WorldWideScience

Sample records for difference vegetation index

  1. Comparison of Topographic Effects between the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI)

    Matsushita, B.; Yang, W.; Chen, J.; Onda, Y.

    2007-12-01

    Vegetation indices play an important role in monitoring variations in vegetation. The Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) proposed by the MODIS Land Discipline Group and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) are both global-based vegetation indices aimed at providing consistent spatial and temporal information regarding global vegetation. However, many environmental factors such as atmospheric conditions and soil background may produce errors in these indices. The topographic effect is another very important factor, especially when the indices are used in areas of rough terrain. In this paper, we analyzed differences in the topographic effect between the EVI and the NDVI based on a non-Lambertian model and using two airborne-based images with a spatial resolution of 1.5m acquired from a mountainous area covered by a homogeneous Japanese cypress plantation. The results indicate that the soil adjustment factor "L" in the EVI makes it more sensitive to topographic conditions than is the NDVI. Based on these results, we strongly recommend that the topographic effect be removed from the EVI--as well as from other vegetation indices that similarly include a term without a band ratio format (e.g., the PVI and SAVI)--when these indices are used in conjunction with a high spatial resolution image of an area of rough terrain, where the topographic effect on the vegetarian indices having only a band ratio format (e.g., the NDVI) can usually be ignored.

  2. Relative sensitivity of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) for vegetation and desertification monitoring

    Becker, Francois; Choudhury, Bhaskar J.

    1988-01-01

    A simple equation relating the Microwave Polarization Difference Index (MPDI) and the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) is proposed which represents well data obtained from Nimbus 7/SMMR at 37 GHz and NOAA/AVHRR Channels 1 and 2. It is found that there is a limit which is characteristic of a particular type of cover for which both indices are equally sensitive to the variation of vegetation, and below which MPDI is more efficient than NDVI. The results provide insight into the relationship between water content and chlorophyll absorption at pixel size scales.

  3. Investigation of Vegetation Dynamics using Long-Term Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Time-Series

    Tamara Bellone

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI is the most extensively used satellite-derived index of vegetation health and density. Since climate is one of the most important factors affecting vegetation condition, satellite-derived vegetation indexes have been often used to evaluate climatic and environmental changes at regional and global scale. The proposed study attempted to investigate the temporal vegetation dynamics in the whole Africa using historical NDVI time-series. Approach: For this aim, 15 day maximum value NDVI composites at 8 km spatial resolution produced from the NASA Global Inventory Mapping and Monitoring System (GIMMS had been used. They were derived from data collected daily by NOAA AVHRR satellites. The AVHRR NDVI GIMMS dataset was freely available and gives global coverage over an extensive time period. First of all, the selected NDVI base data had been geometrically pre-processed and organized into a historical database implemented in order to grant their spatial integration. Starting from this archive, monthly and yearly NDVI historical time-series, extended from 1982-2006, had been then developed and analysed on a pixel basis. Several routines hade been developed in IDL (Interactive Data Language programming tool with the purpose of applying suitable statistical analysis techniques to the historical information in the database in order to identify the long-term trend components of generated NDVI time-series and extract vegetation dynamics. Specific tests had been then considered in order to define the validity of results. Results: The existence of clear regional trends of NDVI, both decreasing and increasing had been showed, which helped to highlight areas subject, respectively to reduction or increase in vegetation greenness. Conclusion: As the relationship between the NDVI and vegetation productivity was well established, these estimated long-term trend components may be also, with much more

  4. Evaluation of vegetation cover using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI

    Gabriela Camargos Lima

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Soil loss by water erosion is the main cause of soil degradation in Brazil. However, erosion can be reduced by the presence of vegetation. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI makes it possible to identify the vegetative vigor of crops or natural vegetation which facilities the identification of areas with vegetation covers. This information is very important in identifying the phenomena which might be occurring in a particular area, especially those related to soil degradation by water erosion. Thus, the aim of this work was to assess the canopy cover by using NDVI, checking the image accuracy using the Coverage Index (CI based on the Stocking method, in the Sub-basin of Posses, which belongs to the Cantareira System, located in the Extrema municipality, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Landsat-5 TM images were used. The sub-basin of Posses was very altered in comparison to the surrounding areas. The NDVI technique proved to be a suitable tool to assess the uses that occur in the sub-basin of Posses, as validated by the Stocking methodology. The map derived from NDVI allowed the geographic distribution of different land uses to be observed and allowed for the identification of critical areas in relation to vegetation cover as well. This finding can be used to optimize efforts to recover and protect soil in areas with bare soil and degraded pasture, in order to reduce environmental degradation. The CI has not exceeded 40% for land use classes that occur in the majority of the sub-basin (91%, except in areas of woody vegetation.

  5. MODIS normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and vegetation phenology dynamics in the Inner Mongolia grassland

    Gong, Z.; Kawamura, K.; Ishikawa, N.; Goto, M.; Wulan, T.; Alateng, D.; Yin, T.; Ito, Y.

    2015-11-01

    The Inner Mongolia grassland, one of the most important grazing regions in China, has long been threatened by land degradation and desertification, mainly due to overgrazing. To understand vegetation responses over the last decade, this study evaluated trends in vegetation cover and phenology dynamics in the Inner Mongolia grassland by applying a normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) time series obtained by the Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) during 2002-2014. The results showed that the cumulative annual NDVI increased to over 77.10 % in the permanent grassland region (2002-2014). The mean value of the total change showed that the start of season (SOS) date and the peak vegetation productivity date of the season (POS) had advanced by 5.79 and 2.43 days, respectively. The end of season (EOS) was delayed by 5.07 days. These changes lengthened the season by 10.86 days. Our results also confirmed that grassland changes are closely related to spring precipitation and increasing temperature at the early growing period because of global warming. Overall, productivity in the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region tends to increase, but in some grassland areas with grazing, land degradation is ongoing.

  6. Principle and application of three-band gradient difference vegetation index

    TANG; Shihao; ZHU; Qijiang; WANG; Jindi; ZHOU; Yuyu; ZHAO

    2005-01-01

    Vegetation index is a simple, effective and experiential measurement of terrestrial vegetation activity, and plays a very important role in qualitative and quantitative remote sensing. Aiming at shortages of current vegetation indices, and starting from the analysis of vegetation spectral characteristics, we put forward a new vegetation index, the three-band gradient difference vegetation index (TGDVI), and established algorithms to inverse crown cover fraction and leaf area index (LAI) from it. Theoretical analysis and model simulation show that TGDVI has high saturation point and the ability to remove the influence of background to some degree, and the explicit functional relation with crown cover fraction and LAI can be established. Moreover, study shows that TGDVI also has the ability to partly remove the influence of thin cloud. Experiment in the Shunyi District, Beijing, China shows that reasonable result can be reached using the vegetation index to retrieve LAI. We also theoretically analyzed the reason why the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) owns the low saturation point, and show that it is determined by the definition of NDVI and the characteristic of vegetation spectra, and is unavoidable to some degree. Meanwhile, through model simulation, we also indicate that the relationship between simple ratio vegetation index (SR) and LAI closes to a piecewise linear one instead of a linear one, which is mainly caused by the influence of background and different change rates of reflectance in red and infrared bands with LAI increasing.

  7. NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), Version 4

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This dataset contains gridded daily Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) derived from the NOAA Climate Data Record (CDR) of Advanced Very High Resolution...

  8. Elk Distributions Relative to Spring Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Values

    Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus) that winter near San Antonio Mountain in northern New Mexico provide important recreational and economic benefits while creating management challenges related to temporospatial variation in their spring movements. Our objective was to examine spring distributions of elk in relation to vegetative emergence as it progresses across the landscape as measured by remote sensing. Spring distributions of elk were closely associated with greater photosynthetic activity of spring vegetation in 2 of 3 years as determined using NDVI values derived from AVHRR datasets. Observed elk locations were up to 271% greater than expected in the category representing the most photosynthetic activity. This association was not observed when analyses at a finer geographic scale were conducted. Managers facing challenges involving human-wildlife interactions and land-use issues should consider environmental conditions that may influence variation in elk association with greener portions of the landscape.

  9. Sensitivity of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI to Topographic Effects: A Case Study in High-density Cypress Forest

    Guoyu Qiu

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation indices play an important role in monitoring variations in vegetation.The Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI proposed by the MODIS Land Discipline Groupand the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI are both global-based vegetationindices aimed at providing consistent spatial and temporal information regarding globalvegetation. However, many environmental factors such as atmospheric conditions and soilbackground may produce errors in these indices. The topographic effect is another veryimportant factor, especially when the indices are used in areas of rough terrain. In thispaper, we theoretically analyzed differences in the topographic effect on the EVI and theNDVI based on a non-Lambertian model and two airborne-based images acquired from amountainous area covered by high-density Japanese cypress plantation were used as a casestudy. The results indicate that the soil adjustment factor “L” in the EVI makes it moresensitive to topographic conditions than is the NDVI. Based on these results, we stronglyrecommend that the topographic effect should be removed in the reflectance data beforethe EVI was calculated—as well as from other vegetation indices that similarly include a term without a band ratio format (e.g., the PVI and SAVI—when these indices are used in the area of rough terrain, where the topographic effect on the vegetation indices having only a band ratio format (e.g., the NDVI can usually be ignored.

  10. On the characterization of vegetation recovery after fire disturbance using Fisher-Shannon analysis and SPOT/VEGETATION Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series

    Lasaponara, Rosa; Lanorte, Antonio; Lovallo, Michele; Telesca, Luciano

    2015-04-01

    Time series can fruitfully support fire monitoring and management from statistical analysis of fire occurrence (Tuia et al. 2008) to danger estimation (lasaponara 2005), damage evaluation (Lanorte et al 2014) and post fire recovery (Lanorte et al. 2014). In this paper, the time dynamics of SPOT-VEGETATION Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series are analyzed by using the statistical approach of the Fisher-Shannon (FS) information plane to assess and monitor vegetation recovery after fire disturbance. Fisher-Shannon information plane analysis allows us to gain insight into the complex structure of a time series to quantify its degree of organization and order. The analysis was carried out using 10-day Maximum Value Composites of NDVI (MVC-NDVI) with a 1 km × 1 km spatial resolution. The investigation was performed on two test sites located in Galizia (North Spain) and Peloponnese (South Greece), selected for the vast fires which occurred during the summer of 2006 and 2007 and for their different vegetation covers made up mainly of low shrubland in Galizia test site and evergreen forest in Peloponnese. Time series of MVC-NDVI have been analyzed before and after the occurrence of the fire events. Results obtained for both the investigated areas clearly pointed out that the dynamics of the pixel time series before the occurrence of the fire is characterized by a larger degree of disorder and uncertainty; while the pixel time series after the occurrence of the fire are featured by a higher degree of organization and order. In particular, regarding the Peloponneso fire, such discrimination is more evident than in the Galizia fire. This suggests a clear possibility to discriminate the different post-fire behaviors and dynamics exhibited by the different vegetation covers. Reference Lanorte A, R Lasaponara, M Lovallo, L Telesca 2014 Fisher-Shannon information plane analysis of SPOT/VEGETATION Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series to

  11. Analysis of regional-scale vegetation dynamics of Mexico using stratified AVHRR NDVI data. [Normalized Difference Vegetaion Index

    Turcotte, Kevin M.; Kramber, William J.; Venugopal, Gopalan; Lulla, Kamlesh

    1989-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a good relationship exists between AVHRR Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) measurements, and both regional-scale patterns of vegetation seasonality and productivity. Most of these studies used known samples of vegetation types. An alternative approach, and the objective was to examine the above relationships by analyzing one year of AVHRR NDVI data that was stratified using a small-scale vegetation map of Mexico. The results show that there is a good relationship between AVHRR NDVI measurements and regional-scale vegetation dynamics of Mexico.

  12. Estimating Sugarcane Yield Potential Using an In-Season Determination of Normalized Difference Vegetative Index

    Howard Viator

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Estimating crop yield using remote sensing techniques has proven to be successful. However, sugarcane possesses unique characteristics; such as, a multi-year cropping cycle and plant height-limiting for midseason fertilizer application timing. Our study objective was to determine if sugarcane yield potential could be estimated using an in-season estimation of normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI. Sensor readings were taken using the GreenSeeker® handheld sensor from 2008 to 2011 in St. Gabriel and Jeanerette, LA, USA. In-season estimates of yield (INSEY values were calculated by dividing NDVI by thermal variables. Optimum timing for estimating sugarcane yield was between 601–750 GDD. In-season estimated yield values improved the yield potential (YP model compared to using NDVI. Generally, INSEY value showed a positive exponential relationship with yield (r2 values 0.48 and 0.42 for cane tonnage and sugar yield, respectively. When models were separated based on canopy structure there was an increase the strength of the relationship for the erectophile varieties (r2 0.53 and 0.47 for cane tonnage and sugar yield, respectively; however, the model for planophile varieties weakened slightly. Results of this study indicate using an INSEY value for predicting sugarcane yield shows potential of being a valuable management tool for sugarcane producers in Louisiana.

  13. Global Trends in Seasonality of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, 1982–2011

    Assaf Anyamba

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year series of global monthly Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI imagery derived from the Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS NDVI3g archive was analyzed for the presence of trends in changing seasonality. Using the Seasonal Trend Analysis (STA procedure, over half (56.30% of land surfaces were found to exhibit significant trends. Almost half (46.10% of the significant trends belonged to three classes of seasonal trends (or changes. Class 1 consisted of areas that experienced a uniform increase in NDVI throughout the year, and was primarily associated with forested areas, particularly broadleaf forests. Class 2 consisted of areas experiencing an increase in the amplitude of the annual seasonal signal whereby increases in NDVI in the green season were balanced by decreases in the brown season. These areas were found primarily in grassland and shrubland regions. Class 3 was found primarily in the Taiga and Tundra biomes and exhibited increases in the annual summer peak in NDVI. While no single attribution of cause could be determined for each of these classes, it was evident that they are primarily found in natural areas (as opposed to anthropogenic land cover conversions and that they are consistent with climate-related ameliorations of growing conditions during the study period.

  14. Normalized difference vegetation index for the South American continent used as a climatic variability indicator

    The NOAA AVHRR GAC data set was used to produce Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) maps for the South American Continent covering the period from August 1, 1981 to June 30, 1987. A 15-day maximum value composite procedure was used to partially eliminate the cloud contamination and atmospheric attenuation. Monthly evolution of NDVI for a dry and a wet year within the period studied was used to estimate the area covered by NDVI value less than 0.223, This value was used as an indicator of the drought area and the delineation of the Low rainfall areas in the continent. It was observed a well defined regional dependence of the drought area variability for the Northeast, Southwest and Northwest continent and also for the Amazon region. It is shown a relative estimation of the area coverage with NDVI less than 0.223 for the years 1982/83 and 1984/85. The dynamics of the drought area evolution in the continent is discussed. It is also presented a diagnosis of regional variability of the continental distribution of drought area from 1981 to 1987 for the months of May and September. This information is also used to discuss its relationship with the EL-Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) and the South American Precipitation patterns during this period. It is suggested that the use of NDVI image to identify the dynamics of the drought induced by low rainfall may provide us valuable information to study the large scale climatic variation

  15. Determination of Leaf Area Index, Total Foliar N, and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index for Arctic Ecosystems Dominated by Cassiope tetragona

    Campioli, M; Street, LE; Michelsen, Anders; Shaver, GR; Maere, T; Samson, R; Lemeur, R

    2009-01-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) and total foliar nitrogen (TFN) are important canopy characteristics and crucial variables needed to simulate photosynthesis and ecosystem CO2 fluxes. Although plant communities dominated by Cassiope tetragona are widespread in the Arctic, LAI and TFN for this vegetation type...... (Greenland and Svalbard). Leaves of C. tetragona are 2–6 mm long and closely appressed to their stems forming parallelepiped shoots. We determined the LAI of C. tetragona by measuring the area of the leaves while still attached to the stem, then doubling the resulting one-sided area. TFN was determined from...

  16. Rural cases of equine West Nile virus encephalomyelitis and the normalized difference vegetation index

    Ward, M.P.; Ramsay, B.H.; Gallo, K.

    2005-01-01

    Data from an outbreak (August to October, 2002) of West Nile virus (WNV) encephalomyelitis in a population of horses located in northern Indiana was scanned for clusters in time and space. One significant (p = 0.04) cluster of case premises was detected, occurring between September 4 and 10 in the south-west part of the study area (85.70??N, 45.50??W). It included 10 case premises (3.67 case premises expected) within a radius of 2264 m. Image data were acquired by the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) sensor onboard a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration polar-orbiting satellite. The Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) was calculated from visible and near-infrared data of daily observations, which were composited to produce a weekly-1km2 resolution raster image product. During the epidemic, a significant (p<0.01) decrease (0.025 per week) in estimated NDVI was observed at all case and control premise sites. The median estimated NDVI (0.659) for case premises within the cluster identified was significantly (p<0.01) greater than the median estimated NDVI for other case (0.571) and control (0.596) premises during the same period. The difference in median estimated NDVI for case premises within this cluster, compared to cases not included in this cluster, was greatest (5.3% and 5.1%, respectively) at 1 and 5 weeks preceding occurrence of the cluster. The NDVI may be useful for identifying foci of WNV transmission. ?? Mary Ann Liebert, Inc.

  17. Interannual Variability of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index on the Tibetan Plateau and Its Relationship with Climate Change

    ZHOU Dingwen; FAN Guangzhou; HUANG Ronghui; FANG Zhifang; LIU Yaqin; LI Hongquan

    2007-01-01

    The Qinghai-Xizang Plateau, or Tibetan Plateau, is a sensitive region for climate change, where the manifestation of global warming is particularly noticeable. The wide climate variability in this region significantly affects the local land ecosystem and could consequently lead to notable vegetation changes. In this paper, the interannual variations of the plateau vegetation are investigated using a 21-year normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) dataset to quantify the consequences of climate warming for the regional ecosystem and its interactions. The results show that vegetation coverage is best in the eastern and southern plateau regions and deteriorates toward the west and north. On the whole, vegetation activity demonstrates a gradual enhancement in an oscillatory manner during 1982-2002. The temporal variation also exhibits striking regional differences: an increasing trend is most apparent in the west, south, north and southeast, whereas a decreasing trend is present along the southern plateau boundary and in the central-east region. Covariance analysis between the NDVI and surface temperature/precipitation suggests that vegetation change is closely related to climate change. However, the controlling physical processes vary geographically. In the west and east, vegetation variability is found to be driven predominantly by temperature, with the impact of precipitation being of secondary importance. In the central plateau, however, temperature and precipitation factors are equally important in modulating the interannual vegetation variability.

  18. Effects of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and Related Wavebands' Characteristics on Detecting Spatial Heterogeneity Using Variogram-based Analysis

    WEN Zhaofei; ZHANG Ce; ZHANG Shuqing; DING Changhong; LIU Chunyue; PAN Xin; LI Huapeng; SUN Yan

    2012-01-01

    Spatial heterogeneity is widely used in diverse applications,such as recognizing ecological process,guiding ecological restoration,managing land use,etc.Many researches have focused on the inherent scale multiplicity of spatial heterogeneity by using various environmental variables.How these variables affect their corresponding spatial heterogeneities,however,have received little attention.In this paper,we examined the effects of characteristics of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and its related bands variable images,namely red and near infrared (NIR),on their corresponding spatial heterogeneity detection based on variogram models.In a coastal wetland region,two groups of study sites with distinct fractal vegetation cover were tested and analyzed.The results show that:1) in high fractal vegetation cover (H-FVC) area,NDVI and NIR variables display a similar ability in detecting the spatial heterogeneity caused by vegetation growing status structure; 2) in low fractal vegetation cover (L-FVC) area,the NIR and red variables outperform NDVI in the survey of soil spatial heterogeneity; and 3) generally,NIR variable is ubiquitously applicable for vegetation spatial heterogeneity investigation in different fractal vegetation covers.Moreover,as variable selection for remote sensing applications should fully take the characteristics of variables and the study object into account,the proposed variogram analysis method can make the variable selection objectively and scientifically,especially in studies related to spatial heterogeneity using remotely sensed data.

  19. Models for the prediction of the cetane index of biofuels obtained from different vegetable oils using their fatty acid composition

    The objective of the present work is to obtain a physical-mathematical model that establishes a relationship between the cetane index of biofuels obtained from different vegetable oils and its composition of essential fatty acid. This model is based on experimental data obtained by the authors of the present work and an experimental data reported by different extracted authors of indexed databases. The adjustment of the coefficients of the model is based on the obtaining of residual minima in the capacity of prediction of the model. Starting from these results it is established a very useful tool for the determination of such an important parameter for the fuel diesel as it is the cetane index obtained from an analysis of chemical composition and not obtained from tests in engines banks, to save time and economic resources. (author)

  20. Estimating net ecosystem exchange of carbon using the normalized difference vegetation index and an ecosystem model

    The evaluation and prediction of changes in carbon dynamics at the ecosystem level is a key issue in studies of global change. An operational concept for the determination of carbon fluxes for the Belgian territory is the goal of the presented study. The approach is based on the integration of remotely sensed data into ecosystem models in order to evaluate photosynthetic assimilation and net ecosystem exchange (NEE). Remote sensing can be developed as an operational tool to determine the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (feAR). A review of the methodological approach of mapping fPAR dynamics at the regional scale by means of NOAA11-A VHRR / 2 data for the year 1990 is given. The processing sequence from raw radiance values to fPAR is presented. An interesting aspect of incorporating remote sensing derived fPAR in ecosystem models is the potential for modeling actual as opposed to potential vegetation. Further work should prove whether the concepts presented and the assumptions made in this study are valid. (NEE). Complex ecosystem models with a highly predictive value for a specific ecosystem are generally not suitable for global or regional applications, since they require a substantial set of ancillary data becoming increasingly larger with increasing complexity of the model. The ideal model for our purpose is one that is simple enough to be used in global scale modeling, and which can be adapted for different ecosystems or vegetation types. The fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (fPAR) during the growing season determines in part net photosynthesis and phytomass production (Ruimy, 1995). Remotely measured red and near-infrared spectral reflectances can be used to estimate fPAR. Therefore, a possible approach is to estimate net photosynthesis, phytomass, and NEE from a combination of satellite data and an ecosystem model that includes carbon dynamics. It has to be stated that some parts of the work presented in this

  1. Spectra and vegetation index variations in moss soil crust in different seasons, and in wet and dry conditions

    Fang, Shibo; Yu, Weiguo; Qi, Yue

    2015-06-01

    Similar to vascular plants, non-vascular plant mosses have different periods of seasonal growth. There has been little research on the spectral variations of moss soil crust (MSC) over different growth periods. Few studies have paid attention to the difference in spectral characteristics between wet MSC that is photosynthesizing and dry MSC in suspended metabolism. The dissimilarity of MSC spectra in wet and dry conditions during different seasons needs further investigation. In this study, the spectral reflectance of wet MSC, dry MSC and the dominant vascular plant (Artemisia) were characterized in situ during the summer (July) and autumn (September). The variations in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), biological soil crust index (BSCI) and CI (crust index) in different seasons and under different soil moisture conditions were also analyzed. It was found that (1) the spectral characteristics of both wet and dry MSCs varied seasonally; (2) the spectral features of wet MSC appear similar to those of the vascular plant, Artemisia, whether in summer or autumn; (3) both in summer and in autumn, much higher NDVI values were acquired for wet than for dry MSC (0.6 ∼ 0.7 vs. 0.3 ∼ 0.4 units), which may lead to misinterpretation of vegetation dynamics in the presence of MSC and with the variations in rainfall occurring in arid and semi-arid zones; and (4) the BSCI and CI values of wet MSC were close to that of Artemisia in both summer and autumn, indicating that BSCI and CI could barely differentiate between the wet MSC and Artemisia.

  2. Evaluation of Three MODIS-Derived Vegetation Index Time Series for Dryland Vegetation Dynamics Monitoring

    Linlin Lu; Claudia Kuenzer; Cuizhen Wang; Huadong Guo; Qingting Li

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the spatial and temporal dynamics of vegetation is essential in drylands. In this paper, we evaluated three vegetation indices, namely the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI), the Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI) and the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI), derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Surface-Reflectance Product in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China (XUAR), to assess index time series’ suitability for monitoring vege...

  3. Trends in the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) associated with urban development in arctic and subarctic Western Siberia

    Outten, S.; Miles, V.; Ezau, I.

    2015-12-01

    Changes in normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in the high Arctic have been reliably documented, with widespread "greening" (increase in NDVI), specifically along the northern rim of Eurasia and Alaska. Whereas in West Siberia south of 65N, widespread "browning" (decrease in NDVI) has been noted, although the causes remain largely unclear. In this study we report results of statistical analysis of the spatial and temporal changes in NDVI around 28 major urban areas in the arctic and subarctic Western Siberia. Exploration and exploitation of oil and gas reserves has led to rapid industrialization and urban development in the region. This development has significant impact on the environment and particularly in the vegetation cover in and around the urbanized areas. The analysis is based on 15 years (2000-2014) of high-resolution (250 m) Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) data acquired for summer months (June through August) over the entire arctic and subarctic Western Siberian region. The analysis shows that the NDVI background trends are generally in agreement with the trends reported in previous coarse-resolution NDVI studies. Our study reveals greening over the arctic (tundra and tundra-forest) part of the region. Simultaneously, the southern (boreal taiga forest) part is browning, with the more densely vegetation areas or areas with highest NDVI, particularly along Ob River showing strong negative trend. The unexpected and interesting finding of the study is statistically robust indication of the accelerated increase of NDVI ("greening") in the older urban areas. Many Siberian cities become greener even against the decrease in the NDVI background. Moreover, interannual variations of urban NDVI are not coherent with the NDVI background variability. We also find that in tundra zones, NDVI values are higher in a 5-10 km buffer zone around the city edge than in rural areas (40 km distance from the city edge), and in taiga in a 5-10 km

  4. Vegetation/Soil Synthesis Water Index Using MODIS Data

    2005-01-01

    In consideration of the spectral character of MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) data and the reflective spectrum of vegetation and soil, NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) and NDWI (Normalized Difference Water Index) are deduced using one visible band (0.66μm) and two near-infrared bands (0.86μm, 1.24 μm). Vegetation canopy temperature is derived using two thermal infrared bands (8.6 μm and 11μm). Then the vegetation/soil synthesis water index (VSWI) is acquired through analyzing the coupling character of three indexes which can reflect the water condition of vegetation. Finally, the synthesis index is verified by equivalent water content of a single leaf. The matching results show that the synthesis index is directly proportional to the modeled data, which means that the vegetation water content can be reflected using the synthesis index effectively.

  5. Early detection of eruptive dykes revealed by normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) on Mt. Etna and Mt. Nyiragongo

    Houlié, N.; Komorowski, J. C.; de Michele, M.; Kasereka, M.; Ciraba, H.

    2006-06-01

    Flank-fissure eruptions involve lateral injection and propagation of magma in a volcanic edifice along pre-existing fractures in the direction of the rift zones where magma intrusion and lava flow production are concentrated over time. Thus, the identification and mapping of active fractures and faults is a fundamental aspect of studies of active volcanic systems. However, gradual dyke wedge emplacement at depth in well-fractured zones on volcano flanks and in volcanic rift zones does not necessarily trigger large amplitude deformation signals susceptible to be recorded months or even years before the actual eruption. Here we show that active and potentially eruptive areas can be detected up to 2 yrs before the arrival to the surface of the final eruptive dyke and venting of lava flows by processing satellite images applying a normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) algorithm. A posteriori analysis of satellite images indeed reveals that the surficial effects of dyke wedge injection and ascent on plant growth were apparent for Mt. Etna from 2000 to 2002 and for Mt. Nyiragongo in 2001, thus months to years before they erupted.

  6. Online measurement of soil organic carbon as correlated with wheat normalised difference vegetation index in a vertisol field.

    Tekin, Yücel; Ulusoy, Yahya; Tümsavaş, Zeynal; Mouazen, Abdul M

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the potential of visible and near infrared (vis-NIR) spectroscopy for online measurement of soil organic carbon (SOC). It also attempts to explore correlations and similarities between the spatial distribution of SOC and normalized differential vegetation index (NDVI) of a wheat crop. The online measurement was carried out in a clay vertisol field covering 10 ha of area in Karacabey, Bursa, Turkey. Kappa statistics were carried out between different SOC and NDVI data to investigate potential similarities. Calibration model of SOC in full cross-validation resulted in a good accuracy (R (2) = 0.75, root mean squares error of prediction (RMSEP) = 0.17%, and ratio of prediction deviation (RPD) = 1.81). The validation of the calibration model using laboratory spectra provided comparatively better prediction accuracy (R (2) = 0.70, RMSEP = 0.15%, and RPD = 1.78), as compared to the online measured spectra (R (2) = 0.60, RMSEP = 0.20%, and RPD = 1.41). Although visual similarity was clear, low similarity indicated by a low Kappa value of 0.259 was observed between the online vis-NIR predicted full-point (based on all points measured in the field, e.g., 6486 points) map of SOC and NDVI map. PMID:25097882

  7. Evaluation of the relation between evapotranspiration and normalized difference vegetation index for downscaling the simplified surface energy balance model

    Haynes, Jonathan V.; Senay, Gabriel B.

    2012-01-01

    The Simplified Surface Energy Balance (SSEB) model uses satellite imagery to estimate actual evapotranspiration (ETa) at 1-kilometer resolution. SSEB ETa is useful for estimating irrigation water use; however, resolution limitations restrict its use to regional scale applications. The U.S. Geological Survey investigated the downscaling potential of SSEB ETa from 1 kilometer to 250 meters by correlating ETa with the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer instrument (MODIS). Correlations were studied in three arid to semiarid irrigated landscapes of the Western United States (Escalante Valley near Enterprise, Utah; Palo Verde Valley near Blythe, California; and part of the Columbia Plateau near Quincy, Washington) during several periods from 2002 to 2008. Irrigation season ETa-NDVI correlations were lower than expected, ranging from R2 of 0.20 to 0.61 because of an eastward 2-3 kilometer shift in ETa data. The shift is due to a similar shift identified in the land-surface temperature (LST) data from the MODIS Terra satellite, which is used in the SSEB model. Further study is needed to delineate the Terra LST shift, its effect on SSEB ETa, and the relation between ETa and NDVI.

  8. Mapping rice cropping systems using Landsat-derived Renormalized Index of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (RNDVI) in the Poyang Lake Region, China

    Li, Peng; Jiang, Luguang; Feng, Zhiming; Sheldon, Sage; Xiao, Xiangming

    2016-06-01

    Mapping rice cropping systems with optical imagery in multiple cropping regions is challenging due to cloud contamination and data availability; development of a phenology-based algorithm with a reduced data demand is essential. In this study, the Landsat-derived Renormalized Index of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (RNDVI) was proposed based on two temporal windows in which the NDVI values of single and early (or late) rice display inverse changes, and then applied to discriminate rice cropping systems. The Poyang Lake Region (PLR), characterized by a typical cropping system of single cropping rice (SCR, or single rice) and double cropping rice (DCR, including early rice and late rice), was selected as a testing area. The results showed that NDVI data derived from Landsat time-series at eight to sixteen days captures the temporal development of paddy rice. There are two key phenological stages during the overlapping growth period in which the NDVI values of SCR and DCR change inversely, namely the ripening phase of early rice and the growing phase of single rice as well as the ripening stage of single rice and the growing stage of late rice. NDVI derived from scenes in two temporal windows, specifically early August and early October, was used to construct the RNDVI for discriminating rice cropping systems in the polder area of the PLR, China. Comparison with ground truth data indicates high classification accuracy. The RNDVI approach highlights the inverse variations of NDVI values due to the difference of rice growth between two temporal windows. This makes the discrimination of rice cropping systems straightforward as it only needs to distinguish whether the candidate rice type is in the period of growth (RNDVI0).

  9. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index as a Tool for Wheat Yield Estimation: A Case Study from Faisalabad, Pakistan

    Syeda Refat Sultana

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available For estimation of grain yield in wheat, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI is considered as a potential screening tool. Field experiments were conducted to scrutinize the response of NDVI to yield behavior of different wheat cultivars and nitrogen fertilization at agronomic research area, University of Agriculture Faisalabad (UAF during the two years 2008-09 and 2009-10. For recording the value of NDVI, Green seeker (Handheld-505 was used. Split plot design was used as experimental model in, keeping four nitrogen rates (N1= 0 kg ha−1, N2= 55 kg ha−1, N3=110 kg ha−1, and N4= 220 kg ha−1 in main plots and ten wheat cultivars (Bakkhar-2001, Chakwal-50, Chakwal-97, Faisalabad-2008, GA-2002, Inqlab-91, Lasani-2008, Miraj-2008, Sahar-2006, and Shafaq-2006 in subplots with four replications. Impact of nitrogen and difference between cultivars were forecasted through NDVI. The results suggested that nitrogen treatment N4 (220 kg ha−1 and cultivar Faisalabad-2008 gave maximum NDVI value (0.85 at grain filling stage among all treatments. The correlation among NDVI at booting, grain filling, and maturity stages with grain yield was positive (R2 = 0.90; R2 = 0.90; R2 = 0.95, respectively. So, booting, grain filling, and maturity can be good depictive stages during mid and later growth stages of wheat crop under agroclimatic conditions of Faisalabad and under similar other wheat growing environments in the country.

  10. HUBUNGAN ANTARA INDEKS VEGETASI NDVI (NORMALIZED DIFFERENCE VEGETATION INDEX DAN KOEFISIEN RESESI BASEFLOW PADA BEBERAPA SUBDAS PROPINSI JAWA TENGAH DAN DAERAH ISTIMEWA YOGYAKARTA

    Bokiraiya Latuamury

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The background of this research is the decrease of environment capacity in cacthment ecosystem, especially impact of vegetation forest on behavior streamflow. The indicators of cacthment destruction can be seen through hydrograph characteristics. Evaluation of cactment respons of flow hydrographic as an evaluation tools of river catchment responses becomes very important to analyze because it is a benchmark in determination several policy about flood, drough, sedimentation and landslide handling. The research purpose is to analyze the relationship between vegetation index NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index and the characteristic of baseflow recession coefficient at several subcatchment areas in province of Central Java and Specific District of Yogjakarta.The method of this research is surveillance on data recording of AWLR (Automatic Water Level Recorder and data of River Flow Measuring Stations in order to separate the baseflow by calibration curve, and image interpretation of Landsat ETM+ for the transformation of vegetation index (NDVI-Normalized Difference Vegetation Index.The analysis on recession coefficient data (Krb and NDVI were correlated to analyze the strength of relationship between these two parameters. The results of statistical analysis on index NDVI and recession coefficient showsthat NDVI and recession coefficient value at R2 is 0.1427, F = 2.17 which is not significant at 1% significance level of 0.1646. The result shows a very weak correlation of 0.077 which mean that vegetation density (NDVI indexhas a very weak control on low flows. Basically, river baseflow is a genetic component of river flow which comes from aquifer storage and/or other low flow sources. Thus, geology and soil have a significant effect on baseflow.

