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Dietary polyunsaturated fats of the W-6 and W-3 series reduce postprandial lipoprotein levels. Chronic and acute effects of fat saturation on postprandial lipoprotein metabolism.  

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The chronic and acute effects of different types of dietary fat on postprandial lipoprotein metabolism were studied in eight normolipidemic subjects. Each person was placed for 25 d on each of three isocaloric diets: a saturated fat (SFA), a w-6 polyunsaturated fat (w-6 PUFA) and a w-3 polyunsaturated fat (w-3 PUFA) diet. Two vitamin A-fat loading tests were done on each diet. The concentrations in total plasma and chylomicron (Sf greater than 1,000) and nonchylomicron (Sf less than 1,000) fr...

Weintraub, M. S.; Zechner, R.; Brown, A.; Eisenberg, S.; Breslow, J. L.

1988-01-01

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Vascular dysfunction induced in offspring by maternal dietary fat involves altered arterial polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis.  

Science.gov (United States)

Nutrition during development affects risk of future cardiovascular disease. Relatively little is known about whether the amount and type of fat in the maternal diet affect vascular function in the offspring. To investigate this, pregnant and lactating rats were fed either 7%(w/w) or 21%(w/w) fat enriched in either 18:2n-6, trans fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, or fish oil. Their offspring were fed 4%(w/w) soybean oil from weaning until day 77. Type and amount of maternal dietary fat altered acetylcholine (ACh)-mediated vaso-relaxation in offspring aortae and mesenteric arteries, contingent on sex. Amount, but not type, of maternal dietary fat altered phenylephrine (Pe)-induced vasoconstriction in these arteries. Maternal 21% fat diet decreased 20:4n-6 concentration in offspring aortae. We investigated the role of ?6 and ?5 desaturases, showing that their inhibition in aortae and mesenteric arteries reduced vasoconstriction, but not vaso-relaxation, and the synthesis of specific pro-constriction eicosanoids. Removal of the aortic endothelium did not alter the effect of inhibition of ?6 and ?5 desaturases on Pe-mediated vasoconstriction. Thus arterial smooth muscle 20:4n-6 biosynthesis de novo appears to be important for Pe-mediated vasoconstriction. Next we studied genes encoding these desaturases, finding that maternal 21% fat reduced Fads2 mRNA expression and increased Fads1 in offspring aortae, indicating dysregulation of 20:4n-6 biosynthesis. Methylation at CpG -394 bp 5' to the Fads2 transcription start site predicted its expression. This locus was hypermethylated in offspring of dams fed 21% fat. Pe treatment of aortae for 10 minutes increased Fads2, but not Fads1, mRNA expression (76%; P<0.05). This suggests that Fads2 may be an immediate early gene in the response of aortae to Pe. Thus both amount and type of maternal dietary fat induce altered regulation of vascular tone in offspring though differential effects on vaso-relaxation, and persistent changes in vasoconstriction via epigenetic processes controlling arterial polyunsaturated fatty acid biosynthesis. PMID:22509311

Kelsall, Christopher J; Hoile, Samuel P; Irvine, Nicola A; Masoodi, Mojgan; Torrens, Christopher; Lillycrop, Karen A; Calder, Philip C; Clough, Geraldine F; Hanson, Mark A; Burdge, Graham C

2012-01-01

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Vascular Dysfunction Induced in Offspring by Maternal Dietary Fat Involves Altered Arterial Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Biosynthesis  

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Nutrition during development affects risk of future cardiovascular disease. Relatively little is known about whether the amount and type of fat in the maternal diet affect vascular function in the offspring. To investigate this, pregnant and lactating rats were fed either 7%(w/w) or 21%(w/w) fat enriched in either18:2n-6, trans fatty acids, saturated fatty acids, or fish oil. Their offspring were fed 4%(w/w) soybean oil from weaning until day 77. Type and amount of maternal dietary fat altere...

Kelsall, Christopher J.; Hoile, Samuel P.; Irvine, Nicola A.; Masoodi, Mojgan; Torrens, Christopher; Lillycrop, Karen A.; Calder, Philip C.; Clough, Geraldine F.; Hanson, Mark A.; Burdge, Graham C.

2012-01-01

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Weighing in on Dietary Fats  

Science.gov (United States)

... our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Weighing in on Dietary Fats Some Fats Are Healthier Than Others With the winter holidays ... of these foods, though, can be high in fat. Learn which fats are naughty and which are ...

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N-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, body fat and inflammation  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

BACKGROUND: Based on animal studies, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been suggested to lower the risk of obesity and inflammation. We aimed to investigate if, among humans, intake of n-3 PUFAs was associated with i) total body fat, ii) body fat distribution and iii) obesity-related inflammatory markers. METHODS: The study population consisted of 1,212 healthy individuals with information on habitual food intake from food frequency questionnaires, six different measures of body fat, and levels of six circulating inflammatory markers. Multiple linear regression analysis of intakes of PUFAs in relation to outcomes were performed and adjusted for potential confounders. RESULTS: Absolute n-3 PUFA intake, but not n-3/n-6, was inversely associated with the different measures of body fat. Among n-3 PUFA derivatives, only ?-linolenic acid (ALA) was inversely associated with body fat measures. No significant interactions with the dietary macronutrient composition were observed. Pro-inflammatory cytokineswere not associated with absolute PUFA intake, but the macrophage inflammatory protein-1? (MIP-1?) was associated with the n-3/n-6 ratio. CONCLUSION: In humans, intake of n-3 PUFAs, in particular ALA, is beneficially associated with body fatness. The favourable association is, however, not reflected in systemic levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines, nor is it influenced by macronutrients in the diet.

Lund, Anne-Sofie Q; Hasselbalch, Ann Louise

2013-01-01

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Overfeeding polyunsaturated and saturated fat causes distinct effects on liver and visceral fat accumulation in humans.  

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Excess ectopic fat storage is linked to type 2 diabetes. The importance of dietary fat composition for ectopic fat storage in humans is unknown. We investigated liver fat accumulation and body composition during overfeeding saturated fatty acids (SFAs) or polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). LIPOGAIN was a double-blind, parallel-group, randomized trial. Thirty-nine young and normal-weight individuals were overfed muffins high in SFAs (palm oil) or n-6 PUFAs (sunflower oil) for 7 weeks. Liver fat, visceral adipose tissue (VAT), abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), total adipose tissue, pancreatic fat, and lean tissue were assessed by magnetic resonance imaging. Transcriptomics were performed in SAT. Both groups gained similar weight. SFAs, however, markedly increased liver fat compared with PUFAs and caused a twofold larger increase in VAT than PUFAs. Conversely, PUFAs caused a nearly threefold larger increase in lean tissue than SFAs. Increase in liver fat directly correlated with changes in plasma SFAs and inversely with PUFAs. Genes involved in regulating energy dissipation, insulin resistance, body composition, and fat-cell differentiation in SAT were differentially regulated between diets, and associated with increased PUFAs in SAT. In conclusion, overeating SFAs promotes hepatic and visceral fat storage, whereas excess energy from PUFAs may instead promote lean tissue in healthy humans. PMID:24550191

Rosqvist, Fredrik; Iggman, David; Kullberg, Joel; Cedernaes, Jonathan; Johansson, Hans-Erik; Larsson, Anders; Johansson, Lars; Ahlström, Håkan; Arner, Peter; Dahlman, Ingrid; Risérus, Ulf

2014-07-01

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EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA); Scientific Opinion on Dietary Reference Values for fats, including saturated fatty acids, polyunsaturated fatty acids, monounsaturated fatty acids, trans fatty acids, and cholesterol  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

This Opinion of the EFSA Panel on Dietetic Products, Nutrition, and Allergies (NDA) deals with the setting of Dietary Reference Values (DRVs) for fats. A lower bound of the reference intake range for total fat of 20 energy % (E%) and an upper bound of 35 E% are proposed. Fat intake in infants can gradually be reduced from 40 E% in the 6-12 month period to 35-40 E% in the 2nd and 3rd year of life. For specific fatty acids the following is proposed: saturated fatty acid (SFA) and trans fatty acid intake should be as low as possible; not to set any DRV for cis-monounsaturated fatty acids; not to formulate a DRV for the intake of total cis-polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA); not to set specific values for the n-3/n-6 ratio; to set an Adequate Intake (AI) of 4 E% for linoleic acid (LA); not to set any DRV for arachidonic acid; not to set an UL for total or any of the n-6 PUFA; to set an AI for alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) of 0.5 E%; not to set an UL for ALA; to set an AI of 250 mg for eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) plus docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) for adults; to set an AI of 100 mg DHA for infants (>6 months) and young children

Tetens, Inge

2010-01-01

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LDL cholesteryl oleate as a predictor for atherosclerosis: evidence from human and animal studies on dietary fat  

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This review focuses on the relationships among dietary fat type, plasma and liver lipid, and lipoprotein metabolism and atherosclerosis. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids are beneficial for the prevention of coronary artery atherosclerosis. By contrast, dietary monounsaturated fatty acids appear to alter hepatic lipoprotein metabolism, promote cholesteryl oleate accumulation, and confer atherogenic properties to lipoproteins as shown in data from experimental animal studies. Polyunsaturated...

