WorldWideScience

Sample records for domestic waste water

  1. Domestic applications for aerospace waste and water management technologies

    Disanto, F.; Murray, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Some of the aerospace developments in solid waste disposal and water purification, which are applicable to specific domestic problems are explored. Also provided is an overview of the management techniques used in defining the need, in utilizing the available tools, and in synthesizing a solution. Specifically, several water recovery processes will be compared for domestic applicability. Examples are filtration, distillation, catalytic oxidation, reverse osmosis, and electrodialysis. Solid disposal methods will be discussed, including chemical treatment, drying, incineration, and wet oxidation. The latest developments in reducing household water requirements and some concepts for reusing water will be outlined.

  2. Phyto-treatment of domestic waste water using artificial marshes

    Vaca, Rodrigo; Sanchez, Fabian [Oleoducto de Crudos Pesados (OCP), Quito (Ecuador)

    2009-12-19

    The phyto-treatment of domestic waste water by the use of artificial marshes system consists in beds of treatment working in series, this beds are constituted basically by inverse filters of inert granular material where the nutrients are cached from the residual water. Most of the treatment is carried in roots steams and leaves of defined species of plants. The rest of the treatment is performed by anaerobic and aerobic bacteria that grow within the beds. In the proximities of the roots and the area near the bed surface, aerobic processes take place and in deepest zones, anaerobic processes take place. It is desirable that the aerobic process will be the predominant one, mainly to avoid bad odors; this is obtained with the correct selection of plants which must have dense and deep roots. The economic factor is also important for the selection of this type of treatment system, the cost of operation and maintenance is minimum compared with other type of systems. The operation cost is practically zero because it is not required provision of electrical energy for its operation; energy used is the solar energy through the photosynthesis process. The maintenance is reduced to pruning and cleaning that can be performed twice a year. The goals of this paper is to show our experiences during the construction, stabilization and operation of these systems installed in 13 OCP locations with different types of weather and explain the conclusions arrived after construction and operation; present this kind of systems as an alternative of economic wastewater treatment in terms of construction, operation and maintenance and as environment friendly treatment. (author)

  3. Water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications. Volume 1: Final report

    Murray, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    A comprehensive study of advanced water recovery and solid waste processing techniques employed in both aerospace and domestic or commercial applications is reported. A systems approach was used to synthesize a prototype system design of an advanced water treatment/waste processing system. Household water use characteristics were studied and modified through the use of low water use devices and a limited amount of water reuse. This modified household system was then used as a baseline system for development of several water treatment waste processing systems employing advanced techniques. A hybrid of these systems was next developed and a preliminary design was generated to define system and hardware functions.

  4. Heating of domestic water by waste heat recovery from household refrigerating equipment

    Reil, J.; Kaster, B.; Wegner, M.

    1982-09-01

    Heat from a 370 l deep freeze was used to heat water in a 250 l boiler. Both units were made from mass produced components. Tests show that the functions of cooling and deep freezing units can be effectively combined with one warm water boiler. The necessary expenditure for the appliance is, however, only economical with deep freezing units because with normal domestic refrigerators the amount of waste heat is too small. The economy of the unit could be considerably increased by the development of a mass produced motor compressor with a sufficiently large oil cooler to accomplish an optimum thermal insulation of the motor compressor surface area.

  5. Domestic Waste: Sources, Effects, and Management

    Waste is any discarded material. Domestic wastes are those produced by individual activities. In common with other living organisms, humans discharge waste substances to the environment that in turn re-energize the endless cycle of nature. Human activities are closely associated with ambient environment (soil , water, or air) through accumulation of domestic waste. Such household hazardous waste deposit arise from the discharge of domestic activities in the form of municipal solid waste (household, commercial and public street wastes), night soil (human and animal body wastes, excreta, or excrement). In rural areas, night soil is one of several components of the refuse that pollute the land. The surface water may be also directly polluted by domestic wastes or agricultural wastes. But in urbanized areas, household wastes, bathroom and laundry are conveniently flushed away by water as domestic wastewater through sewerage system, and disposed onto land or into receiving water, or in some countries it is treated and re-discharged for domestic usage. Solid waste in the form of kitchen garbage and other household refuse is collected for landfill disposal or for re-industrialization. Many domestic waste influence indoor air quality in urban and rural areas as for example the fuel used for cooking, smoke from cooking and from smoking habits, modern building materials, insulation, fabrics and furniture, cleaning materials, solvents, pesticides, personal care products, organic material or vegetable origin and dander from domestic life

  6. Processing of combined domestic bath and laundry waste waters for reuse as commode flushing water

    Hypes, W. D.; Batten, C. E.; Wilkins, J. R.

    1975-01-01

    An experimental investigation of processes and system configurations for reclaiming combined bath and laundry waste waters for reuse as commode flush water was conducted. A 90-min recycle flow was effective in removing particulates and in improving other physical characteristics to the extent that the filtered water was subjectively acceptable for reuse. The addition of a charcoal filter resulted in noticeable improvements in color, turbidity, and suds elimination. Heating and chlorination of the waste waters were investigated for reducing total organism counts and eliminating coliform organisms. A temperature of 335.9 K (145 F) for 30 min and chlorine concentrations of 20 mg/l in the collection tank followed by 10 mg/l in the storage tank were determined to be adequate for this purpose. Water volume relationships and energy-use rates for the waste water reuse systems are also discussed.

  7. Energy from domestic wast water and kitchen wast with Eureka-HD, An Energy Balance

    Grond, Lukas

    2010-01-01

    Treatment of wastewater is commonly done centralized, bringing high costs for collecting a big flow of low concentrated wastewater. A mixed input of black water, grey water, rainwater and groundwater has a low concentration of contamination making recover

  8. Anaerobe-Aerobe Submerged Biofilter Technology for Domestic Waste Water Treatment

    Water pollution in the big cities in Indonesia, especially in DKI Jakarta has shown serious problems. One of the potential sources of water pollution is domestic wastewater that is wastewater from kitchens, laundry, bathing and toilets. These problems have become more serious since the spreads of sewerage systems are still low, so that domestic, institutional and commercial wastewater cause severe water pollution in many rivers or shallow ground water. Bases on the fact that the progress of development of sewerage system is still low, it is important to develop low cost technology for individual house hold or semi communal wastewater treatment such as using anaerobic and aerobic submerged biofilter. This paper describes alternative technology for treatment of household wastewater or organic wastewater using anaerobic and aerobic submerged biofilter. Using this technology can decrease BOD, COD and Suspended Solids (SS) concentration more than 90 %. (author)

  9. Water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications. Volume 2: Appendices

    Murray, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    Water and sewage treatment systems are presented with concentration on the filtration of water. Equipment is described for organic removal, solids removal, nutrient removal, inorganic removal, and disinfection of the water. Such things as aseline hardware, additional piping connections, waste disposal, and costs involved are also reported.

  10. Anaerobic treatment as a core technology for energy, nutrients and water recovery from source-separated domestic waste(water).

    Zeeman, Grietje; Kujawa, Katarzyna; de Mes, Titia; Hernandez, Lucia; de Graaff, Marthe; Abu-Ghunmi, Lina; Mels, Adriaan; Meulman, Brendo; Temmink, Hardy; Buisman, Cees; van Lier, Jules; Lettinga, Gatze

    2008-01-01

    Based on results of pilot scale research with source-separated black water (BW) and grey water (GW), a new sanitation concept is proposed. BW and GW are both treated in a UASB (-septic tank) for recovery of CH4 gas. Kitchen waste is added to the anaerobic BW treatment for doubling the biogas production. Post-treatment of the effluent is providing recovery of phosphorus and removal of remaining COD and nitrogen. The total energy saving of the new sanitation concept amounts to 200 MJ/year in comparison with conventional sanitation, moreover 0.14 kg P/p/year and 90 litres of potential reusable water are produced. PMID:18469391

  11. The application of membrane Bio-Reactor for East Java Domestic waste water treatment

    Aisyah E. Palupi; Ali Altway; Arief Widjaja

    2008-01-01

    Membrane bioreactors for wastewater treatment research have been carried out. In this system, membrane replaces the function of the sedimentation tank. Until recent time, fouling was still the main problem for membrane processes. This research has investigated the effect of MLSS concentration and back flushing on external membrane bioreactor performances such as COD and BOD reduction, and the back flushing effect for domestic wastewater treatment. Polyacrylonitril hollow fiber membrane with p...

  12. The application of membrane Bio-Reactor for East Java Domestic waste water treatment

    Aisyah E. Palupi

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Membrane bioreactors for wastewater treatment research have been carried out. In this system, membrane replaces the function of the sedimentation tank. Until recent time, fouling was still the main problem for membrane processes. This research has investigated the effect of MLSS concentration and back flushing on external membrane bioreactor performances such as COD and BOD reduction, and the back flushing effect for domestic wastewater treatment. Polyacrylonitril hollow fiber membrane with pore diameter 0.1-0.01 m, surface area 0.075 m2 was used in this research. This process was at HRT 5 hour, no sludge disposal, intermittent operation, and permeate exiting from membrane shell side. Optimum condition was obtained at a transmembrane pressure (TMP of 1.45 bar. Back flushing was conducted for 10 minute at 3.0 bar pressure. Effective back flushing was shown after operation at MLSS of 7500 and 10000 mg/l. The result of this research shows that COD and BOD in the domestic wastewater decreased almost 98%. MLSS and MLVSS degradations were 98.6% and 98%, respectively.

  13. Domestic water conservation potential in Saudi Arabia

    Abdulrazzak, Mohammed J.; Khan, Muhammad Z. A.

    1990-03-01

    Domestic water conservation in arid climates can result in efficient utilization of existing water supplies. The impacts of conservation measures such as the installation of water-saving devices, water metering and pricing schemes, water rationing and public awareness programs, strict plumbing codes, penalties for wasting water, programs designed to reduce leakage from public water lines and within the home, water-efficient landscaping, economic and ethical incentives are addressed in detail. Cost savings in arid climates, with particular reference to Saudi Arabia, in relation to some conservation techniques, are presented. Water conservation technology and tentative demonstration and implementation of water conservation programs are discussed.

  14. Pharmaceuticals in domestic and agricultural waste waters - problem and its solution

    Maršík, Petr; Soudek, Petr; Hudcová, T.; Syrovátka, J.; Vaněk, Tomáš

    Shanghai: Tongji University, 2014, s. 523-530. [International Conference on Wetland Systems for Water Pollution Control (ICWS2014). Shanghai (CN), 12.10.2014-16.10.2014] R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01020573; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22593S Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : Constructed wetland * pharmaceutical * Phragmites Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality

  15. Aspects of contamination produced by domestic waste landfills on receiving waters in Madrid province

    Pastor Piñeiro, Jesús; Urcelay, A.; Adarve, M. J.; Hernández, Ana Jesús; Sánchez, A.

    1993-01-01

    This study describes some aspects of the anion content in surface waters and ground waters as well as ín the soils affected by three landfills in the Province of Madrid. The anions concerned are chlorides, fluorides, sulfates, phosphates and nitrates. The pH and conductivity were also determíned. These parameters may constitute abiotic índicators to observe the alterations produced in the water and soil by the leachates from the landfills. The results show that the concentrations ...

  16. Pharmaceuticals in domestic and agricultural waste waters – problem and its solution

    Maršík, Petr; Soudek, Petr; Hudcová, T.; Syrovátka, J.; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 3 (2015), s. 564-572. ISSN 1751-231X R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA14-22593S; GA TA ČR TA01020573 Grant ostatní: European Regional Development Fund(XE) CZ.2.16/ 3.1.00/24014 Institutional support: RVO:61389030 Keywords : constructed wetland * pharmaceutical * Phragmites Subject RIV: DJ - Water Pollution ; Quality

  17. Resource recovery from source separated domestic waste(water) streams; full scale results.

    Zeeman, Grietje; Kujawa-Roeleveld, Katarzyna

    2011-01-01

    A major fraction of nutrients emitted from households are originally present in only 1% of total wastewater volume. New sanitation concepts enable the recovery and reuse of these nutrients from feces and urine. Two possible sanitation concepts are presented, with varying degree of source separation leading to various recovery products. Separate vacuum collection and transport followed by anaerobic treatment of concentrated black water (BW) demonstrated on a scale of 32 houses preserve 7.6 g/N/p/d and 0.63 gP/p/d amounting to respectively 69 and 48% of the theoretically produced N and P in the household, and 95% of the retained P was shown to be recoverable via struvite precipitation. Reuse of the anaerobic sludge in agriculture can substantially increase the P recovery. Energy recovery in the form of biogas from anaerobic digestion of concentrated BW, fits well in new concepts of sustainable, zero energy buildings. Nutrient recovery from separately collected urine lowers the percentage of nutrient recovery in comparison with BW but can, on the other hand, often be implemented in existing sanitation concepts. Theoretically 11gN/p/d and 1.0 g P/p/d are produced with urine, of which 38-63 and 34-61% were recovered in practice on a scale of 8-160 inhabitants in Sweden. New sanitation concepts with resource recovery and reuse are being demonstrated worldwide and more and more experience is being gained. PMID:22105119

  18. Study of water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications. Volume 2: Final report

    Guarneri, C. A.; Reed, A.; Renman, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    The manner in which current and advanced technology can be applied to develop practical solutions to existing and emerging water supply and waste disposal problems is evaluated. An overview of water resource factors as they affect new community planning, and requirements imposed on residential waste treatment systems are presented. The results of equipment surveys contain information describing: commercially available devices and appliances designed to conserve water; devices and techniques for monitoring water quality and controlling back contamination; and advanced water and waste processing equipment. System concepts are developed and compared on the basis of current and projected costs. Economic evaluations are based on community populations of from 2,000 to 250,000. The most promising system concept is defined in sufficient depth to initiate detailed design.

  19. Study of water recovery and solid waste processing for aerospace and domestic applications. Volume 1: Final report summary

    Guarneri, C. A.; Reed, A.; Renman, R. E.

    1972-01-01

    This study of water reclamation and waste disposal is directed toward a more efficient utilization of natural resources. From an ecological standpoint improved methods of land use, water processing equipment, and ideal population profiles are investigated. Methods are described whereby significant reduction in water usage can be achieved by the adoption of presently available and practically applied technological concepts. Allowances are made for social, natural, and economic contingencies which are likely to occur up to the year 2000.

  20. Experience on domestic waste segregation in Ghana

    Osei Bonsu Patterson

    2013-01-01

    Pollution from domestic wastes is a major environmental challenge in Ghana and many developing countries. Most of these countries depend almost entirely on landfills for waste management, which has proved to be expensive, inefficient and unsustainable. A sustainable solution to this problem is productive use of waste such as recycling. The main challenge that may limit recycling in Ghana and some of these countries is that a chunk of the wastes are littered on the environment, and the rest is...

  1. Experience on domestic waste segregation in Ghana

    Osei Bonsu Patterson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Pollution from domestic wastes is a major environmental challenge in Ghana and many developing countries. Most of these countries depend almost entirely on landfills for waste management, which has proved to be expensive, inefficient and unsustainable. A sustainable solution to this problem is productive use of waste such as recycling. The main challenge that may limit recycling in Ghana and some of these countries is that a chunk of the wastes are littered on the environment, and the rest is collected in bulk in the same waste bin, thereby mixing them. The cost of collecting littered wastes, or separating mixed wastes could be prohibitive, making recycling uneconomical. In order to productively utilize wastes, adequate and separate waste bins must be provided for collecting the different components of wastes. However, budgetary constraints may not allow many countries to purchase expansive waste bins for the different components of wastes. Consequently, a simple waste bin, comprising a metal frame on which polypropylene sack (pp-sack can be hanged to collect inorganic wastes has been developed by the author. The waste bin (new bin can be manufactured industrially using plastic or fabricated by local artisans at an affordable price. This document describes the new bin. Experience in collecting organic and inorganic wastes generated in a house in separate waste bins (waste segregation for the past 16 years is also highlighted.

  2. Characterization of an Am-Be PGNAA set-up developed for in situ liquid analysis: Application to domestic waste water and industrial liquid effluents analysis

    Idiri, Z., E-mail: zmidiri@yahoo.f [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 02 Bd Frantz Fanon, B.P399, Alger-Gare (Algeria); Mazrou, H. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 02 Bd Frantz Fanon, B.P399, Alger-Gare (Algeria); Amokrane, A. [Universite des Sciences et de la Technologie Houari Boumediene, Alger (Algeria); Bedek, S. [Centre de Recherche Nucleaire d' Alger, 02 Bd Frantz Fanon, B.P399, Alger-Gare (Algeria)

    2010-01-15

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) set-up with an Am-Be source developed for in situ analysis of liquid samples is described. The linearity of its response was tested for chlorine and cadmium dissolved in water. Prompt gamma efficiency of the system has been determined experimentally using prompt gamma of chlorine dissolved in water and detection limits for different elements have been derived for domestic waste water. A methodology to analyze any kind of liquid is then proposed. This methodology consists mainly on using standards with water as bulk or in the case of absolute method, to use gamma efficiency determined with prompt gammas emitted by chlorine dissolved in water. To take into account the thermal neutron flux variations inside the samples, flux monitoring was carried out using a He-3 neutron detector placed at the external sample container surface. Finally, to correct for the differences in gamma attenuation, average gamma attenuations factors were calculated using MCNP5 code. This method was then checked successfully by determining cadmium in industrial phosphoric acid and our result was in good agreement with that obtained with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) method.

  3. Characterization of an Am-Be PGNAA set-up developed for in situ liquid analysis: Application to domestic waste water and industrial liquid effluents analysis

    Idiri, Z.; Mazrou, H.; Amokrane, A.; Bedek, S.

    2010-01-01

    A prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (PGNAA) set-up with an Am-Be source developed for in situ analysis of liquid samples is described. The linearity of its response was tested for chlorine and cadmium dissolved in water. Prompt gamma efficiency of the system has been determined experimentally using prompt gamma of chlorine dissolved in water and detection limits for different elements have been derived for domestic waste water. A methodology to analyze any kind of liquid is then proposed. This methodology consists mainly on using standards with water as bulk or in the case of absolute method, to use gamma efficiency determined with prompt gammas emitted by chlorine dissolved in water. To take into account the thermal neutron flux variations inside the samples, flux monitoring was carried out using a He-3 neutron detector placed at the external sample container surface. Finally, to correct for the differences in gamma attenuation, average gamma attenuations factors were calculated using MCNP5 code. This method was then checked successfully by determining cadmium in industrial phosphoric acid and our result was in good agreement with that obtained with inductively coupled plasma (ICP) method.

  4. Quantifying Urban Water Subsidies with Hydrological Tracers of Domestic Water

    Bain, D. J.; Sikora, M. T.; Wozniak, E.; Fisher, K. R.; Carr, J.; Elliott, E. M.

    2011-12-01

    Connections between urban hydrological systems and human water infrastructure are well established. Interactions between these systems occur at a wide range of scales, from large inter-basin transfers to individual leaking pipes. However, much of the interest in these connections arises from practical considerations, for example, substantially altered in-stream flow or the presence/absence of sewage in surface water systems. Less recognized is that in smaller urban catchments, daily water flux through human water distribution systems is often much larger than low flow surface water flux from the catchment. As infrastructure ages and cross-connections grow, transfers from the substantial human fluxes to the catchment will increasingly subsidize urban water budgets. Tools for quantifying the contribution of this subsidy to urban hydrological systems can clarify both practical questions for urban managers and our understanding of flow generation in catchments. Stream water chemistry from a multi-year sampling campaign in Nine Mile Run (Pittsburgh, PA) is used to examine potential hydrological tracers of human domestic water. In particular, we examine the use of fluoride added in precise quantities as a dental health supplement as a tracer of human domestic water (e.g., drinking and waste water). While fluoride is not necessarily a conservative tracer, equilibrium reactions governing fluoride solubility generally require substantially higher cationic concentrations than those observed in surface water chemistry. Further, during periods where human subsidies dominate (e.g., water line breaks or hydrant flushes discharging to the stream) fluoride concentrations generally approach the concentration added to domestic water. We use multiple modeling approaches to demonstrate the appropriateness of fluoride as a tracer, infer contributions of human domestic water to the hydrologic budget, and explore fluoride dynamics in the Nine Mile Run basin. A fluoride tracer is

  5. Occurrence and removal of butyltin compounds in a waste stabilisation pond of a domestic waste water treatment plant of a rural French town

    Sabah, A.; Bancon-Montigny, C.; Rodier, C.; MARCHAND, Pierre; Delpoux, S.; Ijjaali, M.; Tournou, M. G.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fate and behaviour of butyltin pollutants, including monobutyltin (MBT), dibutylin (DBT), and tributyltin (TBT), in waste stabilisation ponds (WSP). The study was conducted as part of a baseline survey and included five sampling campaigns comprising bottom sludge and the water column from each pond from a typical WSP in France. Butyltins were detected in all raw wastewater and effluents, reflecting their widespread use. Our results revealed high af...

  6. Drinking Water Temperature Modelling in Domestic Systems

    Moerman, A.; Blokker, M.; Vreeburg, J.; Van der Hoek, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Domestic water supply systems are the final stage of the transport process to deliver potable water to the customers’ tap. Under the influence of temperature, residence time and pipe materials the drinking water quality can change while the water passes the domestic drinking water system. According

  7. Drinking Water Temperature Modelling in Domestic Systems

    Moerman, A; Blokker, M.; Vreeburg, J.; J. P. van der Hoek

    2014-01-01

    Domestic water supply systems are the final stage of the transport process to deliver potable water to the customers’ tap. Under the influence of temperature, residence time and pipe materials the drinking water quality can change while the water passes the domestic drinking water system. According to the Dutch Drinking Water Act the drinking water temperature may not exceed the 25 °C threshold at point-of-use level. This paper provides a mathematical approach to model the heating of drinking...

  8. Occurrence and removal of butyltin compounds in a waste stabilisation pond of a domestic waste water treatment plant of a rural French town.

    Sabah, A; Bancon-Montigny, C; Rodier, C; Marchand, P; Delpoux, S; Ijjaali, M; Tournoud, M-G

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the fate and behaviour of butyltin pollutants, including monobutyltin (MBT), dibutylin (DBT), and tributyltin (TBT), in waste stabilisation ponds (WSP). The study was conducted as part of a baseline survey and included five sampling campaigns comprising bottom sludge and the water column from each pond from a typical WSP in France. Butyltins were detected in all raw wastewater and effluents, reflecting their widespread use. Our results revealed high affinity between butyltins and particulate matter and high accumulation of butyltins in the sludge taken from anaerobic ponds. The dissolved butyltins in the influent ranged from 21.5 to 28.1 ng(Sn).L(-1) and in the effluent, from 8.8 to 29.3 ng(Sn).L(-1). The butyltin concentrations in the sludge ranged from 45.1 to 164 and 3.6-8.1 ng(Sn).g(-1) respectively in the first and last ponds. Our results showed an average treatment efficiency of 71% for MBT, 47% for DBT, 55% for TBT. Laboratory sorption experiments enabled the calculation of a distribution coefficient (Kd = 75,000 L.kg-1) between TBT and particulate matter from the WSPs. The Kd explained the accumulation and persistence of the TBT in the sludge after settling of particulate matter. The continuous supply of contaminated raw wastewater and the sorption-desorption processes in the ponds led to incomplete bio- and photolytic degradation and to the persistence of butyltins in dissolved and particulate matrices throughout the survey period. It is thus recommended to use shallow ponds and to pay particular attention when sludge is used for soil amendment. PMID:26624956

  9. DOMESTIC SOLID WASTE MANAGEMENT IN DHARAMSALA, NORTHERN INDIA

    KHOLIAVKO T.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper the current situation of domestic solid waste management in Dharamsala, Northern India is presented. In particular, collection system and disposal method and its effects to local and global environment are described.