  11. Seasonal relationship between normalized difference vegetation index and abundance of the Phlebotomus kala-azar vector in an endemic focus in Bihar, India

    Gouri S. Bhunia; Shreekant Kesari; Nandini Chatterjee; Rakesh Mandal; Vijay Kumar; Pradeep Das

    2012-01-01

    Remote sensing was applied for the collection of spatio-temporal data to increase our understanding of the potential distribution of the kala-azar vector Phlebotomus argentipes in endemic areas of the Vaishali district of Bihar, India. We produced monthly distribution maps of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) based on data from the thematic mapper (TM) sensor onboard the Landsat-5 satellite. Minimum, maximum and mean NDVI values were computed for each month and compared with t...

  12. Vegetation Drought Response Index: 2010-Present

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — VegDRI, short for Vegetation Drought Response Index, is a drought-monitoring tool developed by scientists at EROS in collaboration with the National Drought...

  13. Evaluating and Quantifying the Climate-Driven Interannual Variability in Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI3g) at Global Scales

    Zeng, Fanwei; Collatz, George James; Pinzon, Jorge E.; Ivanoff, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    Satellite observations of surface reflected solar radiation contain informationabout variability in the absorption of solar radiation by vegetation. Understanding thecauses of variability is important for models that use these data to drive land surface fluxesor for benchmarking prognostic vegetation models. Here we evaluated the interannualvariability in the new 30.5-year long global satellite-derived surface reflectance index data,Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies normalized difference vegetation index(GIMMS NDVI3g). Pearsons correlation and multiple linear stepwise regression analyseswere applied to quantify the NDVI interannual variability driven by climate anomalies, andto evaluate the effects of potential interference (snow, aerosols and clouds) on the NDVIsignal. We found ecologically plausible strong controls on NDVI variability by antecedent precipitation and current monthly temperature with distinct spatial patterns. Precipitation correlations were strongest for temperate to tropical water limited herbaceous systemswhere in some regions and seasons 40 of the NDVI variance could be explained byprecipitation anomalies. Temperature correlations were strongest in northern mid- to-high-latitudes in the spring and early summer where up to 70 of the NDVI variance was explained by temperature anomalies. We find that, in western and central North America,winter-spring precipitation determines early summer growth while more recent precipitation controls NDVI variability in late summer. In contrast, current or prior wetseason precipitation anomalies were correlated with all months of NDVI in sub-tropical herbaceous vegetation. Snow, aerosols and clouds as well as unexplained phenomena still account for part of the NDVI variance despite corrections. Nevertheless, this study demonstrates that GIMMS NDVI3g represents real responses of vegetation to climate variability that are useful for global models.

  14. Vegetation Responses to Climate Change by Using the Satellite-Derived Normalized Difference Vegetation Index:A Review%基于卫星遥感的植被NDVI对气候变化响应的研究进展

    侯美亭; 赵海燕; 王筝; 延晓冬

    2013-01-01

    precipitation significantly affects the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) in arid and semiarid regions and in regions with distinct dry and wet seasons. The time lag in the response of vegetation to precipitation, and the way the time lag depends on local conditions. Temperature is the dominant climate parameter that affects the NDVI in temperate and boreal regions. The time lag in the vegetation response to temperature is somewhat less pronounced than the time lag in response to precipitation. Solar radiation is the predominant factor limiting vegetation growth in some low latitude areas and areas that have lots of cloud cover, and at certain times in high latitude regions. Future research should focus on 1) quantifying the human role in the response of vegetation to climate change, 2) remeasuring the vegetation responses to different climate parameter changes associated with global warming, and 3) considering the multi-scale assessment of climate change impacts on vegetation.

  15. Evaluation of Three MODIS-Derived Vegetation Index Time Series for Dryland Vegetation Dynamics Monitoring

    Linlin Lu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the spatial and temporal dynamics of vegetation is essential in drylands. In this paper, we evaluated three vegetation indices, namely the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, the Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI and the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI, derived from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Surface-Reflectance Product in the Xinjiang Uygur Autonomous Region, China (XUAR, to assess index time series’ suitability for monitoring vegetation dynamics in a dryland environment. The mean annual VI and its variability were generated and analyzed from the three VI time series for the period 2001–2012 across XUAR. Two phenological metrics, start of the season (SOS and end of the season (EOS, were detected and compared for each vegetation type. The mean annual VI images showed similar spatial patterns of vegetation conditions with varying magnitudes. The EVI exhibited high uncertainties in sparsely vegetated lands and forests. The phenological metrics derived from the three VIs are consistent for most vegetation types, with SOS and EOS generated from NDVI showing the largest deviation.

  16. A Wetness Index Using Terrain-Corrected Surface Temperature and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Derived from Standard MODIS Products: An Evaluation of Its Use in a Humid Forest-Dominated Region of Eastern Canada

    Roger M. Cox

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we develop a method to estimate land-surface water content in amostly forest-dominated (humid and topographically-varied region of eastern Canada. Theapproach is centered on a temperature-vegetation wetness index (TVWI that uses standard 8-day MODIS-based image composites of land surface temperature (TS and surface reflectanceas primary input. In an attempt to improve estimates of TVWI in high elevation areas, terrain-induced variations in TS are removed by applying grid, digital elevation model-basedcalculations of vertical atmospheric pressure to calculations of surface potential temperature(θS. Here, θS corrects TS to the temperature value to what it would be at mean sea level (i.e.,~101.3 kPa in a neutral atmosphere. The vegetation component of the TVWI uses 8-daycomposites of surface reflectance in the calculation of normalized difference vegetation index(NDVI values. TVWI and corresponding wet and dry edges are based on an interpretation ofscatterplots generated by plotting θS as a function of NDVI. A comparison of spatially-averaged field measurements of volumetric soil water content (VSWC and TVWI for the 2003-2005 period revealed that variation with time to both was similar in magnitudes. Growing season, point mean measurements of VSWC and TVWI were 31.0% and 28.8% for 2003, 28.6% and 29.4% for 2004, and 40.0% and 38.4% for 2005, respectively. An evaluation of the long-term spatial distribution of land-surface wetness generated with the new θS-NDVI function and a process-based model of soil water content showed a strong relationship (i.e., r2 = 95.7%.

  17. Spatial and temporal patterns of greenness on the Yamal Peninsula, Russia: interactions of ecological and social factors affecting the Arctic normalized difference vegetation index

    The causes of a greening trend detected in the Arctic using the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) are still poorly understood. Changes in NDVI are a result of multiple ecological and social factors that affect tundra net primary productivity. Here we use a 25 year time series of AVHRR-derived NDVI data (AVHRR: advanced very high resolution radiometer), climate analysis, a global geographic information database and ground-based studies to examine the spatial and temporal patterns of vegetation greenness on the Yamal Peninsula, Russia. We assess the effects of climate change, gas-field development, reindeer grazing and permafrost degradation. In contrast to the case for Arctic North America, there has not been a significant trend in summer temperature or NDVI, and much of the pattern of NDVI in this region is due to disturbances. There has been a 37% change in early-summer coastal sea-ice concentration, a 4% increase in summer land temperatures and a 7% change in the average time-integrated NDVI over the length of the satellite observations. Gas-field infrastructure is not currently extensive enough to affect regional NDVI patterns. The effect of reindeer is difficult to quantitatively assess because of the lack of control areas where reindeer are excluded. Many of the greenest landscapes on the Yamal are associated with landslides and drainage networks that have resulted from ongoing rapid permafrost degradation. A warming climate and enhanced winter snow are likely to exacerbate positive feedbacks between climate and permafrost thawing. We present a diagram that summarizes the social and ecological factors that influence Arctic NDVI. The NDVI should be viewed as a powerful monitoring tool that integrates the cumulative effect of a multitude of factors affecting Arctic land-cover change.

  18. Atmospherically resistant vegetation index (ARVI) for EOS-MODIS

    Kaufman, Y.J.; Tanre, D. (NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD (US))

    1992-03-01

    In this paper atmospherically resistant vegetation index (ARVI) is proposed and developed to be used for remote sensing of vegetation from the earth Observing System (EOS) MODIS sensor. The same index can be used for remote sensing from Landsat TM, and the EOS-HIRIS sensor. The index takes advantage of the presence of the blue channel in the MODIS sensor, in addition to the red and the near IR channels that compose the present normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). The resistance of the ARVI to atmospheric effects (in comparison to the NDVI) is accomplished by a self-correction process for the atmospheric effect on the red channel, using the difference in the radiance between the blue and the red channels to correct the radiance in the red channel. Simulations using radiative transfer computations on arithmetic and natural surface spectra, for various atmospheric conditions, show that ARVI has a similar dynamic range to the NDVI, but is, on average, four times less sensitive to atmospheric effects that the NDVI. The improvement is much better for vegetated surfaces than for soils. It is much better for moderate to small size aerosol particles (e.g., continental, urban, or smoke aerosol) than for large particle size (e.g., maritime aerosol or dust).

  19. Seasonal relationship between normalized difference vegetation index and abundance of the Phlebotomus kala-azar vector in an endemic focus in Bihar, India

    Gouri S. Bhunia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Remote sensing was applied for the collection of spatio-temporal data to increase our understanding of the potential distribution of the kala-azar vector Phlebotomus argentipes in endemic areas of the Vaishali district of Bihar, India. We produced monthly distribution maps of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI based on data from the thematic mapper (TM sensor onboard the Landsat-5 satellite. Minimum, maximum and mean NDVI values were computed for each month and compared with the concurrent incidence of kala-azar and the vector density. Maximum and mean NDVI values (R2 = 0.55 and R2 = 0.60, respectively, as well as the season likelihood ratio (X2 = 17.51; P <0.001, were found to be strongly associated with kala-azar, while the correlation with between minimum NDVI values and kala-azar was weak (R2 = 0.25. Additionally, a strong association was found between the mean and maximum NDVI values with seasonal vector abundance (R2 = 0.60 and R2 = 0.55, respectively but there was only a marginal association between minimum NDVI value and the spatial distribution of kala-azar vis-à-vis P. argentipes density.

  20. A new burn severity index based on land surface temperature and enhanced vegetation index

    Zheng, Zhong; Zeng, Yongnian; Li, Songnian; Huang, Wei

    2016-03-01

    Remotely sensed data have already become one of the major resources for estimating the burn severity of forest fires. Recently, Land Surface Temperature (LST) calculated from remote sensing data has been considered as a potential indicator for estimating burn severity. However, using the LST-based index alone may not be sufficient for estimating burn severity in the areas that has unburned trees and vegetation. In this paper, a new index is proposed by considering LST and enhanced vegetation index (EVI) together. The accuracy of the proposed index was evaluated by using 264 composite burn index (CBI) field sample data of the five fires across different regional eco-type areas in the Western United States. Results show that the proposed index performed equally well for post-fire areas covered with both sparse vegetation and dense vegetation and relatively better than some commonly-used burn severity indices. This index also has high potential of estimating burn severity if more accurate surface temperatures can be obtained in the future.

  1. [Construction of age group vegetation index and preliminary application].

    Xu, Zhang-hua; Li, Cong-hui; Liu, Jian; Yu, Kun-yong; Gong, Cong-hong; Tang, Meng-ya

    2014-06-01

    In the present paper, one remote sensing index-age group vegetation index (AGVI) was put forward, and its feasibility was verified. Taking 518 groups of pine forest age group data collected in 13 counties (cities) of Sanming, Jiangle, Shaxian, Nanping, Huaan, Yunxiao, Nanping, Anxi, Putian, Changting, Jianyang, Ningde and Fuqing, Fujian Province and HJ-1 CCD multi-spectral image at the same time-phase as the basis, the spectrum differences of blue, green, red, near infrared and NDVI of each age group were analyzed, showing the characteristics of young forest>middle-aged forest>over-mature forest>mature forest>near mature forest at near infrared band and mature forest>near mature forest>over-mature forest>young forest>middle-aged forest at NDVI, thus the age group vegetation index (AGVI) was constructed; the index could increase the absolute and relative spectrum differences among age groups. For the pine forest AGVI, cluster analysis was conducted with K-mean method, showing that the division accuracy of pine forest age group was 80.45%, and the accurate rate was 90.41%. Therefore, the effectiveness of age group vegetation index constructed was confirmed. PMID:25358177

  2. Analysis of Urban Heat Island (UHI in Relation to Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI: A Comparative Study of Delhi and Mumbai

    Aakriti Grover

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The formation and occurrence of urban heat island (UHI is a result of rapid urbanization and associated concretization. Due to intensification of heat combined with high pollution levels, urban areas expose humans to unexpected health risks. In this context, the study aims at comparing the UHI in the two largest metropolitan cities of India, i.e., Delhi and Mumbai. The presence of surface UHI is analyzed using the Landsat 5 TM image of 5 May 2010 for Delhi and the 17 April 2010 image for Mumbai. The validation of the heat island is done in relation to the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI patterns. The study reveals that built-up and fallow lands record high temperatures, whereas the vegetated areas and water bodies exhibit lower temperatures. Delhi, an inland city, possesses mixed land use and the presence of substantial tree cover along roads; the Delhi Ridge forests and River Yamuna cutting across the city have a high influence in moderating the surface temperatures. The temperature reaches a maximum of 35 °C in West Delhi and a minimum of 24 °C in the east at the River Yamuna. Maximum temperature in East Delhi goes to 30 °C, except the border areas. North, Central and south Delhi have low temperatures (28 °C–31 °C, but the peripheral areas have high temperatures (36 °C–37 °C. The UHI is not very prominent in the case of Delhi. This is proven by the correlations of surface temperature with NDVI. South Delhi, New Delhi and areas close to River Yamuna have high NDVI and, therefore, record low temperatures. Mumbai, on the other hand, is a coastal city with lower tree cover than Delhi. The Borivilli National Park (BNP is in the midst of dense horizontal and vertical growth of buildings. The UHI is much stronger where the heat is trapped that is, the built-up zones. There are four small rivers in Mumbai, which have low carrying capacity. In Mumbai suburban district, the areas adjoining the creeks, sea and the lakes act as

  3. A Wetness Index Using Terrain-Corrected Surface Temperature and Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Derived from Standard MODIS Products: An Evaluation of Its Use in a Humid Forest-Dominated Region of Eastern Canada

    Cox, Roger M.; Fan-Rui Meng; Charles P.-A. Bourque; Quazi K. Hassan

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we develop a method to estimate land-surface water content in amostly forest-dominated (humid) and topographically-varied region of eastern Canada. Theapproach is centered on a temperature-vegetation wetness index (TVWI) that uses standard 8-day MODIS-based image composites of land surface temperature (TS) and surface reflectanceas primary input. In an attempt to improve estimates of TVWI in high elevation areas, terrain-induced variations in TS are removed by applying grid, dig...

  4. Investigation on the Patterns of Global Vegetation Change Using a Satellite-Sensed Vegetation Index

    Ainong Li

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The pattern of vegetation change in response to global change still remains a controversial issue. A Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI dataset compiled by the Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS was used for analysis. For the period 1982–2006, GIMMS-NDVI analysis indicated that monthly NDVI changes show homogenous trends in middle and high latitude areas in the northern hemisphere and within, or near, the Tropic of Cancer and Capricorn; with obvious spatio-temporal heterogeneity on a global scale over the past two decades. The former areas featured increasing vegetation activity during growth seasons, and the latter areas experienced an even greater amplitude in places where precipitation is adequate. The discussion suggests that one should be cautious of using the NDVI time-series to analyze local vegetation dynamics because of its coarse resolution and uncertainties.

  5. Recurrence Plots for the analysis of Vegetation Health Index (VHI)

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina

    2015-01-01

    Many satellite and information services, such as NOAA STAR, are providing maps displaying data about vegetation indices. Using the time-series that we can obtain from these maps, several analyses are possible. Here we propose the use of recurrence plots. We will show examples based on the data corresponding to three small areas in Italy of the NOAA STAR Vegetation Health Index (VHI), an index used for monitoring and forecasting the status of vegetation. The recurrence plots we obtained seem b...

  6. Phenology-Based Vegetation Index Differencing for Mapping of Rubber Plantations Using Landsat OLI Data

    Hui Fan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurate and up-to-date mapping and monitoring of rubber plantations is challenging. In this study, we presented a simple method for rapidly and accurately mapping rubber plantations in the Xishuangbanna region of southwest China using phenology-based vegetation index differencing. Temporal profiles of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI, Atmospherically Resistant Vegetation Index (ARVI, Normalized Difference Moisture Index (NDMI, and Tasselled Cap Greenness (TCG for rubber trees, natural forests and croplands were constructed using 11 Landsat 8 OLI images acquired within one year. These vegetation index time series accurately demonstrated the unique seasonal phenological dynamics of rubber trees. Two distinct phenological phases (i.e., defoliation and foliation of rubber trees were clearly distinguishable from natural forests and croplands. Rubber trees undergo a brief defoliation-foliation process between late December and mid-March. Therefore, vegetation index differencing between the nearly complete defoliation (leaf-off and full foliation (leaf flushing phases was used to delineate rubber plantations within fragmented tropical mountainous landscapes. The method presented herein greatly improved rubber plantation classification accuracy. Overall classification accuracies derived from the differences of the five vegetation indices varied from 92% to 96% with corresponding kappa coefficients of 0.84–0.92. These results demonstrate the promising potential of phenology-based vegetation index differencing for mapping and monitoring rubber expansion at the regional scale.

  7. Research on fractal dimension of vegetation cover based on normalized difference vegetation index in watershed scale%基于归一化植被指数的流域植被覆盖分形维数研究

    李斌斌; 李占斌; 宇涛; 李鹏

    2014-01-01

    量化和表征植被覆盖空间分布的复杂性是研究植被与地表物质迁移关系的重要问题。为研究植被覆盖分形维数的表征特点及其在不同尺度上的变化特征,该文基于地理信息系统平台,利用分形布朗运动理论,结合像元归一化植被指数(normalized difference vegetation index,NDVI)的空间分布,提出并计算了植被覆盖分形布朗运动(fractional brownian motion,FBM)分形维数。结果显示,流域植被覆盖的空间分布具有统计自相似性,可用分形维数表征,其值在2.5~3之间,越接近2.5,表示植被覆盖空间分布越复杂。植被覆盖FBM分形维数与流域内均值化 NDVI 值和 NDVI 值的变异系数无直接关系,与单位面积不同 NDVI 值的像元数呈极显著负相关(R=0.66,P<0.01)。植被覆盖FBM分形维数具有尺度效应,随流域面积增大而增大,到一定尺度后趋于平稳。流域植被覆盖 FBM 分形维数能够克服 NDVI 像元点奇异值等对植被空间分布量化表征计算的干扰,相对传统表征植被覆盖的指数,其在水文、土壤侵蚀等模型中具有更广泛的应用意义。%It is a critical issue to quantify and characterize the complexity of the spatial distribution of vegetation cover when studying the effects of vegetation cover on material migration processes of the earth's surface at the watershed scale. Fractal theory, known as “geometry of nature”, is the frequently-used tool for quantitative research on the distribution and complexity of vegetation at different scales. But fewer researches of the spatial distribution of vegetation with fractal theory at the pixel scale are reported. The objective of this work was to establish the method of using NDVI values and fractional Brownian motion (FBM) theory to describe the complexity of the spatial distribution of vegetation cover. Firstly, the spatial distribution pattern of pixel NDVI, which had the

  8. How Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) Trendsfrom Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) and Système Probatoire d’Observation de la Terre VEGETATION (SPOT VGT) Time Series Differ in Agricultural Areas: An Inner Mongolian Case Study

    Patrick Hostert; Dirk Pflugmacher; Thomas Udelhoven; Rasmus Fensholt; He Yin

    2012-01-01

    Detailed information from global remote sensing has greatly advanced ourunderstanding of Earth as a system in general and of agricultural processes in particular.Vegetation monitoring with global remote sensing systems over long time periods iscritical to gain a better understanding of processes related to agricultural change over longtime periods. This specifically relates to sub-humid to semi-arid ecosystems, whereagricultural change in grazing lands can only be detected based on long time ...

  9. Estimating Crop Coefficients Using Remote Sensing-Based Vegetation Index

    Kenneth Hubbard

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Crop coefficient (Kc-based estimation of crop evapotranspiration is one of the most commonly used methods for irrigation water management. However, uncertainties of the generalized dual crop coefficient (Kc method of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations Irrigation and Drainage Paper No. 56 can contribute to crop evapotranspiration estimates that are substantially different from actual crop evapotranspiration. Similarities between the crop coefficient curve and a satellite-derived vegetation index showed potential for modeling a crop coefficient as a function of the vegetation index. Therefore, the possibility of directly estimating the crop coefficient from satellite reflectance of a crop was investigated. The Kc data used in developing the relationship with NDVI were derived from back-calculations of the FAO-56 dual crop coefficients procedure using field data obtained during 2007 from representative US cropping systems in the High Plains from AmeriFlux sites. A simple linear regression model ( is developed to establish a general relationship between a normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI from a moderate resolution satellite data (MODIS and the crop coefficient (Kc calculated from the flux data measured for different crops and cropping practices using AmeriFlux towers. There was a strong linear correlation between the NDVI-estimated Kc and the measured Kc with an r2 of 0.91 and 0.90, while the root-mean-square error (RMSE for Kc in 2006 and 2007 were 0.16 and 0.19, respectively. The procedure for quantifying crop coefficients from NDVI data presented in this paper should be useful in other regions of the globe to understand regional irrigation water consumption.

  10. Atmospherically Resistant Vegetation Index (ARVI) for EOS-MODIS

    Kaufman, Yoram J.; Tanre, Didier

    1992-01-01

    ARVI, which is here proposed as a tool for the remote sensing of vegetation by the EOS MODIS sensor, takes advantage of the presence of the blue channel in MODIS, together with the red and near-IR channels composing the normalized-difference vegetation index (NDVI). Unlike the NDVI, ARVI resists atmospheric effects via a self-correction process for the effects of the atmosphere on the red channel. ARVI is presently shown to have a dynamic range similar to NDVI's, but is on average less sensitive to atmospheric effects by a factor of 4. A single combination of the blue and red channels in the ARVI may be used in all or most remote-sensing applications.

  11. Inversion of Biochemical Parameters by Selection of Proper Vegetation Index in Winter Wheat

    HUANG Wen-jiang; WANG Ji-hua; LIU Liang-yun; ZHAO Chun-jiang; WANG Zhi-jie; WANG Jin-di

    2004-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated the application of vegetation indices from canopy reflected spectrum for inversion of chlorophyll concentration.Some indices are both response to variations of vegetation and environmental factors.Canopy chlorophyll concentration,an indicator of photosynthesis activity,is related to nitrogen concentration in green vegetation and serves as an indicator of the crop response to soil nitrogen fertilizer application.The combination of normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and photochemical reflectance index (PRI) can reduce the effect of leaf area index (LAI) and soil background.The canopy chlorophyll inversion index (CCII) was proved to be sensitive to chlorophyll concentration and very resistant to the other variations.This paper introduced the ratio of TCARI/OSAVI to make accurate predictions of winter wheat chlorophyll concentration under different cultivars.It indicated that canopy chlorophyll concentration could be evaluated by some combined vegetation indices.

  12. A MODIS-based vegetation index climatology

    Our motivation here is to provide information for the NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite soil moisture retrieval algorithms (launch in 2014). Vegetation attenuates the signal and the algorithms must correct for this effect. One approach is to use data that describes the canopy water ...

  13. New Vegetation Index and Its Application in Estimating Leaf Area Index of Rice

    2007-01-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is an important characteristic of land surface vegetation system, and is also a key parameter for the models of global water balancing and carbon circulation. By using the reflectance values of Landsat-5 blue, green and red channels simulated from rice reflectance spectrum, the sensitivities of the bands to LAI were analyzed, and the response and capability to estimate LAI of various NDVIs (normalized difference vegetation indices), which were established by substituting the red band of general NDVI with all possible combinations of red, green and blue bands, were assessed. Finally,the conclusion was tested by rice data at different conditions. The sensitivities of red, green and blue bands to LAI were different under various conditions. When LAI was less than 3, red and blue bands were more sensitive to LAI. Though green band in the circumstances was less sensitive to LAI than red and blue bands, it was sensitive to LAI in a wider range. When the vegetation indices were constituted by all kinds of combinations of red, green and blue bands, the premise for making the sensitivity of these vegetation indices to LAI be meaningful was that the value of one of the combinations was greater than 0.024, i.e. visible reflectance (VIS)>0.024. Otherwise, the vegetation indices would be saturated, resulting in lower estimation accuracy of LAI. Comparison on the capabilities of the vegetation indices derived from all kinds of combinations of red, green and blue bands to LAI estimation showed that GNDVI (Green NDVI) and GBNDVI (Green-Blue NDVI) had the best relations with LAI. The capabilities of GNDVI and GBNDVI to LAI estimation were tested under different circumstances, and the same result was acquired. It suggested that GNDVI and GBNDVI performed better to predict LAI than the conventional NDVI.

  14. Global Data Sets of Vegetation Leaf Area Index (LAI3g and Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR3g Derived from Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI3g for the Period 1981 to 2011

    Ranga B. Myneni

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Long-term global data sets of vegetation Leaf Area Index (LAI and Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR are critical to monitoring global vegetation dynamics and for modeling exchanges of energy, mass and momentum between the land surface and planetary boundary layer. LAI and FPAR are also state variables in hydrological, ecological, biogeochemical and crop-yield models. The generation, evaluation and an example case study documenting the utility of 30-year long data sets of LAI and FPAR are described in this article. A neural network algorithm was first developed between the new improved third generation Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI3g and best-quality Terra Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS LAI and FPAR products for the overlapping period 2000–2009. The trained neural network algorithm was then used to generate corresponding LAI3g and FPAR3g data sets with the following attributes: 15-day temporal frequency, 1/12 degree spatial resolution and temporal span of July 1981 to December 2011. The quality of these data sets for scientific research in other disciplines was assessed through (a comparisons with field measurements scaled to the spatial resolution of the data products, (b comparisons with broadly-used existing alternate satellite data-based products, (c comparisons to plant growth limiting climatic variables in the northern latitudes and tropical regions, and (d correlations of dominant modes of interannual variability with large-scale circulation anomalies such as the EI Niño-Southern Oscillation and Arctic Oscillation. These assessment efforts yielded results that attested to the suitability of these data sets for research use in other disciplines. The utility of these data sets is documented by comparing the seasonal profiles of LAI3g with profiles from 18 state-of-the-art Earth System Models: the models

  15. Comparison of Hybrid Classifiers for Crop Classification Using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Time Series: A Case Study for Major Crops in North Xinjiang, China.

    Pengyu Hao

    Full Text Available A range of single classifiers have been proposed to classify crop types using time series vegetation indices, and hybrid classifiers are used to improve discriminatory power. Traditional fusion rules use the product of multi-single classifiers, but that strategy cannot integrate the classification output of machine learning classifiers. In this research, the performance of two hybrid strategies, multiple voting (M-voting and probabilistic fusion (P-fusion, for crop classification using NDVI time series were tested with different training sample sizes at both pixel and object levels, and two representative counties in north Xinjiang were selected as study area. The single classifiers employed in this research included Random Forest (RF, Support Vector Machine (SVM, and See 5 (C 5.0. The results indicated that classification performance improved (increased the mean overall accuracy by 5%~10%, and reduced standard deviation of overall accuracy by around 1% substantially with the training sample number, and when the training sample size was small (50 or 100 training samples, hybrid classifiers substantially outperformed single classifiers with higher mean overall accuracy (1%~2%. However, when abundant training samples (4,000 were employed, single classifiers could achieve good classification accuracy, and all classifiers obtained similar performances. Additionally, although object-based classification did not improve accuracy, it resulted in greater visual appeal, especially in study areas with a heterogeneous cropping pattern.

  16. HUBUNGAN ANTARA INDEKS VEGETASI NDVI (NORMALIZED DIFFERENCE VEGETATION INDEX) DAN KOEFISIEN RESESI BASEFLOW PADA BEBERAPA SUBDAS PROPINSI JAWA TENGAH DAN DAERAH ISTIMEWA YOGYAKARTA

    Bokiraiya Latuamury

    2013-01-01

    The background of this research is the decrease of environment capacity in cacthment ecosystem, especially impact of vegetation forest on behavior streamflow. The indicators of cacthment destruction can be seen through hydrograph characteristics. Evaluation of cactment respons of flow hydrographic as an evaluation tools of river catchment responses becomes very important to analyze because it is a benchmark in determination several policy about flood, drough, sedimentation and landslide handl...

  17. A PROPOSED NEW VEGETATION INDEX, THE TOTAL RATIO VEGETATION INDEX (TRVI), FOR ARID AND SEMI-ARID REGIONS

    H. Fadaei; Suzuki, R.; Sakai, T; Torii, K.

    2012-01-01

    Vegetation indices that provide important key to predict amount vegetation in forest such as percentage vegetation cover, aboveground biomass, and leaf-area index. Arid and semi-arid areas are not exempt of this rule. Arid and semi-arid areas of northeast Iran cover about 3.4 million ha and are populated by two main tree species, the broadleaf Pistacia vera (pistachio) and the conifer Juniperus excelsa ssp. polycarpos (Persian juniper). Natural stands of pistachio in Iran are not only environ...

  18. A novel moisture adjusted vegetation index (MAVI to reduce background reflectance and topographical effects on LAI retrieval.

    Gaolong Zhu

    Full Text Available A new moisture adjusted vegetation index (MAVI is proposed using the red, near infrared, and shortwave infrared (SWIR reflectance in band-ratio form in this paper. The effectiveness of MAVI in retrieving leaf area index (LAI is investigated using Landsat-5 data and field LAI measurements in two forest and two grassland areas. The ability of MAVI to retrieve forest LAI under different background conditions is further evaluated using canopy reflectance of Jack Pine and Black Spruce forests simulated by the 4-Scale model. Compared with several commonly used two-band vegetation index, such as normalized difference vegetation index, soil adjusted vegetation index, modified soil adjusted vegetation index, optimized soil adjusted vegetation index, MAVI is a better predictor of LAI, on average, which can explain 70% of variations of LAI in the four study areas. Similar to other SWIR-related three-band vegetation index, such as modified normalized difference vegetation index (MNDVI and reduced simple ratio (RSR, MAVI is able to reduce the background reflectance effects on forest canopy LAI retrieval. MAVI is more suitable for retrieving LAI than RSR and MNDVI, because it avoids the difficulty in properly determining the maximum and minimum SWIR values required in RSR and MNDVI, which improves the robustness of MAVI in retrieving LAI of different land cover types. Moreover, MAVI is expressed as ratios between different spectral bands, greatly reducing the noise caused by topographical variations, which makes it more suitable for applications in mountainous area.

  19. A novel moisture adjusted vegetation index (MAVI) to reduce background reflectance and topographical effects on LAI retrieval.

    Zhu, Gaolong; Ju, Weimin; Chen, J M; Liu, Yibo

    2014-01-01

    A new moisture adjusted vegetation index (MAVI) is proposed using the red, near infrared, and shortwave infrared (SWIR) reflectance in band-ratio form in this paper. The effectiveness of MAVI in retrieving leaf area index (LAI) is investigated using Landsat-5 data and field LAI measurements in two forest and two grassland areas. The ability of MAVI to retrieve forest LAI under different background conditions is further evaluated using canopy reflectance of Jack Pine and Black Spruce forests simulated by the 4-Scale model. Compared with several commonly used two-band vegetation index, such as normalized difference vegetation index, soil adjusted vegetation index, modified soil adjusted vegetation index, optimized soil adjusted vegetation index, MAVI is a better predictor of LAI, on average, which can explain 70% of variations of LAI in the four study areas. Similar to other SWIR-related three-band vegetation index, such as modified normalized difference vegetation index (MNDVI) and reduced simple ratio (RSR), MAVI is able to reduce the background reflectance effects on forest canopy LAI retrieval. MAVI is more suitable for retrieving LAI than RSR and MNDVI, because it avoids the difficulty in properly determining the maximum and minimum SWIR values required in RSR and MNDVI, which improves the robustness of MAVI in retrieving LAI of different land cover types. Moreover, MAVI is expressed as ratios between different spectral bands, greatly reducing the noise caused by topographical variations, which makes it more suitable for applications in mountainous area. PMID:25025128

  20. Assessing landscape changes in Laos using MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index

    Hett, Cornelia; Hurni, Kaspar; Heinimann, Andreas; Mueller, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing rapid and vast land cover and land use transformations in Laos are only documented by punctual local case studies; information on national level is barely available. We explore ways to address this by using MODIS vegetation index times series data to detect medium to large scale transformation on the national level.

  1. The use of a satellite derived vegetation index for assessment of the urban heat island effect

    Gallo, Kevin P.; Tarpley, J. D.; Mcnab, Alan L.; Karl, Thomas R.; Brown, Jesslyn F.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite derived normalized difference (ND) vegetation index data, based on urban and rural region composed of a variety of land surface environments, are evaluated. These data are linearly related to the difference in observed urban and rural minimum temperatures. It is concluded that the difference in the ND index between urban and rural regions reflects the difference in the surface properties (evaporation and heat storage capacity) of these two environments and urban and rural minimum temperatures (the urban heat island effect).

  2. Performance Indexes: Similarities and Differences

    André Machado Caldeira

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The investor of today is more rigorous on monitoring a financial assets portfolio. He no longer thinks only in terms of the expected return (one dimension, but in terms of risk-return (two dimensions. Thus new perception is more complex, since the risk measurement can vary according to anyone’s perception; some use the standard deviation for that, others disagree with this measure by proposing others. In addition to this difficulty, there is the problem of how to consider these two dimensions. The objective of this essay is to study the main performance indexes through an empirical study in order to verify the differences and similarities for some of the selected assets. One performance index proposed in Caldeira (2005 shall be included in this analysis.

  3. Assessments of Drought Impacts on Vegetation in China with the Optimal Time Scales of the Climatic Drought Index

    Zheng Li; Tao Zhou; Xiang Zhao; Kaicheng Huang; Shan Gao; Hao Wu; Hui Luo

    2015-01-01

    Drought is expected to increase in frequency and severity due to global warming, and its impacts on vegetation are typically extensively evaluated with climatic drought indices, such as multi-scalar Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). We analyzed the covariation between the SPEIs of various time scales and the anomalies of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), from which the vegetation type-related optimal time scales were retrieved. The results indicated ...

  4. Comparisons among a new soil index and other two- and four-dimensional vegetation indices

    Wiegand, C. L.; Richardson, A. J.