Degirolamo, Chiara; Shelness, Gregory S.; Rudel, Lawrence L.

2009-01-01

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Effects of dietary fat source and breed on the carcass composition, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid and conjugated linoleic acid content of sheep meat and adipose tissue.  

Science.gov (United States)

Seventy-two 8-week-old ram lambs from three breeds, Suffolk, Soay and Friesland, were offered one of four diets based on dried grass and formulated to have a similar fatty acid content (60 g/kg DM) and containing: Megalac (high in 16 : 0, control; Volac Ltd, Royston, Herts., UK), whole linseed (18 : 3n-3), fish oil (20 : 5n-3 and 22 : 6n-3) or whole linseed plus fish oil. The lambs were slaughtered at approximately half of their mature live weight (43, 21 and 43 kg for Suffolk, Soay and Friesland lambs, respectively). Fish oil reduced DM intake and lamb live-weight gain (PLinseed feeding doubled the proportion (x100) of 18 : 3n-3 in the longissimus dorsi from 1.4 to 3.1 and in the subcutaneous adipose tissue from 1.2 to 2.6 (Poil increased the muscle proportion (x100) of 20 : 5n-3 from 0.7 to 2.3 and 22 : 6n-3 from 0.3 to 0.8 (Plinseed. Feeding linseed or fish oil lowered the n-6 : n-3 ratio in sheep meat, but neither diet nor breed had much effect on the polyunsaturated fatty acid: saturated fatty acid ratio. PMID:12493092

Wachira, A M; Sinclair, L A; Wilkinson, R G; Enser, M; Wood, J D; Fisher, A V

2002-12-01

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What Are the Types of Fat?  

Science.gov (United States)

... move.va.gov What Are the Types of Fat? Most foods contain several different kinds of fat. ... harmful dietary fats. The four major types of fats are: • Monounsaturated fatsPolyunsaturated fats • Saturated fats • Trans ...

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Dietary Fat Influences the Expression of Contractile and Metabolic Genes in Rat Skeletal Muscle  

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Dietary fat plays a major role in obesity, lipid metabolism, and cardiovascular diseases. To determine whether the intake of different types of dietary fats affect the muscle fiber types that govern the metabolic and contractile properties of the skeletal muscle, we fed male Wistar rats with a 15% fat diet derived from different fat sources. Diets composed of soybean oil (n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA)-rich), fish oil (n-3 PUFA-rich), or lard (low in PUFAs) were administered to the ra...

Mizunoya, Wataru; Iwamoto, Yohei; Shirouchi, Bungo; Sato, Masao; Komiya, Yusuke; Razin, Farzaneh Rahimi; Tatsumi, Ryuichi; Sato, Yusuke; Nakamura, Mako; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide

2013-01-01

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[The influence of the dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on the phagocyte's functional activity in rats].  

Science.gov (United States)

The influence of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on the superoxid anion production by peritoneal macrophages and phagocytosis by blood neutrophiles in male Wistar rats weighting 127.0 +/- 3.2 r was investigated after 3 months feeding. Rats fed isocaloric purified diets contained 24% fat representing combinations of lard, sunflower oil and fish oil (eiconol) providing the ratios of w6/w3 fatty acids equal 49.0; 6.1; 1.1. The increasing of superoxide formed by peritoneal macrophages and phagocytic activity of neutrophiles in the group received diet with the minimal ratios of w6/w3 fatty acids compared to that in rats fed diet with ratio 49.0 was noted. The increased activity of mononuclear-phagocytic system was confirmed by morphological investigation of peripheral lymphoid organs. PMID:12968296

Trushina, E N; Mustafina, O K; Kulakova, S N

2003-01-01

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Dietary fat and risk of breast cancer  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer is one of the major public health problems among women worldwide. A number of epidemiological studies have been carried out to find the role of dietary fat and the risk of breast cancer. The main objective of the present communication is to summarize the evidence from various case-control and cohort studies on the consumption of fat and its subtypes and their effect on the development of breast cancer. Methods A Pubmed search for literature on the consumption of dietary fat and risk of breast cancer published from January 1990 through December 2003 was carried out. Results Increased consumption of total fat and saturated fat were found to be positively associated with the development of breast cancer. Even though an equivocal association was observed for the consumption of total monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA and the risk of breast cancer, there exists an inverse association in the case of oleic acid, the most abundant MUFA. A moderate inverse association between consumption of n-3 fatty acids and breast cancer risk and a moderate positive association between n-6 fatty acids and breast cancer risk were observed. Conclusion Even though all epidemiological studies do not provide a strong positive association between the consumption of certain types of dietary fat and breast cancer risk, at least a moderate association does seem to exist and this has a number of implications in view of the fact that breast cancer is an increasing public health concern.

Mathew Aleyamma

2005-07-01

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Fats  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... that you include these in your diet as well as monounsaturated fats. Like the other healthy fats, you want to replace the sources of saturated fat in your diet with polyunsaturated fats. Sources of polyunsaturated fats are: Corn oil Cottonseed oil Safflower oil Soybean oil Sunflower oil ...

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Dietary fat intake and risk for Parkinson's disease.  

Science.gov (United States)

Previous epidemiological studies have generated inconsistent results regarding the associations between dietary fat intakes and risk for Parkinson's disease (PD). We therefore prospectively examined these associations in the National Institutes of Health-American Association of Retired Persons (NIH-AARP) Diet and Health Study. A 124-item food frequency questionnaire was administered at baseline in1995 to 1996, and PD diagnosis was self-reported at the follow-up survey in 2004 to 2006. A total of 1,087 cases with a PD diagnosis between 2000 and 2006 and 299,617 controls were included in the analyses. Overall, intakes of fats and other macronutrients were not associated with PD risk. However, we found a weak positive association between n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) and the risk for PD. After adjusting for potential confounders, the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) between extreme quintiles of n-6 PUFA intake was 1.23 (95% CI?=?1.02-1.49, P for trend?=?0.02). A similar association was observed for the intake of linoleic acid. Results were similar among men and among women. Our study suggests that fat intake in general is not related to the risk for PD. The weak positive association between intake of n-6 PUFA and PD risk needs further investigation. PMID:25186946

Dong, Jing; Beard, John D; Umbach, David M; Park, YikYung; Huang, Xuemei; Blair, Aaron; Kamel, Freya; Chen, Honglei

2014-11-01

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Interaction of PPARG Pro12Ala with dietary fat influences plasma lipids in subjects at cardiometabolic risk.  

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Objective: The PPARG SNP rs1801282 (Pro12Ala C>G) has shown variable association with metabolic syndrome traits in healthy subjects. We investigated genotype association with plasma lipids and the influence of dietary polyunsaturated:saturated fat ratio (P:S) in subjects at increased cardiometabolic risk. Methods: Habitual dietary intake was recorded at recruitment to the RISCK Study. PPARG rs1801282 was genotyped in 466 subjects aged 30-70 y. Genotype associations with plasma ...

Alsaleh, A.; O, Sd; Frost, Gs; Griffin, Ba; Lovegrove, Ja; Jebb, Sa; Sanders, Ta

2011-01-01

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Dietary Soybean Oil, but Not Krabok Oil, Diminishes Abdominal Fat Deposition in Broiler Chickens  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available In broiler chickens we tested the hypothesis that dietary fats rich in medium-chain triacylglycerols (MCT would diminish abdominal fat deposition as do fats rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA. Broiler chickens were fed on diets containing either tallow, which is rich in Saturated Fatty Acids (SFA, soybean oil, which is rich in PUFA, or krabok oil, which is rich in MCT. Krabok oil was isolated from the seeds of a tree (Irvingia malayana grown widely in tropical and subtropical areas. Growth performance was not significantly affected by the type of dietary fat. Possibly, the production of krabok oil for use in broiler rations may become economically relevant. The diets containing either soybean oil or krabok oil showed a significantly higher apparent fat digestibility than did the diet containing tallow. In keeping with earlier investigations, dietary soybean oil versus tallow significantly lowered abdominal fat deposition, the lowering being 21%. The feeding of krabok oil instead of tallow did not affect the weight of abdominal fat, which would lead to rejection of our hypothesis.

Sasiphan Wongsuthavas

2007-01-01

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Dietary fat effects on brush border membrane composition and enzyme activities in rat intestine.  