  10. Application of SBR technology for domestic waste water treatment; Aplicacion de la tecnologia SBR para el tratamiento de aguas residuales domesticas

    Mace, S.; Mata-Alvarez, J.

    2001-07-01

    The objective of the present study is to give an overall vision of SBR (Sequencing Batch Reactors) technology as an alternative way for treating domestic and municipal wastewaters. This technology has been gaining popularity through years, mainly due to its single-tank design and the ease of its automation. There are a lot of cases in literature dealing with the treatment of this kind of effluents with this technology, whether a lab-scale, pilot scale or industrial scale. Thus, this paper includes relevant experiments found in literature concerning domestic wastewater treatment. There is also a special attention given to an application that has been studied recently: the use of this technology in wastewater treatment plants, concretely for the treatment of the reject water found after anaerobic digesters, which contains high concentrations of ammoniacal nitrogen. (Author)

  11. Water-Using Equipment: Domestic

    Solana, Amy E.; Mcmordie, Katherine

    2006-01-24

    Water management is an important aspect of energy engineering. This article addresses water-using equipment primarily used for household purposes, including faucets, showers, toilets, urinals, dishwashers, and clothes washers, and focuses on how the equipment can be optimized to save both water and energy. Technology retrofits and operation and maintenance changes are the primary methods discussed for water and energy conservation. Auditing to determine current consumption rates is also described for each technology.

  12. Tertiary Treated Waste water as a Promising Alternative for Potable Water for Non-Contact Domestic Use. CaseStudy:RiqqaWastewaterTreatmentPlant

    Munther I. Almatouq,; AbdullaM.Taha

    2015-01-01

    WatersecurityisavitalissueinaridcountrieslikeKuwait,wheredesalinatedwateristhe solesupplyoffresh water.Thispaper isacontributiontotheongoingefforts towardsrationalizationin potablewater consumption.In addition,itdiscusses therole of high-quality effluent water, from wastewater treatment plants in Kuwait, as a potential replacementfor potable water for non-contact domesticapplications as a oneway in savingin thisvaluablecommodity.

  13. Tertiary Treated Waste water as a Promising Alternative for Potable Water for Non-Contact Domestic Use. CaseStudy:RiqqaWastewaterTreatmentPlant

    Munther I. Almatouq,

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available WatersecurityisavitalissueinaridcountrieslikeKuwait,wheredesalinatedwateristhe solesupplyoffresh water.Thispaper isacontributiontotheongoingefforts towardsrationalizationin potablewater consumption.In addition,itdiscusses therole of high-quality effluent water, from wastewater treatment plants in Kuwait, as a potential replacementfor potable water for non-contact domesticapplications as a oneway in savingin thisvaluablecommodity.

  14. Methanization of domestic and industrial wastes

    After having recalled that methanization helps meeting objectives of the Grenelle de l'Environnement regarding waste valorisation and production of renewable heat and electricity, this publication presents the methanization process which produces a humid product (digestate) and biogas by using various wastes (from agriculture, food industry, cities, households, sludge and so on). The numbers of existing and planned methanization units are evoked. The publication discusses the main benefits (production of renewable energy, efficient waste processing, and compact installations), drawbacks (costs, necessary specific abilities, impossibility to treat all organic materials) and associated recommendations. Actions undertaken by the ADEME are evoked. In conclusion, the publication outlines some priorities related to the development of this sector, its benefits, and the main strategic recommendations

  15. Upper airway inflammation and respiratory symptoms in domestic waste collectors

    Wouters, I; Hilhorst, S; Kleppe, P; Doekes, G; Douwes, J; Peretz, C; Heederik, D.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: To compare respiratory symptoms and upper airway inflammation in domestic waste collectors and controls, and to find the association between measures of upper airway inflammation on the one hand and exposure concentrations of organic dust or respiratory symptoms on the other hand.

  16. The aerosol radiative effects of uncontrolled combustion of domestic waste

    Kodros, John K.; Cucinotta, Rachel; Ridley, David A.; Wiedinmyer, Christine; Pierce, Jeffrey R.

    2016-06-01

    Open, uncontrolled combustion of domestic waste is a potentially significant source of aerosol; however, this aerosol source is not generally included in many global emissions inventories. To provide a first estimate of the aerosol radiative impacts from domestic-waste combustion, we incorporate the Wiedinmyer et al. (2014) emissions inventory into GEOS-Chem-TOMAS, a global chemical-transport model with online aerosol microphysics. We find domestic-waste combustion increases global-mean black carbon and organic aerosol concentrations by 8 and 6 %, respectively, and by greater than 40 % in some regions. Due to uncertainties regarding aerosol optical properties, we estimate the globally averaged aerosol direct radiative effect to range from -5 to -20 mW m-2; however, this range increases from -40 to +4 mW m-2 when we consider uncertainties in emission mass and size distribution. In some regions with significant waste combustion, such as India and China, the aerosol direct radiative effect may exceed -0.4 W m-2. Similarly, we estimate a cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect of -13 mW m-2, with a range of -4 to -49 mW m-2 due to emission uncertainties. In the regions with significant waste combustion, the cloud-albedo aerosol indirect effect may exceed -0.4 W m-2.

  17. Exothermic hydrogen production system in supercritical water from biomass and usual domestic wastes with an exploitation of RuO2 catalyst

    This paper deals with a method of producing hydrogen from biomass and sewage disposals in supercritical water by use of ruthenium dioxides as a catalyst. Experiments were carried out under argon atmosphere with a batch reactor made of INCONEL625. Reaction temperatures and pressures were changed in the ranges of 400-500degC and 30-50 MPa, respectively. The gas produced was quantitatively analyzed by online gas chromatography. In conclusion, considerably high ratios of hydrogen up to 38.5% were produced from the sewage disposals. This value was even higher than the hydrogen production ratios from other biomass: 15.0% from cellulose, 14.1% from pulp, 16.0% from waste paper, and 27.0% from paper sludge. The heat balance was calculated in the present reaction system using ruthenium oxide as the catalyst in supercritical water for the reaction of naphthalene and cellulose. The result showed that the total reaction was exothermic. This is rather surprising, because most of the hydrogen forming reactions are endothermic. The present result should be due to the excess heat derived by the partial formation of carbon dioxide. (author)

  18. Concrete Production Using Technogenical, Constructional and Domestic Waste

    Marija Vaičienė

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The article describes investigations carried out by the scientists from various countries in order to improve the physical and mechanical properties of concrete. The grained rubber of tyres, modified sawdust, crushed ceramic bricks, plastic waste and remains of glass are utilised to produce concrete mixtures. The results of research conducted by the scientists show that in the process of producing concrete we can use different types of waste to change natural aggregates and to get concrete with specific properties. Currently, waste handling and utilization are burning ecological problems. Therefore, intensive investigations are carried out in order to utilise technogenical, constructional and domestic waste for concrete mixtures. Article in Lithuanian

  19. Accounting for Water Insecurity in Modeling Domestic Water Demand

    Galaitsis, S. E.; Huber-lee, A. T.; Vogel, R. M.; Naumova, E.

    2013-12-01

    Water demand management uses price elasticity estimates to predict consumer demand in relation to water pricing changes, but studies have shown that many additional factors effect water consumption. Development scholars document the need for water security, however, much of the water security literature focuses on broad policies which can influence water demand. Previous domestic water demand studies have not considered how water security can affect a population's consumption behavior. This study is the first to model the influence of water insecurity on water demand. A subjective indicator scale measuring water insecurity among consumers in the Palestinian West Bank is developed and included as a variable to explore how perceptions of control, or lack thereof, impact consumption behavior and resulting estimates of price elasticity. A multivariate regression model demonstrates the significance of a water insecurity variable for data sets encompassing disparate water access. When accounting for insecurity, the R-squaed value improves and the marginal price a household is willing to pay becomes a significant predictor for the household quantity consumption. The model denotes that, with all other variables held equal, a household will buy more water when the users are more water insecure. Though the reasons behind this trend require further study, the findings suggest broad policy implications by demonstrating that water distribution practices in scarcity conditions can promote consumer welfare and efficient water use.

  20. Study on Rural Domestic Waste Treatment in Loess Plateau Region——Taking Longfang Town in Shaanxi Province as Example

    2011-01-01

    With the continuous development of economy and changes in people's lifestyle,rural domestic waste brought about serious harm to water,air,human health,ecological landscape and so forth.In this paper,taking Longfang Town in Loess Plateau region as example,the source,amount and harms of rural domestic waste were analyzed firstly,as well as the current situation and existing problems of treatment,and then a suitable waste disposal technology for the town was chosen,finally the reasonable treatment methods comb...

  1. Tritium distribution in leachates from domestic solid waste landfills

    It is for the purpose of investigating the tritium distribution in the leachates, the raw and treated leachates and the condensates of the methane gas, which have occurred from domestic solid waste landfills. Also it aims to measure the tritium distribution level on the colloid size of the leachates, the raw and treated leachates. It was found that the major inorganic contaminants of the leachates were Na, K, Ca, Mg, NH4+-N and Cl-. The mean tritium level of the raw leachates of the investigated 13 landfill sites for 6 months was 17∼1196 TU. It corresponded to a several scores or hundreds of magnitude higher value than that of the normal environmental sample level except for two landfill sites. Also such a high concentration of the tritium was found in the treated leachates and methane gas condensates as well. Nevertheless it is important to emphasize that the tritium level which was found in this research is about 100 times lower than the tritium limit for the drinking water quality. And most of the tritium existed in the dissolved colloid of the leachate of which the colloid size is below 0.45 μm. Also, according to the tritium analysis results of the leachates after filtration with 0.45μm membrane filter for some landfills, it is likely that some tritium of the leachate would be distributed in a colloid size over 0.45μm. In general the relationship between the tritium and other contaminants in the raw leachate was low, but it was relatively high between the tritium and TOC. However, the tritium content in the leachate had no meaningful relationship with the scale, hydrological characteristics and age of the landfill

  2. A Benchmarking System for Domestic Water Use

    Dexter V. L. Hunt

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The national demand for water in the UK is predicted to increase, exacerbated by a growing UK population, and home-grown demands for energy and food. When set against the context of overstretched existing supply sources vulnerable to droughts, particularly in increasingly dense city centres, the delicate balance of matching minimal demands with resource secure supplies becomes critical. When making changes to "internal" demands the role of technological efficiency and user behaviour cannot be ignored, yet existing benchmarking systems traditionally do not consider the latter. This paper investigates the practicalities of adopting a domestic benchmarking system (using a band rating that allows individual users to assess their current water use performance against what is possible. The benchmarking system allows users to achieve higher benchmarks through any approach that reduces water consumption. The sensitivity of water use benchmarks are investigated by making changes to user behaviour and technology. The impact of adopting localised supplies (i.e., Rainwater harvesting—RWH and Grey water—GW and including "external" gardening demands are investigated. This includes the impacts (in isolation and combination of the following: occupancy rates (1 to 4; roof size (12.5 m2 to 100 m2; garden size (25 m2 to 100 m2 and geographical location (North West, Midlands and South East, UK with yearly temporal effects (i.e., rainfall and temperature. Lessons learnt from analysis of the proposed benchmarking system are made throughout this paper, in particular its compatibility with the existing Code for Sustainable Homes (CSH accreditation system. Conclusions are subsequently drawn for the robustness of the proposed system.

  3. Heat Losses Evaluation for Domestic Hot Water Distribution Systems

    Theodor Mateescu

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In sanitary systems assembly, domestic hot water distribution supply networks represent an important weight for energetically balance.par This paper presents, in an analytical and graphical manner, the computational tools needed for domestic hot water piping system behavior characterization in different functional and structural assumptions.

  4. Long-term behavior of domestic waste slags

    Vitrification is one of the envisaged solutions to face French legal requirements related to the solidification/stabilisation of some wastes. It results in glassy or crystallized aluminosilicate and calcium-rich materials which trap heavy metals notably contained by the ashes of purification residues from incineration smokes of domestic wastes. This research thesis addresses the study of the long term behaviour of such materials in order to check that toxic compounds they contain will not be released in the environment so that these materials can become common and even valorised. Four vitrified products have been studied. It appeared that their alteration mechanisms in aqueous phase are close to that of already known natural and artificial silicate materials. Alteration rates depend on material composition and structure on the one hand, and on solution temperature, pH, composition and renewal rate on the other hand. The influence of surrounding materials is also taken into account within the frame of a scenario of use in road construction. Modelling studies are also performed and it appears that the containment of toxic elements contained in vitrified products obtained from domestic waste is sustainable

  5. Water: Too Precious to Waste.

    National Geographic World, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Provides background information on many topics related to water. These include the water cycle, groundwater, fresh water, chemical wastes, water purification, river pollution, acid rain, and water conservation. Information is presented at an elementary level. (JM)

  6. Reduction of the waste from domestic production of the orange

    The research subject is (reduction of the waste from domestic production of orange) we find there is a lot of wastage after harvest, because the process of packaging, loading, transportation, and store is not adequate. The purpose of this research is to solve this problem of wastage by following a number of steps after harvesting and pre-harvest process. This process is called COLD CHAIN. Cold chain is: cold store in production place, cold vehicles for transportation, cold room in the market, cold car for distribution, cold and freezer refrigerator home. After adopting the cold chain we achieved the following results: orange wastage is reduced, the orange quality improved. (Author)

  7. Air conditioning on turbo-generator input using waste heat of pyrolysis technology of solid domestic waste utilization

    Ryzhkov, Serhiy S.; Markina, Liudmyla M.; Serbin, Serhii I.; Radchenko, Mykola I.

    2014-01-01

    The efficiency is studied of using waste heat of condensation of utilization technology of solid domestic waste by means of pyrolysis for air conditioning (cooling with drying) on the input of the turbo-generator which works at pyrolysis gas.

  8. Toxicity Assessment of Contaminated Soils of Solid Domestic Waste Landfill

    The paper delivers the analysis of an 18-year dynamic pattern of land pollutants concentration in the soils of a solid domestic waste landfill. It also presents the composition of the contaminated soils from different areas of the waste landfill during its operating period. The authors calculate the concentrations of the following pollutants: chrome, nickel, tin, vanadium, lead, cuprum, zinc, cobalt, beryllium, barium, yttrium, cadmium, arsenic, germanium, nitrate ions and petrochemicals and determine a consistent pattern of their spatial distribution within the waste landfill area as well as the dynamic pattern of their concentration. Test-objects are used in experiments to make an integral assessment of the polluted soil's impact on living organisms. It was discovered that the soil samples of an animal burial site are characterized by acute toxicity while the area of open waste dumping is the most dangerous in terms of a number of pollutants. This contradiction can be attributed to the synergetic effect of the polluted soil, which accounts for the regularities described by other researchers

  9. 30 CFR 250.248 - What solid and liquid wastes and discharges information and cooling water intake information must...

    2010-07-01

    ..., sanitary and domestic wastes, produced waters, and chemical product wastes) likely to be generated by your..., and rate of discharge for each waste type; and (2) A description of the discharge method (such...

  10. Socioeconomic differentials and availability of domestic water in South Africa

    Dungumaro, Esther W.

    The past few decades has seen massive efforts to increasing provision of domestic water. However, water is still unavailable to many people most of them located in sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia and East Asia. Furthermore, availability of water varies greatly both spatially and temporary. While other people pay so dearly for domestic water others have an easy access to adequate clean water and sanitation. Accessibility and affordability of domestic water and sanitation is determined by a great variety of factors including socioeconomic status of households. The main objective of the paper is to inform on factors which need to be taken into account when coming up with projects to provide domestic water. It is more critical when the issue of water pricing comes into the equation. Water pricing has many facets, including equity, willingness to pay and affordability. In this premise, it is deemed important to understand the socioeconomic characteristics of the people before deciding on the amount of money they will have to pay for water consumption. It is argued that understanding people’s socioeconomic situation will greatly help to ensure that principles of sustainability and equity in water allocation and pricing are achieved. To do so, the paper utilized 2002 South Africa General Household Survey (GHS), to analyze socioeconomic variables and availability of domestic water. Analysis was mainly descriptive. However, logistic regression analysis was also utilized to determine the likelihood of living in a household that obtain water from a safe source. The study found that there is a strong relationship between availability of domestic water and socioeconomic conditions. Economic status, household size and to a lesser extent gender of head of household were found to be strong predictors of living in a household which obtained water from a safe source. The paper recommends that needs and priorities for interventions in water provision should take into account

  11. Production of biogas from municipal solid waste with domestic sewage.

    Elango, D; Pulikesi, M; Baskaralingam, P; Ramamurthi, V; Sivanesan, S

    2007-03-01

    In this study, experiments were conducted to investigate the production of biogas from municipal solid waste (MSW) and domestic sewage by using anaerobic digestion process. The batch type of reactor was operated at room temperature varying from 26 to 36 degrees C with a fixed hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 25 days. The digester was operated at different organic feeding rates of 0.5, 1.0, 2.3, 2.9, 3.5 and 4.3kg of volatile solids (VS)/m(3) of digester slurry per day. Biogas generation was enhanced by the addition of domestic sewage to MSW. The maximum biogas production of 0.36m(3)/kg of VS added per day occurred at the optimum organic feeding rate of 2.9kg of VS/m(3)/day. The maximum reduction of total solids (TS) (87.6%), VS (88.1%) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) (89.3%) occurred at the optimum organic loading rate of 2.9kg of VS/m(3)/day. The quality of biogas produced during anaerobic digestion process was 68-72%. PMID:16914265

  12. Study on the construction and operation for management system of municipal domestic wastes

    Liu Wei; Wang Shuqiang; Chen Jingxin

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the quantity of our country's municipal domestic wastes increase rapidly, but the waste disposal still has problems, such as the simple way of processing, wasting the resources, the serious environmental pollution and so on. By holding waste minimization as the center, the developed countries have formed perfect waste management system. Based on analyzing the status quo and problems of processing in our country, on the principle of benefit, scale,waste minimization, reclamation and hazard-free treatment, according to the recycling model of processing, the article has constructed our country's domestic wastes management system, proposed the measures of promoting the operation of system. It has realized the transformation of waste management system from terminal disposal to source reduction,achieved the goals, including domestic wastes categorizing and reclaiming, industrialization and non-pollution processing,and finally brought sustainable development for resources, environment, economy and society.

  13. Municipal solid waste generation in municipalities: Quantifying impacts of household structure, commercial waste and domestic fuel

    Waste management planning requires reliable data concerning waste generation, influencing factors on waste generation and forecasts of waste quantities based on facts. This paper aims at identifying and quantifying differences between different municipalities' municipal solid waste (MSW) collection quantities based on data from waste management and on socio-economic indicators. A large set of 116 indicators from 542 municipalities in the Province of Styria was investigated. The resulting regression model included municipal tax revenue per capita, household size and the percentage of buildings with solid fuel heating systems. The model explains 74.3% of the MSW variation and the model assumptions are met. Other factors such as tourism, home composting or age distribution of the population did not significantly improve the model. According to the model, 21% of MSW collected in Styria was commercial waste and 18% of the generated MSW was burned in domestic heating systems. While the percentage of commercial waste is consistent with literature data, practically no literature data are available for the quantity of MSW burned, which seems to be overestimated by the model. The resulting regression model was used as basis for a waste prognosis model (Beigl and Lebersorger, in preparation).

  14. Distribution of coliform bacteria in waste water

    Dau Lal Bohra

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Biological activity of water can be apparently judged by the colonization of bacteria (microbes. In order to find out the extent of pollution and the relationship between inorganic matters and microbiota, a quantitative and qualitative analysis of bacteria in various types of sewage waters, namely sewage water by the residential colonies (group I, industrial waste water (group II, sewage treatment hub (group III, unorganized collected waste water (group IV and old residential waste collection center (group V, of Bikaner city (Rajasthan, India was carried out from February, 2010 to May, 2010. Water samples were taken from surface only owing to low depth and investigated for various abiotic factors (viz. transparency, pH, carbonate, bicarbonate, total alkalinity, total hardness, salinity, chloride, calcium, magnesium, sulphate, nitrate, silica, and inorganic phosphorous and biotic factors (viz. number and diversity of bacteria. The domestic sewage water causes major water borne diseases basing upon Total Bacterial Count (TBC and coliform Count (CC. The coliform count in the present study ranged from 2.5 to 5.12 MPN/mL. Comparision of microbial population in sewage water from all different Groups was done and the higher values of TBC and CC were recorded only in Sewage treatement hub (Group III.

  15. The domestic wastes incinerators; Les incinerateurs d'ordures menegares: quels risques? quelles politiques?

    NONE

    2004-10-01

    This document presents the opinion of the Committee of Prevention and Precaution (CPP), on the domestic wastes incinerators, in the framework of the global wastes policy. The seven chapters detail and bring advices on the following topics: the elements which are going in and out of the incinerators, the technical processes, the occupational activities and the risks bound to the incinerators use, the transfer modes towards the different environmental areas, the exposure estimation, the risks of people living near the domestic wastes incinerators compared to the other concerning a cancer development, the legislation concerning the domestic wastes and the social acceptability of the incinerators. (A.L.B.)

  16. Preliminary ECLSS waste water model

    Carter, Donald L.; Holder, Donald W., Jr.; Alexander, Kevin; Shaw, R. G.; Hayase, John K.

    1991-01-01

    A preliminary waste water model for input to the Space Station Freedom (SSF) Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) Water Processor (WP) has been generated for design purposes. Data have been compiled from various ECLSS tests and flight sample analyses. A discussion of the characterization of the waste streams comprising the model is presented, along with a discussion of the waste water model and the rationale for the inclusion of contaminants in their respective concentrations. The major objective is to establish a methodology for the development of a waste water model and to present the current state of that model.

  17. The Knowledge And Behaviors Of Individuals Regarding The Management Of Domestic Solid Waste

    Birsel Canan DEMİRBAĞ; GÜNGÖRMÜŞ, Zeynep

    2012-01-01

    Population growth and development of urban centers, supports the increase in the amount of domestıc solid waste. Therefore, due to serious environmental problems in urban areas, solid waste management has become one of the most important problems. The aim of this study was to identify knowledge and behaviors of individuals regarding the management of domestic solid waste. This study is descriptive in nature and it was carried out with a population of 14,600 people living in the neighborhoods ...