    1982-01-01

    The 2-D difference vegetation index (DVI) and perpendicular vegetation index (PVI), and the 4-D green vegetation index (GVI) are compared in Landsat MSS data from grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor, L. Moench) fields for the years 1973 to 1977. PVI and DVI were more closely related to LAI than was GVI. A new 2-D soil line index (SLI), the vector distance from the soil line origin to the point of intersection of PVI with the soil line, is defined and compared with the 4-D soil brightness index, SBI. SLI (based on MSS and MSS7) and SL16 (based on MSS5 and MSS6) were smaller in magnitude than SBI but contained similar information about the soil background. These findings indicate that vegetation and soil indices calculated from the single visible and reflective infrared band sensor systems, such as the AVHRR of the TIROS-N polar orbiting series of satellites, will be meaningful for synoptic monitoring of renewable vegetation. Previously announced in STAR as N83-14567

  5. Comparisons among a new soil index and other two- and four-dimensional vegetation indices

    Wiegand, C. L.; Richardson, A. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    The 2-D difference vegetation index (DVI) and perpendicular vegetation index (PVI), and the 4-D green vegetation index (GVI) are compared in LANDSAT MSS data from grain sorghum (Sorghum bicolor, L. Moench) fields for the years 1973 to 1977. PVI and DVI were more closely related to LAI than was GVI. A new 2-D soil line index (SLI), the vector distance from the soil line origin to the point of intersection of PVI with the soil line, is defined and compared with the 4-D soil brightness index, SBI. SLI (based on MSS and MSS7) and SL16 (based on MSS 5 and MSS 6) were smaller in magnitude than SBI but contained similar information about the soil background. These findings indicate that vegetation and soil indices calculated from the single visible and reflective infrared band sensor systems, such as the AVHRR of the TIROS-N polar orbiting series of satellites, will be meaningful for synoptic monitoring of renewable vegetation.

  6. Statistical analysis of land surface temperature-vegetation indexes relationship through thermal remote sensing.

    Kumar, Deepak; Shekhar, Sulochana

    2015-11-01

    Vegetation coverage has a significant influence on the land surface temperature (LST) distribution. In the field of urban heat islands (UHIs) based on remote sensing, vegetation indexes are widely used to estimate the LST-vegetation relationship. This paper devises two objectives. The first analyzes the correlation between vegetation parameters/indicators and LST. The subsequent computes the occurrence of vegetation parameter, which defines the distribution of LST (for quantitative analysis of urban heat island) in Kalaburagi (formerly Gulbarga) City. However, estimation work has been done on the valuation of the relationship between different vegetation indexes and LST. In addition to the correlation between LST and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), the normalized difference build-up index (NDBI) is attempted to explore the impacts of the green land to the build-up land on the urban heat island by calculating the evaluation index of sub-urban areas. The results indicated that the effect of urban heat island in Kalaburagi city is mainly located in the sub-urban areas or Rurban area especially in the South-Eastern and North-Western part of the city. The correlation between LST and NDVI, indicates the negative correlation. The NDVI suggests that the green land can weaken the effect on urban heat island, while we perceived the positive correlation between LST and NDBI, which infers that the built-up land can strengthen the effect of urban heat island in our case study. Although satellite data (e.g., Landsat TM thermal bands data) has been applied to test the distribution of urban heat islands, but the method still needs to be refined with in situ measurements of LST in future studies. PMID:26209299

  7. Vegetation index analysis of multi-source remote sensing data in coal mine wasteland

    Han, Y.X.; Li, M.Z.; Li, D.L. [China Agricultural University, Beijing (China)

    2007-12-15

    Thirty-six soil samples were collected and their hyperspectral data used to calculate vegetation indices such as a normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI) and a difference vegetation index (DVI). These were evaluated for typical surface object features within the wastelands around Haizhou Opencast Coal Mine in Fuxin city. A principal component analysis to the hyperspectral data was performed, and the result showed that the first and the second principal components satisfactorily accounted for the multi-spectral image information. The panchromatic and multi-spectral images of SPOT5 were then merged. The panchromatic image replaced the first principal component to improve spatial resolution of the image. In addition, the multispectral images and the NDVI image were classified into six types using the unsupervised classification method. The linear quantitative models were built up and the highest correlation coefficients were obtained between the hyperspectral vegetation index and the vegetation index data from the SPOT5 image. The results show that the hyperspectral data and remote sensing images can be used for quantitative estimation of soil nutrients in coal mine wasteland. They can also provide large area surface information for fast and effective decision making regarding revegetation and the monitoring of dynamic change.

  8. a Proposed New Vegetation Index, the Total Ratio Vegetation Index (trvi), for Arid and Semi-Arid Regions

    Fadaei, H.; Suzuki, R.; Sakai, T.; Torii, K.

    2012-07-01

    Vegetation indices that provide important key to predict amount vegetation in forest such as percentage vegetation cover, aboveground biomass, and leaf-area index. Arid and semi-arid areas are not exempt of this rule. Arid and semi-arid areas of northeast Iran cover about 3.4 million ha and are populated by two main tree species, the broadleaf Pistacia vera (pistachio) and the conifer Juniperus excelsa ssp. polycarpos (Persian juniper). Natural stands of pistachio in Iran are not only environmentally important but also genetically essential as seed sources for pistachio production in orchards. We investigated the relationships between tree density and vegetation indices in the arid and semi-arid regions in the northeast of Iran by analysing Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) data PRISM is a panchromatic radiometer with a 2.5 m spatial resolution at nadir, and has one band with a wavelength of 0.52-0.77 μm (JAXA EORC). AVNIR-2 is a visible and near infrared radiometer for observing land and coastal zones with a 10 m spatial resolution at nadir, and has four multispectral bands: blue (0.42-0.50 μm), green (0.52-0.60 μm), red (0.61-0.69 μm), and near infrared (0.76-0.89 μm) (JAXA EORC). In this study, we estimated various vegetation indices using maximum filtering algorithm (5×5) and examined. This study carried out of juniper forests and natural pistachio stand using Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS) and field inventories. Have been compared linear regression model of vegetation indices and proposed new vegetation index for arid and semi-arid regions. Also, we estimated the densities of juniper forests and natural pistachio stands using remote sensing to help in the sustainable management and production of pistachio in Iran. We present a new vegetation index for arid and semi-arid regions with sparse forest cover, the Total Ratio Vegetation Index (TRVI), and we investigate the relationship of the new index to tree density by analysing data from the

  9. A PROPOSED NEW VEGETATION INDEX, THE TOTAL RATIO VEGETATION INDEX (TRVI, FOR ARID AND SEMI-ARID REGIONS

    H. Fadaei

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Vegetation indices that provide important key to predict amount vegetation in forest such as percentage vegetation cover, aboveground biomass, and leaf-area index. Arid and semi-arid areas are not exempt of this rule. Arid and semi-arid areas of northeast Iran cover about 3.4 million ha and are populated by two main tree species, the broadleaf Pistacia vera (pistachio and the conifer Juniperus excelsa ssp. polycarpos (Persian juniper. Natural stands of pistachio in Iran are not only environmentally important but also genetically essential as seed sources for pistachio production in orchards. We investigated the relationships between tree density and vegetation indices in the arid and semi-arid regions in the northeast of Iran by analysing Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS data PRISM is a panchromatic radiometer with a 2.5 m spatial resolution at nadir, and has one band with a wavelength of 0.52–0.77 μm (JAXA EORC. AVNIR-2 is a visible and near infrared radiometer for observing land and coastal zones with a 10 m spatial resolution at nadir, and has four multispectral bands: blue (0.42–0.50 μm, green (0.52–0.60 μm, red (0.61–0.69 μm, and near infrared (0.76–0.89 μm (JAXA EORC. In this study, we estimated various vegetation indices using maximum filtering algorithm (5×5 and examined. This study carried out of juniper forests and natural pistachio stand using Advanced Land Observing Satellite (ALOS and field inventories. Have been compared linear regression model of vegetation indices and proposed new vegetation index for arid and semi-arid regions. Also, we estimated the densities of juniper forests and natural pistachio stands using remote sensing to help in the sustainable management and production of pistachio in Iran. We present a new vegetation index for arid and semi-arid regions with sparse forest cover, the Total Ratio Vegetation Index (TRVI, and we investigate the relationship of the new index to tree density by

  10. The use of a vegetation index for assessment of the urban heat island effect

    Gallo, K. P.; Mcnab, A. L.; Karl, T. R.; Brown, J. F.; Hood, J. J.; Tarpley, J. D.

    1993-01-01

    A vegetation index and radiative surface temperature were derived from NOAA-11 Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data for the Seattle, WA region from 28 June through 4 July 1991. The vegetation index and surface temperature values were computed for locations of weather observation stations within the region and compared to observed minimum air temperatures. These comparisons were used to evaluate the use of AVHRR data to assess the influence of the urban environment on observed minimum air temperatures (the urban heat island effect). AVHRR derived normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and radiant surface temperature data from a one week composite product were both related significantly to observed minimum temperatures, however, the vegetation index accounted for a greater amount of the spatial variation observed in mean minimum temperatures. The difference in the NDVI between urban and rural regions appears to be an indicator of the difference in surface properties (i.e., evaporation and heat storage capacity) between the two environments that are responsible for differences in urban and rural minimum temperatures.

  11. Validating a Dynamic Global Vegetation Model with Remotely Sensed Vegetation Index

    Jiaxin Jin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to evaluate the ability of IBIS model to capture the difference in vegetation characteristics among six major biomes in the Northeast China Transect and to calibrate the simulated LAI by IBIS, using the product of MODIS LAI (Leaf Area Index. The results showed that IBIS simulated a little lower growing season LAI over temperate evergreen conifer forest and boreal evergreen forest, while it overestimated LAI relative to MODIS in non-growing season. IBIS performed poorly on LAI over savanna, grassland and shrub land, compared with MODIS and it nearly simulated higher LAI throughout the year. Based on regression analysis, the simulating LAI by IBIS (Integrated Biosphere Simulator presented a significant linear correlation with that from MODIS over temperate evergreen conifer forest in spring and winter, boreal evergreen forest throughout the year and grassland from summer to early autumn. Therefore, it was help to adjust the model parameters over these plant functional types to calibrate the estimated LAI in a large spatial scale.

  12. A special vegetation index for the weed detection in sensor based precision agriculture.

    Langner, Hans-R; Böttger, Hartmut; Schmidt, Helmut

    2006-06-01

    Many technologies in precision agriculture (PA) require image analysis and image- processing with weed and background differentiations. The detection of weeds on mulched cropland is one important image-processing task for sensor based precision herbicide applications. The article introduces a special vegetation index, the Difference Index with Red Threshold (DIRT), for the weed detection on mulched croplands. Experimental investigations in weed detection on mulched areas point out that the DIRT performs better than the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI). The result of the evaluation with four different decision criteria indicate, that the new DIRT gives the highest reliability in weed/background differentiation on mulched areas. While using the same spectral bands (infrared and red) as the NDVI, the new DIRT is more suitable for weed detection than the other vegetation indices and requires only a small amount of additional calculation power. The new vegetation index DIRT was tested on mulched areas during automatic ratings with a special weed camera system. The test results compare the new DIRT and three other decision criteria: the difference between infrared and red intensity (Diff), the soil-adjusted quotient between infrared and red intensity (Quotient) and the NDVI. The decision criteria were compared with the definition of a worse case decision quality parameter Q, suitable for mulched croplands. Although this new index DIRT needs further testing, the index seems to be a good decision criterion for the weed detection on mulched areas and should also be useful for other image processing applications in precision agriculture. The weed detection hardware and the PC program for the weed image processing were developed with funds from the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF). PMID:16917726

  13. Heterogeneity as an index of anthropogenic disturbance of soil and vegetation in urban Parks

    Zhevelev, H.; Sarah, P.

    2012-04-01

    The conditions of urban ecosystems depend on a wide range of anthropogenic factors, one of which is visitor pressure on urban parks. This study aims: (1) to analyze soil properties and vegetation characteristics of different open areas, and (2) to determine an index of disturbance for these areas, according to their spatial heterogeneity. The study was conducted in Tel-Aviv, and addressed two scales: (1) Land Use Units (municipal parks and vacant lots); and (2) Microenvironment (under tree, under bush, herbaceous area, lawn, and path). In each type of microenvironment, soil was sampled at seven points, from layers at two depths (0-2 and 5-10 cm). Before the sampling, penetration depth, litter biomass and vegetation characteristics (vegetation cover, number of species, and vegetation height) were determined in the field. In each soil sample gravimetric soil moisture and organic matter contents were determined, and pH, electrical conductivity and soluble-ion contents were measured in a 1:1 water extraction. The level of disturbance by visitors was scored for each microenvironment according to field evidence of trampling, such as lack of vegetation cover and litter biomass. The results show strong differences in soil properties among the various microenvironments: penetration depth ranged from a few millimeters up to ~ 3 cm; organic matter content from less than 1% to 10%; soil moisture content from a few percents to ~ 30%; electrical conductivity from ~ 0.3 to ~2 dS/m; sodium content from ~ 1 to 7.5 meq/kg; chlorine content from ~ 0.5 to ~9 meq/kg; and litter biomass from 0.5 to 1.4 kg/m2. The vegetation characteristics also varied among the microenvironments: vegetation cover ranged from 11 to 99 %; number of species from 2 to11; and vegetation height from 5 to 35 cm. In order to assess the level of heterogeneity of soil and vegetation, an integral index, based on the number of Duncan groups, has been calculated. Regarding the Scale of Land Use unit, it was found

  14. Frontier differences and the global malmquist index

    Asmild, Mette

    2015-01-01

    This chapter reviews different ways of comparing the efficiency frontiers for subgroups within a data set, specifically program efficiency, the metatechnology (or technology gap) ratio and the global frontier difference index. The latter is subsequently used to define a global Malmquist index, as...

  15. Analysis of agricultural drought using vegetation temperature condition index (VTCI) from Terra/MODIS satellite data.

    Patel, N R; Parida, B R; Venus, V; Saha, S K; Dadhwal, V K

    2012-12-01

    The most commonly used normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from remote sensing often fall short in real-time drought monitoring due to a lagged vegetation response to drought. Therefore, research recently emphasized on the use of combination of surface temperature and NDVI which provides vegetation and moisture conditions simultaneously. Since drought stress effects on agriculture are closely linked to actual evapotranspiration, we used a vegetation temperature condition index (VTCI) which is more closely related to crop water status and holds a key place in real-time drought monitoring and assessment. In this study, NDVI and land surface temperature (T (s)) from MODIS 8-day composite data during cloud-free period (September-October) were adopted to construct an NDVI-T (s) space, from which the VTCI was computed. The crop moisture index (based on estimates of potential evapotranspiration and soil moisture depletion) was calculated to represent soil moisture stress on weekly basis for 20 weather monitoring stations. Correlation and regression analysis were attempted to relate VTCI with crop moisture status and crop performance. VTCI was found to accurately access the degree and spatial extent of drought stress in all years (2000, 2002, and 2004). The temporal variation of VTCI also provides drought pattern changes over space and time. Results showed significant and positive relations between CMI (crop moisture index) and VTCI observed particularly during prominent drought periods which proved VTCI as an ideal index to monitor terminal drought at regional scale. VTCI had significant positive relationship with yield but weakly related to crop anomalies. Duration of terminal drought stress derived from VTCI has a significant negative relationship with yields of major grain and oilseeds crops, particularly, groundnut. PMID:22200944

  16. On index-2 linear implicit difference equations

    Nguyen Huu Du, [No Value; Le Cong Loi, [No Value; Trinh Khanh Duy, [No Value; Vu Tien Viet, [No Value

    2011-01-01

    This paper deals with an index-2 notion for linear implicit difference equations (LIDEs) and with the solvability of initial value problems (IVPs) for index-2 LIDEs. Besides, the cocycle property as well as the multiplicative ergodic theorem of Oseledets type are also proved. (C) 2010 Elsevier Inc.

  17. Calibration of UAS imagery inside and outside of shadows for improved vegetation index computation

    Bondi, Elizabeth; Salvaggio, Carl; Montanaro, Matthew; Gerace, Aaron D.

    2016-05-01

    Vegetation health and vigor can be assessed with data from multi- and hyperspectral airborne and satellite- borne sensors using index products such as the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Recent advances in unmanned aerial systems (UAS) technology have created the opportunity to access these same image data sets in a more cost effective manner with higher temporal and spatial resolution. Another advantage of these systems includes the ability to gather data in almost any weather condition, including complete cloud cover, when data has not been available before from traditional platforms. The ability to collect in these varied conditions, meteorological and temporal, will present researchers and producers with many new challenges. Particularly, cloud shadows and self-shadowing by vegetation must be taken into consideration in imagery collected from UAS platforms to avoid variation in NDVI due to changes in illumination within a single scene, and between collection flights. A workflow is presented to compensate for variations in vegetation indices due to shadows and variation in illumination levels in high resolution imagery collected from UAS platforms. Other calibration methods that producers may currently be utilizing produce NDVI products that still contain shadow boundaries and variations due to illumination, whereas the final NDVI mosaic from this workflow does not.

  18. RGB picture vegetation indexes for High-Throughput Phenotyping Platforms (HTPPs)

    Kefauver, Shawn C.; El-Haddad, George; Vergara-Diaz, Omar; Araus, José Luis

    2015-10-01

    Extreme and abnormal weather events, as well as the more gradual meteorological changes associated with climate change, often coincide with not only increased abiotic risks (such as increases in temperature and decreases in precipitation), but also increased biotic risks due to environmental conditions that favor the rapid spread of crop pests and diseases. Durum wheat is by extension the most cultivated cereal in the south and east margins of the Mediterranean Basin. It is of strategic importance for Mediterranean agriculture to develop new varieties of durum wheat with greater production potential, better adaptation to increasingly adverse environmental conditions (drought) and better grain quality. Similarly, maize is the top staple crop for low-income populations in Sub-Saharan Africa and is currently suffering from the appearance of new diseases, which, together with increased abiotic stresses from climate change, are challenging the very sustainability of African societies. Current constraints in field phenotyping remain a major bottleneck for future breeding advances, but RGB-based High-Throughput Phenotyping Platforms (HTPPs) have shown promise for rapidly developing both disease-resistant and weather-resilient crops. RGB cameras have proven costeffective in studies assessing the effect of abiotic stresses, but have yet to be fully exploited to phenotype disease resistance. Recent analyses of durum wheat in Spain have shown RGB vegetation indexes to outperform multispectral indexes such as NDVI consistently in disease and yield prediction. Towards HTTP development for breeding maize disease resistance, some of the same RGB picture vegetation indexes outperformed NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index), with R2 values up to 0.65, compared to 0.56 for NDVI. . Specifically, hue, a*, u*, and Green Area (GA), as produced by FIJI and BreedPix open source software, performed similar to or better than NDVI in predicting yield and disease severity conditions

  19. Evaluating the potential of vegetation indices for winter wheat LAI estimation under different fertilization and water conditions

    Xie, Qiaoyun; Huang, Wenjiang; Dash, Jadunandan; Song, Xiaoyu; Huang, Linsheng; Zhao, Jinling; Wang, Renhong

    2015-12-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is an important indicator for monitoring crop growth conditions and forecasting grain yield. Many algorithms have been developed for remote estimation of the leaf area index of vegetation, such as using spectral vegetation indices, inversion of radiative transfer models, and supervised learning techniques. Spectral vegetation indices, mathematical combination of reflectance bands, are widely used for LAI estimation due to their computational simplicity and their applications ranged from the leaf scale to the entire globe. However, in many cases, their applicability is limited to specific vegetation types or local conditions due to species specific nature of the relationship used to transfer the vegetation indices to LAI. The overall objective of this study is to investigate the most suitable vegetation index for estimating winter wheat LAI under eight different types of fertilizer and irrigation conditions. Regression models were used to estimate LAI using hyperspectral reflectance data from the Pushbroom Hyperspectral Imager (PHI) and in-situ measurements. Our results showed that, among six vegetation indices investigated, the modified soil-adjusted vegetation index (MSAVI) and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) exhibited strong and significant relationships with LAI, and thus were sensitive across different nitrogen and water treatments. The modified triangular vegetation index (MTVI2) confirmed its potential on crop LAI estimation, although second to MSAVI and NDVI in our study. The enhanced vegetation index (EVI) showed moderate performance. However, the ratio vegetation index (RVI) and the modified simple ratio index (MSR) predicted the least accurate estimations of LAI, exposing the simple band ratio index's weakness under different treatment conditions. The results support the use of vegetation indices for a quick and effective LAI mapping procedure that is suitable for winter wheat under different management practices.

  20. Influence of winter wheat seed treatment by laser on vegetation period duration and harvest index of grain

    Influence of winter wheat seed stimulation by laser (cv. Radika) on the stages of development, duration of vegetation period and harvest index of grain was investigated. For dates of development stages advancing to heading, between cv. Radika and it's laser treatment weren't noticed significant differences. Noticable differences appear in stages of kernel filling and for duration of vegetation period. Treatments by laser were earlier in maturing from standard for 2-6 days depending of treatment and year. The harvest index of grain at laser treatments was significantly higher and depended from the conditions of year, too

  1. Assessments of Drought Impacts on Vegetation in China with the Optimal Time Scales of the Climatic Drought Index.

    Li, Zheng; Zhou, Tao; Zhao, Xiang; Huang, Kaicheng; Gao, Shan; Wu, Hao; Luo, Hui

    2015-07-01

    Drought is expected to increase in frequency and severity due to global warming, and its impacts on vegetation are typically extensively evaluated with climatic drought indices, such as multi-scalar Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI). We analyzed the covariation between the SPEIs of various time scales and the anomalies of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), from which the vegetation type-related optimal time scales were retrieved. The results indicated that the optimal time scales of needle-leaved forest, broadleaf forest and shrubland were between 10 and 12 months, which were considerably longer than the grassland, meadow and cultivated vegetation ones (2 to 4 months). When the optimal vegetation type-related time scales were used, the SPEI could better reflect the vegetation's responses to water conditions, with the correlation coefficients between SPEIs and NDVI anomalies increased by 5.88% to 28.4%. We investigated the spatio-temporal characteristics of drought and quantified the different responses of vegetation growth to drought during the growing season (April-October). The results revealed that the frequency of drought has increased in the 21st century with the drying trend occurring in most of China. These results are useful for ecological assessments and adapting management steps to mitigate the impact of drought on vegetation. They are helpful to employ water resources more efficiently and reduce potential damage to human health caused by water shortages. PMID:26184243

  2. Solar radiation measurements and Leaf Area Index (LAI) from vegetal covers

    A method by which a physical model of the solar radiation transfer in a vegetal medium is inverted to estimate the leaf area index (LAI) for different types of vegetation is presented here, as an alternative to the destructive experiments, which are a hard task to implement on the vegetation covers. Radiation data were obtained during the dry season — 1996, at the Embrapa Experimental Station, (BR 174 - km 54, 2° 31' S, 60° 01' W), Manaus, Brazil. The method yielded convergent values for the LAI between different adopted radiation classes with more stable estimates at time when there is a predominant diffuse radiation. The application of the inversion algorithm yields the following values for the leaf area index and respective annual foliage increments: 3.5 (0.35 yr.-1) for the intact secondary forest; 2.0 (0.5 yr-1) for the palm agroforestry system; and 1.6 (0.4 yr-1) for the multi-layer ones

  3. Vegetation Index Differencing for Broad-Scale Assessment of Productivity Under Prolonged Drought and Sequential High Rainfall Conditions

    Caitriana M. Steele; Dawn M. Browning

    2013-01-01

    Spatially-explicit depictions of plant productivity over large areas are critical to monitoring landscapes in highly heterogeneous arid ecosystems. Applying radiometric change detection techniques we sought to determine whether: (1) differences between pre- and post-growing season spectral vegetation index values effectively identify areas of significant change in vegetation; and (2) areas of significant change coincide with altered ecological states. We differenced NDVI values, standardized ...

  4. Spatio-temporal patterns in vegetation start of season across the island of Ireland using the MERIS Global Vegetation Index

    O'Connor, Brian; Dwyer, Edward; Cawkwell, Fiona; Eklundh, Lars

    2012-03-01

    Spring phenophases such as the beginning of leaf unfolding, measured in the Irish gardens of the International Phenological Garden (IPG) network, indicate an earlier spring occurrence hence a longer growing season. However, these measurements are limited to selected species of trees at a few point locations in the southern half of the country. The aim of this study was to develop a methodology, based on satellite remote sensing, to measure the vegetation start of season (SOS) across the whole island of Ireland on an annual basis, complementary to existing ground-based methods. The SOS metric was extracted for each year in a 7-year time series of 10-day composited, 1.2 km reduced resolution MERIS Global Vegetation Index (MGVI) data from 2003 to 2009, based on curve fitting, using the time series analysis software, TIMESAT. Spatio-temporal variability in the SOS was detected across the island on an annual basis and highlighted in a series of anomaly images showing variation from the 7-year mean SOS. The 2006 SOS was late across the island while there were strong geographical gradients to the SOS anomalies in 2009 when it occurred later in the south and earlier in the north. There was a mix of early and late anomaly values throughout the country in the other years. Qualitatively, the spatial patterns in the timing of the SOS were related to the distribution of landcover types as indicated by the CORINE Land Cover map (CLC). Three statistically separable groups of CLC classes were derived from differences in the SOS, namely agricultural and forest land cover types, peat bogs, and natural and semi-natural vegetation types. These groups demonstrated that vegetation in cultivated areas like pastures has a significantly earlier SOS than in areas of unmanaged vegetation such as peat bogs. An initial climate analysis indicated that an anomalously cold winter and spring in 2005/2006 delayed the 2006 SOS countrywide; while a cold winter followed by a mild spring in 2009 caused

  5. Analyzing Vegetation Change in an Elephant-Impacted Landscape Using the Moving Standard Deviation Index

    Timothy J. Fullman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Northern Botswana is influenced by various socio-ecological drivers of landscape change. The African elephant (Loxodonta africana is one of the leading sources of landscape shifts in this region. Developing the ability to assess elephant impacts on savanna vegetation is important to promote effective management strategies. The Moving Standard Deviation Index (MSDI applies a standard deviation calculation to remote sensing imagery to assess degradation of vegetation. Used previously for assessing impacts of livestock on rangelands, we evaluate the ability of the MSDI to detect elephant-modified vegetation along the Chobe riverfront in Botswana, a heavily elephant-impacted landscape. At broad scales, MSDI values are positively related to elephant utilization. At finer scales, using data from 257 sites along the riverfront, MSDI values show a consistent negative relationship with intensity of elephant utilization. We suggest that these differences are due to varying effects of elephants across scales. Elephant utilization of vegetation may increase heterogeneity across the landscape, but decrease it within heavily used patches, resulting in the observed MSDI pattern of divergent trends at different scales. While significant, the low explanatory power of the relationship between the MSDI and elephant utilization suggests the MSDI may have limited use for regional monitoring of elephant impacts.

  6. Generating Vegetation Leaf Area Index Earth System Data Record from Multiple Sensors. Part 1; Theory

    Ganguly, Sangram; Schull, Mitchell A.; Samanta, Arindam; Shabanov, Nikolay V.; Milesi, Cristina; Nemani, Ramakrishna R.; Knyazikhin, Yuri; Myneni, Ranga B.

    2008-01-01

    The generation of multi-decade long Earth System Data Records (ESDRs) of Leaf Area Index (LAI) and Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) from remote sensing measurements of multiple sensors is key to monitoring long-term changes in vegetation due to natural and anthropogenic influences. Challenges in developing such ESDRs include problems in remote sensing science (modeling of variability in global vegetation, scaling, atmospheric correction) and sensor hardware (differences in spatial resolution, spectral bands, calibration, and information content). In this paper, we develop a physically based approach for deriving LAI and FPAR products from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) data that are of comparable quality to the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) LAI and FPAR products, thus realizing the objective of producing a long (multi-decadal) time series of these products. The approach is based on the radiative transfer theory of canopy spectral invariants which facilitates parameterization of the canopy spectral bidirectional reflectance factor (BRF). The methodology permits decoupling of the structural and radiometric components and obeys the energy conservation law. The approach is applicable to any optical sensor, however, it requires selection of sensor-specific values of configurable parameters, namely, the single scattering albedo and data uncertainty. According to the theory of spectral invariants, the single scattering albedo is a function of the spatial scale, and thus, accounts for the variation in BRF with sensor spatial resolution. Likewise, the single scattering albedo accounts for the variation in spectral BRF with sensor bandwidths. The second adjustable parameter is data uncertainty, which accounts for varying information content of the remote sensing measurements, i.e., Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, low information content), vs. spectral BRF (higher

  7. Assessments of Drought Impacts on Vegetation in China with the Optimal Time Scales of the Climatic Drought Index

    Zheng Li

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Drought is expected to increase in frequency and severity due to global warming, and its impacts on vegetation are typically extensively evaluated with climatic drought indices, such as multi-scalar Standardized Precipitation Evapotranspiration Index (SPEI. We analyzed the covariation between the SPEIs of various time scales and the anomalies of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI, from which the vegetation type-related optimal time scales were retrieved. The results indicated that the optimal time scales of needle-leaved forest, broadleaf forest and shrubland were between 10 and 12 months, which were considerably longer than the grassland, meadow and cultivated vegetation ones (2 to 4 months. When the optimal vegetation type-related time scales were used, the SPEI could better reflect the vegetation’s responses to water conditions, with the correlation coefficients between SPEIs and NDVI anomalies increased by 5.88% to 28.4%. We investigated the spatio-temporal characteristics of drought and quantified the different responses of vegetation growth to drought during the growing season (April–October. The results revealed that the frequency of drought has increased in the 21st century with the drying trend occurring in most of China. These results are useful for ecological assessments and adapting management steps to mitigate the impact of drought on vegetation. They are helpful to employ water resources more efficiently and reduce potential damage to human health caused by water shortages.

  8. A Novel Moisture Adjusted Vegetation Index (MAVI) to Reduce Background Reflectance and Topographical Effects on LAI Retrieval

    Gaolong Zhu; Weimin Ju; Chen, J. M.; Yibo Liu

    2014-01-01

    A new moisture adjusted vegetation index (MAVI) is proposed using the red, near infrared, and shortwave infrared (SWIR) reflectance in band-ratio form in this paper. The effectiveness of MAVI in retrieving leaf area index (LAI) is investigated using Landsat-5 data and field LAI measurements in two forest and two grassland areas. The ability of MAVI to retrieve forest LAI under different background conditions is further evaluated using canopy reflectance of Jack Pine and Black Spruce forests s...

  9. Recent Trends in Satellite Vegetation Index Observations Indicate Decreasing Vegetation Biomass in the Southeastern Saline Everglades Wetlands

    Fuller, D. O.

    2013-12-01

    We analyzed trends in time series of the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) from multitemporal satellite imagery for 2001-2010 over the southeastern Everglades where major changes in vegetation structure and type have been associated with sea-level rise and reduced freshwater flow since the 1940s. Non-parametric trend analysis using the Theil-Sen slope revealed that 84.4% of statistically significant trends in NDVI were negative, mainly concentrated in scrub mangrove, sawgrass (Cladium jamaicense) and spike rush (Eleocharis cellulosa) communities within 5 km of the shoreline. Observed trends were consistent with trends in sawgrass biomass measurements made from 1999-2010 in three Long-term Ecological Research (LTER) sites within our study area. A map of significant trends overlaid on a RapidEye high-resolution satellite image showed large patches of negative trends parallel to the shoreline in and around the 'white zone,' which corresponds to a low-productivity band that has moved inland over the past 70 years. Significantly positive trends were observed mainly in the halophytic prairie community where highly salt tolerant species are typically found. Taken as a whole, the results suggest that increased saline intrusion associated with sea-level rise continues to reduce the photosynthetic biomass within freshwater and oligohaline marsh communities of the southeastern Everglades. Trends in 2001-2010 NDVI in southern saline Everglades wetlands of South Florida. a) slope values; b) areas of significant slope; c) location of the study area.

  10. Modified soil adjusted vegetation index for the Death Valley regional flow system, Nevada and California

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The raster-based Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index was derived from Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery data acquired during June 1992 for the Death Valley...

  11. Modified soil adjusted vegetation index of the Sarcobatus Flat area of the Death Valley

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The raster-based Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index was derived from Landsat Thematic Mapper imagery data acquired during June 1989 for Sarcobatus Flat. The...

  12. Global assessment of Vegetation Index and Phenology Lab (VIP and Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS version 3 products

    M. Marshall

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Earth observation based long-term global vegetation index products are used by scientists from a wide range of disciplines concerned with global change. Inter-comparison studies are commonly performed to keep the user community informed on the consistency and accuracy of such records as they evolve. In this study, we compared two new records: (1 Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS Normalized Difference Vegetation Index Version 3 (NDVI3g and (2 Vegetation Index and Phenology Lab (VIP Version 3 NDVI (NDVI3v and Enhanced Vegetation Index 2 (EVI3v. We evaluated the two records via three experiments that addressed the primary use of such records in global change research: (1 prediction of the Leaf Area Index (LAI used in light-use efficiency modeling, (2 estimation of vegetation climatology in Soil-Vegetation-Atmosphere Transfer models, and (3 trend analysis of the magnitude and phenology of vegetation productivity. Experiment one, unlike previous inter-comparison studies, was performed with a unique Landsat 30 m spatial resolution and in situ LAI database for major crop types on five continents. Overall, the two records showed a high level of agreement both in direction and magnitude on a monthly basis, though VIP values were higher and more variable and showed lower correlations and higher error with in situ LAI. The records were most consistent at northern latitudes during the primary growing season and southern latitudes and the tropics throughout much of the year, while the records were less consistent at northern latitudes during green-up and senescence and in the great deserts of the world throughout much of the year. The two records were also highly consistent in terms of trend direction/magnitude, showing a 30+ year increase (decrease in NDVI over much of the globe (tropical rainforests. The two records were less consistent in terms of timing due to the poor correlation of the records during start and end of growing season.

  13. Estimating Riparian and Agricultural Actual Evapotranspiration by Reference Evapotranspiration and MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index

    Scott, Russell L.; Uyen Nguyen; Glenn, Edward P; Pamela L. Nagler; Tanya Doody

    2013-01-01

    Dryland river basins frequently support both irrigated agriculture and riparian vegetation and remote sensing methods are needed to monitor water use by both crops and natural vegetation in irrigation districts. We developed an algorithm for estimating actual evapotranspiration (ETa) based on the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensor on the EOS-1 Terra satellite and locally-derived measurements of reference crop ET (ETo). The algorith...

  14. A near infrared vegetation index formed with airborne multispectral scanner data

    Elvidge, Christopher D.; Rock, Barrett N.

