domains. The traditional numerical spreadsheet paradigm has been extended to develop a scientific visualization approach for processing Hyperimage datasets and 3D model results interactively. The advantages of extending the powerful spreadsheet style of computation to multiple sets of images and organizing image processing were demonstrated using the Distributed Image SpreadSheet (DISS).

  4. Geomorphology and earth system science

    OpenAIRE

    Dadson, Simon

    2010-01-01

    Earth system science is an approach to obtain a scientific understanding of the entire Earth system on a global scale by describing how its component parts and their interactions have evolved, how they function, and how they may be expected to continue to evolve on all time-scales. The aim of this review is to introduce some key examples showing the role of earth surface processes, the traditional subject of geomorphology, within the interacting Earth system. The paper considers three example...

  5. Intracranial pressure monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ICP monitoring; CSF pressure monitoring ... There are three ways to monitor pressure in the skull (intracranial pressure). INTRAVENTRICULAR CATHETER The intraventricular catheter is the most accurate monitoring method. To insert an intraventricular catheter, a ...

  6. Skin (Pressure) Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Topic Skin dryness Next Topic Sleep problems Skin (pressure) sores A skin or pressure sore develops when the blood supply to an ... is bedridden or always in a wheelchair puts pressure on the same places much of the time. ...

  7. High Blood Pressure (Hypertension)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen High Blood Pressure (Hypertension) Nearly 1 in 3 American adults has ... weight. How Will I Know if I Have High Blood Pressure? High blood pressure is a silent problem — you ...

  8. High Blood Pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... normal blood pressure 140/90 or higher is high blood pressure Between 120 and 139 for the top number, ... prehypertension. Prehypertension means you may end up with high blood pressure, unless you take steps to prevent it. High ...

  9. Preventing Pressure Sores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experts \\ Preventing Pressure Sores Topics Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 Spinal Cord Injury 101 The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Preventing Pressure Sores Preventing Pressure Sores Transition from Hospital to Home ...

  10. The earth dynamic system: the earth rotation vs mantle convection

    OpenAIRE

    Shuping Chen

    2010-01-01

    The earth dynamic system is one of the key scientific questions on the earth science. The thermodynamic behavior and gravity force of the earth and the rheology nature of the mantle prove that mantle convection is the main power source leading the lithosphere to break and move. Yet the directivity of both the structures in the crust and plate movement reminds of the earth rotation. Here we demonstrate that the mantle convection and inertia force of the earth rotation affect each other, the fo...

  11. Balanced Budget Government Spending in a Small Open Regional Economy

    OpenAIRE

    McGregor, Peter; Lecca, Patrizio; Swales, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Scotland is engaged in a lively and on-going debate on greater fiscal autonomy and independence, which is politically controversial, especially in respect of tax-varying powers. The Scottish Parliament has the power to make a balanced-budget adjustment in public expenditure by varying the basic rate of income tax. While this power has not so far been used, there is considerable pressure further to increase the fiscal powers of the Scottish Government. The object of this paper is to explore an...

  12. Polar Misunderstandings: Earth's Dynamic Dynamo

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiSpezio, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses the movement of Earth's north and south poles. The Earth's poles may be a bit more complex and dynamic than what many students and teachers believe. With better understanding, offer them up as a rich landscape for higher-level critical analysis and subject integration. Possible curriculum tie-ins include magnets, Earth

  13. Uncontrolled hypertension and orthostatic hypotension in relation to standing balance in elderly hypertensive patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen SS

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Shanshan Shen,1 Ting He,1 Jiaojiao Chu,1 Jin He,2 Xujiao Chen1 1Department of Geriatrics, Zhejiang Hospital, Hangzhou, 2Department of Neurology, Fuyuan Hospital of Yiwu, Jinhua, People’s Republic of China Objective: To investigate the associations among uncontrolled hypertension, orthostatic hypotension (OH, and standing balance impairment in the elderly hypertensive patients referred to comprehensive geriatric assessment (CGA.Methods: In a cross-sectional study, a total of 176 elderly hypertensive patients who underwent CGA were divided into OH group (n=36 and non-OH group (n=140 according to blood pressure measurement in the supine position, after immediate standing up, and after 1 minute and 3 minutes of standing position. Uncontrolled hypertension was defined as blood pressure of ?140/90 mmHg if accompanied by diabetes mellitus (DM or chronic kidney disease (CKD, or ?150/90 mmHg if no DM and no CKD. Standing balance, including immediate standing balance and prolonged standing balance, was assessed in side-by-side and tandem stance.Results: Neither uncontrolled hypertension nor OH was associated with prolonged standing balance impairment in elderly hypertensive patients (P>0.05. Blood pressure decrease after postural change was significantly associated with immediate standing balance impairment in side-by-side and tandem stance (P<0.05. Patients with OH were at greater risk of immediate standing balance impairment in both side-by-side and tandem stance than those without OH (odds ratio [OR] 3.44, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.26–9.33, P<0.05; OR 3.14, 95% CI 1.14–8.64, P<0.01. Furthermore, uncontrolled hypertension was associated with immediate standing balance impairment in side-by-side stance (OR 2.96, 95% CI 1.31–6.68, P<0.05.Conclusion: Uncontrolled hypertension, OH, and blood pressure decrease after postural change were associated with immediate standing balance impairment, and therefore, a better understanding of the underlying associations might have major clinical value. Keywords: hypertension, orthostatic hypotension, balance, elderly

  14. Inference on the Nature and the Mass of Earth's Late Veneer from Noble Metals and Gases

    CERN Document Server

    Dauphas, N

    2001-01-01

    Noble metals and gases are very sensitive to the late accretion to the Earth of asteroids and comets. We present mass balance arguments based on these elements that indicate that 0.7E22-2.7E22 kg of extraterrestrial bodies struck the Earth after core formation and that comets comprised less than 1E-5 by mass of the impacting population. These results imply that the dynamics of asteroids and comets changed drastically with time and that biogenic elements and prebiotic molecules were not delivered to the Earth by comets but rather by carbonaceous asteroids.