  18. Anaerobic digestion technologies for closing the domestic water, carbon and nutrient cycles.

    Hammes, F; Kalogo, Y; Verstraete, W

    2000-01-01

    Sustainable wastewater treatment requires that household wastewater is collected and treated separately from industrial wastewater and rainwater run-offs. This separate treatment is, however, still inadequate, as more than 70% of the nutrients and much of the chemical oxygen demand (COD) and potential pathogens of a domestic sewage system are confined to the few litres of black water (faeces, urine and toilet water). Whilst grey water can easily be filter treated and re-used for secondary household purposes, black water requires more intensive treatment due to its high COD and microbial (pathogens) content. Recently developed vacuum/dry toilets produce a nutrient rich semi-solid waste stream, which, with proper treatment, offers the possibility of nutrient, carbon, water and energy recovery. This study investigates the terrestrial applicability of Life Support System (LSS) concepts as a framework for future domestic waste management. The possibilities of treating black water together with other types of human-generated solid waste (biowastes/mixed wastes) in an anaerobic reactor system at thermophilic conditions, as well as some post treatment alternatives for product recovery and re-use, are considered. Energy can partially be recovered in the form of biogas produced during anaerobic digestion. The system is investigated in the form of theoretical mass balances, together with an assessment of the current feasibility of this technology and other post-treatment alternatives. PMID:11381993

  19. The Stady of Legislation on the Utilization of Domestic Sea Water

    苗英霞

    2014-01-01

    The contradiction between shortage of water resource and lack of legislation for using seawater as domestic water was revealed. We started our work from present situation of legislation for using seawater as domestic water. Necessity and feasibility of legislation for using seawater as domestic water were explored which contribute to the healthy development of domestic seawater industry.

  20. Waste water treatment by flotation

    Camelia Badulescu; Lorand Toth; Romulus Sarbu

    2005-01-01

    The flotation is succesfully applied as a cleaning method of waste water refineries, textile fabrics (tissues), food industry, paper plants, oils plants, etc. In the flotation process with the released air, first of all, the water is saturated with air compressed at pressures between 0,3 – 3 bar, followed by the relaxed phenomenon of the air-water solution in a flotation cell with slowly flowing. The supersaturation could be applied in the waste water treatment. In this case the waste water, ...

  1. Development of automated information system for domestic waste logistics management (by the example of Apatity town

    Ladik A. S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available A software system for management information support of domestic waste logistics (by the example of Apatity town has been developed for management information support efficiency enhancement of domestic waste collection and transportation processes in the municipal systems subject to hygiene and sanitary norms and standards. The system is implemented as an interactive multilogic web-service. The system provides computational procedure execution of financial expenditure and ecological damage in the issue of domestic waste collection and transportation and environmental risk minimization on the basis of proposed algorithms for automated synthesis of adaptive journey routes in comparison with existing prototypes

  2. Legionella Infection Risk from Domestic Hot Water

    Borella, Paola; Montagna, M. Teresa; Romano-Spica, Vincenzo; Stampi, Serena; Stancanelli, Giovanna; Triassi, Maria; Neglia, Rachele; Marchesi, Isabella; Fantuzzi, Guglielmina; Tatò, Daniela; Napoli, Christian; Quaranta, Gianluigi; Laurenti, Patrizia; Leoni, Erica; De Luca, Giovanna

    2004-01-01

    We investigated Legionella and Pseudomonas contamination of hot water in a cross-sectional multicentric survey in Italy. Chemical parameters (hardness, free chlorine, and trace elements) were determined. Legionella spp. were detected in 33 (22.6%) and Pseudomonas spp. in 56 (38.4%) of 146 samples. Some factors associated with Legionella contamination were heater type, tank distance and capacity, water plant age, and mineral content. Pseudomonas presence was influenced by water source, hardnes...

  3. Sludge accumulation and conversion to methane in a septic tank treating domestic wastewater or black water.

    Elmitwalli, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    Although the septic tank is the most applied on-site system for wastewater pre-treatment, limited research has been performed to determine sludge accumulation and biogas production in the tank. Therefore a dynamic mathematical model based on the Anaerobic Digestion Model No. 1 (ADM1) was developed for anaerobic digestion of the accumulated sludge in a septic tank treating domestic wastewater or black water. The results showed that influent chemical oxygen demand (COD) concentration and hydraulic retention time (HRT) of the tank mainly control the filling time with sludge, while operational temperature governs characteristics of the accumulated sludge and conversion to methane. For obtaining stable sludge and high conversion, the tank needs to be operated for a period more than a year without sludge wasting. Maximum conversion to methane in the tank is about 50 and 60% for domestic wastewater and black water, respectively. The required period for sludge wasting depends on the influent COD concentration and the HRT, while characteristics of the wasted sludge are affected by operational temperature followed by the influent COD concentration and the HRT. Sludge production from the tank ranges between 0.19 to 0.22 and 0.13 to 0.15 L/(person.d), for the domestic wastewater and black water, respectively. PMID:23985530

  4. Tracing Waste Water with Li isotopes

    Millot, R.; Desaulty, A. M.

    2015-12-01

    The contribution of human activities such as industries, agriculture and various domestic inputs, becomes more and more significant in the chemical composition of the dissolved load of rivers. Human factors act as a supplementary key process. Therefore the mass-balance for the budget of catchments and river basins include anthropogenic disturbances. In the present study, we investigate waste water tracing by the use of Li isotopes in a small river basin near Orléans in France (l'Egoutier, 15 km² and 5 km long). It is well known that Li has strategic importance for numerous industrial applications including its use in the production of batteries for both mobile devices (computers, tablets, smartphones, etc.) and electric vehicles, but also in pharmaceutical formulations. In the present work, we collected river waters samples before and after the release from a waste water treatment plant connected to an hospital. Lithium isotopic compositions are rather homogeneous in river waters with δ7Li values around -0.5‰ ± 1 along the main course of the stream (n=7). The waste water sample is very different from the natural background of the river basin with Li concentration being twice of the values without pollution and significant heavy lithium contribution (δ7Li = +4‰). These preliminary results will be discussed in relation with factors controlling the distribution of Li and its isotopes in this specific system and compared with the release of other metals such as Pb or Zn.

  5. BIO-METHANATION AS AN OPTION FOR DOMESTIC SOLID WASTE PROCESSING METHOD IN DHARAMSALA, NORTHERN INDIA

    KHOLIAVKO T.

    2015-01-01

    The bio-methanation as an option for domestic solid waste processing method in Dharamsala, Northern India is presented in terms of energy specifications, economic costs, environmental and additional impacts.

  6. Domestic Separation and Collection of Municipal Solid Waste: Opinion and Awareness of Citizens and Workers

    Giovanni De Feo; Sabino De Gisi

    2010-01-01

    The state of the art on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW) management is based on the domestic separation of materials produced. After domestic separation, the resident has to transfer the separated materials to the MSW manager through the hands of collection workers. It is exactly at this stage that an end-use product changes its status and property becomes waste. This paper analyzes and compares the opinions and awareness of citizens and kerbside collection workers on this subject by means of two ...

  7. Tritium levels in leachates and condensates from domestic wastes in landfill sites

    An extensive review study of leachate composition, from landfills which have received mainly domestic wastes in the UK, has been carried out by Aspinwall and Company on behalf of the Department of the Environment. This work has provided detailed information on concentrations of a wide range of determinands. One set of analyses which has produced particularly interesting results comprises the determination of tritium. Tritium is a natural isotope of hydrogen (3H), with a half-life of 12.43 years, which decays radioactively to form stable 3He atoms, releasing beta particles. Although tritium concentrations can be measured accurately as tritium units (TU), these represent extremely low levels of activity, and concentrations of tritium well in excess of 100 000 TU would be needed before acceptable levels of radioactivity in drinking water were exceeded. Background levels of tritium in UK rainfall rarely now exceed 50 TU although, in the 1960s, values of up to 3000 TU in rainfall were associated with atmospheric testing of atomic weapons. It was somewhat surprising, therefore, to discover that relatively high concentrations of tritium (>10 000 TU) were widespread in leachates from landfills which had received primarily domestic wastes. This paper presents results from samples taken at 30 representative UK sites, and discusses potential sources of tritium. (UK)

  8. Tritium levels in leachates and condensates from domestic wastes in landfill sites

    Robinson, H.D. [Aspinwall and Co., Shrewsbury (United Kingdom); Gronow, J.R. [Environment Agency, London (United Kingdom). Waste Regulation Policy Group

    1996-12-01

    An extensive review study of leachate composition, from landfills which have received mainly domestic wastes in the UK, has been carried out by Aspinwall and Company on behalf of the Department of the Environment. This work has provided detailed information on concentrations of a wide range of determinands. One set of analyses which has produced particularly interesting results comprises the determination of tritium. Tritium is a natural isotope of hydrogen ({sup 3}H), with a half-life of 12.43 years, which decays radioactively to form stable {sup 3}He atoms, releasing beta particles. Although tritium concentrations can be measured accurately as tritium units (TU), these represent extremely low levels of activity, and concentrations of tritium well in excess of 100 000 TU would be needed before acceptable levels of radioactivity in drinking water were exceeded. Background levels of tritium in UK rainfall rarely now exceed 50 TU although, in the 1960s, values of up to 3000 TU in rainfall were associated with atmospheric testing of atomic weapons. It was somewhat surprising, therefore, to discover that relatively high concentrations of tritium (>10 000 TU) were widespread in leachates from landfills which had received primarily domestic wastes. This paper presents results from samples taken at 30 representative UK sites, and discusses potential sources of tritium. (UK).

  9. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms

  10. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium concentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms

  11. Uranium in US surface, ground, and domestic waters. Volume 2

    Drury, J.S.; Reynolds, S.; Owen, P.T.; Ross, R.H.; Ensminger, J.T.

    1981-04-01

    The report Uranium in US Surface, Ground, and Domestic Waters comprises four volumes. Volumes 2, 3, and 4 contain data characterizing the location, sampling date, type, use, and uranium conentrations of 89,994 individual samples presented in tabular form. The tabular data in volumes 2, 3, and 4 are summarized in volume 1 in narrative form and with maps and histograms.

  12. A Benchmarking System for Domestic Water Use

    Dexter V.L. Hunt; Rogers, Christopher D. F.

    2014-01-01

    The national demand for water in the UK is predicted to increase, exacerbated by a growing UK population, and home-grown demands for energy and food. When set against the context of overstretched existing supply sources vulnerable to droughts, particularly in increasingly dense city centres, the delicate balance of matching minimal demands with resource secure supplies becomes critical. When making changes to "internal" demands the role of technological efficiency and user behaviour cannot be...

  13. Review of domestic water conservation practices in Saudi Arabia

    Ouda, Omar K. M.; Shawesh, Ahmad; Al-Olabi, Tareq; Younes, Firas; Al-Waked, Rafat

    2013-12-01

    The Kingdom of Saudi Arabian (KSA) has a substantial water shortage problem where water demand far exceeds water resources sustainable yields. This fact has motivated the Ministry of Water and Electricity (MOWE) to launch a massive water conservation awareness program to enhance water-using efficiency in the country. The MOWE among other water awareness activities has introduced a four-stage program of free distribution of water conservation tools. This research reviewed the domestic water conservation awareness program in Saudi Arabia and assessed the program performance through conducting questionnaire surveys. The latter was designed and implemented in Al-Khobar city in the Eastern Province to measure public awareness regarding water issues. The survey started on April 28, 2012, and continued for 3 weeks. A total of 197 questionnaires were completed. The survey results showed a relatively low awareness among respondents about water shortage problem in the Kingdom. A low percentage of respondents have water conservation tools installed in their houses, but a high percentage is willing to buy and install water conservation tools. The majority of respondents consider the water price low and are willing to pay more for water. The respondents' feedback highlighted the need to improve the current water conservation awareness program.

  14. Anaerobia Treatments of the domestic residual waters. Limitations potentialities

    The quick growth of the Latin American cities has prevented that an appropriate covering of public services is achieved for the whole population, One of the undesirable consequences of this situation is the indiscriminate discharge from the domestic and industrial residual waters to the nearest bodies of water with its consequent deterioration and with disastrous consequences about the ecology and the public health. The developed countries have controlled this situation using systems of purification of the residual waters previously to their discharge in the receptor source. The same as the technology of the evacuation of the served waters, they have become numerous efforts for the application of the purification systems used in the countries developed to the socioeconomic, climatic and cultural conditions of our means. One of the results obtained in these efforts is the economic inability of the municipalities to pay the high investment costs and of operation of the traditional systems for the treatment of the residual waters. Contrary to another type of public services, the treatment of the residual waters needs of appropriate technological solutions for the Climatic and socioeconomic means of the developing countries, One of the technological alternatives for the purification of the residual waters that has had a great development in the last decades has been that of the biological treatments in t anaerobia ambient. The objective of this contribution is to present, to author's trial, the limitations and potentialities of this technology type with special emphasis in the case of the domestic residual waters

  15. Treating water-reactive wastes

    Some compounds and elements, such as lithium hydride, magnesium, sodium, and calcium react violently with water to generate much heat and produce hydrogen. The hydrogen can ignite or even form an explosive mixture with air. Other metals may react rapidly only if they are finely divided. Some of the waste produced at Los Alamos National Lab. includes these metals that are contaminated with radioactivity. By far the greatest volume of water-reactive waste is lithium hydride contaminated with depleted uranium. Reactivity of the water-reactive wastes is neutralized with an atmosphere of humid nitrogen, which prevents the formation of an explosive mixture of hydrogen and air. When we adjust the temperature of the nitrogen and the humidifier, the nitrogen can be more or less humid, and the rate of reaction can be adjusted and controlled. Los Alamos has investigated the rates of reaction of lithium hydride as a function of the temperature and humidity. Los Alamos will investigate other variables. For example, the nitrogen flow will be optimized to conserve nitrogen and yet keep the reaction rates high. Reaction rates will be determined for various forms of lithium waste, from small chips to powder. Bench work will lead to the design of a skid-mounted process for treating wastes. Other water-reactive wastes will also be investigated

  16. An example to the storage of domestic solid waste problem during today’s urbanization process: The city of Nigde

    ÖCAL, TÜLAY

    2014-01-01

    The problem of domestic solid waste generated by adaption to the sedentary life has accelerated with the Industrial Revolution. In conjunction with urbanization, industrialization, population increase and economic development, domestic solid waste problem, which changes according to each country’s development level, is among the significant environmental problems of Turkey’s cities. As a natural process, domestic solid waste is generated by the necessities of sociobiological life. This kind o...

  17. Collection of domestic waste. Review of occupational health problems and their possible causes.

    Poulsen, O M; Breum, N O; Ebbehøj, N; Hansen, A M; Ivens, U I; van Lelieveld, D; Malmros, P; Matthiasen, L; Nielsen, B H; Nielsen, E M

    1995-08-18

    During the last decade, a growing interest in recycling of domestic waste has emerged, and action plans to increase the recycling of domestic waste have been agreed by many governments. A common feature of these plans is the implementation of new systems and equipment for the collection of domestic waste which has been separated at source. However, only limited information exists on possible occupational health problems related to such new systems. Occupational accidents are very frequent among waste collectors. Based on current knowledge, it appears that the risk factors should be considered as an integrated entity, i.e. technical factors (poor accessibility to the waste, design of equipment) may act in concert with high working rate, visual fatigue due to poor illumination and perhaps muscle fatigue due to high work load. Musculoskeletal problems are also common among waste collectors. A good deal of knowledge has accumulated on mechanical load on the spine and energetic load on the cardio-pulmonary system in relation to the handling of waste bags, bins, domestic containers and large containers. However, epidemiologic studies with exposure classification based on field measurement are needed, both to further identify high risk work conditions and to provide a detailed basis for the establishment of occupational exposure limits for mechanical and energetic load particularly in relation to pulling, pushing and tilting of containers. In 1975, an excess risk for chronic bronchitis was reported for waste collectors in Geneva (Rufèner-Press et al., 1975) and data from the Danish Registry of Occupational Accidents and Diseases also indicate an excess risk for pulmonary problems among waste collectors compared with the total work force. Surprisingly few measurements of potentially hazardous airborne exposures have been performed, and the causality of work-related pulmonary problems among waste collectors is unknown. Recent studies have indicated that implementation of

  18. What lies behind domestic water use? : A review essay on the drivers of domestic water consumption

    March Corbella, Hug; Saurí i Pujol, David

    2009-01-01

    Water constitutes and essential flow for the reproduction of urban environments. However and differently than other essential flows such as energy, money or materials, water is essentially bounded to local or regional environments for direct uses. Water stressed urban environments (such those in Mediterranean areas) are prone to suffer water scarcity both due to physical variables but also to human and social factors. Thus, understanding which factors lay behind urban water consumption is cri...

  19. The radioactivity of domestic water and its elimination

    Most Finns rely on water distributed by waterworks or on groundwater from their own wells for their supply of domestic water. The radioactivity of these waters is usually low, and the radiation doses from drinking water are insignificant compared with the mean doses received from all other sources of radiation in Finland. High concentrations of 222Rn and also other natural radionuclides are, however, found in a small percentage of groundwater wells drilled in bedrock. Most of these wells are located in the granitic areas of southern Finland. The arithmetic mean for 222Rn in water in drilled wells is 960 Bq/l, for that in dug wells 85 Bq/l and for that from waterworks 26 Bq/l, the maximum concentrations being 77500, 3500 and 1630 Bq/l, respectively. Uranium is another radionuclide that seems to be rather soluble in Finnish groundwaters. High concentrations of uranium are, however, only found in drilled wells. (orig.)

  20. An experimental study on recovering heat from domestic drain water

    Ramadan, Mohamad; Al Shaer, Ali; Haddad, Ahmad; Khaled, Mahmoud

    2016-07-01

    This paper concerns an experimental study on a system of heat recovery applied to domestic drain water pipes. The concept suggested consists of using the heat still present in the drain water as a preheating/heating source to the cold water supply of the building. To proceed, an appropriate experimental setup is developed and a coil heat exchanger is used as heat transfer device in the recovery system. Several scenarios are simulated and corresponding parameters are recorded and analyzed. It was shown that the suggested recovery concept can considerably preheat the cold water supply and then decrease the energy consumption. Particularly, up to 8.6 kW of heat were recovered when the cold water supply is initially at 3 °C.

  1. Radon in domestic water supplies in the UK

    In a novel experiment carried out by school children the level of naturally occurring 222Rn has been measured in domestic tap water at 504 locations throughout the UK. Most values were close to 1 Bq.1-1 and none were above the limit suggested by the UK National Radiological Protection Board of 100 Bq.1-1. The values are considerably lower than in many US tap waters and provide a negligible contribution to the level of inhaled radon in room air. (author)

  2. Phosphate and ammonium removal from waste water, using constructed wetland systems

    Drizo, Aleksandra

    1998-01-01

    Phosphorus and nitrogen in waste water from sewerage systems contribute to excessive nutrient enrichment of surface waters, presenting a threat to nature conservation, domestic and industrial water supplies, and recreation. The general objective of this research was to investigate phosphate and ammonium removal from waste water by constructed wetland systems (CWS), which are increasingly being used for low-cost water treatment. Phosphate (P) adsorption capacity and other prope...

  3. Investigation of the Domestic Hot Water Consumption in the Apartment Building

    Budjko, Ž; Zēbergs, V

    2009-01-01

    Since the independence resumption of Latvia in 1990, water consumption in the country has decreased few times. Accordingly, domestic hot water consumption in the household sector reduced. Water consumption decrease was caused by extensive water consumption meters’ installation, increased heat supply tariffs, and domestic hot water savings activities. In this paper there are presented the results of domestic hot water consumption measurements, which were done in a dwelling house...

  4. A Financial, Environmental and Social Evaluation of Domestic Water Management Options in the West Bank, Palestine

    Nazer, D.W.; Siebel, M.A.; P. van der Zaag; Mimi, Z.; Gijzen, H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Water is one of the most valuable natural resources in the West Bank, Palestine. Due to its limited availability, it is a resource that needs particular protection. Although agriculture consumes most of the water (70%) in the West Bank, the domestic water supply is strategically not less important. It is the aim of this study to evaluate domestic water management options suitable for Palestinian conditions that contribute to achieving water sufficiency in the domestic water use in the house o...

  5. Molecular markers for identifying municipal, domestic and agricultural sources of organic matter in natural waters.

    Harwood, John J

    2014-01-01

    Molecular markers can be used to determine the sources of organic pollution in water. This review summarizes progress made during the last two decades in identifying reliable molecular markers to distinguish pollution from sewage, animal production, and other sources. Two artificial sweeteners, sucralose and acesulfame-K, are sufficiently stable to be molecular markers and easily associated with domestic wastewater. Waste from different animal species may be distinguished by profiling fecal sterols and bile acids. Other markers which have been evaluated, including caffeine, detergent components, and compounds commonly leached from landfills are discussed. PMID:24200048

  6. High Strength Lightweight Nanocomposite from Domestic Solid Waste

    Masturi, Swardhani, Anggi Puspita; Sustini, Euis; Bukit, Minsyahril; Mora, Khairurrijal, Abdullah, Mikrajuddin

    2010-10-01

    The issue of waste problems needs innovative efforts to solve. One of them is solid waste utilization as nanocomposite using polyurethane (PU) polymer as matrix. Beside using solid waste as filler, nanosilica is also added to improve the material strength of composite-produced. These materials were mixed by simple mixing with variative compositions, and then hot-pressed at 30 MPa and 100° C for 30 minutes. From compressive strength test, it was found that composite with composition 2:8 of PU and solid waste has optimum compressive strength, i.e. 160 MPa. Into this optimum composition, nanosilica then is added to improve the compressive strength and found that at composition 1:40:160 of nanosilica, PU and solid waste, the composite has optimum compressive strength 200 MPa, or increases 25% of that without nanosilica. The composite-produced is also lightweight material with the density is 0.69 g/cm.

  7. Patterns, structures and regulations of domestic water cycle systems in China

    Chu, Junying; Wang, Hao; Wang, Jianhua; Qin, Dayong

    2010-05-01

    Domestic water cycle systems serving as one critical component of artificial water cycle at the catchment's scale, is so closely related to public healthy, human rights and social-economic development, and has gained the highest priority in strategic water resource and municipal infrastructure planning. In this paper, three basic patterns of domestic water cycle systems are identified and analyzed, including rural domestic water system (i.e. primary level), urban domestic water system (i.e. intermediate level) and metropolitan domestic water system (i.e. senior level), with different "abstract-transport-consume-discharge" mechanisms and micro-components of water consumption (such as drinking, cooking, toilet flushing, showering or cleaning). The rural domestic water system is general simple with three basic "abstract-consume-discharge" mechanisms and micro-components of basic water consumption such as drinking, cooking, washing and sanitation. The urban domestic water system has relative complex mechanisms of "abstract-supply-consume-treatment-discharge" and more micro-components of water consumption such as bath, dishwashing or car washing. The metropolitan domestic water system (i.e. senior level) has the most complex mechanisms by considering internal water reuse, external wastewater reclamation, and nutrient recycling processes. The detailed structures for different water cycle pattern are presented from the aspects of water quantity, wastewater quality and nutrients flow. With the speed up of urbanization and development of social-economy in China, those three basic patterns are interacting, transforming and upgrading. According to the past experiences and current situations, urban domestic water system (i.e. intermediate level) is the dominant pattern based on indicator of system number or system scale. The metropolitan domestic water system (i.e. senior level) is the idealized model for the future development and management. Current domestic water system

  8. Collection of domestic waste. Review of occupational health problems and their possible causes

    Poulsen, O M; Breum, N O; Ebbehøj, N;

    1995-01-01

    good deal of knowledge has accumulated on mechanical load on the spine and energetic load on the cardio-pulmonary system in relation to the handling of waste bags, bins, domestic containers and large containers. However, epidemiologic studies with exposure classification based on field measurement are...... gastrointestinal problems, irritation of the eye and skin, and perhaps symptoms of organic dust toxic syndrome (influenza-like symptoms, cough, muscle pains, fever, fatigue, headache) have been reported among workers collecting the biodegradable fraction of domestic waste. The few data available on exposure to bio...