    1987-01-01

    A near infrared vegetation index (NIVI) has been formed with the 1.24 and 1.65 micron bands on the NS001 Thematic Mapper Simulator. The NIVI was compared to the more traditional Perpendicular Vegetation Index (PVI) formed with the 0.66 and 0.83 micron bands. The PVI was found to be less susceptible to problems with rock and soil spectral variations than the VIVI.

  15. The Vegetation Drought Response Index (VegDRI): A new integrated approach for monitoring drought stress in vegetation

    Brown, J.F.; Wardlow, B.D.; Tadesse, T.; Hayes, M.J.; Reed, B.C.

    2008-01-01

    The development of new tools that provide timely, detailed-spatial-resolution drought information is essential for improving drought preparedness and response. This paper presents a new method for monitoring drought-induced vegetation stress called the Vegetation Drought Response Index (VegDRI). VegDRI integrates traditional climate-based drought indicators and satellite-derived vegetation index metrics with other biophysical information to produce a I km map of drought conditions that can be produced in near-real time. The initial VegDRI map results for a 2002 case study conducted across seven states in the north-central United States illustrates the utility of VegDRI for improved large-area drought monitoring. Copyright ?? 2008 by Bellwether Publishing, Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of soil moisture on the 37 GHz microwave polarization difference index (MPDI)

    Previous studies have shown that the 37 GHz microwave polarization difference index (MPDI) has an inverse nonlinear relationship to the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) with the MPDI (NDVI) being more sensitive to vegetation density under sparse (moderate) vegetation conditions. It has also been noted that soil moisture can have a significant influence on the MPDI. This study quantifies the effect of soil moisture on the MPDI using the RADTRAN model and comparison with measurements from a few geographically restricted (eastern USA) study sites. Model results show the MPDI increases with soil moisture but its sensitivity approaches zero when soil moisture values or vegetation densities are large. Results based on special sensor microwave/imager (SSM/I) measured values of MPDI, using the NDVI as a surrogate for vegetation density and an antecedent precipitation index (API) as a surrogate for soil moisture, were consistent with those based on the model. Linear equations, one for each of three categories of vegetation density, expressing MPDI as a function of API were derived based on SSM/I measurements. These equations demonstrate that soil moisture information can be extracted from the MPDI when the NDVI is used to account for the effect of vegetation and that the effect of soil moisture on the MPDI should be taken into account if it is to be used as a vegetation index. The potential to normalize MPDI values for variations in soil moisture is discussed. (author)

  17. A simple interpretation of the surface temperature/vegetation index space for assessment of surface moisture status

    Sandholt, Inge; Rasmussen, Kjeld; Andersen, Jens Asger

    2002-01-01

    A simplified land surface dryness index (Temperature-Vegetation Dryness Index, TVDI) based on an empirical parameterisation of the relationship between surface temperature (T-s) and vegetation index (NDVI) is suggested. The index is related to soil moisture and, in comparison to existing interpre...

  18. Estimating soil moisture from 6.6 GHz dual polarization, and/or satellite derived vegetation index

    Eight and a half years (January 1979 to August 1987) of Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) data taken at a frequency of 6.6 GHz for both day and night observations at both polarizations were processed, documented and used to study the relationship between brightness temperature (T(B)) and antecedent precipitation index (API) in a wide range of vegetation index (normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) varies from 0.2 to 0.6) in the mid-west and southern United States. In general, this study validates the model structure for soil wetness developed by Choudhury and Golus. For NDVI greater than 0.45 the resultant microwave signal is substantially affected by the vegetation. The night-time observations by both polarizations gave a better correlation between T(B) and API. The horizontal polarization is more sensitive to vegetation. For the least and greatest vegetated areas, night-time observations by vertical polarization showed less scatter in the T(B) versus API relation. A non-linear model was developed for soil wetness using horizontal and vertical polarization and their difference. The estimate of error for this model is better than previous models, and can be used to obtain six levels of soil moisture. (author)

  19. Vegetation indices derived from a modified digital camera in combination with different blocking filters

    Krainer, Karl; Hammerle, Albin; Wohlfahrt, Georg

    2015-04-01

    Remote and proximal sensing have become valuable and broadly used tools in ecosystem research. Radiation reflected and scattered at and from the vegetation is used to infer information about vegetation biomass, structure, vitality and functioning, just to name a few. To this end numerous vegetation indices have been established, which relate reflectance in different wavelengths to each other. While such indices are usually calculated from reflectance data measured by spectro-radiometers we did a study using a commercially available digital camera, from which the infrared (IR) band elimination filter was removed. By removing this filter, the camera sensor became sensitive for IR radiation besides the visible spectrum. Comparing measurements with this modified camera and a hyperspectral spectro-radiometer over different vegetation and surfaces we determined the potential of such a modified camera to measure different vegetation indices. To this end we compared 71 vegetation indices derived from spectro-radiometer data with 63 indices derived from the modified digital camera. We found that many of these different indices featured relatively high correlations. Especially the rgR (green/red ratio) and NDI (normalized difference vegetation index) calculated from data of the modified camera do correlate very well with vegetation indices that are known for representing the amount and vitality of green biomass, as these are the NIDI (normalized infrared vegetation index) and the LIC (curvature index). We thus conclude from this experiment, that given a proper inter-calibration, a commercially available digital camera can be modified and used as a reasonable alternative tool to determine vegetation biomass and/or vitality. In addition to these measurements currently different band elimination filters are used to improve the information content of the digital images.

  20. Monitoring the vegetation start of season (SOS) across the island of Ireland using the MERIS global vegetation index

    O'Connor, Brian

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a methodology, based on satellite remote sensing, to estimate the vegetation Start of Season (SOS) across the whole island of Ireland on an annual basis. This growing body of research is known as Land Surface Phenology (LSP) monitoring. The SOS was estimated for each year from a 7-year time series of 10-day composited, 1.2 km reduced resolution MERIS Global Vegetation Index (MGVI) data from 2003 to 2009, using the time series analysis software, TIMESAT. Th...

  1. Estimating Riparian and Agricultural Actual Evapotranspiration by Reference Evapotranspiration and MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index

    Russell L. Scott

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Dryland river basins frequently support both irrigated agriculture and riparian vegetation and remote sensing methods are needed to monitor water use by both crops and natural vegetation in irrigation districts. We developed an algorithm for estimating actual evapotranspiration (ETa based on the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS sensor on the EOS-1 Terra satellite and locally-derived measurements of reference crop ET (ETo. The algorithm was calibrated with five years of ETa data from three eddy covariance flux towers set in riparian plant associations on the upper San Pedro River, Arizona, supplemented with ETa data for alfalfa and cotton from the literature. The algorithm was based on an equation of the form ETa = ETo [a(1 − e−bEVI − c], where the term (1 − e−bEVI is derived from the Beer-Lambert Law to express light absorption by a canopy, with EVI replacing leaf area index as an estimate of the density of light-absorbing units. The resulting algorithm capably predicted ETa across riparian plants and crops (r2 = 0.73. It was then tested against water balance data for five irrigation districts and flux tower data for two riparian zones for which season-long or multi-year ETa data were available. Predictions were within 10% of measured results in each case, with a non-significant (P = 0.89 difference between mean measured and modeled ETa of 5.4% over all validation sites. Validation and calibration data sets were combined to present a final predictive equation for application across crops and riparian plant associations for monitoring individual irrigation districts or for conducting global water use assessments of mixed agricultural and riparian biomes.

  2. Estimating riparian and agricultural evapotranspiration by reference crop evapotranspiration and MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index

    Nagler, Pamela L.; Glenn, Edward P.; Nguyen, Uyen; Scott, Russell; Doody, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Dryland river basins frequently support both irrigated agriculture and riparian vegetation and remote sensing methods are needed to monitor water use by both crops and natural vegetation in irrigation districts. We developed an algorithm for estimating actual evapotranspiration (ETa) based on the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS) sensor on the EOS-1 Terra satellite and locally-derived measurements of reference crop ET (ETo). The algorithm was calibrated with five years of ETa data from three eddy covariance flux towers set in riparian plant associations on the upper San Pedro River, Arizona, supplemented with ETa data for alfalfa and cotton from the literature. The algorithm was based on an equation of the form ETa = ETo [a(1 − e−bEVI) − c], where the term (1 − e−bEVI) is derived from the Beer-Lambert Law to express light absorption by a canopy, with EVI replacing leaf area index as an estimate of the density of light-absorbing units. The resulting algorithm capably predicted ETa across riparian plants and crops (r2 = 0.73). It was then tested against water balance data for five irrigation districts and flux tower data for two riparian zones for which season-long or multi-year ETa data were available. Predictions were within 10% of measured results in each case, with a non-significant (P = 0.89) difference between mean measured and modeled ETa of 5.4% over all validation sites. Validation and calibration data sets were combined to present a final predictive equation for application across crops and riparian plant associations for monitoring individual irrigation districts or for conducting global water use assessments of mixed agricultural and riparian biomes.

  3. Identification of Forest Vegetation Using Vegetation Indices

    Yuan Jinguo; Wang Wei

    2004-01-01

    Spectral feature of forest vegetation with remote sensing techniques is the research topic all over the world, because forest plays an important role in human beings' living environment. Research on vegetation classification with vegetation index is still very little recently. This paper proposes a method of identifying forest types based on vegetation indices,because the contrast of absorbing red waveband with reflecting near-infrared waveband strongly for different vegetation types is recognized as the theoretic basis of vegetation analysis with remote sensing. Vegetation index is highly related to leaf area index, absorbed photosynthetically active radiation and vegetation cover. Vegetation index reflects photosynthesis intensity of plants and manifests different forest types. According to reflectance data of forest canopy and soil line equation NIR=1.506R+0.0076 in Jingyuetan, Changchun of China, many vegetation indices are calculated and analyzed. The result shows that the relationships between vegetation indices and forest types are that perpendicular vegetation index (PVI) identifies broadleaf forest and coniferous forest the most easily;the next is transformed soil-adjusted vegetation index(TSVI) and modified soil-adjusted vegetation index(MSVI), but their calculation is complex. Ratio vegetation index (RVT) values of different coniferous forest vary obviously, so RVI can classify conifers.Therefore, the combination of PVI and RVI is evaluated to classify different vegetation types.

  4. Evaluating the quality of riparian forest vegetation: the Riparian Forest Evaluation (RFV index

    Fernando Magdaleno

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: This paper presents a novel index, the Riparian Forest Evaluation (RFV index, for assessing the ecological condition of riparian forests. The status of riparian ecosystems has global importance due to the ecological and social benefits and services they provide. The initiation of the European Water Framework Directive (2000/60/CE requires the assessment of the hydromorphological quality of natural channels. The Directive describes riparian forests as one of the fundamental components that determine the structure of riverine areas. The RFV index was developed to meet the aim of the Directive and to complement the existing methodologies for the evaluation of riparian forests.Area of study: The RFV index was applied to a wide range of streams and rivers (170 water bodies inSpain.Materials and methods: The calculation of the RFV index is based on the assessment of both the spatial continuity of the forest (in its three core dimensions: longitudinal, transversal and vertical and the regeneration capacity of the forest, in a sampling area related to the river hydromorphological pattern. This index enables an evaluation of the quality and degree of alteration of riparian forests. In addition, it helps to determine the scenarios that are necessary to improve the status of riparian forests and to develop processes for restoring their structure and composition.Main results: The results were compared with some previous tools for the assessment of riparian vegetation. The RFV index got the highest average scores in the basins of northernSpain, which suffer lower human influence. The forests in central and southern rivers got worse scores. The bigger differences with other tools were found in complex and partially altered streams and rivers.Research highlights: The study showed the index’s applicability under diverse hydromorphological and ecological conditions and the main advantages of its application. The utilization of the index allows a

  5. Comparison of the Continuity of Vegetation Indices Derived from Landsat 8 OLI and Landsat 7 ETM+ Data among Different Vegetation Types

    Xiaojun She

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Landsat 8, the most recently launched satellite of the series, promises to maintain the continuity of Landsat 7. However, in addition to subtle differences in sensor characteristics and vegetation index (VI generation algorithms, VIs respond differently to the seasonality of the various types of vegetation cover. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the effects of these variations on VIs between Operational Land Imager (OLI and Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+. Ground spectral data for vegetation were used to simulate the Landsat at-senor broadband reflectance, with consideration of sensor band-pass differences. Three band-geometric VIs (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, Soil-Adjusted Vegetation Index (SAVI, Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI and two band-transformation VIs (Vegetation Index based on the Universal Pattern Decomposition method (VIUPD, Tasseled Cap Transformation Greenness (TCG were tested to evaluate the performance of various VI generation algorithms in relation to multi-sensor continuity. Six vegetation types were included to evaluate the continuity in different vegetation types. Four pairs of data during four seasons were selected to evaluate continuity with respect to seasonal variation. The simulated data showed that OLI largely inherits the band-pass characteristics of ETM+. Overall, the continuity of band-transformation derived VIs was higher than band-geometry derived VIs. VI continuity was higher in the three forest types and the shrubs in the relatively rapid growth periods of summer and autumn, but lower for the other two non-forest types (grassland and crops during the same periods.

  6. Analyzing Vegetation Change in an Elephant-Impacted Landscape Using the Moving Standard Deviation Index

    Timothy J. Fullman; Erin L. Bunting

    2014-01-01

    Northern Botswana is influenced by various socio-ecological drivers of landscape change. The African elephant (Loxodonta africana) is one of the leading sources of landscape shifts in this region. Developing the ability to assess elephant impacts on savanna vegetation is important to promote effective management strategies. The Moving Standard Deviation Index (MSDI) applies a standard deviation calculation to remote sensing imagery to assess degradation of vegetation. Used previously for asse...

  7. Monitoring responses of Mason Pine to acid rain in China based on remote sensing vegetation index

    Since the 1970s, acid rain has remained in the public spotlight in both Europe and the United States and recently has emerged as an important problem in other regions such as Southeast Asia. To reveal responses of Masson Pine to acid rain during a long time series in central China, we used the interpolation dataset of acid rain and the Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies (GIMMS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) data to derive the monthly pH and NDVI trajectories based on acidity gradients from 1992 to 2006. Then we analyzed inter-annual and seasonal variation of vegetation growth by improved sinusoidal fitting and regression analysis. In the environment of strong acidity and moderate acidity, the growth of Masson Pine was inhibited during the study period, while the slight acidity promoted growth of Masson Pine to some extent. For the multi-year monthly changing trend of NDVI, late spring to mid autumn, the NDVI showed a decreasing trend, especially in June, while from late autumn to the following spring, the NDVI showed a rising tendency, specifically in December and March

  8. The effect of bi-directional reflectance distribution function on the estimation of vegetation indices and leaf area index (LAI): A case study of the vegetation in succession stages after forest fire in northwestern Canada

    The effect of the dependence of the satellite data on sun/sensor geometry must be considered in the case of monitoring vegetation from satellites. Vegetation structure causes uneven scattering of sunlight, which is expressed by bi-directional reflectance distribution function (BRDF). The purpose of this study is to estimate the effect of BRDF of monitoring vegetation using the reflectance of visible and near-infrared bands. We investigated the vegetation in succession stages after forest fire (main species: spruce) in the northwestern Canada. BRF (Bidirectional Reflectance Factor) was measured in the seven sites of some succession stages, along with the measurements of leaf area index (LAI) and biomass. The main results obtained in this study are summarized as follows. (1) In each site, the difference of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) value around 0.1-0.2 was caused by BRDF when the sensor angle was changed from -15deg to 15 deg, being equivalent to the standard image of IKONOS. Also, LAI estimated by NDVI varied from 22% to 65% of the average. (2) The robustness of other vegetation indices to BRDF was compared. The reflectance of the near-infrared band normalized by the sum of other bands (nNIR), and Global Environmental Monitoring Index (GEMI) were investigated along with NDVI. It is clarified that nNIR was most robust in the site where vegetation existed. GEMI was most robust in the sites of scarce vegetation, while NDVI was strongly affected by BRDF in such sites

  9. Estimating Crop Coefficients Using Remote Sensing-Based Vegetation Index

    Kenneth Hubbard; Baburao Kamble; Ayse Kilic

    2013-01-01

    Crop coefficient (Kc)-based estimation of crop evapotranspiration is one of the most commonly used methods for irrigation water management. However, uncertainties of the generalized dual crop coefficient (Kc) method of the Food and Agricultural Organization of the United Nations Irrigation and Drainage Paper No. 56 can contribute to crop evapotranspiration estimates that are substantially different from actual crop evapotranspiration. Similarities between the crop coefficient curve and a sate...

  10. Camera derived vegetation greenness index as proxy for gross primary production in a low Arctic wetland area

    Westergaard-Nielsen, Andreas; Lund, Magnus; Hansen, Birger;

    2013-01-01

    normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) product derived from the WorldView-2 satellite. An object-based classification based on a bi-temporal image composite was used to classify the study area into heath, copse, fen, and bedrock. Temporal evolution of vegetation greenness was evaluated and modeled......The Arctic is experiencing disproportionate warming relative to the global average, and the Arctic ecosystems are as a result undergoing considerable changes. Continued monitoring of ecosystem productivity and phenology across temporal and spatial scales is a central part of assessing the magnitude...... of these changes. This study investigates the ability to use automatic digital camera images (DCIs) as proxy data for gross primary production (GPP) in a complex low Arctic wetland site. Vegetation greenness computed from DCIs was found to correlate significantly (R2 = 0.62, p < 0.001) with a...

  11. Vegetation biomass, leaf area index, and NDVI patterns and relationships along two latitudinal transects in arctic tundra

    Epstein, H. E.; Walker, D. A.; Raynolds, M. K.; Kelley, A. M.; Jia, G.; Ping, C.; Michaelson, G.; Leibman, M. O.; Kaarlejärvi, E.; Khomutov, A.; Kuss, P.; Moskalenko, N.; Orekhov, P.; Matyshak, G.; Forbes, B. C.; Yu, Q.

    2009-12-01

    Analyses of vegetation properties along climatic gradients provide first order approximations as to how vegetation might respond to a temporally dynamic climate. Until recently, no systematic study of tundra vegetation had been conducted along bioclimatic transects that represent the full latitudinal extent of the arctic tundra biome. Since 1999, we have been collecting data on arctic tundra vegetation and soil properties along two such transects, the North American Arctic Transect (NAAT) and the Yamal Arctic Transect (YAT). The NAAT spans the arctic tundra from the Low Arctic of the North Slope of Alaska to the polar desert of Cape Isachsen on Ellef Ringnes Island in the Canadian Archipelago. The Yamal Arctic Transect located in northwest Siberia, Russia, presently ranges from the forest-tundra transition at Nadym to the High Arctic tundra on Belyy Ostrov off the north coast of the Yamal Peninsula. The summer warmth indices (SWI - sum of mean monthly temperatures greater than 0°C) range from approximately 40 °C months to 3 °C months from south to north. For largely zonal sites along these transects, we systematically collected leaf area index (LAI-2000 Plant Canopy Analyzer), normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI - PSII hand-held spectro-radiometer), and vegetation biomass (clip harvests). Site-averaged LAI ranges from 1.08 to 0 along the transects, yet can be highly variable at the landscape scale. Site-averaged NDVI ranges from 0.67 to 0.26 along the transects, and is less variable than LAI at the landscape scale. Total aboveground live biomass ranges from approximately 700 g m-2 to < 50 g m-2 along the NAAT, and from approximately 1100 g m-2 to < 400 g m-2 along the YAT (not including tree biomass at Nadym). LAI and NDVI are highly correlated logarithmically (r = 0.80) for the entire dataset. LAI is significantly related to total aboveground (live plus dead) vascular plant biomass, although there is some variability in the data (r = 0.63). NDVI is

  12. Cooling parameters for fruits and vegetables of different sizes in a hydrocooling system

    Teruel Bárbara

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The cooling of fruits and vegetables in hydrocooling system can be a suitable technique. This work aimed to define cooling time for fruits and vegetables of different sizes, presenting practical indexes that could be used to estimate cooling time for produce with similar characteristics. Fruits (orange melon-Cucumis melo, mango-Mangifera indica, guava-Psidium guajava, orange-Citrus sinensis Osbeck, plum-Prunus domestica, lime-Citrus limon, and acerola-Prunus cerasus and vegetables (cucumber-Cucumis sativus, carrot-Daucus carota, and green bean-Phaseolus vulgaris, were cooled in a hydrocooling system at 1°C. The volume of fruits and vegetables ranged between 8.18 cm³ and 1,150.35 cm³, and between 13.06 cm³ and 438.4 cm³, respectively. Cooling time varied proportionally to produce volume (from 8.5 to 124 min for fruits, and from 1.5 to 55 min, for vegetables. The relationship between volume and time needed to cool fruits (from 1.03 min cm-3 to 0.107 min cm-3 and vegetables (from 0.06 min cm-3 to 0.12 min cm-3 is an index that could be used to estimate cooling time for fruits and vegetables with similar dimensions as those presented in this work.

  13. MODIS derived vegetation index for drought detection on the San Carlos Apache Reservation

    Wu, Zhuoting; Velasco, Miguel G.; McVay, Jason; Middleton, Barry R.; Vogel, John M.; Dye, Dennis G.

    2016-01-01

    A variety of vegetation indices derived from remotely sensed data have been used to assess vegetation conditions, enabling the identification of drought occurrences as well as the evaluation of drought impacts. Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra 8-day composite data were used to compute the Modified Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index II (MSAVI2) of four dominant vegetation types over a 13-year period (2002 – 2014) on the San Carlos Apache Reservation in Arizona, US. MSAVI2 anomalies were used to identify adverse impacts of drought on vegetation, characterized as mean MSAVI2 below the 13-year average. In terms of interannual variability, we found similar responses between grassland and shrubland, and between woodland and forest vegetation types. We compared MSAVI2 for specific vegetation types with precipitation data at the same time step, and found a lag time of roughly two months for the peak MSAVI2 values following precipitation in a given year. All vegetation types responded to summer monsoon rainfall, while shrubland and annual herbaceous vegetation also displayed a brief spring growing season following winter snowmelt. MSAVI2 values of shrublands corresponded well with precipitation variability both for summer rainfall and winter snowfall, and can be potentially used as a drought indicator on the San Carlos Apache Reservation given its wide geographic distribution. We demonstrated that moderate temporal frequency satellite-based MSAVI2 can provide drought monitoring to inform land management decisions, especially on vegetated tribal land areas where in situ precipitation data are limited.

  14. Wheat Yield Forecasting for Punjab Province from Vegetation Index Time Series and Historic Crop Statistics

    Jan Dempewolf

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Policy makers, government planners and agricultural market participants in Pakistan require accurate and timely information about wheat yield and production. Punjab Province is by far the most important wheat producing region in the country. The manual collection of field data and data processing for crop forecasting by the provincial government requires significant amounts of time before official reports can be released. Several studies have shown that wheat yield can be effectively forecast using satellite remote sensing data. In this study, we developed a methodology for estimating wheat yield and area for Punjab Province from freely available Landsat and MODIS satellite imagery approximately six weeks before harvest. Wheat yield was derived by regressing reported yield values against time series of four different peak-season MODIS-derived vegetation indices. We also tested deriving wheat area from the same MODIS time series using a regression-tree approach. Among the four evaluated indices, WDRVI provided more consistent and accurate yield forecasts compared to NDVI, EVI2 and saturation-adjusted normalized difference vegetation index (SANDVI. The lowest RMSE values at the district level for forecast versus reported yield were found when using six or more years of training data. Forecast yield for the 2007/2008 to 2012/2013 growing seasons were within 0.2% and 11.5% of final reported values. Absolute deviations of wheat area and production forecasts from reported values were slightly greater compared to using the previous year's or the three- or six-year moving average values, implying that 250-m MODIS data does not provide sufficient spatial resolution for providing improved wheat area and production forecasts.

  15. Evaluation of vegetation post-fire resilience in the Alpine region using descriptors derived from MODIS spectral index time series

    Di Mauro, Biagio; Fava, Francesco; Busetto, Lorenzo; Crosta, Giovanni Franco; Colombo, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    In this study a method based on the analysis of MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) time series is proposed to estimate the post-fire resilience of mountain vegetation (broadleaf forest and prairies) in the Italian Alps. Resilience is defined herewith as the ability of a dynamical system to counteract disturbances. It can be quantified by the amount of time the disturbed system takes to resume, in statistical terms, an ecological functionality comparable with its undisturbed behavior. Satellite images of the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) and of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) with spatial resolution of 250m and temporal resolution of 16 days in the 2000-2012 time period were used. Wildfire affected areas in the Lombardy region between the years 2000 and 2010 were analysed. Only large fires (affected area >40ha) were selected. For each burned area, an undisturbed adjacent control site was located. Data pre-processing consisted in the smoothing of MODIS time series for noise removal and then a double logistic function was fitted. Land surface phenology descriptors (proxies for growing season start/end/length and green biomass) were extracted in order to characterize the time evolution of the vegetation. Descriptors from a burned area were compared to those extracted from the respective control site by means of the one-way analysis of variance. According to the number of subsequent years which exhibit statistically meaningful difference between burned and control site, five classes of resilience were identified and a set of thematic maps was created for each descriptor. The same method was applied to all 84 aggregated events and to events aggregated by main land cover. EVI index results more sensitive to fire impact than NDVI index. Analysis shows that fire causes both a reduction of the biomass and a variation in the phenology of the Alpine vegetation. Results suggest an average ecosystem resilience of 6-7 years. Moreover

  16. Predicting maize yield in Zimbabwe using dry dekads derived from remotely sensed Vegetation Condition Index

    Kuri, Farai; Murwira, Amon; Murwira, Karin S.; Masocha, Mhosisi

    2014-12-01

    Maize is a key crop contributing to food security in Southern Africa yet accurate estimates of maize yield prior to harvesting are scarce. Timely and accurate estimates of maize production are essential for ensuring food security by enabling actionable mitigation strategies and policies for prevention of food shortages. In this study, we regressed the number of dry dekads derived from VCI against official ground-based maize yield estimates to generate simple linear regression models for predicting maize yield throughout Zimbabwe over four seasons (2009-10, 2010-11, 2011-12, and 2012-13). The VCI was computed using Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) time series dataset from the SPOT VEGETATION sensor for the period 1998-2013. A significant negative linear relationship between number of dry dekads and maize yield was observed in each season. The variation in yield explained by the models ranged from 75% to 90%. The models were evaluated with official ground-based yield data that was not used to generate the models. There is a close match between the predicted yield and the official yield statistics with an error of 33%. The observed consistency in the negative relationship between number of dry dekads and ground-based estimates of maize yield as well as the high explanatory power of the regression models suggest that VCI-derived dry dekads could be used to predict maize yield before the end of the season thereby making it possible to plan strategies for dealing with food deficits or surpluses on time.

  17. Dynamic Drought Monitoring in Guangxi Using Revised Temperature Vegetation Dryness Index

    LU Yuan; TAG Heping; WU Hua

    2007-01-01

    Moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) data are very suitable for vast extent, long term and dynamic drought monitoring for its high temporal resolution, high spectral resolution and moderate spatial resolution. The composite Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) and composite land surface temperature (Ts) obtained from MODIS data MOD11A2 and MOD13A2 were used to construct the EVI-rs space. And Temperature Vegetation Dryness Index (TVDI) was calculated to evaluate the agriculture drought in Guangxi province, China in October of 2006. The results showed that the drought area in Guangxi was evidently increasing and continuously deteriorating from the middle of September to the middle of November. The TVDI, coming from the EVI-rs space, could effectively indicate the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of drought, so that it could provide a strong technical support for the forecasting agricultural drought in south China.

  18. How Universal Is the Relationship between Remotely Sensed Vegetation Indices and Crop Leaf Area Index? A Global Assessment

    Yanghui Kang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Leaf Area Index (LAI is a key variable that bridges remote sensing observations to the quantification of agroecosystem processes. In this study, we assessed the universality of the relationships between crop LAI and remotely sensed Vegetation Indices (VIs. We first compiled a global dataset of 1459 in situ quality-controlled crop LAI measurements and collected Landsat satellite images to derive five different VIs including Simple Ratio (SR, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI, two versions of the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI and EVI2, and Green Chlorophyll Index (CIGreen. Based on this dataset, we developed global LAI-VI relationships for each crop type and VI using symbolic regression and Theil-Sen (TS robust estimator. Results suggest that the global LAI-VI relationships are statistically significant, crop-specific, and mostly non-linear. These relationships explain more than half of the total variance in ground LAI observations (R2 > 0.5, and provide LAI estimates with RMSE below 1.2 m2/m2. Among the five VIs, EVI/EVI2 are the most effective, and the crop-specific LAI-EVI and LAI-EVI2 relationships constructed by TS, are robust when tested by three independent validation datasets of varied spatial scales. While the heterogeneity of agricultural landscapes leads to a diverse set of local LAI-VI relationships, the relationships provided here represent global universality on an average basis, allowing the generation of large-scale spatial-explicit LAI maps. This study contributes to the operationalization of large-area crop modeling and, by extension, has relevance to both fundamental and applied agroecosystem research.

  19. Global trends in vegetation phenology from 32-year GEOV1 leaf area index time series

    Verger, Aleixandre; Baret, Frédéric; Weiss, Marie; Filella, Iolanda; Peñuelas, Josep

    2013-04-01

    Phenology is a critical component in understanding ecosystem response to climate variability. Long term data records from global mapping satellite platforms are valuable tools for monitoring vegetation responses to climate change at the global scale. Phenology satellite products and trend detection from satellite time series are expected to contribute to improve our understanding of climate forcing on vegetation dynamics. The capacity of monitoring ecosystem responses to global climate change was evaluated in this study from the 32-year time series of global Leaf Area Index (LAI) which have been recently produced within the geoland2 project. The long term GEOV1 LAI products were derived from NOAA/AVHRR (1981 to 2000) and SPOT/VGT (1999 to the present) with specific emphasis on consistency and continuity. Since mid-November, GEOV1 LAI products are freely available to the scientific community at geoland2 portal (www.geoland2.eu/core-mapping-services/biopar.html). These products are distributed at a dekadal time step for the period 1981-2000 and 2000-2012 at 0.05° and 1/112°, respectively. The use of GEOV1 data covering a long time period and providing information at dense time steps are expected to increase the reliability of trend detection. In this study, GEOV1 LAI time series aggregated at 0.5° spatial resolution are used. The CACAO (Consistent Adjustment of the Climatology to Actual Observations) method (Verger et al, 2013) was applied to characterize seasonal anomalies as well as identify trends. For a given pixel, CACAO computes, for each season, the time shift and the amplitude difference between the current temporal profile and the climatology computed over the 32 years. These CACAO parameters allow quantifying shifts in the timing of seasonal phenology and inter-annual variations in magnitude as compared to the average climatology. Interannual variations in the timing of the Start of Season and End of Season, Season Length and LAI level in the peak of the

  20. Growing Degree Vegetation Production Index (GDVPI): A Novel and Data-Driven Approach to Delimit Season Cycles

    Graham, W. D.; Spruce, J.; Ross, K. W.; Gasser, J.; Grulke, N.

    2014-12-01

    Growing Degree Vegetation Production Index (GDVPI) is a parametric approach to delimiting vegetation seasonal growth and decline cycles using incremental growing degree days (GDD), and NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) 8-day composite cumulative integral data. We obtain a specific location's daily minimum and maximum temperatures from the nearest National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) weather stations posted on the National Climate Data Center (NCDC) Climate Data Online (CDO) archive and compute GDD. The date range for this study is January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2012. We employ a novel process, a repeating logistic product (RLP), to compensate for short-term weather variability and data drops from the recording stations and fit a curve to the median daily GDD values, adjusting for asymmetry, amplitude, and phase shift that minimize the sum of squared errors when comparing the observed and predicted GDD. The resulting curve, here referred to as the surrogate GDD, is the time-temperature phasing parameter used to convert Cartesian NDVI values into polar coordinate pairs, multiplying the NDVI values as the radial by the cosine and sine of the surrogate GDD as the angular. Depending on the vegetation type and the original NDVI curve, the polar NDVI curve may be nearly circular, kidney-shaped, or pear-shaped in the case of conifers, deciduous, or agriculture, respectively. We examine the points of tangency about the polar coordinate NDVI curve, identifying values of 1, 0, -1, or infinity, as each of these represent natural inflection points. Lines connecting the origin to each tangent point illustrate and quantify the parametrically segmentation of the growing season based on the GDD and NDVI ostensible dependency. Furthermore, the area contained by each segment represents the apparent vegetation production. A particular benefit is that the inflection points are determined

  1. Assessment of Iranian Agroclimatological Zone Classification by Using TVDI (Temperature Vegetation Dryness Index)

    Asadi, Ebrahim; Lopez-Baeza, Ernesto; Coll Pajaron, M. Amparo; Kouzehgaran, Saeedeh; Haghighat, Masoud

    2016-07-01

    Agricultural zoning is an important tool for authorities to plan and decide about development of the agricultural sector, environmental sustainability issues and plan and provide irrigation and rural infrastructures. Previous different methods have suggested the definition of agroclimatological zones in big areas in Iran, but most of them are not easy to be validated or there are not clear criteria to evaluate whether the zones are correctly defined or not. The current {it Iranian Meteorological Organisation} classification is composed of six significant agroclimatological zones defined using the fundamental climate elements of temperature and precipitation obtained from 30 years data from 180 synoptic stations interpolated using regression kriging methods. Elevation was derived from SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) digital elevation model of 90 m resolution. In this paper we assess the homogeneity of each of these conventionally defined agroclimatological zones using {bf TVDI (Temperature Vegetation Dryness Index)} values obtained from MODIS land surface temperature and NDVI operational products of the last three years between 2013 and 2015.

  2. Vegetation index in cotton under rates of nitrogen and growth regulator

    Anamari Viegas de Araujo Motomiya

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The increasing cost of nitrogen fertilizer, combined with high losses, demand management practices that result in high efficiency of nitrogen use by crops, considering the reduction of risks to the environment. Our objectives were to evaluate the index of normalized difference vegetation – NDVI – the variation of nitrogen and growth regulator and its relationship to foliar N and chlorophyll in cotton crops. The experiment was conducted on Distroferric Latosol (Oxisol, in Dourados, MS. We adopted a randomized block design in split plot with four replications. The main treatments consisted of doses of growth regulator (0, 0.30 and 0.60 L ha-1, the secondary treatments consisted of five N rates (0, 30, 70, 110 and 150 kg ha-1. The NDVI obtained by an active optical sensor was influenced significantly by the N and the growth regulator application, but on most of the readings the interactions between these two factors were not significant. NDVI values can be used on the diagnostic of N nutritional deficiencies for cotton.