Science.gov (United States)

The effect of dietary fats on the chemical composition and enzyme activities has been studied in intestinal brush border membranes (BBM) or rats. Animals were given commercial rat pellet diet (RP) or semisynthetic diet rich in either saturated [coconut oil (CCO))] or polyunsaturated [n-6, corn oil (CO) or n-3, fish oil (FO)] fat at the 10% level for 5 weeks. The membrane cholesterol/phospholipid ratio was augmented in CO- or RP-fed rats. There was an increase in level of saturated fatty acids in BBM from CCO- or FO-fed animals. n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid content was raised in FO-fed rats, while the proportion of linoleic acid and arachidonic acid was enhanced in animals given a CO diet. Membrane fluidity was in the order of CCO elevated (p elevated in CO- (p lactase were augmented (p intestine. PMID:9001687

Kaur, M; Kaur, J; Ojha, S; Mahmood, A

1996-01-01

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New insights into the health effects of dietary saturated and omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Cardiovascular diseases and cancers are leading causes of morbidity and mortality. Reducing dietary saturated fat and replacing it with polyunsaturated fat is still the main dietary strategy to prevent cardiovascular diseases, although major flaws have been reported in the analyses supporting this approach. Recent studies introducing the concept of myocardial preconditioning have opened new avenues to understand the complex interplay between the various lipids and the risk of cardiovascular diseases. The optimal dietary fat profile includes a low intake of both saturated and omega-6 fatty acids and a moderate intake of omega-3 fatty acids. This profile is quite similar to the Mediterranean diet. On the other hand, recent studies have found a positive association between omega-6 and breast cancer risk. In contrast, omega-3 fatty acids do have anticancer properties. It has been shown that certain (Mediterranean polyphenols significantly increase the endogenous synthesis of omega-3 whereas high intake of omega-6 decreases it. Finally, epidemiological studies suggest that a high omega-3 to omega-6 ratio may be the optimal strategy to decrease breast cancer risk. Thus, the present high intake of omega-6 in many countries is definitely not the optimal strategy to prevent cardiovascular disease and cancers. A moderate intake of plant and marine omega-3 in the context of the traditional Mediterranean diet (low in saturated and omega-6 fatty acids but high in plant monounsaturated fat appears to be the best approach to reduce the risk of both cardiovascular diseases and cancers, in particular breast cancer.

de Lorgeril Michel

2012-05-01

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Differential metabolic effects of saturated versus polyunsaturated fats in ketogenic diets.  

Science.gov (United States)

Ketogenic diets (KDs) are used for treatment of refractory epilepsy and metabolic disorders. The classic saturated fatty acid-enriched (SAT) KD has a fat:carbohydrate plus protein ratio of 4:1, in which the predominant fats are saturated. We hypothesized that a polyunsaturated fat-enriched (POLY) KD would induce a similar degree of ketosis with less detrimental effects on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. Twenty healthy adults were randomized to two different weight-maintaining KDs for 5 d. Diets were 70% fat, 15% carbohydrate, and 15% protein. The fat contents were 60 or 15% saturated, 15 or 60% polyunsaturated, and 25% monounsaturated for SAT and POLY, respectively. Changes in serum beta-hydroxybutyrate, insulin sensitivity (S(I)), and lipid profiles were measured. Mean circulating beta-hydroxybutyrate levels increased 8.4 mg/dl in the POLY group (P = 0.0004), compared with 3.1 mg/dl in the SAT group (P = 0.07). S(I) increased significantly in the POLY group (P = 0.02), whereas total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol increased significantly in the SAT group (both P = 0.002). These data demonstrate that a short-term POLY KD induces a greater level of ketosis and improves S(I), without adversely affecting total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, compared with a traditional SAT KD. Thus, a POLY KD may be superior to a classical SAT KD for chronic administration. PMID:15070924

Fuehrlein, Brian S; Rutenberg, Michael S; Silver, Jared N; Warren, Matthew W; Theriaque, Douglas W; Duncan, Glen E; Stacpoole, Peter W; Brantly, Mark L

2004-04-01

 
 
 
 
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Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Increase Survival and Decrease Bacterial Load during Septic Staphylococcus aureus Infection and Improve Neutrophil Function in Mice.  

Science.gov (United States)

Severe infection, including sepsis, is an increasing clinical problem that causes prolonged morbidity and substantial mortality. At present, antibiotics are essentially the only pharmacological treatment for sepsis. The incidence of resistance to antibiotics is increasing; therefore, it is critical to find new therapies for sepsis. Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of septic mortality. Neutrophils play an important role in the defense against bacterial infections. We have shown that a diet with high levels of dietary saturated fatty acids decreases survival in septic mice, but the mechanisms behind this remain elusive. The aim of the present study was to investigate how the differences in dietary fat composition affect survival and bacterial load after experimental septic infection and neutrophil function in uninfected mice. We found that, after S. aureus infection, mice fed a polyunsaturated high-fat diet (HFD-P) for 8 weeks had increased survival and decreased bacterial load during sepsis compared with mice fed a saturated high-fat diet (HFD-S), similar to mice fed a low-fat diet (LFD). Uninfected mice fed HFD-P had a higher frequency of neutrophils in bone marrow than mice fed HFD-S. In addition, mice fed HFD-P had a higher frequency of neutrophils recruited to the site of inflammation in response to peritoneal injection of thioglycolate than mice fed HFD-S. Differences between the proportion of dietary protein and carbohydrate did not affect septic survival at all. In conclusion, polyunsaturated dietary fat increased both survival and efficiency of bacterial clearance during septic S. aureus infection. Moreover, this diet increased the frequency and chemotaxis of neutrophils, key components of the immune response to S. aureus infections. PMID:25404025

Svahn, Sara L; Grahnemo, Louise; Pálsdóttir, Vilborg; Nookaew, Intawat; Wendt, Karl; Gabrielsson, Britt; Schéle, Erik; Benrick, Anna; Andersson, Niklas; Nilsson, Staffan; Johansson, Maria E; Jansson, John-Olov

2015-02-01

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Dietary fat and risk of coronary heart disease: possible effect modification by gender and age  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

In a 16-year follow-up study (ending in 1998) of 3,686 Danish men and women aged 30-71 years at recruitment, the association between energy intake from dietary fat and the risk of coronary heart disease was evaluated while assessing the possible modifying role of gender and age. In the models used, total energy and protein intake were fixed. Differences in intake of energy from fat thus reflected complementary differences in intake of energy from carbohydrates. A 5% higher level of energy from saturated fat intake was associated with a 36% greater risk of coronary heart disease among women (hazard ratio (HR) = 1.36, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.98, 1.88). No overall association between saturated fat and coronary heart disease was found among men. However, age-dependent analyses showed that saturated fat was positively associated with coronary heart disease among the younger men (HR = 1.29, 95% CI: 0.87, 1.91) and the younger women (HR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.40, 5.12) but not among the older men (HR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.70, 1.28) and the older women (HR = 1.22, 95% CI: 0.86, 1.71). Polyunsaturated fat was inversely associated with coronary heart disease among women and men, although not significantly. In conclusion, the present study suggests that coronary heart disease risk relates to both the quantity and the quality of dietary fats.

Jakobsen, Marianne U; Overvad, Kim

2004-01-01

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PREDICTION OF MONOUNSATURATED, POLYUNSATURATED, AND SATURATED FATS BY NIR AND FT-NIR SPECTROSCOPY IN PROCESSED CEREAL PRODUCTS  

Science.gov (United States)

U.S. nutrition labeling legislation requires the declaration of total and saturated fat content on a product’s nutrition label, while declaration of mono- and polyunsaturated fat is voluntary. The accepted method for analysis of these components is extremely labor-intensive and time consuming. Pre...

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Dietary fats and prevention of type 2 diabetes  

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Although type 2 diabetes is determined primarily by lifestyle and genes, dietary composition may affect both its development and complications. Dietary fat is of particular interest because fatty acids influence glucose metabolism by altering cell membrane function, enzyme activity, insulin signaling, and gene expression. This paper focuses on the prevention of type 2 diabetes and summarizes the epidemiologic literature on associations between types of dietary fat and diabetes risk. It also s...

Rise?rus, Ulf; Willett, Walter C.; Hu, Frank B.

2008-01-01

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Dietary intake and plasma metabolomic analysis of polyunsaturated fatty acids in bipolar subjects reveal dysregulation of linoleic acid metabolism.  