  9. Domestic Separation and Collection of Municipal Solid Waste: Opinion and Awareness of Citizens and Workers

    Giovanni De Feo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The state of the art on Municipal Solid Waste (MSW management is based on the domestic separation of materials produced. After domestic separation, the resident has to transfer the separated materials to the MSW manager through the hands of collection workers. It is exactly at this stage that an end-use product changes its status and property becomes waste. This paper analyzes and compares the opinions and awareness of citizens and kerbside collection workers on this subject by means of two structured questionnaires in the city of Mercato San Severino (about 22,000 people, in Southern Italy.

  10. Simulation analysis of domestic water demand and its future uncertainty in water scarce areas

    Shouke WEI; Albrecht GNAUCK; Alin LEI

    2009-01-01

    This paper demonstrates a practical simulation approach to analyze domestic water demand and its future uncertainty in water scarce areas through a case study of Beijing, China. Analytic models and a forecasting model were constructed using statistic and econometric regres-sion approaches. The analytic models were used to analyze the interrelationships between domestic water demand and some socio-economic factors of Beijing. The forecasting model was applied to predict domestic water demand from 2009 to 2015, and this model was validated by comparing the prediction values with the observations. Scenario analysis was applied to simulate uncertainty and risks in domestic water demand in the future. The simulation results proved that domestic water demand will increase from 13.9×108 m3 to 16.7×108 m3 from 2009 to 2015. Three more sustainable strategies were also found through scenario analysis. The simulation and modeling approaches and results would be very supportive for water decision makers in allocating water efficiently and making sustainable water strategies.

  11. Waste Water Disposal Design And Management IV

    This book introduces biological waste water treatment with basic theory and activated sludge process, which includes chemical reaction engineering with reaction velocity and mass balance, an effector, characteristic of water treatment effector and biological waste water disposal such as flow pattern and tracer test. This is biological theory of steady on waste water treatment, design and management.

  12. State of Art About water Uses and Waste water Management in Lebanon

    This paper shows the real situation about management of water and waste water in Lebanon and focuses on problems related to urban water pollution released in environment. Water and waste water infrastructures have been rebuilt since 1992. However, waste water management still remains one of the greatest challenges facing Lebanese people, since water supply projects have been given priority over wastewater projects. As a consequence of an increased demand of water by agricultural, industrial and household sectors in the last decade, waste water flows have been increased. In this paper, the existing waste water treatment plants (WWTP) operating in Lebanon are presented. Most of them are small-scale community-based ones, only two large-scale plants, constructed by the government, are currently operational. Lebanese aquatic ecosystems are suffering from the deterioration of water quality because of an insufficient treatment of waste water, which is limited mostly to pre-treatment processes. In fact, domestic and industrial effluents are mainly conducted together in the sewer pipes to the WWTP before being discharged, without adequate treatment into the rivers or directly into the Mediterranean Sea. Such discharges are threatening the coastal marine ecosystem in the Mediterranean basin. This paper aims at giving the current state of knowledge about water uses and wastewater management in Lebanon. The main conclusion drawn from this state of art is a lack of data. In fact, the available data are limited to academic research without being representative on a national scale. (author)

  13. Domestic Water Consumption under Intermittent and Continuous Modes of Water Supply

    Fan, L.; Liu, G.; Wang, F.; Ritsema, C.J.; Geissen, V.

    2014-01-01

    Although an extensive literature emphasizes the disadvantages of intermittent water supply, it remains prevalent in rural areas of developing countries. Understanding the effects of water supply time restrictions on domestic water use activities and patterns, especially for hygienic purposes, is imp

  14. Concrete Production Using Technogenical, Constructional and Domestic Waste

    Marija Vaičienė

    2011-01-01

    The article describes investigations carried out by the scientists from various countries in order to improve the physical and mechanical properties of concrete. The grained rubber of tyres, modified sawdust, crushed ceramic bricks, plastic waste and remains of glass are utilised to produce concrete mixtures. The results of research conducted by the scientists show that in the process of producing concrete we can use different types of waste to change natural aggregates and to get concrete wi...

  15. Application analysis of high integrity container on domestic radioactive waste management

    This paper simply described three kinds of material high integrity containers, and accordingly emphasized the cross linked polyethylene HIC used in the domestic projects under construction, focusing on the waste treatment proposal coupling with HIC model and the advantages and disadvantages comparing with the cement solidification proposal. Many aspects are analyzed including waste filling and HIC lifting, transportation, and final disposal. The potential solutions are pointed out for the issues and the post actions as well. (authors)

  16. Domestic light water reactor fuel design evolution. Volume III

    Volume III of this report examines the design evolution of domestic light water reactor fuel. The fuel of each vendor is individually described. Tables and figures detail the fuel's design parameters. A data base of this nature is required for the design of an underwater fuel disassembly and rod storage system. An assessment of fuel failure mechanisms and fuel performance is presented showing that spent fuel pool operational problems will be minimal or nonexistent. A summary and projection of spent fuel discharges, organized by reactor and fuel design type, is included to show the magnitude and composition of the spent fuel situation facing the nuclear industry

  17. Solar domestic heating water systems in Morocco: An energy analysis

    Highlights: • A forced-circulation solar water heater system for domestic use was investigated. • Six different climatic zones of Morocco were simulated. • Flat plate and evacuated tube installations were compared. • Solar fractions for the different scenarios were given. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to assess the technical feasibility of solar water heaters (SWH) under Moroccan conditions. Annual simulations in six different regions for two technologies: flat plate and evacuated tube collectors were carried out using TRANSOL program. It is found that high values of solar fraction can be reached in almost the studied regions with the preference of using evacuated tube collectors. Furthermore, the study emphasizes that the location and the climate are determinant parameters on the overall performance of solar water heating systems

  18. Investigation of toxic influence of Ignalina NPP waste water on Spirodela polyrrhiza culture

    The influence of Ignalina NPP waste waters and of water taken in different biotop of lake Drukshiai on Spirodela polyrrhiza culture (growth intensity, biomass and morphological changes) was investigated. It was revealed that most polluted waters formed by Ignalina NPP outcomes were from industrial - rain sewerage and economic - domestic waste waters. Toxicity of all investigated waters was higher in autumn (October) than it was in spring (March -April). Comparative analysis of the data obtained in 1992-1994 indicated the growing tendency of toxicity in Ignalina NPP waste waters as well as lake Drukshiai water. (author). 5 refs., 4 figs

  19. Waste Water Treatment Unit

    A wastewater treatment plant to treat both the sanitary and industrial effluent originated from process, utilities and off site units of the refinery is described. The purpose is to obtain at the end of the treatment plant, a water quality that is in compliance with contractual requirements and relevant environmental regulations. first treatment (pretreatment). Primary de-oiling, Equalization, Neutralization, Secondary de-oiling. Second treatment (Biological), The mechanism of BOD removal, Biological flocculation, Nutrient requirements, Nitrification, De-nitrification, Effect of temperature, Effect of ph, Toxicity

  20. Simultaneous treatment of SO2 containing stack gases and waste water

    Poradek, J. C.; Collins, D. D. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A process for simultaneously removing sulfur dioxide from stack gases and the like and purifying waste water such as derived from domestic sewage is described. A portion of the gas stream and a portion of the waste water, the latter containing dissolved iron and having an acidic pH, are contacted in a closed loop gas-liquid scrubbing zone to effect absorption of the sulfur dioxide into the waste water. A second portion of the gas stream and a second portion of the waste water are controlled in an open loop gas-liquid scrubbing zone. The second portion of the waste water contains a lesser amount of iron than the first portion of the waste water. Contacting in the openloop scrubbing zone is sufficient to acidify the waste water which is then treated to remove solids originally present.

  1. Sorting and recycling of domestic waste. Review of occupational health problems and their possible causes

    Poulsen, O M; Breum, N O; Ebbehøj, N;

    1995-01-01

    plants. Workers involved in manual sorting of unseparated domestic waste, as well as workers at compost plants experience more or less frequent symptoms of organic dust toxic syndrome (ODTS) (cough, chest-tightness, dyspnoea, influenza-like symptoms such as chills, fever, muscle ache, joint pain, fatigue...

  2. The estimation of radiological impact from the disposal of radionuclides with domestic and commercial wastes

    In the UK, limited quantities of radionuclides are disposed of with non-radioactive domestic and commercial wastes under the terms of Exemption Orders or Authorisations granted by the Radiochemical Inspectorate. This report presents a methodology and basis for the calculation of individual and collective doses to workers and to members of the public from such disposals. (author)

  3. Domestic hot water storage: Balancing thermal and sanitary performance

    Thermal stratification within hot water tanks maximises the availability of stored energy and facilitates optimal use of both conventional and renewable energy sources. However, stratified tanks are also associated with the proliferation of pathogenic bacteria, such as Legionella, due to the hospitable temperatures that arise during operation. Sanitary measures, aimed at homogenising the temperature distribution throughout the tank, have been proposed; such measures reduce the effective energy storage capability that is otherwise available. Here we quantify the conflict that arises between thermodynamic performance and bacterial sterilisation within 10 real world systems. Whilst perfect stratification enhances the recovery of hot water and reduces heat losses, water samples revealed significant bacterial growth attributable to stratification (P<0.01). Temperature measurements indicated that users were exposed to potentially unsanitary water as a result. De-stratifying a system to sterilise bacteria led to a 19% reduction in effective hot water storage capability. Increasing the tank size to compensate for this loss would lead to an 11% increase in energy consumed through standing heat losses. Policymakers, seeking to utilise hot water tanks as demand response assets, should consider monitoring and control systems that prevent exposures to unsanitary hot water. - Highlights: • Domestic hot water tanks are a potential demand side asset for power networks. • A preference for bacterial growth in stratified hot water tanks has been observed. • Temperatures in base of electric hot water tanks hospitable to Legionella. • Potential exposures to unsanitary water observed. • De-stratifying a tank to sterilise leads to reduced energy storage capability

  4. Fermentative Production of Ethanol fuel from Domestic Waste by Pichia stipitis

    Modugu P

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Production of Ethanol fuel from the garbage/kitchen waste was carried out with the main purpose of converting the domestic waste into a useful material. The conversion of food waste or garbage by acid hydrolysis was carried out to obtain fermentable sugars, which was converted into ethanol by fermentation process using Pichia stipitis. The present study indicated that at 36 h of incubation resulted in utilization of 29 g/L of glucose with yield of 9.2 g/L ethanol. Compared to various sugars the glucose resulted in the production of ethanol.

  5. Ground water share in supplying domestic water in Khartoum state

    In this research study of the sources of groundwater from wells and stations that rely on the national authority for urban water in the state of Khartoum, this study includes three areas, namely the Khartoum area, North Khartoum and Omdurman area. This research evaluate and identify the sources of groundwater from wells and stations and find out the productivity of wells and underground stations. The study period were identified from 2004 to 2008 during this commoners were Alabaralgeoffip Knowledge Production and stations from the water. The methods used in this study was to determine the sources of groundwater from wells and stations in the three areas with the knowledge of the percentage in each year and the total amount of water produced from wells and stations in Khartoum, North Khartoum and Omdurman it is clear from this study that the percentage of productivity in the annual increase to varying degrees in floater from 2004 to 2008 and also clear that the Omdurman area depends on groundwater wells over a maritime area of stations based on stations with more and more consumption of Khartoum and the sea. Also been identified on the tank top and bottom of the tank where the chemical properties and physical properties after the identification of these qualities and characteristics have been identified the quantity and quality of water produced from wells and stations. (Author)

  6. Review of pre-treated peat applied in treating domestic wastewaters and oily waters

    Jiang, X.; Coles, C.A.; Asapo, E.S. [Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John' s, NL (Canada). Dept. of Engineering and Applied Science

    2008-07-01

    This paper discussed recent research related to the use of peat in removing contaminants from domestic wastewater, oil-contaminated water, and soil. The review also discussed methods of pretreating peat before its application to polluted area. Pretreatment processes are needed to remove components in peat that interfere with treatment mechanisms. Polymers are added to peat in order to encourage the aggregation of the peat particles into larger colloidal particles that are easy to dewater. Phosphoric acid treatments are also applied to increase the swelling capacity of peat. Hydrogen peroxide is used to break down oil-contaminated peat in order to facilitate its subsequent decomposition. Experiments have demonstrated that peat is an effective adsorbent for many different types of oil. Studies have demonstrated that the removal rate for standard mineral and crude oils from wastewater using peat was 83 and 70 per cent. Applications of commercial peat to the surface of oily contaminated waters resulted in oil removal efficiencies of 99.998 per cent. It was concluded that peat is an effective, low-cost material for removing contaminants from domestic waste water and oil-contaminated water. The peat can also be used as a secondary energy source after the sorption process. While peat is an abundant resource in Canada, the resource is found mainly in wetlands. Effective harvesting strategies should be used to ensure the environmental sustainability of peat filtration systems. 38 refs., 1 tab.

  7. Review of pre-treated peat applied in treating domestic wastewaters and oily waters

    This paper discussed recent research related to the use of peat in removing contaminants from domestic wastewater, oil-contaminated water, and soil. The review also discussed methods of pretreating peat before its application to polluted area. Pretreatment processes are needed to remove components in peat that interfere with treatment mechanisms. Polymers are added to peat in order to encourage the aggregation of the peat particles into larger colloidal particles that are easy to dewater. Phosphoric acid treatments are also applied to increase the swelling capacity of peat. Hydrogen peroxide is used to break down oil-contaminated peat in order to facilitate its subsequent decomposition. Experiments have demonstrated that peat is an effective adsorbent for many different types of oil. Studies have demonstrated that the removal rate for standard mineral and crude oils from wastewater using peat was 83 and 70 per cent. Applications of commercial peat to the surface of oily contaminated waters resulted in oil removal efficiencies of 99.998 per cent. It was concluded that peat is an effective, low-cost material for removing contaminants from domestic waste water and oil-contaminated water. The peat can also be used as a secondary energy source after the sorption process. While peat is an abundant resource in Canada, the resource is found mainly in wetlands. Effective harvesting strategies should be used to ensure the environmental sustainability of peat filtration systems. 38 refs., 1 tab

  8. 我国生活废弃物的经济分析与对策%An Economic Analysis and Countermeasures for Domestic Wastes in China

    庄宇

    2005-01-01

    Domestic wastes have become an important topic of environmental protection research. From the social cost of treating domestic wastes, this article analyzes present environmental pollution caused by neglected externality when we discharge domestic wastes in the method of analysis on the difference between marginal personal cost and marginal social cost. It also proves the necessity and the importance of levying pollution tax, and proposes the measures of controlling environmental pollution caused by domestic wastes.

  9. Distribution of coliform bacteria in waste water

    Dau Lal Bohra; Vikas Modasiya; Chandan Kumar Bahura

    2012-01-01

    Biological activity of water can be apparently judged by the colonization of bacteria (microbes). In order to find out the extent of pollution and the relationship between inorganic matters and microbiota, a quantitative and qualitative analysis of bacteria in various types of sewage waters, namely sewage water by the residential colonies (group I), industrial waste water (group II), sewage treatment hub (group III), unorganized collected waste water (group IV) and old residential waste colle...

  10. Space, Identity and Health Risks: a study of domestic waste in Ibadan, Nigeria

    Aderemi Suleiman Ajala

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Poor waste management has characterized Ibadan’s modern and historical identity.  As a consequence, residents of Ibadan (indigenes hold diverse views about the city's image, while non-indigenes label it "filthy" and "dirty".  These perceptions, spatial and cultural, are deep rooted, intertwining with the political and cultural plane of Nigerian society. A distinction between “self” and “others” is seen to mark a discourse and counter discourse in the perception of health risks associated with domestic waste in the Ibadan.  Through survey and descriptive ethnography, our paper examines the nature and extent of domestic waste in Ibadan, as a physical, community and psychological reality, where we seek to explain how generation and poor waste management  impacts on these spaces and the very mechanics of identity. Different perceptions of health risks are observed as well the vulnerability to diseases associated with domestic waste and poor hygiene, bringing into play the socioeconomic variables and residential patterns which constitute the daily reality of this city.  Our study establishes that the increase in urban population, the low economic status, the indiscriminate setting up of artisans’ shops or outlets and the overall inability of government agencies to monitor the menace of domestic waste and its attendant health risks, are central factors to the problem generically deemed one of “waste”.  

  11. Exploring water and food security: the water footprint of domestic food production in the Gaza Strip

    Recanati, Francesca; Castelletti, Andrea; Dotelli, Giovanni; Melià, Paco

    2016-04-01

    Water scarcity and food security are major issues in the Gaza Strip. This area is characterized by one of the highest densities in the world and it is affected by both severe scarcity of water resources and limited trading possibilities.Given this context, the enhancement of domestic food production is considered a fundamental strategy in achieving food security in the area. For this reason, rural people play a crucial role in implementing sustainable strategies for enhancing the domestic food production while preserving water resources. In order to investigate the effectiveness of existing agricultural scenarios in achieving food security in a sustainable manner, we propose a framework to assess food production systems in terms of their contribution to the nutritional and economic conditions of rural households and their impact on water resources. In particular, the latter has been carried out through the water footprint indicator proposed by the Water Footprint Network. The case study analyzed is a sample farm located in the Gaza Strip, whose food production is based on horticulture, animal husbandry and aquaculture. The study is articulated into two main parts: first, we compare alternative scenarios of vegetal and animal food production in terms of food supply, water consumption and economic income at the household scale; then, we extend the analysis to evaluate the potential contribution of domestic food production to the food security in the whole Gaza Strip, focusing on the nutritional dimension, and providing a preliminary assessment of the environmental and economic sustainability. In particular, we evaluate water appropriation for domestic food production and compare it with the availability of water resources in the region. The outcomes highlight that the domestic food production can potentially satisfy both a basic diet and economic income for rural household, but the related appropriation of freshwater results unsustainable with respect to the fresh

  12. Domestic production of control parts for the nuclear waste treatment facility

    The control part IND-100, which interfaces the field signals to the control networks in the control systems of PIEF (Post-Irradiated Examination Facility) and RWTF (Radioactive Waste Treatment Facility), was designed and fabricated. Preamplifier boards for radiation detectors, proportional counter and Geiger-Mueller tube which are in use in the radiation monitoring systems, were also designed and fabricated. Control parts which may be replaced with the domestic parts were surveyed, and a domestic relay model and a recorder model were selected as the replaceable ones. To improve the control systems, adoption of programmable controller to the conventional relay logic system were considered and analyzed. (Author)

  13. Smart solar tanks for small solar domestic hot water systems

    Furbo, Simon; Andersen, Elsa; Knudsen, Søren;

    2005-01-01

    Investigation of small SDHW systems based on smart solar tanks are presented. The domestic water in a smart solar tank can be heated both by solar collectors and by means of an auxiliary energy supply system. The auxiliary energy supply system – in this study electric heating elements – heats up...... systems, based on differently designed smart solar tanks and a traditional SDHW system were investigated by means of laboratory experiments and theoretical calculations. The investigations showed that the yearly thermal performance of SDHW systems with smart solar tanks is 5-35% higher than the thermal...... performance of traditional SDHW systems. Estimates indicate that the performance/cost ratio can be improved by up to 25% by using a smart solar tank instead of a traditional tank when the backup energy system is electric heating elements. Further, smart solar tanks are suitable for unknown, variable, large...

  14. Departmental plans of domestic wastes management - evaluation 2002; Plans departementaux d'elimination des dechets menager assimiles - bilan 2002

    NONE

    2004-03-01

    The departmental plans of domestic wastes management are official documents which manage the actions needed to realize the legislative and regulation objectives concerning the domestic wastes and related wastes. A first evaluation has been realized in 1997 for 47 edited plans. In the context of the new wastes policy a new evaluation has been realized by the ADEME in 2002 for 98 plans. It provides the methodology of the study, the analysis of the plans, the sites and management of wastes, economic data, the equipment and investments. (A.L.B.)

  15. Domestic water and sanitation as water security: monitoring, concepts and strategy

    Bradley, David J; Bartram, Jamie K.

    2013-01-01

    Domestic water and sanitation provide examples of a situation where long-term, target-driven efforts have been launched with the objective of reducing the proportion of people who are water-insecure, most recently through the millennium development goals (MDGs) framework. Impacts of these efforts have been monitored by an increasingly evidence-based system, and plans for the next period of international policy, which are likely to aim at universal coverage with basic water and sanitation, are...

  16. Sorting and recycling of domestic waste. Review of occupational health problems and their possible causes.

    Poulsen, O M; Breum, N O; Ebbehøj, N; Hansen, A M; Ivens, U I; van Lelieveld, D; Malmros, P; Matthiasen, L; Nielsen, B H; Nielsen, E M

    1995-05-19

    In order to reduce the strain on the environment from the deposition of waste in landfills and combustion at incineration plants, several governments throughout the industrialized world have planned greatly increased recycling of domestic waste by the turn of the millennium. To implement the plans, new waste recycling facilities are to be built and the number of workers involved in waste sorting and recycling will increase steadily during the next decade. Several studies have reinforced the hypothesis that exposure to airborne microorganisms and the toxic products thereof are important factors causing a multitude of health problems among workers at waste sorting and recycling plants. Workers at transfer stations, landfills and incineration plants may experience an increased risk of pulmonary disorders and gastrointestinal problems. High concentrations of total airborne dust, bacteria, faecal coliform bacteria and fungal spores have been reported. The concentrations are considered to be sufficiently high to cause adverse health effects. In addition, a high incidence of lower back injuries, probably due to heavy lifting during work, has been reported among workers at landfills and incineration plants. Workers involved in manual sorting of unseparated domestic waste, as well as workers at compost plants experience more or less frequent symptoms of organic dust toxic syndrome (ODTS) (cough, chest-tightness, dyspnoea, influenza-like symptoms such as chills, fever, muscle ache, joint pain, fatigue and headache), gastrointestinal problems such as nausea and diarrhoea, irritation of the skin, eye and mucous membranes of the nose and upper airways, etc. In addition cases of severe occupational pulmonary diseases (asthma, alveolitis, bronchitis) have been reported. Manual sorting of unseparated domestic waste may be associated with exposures to large quantities of airborne bacteria and endotoxin. Several work functions in compost plants can result in very high exposure to

  17. Numerical Simulation of a Solar Domestic Hot Water System

    An innovative transient numerical model is presented for the simulation of a solar Domestic Hot Water (DHW) system. The solar collectors have been simulated by using a zerodimensional analytical model. The temperature distributions in the heat transfer fluid and in the water inside the tank have been evaluated by one-dimensional models. The reversion elimination algorithm has been used to include the effects of natural convection among the water layers at different heights in the tank on the thermal stratification. A finite difference implicit scheme has been implemented to solve the energy conservation equation in the coil heat exchanger, and the energy conservation equation in the tank has been solved by using the finite difference Euler implicit scheme. Energy conservation equations for the solar DHW components models have been coupled by means of a home-made implicit algorithm. Results of the simulation performed using as input data the experimental values of the ambient temperature and the solar irradiance in a summer day are presented and discussed

  18. Actual problems of municipal cleaners waste waters

    Konko¾ová Patrícia

    2000-01-01

    In paper are evaluated social and economical changes in water economy with emphasis on complex evaluation of municipal cleaners waste waters with respect of legislative, position of ownerskip relationskips and financial security of public experiences of water economy.