  3. What are the most important factors determining different vegetation types in the Chapada Diamantina, Brazil?

    Neves, S P S; Funch, R; Conceição, A A; Miranda, L A P; Funch, L S

    2016-06-01

    A transect was used to examine the environmental and biological descriptors of a compact vegetation mosaic in the Chapada Diamantina in northeastern Brazil, including the floristic composition, spectrum of plant life forms, rainfall, and soil properties that defined areas of cerrado (Brazilian savanna), caatinga (seasonally dry tropical forest thorny, deciduous shrub/arboreal vegetation) and cerrado-caatinga transition vegetation. The floristic survey was made monthly from April/2009 to March/2012. A dendrogram of similarity was generated using the Jaccard Index based on a matrix of the species that occurred in at least two of the vegetation types examined. The proportions of life forms in each vegetation type were compared using the chi-square test. Composite soil samples were analyzed by simple variance (ANOVA) to examine relationships between soil parameters of each vegetation type and the transition area. The monthly precipitation levels in each vegetation type were measured and compared using the chi-square test. A total of 323 species of angiosperms were collected distributed in 193 genera and 54 families. The dendrogram demonstrated strong difference between the floristic compositions of the cerrado and caatinga, sharing 2% similarity. The chi-square test did not demonstrate any significant statistical differences between the monthly values of recorded rainfall. The organic matter and clay contents of the soilsin the caatinga increased while sand decreased, and the proportions of therophyte, hemicryptophyte, and chamaephyte life forms decreased and phanerophytes increased. We can therefore conclude that the floristic composition and the spectrum of life forms combined to define the cerrado and caatinga vegetation along the transect examined, with soil being the principal conditioning factor determining the different vegetation types, independent of precipitation levels. PMID:26934155

  4. An Assessment of Mining Activities Impact on Vegetation in Bukuru Jos Plateau State Nigeria Using Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI)

    Musa Haruna D.; Jiya Solomon N.

    2011-01-01

    The study area has a pathetic and deplorable condition of landuse/ landcover. The vegetal cover in the area has to be removed from the activities of tin mining which consequently resulted into adverse environmental effect such as erosion. Different forms of human induced stress such as tin mining and heavy rainfall have severely degraded soils on the Jos Plateau. Such degradation problems are also caused by deforestation, inappropriate farming system, bush burning and over-grazing which are h...

  5. Cultivar discrimination at different site elevations with remotely sensed vegetation indices

    Bruno Basso

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study are (i to evaluate vegetation indices sensitivity to discriminate between two different cultivars; (ii to determine the effects of site elevation and developmental stages on cultivar discrimination. The experiment was carried out for the growing season 2007/08 at “Agro di Pesche” (Central Italy, Molise region. Four experimental fields were located at different elevation ranging between 590 m to 922 m above the sea level (asl. For each field, two potato (Soluanum Tuberosum L. cultivars were used. Leaf area was collected through non-destructive measurements, and a hand-held spectroradiometer was used to measure the reflected light from the canopy of the two cultivars. Results from the ANOVA show that the ratio between MCARI (Modified Chlorophyll Absorption Ratio Index and OSAVI (Optimized Soil Adjusted Vegetation Index, NDRE (Normalized Difference Red Edge and MCARI were able to discriminate among cultivars at different site elevations. NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index was not able to discriminate the two cultivars because of the influence of soil reflectance and leaves distribution.

  6. A method for canopy water content estimation for highly vegetated surfaces-shortwave infrared perpendicular water stress index

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, a new method for canopy water content (FMC) estimation for highly vegetated surfaces- shortwave infrared perpendicular water stress index (SPSI) is developed using NIR, SWIR wavelengths of Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) on the basis of spectral features and distribution of surface targets with different water conditions in NIR-SWIR spectral space. The developed method is further explored with radiative transfer simulations using PROSPECT, Lillesaeter, SailH and 6S. It is evident from the results of validation derived from satellite synchronous field measurements that SPSI is highly correlated with FMC, coefficient of determination (R squared) and root mean square error are 0.79 and 26.41%. The paper concludes that SPSI has a potential in vegetation water content estimation in terms of FMC.

  7. Camera derived vegetation greenness index as proxy for gross primary production in a low Arctic wetland area

    Westergaard-Nielsen, Andreas; Lund, Magnus; Hansen, Birger Ulf; Tamstorf, Mikkel Peter

    2013-12-01

    The Arctic is experiencing disproportionate warming relative to the global average, and the Arctic ecosystems are as a result undergoing considerable changes. Continued monitoring of ecosystem productivity and phenology across temporal and spatial scales is a central part of assessing the magnitude of these changes. This study investigates the ability to use automatic digital camera images (DCIs) as proxy data for gross primary production (GPP) in a complex low Arctic wetland site. Vegetation greenness computed from DCIs was found to correlate significantly (R2 = 0.62, p < 0.001) with a normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) product derived from the WorldView-2 satellite. An object-based classification based on a bi-temporal image composite was used to classify the study area into heath, copse, fen, and bedrock. Temporal evolution of vegetation greenness was evaluated and modeled with double sigmoid functions for each plant community. GPP at light saturation modeled from eddy covariance (EC) flux measurements were found to correlate significantly with vegetation greenness for all plant communities in the studied year (i.e., 2010), and the highest correlation was found between modeled fen greenness and GPP (R2 = 0.85, p < 0.001). Finally, greenness computed within modeled EC footprints were used to evaluate the influence of individual plant communities on the flux measurements. The study concludes that digital cameras may be used as a cost-effective proxy for potential GPP in remote Arctic regions.

  8. Normalized Difference Vegetation Index for Fanno Creek, Oregon

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Fanno Creek is a tributary to the Tualatin River and flows though parts of the southwest Portland metropolitan area. The stream is heavily influenced by urban...

  9. [Vegetation index estimation by chlorophyll content of grassland based on spectral analysis].

    Xiao, Han; Chen, Xiu-Wan; Yang, Zhen-Yu; Li, Huai-Yu; Zhu, Han

    2014-11-01

    Comparing the methods of existing remote sensing research on the estimation of chlorophyll content, the present paper confirms that the vegetation index is one of the most practical and popular research methods. In recent years, the increasingly serious problem of grassland degradation. This paper, firstly, analyzes the measured reflectance spectral curve and its first derivative curve in the grasslands of Songpan, Sichuan and Gongger, Inner Mongolia, conducts correlation analysis between these two spectral curves and chlorophyll content, and finds out the regulation between REP (red edge position) and grassland chlorophyll content, that is, the higher the chlorophyll content is, the higher the REIP (red-edge inflection point) value would be. Then, this paper constructs GCI (grassland chlorophyll index) and selects the most suitable band for retrieval. Finally, this paper calculates the GCI by the use of satellite hyperspectral image, conducts the verification and accuracy analysis of the calculation results compared with chlorophyll content data collected from field of twice experiments. The result shows that for grassland chlorophyll content, GCI has stronger sensitivity than other indices of chlorophyll, and has higher estimation accuracy. GCI is the first proposed to estimate the grassland chlorophyll content, and has wide application potential for the remote sensing retrieval of grassland chlorophyll content. In addition, the grassland chlorophyll content estimation method based on remote sensing retrieval in this paper provides new research ideas for other vegetation biochemical parameters' estimation, vegetation growth status' evaluation and grassland ecological environment change's monitoring. PMID:25752061

  10. Estimating switchgrass productivity in the Great Plains using satellite vegetation index and site environmental variables

    Gu, Yingxin; Wylie, Bruce K.; Howard, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Switchgrass is being evaluated as a potential feedstock source for cellulosic biofuels and is being cultivated in several regions of the United States. The recent availability of switchgrass land cover maps derived from the National Agricultural Statistics Service cropland data layer for the conterminous United States provides an opportunity to assess the environmental conditions of switchgrass over large areas and across different geographic locations. The main goal of this study is to develop a data-driven multiple regression switchgrass productivity model and identify the optimal climate and environment conditions for the highly productive switchgrass in the Great Plains (GP). Environmental and climate variables used in the study include elevation, soil organic carbon, available water capacity, climate, and seasonal weather. Satellite-derived growing season averaged Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (GSN) was used as a proxy for switchgrass productivity. Multiple regression analyses indicate that there are strong correlations between site environmental variables and switchgrass productivity (r = 0.95). Sufficient precipitation and suitable temperature during the growing season (i.e., not too hot or too cold) are favorable for switchgrass growth. Elevation and soil characteristics (e.g., soil available water capacity) are also an important factor impacting switchgrass productivity. An anticipated switchgrass biomass productivity map for the entire GP based on site environmental and climate conditions and switchgrass productivity model was generated. Highly productive switchgrass areas are mainly located in the eastern part of the GP. Results from this study can help land managers and biofuel plant investors better understand the general environmental and climate conditions influencing switchgrass growth and make optimal land use decisions regarding switchgrass development in the GP.

  11. Limited Area Coverage/High Resolution Picture Transmission (LAC/HRPT) data vegetative index calculation processor user's manual

    Obrien, S. O. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    The program, LACVIN, calculates vegetative indexes numbers on limited area coverage/high resolution picture transmission data for selected IJ grid sections. The IJ grid sections were previously extracted from the full resolution data tapes and stored on disk files.

  12. RNDSI: A ratio normalized difference soil index for remote sensing of urban/suburban environments

    Deng, Yingbin; Wu, Changshan; Li, Miao; Chen, Renrong

    2015-07-01

    Understanding land use land cover change (LULCC) is a prerequisite for urban planning and environment management. For LULCC studies in urban/suburban environments, the abundance and spatial distributions of bare soil are essential due to its biophysically different properties when compared to anthropologic materials. Soil, however, is very difficult to be identified using remote sensing technologies majorly due to its complex physical and chemical compositions, as well as the lack of a direct relationship between soil abundance and its spectral signatures. This paper presents an empirical approach to enhance soil information through developing the ratio normalized difference soil index (RNDSI). The first step involves the generation of random samples of three major land cover types, namely soil, impervious surface areas (ISAs), and vegetation. With spectral signatures of these samples, a normalized difference soil index (NDSI) was proposed using the combination of bands 7 and 2 of Landsat Thematic Mapper Image. Finally, a ratio index was developed to further highlight soil covers through dividing the NDSI by the first component of tasseled cap transformation (TC1). Qualitative (e.g., frequency histogram and box charts) and quantitative analyses (e.g., spectral discrimination index and classification accuracy) were adopted to examine the performance of the developed RNDSI. Analyses of results and comparative analyses with two other relevant indices, biophysical composition index (BCI) and enhanced built-up and bareness Index (EBBI), indicate that RNDSI is promising in separating soil from ISAs and vegetation, and can serve as an input to LULCC models.

  13. Estimation of soil moisture using trapezoidal relationship between remotely sensed land surface temperature and vegetation index

    W. Wang

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The trapezoidal relationship between land surface temperature (Ts and Vegetation Index (VI was used to estimate soil moisture in the present study. An iterative algorithm is proposed to estimate the vertices of the Ts ~ VI trapezoid theoretically for each pixel, and then Water Deficit Index (WDI is calculated based on the Ts ~ VI trapezoid using MODIS remotely sensed measurements of surface temperature and enhanced vegetation index (EVI. The capability of using WDI based on Ts ~ VI trapezoid to estimate soil moisture is evaluated using soil moisture observations and antecedent precipitation in the Walnut Gulch Experimental Watershed (WGEW in Arizona, USA. The result shows that, the Ts ~ VI trapezoid based WDI can capture temporal variation in surface soil moisture well, but the capability of detecting spatial variation is poor for such a semi-arid region as WGEW.

  14. Estimation of the soil heat flux/net radiation ratio based on spectral vegetation indexes in high-latitude Arctic areas

    The vegetation communities in the Arctic environment are very sensitive to even minor climatic variations and therefore the estimation of surface energy fluxes from high-latitude vegetated areas is an important subject to be pursued. This study was carried out in July-August and used micro meteorological data, spectral reflectance signatures, and vegetation biomass to establish the relation between the soil heat flux/net radiation (G / Rn) ratio and spectral vegetation indices (SVIs). Continuous measurements of soil temperature and soil heat flux were used to calculate the surface ground heat flux by use of conventional methods, and the relation to surface temperature was investigated. Twenty-seven locations were established, and six samples per location, including the measurement of the surface temperature and net radiation to establish the G/Rn ratio and simultaneous spectral reflectance signatures and wet biomass estimates, were registered. To obtain regional reliability, the locations were chosen in order to represent the different Arctic vegetation communities in the study area; ranging from dry tundra vegetation communities (fell fields and dry dwarf scrubs) to moist/wet tundra vegetation communities (snowbeds, grasslands and fens). Spectral vegetation indices, including the simple ratio vegetation index (RVI) and the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), were calculated. A comparison of SVIs to biomass proved that RVI gave the best linear expression, and NDVI the best exponential expression. A comparison of SVIs and the surface energy flux ratio G / Rn proved that NDVI gave the best linear expression. SPOT HRV images from July 1989 and 1992 were used to map NDVI and G / Rn at a regional scale. (author)

  15. Mathematical modeling riparian vegetation zonation in semiarid conditions based on a transpiration index.

    Real, Joaquin; Morales, Marco; Garcia, Alicia; Garofano, Virginia; Martinez-Capel, Francisco; Frances, Felix

    2010-05-01

    actual evapotranspiration of the riparian plants. This tank represents a portion of soil of the superficial root layer. The lower capacity limit of this tank is the permanent wilting moisture of the soil sample. On the other hand the upper capacity limit is the field capacity moisture. The tank's input flows are the precipitation, the root water rise and the capillary water rise. In contrast output flows are the actual evapotranspiration and the excess water of the tank. The most relevant model parameters are the soil retention curves, vegetation functional type parameters (specially related to root depths and the transpiration efficiency factors) and the daily hidro-meteorological data, which are water table elevation, precipitation and potential evapotranspiration. The model runs for a limited amount of vegetation functional types. In our simulations the following four functional types were used: Riparian Herbs; Riparian Juveniles and Small Scrubs, Riparian Trees and Big Shrubs; and Terrestrial Vegetation. The general model output variable is an evapotranspiration index based in the quotient between the current and the potential evapotranspiration. This index is used to determine the suitability of the simulated vegetation functional types to certain environmental conditions. Secondly, a sensitivity analysis was made for determining the most relevant model parameters. Finally the model has been calibrated and validated using as objective function a confusion matrix which compares the observed and the simulated riparian vegetation zonation. The calibration/validation processes have been carried out in seven study sites of the Jucar River Basin District. Four of those sites have a natural flow regime and three of them a regulated flow regime due to the presence of dams. Results have shown that the model is capable of providing effective simulations in compared to the observed riparian vegetation.

  16. Relationship of Remote Sensing Normalized Differential Vegetation Index to Anopheles Density and Malaria Incidence Rate

    2006-01-01

    To study the relationship of remote sensing normalized differential vegetation index (NDVI) to Anopheles density and malaria incidence rate. Methods Data of monthly average climate, environment, Anopheles density and malaria incidence rate, and remote sensing NDVI were collected from 27 townships of 10 counties in southeastern Yunnan Province from 1984 to 1993. The relationship of remote sensing ecological proxy index, NDVI, to Anopheles density and malaria incidence rate was studied by principal component analysis, factor analysis and grey correlation analysis. Results The correlation matrix showed that NDVI highly correlated with Anopheles density in 4 townships of Mengla, Jinghong, and Yuanjiang counties, but in other 23 townships the relationship was not clear. Principal component and factor analyses showed that remote sensing NDVI was the representative index of the first principal component and the first common factor of Anopheles density evaluation. Grey correlation analysis showed that in rainy season NDVI had a high grey correlation with Anopheles density and malaria incidence rate. The grey correlation analysis showed that in rainy season the grey degree of NDVI correlated with Anopheles. Minimus density was 0.730, and 0.713 with Anopheles sinensis density, and 0.800 with malarial incidence rate. Conclusion Remote sensing NDVI can serve as a sensitive evaluation index of Anopheles density and malaria incidence rate.

  17. Long-term vegetation monitoring for different habitats in floodplains

    Lang, Petra; SCHWAB André; Stammel, Barbara; Ewald, Jörg; Kiehl, Kathrin

    2013-01-01

    A floodplain-restoration project along the Danube between Neuburg and Ingolstadt (Germany) aims to bring back water and sediment dynamic to the floodplain. The accompanied long-term monitoring has to document the changes in biodiversity related to this new dynamics. Considerations on and results of the vegetation monitoring concept are documented in this paper. In a habitat rich ecosystem like a floodplain different habitats (alluvial forest, semi-aquatic/aquatic sites) have different dema...

  18. Long-term vegetation monitoring for different habitats in floodplains

    Lang, Petra; SCHWAB André; Stammel, Barbara; Ewald, Jörg; Kiehl, Kathrin

    2014-01-01

    A floodplain-restoration project along the Danube between Neuburg and Ingolstadt (Germany) aims to bring back water and sediment dynamic to the floodplain. The accompanied long-term monitoring has to document the changes in biodiversity related to this new dynamics. Considerations on and results of the vegetation monitoring concept are documented in this paper. In a habitat rich ecosystem like a floodplain different habitats (alluvial forest, semi-aquatic/aquatic sites) have different dema...

  19. An efficient unsupervised index based approach for mapping urban vegetation from IKONOS imagery

    Anchang, Julius Y.; Ananga, Erick O.; Pu, Ruiliang

    2016-08-01

    Despite the increased availability of high resolution satellite image data, their operational use for mapping urban land cover in Sub-Saharan Africa continues to be limited by lack of computational resources and technical expertise. As such, there is need for simple and efficient image classification techniques. Using Bamenda in North West Cameroon as a test case, we investigated two completely unsupervised pixel based approaches to extract tree/shrub (TS) and ground vegetation (GV) cover from an IKONOS derived soil adjusted vegetation index. These included: (1) a simple Jenks Natural Breaks classification and (2) a two-step technique that combined the Jenks algorithm with agglomerative hierarchical clustering. Both techniques were compared with each other and with a non-linear support vector machine (SVM) for classification performance. While overall classification accuracy was generally high for all techniques (>90%), One-Way Analysis of Variance tests revealed the two step technique to outperform the simple Jenks classification in terms of predicting the GV class. It also outperformed the SVM in predicting the TS class. We conclude that the unsupervised methods are technically as good and practically superior for efficient urban vegetation mapping in budget and technically constrained regions such as Sub-Saharan Africa.

  20. Use of Radar Vegetation Index (RVI) in Passive Microwave Algorithms for Soil Moisture Estimates

    Rowlandson, T. L.; Berg, A. A.

    2013-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite will provide a unique opportunity for the estimation of soil moisture by having simultaneous radar and radiometer measurements available. As with the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) satellite, the soil moisture algorithms will need to account for the contribution of vegetation to the brightness temperature. Global maps of vegetation volumetric water content (VWC) are difficult to obtain, and the SMOS mission has opted to estimate the optical depth of standing vegetation by using a relationship between the VWC and the leaf area index (LAI). LAI is estimated from optical remote sensing or through soil-vegetation-atmosphere transfer modeling. During the growing season, the VWC of agricultural crops can increase rapidly, and if cloud cover exists during an optical acquisition, the estimation of LAI may be delayed, resulting in an underestimation of the VWC and overestimation of the soil moisture. Alternatively, the radar vegetation index (RVI) has shown strong correlation and linear relationship with VWC for rice and soybeans. Using the SMAP radar to produce RVI values that are coincident to brightness temperature measurements may eliminate the need for LAI estimates. The SMAP Validation Experiment 2012 (SMAPVEX12) was a cal/val campaign for the SMAP mission held in Manitoba, Canada, during a 6-week period in June and July, 2012. During this campaign, soil moisture measurements were obtained for 55 fields with varying soil texture and vegetation cover. Vegetation was sampled from each field weekly to determine the VWC. Soil moisture measurements were taken coincident to overpasses by an aircraft carrying the Passive and Active L-band System (PALS) instrumentation. The aircraft flew flight lines at both high and low altitudes. The low altitude flight lines provided a footprint size approximately equivalent to the size of the SMAPVEX12 field sites. Of the 55 field sites, the low altitude flight lines provided

  1. Inter-Comparison of ASTER and MODIS Surface Reflectance and Vegetation Index Products for Synergistic Applications to Natural Resource Monitoring

    Miura, Tomoaki; Yoshioka, Hiroki; Fujiwara, Kayo; Yamamoto, Hirokazu

    2008-01-01

    Synergistic applications of multi-resolution satellite data have been of a great interest among user communities for the development of an improved and more effective operational monitoring system of natural resources, including vegetation and soil. In this study, we conducted an inter-comparison of two remote sensing products, namely, visible/near-infrared surface reflectances and spectral vegetation indices (VIs), from the high resolution Advanced Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) (15 m) and lower resolution Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) (250 m – 500 m) sensors onboard the Terra platform. Our analysis was aimed at understanding the degree of radiometric compatibility between the two sensors' products due to sensor spectral bandpasses and product generation algorithms. Multiple pairs of ASTER and MODIS standard surface reflectance products were obtained at randomly-selected, globally-distributed locations, from which two types of VIs were computed: the normalized difference vegetation index and the enhanced vegetation indices with and without a blue band. Our results showed that these surface reflectance products and the derived VIs compared well between the two sensors at a global scale, but subject to systematic differences, of which magnitudes varied among scene pairs. An independent assessment of the accuracy of ASTER and MODIS standard products, in which “in-house” surface reflectances were obtained using in situ Aeronet atmospheric data for comparison, suggested that the performance of the ASTER atmospheric correction algorithm may be variable, reducing overall quality of its standard reflectance product. Atmospheric aerosols, which were not corrected for in the ASTER algorithm, were found not to impact the quality of the derived reflectances. Further investigation is needed to identify the sources of inconsistent atmospheric correction results associated with the ASTER algorithm, including additional quality

  2. Inter-Comparison of ASTER and MODIS Surface Reflectance and Vegetation Index Products for Synergistic Applications to Natural Resource Monitoring

    Hirokazu Yamamoto

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Synergistic applications of multi-resolution satellite data have been of a great interest among user communities for the development of an improved and more effective operational monitoring system of natural resources, including vegetation and soil. In this study, we conducted an inter-comparison of two remote sensing products, namely, visible/near-infrared surface reflectances and spectral vegetation indices (VIs, from the high resolution Advanced Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER (15 m and lower resolution Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS (250 m – 500 m sensors onboard the Terra platform. Our analysis was aimed at understanding the degree of radiometric compatibility between the two sensors’ products due to sensor spectral bandpasses and product generation algorithms. Multiple pairs of ASTER and MODIS standard surface reflectance products were obtained at randomly-selected, globally-distributed locations, from which two types of VIs were computed: the normalized difference vegetation index and the enhanced vegetation indices with and without a blue band. Our results showed that these surface reflectance products and the derived VIs compared well between the two sensors at a global scale, but subject to systematic differences, of which magnitudes varied among scene pairs. An independent assessment of the accuracy of ASTER and MODIS standard products, in which “in-house” surface reflectances were obtained using in situ Aeronet atmospheric data for comparison, suggested that the performance of the ASTER atmospheric correction algorithm may be variable, reducing overall quality of its standard reflectance product. Atmospheric aerosols, which were not corrected for in the ASTER algorithm, were found not to impact the quality of the derived reflectances. Further investigation is needed to identify the sources of inconsistent atmospheric correction results

  3. Detecting post-fire burn severity and vegetation recovery using multitemporal remote sensing spectral indices and field-collected composite burn index data in a ponderosa pine forest

    Chen, X.; Vogelmann, J.E.; Rollins, M.; Ohlen, D.; Key, C.H.; Yang, L.; Huang, C.; Shi, H.

    2011-01-01

    It is challenging to detect burn severity and vegetation recovery because of the relatively long time period required to capture the ecosystem characteristics. Multitemporal remote sensing data can providemultitemporal observations before, during and after a wildfire, and can improve the change detection accuracy. The goal of this study is to examine the correlations between multitemporal spectral indices and field-observed burn severity, and to provide a practical method to estimate burn severity and vegetation recovery. The study site is the Jasper Fire area in the Black Hills National Forest, South Dakota, that burned during August and September 2000. Six multitemporal Landsat images acquired from 2000 (pre-fire), 2001 (post-fire), 2002, 2003, 2005 and 2007 were used to assess burn severity. The normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), enhanced vegetation index (EVI), normalized burn ratio (NBR), integrated forest index (IFI) and the differences of these indices between the pre-fire and post-fire years were computed and analysed with 66 field-based composite burn index (CBI) plots collected in 2002. Results showed that differences of NDVI and differences of EVI between the pre-fire year and the first two years post-fire were highly correlated with the CBI scores. The correlations were low beyond the second year post-fire. Differences of NBR had good correlation with CBI scores in all study years. Differences of IFI had low correlation with CBI in the first year post-fire and had good correlation in later years. A CBI map of the burnt area was produced using regression tree models and the multitemporal images. The dynamics of four spectral indices from 2000 to 2007 indicated that both NBR and IFI are valuable for monitoring long-term vegetation recovery. The high burn severity areas had a much slower recovery than the moderate and low burn areas. ?? 2011 Taylor & Francis.

  4. Exposure to vegetable variety in infants weaned at different ages.

    Coulthard, Helen; Harris, Gillian; Fogel, Anna

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the current study was to examine the effectiveness of different vegetable exposure methods (variety versus single taste) over a 9 day period in two groups of infants; those introduced to solids prior to the age of 5.5 months, and those introduced after 5.5 months. Sixty parent-infant dyads were recruited in South Birmingham, UK. Infants' acceptance of a novel vegetable (pea puree) was measured after a 9 day exposure period in the infants a week after they were first introduced to solid foods. During the exposure period half of each age group was given carrot every day, and the other half was given a variety pack of courgette, parsnip and sweet potato. A baseline measurement of the infants' acceptance of a vegetable (carrot) was taken prior to the exposure period. There was no difference between the groups in consumption of the baseline vegetable (carrot). There were no main effects of exposure group or age group on consumption of pea after the exposure period. There was, however, an interaction between the age of introduction and exposure group on consumption of the new vegetable (pea). In particular, infants weaned at 6 months in the single taste group ate significantly less pea puree than those in the variety group. These findings suggest that infants, who are weaned at 6 months or later, may benefit from being weaned onto a variety of tastes rapidly to ensure adequate exposure to taste. This study constitutes some of the first evidence to suggest that there may be a sensitive period for the acceptance of tastes between the ages of 4 and 6 months. PMID:24685457

  5. Responses of grassland vegetation to climatic variations on different temporal scales in Hulun Buir Grassland in the past 30 years

    ZHANG Geli; XU Xingliang; ZHOU Caiping; ZHANG Hongbin; OUYANG Hua

    2011-01-01

    Global warming has led to significant vegetation changes especially in the past 20 years.Hulun Buir Grassland in Inner Mongolia,one of the world's three prairies,is undergoing a process of prominent warming and drying.It is essential to investigate the effects of climatic change (temperature and precipitation) on vegetation dynamics for a better understanding of climatic change.NDVl (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index),reflecting characteristics of plant growth,vegetation coverage and biomass,is used as an indicator to monitor vegetation changes.GIMMS NDVl from 1981 to 2006 and MODIS NDVl from 2000 to 2009 were adopted and integrated in this study to extract the time series characteristics of vegetation changes in Hulun Buir Grassland.The responses of vegetation coverage to climatic change on the yearly,seasonal and monthly scales were analyzed combined with temperature and precipitation data of seven meteorological sites.In the past 30 years,vegetation coverage was more correlated with climatic factors,and the correlations were dependent on the time scales.On an inter-annual scale,vegetation change was better correlated with precipitation,suggesting that rainfall was the main factor for driving vegetation changes.On a seasonal-interannual scale,correlations between vegetation coverage change and climatic factors showed that the sensitivity of vegetation growth to the aqueous and thermal condition changes was different in different seasons.The sensitivity of vegetation growth to temperature in summers was higher than in the other seasons,while its sensitivity to rainfall in both summers and autumns was higher,especially in summers.On a monthly-interannual scale,correlations between vegetation coverage change and climatic factors during growth seasons showed that the response of vegetation changes to temperature in both April and May was stronger.This indicates that the temperature effect occurs in the early stage of vegetation growth.Correlations between

  6. Spectral Reflectance and Vegetation Index Changes in Deciduous Forest Foliage Following Tree Removal: Potential for Deforestation Monitoring

    Peng, D.; Hu, Y.; Li, Z.

    2016-05-01

    It is important to detect and quantify deforestation to guide strategic decisions regarding environment, socioeconomic development, and climate change. In the present study, we conducted a field experiment to examine spectral reflectance and vegetation index changes in poplar and locust tree foliage with different leaf area indices over the course of three sunny days, following tree removal from the canopy. The spectral reflectance of foliage from harvested trees was measured using an ASD FieldSpec Prospectroradiometer; synchronous meteorological data were also obtained. We found that reflectance in short-wave infrared and red-edge reflectance was more time sensitive after tree removal than reflectance in other spectral regions, and that the normalized difference water index (NDWI) and the red-edge chlorophyll index (CIRE) were the preferred indicators of these changes from several indices evaluated. Synthesized meteorological environments were found to influence water and chlorophyll contents after tree removal, and this subsequently changed the spectral canopy reflectance. Our results indicate the potential for such tree removal to be detected with NDWI or CIRE from the second day of a deforestation event.

  7. Determination index of compatible vegetable species with the lines of electric power transmission

    With the purpose of designing methods to clearly identify which plant species generate electrical ground discharges in energy transmission line service corridors and thus avoid the frequent pruning of all Vegetation present in the corridors this study proposes and evaluates compatibility index of plant species with transmission lines, based on six variables: maximum height, growth form, ecological group, life zone, and abundance and frequency of each species. This index was tested in 20 plots of information was collected on all vascular plans present yielding 2147 individuals belonging to 485 species and 105 families, the most discriminating variables in the model were life zone and ecological group, based upon an analysis of principal components. This index applied to the 147 fully identified species with DBH = 2,5 cm showed that Cecropia peltata and Jacaranda copaia were the most problematic species for service lines. Furthermore, a catalogue was developed containing general information and a photographic record of some of the species considered as compatible as a reference for use during maintenance work

  8. Estimating the Maximal Light Use Efficiency for Different Vegetation through the CASA Model Combined with Time-Series Remote Sensing Data and Ground Measurements

    Ainong Li; Jinhu Bian; Guangbin Lei; Chengquan Huang

    2012-01-01

    Maximal light use efficiency (LUE) is an important ecological index of a vegetation essential attribute, and a key parameter of the LUE-based model for estimating large-scale vegetation productivity by remote sensing technology. However, although currently used in different models there still exists extensive controversy. This paper takes the Zoige Plateau in China as a case area to develop a new approach for estimating the maximal LUEs for different vegetation. Based on an existing land cove...

  9. Lipid Peroxidation in Rat Liver using Different Vegetable Oils

    The objective of the study was to evaluate the effect of different vegetable oils (Red Palm Olien (RPO), Palm Olein (PO), Corn Oil (CO) and Coconut Oil on lipid peroxidation of rat liver. One hundred and thirty two Sprague Dawley male rats were randomly divided into two groups. The first group contains seventy two rats were divided into twelve groups of 6 rats per group and were treated with different concentrations of RPO (5 %, 10 % and 15 %) for 2, 4 and 8 weeks. The second group contains sixty male rats were randomly divided into ten groups of 6 rats per group and were treated with 15 % of RPO, PO, CO and COC for 4 and 8 weeks. The results shows that after 8 weeks of treatment the malonaldehyde (MDA) value in RPO group was significantly lower (P≤0.05) than control or vegetable oils studied. These experiments suggested that red palm olein antioxidants present in rat diets may better attenuate peroxyl radical than other vegetable oil studied. (author)

  10. Estimating the Fractional Vegetation Cover from GLASS Leaf Area Index Product

    Zhiqiang Xiao

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The fractional vegetation cover (FCover is an essential biophysical variable and plays a critical role in the carbon cycle studies. Existing FCover products from satellite observations are spatially incomplete and temporally discontinuous, and also inaccurate for some vegetation types to meet the requirements of various applications. In this study, an operational method is proposed to calculate high-quality, accurate FCover from the Global LAnd Surface Satellite (GLASS leaf area index (LAI product to ensure physical consistency between LAI and FCover retrievals. As a result, a global FCover product (denoted by TRAGL were generated from the GLASS LAI product from 2000 to present. With no missing values, the TRAGL FCover product is spatially complete. A comparison of the TRAGL FCover product with the Geoland2/BioPar version 1 (GEOV1 FCover product indicates that these FCover products exhibit similar spatial distribution pattern. However, there were relatively large discrepancies between these FCover products over equatorial rainforests, broadleaf crops in East-central United States, and needleleaf forests in Europe and Siberia. Temporal consistency analysis indicates that TRAGL FCover product has continuous trajectories. Direct validation with ground-based FCover estimates demonstrated that TRAGL FCover values were more accurate (RMSE = 0.0865, and R2 = 0.8848 than GEOV1 (RMSE = 0.1541, and R2 = 0.7621.

  11. Chlorophyll content mapping of urban vegetation in the city of Valencia based on the hyperspectral NAOC index

    Delegido, Jesús; Van Wittenberghe, Shari; Verrelst, Jochem; Ortiz, Violeta; Veroustraete, Frank; Valcke, Roland; Samson, Roeland; Rivera, Juan P.; Tenjo, Carolina; Moreno, José

    2014-01-01

    Spatially distributed chlorophyll content of urban vegetation provides an important indicator of a plant's health status, which might depend on the habitat quality of the specific urban environment. Recent advances in optical remote sensing led to improved methodologies to monitor vegetation properties. The hyperspectral index NAOC (Normalized Area Over reflectance Curve) is one of these new tools that can be used for mapping chlorophyll content. In this paper we present the work done to quan...

  12. Vegetation Response and Streamflow Anomalies: Exploring the Modulating Effect of Watershed Storage as Estimated by a Regionalized Stream Recession Index

    Worland, S. C.; Bennartz, R.; Murphy, J.; Merrick, T.; Bradley, M.; Hornberger, G. M.