Science.gov (United States)

Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) profiles associate with risk for mood disorders. This poses the hypothesis of metabolic differences between patients and unaffected healthy controls that relate to the primary illness or are secondary to medication use or dietary intake. However, dietary manipulation or supplementation studies show equivocal results improving mental health outcomes. This study investigates dietary patterns and metabolic profiles relevant to PUFA metabolism, in bipolar I individuals compared to non-psychiatric controls. We collected seven-day diet records and performed metabolomic analysis of fasted plasma collected immediately after diet recording. Regression analyses adjusted for age, gender and energy intake found that bipolar individuals had significantly lower intake of selenium and PUFAs, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (n-3), arachidonic acid (AA) (n-6) and docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (n-3/n-6 mix); and significantly increased intake of the saturated fats, eicosanoic and docosanoic acid. Regression analysis of metabolomic data derived from plasma samples, correcting for age, gender, BMI, psychiatric medication use and dietary PUFA intake, revealed that bipolar individuals had reduced 13S-HpODE, a major peroxidation product of the n-6, linoleic acid (LA), reduced eicosadienoic acid (EDA), an elongation product of LA; reduced prostaglandins G2, F2 alpha and E1, synthesized from n-6 PUFA; and reduced EPA. These observations remained significant or near significant after Bonferroni correction and are consistent with metabolic variances between bipolar and control individuals with regard to PUFA metabolism. These findings suggest that specific dietary interventions aimed towards correcting these metabolic disparities may impact health outcomes for individuals with bipolar disorder. PMID:24953860

Evans, Simon J; Ringrose, Rachel N; Harrington, Gloria J; Mancuso, Peter; Burant, Charles F; McInnis, Melvin G

2014-10-01

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Ruminant milk fat plasticity: nutritional control of saturated, polyunsaturated, trans and conjugated fatty acids  

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After a brief survey of metabolic pathways and nutrient fluxes involved in mammary lipogenesis, this review summarises the known effects of diet on ruminant milk fat composition. Special attention is given to fatty acids that could play a positive role for human health, such as butyric acid, oleic acid, C18 to C22 polyunsaturated fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). The efficiency of the transfer of C18:2, C18:3, C20:5, C22:5 and C22:6, from the duodenum to the milk, is reviewed. T...

Chilliard, Yves; Ferlay, Anne; Mansbridge, Rosemary; Doreau, Michel

2000-01-01

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Metabolic and Histological Effects of Different Polyunsaturated Fat Types in the Diet: Omega-3 and Omega-6  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The beneficial effects of polyunsaturated fats and omega 3 supplements in human and animal nutrition have been widely discussed and established though clinical and experimental studies. In this study the High-Fat (HF diet rodent models were used to evaluate the effects high doses of two polyunsaturated fats omega-3 and omega-6 on metabolic parameters and histology of liver and kidney. Male and female Wistar rats were fed High-Fat (HF diets containing Omega-3 fish oil supplements (HF-F and Omega-6 corn oil (HF-C at a level that was equivalent to three times the maximum safe daily dosage and the control group was fed with regular laboratory chow. Body weight and plasma parameters of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides were measured after a 8 week diet course. Rats fed both the high fat oil based diets (HF-F, HF-C reported a significantly higher body weight gain than the control group. Plasma triglyceride levels were significantly higher in the high fat diets being highest in the fish oil based diet. Both the high fat diets fed animals (HF-F, HF-C showed pronounced hepatic micro vesicular steaosis and renal interstitial inflammation in comparison with the control in the histological studies. Thus this study demonstrated that high fat diets with polyunsaturated fats including omega-3 rich fish oil could induce dyslipidemia and obesity in rodent models reflecting signs of metabolic syndrome in the humans.

Ayman EL-Meghawry EL-Kenawy

2012-01-01

28

Dietary saturated and monounsaturated fats protect against acute acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by altering fatty acid composition of liver microsomal membrane in rats  

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Abstract Background Dietary polyunsaturated fats increase liver injury in response to ethanol feeding. We evaluated the effect of dietary corn oil (CO), olive oil (OO), and beef tallow (BT) on fatty acid composition of liver microsomal membrane and acute acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed 15% (wt/wt) CO, OO or BT for 6 weeks. After treatment with acetaminophen (600 mg/kg), samples of plasma and liver were taken for analyses o...

Shim Eugene; Chung Haeyon; Kim Soo; Park Jung; Chang Yun-Hee; Hwang Jinah; Hwang Hye

2011-01-01

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Dietary Fat Intake among Urban, African American Adolescents  

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This study examined commonly consumed high-fat food sources to estimate dietary fat intake among 314 urban, African American adolescents (mean age (SD) = 12.57 (.98) years; 66% female; 91% African American non-Hispanic; and 9% African American Hispanic). Youths’ fat intake was measured using the Block Fat Screener. Most (77%) participants had diets very high in fat (i.e., 40% to 50% of energy). Mean frequencies of consumption revealed youths’ preferences for the following high-fat food it...

Di Noia, Jennifer; Schinke, Steven P.; Contento, Isobel R.

2007-01-01

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The role of dietary fat throughout the prostate cancer trajectory.  

Science.gov (United States)

Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosed world-wide; however, patients demonstrate exceptionally high survival rates. Many lifestyle factors, including obesity and diet, are considered risk factors for advanced prostate cancer. Dietary fat is a fundamental contributor to obesity and may be specifically important for prostate cancer patients. Prostate cancer treatment can result in changes in body composition, affecting quality of life for survivors by increasing the risk of co-morbidities, like cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We aim to examine dietary fat throughout the prostate cancer treatment trajectory, including risk, cancer development and survivorship. Focusing on one specific nutrient throughout the prostate cancer trajectory provides a unique perspective of dietary fat in prostate cancer and the mechanisms that may exacerbate prostate cancer risk, progression and recurrence. Through this approach, we noted that high intake of dietary fat, especially, high intake of animal and saturated fats, may be associated with increased prostate cancer risk. In contrast, a low-fat diet, specifically low in saturated fat, may be beneficial for prostate cancer survivors by reducing tumor angiogenesis and cancer recurrence. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF)/Akt signaling pathway appears to be the key pathway moderating dietary fat intake and prostate cancer development and progression. PMID:25533015

Di Sebastiano, Katie M; Mourtzakis, Marina

2014-12-01

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The Role of Dietary Fat throughout the Prostate Cancer Trajectory  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer diagnosed world-wide; however, patients demonstrate exceptionally high survival rates. Many lifestyle factors, including obesity and diet, are considered risk factors for advanced prostate cancer. Dietary fat is a fundamental contributor to obesity and may be specifically important for prostate cancer patients. Prostate cancer treatment can result in changes in body composition, affecting quality of life for survivors by increasing the risk of co-morbidities, like cardiovascular disease and diabetes. We aim to examine dietary fat throughout the prostate cancer treatment trajectory, including risk, cancer development and survivorship. Focusing on one specific nutrient throughout the prostate cancer trajectory provides a unique perspective of dietary fat in prostate cancer and the mechanisms that may exacerbate prostate cancer risk, progression and recurrence. Through this approach, we noted that high intake of dietary fat, especially, high intake of animal and saturated fats, may be associated with increased prostate cancer risk. In contrast, a low-fat diet, specifically low in saturated fat, may be beneficial for prostate cancer survivors by reducing tumor angiogenesis and cancer recurrence. The insulin-like growth factor (IGF/Akt signaling pathway appears to be the key pathway moderating dietary fat intake and prostate cancer development and progression.

Katie M. Di Sebastiano

2014-12-01

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Dietary fat supplementation and the consequences for oocyte and embryo quality: hype or significant benefit for dairy cow reproduction?  

Science.gov (United States)

In many countries, fat supplementation in the diet has become common in the dairy industry. There are several ideas as to how dietary fat could influence reproductive performance. Saturated fatty acids, such as palm oil, can increase milk yield but may aggravate negative energy balance and thus may impair fertility when fed during the first week post-partum. However, priming the lipid oxidation in the liver by feeding saturated fats during the dry period has recently been shown to be a potentially promising strategy to mitigate fat mobilization and liver accumulation post-partum. Furthermore, polyunsaturated fats (omega-3 fatty acids and conjugated linoleic acids) are fed to reduce the 'de novo' fat synthesis in the udder and thus the milk fat content, which may be of modest benefit for overall energy balance. Furthermore, omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are reported to alter follicular growth, steroid synthesis and prostaglandin metabolism in the ovary and endometrium, respectively. Omega-6 fatty acids are believed to have pro-inflammatory and thus PGF2?-stimulating properties rendering them extra value as 'nutraceutical' early post-partum, while omega-3 fatty acids can weaken this inflammatory potency, leading to a higher chance of survival of the embryo when supplemented during the periconceptual period. Unfortunately, research results rarely provide a consensus in this perspective. The consequences of these fat-feeding strategies on oocyte and embryo quality remain an intriguing issue for debate. Fat feeding may alter the microenvironment of the growing and maturing oocyte of the early and older embryo and thus may affect reproductive outcome. We recently reported that dietary-induced hyperlipidaemic conditions can be harmful for embryo development and metabolism. However, to date, research results remain somewhat conflicting most probably due to differences in fat sources used, in diet and duration of supplementation and in experimental set-up in general. PMID:24697981

Leroy, J L M R; Sturmey, R G; Van Hoeck, V; De Bie, J; McKeegan, P J; Bols, P E J

2014-06-01

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The effects of dietary fatty acid composition in the post-sucking period on metabolic alterations in adulthood: can ?3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevent adverse programming outcomes?  