  19. Caffeine and pharmaceuticals as indicators of waste water contamination in wells

    Seiler, R.L.; Zaugg, S.D.; Thomas, J.M.; Howcroft, D.L.

    1999-01-01

    The presence of caffeine or human pharmaceuticals in ground water with elevated nitrate concentrations can provide a clear, unambiguous indication that domestic waste water is a source of some of the nitrate. Water from domestic, public supply, and monitoring wells in three communities near Reno, Nevada, was sampled to test if caffeine or pharmaceuticals are common, persistent, and mobile enough in the environment that they can be detected in nitrate-contaminated ground water and, thus, can be useful indicators of recharge from domestic waste water. Results of this study indicate that these compounds can be used as indicators of recharge from domestic waste water, although their usefulness is limited because caffeine is apparently nonconservative and the presence of prescription pharmaceuticals is unpredictable. The absence of caffeine or pharmaceuticals in ground water with elevated nitrate concentrations does not demonstrate that the aquifer is free of waste water contamination. Caffeine was detected in ground water samples at concentrations up to 0.23 ??g/L. The human pharmaceuticals chlorpropamide, phensuximide, and carbamazepine also were detected in some samples.

  20. The efficient role of aquatic plant (water hyacinth) in treating domestic wastewater in continuous system.

    Rezania, Shahabaldin; Din, Mohd Fadhil Md; Taib, Shazwin Mat; Dahalan, Farrah Aini; Songip, Ahmad Rahman; Singh, Lakhweer; Kamyab, Hesam

    2016-07-01

    In this study, water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipes) was used to treat domestic wastewater. Ten organic and inorganic parameters were monitored in three weeks for water purification. The six chemical, biological and physical parameters included Dissolved Oxygen (DO), Biological Oxygen Demand (BOD), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Ammoniacal Nitrogen (NH3-N), Total Suspended Solids (TSS), and pH were compared with the Interim National Water Quality Standards, Malaysia River classification (INWQS) and Water Quality Index (WQI). Between 38% to 96% of reduction was observed and water quality has been improved from class III and IV to class II. Analyses for Electricity Conductivity (EC), Salinity, Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) and Ammonium (NH4) were also investigated. In all parameters, removal efficiency was in range of 13-17th day (optimum 14th day) which was higher than 3 weeks except DO. It reveals the optimum growth rate of water hyacinth has great effect on waste water purification efficiency in continuous system and nutrient removal was successfully achieved. PMID:26684985

  1. EnviroAtlas - Portland, ME -Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, the community domestic water use was calculated using local domestic water use per capita in gallons of water per day...

  2. Glucoamylase production from food waste by solid state fermentation and its evaluation in the hydrolysis of domestic food waste

    Esra Uçkun Kiran

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study, food wastes such as waste bread, savory, waste cakes, cafeteria waste, fruits, vegetables and potatoes were used as sole substrate for glucoamylase production by solid state fermentation. Response surface methodology was employed to optimize the fermentation conditions for improving the production of high activity enzyme. It was found that waste cake was the best substrate for glucoamylase production. Among all the parameters studied, glucoamylase activity was significantly affected by the initial pH and incubation time. The highest glucoamylase activity of 108.47 U/gds was achieved at initial pH of 7.9, moisture content of 69.6% wt., inoculum loading of 5.2×105 cells/gram substrate (gs and incubation time of 6 d. The enzyme preparation could effectively digest 50% suspension of domestic food waste in 24 h with an almost complete saccharification using an enzyme dose of only 2U/g food waste at 60°C.

  3. BIOLOGICAL NITRIFICATION OF WASTE WATER

    P. B. N. Lakshmi Devi

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Nitrification has been studied extensively as a result of its significance within the biological process and at intervals the necessity for treatment of waste water. In the last decade, the treatment of high ammonical concentration effluents has become a matter of nice interest. Many effluents will contain some hundred milligrams of nitrogen per liter (supernatants from anaerobic digestion, lechates from municipal water, etc. may have specific treatment before utilization them to the plant recycling process. Sometimes this reaction is applied by maintaining robust ammonical concentrations which have the role of inhibiting the nitrite – oxidizing population responsible for the reaction of nitrites into nitrates (final stage of nitrification. However the nitrification methods served as a very important basis for the development of today understands and mathematical models for several waste treatment processes (activated sludge process using biofilm reactors and self – purification in rivers. Often nitrogen removal from sea wastewater is problematic due to the low rate of bacteria concerned. Immobilization is an economical technique to retain slow growing organisms in continuous flow reactors. Immobilized cells can be classified into “naturally” attached cells (biofilms and “artificially” immobilized cells. The simultaneous nitrification and denitrification within the step feeding biological nitrogen removal method were investigated below different inflowing substrate and aeration flow rates. The experimental results showed that there was additionally linear relationship between simultaneous nitrification and denitrification and DO concentration below the conditions of low and high aeration rate.

  4. Design a Close Loop Cooling System for EA-P1 and Its Auxiliaries to Prevent Loss of Domestic Water

    Any one of four machines i.e. EA-P1, EA-J4, EA-J5 and EA-J6 may be used to develop vacuum in water box side of main condenser in KANUPP. As per design and operating experience, most efficient one is EA-P1. But since it consumes ample quantity of domestic water which is already very short at KANUPP (even tankers are purchased), its use is avoided. If water used for its cooling is prevented from going to waste and is recycled. EA-P1 operation may be resumed thereby improving efficiency of condenser. We made a close loop for EA-P1 in order to prevent water from going to waste. For this purpose we suggested two close loop schemes and discuss their advantages and drawbacks. Feasibility of both schemes is present in this report and efficient one is proposed for installation at KANUPP. (author)

  5. Expert Meeting Report: Recommendations for Applying Water Heaters in Combination Space and Domestic Water Heating Systems

    Rudd, A.; Ueno, K.; Bergey, D.; Osser, R.

    2012-07-01

    The topic of this meeting was 'Recommendations For Applying Water Heaters In Combination Space And Domestic Water Heating Systems.' Presentations and discussions centered on the design, performance, and maintenance of these combination systems, with the goal of developing foundational information toward the development of a Building America Measure Guideline on this topic. The meeting was held at the Westford Regency Hotel, in Westford, Massachusetts on 7/31/2011.

  6. The effect of waste water treatment on river metal concentrations: removal or enrichment?

    Teuchies, J.; Bervoets, L.; Cox, T.J.S.; P. Meire; de Deckere, E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Discharge of untreated domestic and industrial waste in many European rivers resulted in low oxygen concentrations and contamination with trace metals, often concentrated in sediments. Under these anoxic conditions, the formation of insoluble metal sulfides is known to reduce metal availability. Nowadays, implementation of waste water treatment plants results in increasing surface water oxygen concentrations. Under these conditions, sediments can be turned from a trace metal sink int...

  7. The effect of waste water treatment on river metal concentrations: removal or enrichment?

    Teuchies, J.; Bervoets, L.; T. J. S. Cox; P. Meire; De Deckere, E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Discharge of untreated domestic and industrial waste in many European rivers resulted in low oxygen concentrations and contamination with trace metals, often concentrated in sediments. Under these anoxic conditions, the formation of insoluble metal sulfides is known to reduce metal availability. Nowadays, implementation of waste water treatment plants results in increasing surface water oxygen concentrations. Under these conditions, sediments can be turned from a trace metal sink into...

  8. EnviroAtlas - Domestic Water Demand by 12-Digit HUC for the Conterminous United States

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset includes domestic water demand attributes which provide insight into the amount of water currently used for indoor and outdoor residential...

  9. A Primer on Waste Water Treatment.

    Department of the Interior, Washington, DC. Federal Water Pollution Control Administration.

    This information pamphlet is for teachers, students, or the general public concerned with the types of waste water treatment systems, the need for further treatment, and advanced methods of treating wastes. Present day pollution control methods utilizing primary and secondary waste treatment plants, lagoons, and septic tanks are described,…

  10. Onsite Waste Water Treatment System

    T. Subramani

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Onsite wastewater treatment systems (OWTSs have evolved from the pit privies used widely throughout history to installations capable of producing a disinfected effluent that is fit for human consumption. Although achieving such a level of effluent quality is seldom necessary, the ability of onsite systems to remove settles able solids, floatable grease and scum, nutrients, and pathogens. From wastewater discharges defines their importance in protecting human health and environmental resources. In the modern era, the typical onsite system has consisted primarily of a septic tank and a soil absorption field, also known as a subsurface wastewater infiltration system, or SWIS. In this manual, such systems are referred to as conventional systems. Septic tanks remove most settle able and floatable material and function as an anaerobic bioreactor that promotes partial digestion of retained organic matter. Septic tank effluent, which contains significant concentrations of pathogens and nutrients, has traditionally been discharged to soil, sand, or other media absorption fields (SWISs for further treatment through biological processes, adsorption, filtration, and infiltration into underlying soils. Conventional systems work well if they are installed in areas with appropriate soils and hydraulic capacities; designed to treat the incoming waste load to meet public health, ground water, and surface water performance standards; installed properly; and maintained to ensure long-term performance. These criteria, however, are often not met. Only about one-third of the land area in the United States has soils suited for conventional subsurface soil absorption fields. System densities in some areas exceed the capacity of even suitable soils to assimilate wastewater flows and retain and transform their contaminants. In addition, many systems are located too close to ground water or surface waters and others, particularly in rural areas with newly installed public

  11. Spectrographic analysis of waste waters

    The Influence of sodium and calcium, up to a maximum concentration of 1000 mg/1 Na and 300 mg/1 Ca, in the spectrographic determination of Cr, Cu, Fe,Mn and Pb in waste waters using graphite spark excitation has been studied. In order to eliminate this influence, each of the elements Ba, Cs, In, La, Li, Sr and Ti, as well as a mixture containing 5% Li-50% Ti, have been tested as spectrochemical buffers. This mixture allows to obtain an accuracy better than 25%. Sodium and calcium enhance the line intensities of impurities, when using graphite or gold electrodes, but they produce an opposite effect if copper or silver electrodes are used. (Author) 1 refs

  12. From awareness to action in sustainable waste management : a case study on waste reduction education to foreign domestic helpers in Hong Kong

    So, Yin-fong, Yvonne; 蘇燕芳

    2013-01-01

    Solving the waste problem is one of the most challenging environmental missions for Hong Kong. Currently, the amount of waste generated has reached an unsustainable level. Hong Kong’s domestic waste disposal rate is significantly higher than other international cities like Tokyo, Taipei City and Seoul. With present trends, this mounting waste has been filled up the three landfill sites at a rate much faster than anticipated. Hong Kong SAR Government is hoping to expand the landfill site and b...

  13. Feasibility analysis of domestic hot water systems using TRNSYS

    A study was conducted in which 17 conventional and solar-based domestic hot water (DHW) systems were simulated using the TRYNSYS simulation model, and their results were compared. According to Natural Resources Canada, DHW heating currently accounts for 25 per cent of Canadian residential energy consumption and 25 per cent of Canadian residential greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The objective of this simulation study was to investigate the fuel consumption of DHW systems, their GHG emissions and 30-year life cycle costs. Another aspect of the study was to model and analyze the effect of time of use (TOU) electricity pricing which was developed by the Ontario Energy Board (OEB) to provide stable and predictable electricity pricing. TOU electricity pricing also promotes energy conservation. In addition, the TOU electricity price charged per kilowatt-hour changes throughout the day to reflect the changes in cost to produce electricity at different times of the day. The Ontario government plans to equip all homes and businesses with smart meters using TOU pricing by 2010. Therefore, this study also investigated the effects of the TOU feature by optimizing its use in the effort to reduce overall energy costs and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The results revealed that a DHW system with solar pre-heat and electrical back-up is the best system for energy conservation and GHG reduction. The best system in terms of 30-year life cycle cost is a high efficiency DHW system with an on demand modulating gas combo boiler with gray water heat recovery. 23 refs., 7 tabs., 8 figs

  14. Promising freeze protection alternatives in solar domestic hot water systems

    Bradley, D.E.

    1997-12-31

    Since the gains associated with solar thermal energy technologies are comparatively small in relation to the required capital investment, it is vital to maximize conversion efficiency. While providing the necessary function of freeze protection, the heat exchanger commonly included in solar domestic water heating systems represents a system inefficiency. This thesis explores two alternate methods of providing freeze protection without resorting to a heat exchanger. Commonly, collectors are made of rigid copper tubes separated by copper or aluminum fins. Cracking damage can occur when water is allowed to freeze and expand inside the non compliant tubes. The possibility of making collectors out of an elastic material was investigated and shown to be effective. Since unlike copper, elastomers typically have low thermal conductivities, the standard collector performance prediction equations do not apply. Modified thermal performance prediction equations were developed which can be used for both low and high thermal conductivity materials to provide accurate predictions within a limited range of plate geometries. An elastomeric collector plate was then designed and shown to have comparable performance to a copper plate collector whose aperture area is approximately 33% smaller. Another options for providing freeze protection to an SDHW system is to turn it off during the winter. Choosing a three-season operating period means two things. First, the system will have different optimums such as slope and collector area. Second, the wintertime solar energy incident on the collector is unavailable for meeting a heating load. However, the system`s heat exchanger becomes unnecessary and removing it increases the amount of energy that arrives at the storage tank during those periods in which the system is operating.

  15. Waste water from dewatering of peat

    The influence of waste water from mechanical dewatering of peat was tested on two species of stream invertebrates. We compared the effects of waste water from peat without any chemical treatment, and waste water from peat where one of the following treatments of the peat had preceded dewatering; a: acidification combined with addition of the cationic polymer Zetag 78 FS40, b: addition of aluminium in combination with the anionic polymer Magnafloc E10, c: polymerisation of the peat by acidification and addition of ferrous chloride and hydrogen peroxide. Waste water from Al/Magnafloc and from the polymerisation treatments had a higher content of suspended matter and a higher oxygen demand than those of other treatments. Total metal content of the water from all treatments was higher than in water from non-treated peat. Survival and growth of nymphs of the mayfly Heptagenia fuscogrisa and the stonefly Nemoura cinerea were compared in waste water from the different treatments. In all tests, the waste water was diluted to 5% (volume) with unchlorinated tapwater and pH was between 7.0-8.0 in all treatments during the experiment. The nymphs were fed with birch leaves that had been incubated in natural stream water for one month. Under these conditions, we did not find any significant effect of waste water on either survival or growth of these two species

  16. Domestic waste recycling, collective action and economic incentive: the case in Hong Kong.

    Yau, Yung

    2010-12-01

    Efficacy of waste recycling is one of the key determinants of environmental sustainability of a city. Like other pro-environmental activities, waste recycling cannot be successfully accomplished by just one or two people, but only by a concerted effort of the community. The collective-action dilemma creates a common underlying difficulty in formulating workable solutions to many environmental problems. With a view to the non-excludability of the outcome, rationality drives people to free-ride efforts of others in waste recycling. To solve this free-rider problem, some scholars suggest the use of economic incentive. This article attempts to study the impacts of reward schemes on waste recycling behaviour of residents in 122 private housing estates in Hong Kong. The study is differentiable from the others as the latter mainly focus on domestic waste recycling in low-rise low-density housing while this one looks into the same in a high-rise high-density residential setting. According to the results of analyses on a set of aggregate data, reward schemes are found to have a significant positive relationship with the per-household weight of recyclables collected, keeping other things constant. The research findings suggest that economic incentives do work in promoting waste recycling in Hong Kong. Practical and policy implications follow. PMID:20619628

  17. TREATMENT OF DOMESTIC WASTEWATER IN SHALLOW WASTE STABILIZATION PONDS FOR AGRICULTURAL IRRIGATION REUSE

    Valderi Duarte Leite

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Waste stabilization ponds are a well established wastewater treatment system being considered by World Health Organization as one of the most appropriated technology for domestic wastewater when agricultural reuse is considered, especially in developing countries. This study was performed in a series of pilot-scale stabilization ponds, being one facultative and three maturation ponds, with depths varying from 0.44 to 0.57 m. The substrate to be treated was composed of a mixture of domestic wastewater and previously anaerobicaly treated leachate. The experimental system was monitored in two different phases, in which the hydraulic retention times were 15 (phase 1 and 10 days (phase 2. Termotolerant coliform removal efficiencies were 3.8 log10 units in both phases while organic matter (BOD5 removal was 87 and 68% for phases 1 and 2, respectively.

  18. Amplification of thermostable lipase genes fragment from thermogenic phase of domestic waste composting process

    Nurhasanah, Nurbaiti, Santi; Madayanti, Fida; Akhmaloka

    2015-09-01

    Lipases are lipolytic enzymes, catalyze the hydrolysis of fatty acid ester bonds of triglycerides to produce free fatty acids and glycerol. The enzyme is widely used in various fields of biotechnological industry. Hence, lipases with unique properties (e.g.thermostable lipase) are still being explored by variation methods. One of the strategy is by using metagenomic approach to amplify the gene directly from environmental sample. This research was focused on amplification of lipase gene fragment directly from the thermogenic phase of domestic waste composting in aerated trenches. We used domestic waste compost from waste treatment at SABUGA, ITB for the sample. Total chromosomal DNA were directly extracted from several stages at thermogenic phase of compost. The DNA was then directly used as a template for amplification of thermostable lipase gene fragments using a set of internal primers namely Flip-1a and Rlip-1a that has been affixed with a GC clamp in reverse primer. The results showed that the primers amplified the gene from four stages of thermogenic phase with the size of lipase gene fragment of approximately 570 base pairs (bp). These results were further used for Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (DGGE) analysis to determine diversity of thermostable lipase gene fragments.

  19. Intraurban Analysis of Domestic Solid Waste Disposal Methods in a Sub-Sahara African City

    Oluwole Samuel Ojewale

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The study examined the influence of socioeconomic attributes of residents on domestic solid waste disposal methods in Lagos metropolis, Nigeria. Primary data for the study were obtained through questionnaire administered on residents in Eti-Osa, Ikeja, and Mushin Local Government Areas (LGAs representing the low, medium, and high densities, respectively, into which the sixteen LGAs in Lagos metropolis were stratified. One out of every four wards in each LGA was selected for survey. From a total of 15,275 residential buildings in the ten wards, one out of every forty buildings (2.5% was selected using systematic random sampling where a household head was sampled. Information obtained includes the residential characteristics and the disposal methods. Enquiries into the socioeconomic attributes of the residents showed that 59.9% were high income earners and 76.6% had attained tertiary school education. This study concluded that six disposal methods were common in the study area. Furthermore, through multinomial logistic regression, the influence of socioeconomic characteristics of residents (density, income, age of respondents, educational status, and length of stay on domestic solid waste disposal methods varied significantly in Lagos metropolis. The study established that most of the solid waste disposal methods utilized by residents in Lagos metropolis were not environment-friendly.

  20. Environmental sustainability of ozonating municipal waste water

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Hansen, Peter Augusto

    The EU FP6 NEPTUNE project is related to the EU Water Framework Directive and the main goal is to develop new and optimize existing waste water treatment technologies (WWTT) and sludge handling methods for municipal waste water. Besides nutrients, a special focus area is micropollutants (e.g. pha...... total more that 20 different waste water and sludge treatment technologies are to be assessed. This paper will present the preliminary LCA results from running the induced versus avoided impact approach (mainly based on existing LCIA methodology) on one of the WWTTs, i.e. ozonation....

  1. Environmental sustainability of waste water ozonation

    Larsen, Henrik Fred; Hansen, Peter Augusto

    The EU FP6 NEPTUNE project is related to the EU Water Framework Directive and the main goal is to develop new and optimize existing waste water treatment technologies (WWTT) and sludge handling methods for municipal waste water. Besides nutrients, a special focus area is micropollutants (e.g. pha...... whole effluent toxicity have been developed. About 15 different waste water and sludge treatment technologies (or combinations) have been assessed. This paper will present the LCA results from running the induced versus avoided impact approach on one of the WWTTs, i.e. ozonation....

  2. Optimization of PWR waste water treatment

    The Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985 has mandated specific volume limitations for waste generators and disposal sites. This, combined with increasing cost, has caused added emphasis to be placed on waste minimization and volume reduction. Since waste streams, as well as technical specifications for water release or re-use, differ from plant to plant, this effort to minimize and reduce waste must be site specific. Over the past several years, numerous water treatment technologies have become available and have resulted in reduced waste generation. This paper discusses the combination of various technologies Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. has applied to process Indian Point II's liquid waste streams, resulting in effective waste reduction program. Included in this discussion is the station's waste reduction program history, actions and results illustrated by the change from evaporation to state-of-the-art liquid waste processing. The paper demonstrates that the Indian Point experience has direct application to other PWRs in the areas of: (1) attempting to achieve the desired results through in-plant systems, (2) evaporator availability, (3) dealing with a waste stream which fluctuates over a broad spectrum and (4) changing from total waste recovery to discharge

  3. Discussion about the standard system on urban domestic water saving technology in China

    YANG Shujun; REN Xiaoli; GAO Benhu

    2007-01-01

    Standard is the technical foundation of national economic and social development, and it is the basic rule of establishing social regulation.Researching and constituting the standard system of urban domestic water saving technology is to offer important science basis for revising standard plan and standardize research plan. This paper introduces the present situation of our urban domestic water saving technical standard system, problem and the development direction in the future, as well as project planning of constructing urban domestic water saving technical standard system.

  4. Lyophilization for Water Recovery From Solid Waste

    Flynn, Michael; Litwiller, Eric; Reinhard, Martin

    2003-01-01

    This abstract describes the development of a solid waste treatment system designed for a near term human exploration mission. The technology being developed is an energy- efficient lyophilization technique that recovers water from spacecraft solid waste. In the lyophilization process water in an aqueous waste is frozen and then sublimed, resulting in the separation of the waste into a dried solid material and liquid water. This technology is ideally suited to applications where water recovery rates approaching 100% are desirable but production of CO, is not. Water contained within solid wastes accounts for approximately 3% of the total water balance. If 100% closure of the water loop is desired the water contained within this waste would need to be recovered. To facilitate operation in microgravity thermoelectric heat pumps have be used in place of traditional fluid cycle heat pumps. A mathematical model of a thermoelectric lyophilizer has been developed and used to generate energy use and processing rate parameters. The results of laboratory investigations and discussions with ALS program management have been used to iteratively arrive at a prototype design. This design address operational limitations which were identified in the laboratory studies and handling and health concerns raised by ALS program management. The current prototype design is capable of integration into the ISS Waste Collection System.