    2014-12-01

    Water managers often make water allocation decisions based on data that is integrated at regional scales much coarser than those at which water management decisions are typically made. Important sub-regional variations in the data are subsumed in the aggregate, potentially leading to an improper handling of water resources. A combination of stream discharge characteristics and remotely sensed data can provide information that is responsive at local scales, such as watershed vulnerability to anomalous moisture conditions. We conducted an exploratory analysis of Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data (500 m2 resolution, 16 day) obtained from NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer and USGS stream discharge (Q) records from over 100 unregulated streams in Tennessee for the years 2001-2012. The data sets were compiled to evaluate the vegetation response during a historical drought (Aug/Sept of 2007) within different streamflow recession index (SRI) regions. SRI can be applied as a metric for watershed storage and the ability of underlying aquifers to sustain streamflow through prolonged dry periods. The time series were filtered to remove seasonal trends, and bimonthly anomalies were calculated. Each of the three NDVI and Q time series (raw, filtered, and anomaly) were analyzed using cross-correlation analysis, cross-wavelet, and wavelet coherence analyses. Four SRI regions with similar land cover were chosen to spatially analyze NDVI anomalies during drought. The results from the cross-correlation analysis reveal strong biannual and annual correlations between raw NDVI and raw discharge values. Correlations between NDVI anomalies and discharge anomalies peak at lag periods of 1 to 1.5 months with NDVI leading. The wavelet coherence analysis suggests that drought dampens the monthly signal correlation between the raw values, and potentially removes a strong 2 year correlation between the anomalies. The spatial analysis shows regions with a

  13. Differences in the deposition of radionuclides to leafy vegetables

    To quantify the variability in deposition to several species, the dry deposition of gaseous elemental radio-iodine and particulate radio-caesium on mature leafy vegetables was studied inside a deposition chamber by comparative experiments. The simultaneous exposition of endive, head lettuce, red oak leaf lettuce, curly kale, white cabbage and spinach was performed under homogeneous and controlled conditions (131 vertical stroke 2-portion, particle median, stomata opening, air humidity and temperature). Significant differences were observed for the 131 vertical stroke deposition on spring vegetables: the deposition on spinach was roughly 3times that on leaf lettuce, 4times that on endive and 9times that on head lettuce. For 134Cs, there was no significant difference between spinach and leaf lettuce, about twice the amount was deposited on both species as on endive and 3times as on head lettuce. All summer vegetables showed differences in deposition. For Iodine, the deposition on spinach was roughly 3times (6times) that on curly kale and 35times (100times) that on white cabbage in the 2 experiments. For Caesium, the deposition to curly kale was highest, about twice that on spinach and 35times (80times) that on white cabbage. The deposition was always the lowest on the closed heads of white cabbage and head lettuce. The many open stomata of spinach increased the efficiency of gaseous deposition. In addition, rough and crimpy leafs increased the particle deposition efficiency. The estimation of the deposition velocity showed that dry deposition was in average about 8times higher for 131 vertical stroke than for 134Cs. The influence of the particle size on the deposition velocity was small in the considered size range. Washing could reduce the contamination by about 10% for 131 vertical stroke and 45% for 134Cs. (orig.)

  14. Modelling spatial and temporal vegetation variability with the Climate Constrained Vegetation Index: evidence of CO2 fertilisation and of water stress in continental interiors

    Los, S. O.

    2015-06-01

    A model was developed to simulate spatial, seasonal and interannual variations in vegetation in response to temperature, precipitation and atmospheric CO2 concentrations; the model addresses shortcomings in current implementations. The model uses the minimum of 12 temperature and precipitation constraint functions to simulate NDVI. Functions vary based on the Köppen-Trewartha climate classification to take adaptations of vegetation to climate into account. The simulated NDVI, referred to as the climate constrained vegetation index (CCVI), captured the spatial variability (0.82 vegetation during the 1984 drought in the Sahel and during dust bowls of the 1930s and 1950s in the Great Plains in North America. A global CO2 fertilisation effect was found in NDVI data, similar in magnitude to that of earlier estimates (8 % for the 20th century). This effect increased linearly with simple ratio, a transformation of the NDVI. Three CCVI scenarios, based on climate simulations using the representative concentration pathway RCP4.5, showed a greater sensitivity of vegetation towards precipitation in Northern Hemisphere mid latitudes than is currently implemented in climate models. This higher sensitivity is of importance to assess the impact of climate variability on vegetation, in particular on agricultural productivity.

  15. THE ASSESSMENT OF ATMOSPHERIC DROUGHT DURING VEGETATION SEASON (ACCORDING TO STANDARDIZED PRECIPITATION INDEX SPI IN CENTRAL-EASTERN POLAND

    Elżbieta Radzka

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents an assessment of atmospheric drought during vegetation season defined on the basis of standardized precipitation index (SPI. The data used in this paper come from nine IMWM stations from central-eastern region of Poland, and they were registered in 1971–2005. The frequency of occurrence of vegetation season’s months was determined in particular drought classes. Spatial distribution of SPI index values was shown in all of the vegetation season’s months on the area examined. The direction and significance of values changes tendency of the analyzed index during the vegetation season were also defined. It was noticed that extreme droughts appeared four times less frequently than the normal months. Very dry months were noted most frequently in September while moderately dry – in August. The analysis of the frequency of spatial distribution of particular drought classes showed that extreme dry and very dry months occurred most frequently in western part of the area examined, while the moderately dry months also in south-eastern part. On the basis of the linear trend analysis it can be said that the SPI index values were slightly decreasing year by year.

  16. Vegetation and Soil Characteristics of Different Desertification Grasslands in Northwest Sichuan

    Wan; Ting; Tu; Weiguo; Xi; Huan; Li; Yudong; Tang; Xuefang; Yang; Yichuan

    2014-01-01

    [Objective]The paper was to study vegetation and soil characteristics of different desertification grasslands in northwest Sichuan. [Method]By taking different desertification grasslands as the research object,the characteristic factors of vegetation community,biomass,soil moisture content,volume weight and porosity were analyzed through scientific investigation,sampling and formula calculation to reveal the changes in vegetation and soil characteristics of different desertification grasslands in Northwest Sichuan. [Result]Community succession presented the pattern of " hygrophyte-mesophyte-xerophyte" with the aggravation of grassland desertification. The height and coverage of community decreased,species richness was declined by 88%,and composition of dominant species also changed greatly. The diversity index of light-desertification grassland was the highest among tested grasslands. Total biomass was decreased by 90. 4%,and the underground biomass decreased far more than aboveground biomass. In desertification progress,both soil moisture content and water holding capacity decreased,while volume weight showed upward trend and porosity showed downward trend; soil characteristics had large variation in early stage of desertification,so restoration treatment of desertification grassland should be carried out in the early stage of desertification. [Conclusion]The study provided a theoretical basis for researches on causes and management programs of desertification grassland,having an important meaning for ecological restoration of regional grassland and maintenance of ecological security.

  17. [A novel vegetation index (MPRI) of corn canopy by vehicle-borne dynamic prediction].

    Li, Shu-qiang; Li, Min-zan; Sun, Hong

    2014-06-01

    Ground-based remote sensing system is a significant way to understand the growth of corn and provide accurate and scientific data for precision agriculture. The vehicle-borne system is one of the most important tools for corn canopy monitoring. However, the vehicle-borne growth monitoring system cannot maintain steady operations due to the row spacing of corn. The reflectance of corn canopy, which was used to construct the model for the chlorophyll content, was disturbed by the reflectance of soil background. The background interference with the reflectance could not be removed effectively, which would result in a deviation in the growth monitoring. In order to overcome this problem, a novel vegetation index named MPRI was developed in the present paper. The tests were carried out by the vehicle-borne system on the cornfield. The sensors which configured the vehicle-borne system had 4 bands, being respectively 550, 650, 766 and 850 nm. It would obtain the spectral data while the vehicle moved along the row direction. The sampling rate was about 1 point per second. The GPS receiver obtained the location information at the same rate. MPRI was made up by the reflectance ratio of 660 and 550 nm. It was very effective to analyze the information about the reflectance of the canopy. The results of experiments showed that the MPRI of soil was the positive value and the MPRI of canopy was the negative value. So it is easier to distinguish the spectral information about soil and corn canopy by MPRI. The results indicated that: it had satisfactory forecasting accuracy for the chlorophyll content by using the MPRI on the moving monitoring. The R2 of the prediction model was about 0.72. The R2 Of the model of NDVI, which was used to represent the chlorophyll content, was only 0.24. It indicates that MPRI had good measurement results for the dynamic measurement process. It provided the novel measurement way to get the canopy reflectance spectra and the better vegetation index to

  18. Comparison of sap flux, moisture flux tower and MODIS enhanced vegetation index methods for estimating riparian evapotranspiration

    Nagler, Pamela L.; Glenn, Edward P.; Morino, Kiyomi

    2010-01-01

    Riparian evapotranspiration (ET) was measured on a salt cedar (Tamarix spp.) dominated river terrace on the Lower Colorado River from 2007 to 2009 using tissue-heat-balance sap flux sensors at six sites representing very dense, medium dense, and sparse stands of plants. Salt cedar ET varied markedly across sites, and sap flux sensors showed that plants were subject to various degrees of stress, detected as mid-day depression of transpiration and stomatal conductance. Sap flux results were scaled from the leaf level of measurement to the stand level by measuring plant-specific leaf area index and fractional ground cover at each site. Results were compared to Bowen ratio moisture tower data available for three of the sites. Sap flux sensors and flux tower results ranked the sites the same and had similar estimates of ET. A regression equation, relating measured ET of salt cedar and other riparian plants and crops on the Lower Colorado River to the Enhanced Vegetation Index from the MODIS sensor on the Terra satellite and reference crop ET measured at meteorological stations, was able to predict actual ET with an accuracy or uncertainty of about 20%, despite between-site differences for salt cedar. Peak summer salt cedar ET averaged about 6 mm d-1 across sites and methods of measurement.

  19. Responses of Natural Vegetation to Different Stages of Extreme Drought during 2009–2010 in Southwestern China

    Xiang Zhao

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available An extreme drought event is usually a long-term process with different stages. Although it is well known that extreme droughts that have occurred frequently in recent years can substantially affect vegetation growth, few studies have revealed the characteristics of vegetation responses for different stages of an extreme drought event. Especially, studies should address when the vegetation growth was disturbed and how it recovered through an extreme drought event. In this study, we used the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI and Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI to evaluate the response of vegetation to different stages of a severe drought event during 2009–2010 throughout Southwestern China. The PDSI time series indicated that the drought can be divided into three stages, including an initial stage represented by moderate drought (S1, a middle stage represented by continual severe drought (S2, and a final recovery stage (S3. The results revealed that the drought during the initial stage inhibited the growth of grassland and woody savanna, however, forest growth did not decrease during the first stage of droughts, and there was even a trend towards higher NDVI values. The continual severe drought in the middle stage inhibited growth for all vegetation types, and the woody savanna was affected most severely. In the final stage, all vegetation types underwent recovery, including the grassland that had endured the most severe drought. This study provides observational evidence and reveals that the responses of forest to the extreme drought are different from grassland and woody savanna in the different drought stages.

  20. Performance of different vegetation indices in assessing degradation of community grazing lands in Indian arid zone

    Kumar, Suresh; Bastin, Gary; Friedel, Margaret; Narain, Pratap; Saha, D. K.; Ahuja, U. R.; Mathur, B. K.

    2006-12-01

    Vegetation in arid community grazinglands shows monsoonal growth. Its matching phenology with crops makes its detection difficult during July to September. While crops are harvested during September-October, using satellite data thereafter for the natural vegetation seems most appropriate but by then it turns dry. An index capable of sensing dry vegetation was needed since conventional NDVI is sensitive to greenness of vegetation. Performance of NDVI vis-à-vis another index, PD54, based on cover was therefore compared in assessing degradation of grazinglands. The PD54 was used to isolate anthropogenic impacts from environmental induced degradation by analyzing satellite images from dry and wet seasons. Substantial absence of appreciable vegetation response indicated poor resilience and severe degradation. Five grazinglands in Shergarh tehsil of Jodhpur district in Rajasthan were studied following above approach. Ground radiometric observations were recorded. Satellite data of IRS 1C/1D/P6 with LISS 3 sensor for both pre and post monsoon season were acquired for three contrasting wet-dry season events. These were geometrically registered and radiometrically calibrated to calculate an index of vegetation cover PD54 as well as NDVI. PD54 is a perpendicular vegetation index based on the green and red spectral band width. The PD54 and NDVI calculated from spectro-radiometer were related to vegetation cover measured on ground in permanent plots. This confirmed that PD54 was superior index for estimating cover in arid dry grasslands. These ground vegetation trends in a good rainfall year (2001) with drought year (2002) were related with satellite data for a protected and four unprotected grazinglands. NDVI failed to detect any vegetation in protected areas supporting excellent grass cover which was succinctly brought out by PD54. Successful validation of PD54 in detecting degradation of 13 additional sites confirmed its efficacy. These findings have implication in forage

  1. Comparative evaluation of the Vegetation Dryness Index (VDI), the Temperature Vegetation Dryness Index (TVDI) and the improved TVDI (iTVDI) for water stress detection in semi-arid regions of Iran

    Rahimzadeh-Bajgiran, Parinaz; Omasa, Kenji; Shimizu, Yo

    2012-03-01

    This study aims at developing appropriate methods to detect water stress in the semi-arid regions of Iran. To do this, the Vegetation Dryness Index (VDI) concept, originally developed for forest fire detection, was applied to detect vegetation/soil water stress. A modified approach towards the Temperature Vegetation Dryness Index (TVDI) concept, incorporating air temperature and a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) to develop the improved TVDI (iTVDI) is also introduced and the results are compared with the original TVDI and VDI through verification by precipitation and soil moisture data. Evaluation of the VDI in the study area showed that there was no significant relationship between the VDI values and precipitation or soil moisture indicating its inappropriateness to be used for water stress detection. Compared with the TVDI, results indicated that there were more statistically significant relationships between the iTVDI and recent precipitation and soil moisture in the four land cover types in the study area. This indicates that the iTVDI is highly influenced by recent precipitation during the summer and can therefore estimate water status. It is concluded that the iTVDI can be successfully used for vegetation/soil water stress monitoring in the semi-arid regions of Iran.

  2. Differentiating between Land Use and Climate-driven Change using Long-term Vegetation Index Trends adjusted for Precipitation on the Mongolian Plateau

    John, R.; Chen, J.; Kim, Y.; Yang, Z.; Xiao, J.; Shao, C.; Batkhishig, O.

    2014-12-01

    The Mongolian plateau is undergoing consistent warming in addition to an increase in extreme climatic events. Land cover/land use change has accelerated over the past three decades, owing to post liberalization socio-economic changes in Inner Mongolia, China (IM) Mongolia (MG) which have different political systems. Extensive anthropomorphic modifications of ecosystems have the ability to alter the structure and function of ecosystems and ecological processes such as the carbon and water cycle and it is therefore important to differentiate between such changes from climate-driven changes. This study identified climate-driven and human-induced changes in vegetation cover on the Mongolian plateau across desert, grassland and forest biomes as well as administrative divisions. We applied non-parametric trend tests on time series of vegetation index datasets that include MODIS EVI, Vegetation Index and Phenology (VIP) EVI2, and GIMMS 3g as well as precipitation and temperature obtained from TRMM and MERRA reanalysis datasets. We then correlated the VI trends with the climate drivers to determine and isolate primary climate drivers. VI residuals obtained from the regression of composites of peak season maximum VI and JJA monthly accumulated rainfall were analyzed for detection of trends in vegetation greenness not explained by rainfall dynamics over different time periods (2000-2012, and 1981 to 2010). In addition, we obtained trends in socioeconomic variables like total livestock and population density which were closely correlated with VI residual trends adjusted for rainfall. Some administrative subdivisions in IM and MG showed a decreasing trend in residuals that could be attributed to anthropogenic activity such as grazing, or urbanization, while other subdivisions showed an increasing trend in residuals increasing trend in residuals suggest that vegetation cover has improved and perhaps be attributed to restoration and conservation efforts.

  3. Retrieval of leaf area index in different plant species using thermal hyperspectral data

    Neinavaz, Elnaz; Skidmore, Andrew K.; Darvishzadeh, Roshanak; Groen, Thomas A.

    2016-09-01

    Leaf area index (LAI) is an important variable of terrestrial ecosystems because it is strongly correlated with many ecosystem processes (e.g., water balance and evapotranspiration) and directly related to the plant energy balance and gas exchanges. Although LAI has been accurately predicted using visible and short-wave infrared hyperspectral data (0.3-2.5 μm), LAI estimation using thermal infrared (TIR, 8-14 μm) measurements has not yet been addressed. The novel approach of this study is to evaluate the retrieval of LAI using TIR hyperspectral data. The leaf area indices were destructively acquired for four plant species: Azalea japonica, Buxussempervirens, Euonymus japonicus, and Ficus benjamina. Canopy emissivity spectral measurements were obtained under controlled laboratory conditions using a MIDAC (M4401-F) spectrometer. The LAI retrieval was assessed using a partial least squares regression (PLSR), artificial neural networks (ANNs), and narrow band indices calculated from all possible combinations of waveband pairs for three vegetation indices including simple difference, simple ratio, and normalized difference. ANNs retrieved LAI more accurately than PLSR and vegetation indices (0.67 methods compared to the univariate technique (e.g., narrow band vegetation indices) when hyperspectral thermal data is utilized. We thus demonstrated for the first time the potential of hyperspectral thermal data to accurately retrieve LAI.

  4. Assessing Land Degradation and Desertification Using Vegetation Index Data: Current Frameworks and Future Directions

    Thomas P. Higginbottom; Elias Symeonakis

    2014-01-01

    Land degradation and desertification has been ranked as a major environmental and social issue for the coming decades. Thus, the observation and early detection of degradation is a primary objective for a number of scientific and policy organisations, with remote sensing methods being a candidate choice for the development of monitoring systems. This paper reviews the statistical and ecological frameworks of assessing land degradation and desertification using vegetation index data. The devel...

  5. Spatial-Temporal Pattern of Vegetation Index Change and the Relationship to Land Surface Temperature in Zoige

    Chen, Z.; Jiang, W. G.; Tang, Z. H.; Jia, K.

    2016-06-01

    The Zoige wetland is the largest alpine peat wetland in China, and it has been degrading since 1960s. MODIS Enhance Vegetation Index (EVI) and Land Surface Temperature (LST) products in late august from 2000 to 2014 were employed to explore vegetation index and land surface temperature change tendency and to perform Temperature Vegetation Dryness Index (TVDI). The correlation between the annual mean of EVI and annual mean of LST was also calculated at pixel scale. The main purpose of this study is to explore the relationship between wetland degradation and climate change. The main conclusions are as follows: (1) Average EVI in Zoige plateau tended to be decreasing from 2000 to 2014, especially after 2007. In wetland areas, the annual mean of EVI were negative, while the slope were positive. It showed that the water storage of wetlands in Zoige plateau had been decreasing in the past 15 years and will keep decreasing in the future. (2) Overall, LST in the whole Zoige plateau had been increasing since 2000. While the minimum TVDI increased from 2000 to 2008 and then decreased. The change of TVDI suggested that drought should be a main factor that lead to wetland degradation in Zoige. (3) The uneven distribution of the correlation between EVI and LST suggested that LST is also one of the main reasons of wetland degradation.

  6. Satellite observations of high northern latitude vegetation productivity changes between 1982 and 2008: ecological variability and regional differences

    To assess ongoing changes in high latitude vegetation productivity we compared spatiotemporal patterns in remotely sensed vegetation productivity in the tundra and boreal zones of North America and Eurasia. We compared the long-term GIMMS (Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies) NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) to the more recent and advanced MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) NDVI data set, and mapped circumpolar trends in a gross productivity metric derived from the former. We then analyzed how temporal changes in productivity differed along an evergreen-deciduous gradient in boreal Alaska, along a shrub cover gradient in Arctic Alaska, and during succession after fire in boreal North America and northern Eurasia. We find that the earlier reported contrast between trends of increasing tundra and decreasing boreal forest productivity has amplified in recent years, particularly in North America. Decreases in boreal forest productivity are most prominent in areas of denser tree cover and, particularly in Alaska, evergreen forest stands. On the North Slope of Alaska, however, increases in tundra productivity do not appear restricted to areas of higher shrub cover, which suggests enhanced productivity across functional vegetation types. Differences in the recovery of post-disturbance vegetation productivity between North America and Eurasia are described using burn chronosequences, and the potential factors driving regional differences are discussed.

  7. Satellite observations of high northern latitude vegetation productivity changes between 1982 and 2008: ecological variability and regional differences

    Beck, Pieter S A; Goetz, Scott J, E-mail: pbeck@whrc.org [Woods Hole Research Center, 149 Woods Hole Road, Falmouth, MA 02540 (United States)

    2011-10-15

    To assess ongoing changes in high latitude vegetation productivity we compared spatiotemporal patterns in remotely sensed vegetation productivity in the tundra and boreal zones of North America and Eurasia. We compared the long-term GIMMS (Global Inventory Modeling and Mapping Studies) NDVI (Normalized Difference Vegetation Index) to the more recent and advanced MODIS (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer) NDVI data set, and mapped circumpolar trends in a gross productivity metric derived from the former. We then analyzed how temporal changes in productivity differed along an evergreen-deciduous gradient in boreal Alaska, along a shrub cover gradient in Arctic Alaska, and during succession after fire in boreal North America and northern Eurasia. We find that the earlier reported contrast between trends of increasing tundra and decreasing boreal forest productivity has amplified in recent years, particularly in North America. Decreases in boreal forest productivity are most prominent in areas of denser tree cover and, particularly in Alaska, evergreen forest stands. On the North Slope of Alaska, however, increases in tundra productivity do not appear restricted to areas of higher shrub cover, which suggests enhanced productivity across functional vegetation types. Differences in the recovery of post-disturbance vegetation productivity between North America and Eurasia are described using burn chronosequences, and the potential factors driving regional differences are discussed.

  8. A MODIS-based begetation index climatology

    Passive microwave soil moisture algorithms must account for vegetation attenuation of the signal in the retrieval process. One approach to accounting for vegetation is to use vegetation indices such as the Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) to estimate the vegetation optical depth. The pa...

  9. Empirical Relationship Between Leaf Biomass of Red Pine Forests and Enhanced Vegetation Index in South Korea Using LANDSAT-5 TM

    Gusso, A.; Lee, J.; Son, Y.; Son, Y. M.

    2016-06-01

    Research on forest carbon (C) dynamics has been undertaken due to the importance of forest ecosystems in national C inventories. Currently, the C sequestration of South Korean forests surpasses that of other countries. In South Korea, Pinus densiflora (red pine) is the most abundant tree species. Thus, understanding the growth rate and biomass evolution of red pine forest in South Korea is important for estimating the forest C dynamics. In this paper, we derived empirical relationship between foliage biomass and the no blue band enhanced vegetation index (EVI-2) profile using both field work and multi-temporal Landsat-5 TM remote sensing data to estimate the productivity of forest biomass in South Korea. Our analysis combined a set of 84 Landsat-5 TM images from 28 different dates between 1986 and 2008 to study red pine forest development over time. Field data were collected from 30 plots (0.04 ha) that were irregularly distributed over South Korea. Individual trees were harvested by destructive sampling, and the age of trees were determined by the number of tree rings. The results are realistic (R2&thinsp=&thinsp0.81, p red pine forest growth.

  10. Seasonal analysis of precipitation, drought and Vegetation index in Indonesian paddy field based on remote sensing data

    Paddy field is important agriculture crop in Indonesia. Rice is a food staple for 237,6 million Indonesian people. Paddy field growth is strongly influenced by water, but the amount of precipitation is unpredictable. Annual and interannual climate variability in Indonesia is unusual. In recent years remote sensing data has been used for measurement and monitoring of precipitation, drought and Vegetation index such as Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP), Multi-purpose Transmission SATellite (MTSAT) and Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). The objective of this research is to investigate seasonal variability of precipitation, drought and Vegetation index in Indonesian paddy field based on remote sensing data. The methodology consists of collecting of enhanced vegetation index (EVI) from MODIS data, mosaicking of image, collecting of region of interest of paddy field, collecting of precipitation and drought index based on Keetch Bryam Drought Index (KBDI) from GSMaP and MTSAT, and seasonal analysis. The result of this research has showed seasonal variability of precipitation, KBDI and EVI on Indonesia paddy field from 2007 until 2012. Precipitation begins from January until May and October until December, and KBDI begins to increase from June and peak in September only in South Sumatera precipitation almost in all month. Seasonal analysis has showed precipitation and KBDI affect on EVI that can indicate variety phenology of Indonesian paddy field. Peak of EVI occurs before peak of KBDI occurs and increasing of KBDI followed by decreasing of EVI. In 2010 all province got higher precipitation and smaller KBDI so EVI has three peaks such as in West Java that can indicated increasing of rice production

  11. Indexed

    Hagy, Jessica

    2008-01-01

    Jessica Hagy is a different kind of thinker. She has an astonishing talent for visualizing relationships, capturing in pictures what is difficult for most of us to express in words. At indexed.blogspot.com, she posts charts, graphs, and Venn diagrams drawn on index cards that reveal in a simple and intuitive way the large and small truths of modern life. Praised throughout the blogosphere as “brilliant,” “incredibly creative,” and “comic genius,” Jessica turns her incisive, deadpan sense of humor on everything from office politics to relationships to religion. With new material along with some of Jessica’s greatest hits, this utterly unique book will thrill readers who demand humor that makes them both laugh and think.

  12. Comparison of Different Vegetation Indices for Very High-Resolution Images, Specific Case Ultracam-D Imagery

    Barzegar, M.; Ebadi, H.; Kiani, A.

    2015-12-01

    Today digital aerial images acquired with UltraCam sensor are known to be a valuable resource for producing high resolution information of land covers. In this research, different methods for extracting vegetation from semi-urban and agricultural regions were studied and their results were compared in terms of overall accuracy and Kappa statistic. To do this, several vegetation indices were first tested on three image datasets with different object-based classifications in terms of presence or absence of sample data, defining other features and also more classes. The effects of all these cases were evaluated on final results. After it, pixel-based classification was performed on each dataset and their accuracies were compared to optimum object-based classification. The importance of this research is to test different indices in several cases (about 75 cases) and to find the quantitative and qualitative effects of increasing or decreasing auxiliary data. This way, researchers who intent to work with such high resolution data are given an insight on the whole procedure of detecting vegetation species as one of the outstanding and common features from such images. Results showed that DVI index can better detect vegetation regions in test images. Also, the object-based classification with average 93.6% overall accuracy and 86.5% Kappa was more suitable for extracting vegetation rather than the pixel-based classification with average 81.2% overall accuracy and 59.7% Kappa.

  13. Vegetative growth and yield of strawberry under irrigation and soil mulches for different cultivation environments

    Pires Regina Célia de Matos

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The vegetative growth and yield of strawberry in relation to irrigation levels and soil mulches are still not well known, mainly for different environmental conditions. Two experiments were carried out in Atibaia, SP, Brazil, during 1995, one in a protected environment and the other in an open field, to evaluate the cultivar Campinas IAC-2712, under different irrigation levels and soil mulches (black and clear polyethylene. Three water potential levels in the soil were used in order to define irrigation time, corresponding to -0.010 (N1, -0.035 (N2, and -0.070 (N3 MPa, measured through tensiometers installed at the 10 cm depth. A 2 x 3 factorial arrangement was adopted, as randomized complete block, with 5 replicates. In the protected cultivation, the irrigation levels of -0.010 and -0.035 MPa and the clear plastic mulch favored the vegetative growth, evaluated through plant height, maximum horizontal dimension of the plant, leaf area index, as well as by total marketable fruit yield and its components (mean number and weight of fruits per plant. In the open field cultivation, no effect of treatments due to rainfall were observed.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF AN INDEX OF ALIEN SPECIES INVASIVENESS: AN AID TO ASSESSING RIPARIAN VEGETATION CONDITION

    Many riparian areas are invaded by alien plant species that negatively affect native species composition, community dynamics and ecosystem properties. We sampled vegetation along reaches of 31 low order streams in eastern Oregon, and characterized species assemblages at patch an...

  15. Comparison between two vegetation indices for measuring different types of forest damage in the north-eastern United States

    Vogelmann, J. E.

    1990-01-01

    The relative effectiveness of the Landsat TM-derived normalized difference vegetative index (NDVI) and the short-wave IR to NIR ratio (SWIR/NIR) index was examined in measurements of different types of damage in several forest communities. The forests examined included a site with well-defined fir waves in New Hampshire, a site undergoing well-documented coniferous forest decline in Vermont, and predominantly deciduous regions in Vermont and northwestern Massachusetts seriously impacted by pear thrips. Both NDVI and SWIR/NIR images were produced for each area. Results demonstrated that the SWIR/NIR index was superior to NDVI in distinguishing between high and low conifer damage at both fir-wave and forest decline sites; high and low deciduous-forest damage sites were easily separable using either NDVI or SWIR/NIR, but the NDVI was superior in separation between medium and low deciduous damage.

  16. Differences in hydrological responses for different vegetation types on a steep slope on the Loess Plateau, China

    Duan, Liangxia; Huang, Mingbin; Zhang, Luodan

    2016-06-01

    Extensive vegetation restoration practices have been implemented to control soil erosion on the Loess Plateau, China. However, no strict guidelines are available to determine the most suitable plant species for vegetation restoration within a given area. The objective of this study was to quantify the changes of each component (soil water storage, surface runoff, and actual evapotranspiration) of a water balance model and soil loss over time under eight different vegetation types, and to further determine the optimal vegetation type for soil and water conservation and sustainable ecological restoration on the steep slopes (>25°) on the Loess Plateau. The results indicated that vegetation type substantially affected soil water storage and that the greatest soil water storage in both the shallow (0-2 m) and the deep soil layers (2-5 m) occurred under Bothriochloa ischaemum L. (BOI). Vegetation type also affected surface runoff and soil losses. The most effective vegetation types for reducing soil erosion were BOI and Sea-buckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.), while Chinese pine (Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.) and Chinese pine + Black locust (Robinia pseudoacacia L.) were the most ineffective types. Soil water dynamics and evapotranspiration varied considerably among the different vegetation types. A soil water surplus was only found under BOI, while insufficient water replenishment existed under the other seven vegetation types. The higher water consumption rates of the seven vegetation types could result in soil desiccation, which could lead to severe water stresses that would adversely affect plant growth. This study suggested that both vegetation type and its effect on controlling soil erosion should be considered when implementing vegetation restoration and that BOI should be highly recommended for vegetation restoration on the steep slopes of the Loess Plateau. A similar approach to the one used in this study could be applied to other regions of the world confronted

  17. A survey of drought and Variation of Vegetation by statistical indexes and remote sensing (Case study: Jahad forest in Bandar Abbas)

    The damages of drought as a climatic and creeping phenomenon are very enormous specially in deserts. Necessity of management and conflict with it is clear. In this case vegetation are damaged too, and even are changed faster. This paper describes the process of vegetation changes and surveys it with drought indexes such as statistical and remote sensing indexes and correlation between temperature and relative humidity by Geographical Information System (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) in forest park of Bandar Abbas in successive years. At the end the regression and determination-coefficient for showing the importance of droughts survey are computed. Results revealed that the correlation between vegetation and indexes was 0.5. The humidity had maximum correlation and when we close to 2009 the period of droughts increase and time intervals decrease that influence vegetation enormously and cause the more area lost its vegetation

  18. Bioclimatic and vegetation mapping of a topographically complex oceanic island applying different interpolation techniques

    Garzón-Machado, Víctor; Otto, Rüdiger; del Arco Aguilar, Marcelino José

    2014-07-01

    Different spatial interpolation techniques have been applied to construct objective bioclimatic maps of La Palma, Canary Islands. Interpolation of climatic data on this topographically complex island with strong elevation and climatic gradients represents a challenge. Furthermore, meteorological stations are not evenly distributed over the island, with few stations at high elevations. We carried out spatial interpolations of the compensated thermicity index (Itc) and the annual ombrothermic Index (Io), in order to obtain appropriate bioclimatic maps by using automatic interpolation procedures, and to establish their relation to potential vegetation units for constructing a climatophilous potential natural vegetation map (CPNV). For this purpose, we used five interpolation techniques implemented in a GIS: inverse distance weighting (IDW), ordinary kriging (OK), ordinary cokriging (OCK), multiple linear regression (MLR) and MLR followed by ordinary kriging of the regression residuals. Two topographic variables (elevation and aspect), derived from a high-resolution digital elevation model (DEM), were included in OCK and MLR. The accuracy of the interpolation techniques was examined by the results of the error statistics of test data derived from comparison of the predicted and measured values. Best results for both bioclimatic indices were obtained with the MLR method with interpolation of the residuals showing the highest R 2 of the regression between observed and predicted values and lowest values of root mean square errors. MLR with correction of interpolated residuals is an attractive interpolation method for bioclimatic mapping on this oceanic island since it permits one to fully account for easily available geographic information but also takes into account local variation of climatic data.

  19. Reactivity indexes for different geometries of palladium leads

    Gomez-Carrillo, S C; Bolcatto, P G [Departamento de Fisica, Facultad de Ingenieria Quimica, Universidad Nacional de Litoral, Santiago del Estero 2829 S3000AOM Santa Fe Argentina (Argentina); Ortega, J, E-mail: scgomez@fiq.unl.edu.a [Departamento de Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (Spain)

    2009-05-01

    Electronic transport through metallic break junctions or molecules is clearly dependent not only on the electronic structure of the central nanodevice connecting the leads, but also the shape and crystalline orientation of the contacts which can define the possible conduction channels. In this work we examine different geometries of contacts of palladium characterizing them through global and local reactivity indexes as electrophilicity, chemical hardness and Fukui functions. In molecules, these indicators are essentially defined by the energies of the frontier molecular orbitals and in solids they are related with the local and partial density of states. We use for this purpose an ab-initio based code (FIREBALL), applied to plane contacts with (001) fcc faces and also pyramidal tips grown following a (001) and (111) packaging. The results allow us to have an insight about the chemical features of this type of nanojunctions.

  20. Satellite-derived leaf-area-index and vegetation maps as input to global carbon cycle models - A hierarchical approach

    Badhwar, G. D.; Macdonald, R. B.; Mehta, N. C.

    1986-01-01

    A hierarchical procedure for developing a leaf area index (LAI) map of deciduous boreal forests is studied. The collection of spectral reflectance data from the Boundary Waters Canoe area in Minnesota using helicopter-, high-altitude aircraft-, and Landsat-mounted spectral sensors is described. The relationship between LAI and biomass and the reflectance ratio is analyzed. The sensitivity of canopy reflectance in the visible and infrared to the LAI of the canopy for various boreal forest species is evaluated. The data reveal that Landsat data are useful for producing LAI maps of deciduous forest areas and the maps provide data which clarifies the function of vegetation in the global carbon cycle models.

  1. Spectral Cross-Calibration of VIIRS Enhanced Vegetation Index with MODIS: A Case Study Using Year-Long Global Data

    Kenta Obata; Tomoaki Miura; Hiroki Yoshioka; Huete, Alfredo R.; Marco Vargas

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) was spectrally cross-calibrated with the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) EVI using a year-long, global VIIRS-MODIS dataset at the climate modeling grid (CMG) resolution of 0.05°-by-0.05°. Our cross-calibration approach was to utilize a MODIS-compatible VIIRS EVI equation derived in a previous study [Obata et al., J. Appl. Remote Sens., vol.7, 2013] and optimize the coeffi...