  15. Ours planet-Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byalko, A. V.

    1983-10-01

    Physical principles and global phenomena on the Earth and Solar System planets has been examined. Their Unity and interrelations are determined first of all by the nature of ours star: Earth. One of the chapters of the book concerns the Structure of the Sun, Nuclear reactions into the Sun's interior, the stability of the Nuclear burning. Physical conditions of the planets depend on their dimensions,chemical composition and distance from the Sun. Thermal equilibrium of planetes determins the composition of the Planetary atmospheres and presence of oceans. The author is trying to answer to following questions: What is the origin of the wind and clouds, how the Ocean streams move the waters ,which causes determin the Climat.

  16. Life Before Earth

    CERN Document Server

    Sharov, Alexei A

    2013-01-01

    An extrapolation of the genetic complexity of organisms to earlier times suggests that life began before the Earth was formed. Life may have started from systems with single heritable elements that are functionally equivalent to a nucleotide. The genetic complexity, roughly measured by the number of non-redundant functional nucleotides, is expected to have grown exponentially due to several positive feedback factors: gene cooperation, duplication of genes with their subsequent specialization, and emergence of novel functional niches associated with existing genes. Linear regression of genetic complexity on a log scale extrapolated back to just one base pair suggests the time of the origin of life 9.7 billion years ago. This cosmic time scale for the evolution of life has important consequences: life took ca. 5 billion years to reach the complexity of bacteria; the environments in which life originated and evolved to the prokaryote stage may have been quite different from those envisaged on Earth; there was no...

  17. Rare earth thermoelectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahan, G.D.

    1997-09-01

    The author reviews the thermoelectric properties of metallic compounds which contain rare-earth atoms. They are the group of metals with the largest value ever reported of the Seebeck coefficient. An increase by 50% of the Seebeck would make these compounds useful for thermoelectric devices. The largest Seebeck coefficient is found for compounds of cerium (e.g., CePd{sub 3}) and ytterbium (e.g., YbAl{sub 3}). Theoretical predictions are in agreement with the maximum observed Seebeck. The author discusses the theoretical model which has been used to calculate the Seebeck coefficient. He is solving this model for other configurations (4f){sup n} of rare-earth ground states.

  18. The earth's chemical activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The earth by all means can be considered as a very active chemical factory, which was homogeneous during its initial phase and has differentiated with time into a core, a mantle and a crust. These all are haloed by the atmosphere. Dupre and Hamelin in 1988 formulized the development history of this planet using radioisotopes. At the very begining the homogeneous mantle was agitated by intensive convection currents. This has led, in the long term, to the differentiation of the core and the mantle through accumulation of the heavy elements in the lower parts (core) and floating the light elements in the upper ones (mantle). The continuation of the differentiation and degasing processes in the newly formed mantle led to the formation of the earth crust in a similar way of preparing an immense soup pot on a light fire over 4.5 billion years. 35 refs., 4 figs

  19. Detecting solar chameleons through radiation pressure

    CERN Document Server

    Baum, S; Hoffmann, D H H; Karuza, M; Semertzidis, Y K; Upadhye, A; Zioutas, K

    2014-01-01

    Light scalar fields can drive the accelerated expansion of the universe. Hence, they are obvious dark energy candidates. To make such models compatible with tests of General Relativity in the solar system and "fifth force" searches on Earth, one needs to screen them. One possibility is the so-called "chameleon" mechanism, which renders an effective mass depending on the local matter density. If chameleon particles exist, they can be produced in the sun and detected on earth exploiting the equivalent of a radiation pressure. Since their effective mass scales with the local matter density, chameleons can be reflected by a dense medium if their effective mass becomes greater than their total energy. Thus, under appropriate conditions, a flux of solar chameleons may be sensed by detecting the total instantaneous momentum transferred to a suitable opto-mechanical force/pressure sensor. We calculate the solar chameleon spectrum and the reach in the chameleon parameter space of an experiment using the preliminary re...

  20. Effects of imipramine of the orthostatic changes in blood pressure, heart rate and plasma catecholamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J R; Johansen, Torben; Arentoft, A; Gram, L F

    1983-01-01

    The effect of imipramine on the orthostatic changes in heart rate, blood pressure and plasma catecholamines were examined in six healthy male subjects on two occasions on high sodium balance (Na+ excretion greater than 120 mmol per day) and on low sodium balance (Na+ excretion less than 110 mmol per day), respectively. Orthostatic tests were carried out before and 2 h after ingestion of 150 mg imipramine hydrochloride. Imipramine caused a moderate increase in supine systolic blood pressure, and ...