  5. Domestic water uses: Characterization of daily cycles in the north region of Portugal

    Nowadays, there is an increasing discussion among specialists about water use efficiency and the best measures to improve it. In Portugal, there have been a few attempts to expand the implementation of in situ water reuse projects. However, there is a lack of information about indoor water uses and how they are influenced by sociodemographic characteristics. There are several studies that investigate per capita global water usage, but the partitioning of this volume per domestic device and daily cycles is yet unknown. Identified as one of the key questions in sustainable building design, the water end-use is of primary importance to the design of hydraulic networks in buildings. In order to overcome this lack, a quantitative characterization of daily water uses for each domestic device was performed, based on a weekly monitoring program in fifty-two different dwellings in the northern region of Portugal (Vila Real, Valpaços and Oporto). For forty of them, each water usage of different domestic devices of each dwelling was recorded. At the same time, the remaining twelve dwellings were also monitored in order to register the volume of water consumed in each utilization of each domestic device. This paper presents the results of this complete monitoring program, using collected data to establish indoor water use patterns for each domestic device, aiming to support a more realistic approach to residential water use. The daily cycles in the different cities, where the monitoring program was performed, are also presented, in order to evaluate possible influences of sociodemographic characteristics. - Highlights: • This paper presents a method to find out the pattern of water use in dwellings. • The number of uses per person a day, by domestic device, is presented. • The volume spent per type of use by domestic device is presented. • The daily cycles per domestic device are presented. • Sociodemographic characteristics seem to affect the daily cycles

  6. Domestic water uses: Characterization of daily cycles in the north region of Portugal

    Matos, Cristina, E-mail: crismato@utad.pt [ECT, University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro (UTAD), Apartado 1013, 5001801 Vila Real (Portugal); Teixeira, Carlos A. [CITAB, University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro, Apartado 1013, 5001-801 Vila Real Portugal (Portugal); Duarte, A.A.L.S. [Civil Engineering Department, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Bentes, I. [ECT, University of Trás-os-Montes e Alto Douro (UTAD), Apartado 1013, 5001801 Vila Real (Portugal)

    2013-08-01

    Nowadays, there is an increasing discussion among specialists about water use efficiency and the best measures to improve it. In Portugal, there have been a few attempts to expand the implementation of in situ water reuse projects. However, there is a lack of information about indoor water uses and how they are influenced by sociodemographic characteristics. There are several studies that investigate per capita global water usage, but the partitioning of this volume per domestic device and daily cycles is yet unknown. Identified as one of the key questions in sustainable building design, the water end-use is of primary importance to the design of hydraulic networks in buildings. In order to overcome this lack, a quantitative characterization of daily water uses for each domestic device was performed, based on a weekly monitoring program in fifty-two different dwellings in the northern region of Portugal (Vila Real, Valpaços and Oporto). For forty of them, each water usage of different domestic devices of each dwelling was recorded. At the same time, the remaining twelve dwellings were also monitored in order to register the volume of water consumed in each utilization of each domestic device. This paper presents the results of this complete monitoring program, using collected data to establish indoor water use patterns for each domestic device, aiming to support a more realistic approach to residential water use. The daily cycles in the different cities, where the monitoring program was performed, are also presented, in order to evaluate possible influences of sociodemographic characteristics. - Highlights: • This paper presents a method to find out the pattern of water use in dwellings. • The number of uses per person a day, by domestic device, is presented. • The volume spent per type of use by domestic device is presented. • The daily cycles per domestic device are presented. • Sociodemographic characteristics seem to affect the daily cycles.

  7. Management of domestic solid wastes at the Akwapim South Municipality: a case study

    The key findings of a solid waste characterization study conducted at Nsawam and Adoagyiri of the Akwapim South Municipality are reported. Household waste generated by a number of residents of these two important towns of the Municipality, were collected through a two-way stratification based on differences in income levels and class of residential areas over a 12- week period, between December 2007 and March 2008. A total of 24 collections were made and about 2319 kg of household solid wastes were collected, weighed and classified according to the various components of the waste streams after thoroughly sorting the waste. Each component of the waste stream (i.e. organic, paper, plastics, metals/cans, textiles, glass, inert materials/residues and miscellaneous components) was then reweighed and the weights recorded. Information on demographics such as household size, characteristics and detailed information on household waste management practices of the study areas were obtained through a self administered questionnaire. Other physico-chemical characteristics of the collected household solid waste such as moisture content, density and volumes and heavy metals were measured. The average waste composition from Nsawam were 62% organic component, 7% paper and card component, 8% plastic and rubber component, 1 % glass component, 3% metal/can component, 2% textile component, 14% residues or inert materials and 3% miscellaneous or other waste component. However, for Adoagyiri, average composition revealed 50% organic component, 10% paper component, 12% plastics and rubber, 3% glass, 4% metal, 2 % textile, 15% residues or inert materials and 4% miscellaneous or other waste. The study also sought to examine the extent to which household demographics influenced waste stream character. Physico-chemical analysis was also conducted on composite samples of domestic solid waste from the two towns. The results of this analysis yielded information on the compostable and combustible

  8. PERFORMANCE EVALUATION OF WASTE WATER TREATMENT PLANT

    K. SUNDARA KUMAR; P. SUNDARA KUMAR,; Dr.M.J.Ratnakanth Babu

    2010-01-01

    The present study has been undertaken to evaluate performance efficiency of a waste water treatment plant. A sewage treatment plant operating on biological treatment method (Activated Sludge Process) with an average wastewater inflow of 23MLD bas been considered for case study. Waste water samples were collected at different stages of treatment units and analysed for the major water quality parameters, such as biological oxygen demand (BOD), chemical oxygen demand (COD), total suspended solid...

  9. PRIMING OF A LOW CAPACITY WASTE WATER TREATEMENT PLANT

    Nicoleta Luminiţa Jurj

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In wastewater treatment plants, secondary biologic treatment is generally compulsory for the localities having less than 10,000 equivalent inhabitants, with a supplementary removal of nutrients if the area is a sensitive one. For the areas which are not suitable for centralized household used water collecting network individual treatment devices or collective low capacity devices are recommended. For certain settlements, for instance for the mountainous dispersed villages, or for detached individual households or farms the collective devices can not be an economic solution as involves high maintenance costs and exploiting problems due to long pipes for low flow rates. Priming is one of the starting up processes of a waste water treatment plant. This is not a very difficult process and requires no specialized staff. However, for helping the owners of a low capacity treatment plant, priming of ORM 5 type mechanical - biological equipment consisting in a tank with four compartments, designed for five equivalent inhabitants was studied inside the plant of Timisoara municipality. For the experimental tests waste water from the Timisoara city sewage network was used. This is mixed waste water resulted from faecal/domestic, industrial and rain water. The study comprised tests in unfavorable technological conditions. The conclusions of the monitoring process underline the need of control of the aeration process and the negative technological and consequently the negative economic effect of the less effective process control.

  10. Characterization of domestic wastes incineration clinkers. Study on the possibilities of dioxines transfer in the environment; Caracterisation des machefers d'incineration d'ordures menageres. Etude sur les possibilites de transfert de dioxines vers l'environnement

    Bartet, B.

    2001-07-15

    The clinkers, resulting from the domestic wastes incineration, contain dioxines. In order to evaluate the possible transfer of these pollutants in the environment, especially towards the underground water, this document brings together data on the dioxines content in clinkers from domestic wastes incineration, other combustion wastes and soils. After a comparison of the dioxines content and the emission factors, the report presents the experimental study on the transfer vectors identification. (A.L.B.)

  11. Integrated waste and water management system

    Murray, R. W.; Sauer, R. L.

    1986-01-01

    The performance requirements of the NASA Space Station have prompted a reexamination of a previously developed integrated waste and water management system that used distillation and catalytic oxydation to purify waste water, and microbial digestion and incineration for waste solids disposal. This system successfully operated continuously for 206 days, for a 4-man equivalent load of urine, feces, wash water, condensate, and trash. Attention is given to synergisms that could be established with other life support systems, in the cases of thermal integration, design commonality, and novel technologies.

  12. Heat Consumption Assessment of the Domestic Hot Water Systems in the Apartment Buildings

    Grasmanis, D; Greķis, A; Talcis, N

    2013-01-01

    This study presents the analysis of energy consumption for domestic hot water in apartment buildings in Riga. The aggregate data contains information about 39 apartment buildings, including heat energy consumption and domestic hot water (DHW) consumption. The analysis is focused on the heat energy consumption in the DHW system. The analysis characterizes the DHW consumption, energy consumption for DHW and energy losses in the DHW systems in apartment buildings.

  13. Heat Consumption Assessment of the Domestic Hot Water Systems in the Apartment Buildings

    Grasmanis, Dzintars; Talcis, Normunds; Greķis, Aldis

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the analysis of energy consumption for domestic hot water in apartment buildings in Riga, Latvia. The aggregate data contains information about 39 apartment buildings, including heat energy consumption and domestic hot water (DHW) consumption. The analysis is focused on the heat energy consumption and seasonal characteristics in the DHW system.The analysis characterizes the DHW consumption, energy consumption for DHW and energy losses in the DHW systems in apartment buildi...

  14. Sustainable treatment of municipal waste water

    Hansen, Peter Augusto; Larsen, Henrik Fred

    develop and implement a methodology to compare and prioritize these technologies and optimizations based on a holistic approach. This will be achieved through the use of life cycle assessment (LCA) along with cost/efficiency analysis with focus on the effects of nutrients, pathogens and micropollutants (i.......e. heavy metals, pharmaceuticals and endocrine disruptors) in the waste water. As a novel approach, the potential ecotoxicity and human toxicity impacts from a high number of micropollutants and the potential impacts from pathogens will be included. In total, more that 20 different waste water and sludge...... treatment technologies are to be assessed. This paper will present the first LCA results from running existing life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) methodology on some of the waste water treatment technologies. Keywords: Sustainability, LCA, micropollutants, waste water treatment technologies....

  15. Hanford 200 area (sanitary) waste water system

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site is located in southeastern Washington State. The Hanford Site is approximately 1,450 sq. km (560 sq. mi) of semiarid land set aside for activities of the DOE. The reactor fuel processing and waste management facilities are located in the 200 Areas. Over the last 50 years at Hanford dicard of hazardous and sanitary waste water has resulted in billions of liters of waste water discharged to the ground. As part of the TPA, discharges of hazardous waste water to the ground and waters of Washington State are to be eliminated in 1995. Currently sanitary waste water from the 200 Area Plateau is handled with on-site septic tank and subsurface disposal systems, many of which were constructed in the 1940s and most do not meet current standards. Features unique to the proposed new sanitary waste water handling systems include: (1) cost effective operation of the treatment system as evaporative lagoons with state-of-the-art liner systems, and (2) routing collection lines to avoid historic contamination zones. The paper focuses on the challenges met in planning and designing the collection system

  16. The potential of Zea mays, Commelina bengelensis, Helianthus annuus and Amaranthus hybridus for phytoremediation of waste water

    Chacha Joseph Sarima; Okong'o Eric Rang’ondi; Kimenyu Phylis Njeri; Oyaro Nathan Mayora

    2012-01-01

    Waste-water from domestic use and from industrial effluent burden the water systems with high levels of heavy metal hence there is need to remove these heavy metals so that the waste water can be recycled for use for household or irrigation. The present study has screened Zea mays (maize), Commelina bengelensis (wondering jew), Helianthus annuus (sunflower) and Amaranthus hybridus (amaranthus) for their ability to bioaccumulate Pb, Cu, Cd and Zn metals. The results obtained show that the H. a...

  17. Use of Industrial Waste Water for Agricultural Purpose: Pb and Cd in Vegetables in Bikaner City, India

    Rajendra Singh; Verma, R S; Yogita Yadav

    2012-01-01

    Shortage of irrigation water resources is leading to the use of domestic and industrial waste water in agriculture. esp. in urban areas. Being contaminated by metals and various toxic chemicals these waste waters leads to the exposure of heavy metals and hazardous chemicals and the subsequent human health hazards through agriculture products and live stocks. Increasing cases of cancer and kidney problems is also related with this aspect. In present study human health risk assessment taken in ...

  18. Numerical hydraulic modeling of urban waste water collecting systems : Working Project at Chazelles-sur-Lyon, France

    Genty, Stanislas

    2014-01-01

    Urban waste water collecting systems are designed to convey domestic, industrial and storm water. When sizing sewer network, heavy rainfall must be considered to provide the needed hydraulic capacity for collection. Maintenance is also required in order to avoid anomalies such as inflow, infiltration and unusual polluted discharges from Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs). Inflow and infiltration decrease the treatment yield at the Waste water Treatment Plant (WWTP) and participate in hydraulic o...

  19. Radioactivities at megalopolis waste water treatment plants

    In waste water treatment plants, the nuclides originated from nuclear medicine are generally detected. In the Tokyo Metropolis, the sludges in five waste water treatment plants were investigated, where the same nuclides were detected, though the concentration was different. The radioactivity was far lower than the permissible concentration level for waste water. In the aspect of environmental protection, the radioactivity contained in the resultant sludges is important. Such sludges are mostly treated by incineration. In this case, the nuclide released to the atmosphere is mainly 131I. This quantity is only slight presently. However, if the quantity of RIs used should increase largely, it will be necessary to monitor the radioactivity in the waste treatment plants. The most suitable place for the monitoring is the process of sludge treatment, preferably with Ge semiconductor detectors. (Mori, K.)

  20. Water and waste water management Generation Victoria - Latrobe Valley

    Water is a necessary resource for coal fired power plant and waste water is generated. The efficient management of water and waste water systems becomes an important operational environmental factor. This paper describes the development and implementation of a ten year water and waste water management strategy for the Latrobe Valley Group of brown coal fired power stations in Victoria. In early 1991, a team was put together of representatives from each power site to develop the strategy entitled 'SECV Latrobe Valley Water and Wastewater Management Strategy'. The strategy was developed with extensive public consultation, which was a factor in protracting the process such that the final document was not promulgated until late 1992. However, the final comprehensive document endorsed and agreed by management, has since attracted favourable comment as a model of its type. (author). 2 figs

  1. Perfluorooctane surfactants in waste waters, the major source of river pollution.

    Becker, Anna Maria; Gerstmann, Silke; Frank, Hartmut

    2008-05-01

    Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are persistent and widely distributed in the environment. Recently, the discharge of municipal waste water has been shown to be an important route of such perfluoroalkyl surfactants into the aquatic environment. The aim of this study was to assess the mass flow of PFOA and PFOS from typical waste water treatment plants (WWTPs) into surface waters. Samples were collected at different stages of treatment of four WWTPs in Northern Bavaria, Germany, and from the rivers receiving the treated waste waters (WW). The outflow of PFOA from the WWTPs to the rivers was 20-fold higher than the inflow to the plants; about a tenth was removed with the sludge. For PFOS, the increase from inlet to outlet was about 3-fold; almost half of it was retained in the sludge. Both surfactants were released into river water from the WWTP of a medium-sized city with domestic, industrial and commercial waste waters; in domestic waste waters the surfactants were found at much lower levels. PMID:18291438

  2. 农村生活垃圾治理对策研究%Countermeasures of Rural Domestic Waste Treatment

    潘志坤

    2013-01-01

    针对我国农村垃圾产生量增长迅速,处理缺口较大,环境污染等突出问题,列举了建立“村收集、镇转运、县处理”的城乡生活垃圾收运处理体系,提出了相应的治理对策.%Aiming at the outstanding problems of rural domestic waste in China, such as rapid growth of waste generation, bigger gap of waste treatment, and environmental pollution, the establishment of urban and rural domestic waste collection, transportation and treatment system of village collection, town transportation and county treatment was listed. And the corresponding countermeasures were put forward.

  3. Waste Water Disposal Design And Management III

    This book gives descriptions of underlying chemistry, chemical conditioning, facilities, sterilization and special water treatment. It includes chemical combination and a chemical equation, molarity, normality, application of normality, chemical evaluation and law of mass action. It deals with chemical conditioning for design and management of waste water treatment.

  4. for the Waste Water Cleaning Plant

    E. V. Grigorieva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A model of a waste water treatment plant is investigated. The model is described by a nonlinear system of two differential equations with one bounded control. An optimal control problem of minimizing concentration of the polluted water on the given time interval is stated and solved analytically with the use of the Pontryagin Maximum Principle and Green's Theorem. Computer simulations of a model of an industrial waste water treatment plant show the advantage of using our optimal strategy. Possible applications are discussed.

  5. Waste water treatment in Bukkerup (VB)

    Thomsen, Rikke; Overgaard, Morten; Jørgensen, Michael Søgaard

    1999-01-01

    In connection to the new waste water plan of Tølløse municipal the technical and environmental board has suggested that Bukkerup get a sewer system which brings the waste water to the treatment plant for Tysinge. All though the residents would like to list alternative suggestions which improve the...... local water environment but is still competitive.In this report the alternatives are listed, e.i. root system plants, sand filters and mini treatment plants.The conclusion is that root system plants and a combination of root system plants and sand filters are better that the sewer system....

  6. Predicted impact of power coastdown operations on the water chemistry for two domestic boiling water reactors

    A theoretical model was adapted to evaluate the impact of power coastdown on the water chemistry of two commercial boiling water reactors (BWRs) in this work. In principle, the power density of a nuclear reactor upon a power level decrease would immediately be lowered, followed by water chemistry variations due to reduced radiolysis of water and extended coolant residence times in the core and near-core regions. It is currently a common practice for commercial BWRs to adopt hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) for corrosion mitigation. The optimal feedwater hydrogen concentration may be different after a power coastdown is implemented in a BWR. A computer code DEMACE was used in the current study to investigate the impact of various power coastdown levels on major radiolytic species concentrations and electrochemical corrosion potential (ECP) behavior of components in the primary coolant circuit of two domestic reactors operating under either normal water chemistry or HWC. Our analyses indicated that under a rated core flow rate the oxidizing species concentrations and the ECP did not vary monotonously with decreases in reactor power level at a fixed feedwater hydrogen concentration. In particular, ECP variations basically followed the patterns of hydrogen peroxide in the select regions and exhibited high values at power levels of 95% and 90% for Chinshan-1 and Kuosheng-1, respectively. (author)

  7. Water supply, waste water cleaning and waste disposal. 2. rev. ed.

    The first part of the book contains fundamentals of chemistry, always having environmental protection in mind. Numerous examples are calculated. The second part gives detailed explanations of the material-scientific and analytical bases of the indispensable resource water and its conditioning, waste water cleaning and sludge treatment. Collection, transport, handling, disposal and recycling of unavoidable wastes and toxic wastes are finally dealt with. (orig./EF)

  8. Measure Guideline: Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems

    Rudd, A.

    2012-08-01

    This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

  9. Determination of uranium concentration in domestic water samples by fission track method

    The sensitive and simple fission track detection technique using a dry method with Melinex-0 plastic track detector was applied for the determination of uranium concentration in samples of domestic water supply plants collected from different states of India, namely West Bengal, Uttar Pradesh, Rajasthan, Punjab and Delhi. The analyses show that uranium concentration of water samples collected from different types of domestic water supply plants varies from 0.6+-0.02 to 19.2+-0.6 μg/l. The present investigations may be useful from the point of view of radiation hygiene. (author) 15 refs.; 1 tab

  10. Measure Guideline. Combination Forced-Air Space and Tankless Domestic Hot Water Heating Systems

    Rudd, Armin [Building Science Corporation Industry Team (BSC), Somerville, MA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    This document describes design and application guidance for combination space and tankless domestic hot water heating systems (combination systems) used in residential buildings, based on field evaluation, testing, and industry meetings conducted by Building Science Corporation. As residential building enclosure improvements continue to drive heating loads down, using the same water heating equipment for both space heating and domestic water heating becomes attractive from an initial cost and space-saving perspective. This topic is applicable to single- and multi-family residential buildings, both new and retrofitted.

  11. Development of Standardized Domestic Hot Water Event Schedules for Residential Buildings

    Hendron, R.; Burch, J.

    2008-08-01

    The Building America Research Benchmark is a standard house definition created as a point of reference for tracking progress toward multi-year energy savings targets. As part of its development, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has established a set of domestic hot water events to be used in conjunction with sub-hourly analysis of advanced hot water systems.

  12. The Status of Domestic Water Demand: Supply Deficit in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal

    Parmeshwar Udmale; Hiroshi Ishidaira; Bhesh Raj Thapa; Narendra Man Shakya

    2016-01-01

    United Nations Sustainable Development Goal 6 targets access to water and sanitation for all people in the next 15 years. However, for developing countries such as Nepal, it is more challenging to achieve this goal given its poor infrastructure and high population growth. To assess the water crisis in the most developed and populated area of Nepal, the Kathmandu Valley, we estimated available water resources and domestic water demand in the valley. We estimated a supply deficit of 102 million...

  13. Disaggregating Hot Water Use and Predicting Hot Water Waste in Five Test Homes

    Henderson, Hugh [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States); Wade, Jeremy [ARIES Collaborative, New York, NY (United States)

    2014-04-01

    While it is important to make the equipment (or "plant") in a residential hot water system more efficient, the hot water distribution system also affects overall system performance and energy use. Energy wasted in heating water that is not used is estimated to be on the order of 10%-30% of total domestic hot water (DHW) energy use. This field monitoring project installed temperature sensors on the distribution piping (on trunks and near fixtures) in five houses near Syracuse, NY, and programmed a data logger to collect data at 5 second intervals whenever there was a hot water draw. This data was used to assign hot water draws to specific end uses in the home as well as to determine the portion of each hot water that was deemed useful (i.e., above a temperature threshold at the fixture). Overall, the procedures to assign water draws to each end use were able to successfully assign about 50% of the water draws, but these assigned draws accounted for about 95% of the total hot water use in each home. The amount of hot water deemed as useful ranged from low of 75% at one house to a high of 91% in another. At three of the houses, new water heaters and distribution improvements were implemented during the monitoring period and the impact of these improvements on hot water use and delivery efficiency were evaluated.

  14. Disaggregating Hot Water Use and Predicting Hot Water Waste in Five Test Homes

    Henderson, H.; Wade, J.

    2014-04-01

    While it is important to make the equipment (or 'plant') in a residential hot water system more efficient, the hot water distribution system also affects overall system performance and energy use. Energy wasted in heating water that is not used is estimated to be on the order of 10 to 30 percent of total domestic hot water (DHW) energy use. This field monitoring project installed temperature sensors on the distribution piping (on trunks and near fixtures) and programmed a data logger to collect data at 5 second intervals whenever there was a hot water draw. This data was used to assign hot water draws to specific end uses in the home as well as to determine the portion of each hot water that was deemed useful (i.e., above a temperature threshold at the fixture). Five houses near Syracuse NY were monitored. Overall, the procedures to assign water draws to each end use were able to successfully assign about 50% of the water draws, but these assigned draws accounted for about 95% of the total hot water use in each home. The amount of hot water deemed as useful ranged from low of 75% at one house to a high of 91% in another. At three of the houses, new water heaters and distribution improvements were implemented during the monitoring period and the impact of these improvements on hot water use and delivery efficiency were evaluated.

  15. Waste water treatment in Triglav national park

    Peterlin, Blaž

    2012-01-01

    The thesis presents the pollution problems caused by municipal waste water in the protected area of the Triglav National Park. Although most people are not detecting the problem, the consequences of water pollution in the area are clearly visible in the mountain lakes and downstream springs. Water resources near the mountain huts and agricultural land show obvious signs of nurient overload. Non- native plant and animal species recklessly discharged into the natural environment also pose a thr...

  16. STUDY ON WASTE WATER TREATMENT PLANTS

    Mariana DUMITRU

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Biogas is more and more used as an alternative source of energy, considering the fact that it is obtained from waste materials and it can be easily used in cities and rural communities for many uses, between which, as a fuel for households. Biogas has many energy utilisations, depending on the nature of the biogas source and the local demand. Generally, biogas can be used for heat production by direct combustion, electricity production by fuel cells or micro-turbines, Combined Hest and Power generation or as vehicle fuel. In this paper we search for another uses of biogas and Anaerobe Digestion substrate, such as: waste water treatment plants and agricultural wastewater treatment, which are very important in urban and rural communities, solid waste treatment plants, industrial biogas plants, landfill gas recovery plants. These uses of biogas are very important, because the gas emissions and leaching to ground water from landfill sites are serious threats for the environment, which increase more and more bigger during the constant growth of some human communities. That is why, in the developed European countries, the sewage sludge is treated by anaerobe digestion, depending on national laws. In Romania, in the last years more efforts were destined to use anaerobe digestion for treating waste waters and management of waste in general. This paper can be placed in this trend of searching new ways of using with maximum efficiency the waste resulted in big communities.