  2. Assessing intra-annual vegetation regrowth after fire using the pixel based regeneration index

    Lhermitte, S.; Verbesselt, J.; Verstraeten, W.W.; Veraverbeke, S.; Coppin, P.

    2011-01-01

    Several remote sensing studies have discussed the potential of satellite imagery as an alternative for extensive field sampling to quantify fire-vegetation impact over large areas. Most studies depend on Landsat image availability with infrequent image acquisition dates and consequently are limited

  3. Temporal trends in the Enhanced Vegetation Index and spring weather predict seed production in Mediterranean oaks

    Fernández Martínez, Marcos; Garbulsky, Martín Fabio; Peñuelas, Josep; Peguero Gutiérrez, Guillermo; Espelta Morral, Josep Maria

    2015-01-01

    The extremely year-to-year variable production of seeds (masting) is an extended plant reproductive behaviour important for forest dynamics and food webs. The dependence of these episodes of massive seed production on recently or long-term photosynthesised carbohydrates, however, remains controversial. In this paper, we explore whether vegetation (tree canopy) changes, detected using EVI as a proxy of leaf area and photosynthetic capacity, can provide a reliable estimation of seed production....

  4. Recurrence Plots of Geolocated Time Series from Satellite Maps of NOAA STAR Vegetation Health Index

    Sparavigna, Amelia Carolina; Marazzato, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Several information services, such as the NOAA Center for Satellite Applications and Research, produces and distributes maps elaborated from satellite images, which display data about vegetation indices. Using the time-series concerning some specific geographical positions, which we can obtain from the available maps, several analyses are possible. Here we propose the use of recurrence plots. We will show examples based on the data corresponding to six small areas, geolocated in Italy, of the...

  5. Assessing Land Degradation and Desertification Using Vegetation Index Data: Current Frameworks and Future Directions

    Thomas P. Higginbottom

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Land degradation and desertification has been ranked as a major environmental and social issue for the coming decades. Thus, the observation and early detection of degradation is a primary objective for a number of scientific and policy organisations, with remote sensing methods being a candidate choice for the development of monitoring systems. This paper reviews the statistical and ecological frameworks of assessing land degradation and desertification using vegetation index data. The development of multi-temporal analysis as a desertification assessment technique is reviewed, with a focus on how current practice has been shaped by controversy and dispute within the literature. The statistical techniques commonly employed are examined from both a statistical as well as ecological point of view, and recommendations are made for future research directions. The scientific requirements for degradation and desertification monitoring systems identified here are: (I the validation of methodologies in a robust and comparable manner; and (II the detection of degradation at minor intensities and magnitudes. It is also established that the multi-temporal analysis of vegetation index data can provide a sophisticated measure of ecosystem health and variation, and that, over the last 30 years, considerable progress has been made in the respective research.

  6. [Accuracy comparison of BJ-1, HJ and Landsat data in the retrieval of grassland vegetation coverage, leaf area index and above ground biomass].

    Wang, Hong-Yan; Li, Xiao-Song; Zhang, Jin; Gao, Zhi-Hai

    2013-10-01

    Domestic satellites BJ-1, HJ and the most widely used satellite Landsat were selected to systematically compare their abilities and differences on the estimation of the biophysical parameters of grassland in sandstorm source region in Beijing and Tianjin, with the combination of field-measured fractional coverage, leaf area index and aboveground biomass data. The result shows: (1) In terms of the surface reflectance, HJ-1B and Landsat have a higher correlation with biophysical parameters in red band, compared with BJ-1, while BJ-1's near infra-red band was obviously superior to HJ-1B and Landsat, (2) with respect to the vegetation indices, Landsat performed best, HJ-1B was the second, and BJ-1 was the worst, (3) compared with vegetation indices, multiple regression model can raise the estimation accuracy, BJ-1 based model improved significantly, while Landsat and HJ-1B based models were less obvious. Among them, the highest accuracy was acquired for leaf area index estimation through the BJ-1 based model (R2 = 0.61, RMSEP = 0.15). In general, domestic satellites have their own unique features, which remain a huge potential to be further tapped. PMID:24409740

  7. Estimation of Anticipated Performance Index and Air Pollution Tolerance Index and of vegetation around the marble industrial areas of Potwar region: bioindicators of plant pollution response.

    Noor, Mehwish Jamil; Sultana, Shazia; Fatima, Sonia; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Zafar, Muhammad; Sarfraz, Maliha; Balkhyour, Masour A; Safi, Sher Zaman; Ashraf, Muhammad Aqeel

    2015-06-01

    Mitigating industrial air pollution is a big challenge, in such scenario screening of plants as a bio monitor is extremely significant. It requires proper selection and screening of sensitive and tolerant plant species which are bio indicator and sink for air pollution. The present study was designed to evaluate the Air Pollution Tolerance Index (APTI) and Anticipated Performance Index (API) of the common flora. Fifteen common plant species from among trees, herb and shrubs i.e. Chenopodium album (Chenopodiaceae), Parthenium hysterophorus (Asteraceae), Amaranthus viridis (Amaranthaceae), Lantana camara (Verbenaceaea), Ziziphus nummulari (Rhamnaceae), Silibum merianum (Asteraceae), Cannabis sativa (Cannabinaceae), Calatropis procera (Asclepediaceae), Ricinus communis (Euphorbiaceae), Melia azadirachta (Meliaceae), Psidium guajava (Myrtaceae), Eucalyptus globules (Myrtaceae), Broussonetia papyrifera (Moraceae), Withania somnifera (Solanaceae) and Sapium sabiferum (Euphorbiaceae) were selected growing frequently in vicinity of Marble industries in Potwar region. APTI and API of selected plant species were analyzed by determining important biochemical parameter i.e. total chlorophyll, ascorbic acid, relative water content and pH etc. Furthermore the selected vegetation was studied for physiological, economic, morphological and biological characteristics. The soil of studied sites was analyzed. It was found that most the selected plant species are sensitive to air pollution. However B. papyrifera, E. globulus and R. communis shows the highest API and therefore recommended for plantation in marble dust pollution stress area. PMID:25503327

  8. Index

    Editörden

    2013-01-01

    ed and indexed in Copernicus, Index Google Scholarship, the PSCR, DOAJ, Research Bible, Indian Open Access Journals (OAJ), Institutional Repositories (IR), Journal TOCs, J-Gate (Informatics India), Ulrich’s, ResearchGate, International Society of Universal Research in Sciences, DRJI, EyeSource

  9. Index

    Editörden

    2014-01-01

    ed and indexed in Copernicus, Index Google Scholarship, the PSCR, DOAJ, Research Bible, Indian Open Access Journals (OAJ), Institutional Repositories (IR), Journal TOCs, J-Gate (Informatics India), Ulrich’s, ResearchGate, International Society of Universal Research in Sciences, DRJI, EyeSource

  10. Soil borne gungi associated with different vegetable crop in sindh, pakistan

    Different soil-borne fungi are responsible for reducing the yield of vegetables throughout the world including Pakistan. There are several soil borne fungal pathogens which aggressively infect vegetable crops. Surveys conducted during September 2010 to October 2011, demonstrated that a great diversity of soil borne plant pathogens associated with different vegetables prevail in vegetable growing areas of Sindh such as Tando Allahayar, Mirpurkhas, Ghotaki, Khairpur, Kunri, Umerkot and Karachi, etc. Our study noted in total thirteen different genera of fungi isolated from vegetable crops (cabbage, brinjal, tomato, radish and spinach). Isolated fungi identified included Alternaria solani, Aspergillus flavus, A. fumigatus, A. niger, A. oryzae, A. terrus, Aeromonium fusidiocles, Cladosporium sp., Drechselra hawaiiensis, Eurotium berbanbrum, Fusarium oxysporum, Macrophomina phaseolina, Penicillium commune, Rhizoctonia solani, Trichoderma harzianum, Ulocladium sp., and unidentified black mycelium from the soil and roots of vegetable crops. In addition, it was found that soil is commonly infected by soil-borne fungi and eventually results in heavy losses of vegetable yield in the vegetable growing areas of Sindh province. The infection rapidly increased due to many factors such as, presence of moisture, excess of water and infection may be caused by winds, gales and dust storms as well as by mechanical vectors. (author)

  11. Comparative analysis of different uni- and multi-variate methods for estimation of vegetation water content using hyper-spectral measurements

    Mirzaie, M.; Darvishzadeh, R.; Shakiba, A.; Matkan, A. A.; Atzberger, C.; Skidmore, A.

    2014-02-01

    Assessment of vegetation water content is critical for monitoring vegetation condition, detecting plant water stress, assessing the risk of forest fires and evaluating water status for irrigation. The main objective of this study was to investigate the performance of various mono- and multi-variate statistical methods for estimating vegetation water content (VWC) from hyper-spectral data. Hyper-spectral data is influenced by multi-collinearity because of a large number of (independent) spectral bands being modeled by a small number of (dependent) biophysical variables. Therefore, some full spectrum methods that are known to be suitable for analyzing multi-collinear data set were chosen. Canopy spectral reflectance was obtained with a GER 3700 spectro-radiometer (400-2400 nm) in a laboratory setting and VWC was measured by calculating wet/dry weight difference per unit of ground area (g/m2) of each plant canopy (n = 95). Three multivariate statistical methods were applied to estimate VWC: (1) partial least square regression, (2) artificial neural network and (3) principal component regression. They were selected to minimize the problem related to multi-collinearity. For comparison, uni-variate techniques including narrow band ratio water index (RWI), normalized difference water index (NDWI), second soil adjusted vegetation index (SAVI2) and transferred soil adjusted vegetation index (TSAVI) were applied. For each type of vegetation index, all two-band combinations were evaluated to determine the best band combination. Validation of the methods was based on the cross validation procedure and using three statistical indicators: R2, RMSE and relative RMSE. The cross-validated results identified PLSR as the regression model providing the most accurate estimates of VWC among the various methods. The result revealed that this model is highly recommended for use with multi-collinear datasets (RCV2=0.94, RRMSECV = 0.23). Principal component regression exhibited the lowest

  12. A 30-Year Multi-Sensor Vegetation Index and Land Surface Phenology Data Record: Methods Challenges and Potentials

    Didan, K.; Barreto-munoz, A.; Miura, T.; Tsend-Ayush, J.

    2013-12-01

    During the last five years the Vegetation Index and Phenology Lab. (vip.arizona.edu) embarked on an effort to process a global multi-sensor Earth Science Data Record of NDVI, EVI2, and land surface Phenology. Data from AVHRR, MODIS, and SPOT-VGT, covering the period 1981 to present, were processed into a seamless and sensor independent record using a suite of community algorithms for data filtering, across-sensor continuity, Vegetation Index (NDVI and EVI2), land surface Phenology, and spatial and temporal gap filling. Currently at Version 3.0 these ESDRs are suitable for the study of land surface vegetation dynamics, long term change and trends, anomalies, and can support various ecosystem and climate modeling efforts by providing key parameters. While adapting the various algorithms to processing this new data record many challenges emerged, ranging from excessive missing and poor quality data to complex and temporally dependent divergence across the various sensors making continuity quite difficult. The first step to addressing these challenges was the adoption of very strict and low tolerance to noise data filters, where the intrinsic input data quality is used along with the long term expected dynamic range to screen for outliers and poor quality. A sophisticated and explicit per-pixel and seasonally dependent across-sensor translation algorithm was developed to address the continuity more properly. To generate the land surface phenology we adapted various community algorithms to work with and take advantage of this new record. Both the standard MODIS Vegetation dynamic algorithm and an in-house homogeneous cluster algorithm were applied to the data. We've also completed a spatially and temporally explicit error and uncertainty characterization of this record. Results indicate a VI error in the range of 5-10% VI units and a 5-40 days error in the date dependent phenology parameters, with an average error of 15 days. This VIP record accounts now for more than

  13. Evaluation of Microclimatic Data on Localities with Different Ratio of Vegetation in Urban Environment

    Keresztesová Soňa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many authors (Akbari, Taha, 1992; Čaboun, 2008; Klein, 2013; Keresztesová, 2013 proved the influence of vegetation on microclimate as well as on the decrease of heat islands. We were interested in how different ratio of vegetation and open spaces influences microclimatic factors. From April to July 2012 microclimatic factors of two different localities with respect to various ratios of vegetation and open spaces were observed in Nitra, Slovakia. More specifically we observed the air temperature, relative air humidity and surface temperatures of four selected points in both localities. We have found out that in the park, i.e. in the locality with a higher portion of vegetation than open space was the course of temperatures more balanced, thanks to the attribute of vegetation to keep a stable microclimate. We have not observed any major Differences between the monitored points variously located in the vegetation in one locality, but on the other hand, we have observed remarkable differences between the two monitored localities. We may allege that the ratio of vegetation and open spaces makes significant contribution to microclimatic conditions of urban environment.

  14. Wave Velocity Attenuation and Sediment Retention among Different Vegetation Types in a Pacific Northwest Estuary

    Lemein, T.; Cox, D. T.; Albert, D.; Blackmar, P.

    2012-12-01

    Feedbacks between vegetation, wave climate, and sedimentation create stable ecosystem states within estuaries that provide ecosystem services such as wildlife habitat, erosion control, and pollution filtration. Flume and field studies conducted with cordgrass (Spartina spp.) and sea grasses (Zostera spp., Halodule spp.) have demonstrated that the presence of vegetation reduces wave energy and increases sediment retention. Since the spatial distribution of plant species and the presence of unique plant species differ between estuaries, there is a need to understand how individual plant species, or groups of species with similar morphology, influence wave characteristics and sedimentation. Within Tillamook Bay, Oregon, three species of emergent vascular vegetation species (Carex lyngbyei, Eleocharis sp., Schoenoplectus pungens) and one species of submergent vascular vegetation species (Zostera marina) are present in the high wave energy portion of the estuary at the border of open water and the start of vegetation. These species represent three distinct growth forms (emergent reeds, emergent grasses, submergent grasses) and occur at varying densities relative to each other, as well as within the estuary. Using paired acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs), we quantify the relative attenuation of wave velocity between vegetation types and densities within the estuary and compare these results with published attenuation rates from flume and field studies in different environments. The effect of decreased wave velocity on sediment retention is measured using permanent sediment markers within and outside of vegetation stands and paired with ADV data. Sediment retention is predicted to vary seasonally with seasonal vegetation composition changes and remain constant in unvegetated areas. From this experiment we expect to identify like groups of plant species whose attenuation characteristics are the same, allowing for models of wave-vegetation-sediment interaction to be

  15. Accuracy of the Temperature-Vegetation Dryness Index using MODIS under water-limited vs. energy-limited evapotranspiration conditions

    Garcia, Monica; Fernández, N.; Villagarcía, L.;

    2014-01-01

    Water deficit indices based on the spatial relationship between surface temperature (Ts) and NDVI, known as triangle approaches, are widely used for drought monitoring. However, their application has been recently questioned when the main factor limiting evapotranspiration is energy. Even though ...... deficit when water was the main limiting factor (R=0.81-0.88; Mean Average Error, MAE=0.16-0.17) but not in energy-limited situations (R......Water deficit indices based on the spatial relationship between surface temperature (Ts) and NDVI, known as triangle approaches, are widely used for drought monitoring. However, their application has been recently questioned when the main factor limiting evapotranspiration is energy. Even though...... water is the main control in dryland ecosystems, these can also undergo periods of energy and temperature limitation. In this paper we aimed to: (i) evaluate the TVDI (Temperature-Vegetation Dryness Index) to estimate water deficits (e.g. ratio between actual and potential evapotranspiration), and heat...

  16. Different index contrast silica-on-silicon waveguides by PECVD

    Ou, Haiyan

    2003-01-01

    Ge-doped silica-on-silicon waveguides with index steps of 0.01 and 0.02 were fabricated by a combination of plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) and reactive ion etching (RIE) techniques, and their characteristics, including propagation loss, coupling loss with standard singlemode f...

  17. Vitamin E and Beta Carotene Composition in Four Different Vegetable Oils

    Ab. G.M. Top

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Some vegetable oils contains natural antioxidants such as beta carotene and vitamin E namely tocopherol and tocotrienol. Different vegetable oils contained different amount of vitamin E and β-carotene. Approach: Study was carried out to investigate the natural antioxidants (vitamin E and beta carotene composition in four different vegetable oils [Red Palm Olein (RPO, palm plein (PO, Corn Oil (CO and Coconut Oil (COC]. Results: The results showed that RPO contained the highest amount of vitamin E and β-carotene compared to the other three types of vegetable oils studied. Conclusion: The RPO can be considered as a good source of natural antioxidant (tocopherol, tocotrienol and β-carotene.

  18. Gravimetric Vegetation Water Content Estimation for Corn Using L-Band Bi-Angular, Dual-Polarized Brightness Temperatures and Leaf Area Index

    Qi Wang; Linna Chai; Shaojie Zhao; Zhongjun Zhang

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an algorithm to retrieve the gravimetric vegetation water content (GVWC, %) of corn was developed. First, the method for obtaining the optical depth from L-band (1.4 GHz) bi-angular, dual-polarized brightness temperatures (TB) for short vegetation was investigated. Then, the quantitative relationship between the corn optical depth, corn GVWC and corn leaf area index (LAI) was constructed. Finally, using the Polarimetric L-band Microwave Radiometer (PLMR) airborne data in the 2...

  19. CHANGES IN AMARANTH POLYPHENOL CONTENT DURING THE DIFFERENT VEGETATION PHASES

    Alena Vollmannová

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Total content of polyphenols was investigated in different anatomical parts of amaranth during different growth periods. Five amaranth cultivars were included in the experiment (Amaranthus hypochondriacus L.: cultivars Annapurna and Koniz, Amaranthus caudatus L.: cultivar Oscar Blanco, Amaranthus cruentus L.: cultivars Golden Giant and Rawa. Analysis were done in 4 growth phases: phase I. – intensive stem growth, phase II. – formation of the flowers and pollination, phase III. – milky ripeness, phase IV. – full ripeness. Based on the determined total polyphenol content in amaranth it is possible to create this anatomical part order: leaves > flowers > seeds > stems. No statistically significant differences were confirmed between phases I., III. and IV. On the other hand the total polyphenol content in amaranth determined in growth phase II. was significantly different in comparison to other growth phases. Statistically significant differences in polyphenolic content were confirmed between all investigated anatomical parts of amaranth.

  20. Airborne Multispectral LIDAR Data for Land-Cover Classification and Land/water Mapping Using Different Spectral Indexes

    Morsy, S.; Shaker, A.; El-Rabbany, A.; LaRocque, P. E.

    2016-06-01

    Airborne Light Detection And Ranging (LiDAR) data is widely used in remote sensing applications, such as topographic and landwater mapping. Recently, airborne multispectral LiDAR sensors, which acquire data at different wavelengths, are available, thus allows recording a diversity of intensity values from different land features. In this study, three normalized difference feature indexes (NDFI), for vegetation, water, and built-up area mapping, were evaluated. The NDFIs namely, NDFIG-NIR, NDFIG-MIR, and NDFINIR-MIR were calculated using data collected at three wavelengths; green: 532 nm, near-infrared (NIR): 1064 nm, and mid-infrared (MIR): 1550 nm by the world's first airborne multispectral LiDAR sensor "Optech Titan". The Jenks natural breaks optimization method was used to determine the threshold values for each NDFI, in order to cluster the 3D point data into two classes (water and land or vegetation and built-up area). Two sites at Scarborough, Ontario, Canada were tested to evaluate the performance of the NDFIs for land-water, vegetation, and built-up area mapping. The use of the three NDFIs succeeded to discriminate vegetation from built-up areas with an overall accuracy of 92.51%. Based on the classification results, it is suggested to use NDFIG-MIR and NDFINIR-MIR for vegetation and built-up areas extraction, respectively. The clustering results show that the direct use of NDFIs for land-water mapping has low performance. Therefore, the clustered classes, based on the NDFIs, are constrained by the recorded number of returns from different wavelengths, thus the overall accuracy is improved to 96.98%.

  1. Reestablishment of wetland vegetation on gas pipeline rights-of-way in six different wetland ecosystems

    Zimmerman, R.E. Shem, L.; Wilkey, P.L. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Van Dyke, G.D. (Trinity Christian Coll. Palos Heights, IL (United States)); Hackney, C. (North Carolina Univ., Wilmington, NC (United States)); Gowdy, M. (Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL (United States))

    1992-05-01

    Vegetational surveys were carried out to compare reestablished vegetation on pipeline rights-of-way (ROWS) with that in adjacent natural ecosystems undisturbed by pipeline installation. Six sites of various ages were surveyed in ecosystems ranging from coastal marsh to forested wetland. At all sites except one, both the number and the percentage of wetland species on the ROW approximated or exceeded those in the adjacent natural area. In four ecosystems, the vegetation on the ROW was limited to a herbaceous layer by ROW maintenance; thus, the ROWs often involved a complex of species quite different from that found in the adjacent ecosystems.

  2. Mapping Fractional Cropland Distribution in Mato Grosso, Brazil Using Time Series MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index and Landsat Thematic Mapper Data

    Changming Zhu

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mapping cropland distribution over large areas has attracted great attention in recent years, however, traditional pixel-based classification approaches produce high uncertainty in cropland area statistics. This study proposes a new approach to map fractional cropland distribution in Mato Grosso, Brazil using time series MODIS enhanced vegetation index (EVI and Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM data. The major steps include: (1 remove noise and clouds/shadows contamination using the Savizky–Gloay filter and temporal resampling algorithm based on the time series MODIS EVI data; (2 identify the best periods to extract croplands through crop phenology analysis; (3 develop a seasonal dynamic index (SDI from the time series MODIS EVI data based on three key stages: sowing, growing, and harvest; and (4 develop a regression model to estimate cropland fraction based on the relationship between SDI and Landsat-derived fractional cropland data. The root mean squared error of 0.14 was obtained based on the analysis of randomly selected 500 sample plots. This research shows that the proposed approach is promising for rapidly mapping fractional cropland distribution in Mato Grosso, Brazil.

  3. ULS LiDAR SUPPORTED ANALYSES OF LASER BEAM PENETRATION FROM DIFFERENT ALS SYSTEMS INTO VEGETATION

    Wieser, M.; Hollaus, M.; G. Mandlburger; Glira, P.; Pfeifer, N

    2016-01-01

    This study analyses the underestimation of tree and shrub heights for different airborne laser scanner systems and point cloud distribution within the vegetation column. Reference data was produced by a novel UAV-borne laser scanning (ULS) with a high point density in the complete vegetation column. With its physical parameters (e.g. footprint) and its relative accuracy within the block as stated in Section 2.2 the reference data is supposed to be highly suitable to detect the highes...

  4. Analysis of Orientation Effects of Crop Vegetation Volumes by Means of SAR Tomography at Different Frequencies

    Joerg, Hannah; Pardini, Matteo; Papathanassiou, Konstantinos; Hajnsek, Irena

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic aperture radar (SAR) tomography is a powerful approach to investigate, widely model free, the relationship between 3-D radar backscattering and physical structure of agricultural vegetation which is not fully understood yet. In this paper, the focus is set on the polarimetric characterization of scattering differences and the detection of orientation effects (i.e. differential extinction) on backscattering of the vegetation layer as a function of species, time and fr...

  5. SPECIES COMPOSITION OF WEED VEGETATION IN DIFFERENT APPLE GROWING TECHNOLOGIES

    Venera TASSEVA

    2005-01-01

    The investigation was carried out in the period 2001-2003 in an orchard of the Institute of Agriculture, Kyustendil, Bulgaria, created in the spring of 1996 on leached cinnamonic forest soil. The weed populations under four different farming technologies of growing of apple cultivar Florina were investigated. It was established, that the apple growing technologies influence the weed association composition. The highest weed diversity was found in the organic technology - 16 weed species were ...

  6. Morphological image filtering for improvement of textural built-up index performances in case of presence of scattered vegetation in semi-desertic areas

    Pesaresi, Martino; GERHARDINGER Andrea

    2009-01-01

    In this paper an improved procedure for the automatic recognition of built-up areas, using the so-called PANTEX index is presented. This index is based on analysis of image textural measures extracted using anisotropic rotation-invariant GLCM statistics. These measures may overestimate the built-up areas in case of presence of scattered vegetation having the same spatial pattern of settlements. In this paper we present a methodology able to overcome this problem. This methodology is based on ...

  7. SPECIES COMPOSITION OF WEED VEGETATION IN DIFFERENT APPLE GROWING TECHNOLOGIES

    Venera TASSEVA

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The investigation was carried out in the period 2001-2003 in an orchard of the Institute of Agriculture, Kyustendil, Bulgaria, created in the spring of 1996 on leached cinnamonic forest soil. The weed populations under four different farming technologies of growing of apple cultivar Florina were investigated. It was established, that the apple growing technologies influence the weed association composition. The highest weed diversity was found in the organic technology - 16 weed species were found. In the application of resource economical and integrated technologies, the development of 13-14 weed species was established. The smallest weed diversity was observed in the conventional technology - eight species, which was due to the twofold herbicide application.

  8. The Normalized Difference Infrared Index (NDII) as a proxy for soil moisture storage in hydrological modelling

    Sriwongsitanon, N.; Gao, H.; Savenije, H. H. G.; Maekan, E.; Saengsawang, S.; Thianpopirug, S.

    2015-08-01

    With remote sensing we can readily observe the Earth's surface, but looking under the surface into the root zone of vegetation is still a major challenge. Yet knowledge on the dynamics of soil moisture in the root zone is essential for agriculture, land-atmosphere interaction and hydrological modelling, alike. In this paper we develop a novel approach to monitor the soil moisture storage deficit in the root zone of vegetation, by using the remotely sensed Normalised Difference Infrared Index (NDII) in the Upper Ping River Basin (UPRB) in northern Thailand. Satellite data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectro-radiometer (MODIS) was used to evaluate the NDII over an 8 day period, covering the study area from 2001 to 2013. The results show that NDII values decrease sharply at the end of the wet season in October and reach lowest values near the end of the dry season in March. The values then increase abruptly after rains have started, but vary in an insignificant manner from the middle to the late rainy season. The NDII proves to be a very strong proxy for moisture storage deficit in the root zone, which is a crucial component of hydrological models. In addition, the NDII appears to be a reliable indicator for the temporal and spatial distribution of drought conditions in the UPRB. The 8 day average NDII values were found to correlate very well with the 8 day average soil moisture content (SU) simulated by FLEXL (rainfall-runoff model) at 8 runoff stations during the dry season - giving an average R2 value 0.87 on an exponential relationship, while for the wet season it reduced to be around 0.61. Apparently, the NDII is an effective index for the moisture storage in the root zone during the time of moisture deficit, and a powerful indicator to assess droughts. In the dry season, when plants are exposed to water stress, the leaf-water deficit increases steadily. Once leaf-water is close to saturation - mostly at the end of the wet season - leaf characteristics

  9. Uls LiDAR Supported Analyses of Laser Beam Penetration from Different ALS Systems Into Vegetation

    Wieser, M.; Hollaus, M.; Mandlburger, G.; Glira, P.; Pfeifer, N.

    2016-06-01

    This study analyses the underestimation of tree and shrub heights for different airborne laser scanner systems and point cloud distribution within the vegetation column. Reference data was produced by a novel UAV-borne laser scanning (ULS) with a high point density in the complete vegetation column. With its physical parameters (e.g. footprint) and its relative accuracy within the block as stated in Section 2.2 the reference data is supposed to be highly suitable to detect the highest point of the vegetation. An airborne topographic (ALS) and topo-bathymetric (ALB) system were investigated. All data was collected in a period of one month in leaf-off condition, while the dominant tree species in the study area are deciduous trees. By robustly estimating the highest 3d vegetation point of each laser system the underestimation of the vegetation height was examined in respect to the ULS reference data. This resulted in a higher under-estimation of the airborne topographic system with 0.60 m (trees) and 0.55 m (shrubs) than for the topo-bathymetric system 0.30 m (trees) and 0.40 m (shrubs). The degree of the underestimation depends on structural characteristics of the vegetation itself and physical specification of the laser system.

  10. Integrating vegetation index time series and meteorological data to understand the effect of the land use/land cover (LULC) in the climatic seasonality of the Brazilian Cerrado

    Lins, D. B.; Zullo, J.; Friedel, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    The Cerrado (savanna ecosystem) of São Paulo state (Brazil) represent a complex mosaic of different typologies of uses, actors and biophysical and social restrictions. Originally, 14% of the state of São Paulo area was covered by the diversity of Cerrado phytophysiognomies. Currently, only 1% of this original composition remains fragmented into numerous relicts of biodiversity, mainly concentrated in the central-eastern of the state. A relevant part of the fragments are found in areas of intense coverage change by human activities, whereas the greatest pressure comes from sugar cane cultivation, either by direct replacement of Cerrado vegetation or occupying pasture areas in the fragments edges. As a result, new local level dynamics has been introduced, directly or indirectly, affecting the established of processes in climate systems. In this study, the main goal is analyzing the relationship between the Cerrado landscape changing and the climate dynamics in regional and local areas. The multi-temporal MODIS 250 m Vegetation Index (VI) datasets (period of 2000 to 2012) are integrated with precipitation data of the correspondent period (http://www.agritempo.gov.br/),one of the most important variable of the spatial phytophysiognomies distribution. The integration of meteorological data enable the development of an integrated approach to understand the relationship between climatic seasonality and the changes in the spatial patterns. A procedure to congregated diverse dynamics information is the Self Organizing Map (SOM, Kohonen, 2001), a technique that relies on unsupervised competitive learning (Kohonen and Somervuo 2002) to recognize patterns. In this approach, high-dimensional data are represented on two dimensions, making possible to obtain patterns that takes into account information from different natures. Observed advances will contribute to bring machine-learning techniques as a valid tool to provide improve in land use/land cover (LULC) analyzes at

  11. Influence of the vegetative rests with a different parity C:N on transition Cs 137 from soil in plants

    On sod-podsolic sandy soil in field experiment with vegetative material (the vegetative rests) and different doses of entering of nitric fertilizers radio caesium accumulation in plants depending on a source of brought nitrogen - nitrogen of fertilizers or nitrogen of the vegetative rests is studied. (authors)

  12. A Method for Application of Classification Tree Models to Map Aquatic Vegetation Using Remotely Sensed Images from Different Sensors and Dates

    Ying Cai

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In previous attempts to identify aquatic vegetation from remotely-sensed images using classification trees (CT, the images used to apply CT models to different times or locations necessarily originated from the same satellite sensor as that from which the original images used in model development came, greatly limiting the application of CT. We have developed an effective normalization method to improve the robustness of CT models when applied to images originating from different sensors and dates. A total of 965 ground-truth samples of aquatic vegetation types were obtained in 2009 and 2010 in Taihu Lake, China. Using relevant spectral indices (SI as classifiers, we manually developed a stable CT model structure and then applied a standard CT algorithm to obtain quantitative (optimal thresholds from 2009 ground-truth data and images from Landsat7-ETM+, HJ-1B-CCD, Landsat5-TM and ALOS-AVNIR-2 sensors. Optimal CT thresholds produced average classification accuracies of 78.1%, 84.7% and 74.0% for emergent vegetation, floating-leaf vegetation and submerged vegetation, respectively. However, the optimal CT thresholds for different sensor images differed from each other, with an average relative variation (RV of 6.40%. We developed and evaluated three new approaches to normalizing the images. The best-performing method (Method of 0.1% index scaling normalized the SI images using tailored percentages of extreme pixel values. Using the images normalized by Method of 0.1% index scaling, CT models for a particular sensor in which thresholds were replaced by those from the models developed for images originating from other sensors provided average classification accuracies of 76.0%, 82.8% and 68.9% for emergent vegetation, floating-leaf vegetation and submerged vegetation, respectively. Applying the CT models developed for normalized 2009 images to 2010 images resulted in high classification (78.0%–93.3% and overall (92.0%–93.1% accuracies. Our

  13. Modeling the effects of vegetation on methane oxidation and emissions through soil landfill final covers across different climates.

    Abichou, Tarek; Kormi, Tarek; Yuan, Lei; Johnson, Terry; Francisco, Escobar

    2015-02-01

    Plant roots are reported to enhance the aeration of soil by creating secondary macropores which improve the diffusion of oxygen into soil as well as the supply of methane to bacteria. Therefore, methane oxidation can be improved considerably by the soil structuring processes of vegetation, along with the increase of organic biomass in the soil associated with plant roots. This study consisted of using a numerical model that combines flow of water and heat with gas transport and oxidation in soils, to simulate methane emission and oxidation through simulated vegetated and non-vegetated landfill covers under different climatic conditions. Different simulations were performed using different methane loading flux (5-200 g m(-2) d(-1)) as the bottom boundary. The lowest modeled surface emissions were always obtained with vegetated soil covers for all simulated climates. The largest differences in simulated surface emissions between the vegetated and non-vegetated scenarios occur during the growing season. Higher average yearly percent oxidation was obtained in simulations with vegetated soil covers as compared to non-vegetated scenario. The modeled effects of vegetation on methane surface emissions and percent oxidation were attributed to two separate mechanisms: (1) increase in methane oxidation associated with the change of the physical properties of the upper vegetative layer and (2) increase in organic matter associated with vegetated soil layers. Finally, correlations between percent oxidation and methane loading into simulated vegetated and non-vegetated covers were proposed to allow decision makers to compare vegetated versus non-vegetated soil landfill covers. These results were obtained using a modeling study with several simplifying assumptions that do not capture the complexities of vegetated soils under field conditions. PMID:25475118

  14. Population of Humic Acid Degrading Microorganisms in Andosols under Different Vegetation Types and Grassland Management Regimens.