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Early life nutrition is important in the regulation of metabolism in adulthood. We studied the effects of different fatty acid composition diets on adiposity measures, glucose tolerance, and peripheral glucocorticoid (GC) metabolism in overfed neonatal rats. Rat litters were adjusted to a litter size of three (small litters (SLs)) or ten (normal litters (NLs)) on postnatal day 3 to induce overfeeding or normal feeding respectively. After weaning, SL and NL rats were fed a ?6 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) diet (14% calories as fat, soybean oil) or high-saturated fatty acid (high-fat; 31% calories as fat, lard) diet until postnatal week 16 respectively. SL rats were also divided into the third group fed a ?3 PUFA diet (14% calories as fat, fish oil). A high-fat diet induced earlier and/or more pronounced weight gain, hyperphagia, glucose intolerance, and hyperlipidemia in SL rats compared with NL rats. In addition, a high-fat diet increased 11?-hsd1 (Hsd11b1) mRNA expression and activity in the retroperitoneal adipose tissue of both litter groups compared with standard chow counterparts, whereas high-fat feeding increased hepatic 11?-hsd1 mRNA expression and activity only in SL rats. SL and a high-fat diet exhibited significant interactions in both retroperitoneal adipose tissue and hepatic 11?-HSD1 activity. Dietary ?3 PUFA offered protection against glucose intolerance and elevated GC exposure in the retroperitoneal adipose tissue and liver of SL rats. Taken together, the results suggest that dietary fatty acid composition in the post-sucking period may interact with neonatal feeding and codetermine metabolic alterations in adulthood. PMID:22847675

Hou, Miao; Ji, Chenlin; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yanhua; Sun, Bin; Guo, Mei; Burén, Jonas; Li, Xiaonan

2012-10-01

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Biosynthesis and dietary uptake of polyunsaturated fatty acids by piezophilic bacteria.  

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The biochemistry of piezophilic bacteria is unique in that piezophiles produce polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). A pertinent question is if piezophilic bacteria synthesize PUFA de novo, through dietary uptake, or both. This study was undertaken to examine the biosynthesis and cellular uptake of PUFAs by piezophilic bacteria. A moderately piezophilic (Shewanella violacea DSS12) and two hyperpiezophilic bacteria (S. benthica DB21MT-2 and Moritella yayanosii DB21MT-5) were grown under 50 MPa (megapascal) and 100 MPa, respectively, in media containing marine broth 2216 supplemented with arachidonic acid (AA, sodium salt) and/or antibiotic cerulenin. There was active uptake and cellular incorporation of AA in the hyperpiezophilic bacteria DB21MT-2 (14.7% of total fatty acids) and DB21MT-5 (1.4%), but no uptake was observed in DSS12. When cells were treated with cerulenin, all three strains incorporated AA into cell membranes (13-19%). The biosynthesis of monounsaturated fatty acids was significantly inhibited (10-37%) by the addition of cerulenin, whereas the concentrations of PUFAs increased by 2-4 times. These results suggest that piezophilic bacteria biosynthesize and/or incorporate dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids that are important for their growth and piezoadaptation. The significance of these findings is also discussed in the context of phenotypic classification of piezophiles. PMID:15081997

Fang, Jiasong; Kato, Chiaki; Sato, Takako; Chan, Olivia; McKay, David

2004-04-01

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Dietary conjugated linoleic acid modify gene expression in liver, muscles, and fat tissues of finishing pigs  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The aim of this study was to investigate underlying mechanisms of dietary conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) on lipid metabolism in various tissues of pigs. Sixteen gilts (73 ± 3 kg) were fed a control (containing sunflower oil) or an experimental diet in which 4% of sunflower oil was replaced by CLA, and slaughtered at an average BW of 117 ± 4.9 kg. Transcription of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPAR?), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR?), fatty acid synthase (FAS), sterol regulatory element binding protein (SREBP1), acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), lipoprotein lipase (LPL), delta-6-desaturase (D6D), and stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD) were determined by real-time PCR in longissimus thoracis (LT) and semimembranosus (SM) muscles, LT subcutaneous and SM intermuscular fat, and in the liver. Fatty acid (FA) composition was analyzed using gas chromatography in these tissues, except for SM intermuscular fat. Dietary CLA increased PPAR? in LT muscle (P < 0.05), whereas CLA reduced PPAR? transcription in all tissues studied (P < 0.05) with the exception of intermuscular fat. Transcription of genes related to FA synthesis was reduced by CLA in SM muscle and liver (SREBP1, both P < 0.1; ACC, P < 0.01 in SM; and FAS, P < 0.01 in liver), whereas CLA reduced (P < 0.05) LPL and D6D transcriptions in SM muscle and reduced (P < 0.05) SCD in liver but increased (P < 0.05) SCD in LT muscle and intermuscular fat. Saturated FA were increased in all studied tissues (P < 0.01), while monosaturated and polyunsaturated FA were reduced in a tissue-specific way by CLA. It was concluded that dietary CLA affected transcription of genes and fat metabolism in a tissue-specific manner.

Tous, Nuria; Theil, Peter Kappel

2012-01-01

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Influence of dietary fats on serum phospholipid fatty acid composition and its relation to obesity in animals  

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Full Text Available Dietary fat and its relation to obesity has been a controversial issue for many years. Experimental data shows that most, though not all animals, which consume a high fat diet, will become obese. However, the effect of fatty acids on animal obesity has not been studied in detail. In order to evaluate the effects of low versus high fat diet on serum phospholipids fatty acids composition a 4-wk study was conducted on male Wister rats. The rats were fed low-fat (10% energy and high-fat (46% energy foods containing constant proportions of fatty acids. Control group C was fed a standard laboratory diet (polyunsaturated/ saturated (P/S fatty ratio 1.3, group M was fed a standard laboratory diet supplemented with margarine (P/S ratio 0.95, and the diet of the SL group was additionally supplemented with a sunflower oil-lard (1:1 mixture (P/S ratio 1.3. All lipid supplemented hyperenergetic diets caused an increase in the average daily energy intake. Both the final and the daily body weight gain were significantly higher in M and SL groups than in group C. Additionally, serum triglyceride levels, LDL-cholesterol and total cholesterol were also significantly higher in M and SL groups when compared to the control group. Serum phospholipids fatty acids varied in response to total dietary fat. A significant decrease in saturated fatty acids (SFA content (16:0 and 18:0 and an increase in monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA content (18:1, n-9 was found in the M group when compared to both C and SL groups. In the SL group, SFA content (18:0 was higher and MUFA content (18:1, n-9 was lower than in group C. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA content showed an increase in both experimental groups. The PUFA/SFA ratio was higher in the M group than in the C and SL groups. Our study suggests that the amount of dietary fat has a greater influence on obesity than the effects of the type of fat consumed. However, depending on the type of fat present in the diet the differences were observed in the composition of serum PL fatty acid suggesting that both total fat and individual fatty acids have to be considered when reaching conclusions about the effect of dietary fat and obesity in animals.

Tepši? Vesna

2008-01-01

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Dietary ?-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids improves learning performance of diabetic rats by regulating the neuron excitability.  

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Previous research has demonstrated that diabetes induced learning and memory deficits. However, the mechanism of memory impairment induced by diabetes is poorly understood. Dietary fatty acids, especially polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA), have been shown to enhance learning and memory and prevent memory deficits in various experimental conditions. Sprague-Dawley rats were used in the present study to investigate the effect of fish oil supplementation on spatial learning and memory of streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats with the Morris Water Maze. The excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons and the related ionic currents was also examined. Diabetes impaired spatial learning and memory of rats. Diabetes decreased the sodium currents and increased the potassium currents, and further led to the reduction of excitability of CA1 pyramidal neurons, effects which may contribute to the behavioral deficits. Fish oil dietary supplementation decreased the transient currents and Kv4.2 expression in the hippocampus and partially improved learning performance of diabetic rats. The results of the present study suggested that sodium and potassium currents contributed to the inhibitory effect of diabetes on neuron excitability, further influencing learning and memory processing. Dietary fish oil may modulate the membrane excitability and is a possible strategy for preventing the impairments of diabetes on hippocampal function. PMID:22516014

Yang, R-H; Wang, F; Hou, X-H; Cao, Z-P; Wang, B; Xu, X-N; Hu, S-J

2012-06-14

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Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (C18:2 omega6 and C18:3 omega3) do not suppress hepatic lipogenesis.  