  17. Waste water discharges into natural waters

    The aqueous discharges into natural waters is a very technical solution expecially for surface buoyant discharges. It is not only convenient to limit the concentration levels of the discharges, but also to improve the turbolent processes that diluite the discharge. Mostly these processes depend by some geometric parameters of the discharge and by some physical parameters of the effluent and of the receiving water body. An appropriate choice of some parameters, using also suitable mathematical models, allows to design discharges with a very high dilution; so the decreasing of the pollutant levels is improved and the environmental impact can be reduced versus a not diluted effluent. The simulations of a mathematical model, here described, prove that in some circumstances, expecially in case of discharges of fresh water into saline water bodies with a low velocity of the current, the dilution is poor; the effluent can be trapped in a narrow water surface layer where the pollutant concentrations remain high. also far away from the discharge point

  18. Chemical Industry Waste water Treatment

    Treatment of chemical industrial wastewater from building and construction chemicals factory and plastic shoes manufacturing factory was investigated. The two factories discharge their wastewater into the public sewerage network. The results showed the wastewater discharged from the building and construction chemicals factory was highly contaminated with organic compounds. The average values of COD and BOD were 2912 and 150 mg O2/l. Phenol concentration up to 0.3 mg/l was detected. Chemical treatment using lime aided with ferric chloride proved to be effective and produced an effluent characteristics in compliance with Egyptian permissible limits. With respect to the other factory, industrial wastewater was mixed with domestic wastewater in order to lower the organic load. The COD, BOD values after mixing reached 5239 and 2615 mg O2/l. The average concentration of phenol was 0.5 mg/l. Biological treatment using activated sludge or rotating biological contactor (RBe) proved to be an effective treatment system in terms of producing an effluent characteristic within the permissible limits set by the law

  19. EnviroAtlas - Milwaukee, WI - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, the community level domestic water use is calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water...

  20. EnviroAtlas - Fresno, CA - Domestic Water Demand per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, community level domestic water demand is calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water...

  1. EnviroAtlas - Woodbine, IA - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, the community level domestic water use is calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water...

  2. EnviroAtlas - Tampa, FL - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, the community level domestic water use was calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water...

  3. EnviroAtlas - Durham, NC - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, the community domestic water use was calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water per...

  4. EnviroAtlas - New Bedford, MA - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, the community level domestic water use is calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water...

  5. EnviroAtlas - Green Bay, WI - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, the community level domestic water use is calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water...

  6. EnviroAtlas - Paterson, NJ - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in the EnviroAtlas, the community level domestic water use is calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water per day...

  7. EnviroAtlas - Phoenix, AZ - Domestic Water Demand per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, community level domestic water demand is calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water...

  8. EnviroAtlas - Pittsburgh, PA - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, the community level domestic water use was calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water...

  9. EnviroAtlas - Memphis, TN - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, the community level domestic water use is calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water...

  10. EnviroAtlas - New York, NY - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, the community level domestic water use is calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water...

  11. EnviroAtlas - Portland, OR - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in the EnviroAtlas, the community level domestic water use is calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water per day...

  12. EnviroAtlas - Austin, TX - Domestic Water Use per Day by U.S. Census Block Group

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — As included in this EnviroAtlas dataset, the community level domestic water use is calculated using locally available water use data per capita in gallons of water...

  13. Solar Energy for Domestic Hot Water: Case Studies in Sisimiut 1999-2005

    Reimann, Gregers Peter

    2005-01-01

    Two pioneer solar domestic hot water systems were installed at Bygge- og Anlægsskolen in Sisimiut in 1999 and 2000. Detailed measurements of energy flows and solar radiation incl. snow reflectance has been undertaken for both plants. Since August 2004 data logging of the measurements was made...... available online on the website www.arcticsolar.com. Measurements show that solar plant 1 and 2 cover 22% and 23%, respectively, of the energy spent for domestic hot water heating. This paper summarises the findings from the past 5 years....

  14. Integrated water and waste management

    Harremoës, P.

    1997-01-01

    The paper discusses concepts and developments within water quantity, water quality, integrated environmental assessment and wastewater treatment. The historical and the global perspectives are used in the discussion of the role of engineers in today's society. Sustainabilty and ethics are taken...... into the analysis. There is a need for re-evaluation of the resource, society and environment scenarios with a view to the totality of the system and with proper analysis of the flow of water and matter through society. Among the tools are input-output analysis and cradle to grave analysis, in...

  15. Opportunities for utility involvement with solar domestic hot water

    Carlisle, N.; Christensen, C. (National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)); Barrett, L. (Barrett Consulting Associates, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO (United States))

    1992-05-01

    Solar water heating is one of a number of options that can be considered under utility demand-side management (DSM) programs. Utilities perceive a range of potential benefits for solar water heating in terms of customer service, energy conservation, load management, environmental enhancement, and public relations. The solar industry may benefit from utility marketing efforts, economies of scale, added credibility, financing options, and long-term maintenance arrangements. This paper covers three topics: (1) the energy and demand impacts of solar water heating on utility load profiles based on the results of four studies in the literature, (2) the results of workshops sponsored by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to identify key issues faced by utilities in considering residential solar water heating as a DSM option, (3) several current or planned utility programs to promote solar water heating. 7 refs.

  16. Efficiency evaluation and consumer economic analysis of domestic water heaters

    Slaughter, G.G.; Spann, D.E.

    1978-09-01

    The performances of one gas-fired and two electric storage-type water heaters were characterized experimentally as a function of water tank temperature. For both types of heaters the application of additional insulation was highly cost effective. For the gas-fired water heater the pilot burner flue losses (92% at a water temperature of 150/sup 0/F (65.6/sup 0/C)) were reduced in a cost-effective manner by either pilot-orifice restriction or flue blocking with electric ignition. In addition, an electrically powered burner, with flue modifications, increased the heat-exchange efficiency of the main burner from 72 to 85% at 160/sup 0/F (71.1/sup 0/C). The heat-loss rate per unit of bare-tank area is a useful number in assessing the energy-conservation potential of a water heater.

  17. Waste water reuse pathways for processing tomato

    Battilani, A; Plauborg, Finn; Andersen, Mathias Neumann;

    allow a safe use of waste water produced by small communities/industries (≤2000 EI) or of treated water discharged in irrigation channels. Water treatment technologies are coupled with irrigation strategies and technologies to obtain a flexible, easy to use, integrated management.......  Direct or indirect water reuse involves several aspects: contamination by faecal, inorganic and xenobiotic pollutants; high levels of suspended solids and salinity; rational use of the dissolved nutrients (particularly nitrogen). The challenge is apply new strategies and technologies which allows...... to use the lowest irrigation water quality without harming nor food safety neither yield and fruit or derivatives quality. The EU project SAFIR aims help farmers solve problems with low quality water and decreased access to water. New water treatment devices (prototypes) are under development to...

  18. MACROWater: a Top-down, Policy-driven Model for Forecasting Domestic Water Demand

    Parsons, J.(Nevis Laboratory, Columbia University, Irvington, NY, United States of America); Rees, P.; Sim, P.; McDonald, A.

    2007-01-01

    MACROWater is a top-down domestic water demand model developed for the WaND project (Water Cycle Management for New Developments). Forecasts have been produced for all local authorities in England and Wales. They can be aggregrated for different reporting areas (such as Government Office Regions, Sustainable Communities and water companies). Sustainable community is the official term for key strategic areas, earmarked for rapid expansion of housing supply (such as the M11 corridor, Ashford, M...

  19. Determining the potential impact of a micro heat pump for domestic water heating / Pieter Willem Jordaan

    Jordaan, Pieter Willem

    2002-01-01

    Hot water used in the South African domestic sector is mostly heated by in-tank electrical resistance heaters. These so-called "geysers" are the major contributors to the undesirable high morning and afternoon peaks imposed on the national electricity supply grid. These peak demands continue to be of concern to Eskom. The "reduced capacity in-line water heating system design methodology" was developed to address this problem. A parallel inline heat pump water heater further red...

  20. Process for the biological purification of waste water

    1992-01-01

    Process for the biological purification of waste water by the activated sludge method, the waste water being mixed with recirculated sludge and being subjected to an anaerobic treatment, before the waste water thus treated is alternately subjected to anoxic and aerobic treatments and the waste...... water thus treated is led into a clarification zone for settling sludge, which sludge is recirculated in order to be mixed with the crude waste water. As a result, a simultaneous reduction of the content both of nitrogen and phosphorus of the waste water is achieved....

  1. Impact of Training Program to Rationalize Consumption of Domestic Water Usages

    Mohammad Said Damanhouri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Reducing water consumption in terms of scarcity of water in Jordan which needs to rationalize consumption of the domestic water usages by some families in Amman-Jordan. Approach: This study aimed to decrease water consumption in household usages and to involve and encouraging the pioneer students in voluntary efforts to reduce domestic water. The study sample consisted of 121 female students of Princess’ Alia University College represented 121 Jordanian families in Amman. They trained to reduce flow of water and the time during usage water in kitchen; toilet; bathroom; washing cars; and to put a plastic bottle full of half liter of water in the toilet’s water tank. Economical and social variables of families were obtained from special questionnaire of this study, data were formed from previous measurements and information; the data analyzed throughout a simple statistical approach. Results: The families whom represented this study sample have positively responded for the proposed program; through reducing water consumption in domestic usages. The most important factor effects on rationalized water consumption are: Average monthly income, average family members, average of family members ages, the size of water tank of the toilet, size of shower used. Conclusion/Recommendations: The study concluded that the amount of preserved water in a bathroom may reach 25%, in kitchen 29, in toilet 10%, in washing cars 9%, of water consumption before implementation program at each of the previous sectors. The total amount of preserved water in Amman may reach to 11 million cubic meters annually. The study recommends implementing this simple program on the whole of Jordanian families as much as possible and encouraging the Jordanian citizens to use different tools, means, programs that may control water consumption and to recycle the used water as possible.""

  2. Solar system for domestic hot water and space heating

    Weiss, W. [Arbeitsgemeinschaf Erneubare Energie, Gleisdorf (Austria)

    1997-12-31

    The solar thermal markets, different types of solar systems for hot water and space heating, the dimensioning and the components of solar heating systems, the properties of the systems are reviewed in this presentation

  3. Electrooxidation of organics in waste water

    Hitchens, G. D.; Murphy, Oliver J.; Kaba, Lamine; Verostko, Charles E.

    1990-01-01

    Electrooxidation is a means of removing organic solutes directly from waste waters without the use of chemical expendables. Research sponsored by NASA is currently being pursued to demonstrate the feasibility of the concept for oxidation of organic impurities common to urine, shower waters and space-habitat humidity condensates. Electrooxidation of urine and waste water ersatz was experimentally demonstrated. This paper discusses the electrooxidation principle, reaction kinetics, efficiency, power, size, experimental test results and water-reclamation applications. Process operating potentials and the use of anodic oxidation potentials that are sufficiently low to avoid oxygen formation and chloride oxidation are described. The design of an electrochemical system that incorporates a membrane-based electrolyte based on parametric test data and current fuel-cell technology is presented.

  4. Remote Sensing Analysis Techniques and Sensor Requirements to Support the Mapping of Illegal Domestic Waste Disposal Sites in Queensland, Australia

    Katharine Glanville

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Illegal disposal of waste is a significant management issue for contemporary governments with waste posing an economic, social, and environmental risk. An improved understanding of the distribution of illegal waste disposal sites is critical to enhance the cost-effectiveness and efficiency of waste management efforts. Remotely sensed data has the potential to address this knowledge gap. However, the literature regarding the use of remote sensing to map illegal waste disposal sites is incomplete. This paper aims to analyze existing remote sensing methods and sensors used to monitor and map illegal waste disposal sites. The purpose of this paper is to support the evaluation of existing remote sensing methods for mapping illegal domestic waste sites in Queensland, Australia. Recent advances in technology and the acquisition of very high-resolution remote sensing imagery provide an important opportunity to (1 revisit established analysis techniques for identifying illegal waste disposal sites, (2 examine the applicability of different remote sensors for illegal waste disposal detection, and (3 identify opportunities for future research to increase the accuracy of any illegal waste disposal mapping products.

  5. Factors affecting domestic water consumption in rural households upon access to improved water supply: insights from the Wei River Basin, China

    Fan, L.; Liu, G.; Wang, F.; Geissen, V.; Ritsema, C.J.

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensively understanding water consumption behavior is necessary to design efficient and effective water use strategies. Despite global efforts to identify the factors that affect domestic water consumption, those related to domestic water use in rural regions have not been sufficiently studied

  6. Installation and operation of the Plantwide Fire Protection Systems and related Domestic Water Supply Systems

    A safe work environment is needed to support the Savannah River Site (SRS) mission of producing special nuclear material. This Environmental Assessment (EA) assesses the potential environmental impact(s) of adding to and upgrading the Plantwide Fire Protection System and selected related portions of the Domestic Water Supply System at SRS, Aiken, South Carolina. The following objectives are expected to be met by this action: Prevent undue threat to public health and welfare from fire at SRS; prevent undue hazard to employees at SRS from fire; prevent unacceptable delay to vital DOE programs as a result of fire at SRS; keep fire related property damage at SRS to a manageable level;, and provide an upgraded supply of domestic water for the Reactor Areas. The Reactor Areas' domestic water supplies do not meet current demand capacity due to the age and condition of the 30-year old iron piping. In addition, the water quality for these supplies is not consistent with current SCDHEC requirements. Therefore, DOE proposes to upgrade this Domestic Water Supply System to meet current demand and quality levels, as well as the needs of fire protection system improvement

  7. Wash water waste pretreatment system

    1977-01-01

    Investigations were completed on wash waters based on each candidate personal cleansing agent. Evaluations of coagulants, antifoam agents, and the effect of promising antifoams on the chemical precipitation were included. Based on these evaluations two candidate soaps as well as their companion antifoam agents were selected for further work. Operating parameters included the effect of soap concentration, ferric chloride concentration, duration of mixing, and pore size of depth filters on the degree of soap removal. The effect of pressure on water flow through filter cartridges and on the rate of decline of water flow was also investigated. The culmination of the program was the recommendation of a pretreatment concept based on chemical precipitation followed by pressure filtration.

  8. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corporation, Columbus, Ohio

    1980-01-01

    The solar energy system installed in the building has 2,978 sq ft of single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/hour water tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  9. Solar heating, cooling and domestic hot water system installed at Columbia Gas System Service Corporation, Columbus, Ohio

    1980-11-01

    The solar energy system installed in the building has 2,978 sq ft of single axis tracking, concentrating collectors and provides solar energy for space heating, space cooling and domestic hot water. A 1,200,000 Btu/hour water tube gas boiler provides hot water for space heating. Space cooling is provided by a 100 ton hot water fired absorption chiller. Domestic hot water heating is provided by a 50 gallon natural gas domestic storage water heater. Extracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  10. Attributes of Domestic Water Sources in a Rapidly Urbanizing State Capital in a Developing Economy

    A. E. Olajuyigbe

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The efficiency and effectiveness of domestic water sources are often gauged by availability, accessibility and adequacy. This study examined various variables that could be harnessed in measuring these parameters with respect to water supply in Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. Approach: The purpose of this study is to investigate the various attributes of domestic water sources in Ado-Ekiti, Nigeria. Three residential zones were identified in the city. They included the urban core, transitional zone and urban periphery. A sample size of 1,200 amounting to 4.0% of the total number of households in Ado-Ekiti, was chosen. Specific areas referred to as Data Delineation Areas (DDAs were identified in each zone. Based on the estimated population of each DDA, the number of households to be interviewed was estimated. In consonance with some assumptions, 600 (50.0% questionnaires were administered in the city core while 420 (35.0% and 180 (15.0% questionnaires were administered in the transitional zone and urban periphery, respectively. Subsequently, systematic sampling procedure was adopted in the choice of households to be interviewed. Some of the attributes investigated included the main source of domestic water used by household, access to improved source of water, distance from improved source to residence, average time spent to fetch from main source, average number of trips per person per day, quantity of water used per person per day and attack by water-borne diseases. Results: Households in Ado-Ekiti had access to diverse sources of domestic water including wells, boreholes, streams/rivers/springs, tanker-drawn water and rainwater. However, most households (59.8% depended on wells. Nevertheless, 84.3% had access to improved sources. Only 10.0% of these households obtained supplies from piped water while piped network is largely restricted to the city core. The research showed that distance, time, number of trips and adequacy of supplies

  11. Management of Rural Domestic Water Systems in Utah

    Hughes, Trevor C.

    1980-01-01

    Introduction: There are now more than 400 community type public drinking water systems in Utah. Considerable state and federal assistance is available for construction or renovation of such systems, but once the system is constructed and the consulting engineer leaves, the managers of the smaller systems find themselves quite isolated from sources of professional assistance. The larger systems have a revenue base...

  12. Process for treating waste water containing radioactive substances

    A process for treating waste water containing radioactive substances comprising treating the waste water by reverse osmosis in the presence of at least one organic surfactant selected from the group consisting of anionic surfactants, cationic surfactants and nonionic surfactants

  13. Waste water treatment of hydrometallurgical mill in mine No. 754

    The author briefly introduces some measures to waste water treatment of hydrometallurgical mill of Uranium Mine No. 754. It is shown in practice that making rational use of waste water is advantageous to production, reducing qcost and lightening environment pollution

  14. Neutron Activation analysis of waste water

    An instrumental neutron activation analysis for the simultaneous determination of chlorine, bromine, sodium, manganese, cobalt, copper, chromium, zinc, nickel, antimony and iron in waste water is described. They were determined in waste water samples under normal conditions by non-destructive neutron activation simultaneously using a suitable monostandard method. Standardized water samples were used and irradiated in polyethylene ampoules at a neutron flux of 1013 cm-2 s-1 for periods of 1 minute, 1 and 10 hours. A Ge hyperpure detector was used for your activity determination, with count times of 60, 180, 300 and 600 seconds. The obtained results show than the method can be utilized for the determination of this elements without realize anything previous treatment of the samples. (Author)

  15. Investigation af a solar heating system for space heating and domestic hot water supply with a high degree of coverage

    Vejen, Niels Kristian

    1999-01-01

    A solar storage tank for space heating and domestic hot water supply was designed and testet in af laboratory test facility.......A solar storage tank for space heating and domestic hot water supply was designed and testet in af laboratory test facility....

  16. The micro-electrolysis technique in waste water treatment

    The micro-electrolysis is one of the efficient methods to treat some kinds of waste water. The experiments have shown its high efficiency in sewage treatment and some kinds of industrial waste water. It is suitable for pre-treatment of high concentrated waste water and deep treatment of waste water for reuse purpose. The disadvantage of micro-electrolysis is its high energy consumption in case of high electrolyte concentration. (author) 2 figs., 11 tabs., 2 refs

  17. Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Humans, Domestic Animals, and Village Water Sources in Rural India.

    Daniels, ME; Shrivastava, A.; Smith, WA; P. Sahu; Odagiri, M; Misra, PR; Panigrahi, P; Suar, M; Clasen, T; Jenkins, MW

    2015-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum and Giardia lamblia are zoonotic enteric protozoa of significant health concern where sanitation, hygiene, and water supplies are inadequate. We examined 85 stool samples from diarrhea patients, 111 pooled fecal samples by species across seven domestic animal types, and water from tube wells (N = 207) and ponds (N = 94) across 60 villages in coastal Odisha, India, for Cryptosporidium oocysts and Giardia cysts to measure occurrence, concentration/shedding, and environmen...

  18. Domestic Hot Water Supply for Multiple Familiy Dwellings using Heat Pumps

    Vetsch, Bernhard; Gschwend, Andreas; Bertsch, Stefan S.

    2012-01-01

    In multiple family dwellings of central Europe heat pumps are not only used for space heating but also increasingly for domestic hot water (dhw) supply. The water is often heated in a centralized or decentralized installation with a large distribution network. This leads to the combination of heat pumps with various trace heating systems to ensure both comfort and protection from legionella disease. The COP of the heat pump can be greatly affected by the choice of the heat tracing system whic...

  19. Determination of volatile metal and metalloid compounds in gases from domestic waste deposits with GC/ICP-MS

    Feldmann, J. (Inst. of Environmental Analytical Chemistry, Univ. of Essen (Germany)); Gruemping, R. (Inst. of Environmental Analytical Chemistry, Univ. of Essen (Germany)); Hirner, A.V. (Inst. of Environmental Analytical Chemistry, Univ. of Essen (Germany))

    1994-10-01

    Low temperature GC coupled on-line with ICP-MS was used to identify volatile metal and metalloid compounds in gases and condensates from a domestic waste deposit. Seven tin species could be identified by external standard addition and further volatile compounds of tin, bismuth, mercury, arsenic, antimony and tellurium could be found by boiling point calibration, respectively. Some technical and methodical concepts towards quantification of the results are indicated. (orig.)

  20. Impact of landfills, domestic and industrial waste on the aquifer in Raipur city and contribution of karst feature to the groundwater contaminations

    Karst features (landscapes that result from dissolution and surface drainage of carbonate terrains) are potentially a large source of water. They have distinctive features, which distinguish them from fissured and porous aquifers. These features include a general lack of permanent surface streams, existence of surface holes into which surface stream sink, presence of underground big channels and large springs etc. Karst environments are used for potable water supply as well as disposal sites for municipal, agricultural and industrial waste dumping. The peculiar geomorphologic and hydrological features of karst make them highly vulnerable for groundwater pollution. The ease with which they can be polluted make a fit case of taking protection measures in advance. Raipur is a major business, educational center as well as capital city of Chhattisgarh state in India. The city has been rapidly expanding during the last two decades, as a result of rapid industrialisation and various economic developments. Wastes generated from a wide variety of industrial, commercial, agricultural and domestic activities are dumped into pits or low - lying area around the Raipur City. The climate in the area is characterised by very hot summer and well distributed rain over four months during monsoon season. Monsoon precipitation begins from mid June and generally remains active till the end of September. The average annual precipitation is ∼1250 mm. In the study area, groundwater lies in the karstified nature of geological formation and is naturally susceptible to contamination by landfills, domestic and industrial wastes. The karstification feature is exposed to the surface in Raipur city at many places. Environmental isotopes (2H, 3H, 18O and 13C) as well as chemistry of the water samples were used to identify a few places, which are prone to contamination in Raipur city. Deterioration of the groundwater quality is not alarming due to thin shale (impervious layer) cover over the

  1. Emissions of polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans and polychlorinated biphenyls from uncontrolled burning of garden and domestic waste (backyard burning).