    Yanagi, Yukiko; Yoda, Kaori; Ogura, Kazuhiko; Fujitake, Nobuhide

    2008-01-01

    To examine the effect of vegetation type and grassland management regimen on the distribution of humus-degrading microorganisms, populations of humic acid-degrading (HAD) bacteria and fungi at three Andosol sites were investigated using the dilution plate method. Each site had three different vegetation types (Eulalia grassland, bamboo grassland, and coniferous plantations). Among the six grassland sites, two were maintained by burning and the others by cutting. HAD microorganisms were found in all soil samples. Low densities and small percentages of HAD bacteria were detected with no significant differences in the number of bacteria found between different vegetation types and grasslands managed in different ways. In contrast, the densities and percentages of HAD fungi differed according to vegetation type and management regimen. Specifically, the percentages of HAD fungi were significantly higher for burned grasslands. At burned sites, the numbers and percentages of HAD bacteria remained at a consistently low level, and no distinct seasonal changes were observed. In contrast, marked seasonal fluctuations in HAD fungi were detected. The percentages of these fungi remained relatively high between April and December. These fluctuations are likely due to the effects of burning on soil microorganisms. PMID:21558687

  15. The 2010 Russian Drought Impact on Satellite Measurements of Solar-Induced Chlorophyll Fluorescence: Insights from Modeling and Comparisons with the Normalized Differential Vegetation Index (NDVI)

    Yoshida, Y.; Berry, J.; Lee, J. -E.; Walker, G.; Reichle, R.; Lyapustin, A.; Joiner, J.; Tucker, C.; Koster, R.; Wang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    We examine satellite-based measurements of chlorophyll solar-induced fluorescence (SIF) over the region impacted by the Russian drought and heat wave of 2010. Like the popular Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) that has been used for decades to measure photosynthetic capacity, SIF measurements are sensitive to the fraction of absorbed photosynthetically-active radiation (fPAR). However, in addition, SIF is sensitive to the fluorescence yield that is related to the photosynthetic yield. Both SIF and NDVI from satellite data show drought-related declines early in the growing season in 2010 as compared to other years between 2007 and 2013 for areas dominated by crops and grasslands. This suggests an early manifestation of the dry conditions on fPAR. We also simulated SIF using a global land surface model driven by observation-based meteorological fields. The model provides a reasonable simulation of the drought and heat impacts on SIF in terms of the timing and spatial extents of anomalies, but there are some differences between modeled and observed SIF. The model may potentially be improved through data assimilation or parameter estimation using satellite observations of SIF (as well as NDVI). The model simulations also offer the opportunity to examine separately the different components of the SIF signal and relationships with Gross Primary Productivity (GPP).

  16. Theory of Planned Behavior Explains Gender Difference in Fruit and Vegetable Consumption

    Emanuel, Amber S.; McCully, Scout N; Gallagher, Kristel M.; Updegraff, John A.

    2012-01-01

    A gender difference in fruit and vegetable intake (FVI) is widely documented, but not well understood. Using data from the National Cancer Institute’s Food Attitudes and Behavior Survey, we assessed the extent to which gender differences in FVI are attributable to gender differences in constructs from the Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB). Females reported more favorable attitudes and greater perceived behavior control regarding FVI than males, and these beliefs mediated the observed gender di...

  17. Differences of fire activity and their underlying factors among vegetation formations in Greece

    Xystrakis F; Koutsias N

    2013-01-01

    Climate and weather play an important role in shaping fire activity patterns by controlling fuel productivity and fire spread, respectively. Additionally, climate is a key factor controlling primary productivity while different climate zones are expected to support different vegetation formations, that on their turn, include different fuel types. The use, therefore, of an underlying phytogeographical framework would provide more comprehensive outputs in exploring fire activity patterns at nat...

  18. Evaluation of Extraction Methods for the Analysis of Carotenoids for Different Vegetable Matrix

    Stancuta Scrob; Sevastita Muste; Crina Muresan; Anca Farcas; Sonia Socaci; Romina Vlaic

    2013-01-01

    In this study, different solvents were used to achieve the maximum extractibility of total carotenoids. The extracted total carotenoids were estimated using UV- visible spectrophotometer. Carotenoids from vegetable matrix can be used as a food colorant, food additive, cosmetics, antioxidants and nutraceuticals.

  19. Mitigation of heavy metals in different vegetables through biological washing techniques

    Muhammad Umair Sattar

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Availability of nutritious and healthy food is the foremost challenging issue in all over the word. Vegetables are essential part in human diet and considered as natural reserves of nutrients gifted by Almighty Allah to human beings. Heavy metals are among the most toxic food pollutants and their intake through diet leads to several disorders. The sources of heavy metal contamination include waste water irrigation, industrial emissions, transportation and application of metal-based pesticides. In Pakistan this situation is more alarming as vegetables grown in peri-urban areas have shown high incidence of heavy metals accumulation. In this study effort was made to mitigate different heavy metals (Ar, Cd, Cr and Pb in cauliflower, spinach, okra and brinjal collected from peri-urban areas through washing with different biological solutions. Heavy metals contents were determined by using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS. Vegetable showed high load of heavy metals in unwashed form that reduced significantly by washing with different biological solutions. Among the different biological solutions, washing of vegetables with 8% ginger solution was found to be more effective.

  20. Description of psychophysiological indexes of students of different sporting specializations

    Barybina L.N.

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Information of the psychophysiological testing of students of technical institute of higher of different sporting specializations is considered. In research took part 159 students of specialization football, sambo, volleyball, basketball, aerobics, boxing, heavy athletics. The psychophysiological testing is given by possibility to choose the proper sporting specialization students for the best realization of the personality qualities. Positive attitude of students is marked toward employments on physical education. The increase of self-appraisal and improvement of health of students is also marked.

  1. Index

    Antonio Juan Sánchez

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The Advances in Distributed Computing and Artificial Intelligence Journal (ISSN: 2255-2863 is an open access journal that publishes articles which contribute new results associated with distributed computing and artificial intelligence, and their application in different areas. The artificial intelligence is changing our society. Its application in distributed environments, such as the Internet, electronic commerce, mobile communications, wireless devices, distributed computing and so on, is increasing and becoming and element of high added value and economic potential in industry and research. These technologies are changing constantly as a result of the large research and technical effort being undertaken in both universities and businesses. The exchange of ideas between scientists and technicians from both academic and business areas is essential to facilitate the development of systems that meet the demands of today's society.

  2. The Effectiveness of Web Search Engines to Index New Sites from Different Countries

    Pirkola, Ari

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Investigates how effectively Web search engines index new sites from different countries. The primary interest is whether new sites are indexed equally or whether search engines are biased towards certain countries. If major search engines show biased coverage it can be considered a significant economic and political problem because…

  3. The Effect of SCENAR-Therapy on Dynamics of Clinic and Endoscopic Vegetative Indexes in Young Children and Preschool Children with Gastroduodenal Diseases

    Zhukova Е.А.

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to assess the dynamics of clinical and endoscopic indexes of gastric and duodenal mucus, as well as vegetative regulation after complex therapy of gastrointestinal pathology including SCENAR-therapy in young children and preschool children. Materials and Methods. 44 children aged 2—5 years with chronic duodenitis and gastroduodenitis were examined. Half of them had traditional treatment, while the therapy of others included SCENAR-therapy. Conclusion. SCENAR-therapy included into complex therapy of duodenites and gastroduodenites in young children and preschool children is marked by evident positive clinical dynamics and improvement of vegetative nervous system indexes enhancing adaptive possibilities of the body.

  4. Metal speciation in salt marsh sediments: Influence of halophyte vegetation in salt marshes with different morphology

    Pedro, Sílvia; Duarte, Bernardo; Raposo de Almeida, Pedro; Caçador, Isabel

    2015-12-01

    Salt marshes provide environmental conditions that are known to affect metal speciation in sediments. The elevational gradient along the marsh and consequent differential flooding are some of the major factors influencing halophytic species distribution and coverage due to their differential tolerance to salinity and submersion. Different species, in turn, also have distinct influences on the sediment's metal speciation, and its metal accumulation abilities. The present work aimed to evaluate how different halophyte species in two different salt marshes could influence metal partitioning in the sediment at root depth and how that could differ from bare sediments. Metal speciation in sediments around the roots (rhizosediments) of Halimione portulacoides, Sarcocornia fruticosa and Spartina maritima was determined by sequentially extracting operationally defined fractions with solutions of increasing strength and acidity. Rosário salt marsh generally showed higher concentrations of all metals in the rhizosediments. Metal partitioning was primarily related to the type of metal, with the elements' chemistry overriding the environment's influence on fractionation schemes. The most mobile elements were Cd and Zn, with greater availability being found in non-vegetated sediments. Immobilization in rhizosediments was predominantly influenced by the presence of Fe and Mn oxides, as well as organic complexes. In the more mature of both salt marshes, the differences between vegetated and non-vegetated sediments were more evident regarding S. fruticosa, while in the younger system all halophytes presented significantly different metal partitioning when compared to that of mudflats.

  5. Index

    Antonio Juan Sánchez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The Advances in Distributed Computing and Artificial Intelligence Journal (ADCAIJ is an open access journal that publishes articles which contribute new results associated with distributed computing and artificial intelligence,and their application in different areas.The artificial intelligence is changing our society. Its application in distributed environments, such as the Internet, electronic commerce, mobile communications, wireless devices, distributed computing and so on, is increasing and becoming and element of high added value and economic potential in industry and research. These technologies are changing constantly as a result of the large research and technical effort being undertaken in both universities and businesses. The exchange of ideas between scientists and technicians from both academic and business areas is essential to facilitate the development of systems that meet the demands of today's society.We would like to thank all the contributing authors for their hard and highly valuable work. Their work has helped to contribute to the success of this special issue. Finally, the Editors wish to thank Scientific Committee of Advances in Distributed Computing and Artificial Intelligence Journal for the collaboration of this special issue, that notably contributes to improve the quality of the journal. We hope the reader will share our joy and find this special issue very useful.

  6. Index

    Antonio Juan SÁNCHEZ

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The Advances in Distributed Computing and Artificial Intelligence Journal (ADCAIJ is an open access journal that publishes articles which contribute new results associated with distributed computing and artificial intelligence,and their application in different areas. The artificial intelligence is changing our society. Its application in distributed environments, such as the Internet, electronic commerce, mobile communications, wireless devices, distributed computing and so on, is increasing and becoming and element of high added value and economic potential in industry and research. These technologies are changing constantly as a result of the large research and technical effort being undertaken in both universities and businesses. The exchange of ideas between scientists and technicians from both academic and business areas is essential to facilitate the development of systems that meet the demands of today's society. We would like to thank all the contributing authors for their hard and highly valuable work. Their work has helped to contribute to the success of this special issue. Finally, the Editors wish to thank Scientific Committee of Advances in Distributed Computing and Artificial Intelligence Journal for the collaboration of this special issue, that notably contributes to improve the quality of the journal. We hope the reader will share our joy and find this special issue very useful.

  7. Index

    Antonio Juan Sánchez

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The Advances in Distributed Computing and Artificial Intelligence Journal (ADCAIJ is an open access journal that publishes articles which contribute new results associated with distributed computing and artificial intelligence,and their application in different areas.The artificial intelligence is changing our society. Its application in distributed environments, such as the Internet, electronic commerce, mobile communications, wireless devices, distributed computing and so on, is increasing and becoming and element of high added value and economic potential in industry and research. These technologies are changing constantly as a result of the large research and technical effort being undertaken in both universities and businesses. The exchange of ideas between scientists and technicians from both academic and business areas is essential to facilitate the development of systems that meet the demands of today's society.We would like to thank all the contributing authors for their hard and highly valuable work. Their work has helped to contribute to the success of this special issue. Finally, the Editors wish to thank Scientific Committee of Advances in Distributed Computing and Artificial Intelligence Journal for the collaboration of this special issue, that notably contributes to improve the quality of the journal. We hope the reader will share our joy and find this special issue very useful.

  8. Index

    Antonio Juan SÁNCHEZ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The Advances in Distributed Computing and Artificial Intelligence Journal (ADCAIJ is an open access journal that publishes articles which contribute new results associated with distributed computing and artificial intelligence,and their application in different areas.The artificial intelligence is changing our society. Its application in distributed environments, such as the Internet, electronic commerce, mobile communications, wireless devices, distributed computing and so on, is increasing and becoming and element of high added value and economic potential in industry and research. These technologies are changing constantly as a result of the large research and technical effort being undertaken in both universities and businesses. The exchange of ideas between scientists and technicians from both academic and business areas is essential to facilitate the development of systems that meet the demands of today's society.We would like to thank all the contributing authors for their hard and highly valuable work. Their work has helped to contribute to the success of this special issue. Finally, the Editors wish to thank Scientific Committee of Advances in Distributed Computing and Artificial Intelligence Journal for the collaboration of this special issue, that notably contributes to improve the quality of the journal. We hope the reader will share our joy and find this special issue very useful.

  9. Responses of Natural Vegetation to Different Stages of Extreme Drought during 2009–2010 in Southwestern China

    Xiang Zhao; Hong Wei; Shunlin Liang; Tao Zhou; Bin He; Bijian Tang; Donghai Wu

    2015-01-01

    An extreme drought event is usually a long-term process with different stages. Although it is well known that extreme droughts that have occurred frequently in recent years can substantially affect vegetation growth, few studies have revealed the characteristics of vegetation responses for different stages of an extreme drought event. Especially, studies should address when the vegetation growth was disturbed and how it recovered through an extreme drought event. In this study, we used the No...

  10. Environmental quality evaluation. Indexing tools to evaluate environmental quality from biological data, floristic and vegetational data in Ponte Galeria (Rome, Italy)

    In the present work the study of indexing tools to evaluate environmental quality from biological data has been performed using a certain number of floristic and vegetational indices near Macchia Grande of Ponte Galeria (Rome, Italy). The indices have been applied on the basis of the data coming from a phyto sociological study of the area. Multivariate statistics methodologies have been utilized to obtain a synthetic evaluation of the indices

  11. A simple model for yield prediction of rice based on vegetation index derived from satellite and AMeDAS data during ripening period

    The present study was conducted to show a simple model for rice yield predicting by using a vegetation index (NDVI) derived from satellite and meteorological data. In a field experiment, the relationship between the vegetation index and radiation absorbed by the rice canopy was investigated from transplanting to maturity. Their correlation held. This result revealed that the vegetation index could be used as a measure of absorptance of solar radiation by rice canopy. NDVI multiplied by solar radiation (SR) every day was accumulated (Σ(SR·NDVI)) from the field experiment. Σ(SR·NDVI) was plotted against above ground dry matter. It was obvious that they had a strong relationship. Rice yield largely depends on solar radiation and air temperature during the ripening period. Air temperature affects dry matter production. Relationships between Y SR-1 (Y: rice yield, SR: solar radiation) and mean air temperature were investigated from meteorological data and statistical data on rice yield. There was an optimum air temperature, 21.3°C, for ripening. When it was near 21.3°C in the ripening period, the rice yield was higher. We proposed a simple model for yield prediction of rice based on these results. The model is composed with SR·NDVI and the optimum air temperature. Vegetation index was derived from 3 years, LANDSAT TM data in Toyama, Ishikawa, Fukui and Nagano prefectures at heading. The meteorological data was used from AMeDAS data. The model was described as follows: Y = 0.728 SR·NDVI−2.04(T−21.3)2 + 282 (r2 = 0.65, n = 43) where Y is rice yield (kg 10a-1), SR is solar radiation (MJ m-2) during the ripening period (from 10 days before heading to 30 days after heading), T is mean air temperature (°C) during the ripening period. RMSE was 33.7kg 10a-1. The model revealed good precision. (author)

  12. Fully-automated estimation of actual to potential evapotranspiration in the Everglades using Landsat and air temperature data as inputs to the Vegetation Index-Temperature Trapezoid method

    Yagci, A. L.; Jones, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    While the greater Everglades contains a vast wetland, evapotranspiration (ET) is a major source of water "loss" from the system. Like other ecosystems, the Everglades is vulnerable to drought. Everglades restoration science and resource management requires information on the spatial and temporal distribution of ET. We developed a fully-automated ET model using the Vegetation Index-Temperature Trapezoid concept. The model was tested and evaluated against in-situ ET observations collected at the Shark River Slough Mangrove Forest eddy-covariance tower in Everglades National Park (Sitename / FLUXNET ID: Florida Everglades Shark River Slough Mangrove Forest / US-Skr). It uses Landsat Surface Reflectance Climate Data from Landsat 5, and Landsat 5 thermal and air temperature data from the Daily Gridded Surface Dataset to output the ratio of actual evapotranspiration (AET) and potential evapotranspiration (PET). When multiplied with a PET estimate, this output can be used to estimate ET at high spatial resolution. Furthermore, it can be used to downscale coarse resolution ET and PET products. Two example outputs covering the agricultural lands north of the major Everglades wetlands extracted from two different dates are shown below along with a National Land Cover Database image from 2011. The irrigated and non-irrigated farms are easily distinguishable from the background (i.e., natural land covers). Open water retained the highest AET/PET ratio. Wetlands had a higher AET/PET ratio than farmlands. The main challenge in this study area is prolonged cloudiness during the growing season.

  13. Recovery of a soil under different vegetation one year after a high intensity wildfire

    A. Martín

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Studies on soil recovery in fragile ecosystems following high intensity wildfires are scarce. The aim of the present investigation is to evaluate the impact of a high intensity wildfire in an ecosystem under different vegetation (shrubland and pinewood located at Vilardevós (Galicia, NW Spain and highly susceptible to suffer soil erosion due to the steep relief and high erositivity of the rainfall. Soil samples were collected from the A horizon (0-5 cm 1 year after the fire and soil quality was evaluated by analysis of several physical, chemical and biochemical properties measured in the fraction chemical properties > physical properties. The data also showed that the fire impact was different depending on the soil vegetation considered (shrubland and pinewood. Moreover, the data confirmed the slow soil recovery in this fragile ecosystem and, therefore, the need of adopting post-fire stabilisation and rehabilitation treatments in order to minimize the post-fire erosion and soil degradation.

  14. The effects of different salt, biostimulant and temperature levels on seed germination of some vegetable species

    Ertan Yildirim

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to determine the effects of two biostimulants (humic acid and biozyme or three different salt (NaCl concentrations at the temperature 10, 15, 20 and 25°C on parsley, leek, celery, tomato, onion, lettuce, basil, radish and garden cress seed germination. Two applications of both biostimulants increased seed germination of parsley, celery and leek at all temperature treatments. Germination rate decreased depending on high salt concentrations. At different salt and temperature levels garden cress was characterised by the highest germination percentage compared to other vegetable species.Interactions between NaCl concentrations and temperatures, as welI as biostimulants and temperatures were significant at p=0.001 in for all vegetable species except onion in NaCl concentrations and temperatures compared to that of the control.

  15. NOAA Climate Data Record Normalized Difference Vegetation Index: 1981-2013

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Climate Data Records (CDR) provide historical climate information using data from weather satellites. This...

  16. Presence of pesticide residues in different types of fruits and vegetables originated from the Republic of Macedonia

    Kostik, Vesna; Bauer, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The Republic of Macedonia is an agricultural developing country with a large production of different types of vegetables and fruits in open fields as well in greenhouses. Most fruits and vegetables are treated with pesticides on several occasions during the growing season. At the same time, pesticides can pose risks if they are not applied according to Good Agricultural Practice (GAP). The present study investigates pesticide residues in samples of fresh fruits and vegetables produced in ...

  17. Inter-Comparison of ASTER and MODIS Surface Reflectance and Vegetation Index Products for Synergistic Applications to Natural Resource Monitoring

    Hirokazu Yamamoto; Kayo Fujiwara; Hiroki Yoshioka; Tomoaki Miura

    2008-01-01

    Synergistic applications of multi-resolution satellite data have been of a great interest among user communities for the development of an improved and more effective operational monitoring system of natural resources, including vegetation and soil. In this study, we conducted an inter-comparison of two remote sensing products, namely, visible/near-infrared surface reflectances and spectral vegetation indices (VIs), from the high resolution Advanced Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer ...

  18. H-Index of Astrophysicists at Raman Research Institute: Performance of Different Calculators

    Meera, B. M.; Manjunath, M.

    2012-08-01

    H-index, a single number proposed by J. E. Hirsch in 2005 has gained popularity as an index number to measure the research performance of individuals, institutions, universities, etc. There are many calculators to derive the h-in dex number, such as Google Scholar, Web of Science, Scopus, etc. However, h-index can be calculated manually, provided we have access to a complete list of publications of a scientist and the number of citations received by them. It is observed that h-index for a given scientist at a ny given point of time differs from one calculator to the other. Here is an attempt to calculate the H-index of scientists of the Astronomy and Astrophysics Group at Raman Research Institute using Google Scholar Free calculator, Web of Science Paid calculator and The SAO/NASA As trophysics Data System manual calculation and comparison of the results. Application of this h- index phenomenon to the research output of RRI scientists in a group is done while keeping in mi nd Hirsch's systematic in vestigation to predict the position of a scientist using h-index in physics. It is believed that the higher the academic age of a scientist, the higher will be the h-index. An attempt is made to find whether this assumption is true with respect to the sample studied by including the superannuated scientists from Astronomy and Astrophysics Group at Raman Research Institute under the purview of this study.

  19. Sacrum Index in Children Suffering from Different Grades of Vesicoureteral Reflux

    Farnaz Hafez Qoran

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at evaluating the sacrum index in children suffering from different grades of vesicoureteral reflux. In this case-control study, according to VCUG results, children with grade III, IV and V refluxes entered the study. There were 76 children with history of urinary canal infection and normal VCUG. Sacrum index was measured in both groups and compared. There was a meaningful relationship between these two groups considering abnormality rate of the index (p = 0.001. The factor can be used as a predictive factor in determining prognosis of medical treatment and selecting those children candidate to surgery.

  20. Study of a Vegetation Index Based on HJ CCD Data's top-of-atmosphere reflectance and FPAR Inversion

    The Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation (FPAR)absorbed by plant canopies is a key parameter for monitoring crop condition and estimating crop yield. In general, it is necessary to obtain Top of Canopy (TOC) reflectance from optical remote sensing data in digital number through atmospheric correction procedures before retrieving FPAR. However, there are a few of uncertainties that existe in the process of atmosphere correction and reduced the quality of TOC. This paper presents a vegetation index based on Top-of-Atmosphere (TOA) reflectance derived from HJ-1 CCD satellite for estimating direct crop FPAR. The vegetation index (HJVI) was designed based on the simulated results of a canopy-atmosphere radiative transfer model, including TOA reflectance and corresponded FPAR. The HJVI had taken the advantages of information in the green, the red and the near-infrared spectral domainswith with a aim of reducing the atmospheric effect and enhancing the sensitive to green vegetation. The HJVI was used to estimate soybean FPAR directly and validated using field measurements. The result indicated that the inversion algorithm produced a good relationship between the prediction and measurement (R2 = 0.546, RMSE = 0.083) and the HJVI showed high potential for estimating FPAR based on the HJ-1 TOA reflectance directly

  1. On the calculation of the topographic wetness index: evaluation of different methods based on field observations

    Sørensen, R.; Zinko, U.; Seibert, J.

    2005-01-01

    The topographic wetness index (TWI, ln(a/tanβ)), which combines local upslope contributing area and slope, is commonly used to quantify topographic control on hydrological processes. Methods of computing this index differ primarily in the way the upslope contributing area is calculated. In this study we compared a number of calculation methods for TWI and evaluated them in terms of their correlation with the following measured variables: vascular plant species richness, soil pH, groundwa...

  2. Comparative uptake and distribution of trace and toxic elements by different vegetables cultivated on soil amended with sewage sludge

    Sewage sludge is a source of organic matter and of micro nutrients. However, it may contain heavy metals which, if they accumulate excessively high levels in soil , can have an adverse effect on plants, especially food crops and consumers health. In this study it is observed that uptake of different trace and toxic metal ions varies in different vegetables and some metals shows high accumulation than others. Different type of vegetables (leafy, root and beans) were grown in sludge amended soil on laboratory scale, and investigated to ascertain which type of vegetables are suitable for grown in agricultural land amended with sewage sludge. It is concluded that leafy vegetables accumulate higher concentration of heavy metals and root vegetables are more sensitive to zinc, nickel, lead and chromium. (author)

  3. Vegetation differences and diagenetic changes between two Bulgarian lignite deposits - Insights from coal petrology and biomarker composition

    Zdravkov, A.; Bechtel, A.; Sachsenhofer, R.F.; Kortenski, J.; Gratzer, R. [University of Mining & Geology St Ivan Rilski, Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2011-03-15

    In this study, we review the petrographic composition and biomarker assemblage of two adjacent basins in western Bulgaria, i.e. Beli Breg and Staniantsi basins. Both contain lignite formed during late Miocene (c. 6 Ma). Despite similar tectonic settings and depositional environments, the lignite seams possess different petrographic and organic geochemical characteristics, reflecting differences in the peat forming palaeo-communities and fades variations. The peat-forming vegetation in Bell Breg Basin was dominated by decay resistant coniferous plants, as indicated by abundant fossil wood remains, very good tissue preservation and a biomarker assemblage dominated by diterpenoids. In contrast, Staniantsi lignite is poor in fossil wood and contains a significant amount of triterpenoid biomarkers, suggesting the predominance of angiosperm plants in the swamp. The results of the biomarker analyses are consistent with palaeobotanical and palynological data from the literature. The lignite seams in both basins formed under frequently changing Eh conditions, as indicated by the severe degradation of the non-gymnosperm tissues, the low gelification index values and the variations in pristane/phytane ratio, probably as a result of seasonal drying of the swamps and changes of the ground water table. Hopanoid contents in Bell Breg lignite are very low and are consistent with the abundance of decay-resistant vegetation. In contrast, bacterial activity was obviously higher in the Staniantsi swamp, however, resulting only in slightly enhanced gelification of plant tissues. The geochemical data suggest that the diagenetic changes of the organic matter were mainly governed by thermal degradation, rather than bacterial activity.

  4. Effects of neighboring vascular plants on the abundance of bryophytes in different vegetation types

    Jägerbrand, Annika K.; Kudo, Gaku; Alatalo, Juha M.; Molau, Ulf

    2012-07-01

    Due to the climate change, vegetation of tundra ecosystems is predicted to shift toward shrub and tree dominance, and this change may influence bryophytes. To estimate how changes in growing environment and the dominance of vascular plants influence bryophyte abundance, we compared the relationship of occurrence of bryophytes among other plant types in a five-year experiment of warming (T), fertilization (F) and T + F in two vegetation types, heath and meadow, in a subarctic-alpine ecosystem. We compared individual leaf area among shrub species to confirm that deciduous shrubs might cause severe shading effect. Effects of neighboring functional types on the performance of Hylocomium splendens was also analyzed. Results show that F and T + F treatments significantly influenced bryophyte abundance negatively. Under natural conditions, bryophytes in the heath site were negatively related to the abundance of shrubs and lichens and the relationship between lichens and bryophytes strengthened after the experimental period. After five years of experimental treatments in the meadow, a positive abundance relationship emerged between bryophytes and deciduous shrubs, evergreen shrubs and forbs. This relationship was not found in the heath site. Our study therefore shows that the abundance relationships between bryophytes and plants in two vegetation types within the same area can be different. Deciduous shrubs had larger leaf area than evergreen shrubs but did not show any shading effect on H. splendens.

  5. Characteristic of Soil Hydro-Physical Properties and Water Dynamics under Different Vegetation Restoration Types

    MA Zelong; GONG Yuanbo; HU Tingxing

    2006-01-01

    By combining the observation of the soil profile at field and the chemical and physical analysis in laboratory, a study on the hydro-physical properties of soil in six different vegetation types and the dynamics of water content after rain was conducted in Wanchanggou, Guangyuan City to find out the vegetation types with effective water-conservation functions in order to serve the ecological restoration in the low hill heavy rain area upper the Jialing River. Results showed that:the hydro-physical properties of soil in the mixed Alnus cremastogyne and Cupressua Leyland forest (AcCl) were best. But in the depth of 0-20 cm. The properties of soil in the abandoned cropland (Fm) was better than that in the AcCl. The soil bulk densities varied significantly between the layers of 0-20 cm and 20-40 cm in all the six vegetation types except that in the Robinia pseudoacacia shrub forest (RpⅡ), and the changes of the maximum and the capillary moisture capacity between layers were significant only in the Fm and in the AcCl. Of these stands, the AcCl had the shortest water-absorbing period and the strongest moisture changes in the upper layer (0-15 cm). In the same stand, the deeper the soil layer, the slighter the soil moisture varied, and the longer the soil moisture accumulating process lasted.

  6. Radium and uranium levels in vegetables grown using different farming management systems

    Lauria, D.C. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN), Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio dos Bandeirantes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22780-160 (Brazil)], E-mail: dejanira@ird.gov.br; Ribeiro, F.C.A. [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares (CRCN/CNEN), Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 200, Cidade Universitaria Recife, PE, CEP 50740-540 (Brazil); Conti, C.C. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN), Av. Salvador Allende s/n, Recreio dos Bandeirantes, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, CEP 22780-160 (Brazil); Loureiro, F.A. [Estacao Experimental de Nova Friburgo, Empresa de Pesquisa Agropecuaria do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, Pesagro (Brazil)

    2009-02-15

    Vegetables grown with phosphate fertilizer (conventional management), with bovine manure fertilization (organic management) and in a mineral nutrient solution (hydroponic) were analyzed and the concentrations of {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra and {sup 228}Ra in lettuce, carrots, and beans were compared. Lettuce from hydroponic farming system showed the lowest concentration of radionuclides 0.51 for {sup 226}Ra, 0.55 for {sup 228}Ra and 0.24 for {sup 238}U (Bq kg{sup -1} dry). Vegetables from organically and conventionally grown farming systems showed no differences in the concentration of radium and uranium. Relationships between uranium content in plants and exchangeable Ca and Mg in soil were found, whereas Ra in vegetables was inversely correlated to the cation exchange capacity of soil, leading to the assumption that by supplying carbonate and cations to soil, liming may cause an increase of U and a decrease of radium uptake by plants. The soil to plant transfer varied from 10{sup -4} to 10{sup -2} for {sup 238}U and from 10{sup -2} to 10{sup -1} for {sup 228}Ra.

  7. Different effects of economic and structural performance indexes on model construction of structural topology optimization

    Yi, G. L.; Sui, Y. K.

    2015-10-01

    The objective and constraint functions related to structural optimization designs are classified into economic and performance indexes in this paper. The influences of their different roles in model construction of structural topology optimization are also discussed. Furthermore, two structural topology optimization models, optimizing a performance index under the limitation of an economic index, represented by the minimum compliance with a volume constraint (MCVC) model, and optimizing an economic index under the limitation of a performance index, represented by the minimum weight with a displacement constraint (MWDC) model, are presented. Based on a comparison of numerical example results, the conclusions can be summarized as follows: (1) under the same external loading and displacement performance conditions, the results of the MWDC model are almost equal to those of the MCVC model; (2) the MWDC model overcomes the difficulties and shortcomings of the MCVC model; this makes the MWDC model more feasible in model construction; (3) constructing a model of minimizing an economic index under the limitations of performance indexes is better at meeting the needs of practical engineering problems and completely satisfies safety and economic requirements in mechanical engineering, which have remained unchanged since the early days of mechanical engineering.

  8. An Empirical Algorithm for Estimating Agricultural and Riparian Evapotranspiration Using MODIS Enhanced Vegetation Index and Ground Measurements of ET. II. Application to the Lower Colorado River, U.S.

    Glenn, Edward P.; Kiyomi Morino; R. Scott Murray; Nagler, Pamela L.

    2009-01-01

    Large quantities of water are consumed by irrigated crops and riparian vegetation in western U.S. irrigation districts. Remote sensing methods for estimating evaporative water losses by soil and vegetation (evapotranspiration, ET) over wide river stretches are needed to allocate water for agricultural and environmental needs. We used the Enhanced Vegetation Index (EVI) from MODIS sensors on the Terra satellite to scale ET over agricultural and riparian areas along the Lower Colorado River in ...

  9. Comparison of carbon balance in Mediterranean pilot constructed wetlands vegetated with different C4 plant species.

    Barbera, Antonio C; Borin, Maurizio; Cirelli, Giuseppe L; Toscano, Attilio; Maucieri, Carmelo

    2015-02-01

    This study investigates carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions and carbon (C) budgets in a horizontal subsurface flow pilot-plant constructed wetland (CW) with beds vegetated with Cyperus papyrus L., Chrysopogon zizanioides (L.) Roberty, and Mischantus × giganteus Greef et Deu in the Mediterranean basin (Sicily) during the 1st year of plant growing season. At the end of the vegetative season, M. giganteus showed the higher biomass accumulation (7.4 kg m(-2)) followed by C. zizanioides (5.3 kg m(-2)) and C. papyrus (1.8 kg m(-2)). Significantly higher emissions of CO2 were detected in the summer, while CH4 emissions were maximum during spring. Cumulative CO2 emissions by C. papyrus and C. zizanioides during the monitoring period showed similar trends with final values of about 775 and 1,074 g m(-2), respectively, whereas M. giganteus emitted 3,395 g m(-2). Cumulative CH4 bed emission showed different trends for the three C4 plant species in which total gas release during the study period was for C. papyrus 12.0 g m(-2) and ten times higher for M. giganteus, while C. zizanioides bed showed the greatest CH4 cumulative emission with 240.3 g m(-2). The wastewater organic carbon abatement determined different C flux in the atmosphere. Gas fluxes were influenced both by plant species and monitored months with an average C-emitted-to-C-removed ratio for C. zizanioides, C. papyrus, and M. giganteus of 0.3, 0.5, and 0.9, respectively. The growing season C balances were positive for all vegetated beds with the highest C sequestered in the bed with M. giganteus (4.26 kg m(-2)) followed by C. zizanioides (3.78 kg m(-2)) and C. papyrus (1.89 kg m(-2)). To our knowledge, this is the first paper that presents preliminary results on CO2 and CH4 emissions from CWs vegetated with C4 plant species in Mediterranean basin during vegetative growth. PMID:24743957

  10. 苔藓结皮影响干旱半干旱植被指数的稳定性%Impact of Moss Soil Crust on Vegetation Indexes Interpretation

    房世波; 张新时

    2011-01-01

    Vegetation indexes were the most common and the most important parameters to characterizing large-scale terrestrial ecosystems. It is vital to get precise vegetation indexes for running land surface process models and computation of NPP change, moisture and heat fluxes over surface Biological soil crusts (BSC) are widely distributed in arid and semi-arid, polar and sub-polar regions. The spectral characteristics of dry and wet BSCs were quite different, which could produce much higher vegetation indexes value for the wet BSC than for the dry BSC as reported. But no research was reported about whether the BSC would impact on regional vegetation indexes and how much dry and wet BSC had impact on regional vegetation indexes. In the present paper, the most common vegetation index NDVI were used to analyze how the moss soil crusts (MSC) dry and wet changes affect regional NDVI values. It was showed that 100% coverage of the wet MSC have a much higher NDVI value (0. 657) than the dry MSC NDVI value (0. 320), with increased 0. 337. Dry and wet MSC NDVI value reached significant difference between the levels of 0. 000. In the study area, MSC, which had the average coverage of 12.25%, would have a great contribution to the composition of vegetation index. Linear mixed model was employed to analyze how the NDVI would change in regional scale as wet MSC become dry MSC inversion. The impact of wet moss crust than the dry moss crust in the study area can make the regional NDVI increasing by 0. 04 (14. 3%). Due to the MSC existence and rainfall variation in arid and semi-arid zones, it was bound to result in NDVI change instability in a short time in the region. For the wet MSC's spectral reflectance curve is similar to those of the higher plants, misinterpretation of the vegetation dynamics could be more severe due to the “maximum value composite” (MVC) technique used to compose the global vegetation maps in the study of vegetation dynamics. The researches would be