Science.gov (United States)

Omega 3 polyunsaturated fatty acids are promoted as beneficial in the prevention of metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. In general, dietary omega 3 fatty acids are derived from plant sources as linolenic acid (LNA, C18:3 omega3) the precursor to eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5 omega3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6 omega3). However, it remains unclear if the polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) LNA can provide the same health benefits as the very long chain highly unsaturated fatty acids (HUFA) EPA and DHA generally derived from oily fish. In this study, mice were fed synthetic diets containing lard (low in PUFA and HUFA), canola oil (to supply PUFA), or a mixture of menhaden and arasco (fish and fungal) oils (to supply HUFA) for 8 weeks. The diets were neither high in calories nor fat, which was supplied at 6%. The lard and canola oil diets resulted in high levels of hepatic triglycerides and cholesterol and elevation of lipogenic gene expression. By comparison livers from mice fed the fish/fungal oil diet had low levels of lipid accumulation and more closely resembled livers from mice fed standard laboratory chow. SREBP1c and PPARgamma gene and protein expression were high in livers of animals fed diets containing lard or canola oil compared with fish/fungal oil. Hepatic fatty acid analyses indicated that dietary PUFA were efficiently converted to HUFA regardless of source. Therefore, differences in hepatic lipid levels and gene expression between dietary groups were due to exogenous fatty acid supplied rather than endogenous pools. These results have important implications for understanding the regulation of hepatic lipogenesis by dietary fatty acids. PMID:18655845

Sealls, Whitney; Gonzalez, Monica; Brosnan, M Julia; Black, Paul N; DiRusso, Concetta C

2008-08-01

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Permeabilization of enterocytes induced by absorption of dietary fat  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Absorption of dietary fat in the small intestine involves epithelial exposure to potentially harmful molecules such as bile salts and free fatty acids. We used organ culture of porcine jejunal explants incubated with a pre-digested mixture of fat (plant oil), bile and pancreatin to mimick the physiological process of dietary fat absorption, and short exposures to the fat mixture caused fat droplet accumulation within villus enterocytes. Lucifer yellow (LY), a fluorescent membrane-impermeable polar tracer was included to monitor epithelial integrity. Both in controls and during fat absorption LY penetrated the epithelium and accumulated in the basal lamina and the lamina propria. LY was also seen in the paracellular space, whereas villus enterocytes were generally only weakly labeled except for small amounts taken up by apical endocytosis. In the crypts, however, fat absorption induced cell permeabilization with LY accumulating in the cytosol and nucleus. Morphologically, both apical and basolateral membranes appeared intact, indicating that the leakiness was caused by minor lesions in the membrane. Albeit to a lesser extent, bile alone was capable of permeabilizing crypt cells, implying that the surfactant properties of bile salts are involved in the process. In addition to LY, crypt enterocytes also became permeable for albumin, ovalbumin and insulin. In conclusion, during fat absorption the permeability of the gut epithelium is increased mainly in the crypts. A possible explanation is that cell membranes of immature crypt cells, lacking detergent-resistant lipid raft microdomains, are less resistant to the deleterious effects of bile salts and free fatty acids.

Danielsen, Erik Michael; Hansen, Gert H

2013-01-01

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Polyunsaturated fatty acids of marine origin upregulate mitochondrial biogenesis and induce-beta oxidation in white fat  

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Aims/hypothesis Intake of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids reduces adipose tissue mass, preferentially in the abdomen. The more pronounced effect of marine-derived eicosapentaenoic (EPA) and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids on adiposity, compared with their precursor -linolenic acid, may be mediated by changes in gene expression and metabolism in white fat. Methods The effects of EPA/DHA concentrate (6% EPA, 51% DHA) admixed to form two types of high-fat diet were studied in C57BL/6J mice. Oligon...

Flachs, P.; Horakova, O.; Brauner, P.; Rossmeisl, M.; Pecina, P.; Franssen-hal, N. L. W.; Ruzickova, J.; Sponarova, J.; Drahota, Z.; Vlcek, C.; Keijer, J.; Houstek, J.; Kopecky, J

2005-01-01

 
 
 
 
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Experimental reduction in dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids depresses sperm competitiveness.  

Science.gov (United States)

The health benefits of diets containing rich sources of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA) are well documented and include reductions in the risk of several diseases typical of Western societies. The dietary intake of n-3 LC-PUFA has also been linked to fertility, and there is abundant evidence that a range of ejaculate traits linked to fertility in humans, livestock and other animals depend on an adequate intake of n-3 LC-PUFA from dietary sources. However, relatively few studies have explored how n-3 LC-PUFA influence reproductive fitness, particularly in the context of sexual selection. Here, we show that experimental reduction in the level of n-3 LC-PUFA in the diet of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) depresses a male's share of paternity when sperm compete for fertilization, confirming that the currently observed trend for reduced n-3 LC-PUFA in western diets has important implications for individual reproductive fitness. PMID:25252837

Rahman, Md Moshiur; Gasparini, Clelia; Turchini, Giovanni M; Evans, Jonathan P

2014-09-01

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GENDER DIFFERENCES IN PLASMA LIPID RESPONSE TO DIETARY FAT  

Science.gov (United States)

The relationship between type of dietary fat, atherosclerotic vascular disease risk and lipid/lipoprotein profiles has been studied since the early 1900s. For the most part, observational data from international comparisons and migration studies as well as prospective studies have identified a posit...

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Dietary intervention increases n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in sceletal muscle membrane phospholipids of obese subjects. Inplications for insulin sensitivity  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

OBJECTIVE: Cross-sectional studies suggest that the fatty acid (FA) composition of phospholipids in skeletal muscle cell membrane may modulate insulin sensitivity in humans. We examined the impact of a hypocaloric low-fat dietary intervention on membrane FA composition and insulin sensitivity. DESIGN Muscle membrane FA profiles were determined in muscle (vastus lateralis) biopsies from 21 obese subjects before and after 6 months of dietary restriction. Diet instructions emphasized low intake of FA of marine origin by recommending lean fish and prohibiting fatty fish and fish oil supplements. Insulin resistance was estimated by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). RESULTS The mean weight loss was 5.1 kg (range -15.3 to +1.3 kg). BMI decreased from 36.5 to 34.9 kg/m(2) (P=0.003). Saturated FA (SFA) decreased 11% (P=0.0001). Polyunsaturated FA (PUFA)n-6 increased 4% (P =0.003). Long-chain PUFAn-3 increased 51% (P= 0.0001), mainly due to a 75% increase (P<0.0001) in docosahexaenoic acid. Changes in HOMA-IR correlated significantly with changes in long-chain PUFAn-3 (R=-0.57, P< 0.01), SFA (R=0.58, P<0.01) and waist circumference (R=0.46, P<0.05). A multivariate linear regression analysis that included changes in weight, fat mass, waist circumference, plasma lipids, PUFA, SFA and long-chain PUFAn-3 indicated that SFA and long-chain PUFAn-3 were independent predictors of HOMA-IR (R(2)=0.33, P<0.01). CONCLUSIONS: A hypocaloric low-fat dietary intervention programme increased incorporation of long-chain PUFAn-3 and reduced SFA in skeletal muscle membrane phospholipids of obese subjects, a setting that may impact on insulin action.

Haugaard, Steen B; Madsbad, Sten

2006-01-01

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Dietary intervention increases n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids in skeletal muscle membrane phospholipids of obese subjects. Implications for insulin sensitivity  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Objective Cross-sectional studies suggest that the fatty acid (FA) composition of phospholipids in skeletal muscle cell membrane may modulate insulin sensitivity in humans. We examined the impact of a hypocaloric low-fat dietary intervention on membrane FA composition and insulin sensitivity. Design Muscle membrane FA profiles were determined in muscle (vastus lateralis) biopsies from 21 obese subjects before and after 6 months of dietary restriction. Diet instructions emphasized low intake of FA of marine origin by recommending lean fish and prohibiting fatty fish and fish oil supplements. Insulin resistance was estimated by the homeostasis model assessment (HOMA-IR). Results The mean weight loss was 5.1 kg (range -15.3 to +1.3 kg). BMI decreased from 36.5 to 34.9 kg/m(2) (P = 0.003). Saturated FA (SFA) decreased 11% (P = 0.0001). Polyunsaturated FA (PUFA)n-6 increased 4% (P = 0.003). Long-chain PUFAn-3 increased 51% (P = 0.0001), mainly due to a 75% increase (P <0.0001) in docosahexaenoic acid. Changes in HOMA-IR correlated significantly with changes in long-chain PUFAn-3 (R = -0.57, P <0.01), SFA (R = 0.58, P <0.01) and waist circumference (R = 0.46, P <0.05). A multivariate linear regression analysis that included changes in weight, fat mass, waist circumference, plasma lipids, PUFA, SFA and long-chain PUFAn-3 indicated that SFA and long-chain PUFAn-3 were independent predictors of HOMA-IR (R-2 = 0.33, P <0.01). Conclusions A hypocaloric low-fat dietary intervention programme increased incorporation of long-chain PUFAn-3 and reduced SFA in skeletal muscle membrane phospholipids of obese subjects, a setting that may impact on insulin action.

Haugaard, S.B.; Madsbad, S.