    Hedman, Björn; Näslund, Morgan; Nilsson, Calle; Marklund, Stellan

    2005-11-15

    To assess emissions of dioxins (chlorinated dibenzodioxins and dibenzofurans) and PCB from uncontrolled domestic combustion of waste ("backyard burning"), test combustions in barrels and open fires were monitored. The waste fuels used were garden waste, paper, paper and plastic packaging, refuse-derived fuel (RDF), PVC, and electronic scrap. Combustions including PVC and electronic scrap emitted several orders of magnitude more dioxins than the other waste fuels. Emissions from the other fuels had considerable variations, but the levels were difficult to relate to waste composition. Emission factors of PCDD/F and PCB from the backyard burning ranged from 2.2 to 13 000 ng (WHO-TEQ)/kg. The levels found in ash usually were less than 5% of the total. For assessment of total emissions of dioxins and PCB from backyard burning of low and moderately contaminated wastes, an emission factor range of 4-72 ng (WHO-TEQ)/kg is suggested. These figures implythat combusting waste in the backyard could contribute substantially to total emissions, even if the amounts of fuel involved are equivalent to just a few tenths of a percent of the amounts combusted in municipal waste incinerators. PMID:16323778

  2. Quantitative bacterial examination of domestic water supplies in the Lesotho Highlands: water quality, sanitation, and village health.

    Kravitz, J. D.; Nyaphisi, M.; Mandel, R; Petersen, E.

    1999-01-01

    Reported are the results of an examination of domestic water supplies for microbial contamination in the Lesotho Highlands, the site of a 20-year-old hydroelectric project, as part of a regional epidemiological survey of baseline health, nutritional and environmental parameters. The population's hygiene and health behaviour were also studied. A total of 72 village water sources were classified as unimproved (n = 23), semi-improved (n = 37), or improved (n = 12). Based on the estimation of tot...

  3. Towards an Improved Human Exposure Assessment for Contaminants in Drinking Water Released by Products Used for Domestic Water Distribution

    HOEKSTRA Eddo

    2008-01-01

    Substances migrated from products or micro-organisms released from biofilms in the domestic distribution system may affect the quality of tap water. The approach to protect consumers against these possible contaminants and specifically the sampling protocol for compliance monitoring at the tap is not well described in the European Drinking Water Directive. Regulators of the member states like to have guidance. This paper describes the issue and proposes a possible approach.

  4. Determination of Heavy Metal Levels in Various Industrial Waste Waters

    Dündar, Mustafa Şahin; Altundağ, Hüseyin; Kaygaldurak, Sinem; Şar, Volkan; Acar, Aysun

    2012-01-01

    Important part of the environmetal pollution consists of waste water and water pollution. The water polluted by anthropogenical, industrial, and agricultural originated sources are defined as waste waters which are the main pollution sources for reservoirs, rivers, lakes, and seas. In this work, waste waters of leather, textile, automotive side, and metal plating industries were used to determine the levels of Cu, Zn, Cr, Pb and Ni by using Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometer. As a result, h...

  5. Hybrid PV/T solar systems for domestic hot water and electricity production

    Hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) solar systems can simultaneously provide electricity and heat, achieving a higher conversion rate of the absorbed solar radiation than standard PV modules. When properly designed, PV/T systems can extract heat from PV modules, heating water or air to reduce the operating temperature of the PV modules and keep the electrical efficiency at a sufficient level. In this paper, we present TRNSYS simulation results for hybrid PV/T solar systems for domestic hot water applications both passive (thermosyphonic) and active. Prototype models made from polycrystalline silicon (pc-Si) and amorphous silicon (a-Si) PV module types combined with water heat extraction units were tested with respect to their electrical and thermal efficiencies, and their performance characteristics were evaluated. The TRNSYS simulation results are based on these PV/T systems and were performed for three locations at different latitudes, Nicosia (35 deg.), Athens (38 deg.) and Madison (43 deg.). In this study, we considered a domestic thermosyphonic system and a larger active system suitable for a block of flats or for small office buildings. The results show that a considerable amount of thermal and electrical energy is produced by the PV/T systems, and the economic viability of the systems is improved. Thus, the PVs have better chances of success especially when both electricity and hot water is required as in domestic applications

  6. Review of Various Solutions for avoiding critical levels of Legionella Bacteria in Domestic Hot Water System

    Yang, Xiaochen; Li, Hongwei; Svendsen, Svend

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature district heating (DH) is designed as 55/25oC for supply/return temperature to fulfill the low energy demand of future buildings. However, to secure the safety of domestic hot water, the supply temperature has to be kept around 60oC to avoid the existence of legionella, which repro...... domestic hot water system is recommended by this study, which is of great use to realize low temperature DH system without any risk of legionella.......Low temperature district heating (DH) is designed as 55/25oC for supply/return temperature to fulfill the low energy demand of future buildings. However, to secure the safety of domestic hot water, the supply temperature has to be kept around 60oC to avoid the existence of legionella, which...... reproduces rapidly at the temperature around 25oC- 45 oC. After several outbreaks of pheumonia and fever caused by legionella bacteria, most countries require 60 oC in the network and 50-55 oC at the faucets with periodic flush by hot water above 60 oC as disinfection solution. That makes obstacles of low...

  7. Domestic wastes incineration in France situation in 2000 evolution and perspectives the 31.12.2002; Incineration des dechets menagers en France situation en 2000 evolution et perspectives au 31.12.2002

    NONE

    2003-07-01

    This document presents the analysis and the conclusions of a working group, concerning the domestic wastes incineration. It presents successively the place of the domestic wastes in the wastes management approach, the regulations, the methodology and the corresponding results of an inquiry realized in 2000 and the research programs on the incineration as the Best Available Techniques, the sanitary impacts of the UIOM (domestic wastes incineration plants), the vitrification, the greenhouse effect. (A.L.B.)

  8. Environmental assessment for the domestic water supply upgrades and consolidation on the Savannah River Site

    1994-06-01

    The domestic water systems on the Savannah River Site (SRS) are currently in need of upgrading to ensure compliance with the Safe Drinking Water Act and South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Drinking Water Regulations. The SRS has 28 separate goundwater-based drinking water systems in use across the site. These aging systems were designed and constructed in the 1950s and are now facing increasing difficulties in meeting cur-rent regulations. Audits of the systems conducted by SCDHEC in 1986, 1988, 1991, and 1993 identified shortfalls in meeting the requirements for secondary maximum containment levels (MCLS) and SCDHEC design standards. Secondary MCLs are those items, such as odor or appearance, that do not pose a direct health impact. SRS has committed to SCDHEC to correct the drinking water discrepancies and construct two new consolidated inter-area drinking water systems. Upgrading the SRS drinking water systems would be necessary to support site activities regardless of the makeup or the mission at SRS. As such, the proposed upgrade and consolidation of SRS domestic water systems is treated as part of the ``No Action`` alternative for the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Reconfiguration of the Nuclear Weapons Complex .

  9. Factors affecting domestic water consumption in rural households upon access to improved water supply: insights from the Wei River Basin, China

    Liangxin Fan; Guobin Liu; Fei Wang; Violette Geissen; Ritsema, Coen J.

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensively understanding water consumption behavior is necessary to design efficient and effective water use strategies. Despite global efforts to identify the factors that affect domestic water consumption, those related to domestic water use in rural regions have not been sufficiently studied, particularly in villages that have gained access to improved water supply. To address this gap, we investigated 247 households in eight villages in the Wei River Basin where three types of improv...

  10. Integrating the simulation of domestic water demand behaviour to an urban water model using agent based modelling

    Koutiva, Ifigeneia; Makropoulos, Christos

    2015-04-01

    The urban water system's sustainable evolution requires tools that can analyse and simulate the complete cycle including both physical and cultural environments. One of the main challenges, in this regard, is the design and development of tools that are able to simulate the society's water demand behaviour and the way policy measures affect it. The effects of these policy measures are a function of personal opinions that subsequently lead to the formation of people's attitudes. These attitudes will eventually form behaviours. This work presents the design of an ABM tool for addressing the social dimension of the urban water system. The created tool, called Urban Water Agents' Behaviour (UWAB) model, was implemented, using the NetLogo agent programming language. The main aim of the UWAB model is to capture the effects of policies and environmental pressures to water conservation behaviour of urban households. The model consists of agents representing urban households that are linked to each other creating a social network that influences the water conservation behaviour of its members. Household agents are influenced as well by policies and environmental pressures, such as drought. The UWAB model simulates behaviour resulting in the evolution of water conservation within an urban population. The final outcome of the model is the evolution of the distribution of different conservation levels (no, low, high) to the selected urban population. In addition, UWAB is implemented in combination with an existing urban water management simulation tool, the Urban Water Optioneering Tool (UWOT) in order to create a modelling platform aiming to facilitate an adaptive approach of water resources management. For the purposes of this proposed modelling platform, UWOT is used in a twofold manner: (1) to simulate domestic water demand evolution and (2) to simulate the response of the water system to the domestic water demand evolution. The main advantage of the UWAB - UWOT model

  11. The methanation of domestic wastes and related products: the organic wastes recycling and their energy potential valorization; La methanisation des dechets menagers et assimiles: recycler les dechets organiques et valoriser leur potentiel energetique

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    The methanation is a technology of domestic wastes treatment, which is increasing in Europe. It constitutes a privileged offer to satisfy the organic wastes recycling objectives. Based on a presentation of the technologies and application domains, economic and energetic data, this document brings more technological choices for those are concerned by the organic wastes treatment. (A.L.B.)

  12. Solar heating and domestic hot water system installed at Kansas City, Fire Stations, Kansas City, Missouri

    1980-01-01

    The solar system was designed to provide 47 percent of the space heating, 8,800 square feet area and 75 percent of the domestic hot water (DHW) load. The solar system consists of 2,808 square feet of Solaron, model 2001, air, flat plate collector subsystem, a concrete box storage subsystem which contains 1,428 cubic feet of 0.5 inch diameter pebbles weighing 71.5 tons, a DHW preheat tank, blowers, pumps, heat exchangers, air ducting, controls and associated plumbing. Two 120 gallon electric DHW heaters supply domestic hot water which is preheated by the solar system. Auxiliary space heating is provided by three electric heat pumps with electric resistance heaters and four 30 kilowatt electric unit heaters. There are six modes of system operation.

  13. Influence of composition variations on the initial alteration rate of vitrified domestic waste incineration fly-ash.

    Frugier, P; Godon, N; Vernaz, E; Larché, F

    2002-01-01

    Vitrification as a waste stabilization technology has often been considered applicable only to high-level radioactive waste for which, with the use of suitable additives, it yields a vitreous material with excellent chemical durability. It has become apparent in recent years that some waste forms-notably domestic waste incineration fly-ash purification residues--contain most of the ingredients of a vitrified material, although their composition variations are difficult to control. It is thus important to ensure not only that the materials are suitable for vitrification, but also that the resulting product exhibits acceptable long-term behavior under all circumstances. An initial study showed that, allowing for the compensation changes inherent in the melting process builtby EDF**, the residue collected by a single fly-ash dust separation defines a composition range within which the suitability of the vitrified material can be verified. "Vitrified material" refers to a melted material that contains no unmelted inclusions after cooling, but that may contain a variable fraction of crystallized phases. Five composition parameters were identified for the long-term behavior assessment: the concentrations of the three major elements (silicon, aluminum and calcium), the total alkali metal (sodium and potassium) concentration, and the sum of the concentrations of two toxic elements (zinc and lead). The other elements were assumed constant at molar ratios representative of industrial wastes. The experimentation plan methodology applied to the composition range identified fourteen materials suilable for developing and validating first-order models of the material components. The fly-ash composition had a very significant effect on the degree and kinetics and crystallization in the vitrified material within the experimental composition range; the cooling rate was the determining factor for some of the fourteen materials studied. Two crystailine phases predominated: spinels

  14. Economic evaluation and optimization of solar systems for space and domestic water heating

    Abou-Zied, M.R.; Hawas, M.M.

    1983-01-01

    Solar energy will be utilized only if it proves to be economical. The economic feasibility of the use of solar energy for space and domestic water heating systems for a house in Benghazi, Libya. A comprehensive evaluation considerering 324 cases representing the proper ranges of economic and load factors and based on the annual equivalent cost approach is given. The optimum collector area for each case is determined. The results obtained and relationships developed permit generalizations that can be applicable in other locations.

  15. Effectiveness of Domestic Wastewater Treatment Using a Bio-Hedge Water Hyacinth Wetland System

    Alireza Valipour; Venkatraman Kalyan Raman; Young-Ho Ahn

    2015-01-01

    onstructed wetland applications have been limited by a large land requirement and capital investment. This study aimed to improve a shallow pond water hyacinth system by incorporating the advantages of engineered attached microbial growth technique (termed Bio-hedge) for on-site domestic wastewater treatment. A laboratory scale continuous-flow system consists of the mesh type matrix providing an additional biofilm surface area of 54 m2/m3. Following one year of experimentation, the process sh...

  16. Radioactive wastes from possible future UK Light Water Reactors

    The predictive radioactive wastes from the operation and decommissioning of various designs of Light Water Reactor (LWR) are reviewed and compared to the Sizewell 'B' Pressurised Water Reactor. The designs considered are the N4, Konvoi, System 80+, Advanced PWR, AP600, Advanced Boiling Water Reactor, the European Pressurised Water Reactor (EPR) and the Sizewell 'XL' design. The sources of activity, active arisings, waste treatment plants, discharges to the environment, the optimisation of waste treatment, lifetime arisings of solid waste and the characteristics of spent fuel are addressed. Conclusions are drawn on the implications for UK waste management policy. (author)

  17. Estimate of the pollution removed by leaching of standard domestic waste: mass assessments carried out in batches and columns.

    Feuillade, Geneviève; Francois, Véronique; Matejka, Guy; Skhiri, Nathalie; Lagier, Thomas

    2008-12-01

    Batch and column tests allowed estimation of the mobilization of pollution of standard domestic waste in leachate and biogas. Three laboratory tests (biochemical methane potential (BMP), tank leaching test (TLT), and column tests) have been applied to evaluate the emission of pollutants in liquid and/or gas phase from reconstituted municipal solid waste (MSW) on the basis of French waste. In the case of the batch tests (BMP and TLT), BMP tests indicated a maximum organic carbon share produced by waste (biogas potential) equal to 59% of the initial carbon. The maximum quantity of carbon likely to be leached by the waste (TLT) corresponded to 6% of the carbon contained in the waste. On the other hand, during column tests, 3.3% of carbon was leached and 8% of carbon was evacuated in biogas at the end of a 440-day follow-up. It thus appears that the test conditions have a great influence on the remobilization of pollution. In particular it has been proven than the greater the optimization of the liquid/solid ratio, the agitation, the sowing, and the temperature, the greater the pollutant is leached. This study highlights the possible use of batch and column tests to evaluate the pollution risk of a landfill. PMID:19189751

  18. Ecotoxicological tests for detection of toxicity in waste waters, sludges and solid wastes

    Maršálek, Blahoslav

    Vol. 1. Tehran: PR Commitee of Asian Conference on Water and Waste water Management, 1998, s. 141-145. [Asian Conference on Water and Waste water Management. Teheran (IR), 02.03.1998-04.03.1998] Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  19. Physiochemicals and Heavy Metal Removal from Domestic Wastewater via Phycoremediation

    Ab Razak Abdul Rafiq; Sunar Norshuhaila Mohamed; Alias Nurul Azira; Gani Paran; Subramaniam Menega

    2016-01-01

    The common sources of water pollution in Malaysia are domestic sewage and industrial waste. Therefore, domestic wastewater quality effluent should be improved before discharged through the outlets. The alternative method of treatment uses microalgae for water remediation which is known as phycoremediation was applied. This technique is to remove or reduce nutrients and harmful pollutants in domestic wastewater. Thus, objective of the present study is to bioremediate the physiochemical and hea...

  20. Commercial pond fish culture using waste water

    Okoye, F.C.; Ita, E.O.; Adeniji, H.A.

    1987-01-01

    Waste water from some National Electric Power Authority (NEPA) housing units in Nigeria was fed to a 0.4 ha pond which was stocked with 2,200 Sarotherodon galilaeus fingerlings with a mean weight of about 36.0gm and 1000 Cyprinus carpio fingerlings with a mean weight of 10gm. This yielded after 10 months, over 2300 kg of harvestable fish plus over 20,000 Sarotherodon galilaeus fingerlings. The growth rate of C. carpio was not very encouraging possibly because of the type of plankton that colo...

  1. Evaluating Domestic Hot Water Distribution System Options with Validated Analysis Models

    Weitzel, E. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, Davis, CA (United States); Hoeschele, E. [Alliance for Residential Building Innovation, Davis, CA (United States)

    2014-09-01

    A developing body of work is forming that collects data on domestic hot water consumption, water use behaviors, and energy efficiency of various distribution systems. Transient System Simulation Tool (TRNSYS) is a full distribution system developed that has been validated using field monitoring data and then exercised in a number of climates to understand climate impact on performance. In this study, the Building America team built upon previous analysis modeling work to evaluate differing distribution systems and the sensitivities of water heating energy and water use efficiency to variations of climate, load, distribution type, insulation and compact plumbing practices. Overall, 124 different TRNSYS models were simulated. The results of this work are useful in informing future development of water heating best practices guides as well as more accurate (and simulation time efficient) distribution models for annual whole house simulation programs.

  2. Low Temperature District Heating Consumer Unit with Micro Heat Pump for Domestic Hot Water Preparation

    Zvingilaite, Erika; Ommen, Torben Schmidt; Elmegaard, Brian; Franck, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present and analyse the feasibility of a district heating (DH) consumer unit with micro heat pump for domestic hot water (DHW) preparation in a low temperature (40 °C) DH network. We propose a micro booster heat pump of high efficiency (COP equal to 5,3) in a consumer DH unit in order to boost the temperature of the district heating water for heating the DHW. The paper presents the main designs of the suggested system and different alternative micro booster heat pump concepts...

  3. Analysis, Modeling and Optimum Design of Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems

    Qin, Lin

    1999-01-01

    This study focus on the analysis, modeling and simulation of solar domestic hot water(DHW) systems. Problems related to the system operation such as input weather data and hot water load conditions are also investigated.In order to investigate the heat loss as part of the total heat load, dynamic...... model of distribution network is developed and simulations are carried out for typical designed circulation type of distribution networks. For dynamic simulation of thermosyphon and drain-back solar DHW systems, thermosyphon loop model and drain-back tank model are put forward. Based on the simulations...

  4. Evaluation of the thermal performance of dead-legs in domestic hot water supply installations

    Burberry, P.J.; Edwards, R.E.; Irwin, C.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes, in brief, the first stage of a programme of research carried out at UMIST as part of the programme of the Building Research Establishment, (Garston), which is intended to establish a realistic model of thermal performance and water consumption for domestic hot water supply installations, a design procedure and a basis for design standards. The work involves the laboratory validation of a dynamic mathematicl simulation of the combined heat and mass transfer concerned in the operation of simple ''dead-leg'' configurations, for a variety of pipe diameters, pipe lengths, draw-off rates and demand profiles.

  5. Pollution characterization of waste water of an industrial zone - Example of a dairy water clarification

    The objective of this study is the estimation of the polluting load generated by domestic effluents added to those of various industries in one of the most important industrial zone in Africa. Analysis of waste water showed strong and irregular pollution which is prejudicial for the aquatic receiving medium (river, sea). This pollution is confirmed among others by COD/BOD ratio which may attain the value of 1.8. Pre-treatment by coagulation floculation of waste water used in a dairy belonging to this industrial zone showed a considerable reduction of the initial pollution by a systematic decreasing of pollution parameters. Aluminium sulphates and iron chloride tested in this experience have reduced considerably all the studied parameters; the organic charge has received a very significant reduction up to 99%. The discharge of treated effluent in the surrounding river or its use for recycling aims is then possible for this industry. However, the formed sludge can be the subject of a suitable treatment for possible agricultural, avicolous valorisation or other. (author)

  6. Waste Water Management and Infectious Disease. Part II: Impact of Waste Water Treatment

    Cooper, Robert C.

    1975-01-01

    The ability of various treatment processes, such as oxidation ponds, chemical coagulation and filtration, and the soil mantle, to remove the agents of infectious disease found in waste water is discussed. The literature concerning the efficiency of removal of these organisms by various treatment processes is reviewed. (BT)

  7. Self Calibrating Flow Estimation in Waste Water Pumping Stations

    Kallesøe, Carsten Skovmose; Knudsen, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge about where waste water is flowing in waste water networks is essential to optimize the operation of the network pumping stations. However, installation of flow sensors is expensive and requires regular maintenance. This paper proposes an alternative approach where the pumps and the waste...... water pit are used for estimating both the inflow and the pump flow of the pumping station. Due to the nature of waste water, the waste water pumps are heavily affected by wear and tear. To compensate for the wear of the pumps, the pump parameters, used for the flow estimation, are automatically...... calibrated. This calibration is done based on data batches stored at each pump cycle, hence makes the approach a self calibrating system. The approach is tested on a pumping station operating in a real waste water network....

  8. Patterns of domestic water use in rural areas of Zimbabwe, gender roles and realities

    Makoni, Fungai S.; Manase, Gift; Ndamba, Jerry

    This paper presents practical experiences into the pattern of domestic water use, benefits and the gender realities. The study was undertaken in two districts of Zimbabwe, Mt Darwin and Bikita covering a total of 16 villages. The study aimed to assess the patterns of domestic water use, benefits derived from its use among the gender groups. Methodology for participatory assessment (MPA) was used for data collection and was done in a participatory manner. Traditionally most people in Zimbabwe are subsistence farmers who rely on rain fed agriculture. Where primary water sources are available such as shallow wells, family wells, deep wells and boreholes households use the water for household water and sanitation, irrigate small family gardens as well as their livestock. The survey established that women and men usually rank uses of water differently. In the two districts it was evident that women are playing more roles in water use and it is apparent that women are most often the users, managers and guardians of household water and hygiene. Women also demonstrated their involvement in commercial use of water, using water for livestock watering (20%) as well as brick moulding (21%). These involvement in commercial use were influenced by survival economics as well as the excess and reliability of the supply. The different roles and incentives in water use of women and men was demonstrated in how they ranked the benefits of water and sanitation. Men ranked clean drinking water among others as a top priority while women ranked improved health and hygiene and reduced distance as top priority. Overall the benefits highlighted by the communities and especially women were meeting the practical needs such as better access to water and reducing their work load. The assessment demonstrated the active role of women in water sources management highlighting quality, reliability and restrictions to their use. Though the communities gave the impression that decision making in the

  9. Simulation Programs for Ph.D. Study of Analysis, Modeling and Optimum Design of Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems

    Qin, Lin

    1999-01-01

    The design of solar domestic hot water system is a complex process, due to characteristics inherent in solar heating technology. Recently, computer simulation has become a widely used technique to improve the understanding of the thermal processes in such systems. This report presents the detailed...... programs or units that were developed in the Ph.D study of " Analysis, Modeling and Optimum Design of Solar Domestic Hot Water Systems"....

  10. A possible case of caprine-associated malignant catarrhal fever in a domestic water buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) in Switzerland

    Dettwiler Martina; Stahel Anina; Krüger Sonka; Gerspach Christian; Braun Ueli; Engels Monika; Hilbe Monika

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Malignant catarrhal fever (MCF) is a fatal herpesvirus infection, affecting various wild and domestic ruminants all over the world. Water buffaloes were reported to be particularly susceptible for the ovine herpesvirus-2 (OvHV-2) causing the sheep-associated form of MCF (SA-MCF). This report describes the first case of possibly caprine-associated malignant catarrhal fever symptoms in a domestic water buffalo in Switzerland. Case presentation The buffalo cow presented with ...