2006-01-01

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The Influence of Dietary Fat Source on Life Span in Calorie Restricted Mice.  

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Calorie restriction (CR) without malnutrition extends life span in several animal models. It has been proposed that a decrease in the amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), and especially n-3 fatty acids, in membrane phospholipids may contribute to life span extension with CR. Phospholipid PUFAs are sensitive to dietary fatty acid composition, and thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the influence of dietary lipids on life span in CR mice. C57BL/6J mice were assigned to four groups (a 5% CR control group and three 40% CR groups) and fed diets with soybean oil (high in n-6 PUFAs), fish oil (high in n-3 PUFAs), or lard (high in saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids) as the primary lipid source. Life span was increased (p lard mice compared to animals consuming either the CR fish or soybean oil diets. These results indicate that dietary lipid composition can influence life span in mice on CR, and suggest that a diet containing a low proportion of PUFAs and high proportion of monounsaturated and saturated fats may maximize life span in animals maintained on CR. PMID:25313149

López-Domínguez, José A; Ramsey, Jon J; Tran, Dianna; Imai, Denise M; Koehne, Amanda; Laing, Steven T; Griffey, Stephen M; Kim, Kyoungmi; Taylor, Sandra L; Hagopian, Kevork; Villalba, José M; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; McDonald, Roger B

2014-10-13

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Interleukin-6 Gene Polymorphisms, Dietary Fat Intake, Obesity and Serum Lipid Concentrations in Black and White South African Women  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This study investigated interactions between dietary fat intake and IL-6 polymorphisms on obesity and serum lipids in black and white South African (SA women. Normal-weight and obese, black and white women underwent measurements of body composition, serum lipids and dietary fat intake, and were genotyped for the IL-6 ?174 G>C, IVS3 +281 G>T and IVS4 +869 A>G polymorphisms. In black women the IVS4 +869 G allele was associated with greater adiposity, and with increasing dietary fat intake adiposity increased in the IVS3 +281 GT+GG and IVS4 +869 AA or AG genotypes. In white women, with increasing omega-3 (n-3 intake and decreasing n-6:n-3 ratio, body mass index (BMI decreased in those with the ?174 C allele, IVS3 +281 T allele and IVS4 +869 AG genotype. In the white women, those with the IVS3 +281 T allele had lower triglycerides. Further, with increasing n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA; triglyceride and total cholesterol:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (T-C:HDL-C ratio decreased in those with the ?174 C allele. In black women, with increasing total fat intake, triglycerides and T-C:HDL-C ratio increased in those with the IVS4 +869 G allele. This study is the first to show that dietary fat intake modulates the relationship between the IL-6 ?174 G>C, IVS3 +281 G>T and IVS4 +869 A>G polymorphisms on obesity and serum lipids in black and white SA women.

Yael T. Joffe

2014-06-01

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Interleukin-6 gene polymorphisms, dietary fat intake, obesity and serum lipid concentrations in black and white South African women.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study investigated interactions between dietary fat intake and IL-6 polymorphisms on obesity and serum lipids in black and white South African (SA) women. Normal-weight and obese, black and white women underwent measurements of body composition, serum lipids and dietary fat intake, and were genotyped for the IL-6 -174 G>C, IVS3 +281 G>T and IVS4 +869 A>G polymorphisms. In black women the IVS4 +869 G allele was associated with greater adiposity, and with increasing dietary fat intake adiposity increased in the IVS3 +281 GT+GG and IVS4 +869 AA or AG genotypes. In white women, with increasing omega-3 (n-3) intake and decreasing n-6:n-3 ratio, body mass index (BMI) decreased in those with the -174 C allele, IVS3 +281 T allele and IVS4 +869 AG genotype. In the white women, those with the IVS3 +281 T allele had lower triglycerides. Further, with increasing n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA); triglyceride and total cholesterol:high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (T-C:HDL-C) ratio decreased in those with the -174 C allele. In black women, with increasing total fat intake, triglycerides and T-C:HDL-C ratio increased in those with the IVS4 +869 G allele. This study is the first to show that dietary fat intake modulates the relationship between the IL-6 -174 G>C, IVS3 +281 G>T and IVS4 +869 A>G polymorphisms on obesity and serum lipids in black and white SA women. PMID:24962479

Joffe, Yael T; van der Merwe, Lize; Evans, Juliet; Collins, Malcolm; Lambert, Estelle V; September, Alison V; Goedecke, Julia H

2014-06-01

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Effect of body fat distribution on the transcription response to dietary fat interventions.  

Science.gov (United States)

Combination of decreased energy expenditure and increased food intake results in fat accumulation either in the abdominal site (upper body obesity, UBO) or on the hips (lower body obesity, LBO). In this study, we used microarray gene expression profiling of adipose tissue biopsies to investigate the effect of body fat distribution on the physiological response to two dietary fat interventions. Mildly obese UBO and LBO male subjects (n = 12, waist-to-hip ratio range 0.93-1.12) were subjected to consumption of diets containing predominantly either long-chain fatty acids (PUFA) or medium-chain fatty acids (MCT). The results revealed (1) a large variation in transcription response to MCT and PUFA diets between UBO and LBO subjects, (2) higher sensitivity of UBO subjects to MCT/PUFA dietary intervention and (3) the upregulation of immune and apoptotic pathways and downregulation of metabolic pathways (oxidative, lipid, carbohydrate and amino acid metabolism) in UBO subjects when consuming MCT compared with PUFA diet. In conclusion, we report that despite the recommendation of MCT-based diet for improving obesity phenotype, this diet may have adverse effect on inflammatory and metabolic status of UBO subjects. The body fat distribution is, therefore, an important parameter to consider when providing personalized dietary recommendation. PMID:19404697

Radonjic, Marijana; van Erk, Marjan J; Pasman, Wilrike J; Wortelboer, Heleen M; Hendriks, Henk F J; van Ommen, Ben

2009-06-01

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Effects of Unsaturated Fat Dietary Supplements on Blood Lipids, and on Markers of Malnutrition and Inflammation in Hemodialysis Patients  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

OBJECTIVE: We examined the effects of commercially available unsaturated fat dietary supplements on blood lipids, and on markers of malnutrition and inflammation, in an adult population of hemodialysis (HD) patients. DESIGN: This was a restricted, randomized (equal blocks), investigator-blinded 2x6 week crossover trial, without a washout interval. SETTING: This study was conducted at the Department of Nephrology, Copenhagen University Hospital Herlev, Herlev, Denmark, in spring 2007. PATIENTS: Participants included 40 (30 males and 10 females) stable, adult patients undergoing regular HD, with a mean age of 64.6 years and a mean body mass index of 23.3kg/m(2). INTERVENTION: In addition to patients' habitual diets, oral unsaturated fat supplements (90mL of Calogen [SHS International, Ltd., Liverpool, UK] and 4 capsules of Pikasol [Dansk Droge, Ishoej, Denmark]) were given in one period, whereas no supplements were given in the other. Dietary supplements contributed 1.8 MJ (430kcal), 47g fat, 26.5g monounsaturated fatty acids, and 3g marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids per day. Blood sampling and nutritional assessments were performed at baseline, after 6 weeks, and after 12 weeks. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Dietary intakes, blood lipids, dry body weight, serum albumin, and serum C-reactive protein comprised our main outcome measures. RESULTS: According to a per-protocol analysis of 14 study completers, fat supplementation resulted in significantly increased total energy intake (+1.6 MJ/day, or 380kcal/day) and an increased dietary fat energy percentage (+9%). We observed no significant changes in blood lipids. Dry body weight (+0.49kg, P=.04) increased, and serum C-reactive protein concentration fell (-1.69mg/L, P=.01), with fat supplementation. Intention-to-treat analysis of 39 participants confirmed the absence of adverse blood-lipid changes. CONCLUSIONS: Unsaturated fat supplementation increased total dietary energy intake to recommended levels, had no adverse impact on blood lipids, improved nutritional status as assessed according to dry body weight, and reduced systemic inflammation as assessed according to C-reactive protein serum concentrations. Adding unsaturated fat to the diet seems to be a safe and effective way to prevent and treat malnutrition in hemodialysis patients.

Ewers, Bettina; Riserus, Ulf

2009-01-01

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Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids suppress acute hepatitis, alter gene expression and prolong survival of female Long-Evans Cinnamon rats, a model of Wilson disease.  

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In the Long-Evans Cinnamon rat, copper accumulates in the liver because of a mutation in the copper-transporting ATPase gene, and peroxidative stresses are supposed to be augmented. We examined the effects of dietary fatty acids on hepatitis, hepatic gene expression, and survival. Rats were fed a conventional, low-fat diet (CE2), a CE2 diet supplemented with 10 wt% of lard (Lar), high-linoleic soybean oil (Soy), or a mixture of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA)-rich fish oil and soybean oil (DHA/Soy). Among female rats, the mean survival times of the DHA/Soy and the Soy groups were longer by 17 approximately 20% than in the Lar and the CE2 groups. Among male rats, the survival times were much longer than in the females, but no significant difference in survival was observed among the dietary groups. Serum ceruloplasmin levels in female and male rats of all of the dietary groups were similar. Serum transaminase levels of the DHA/Soy group tended to be lower than in the CE2 group. Histological examinations revealed a marked degeneration in hepatic tissue integrity in the Lar and CE2 groups but not in the DHA/Soy group. Hepatic levels of metal-related genes, transferrin and ceruloplasmin, as well as those related to bile acid synthesis were up-regulated, and an inflammation-related gene (cyclooxygenase [COX]-2) was down-regulated in the DHA/Soy group. Some proliferation-related genes were also affected by the dietary fatty acids. These results indicate that polyunsaturated fatty acids suppress the development of acute hepatitis and prolong survival in females, regardless of whether they are of the n-6 or n-3 type, which are associated with altered gene expressions. PMID:15135151

Du, Chunyan; Fujii, Yoichi; Ito, Masafumi; Harada, Manabu; Moriyama, Emiko; Shimada, Ryo; Ikemoto, Atsushi; Okuyama, Harumi

2004-05-01

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Endogenous n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Delay Progression of Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma in Fat-1-p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ Mice  

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Full Text Available Preclinical studies suggest that diets rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs may be beneficial for prevention of pancreatic cancer. Nutritional intervention studies are often complex, and there is no clear evidence, without potential confounding factors, on whether conversion of n-6 PUFAs to n-3 PUFAs in pancreatic tissues would provide protection. Experiments were designed using n-3 fatty acid desaturase (Fat-1 transgenic mice, which can convert n-6 PUFA to n-3 FAs endogenously, to determine the impact of n-3 PUFAs on pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasms (PanINs and their progression to pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC. Six-weekold female p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ andcompoundFat-1-p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ mice were fed (AIN-76A diets containing 10% safflower oil for 35 weeks. Pancreata were evaluated histopathologically for PanINs and PDAC. Results showed a dramatic reduction in incidence of PDAC (84%; P 85%; P < .05–0.01 in pancreas of compound transgenic mice than in those of p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ mice. Molecular analysis of the pancreas showed a significant down-regulation of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, cyclooxygenase-2, 5-lipoxygenase (5-LOX, 5-LOX-activating protein, Bcl-2, and cyclin D1 expression levels in Fat-1-p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ mice compared to p48Cre/+-LSL-KrasG12D/+ mice. These data highlight the promise of dietary n-3 FAs for chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer in high-risk individuals.

Altaf Mohammed

2012-12-01

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Effect of dietary fat content on microvillus in rat jejunum.  

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To examine whether dietary manipulation of isoenergic diets might affect microvillar structure of small intestinal epithelial cells, morphological parameters of enterocytes and microvilli in the mid-villus portion of jejunum were determined in the rats fed either high-starch (70 energy %), low-fat (7 energy %) diet or high-fat (73 energy %), low-starch (5 energy %) diet for 7 days. Feeding the high-fat diet produced an increase in the height of villus, in accordance with the elevated jejunal mucosal weight and total protein contents as compared with the high-starch diet. No appreciable change in crypt depth occurred. Scanning electron microscopy of jejunal epithelial cells revealed that the morphometrical parameters of the villus cells were unchanged by the diets, but the microvillar structure of each villus cell was influenced by the diets; the animals fed the high-fat diet exhibited a reduced length (28%) of microvillus with a slight increase (12%) in diameter, showing a significantly reduced surface area of microvilli per enterocyte. The reduction in microvillar surface area of animals fed the high-fat diet was accompanied by the decrease in total proteins of the brush border membranes as well as the decrease in the activities of microvillar stalked disaccharidases, i.e., sucrase-isomaltase and lactase. These results provide an evidence that dietary manipulation, even when diets are "complete" in terms of the content of energy, protein, and other micronutrients, can modify the microvillar structure of small intestinal epithelial cells, leading to alterations in the digestive/absorptive surface area of villus cells. PMID:7931721

Goda, T; Takase, S

1994-04-01

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Dietary saturated fat/cholesterol, but not unsaturated fat or starch, induces C-reactive protein associated early atherosclerosis and ectopic fat deposition in diabetic pigs  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Diabetes is thought to accelerate cardiovascular disease depending on the type of diet. This study in diabetic subjects was performed to investigate the metabolic, inflammatory and cardiovascular effects of nutritional components typically present in a Western, Mediterranean or high glycaemic diet. Methods Streptozotocin-diabetic pigs (~45 kg were fed for 10 weeks supplemental (40% of dietary energy saturated fat/cholesterol (SFC, unsaturated fat (UF or starch (S in an eucaloric dietary intervention study. Results Fasting plasma total, LDL and HDL cholesterol concentrations were 3-5 fold higher (p 2 = 0.95. Retroperitoneal fat depot weight (g was intermediate in SFC (260 ± 72, lowest in S (135 ± 51 and highest (p Conclusion Dietary saturated fat/cholesterol induces inflammation, atherosclerosis and ectopic fat deposition whereas an equally high dietary unsaturated fat load does not induce these abnormalities and shows beneficial effects on postprandial glycaemia in diabetic pigs.

Serlie Mireille J

2011-07-01

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The impact of dietary fat withdrawal on carcass iodine value, belly characteristics, and changes in body fat over time.  

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The inclusion of unsaturated fats in pig diets has raised issues related to pork carcass fat quality. The objective of this experiment was to understand how withdrawal from the diet of unsaturated dietary fat before slaughter impacts the composition of jowl fat during the growth cycle and at market. Fifty individually housed pigs (PIC 337 × C22/29; initial BW = 59.3 ± 0.55 kg) were allotted based on sex and initial BW to 10 treatments for an 82-d experiment as follows: 3 dietary fat withdrawal times before slaughter (21, 42, or 63 d) by 3 dietary fat unsaturation loads (DFUL), which includea high intake of unsaturated fatty acids supplied through an inclusion of 5% corn oil (HIGH), a high intake of a mixture of saturated and unsaturated fatty acids supplied through an inclusion of 5% animal-vegetable blend (MED), and a moderate intake of unsaturated fatty acids supplied through an inclusion of 2.5% corn oil (LOW). Pigs were weighed and jowl adipose samples were collected on d 0, 21, 42, and 63 and at harvest on d 82. Data were analyzed using PROC MIXED with treatment and sex as fixed effects. At market (d 82), increasing the withdrawal of dietary fat further away from market increased 18:1 (P = 0.045) and tended to increase 14:0 concentrations (P = 0.054). It also significantly decreased 18:2 (P iodine value (IV) measured at d 82 (P = 0.006). In conclusion, elevated 18:2 intake makes lowering carcass IV in the depot fat very difficult and may take as long as 61 d. The withdrawal of unsaturated dietary fat apparently altered the fat depot to be more reflective of fat synthesized de novo, resulting in a more saturated depot fat. Importantly, this alteration of deposited fat composition did not translate into improved belly firmness, depth, weight, or fat color. PMID:25568373

Kellner, T A; Prusa, K J; Patience, J F

2015-01-01

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Effects of Dietary Fatty Acids on Lipid Traits in the Muscle and Perirenal Fat of Growing Rabbits Fed Mixed Diets  

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Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of various raw materials (spirulina, curcuma, tomato pomace, false flax, linseed, chia, perilla seeds as suitable polyunsaturated fatty acid n-3 (n-3 PUFA sources, on the lipid traits in the longissimus dorsi muscle and perirenal fat of growing rabbits. The fatty acid (FA analyses of the diets, carried out by gas chromatography, differed over a wide range on the basis of the highly varied ingredients in 27 experimental formulations. Among the 29 identified FAs, three from feeds were catabolized in the rabbits, five were de novo synthesized and stored chiefly in the muscle. It was possible to linearly characterize the incorporation from the feed to the muscle of 16 FAs. This study has confirmed that the dietary inclusion of various raw materials could be considered as a way of enriching the n-3 PUFA of rabbit meat. A proposal for the prediction of n-3 PUFA from dietary ?-linolenic acid (C18:3 n-3 and a panel of another 10 FAs has been made for intramuscular fat (R2 = 0.94 and perirenal fat (R2 = 0.96.

Pier Giorgio Peiretti

2012-02-01

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Transfer of dietary zinc and fat to milk--evaluation of milk fat quality, milk fat precursors, and mastitis indicators.  

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The present study demonstrated that the zinc concentration in bovine milk and blood plasma is significantly affected by the intake of saturated fat supplements. Sixteen Holstein cows were used in a 4 x 4 Latin square design with 4 periods of 12 d, and 4 dietary treatments were conducted. A total mixed ration based on corn silage, grass-clover silages, and pelleted sugar beet pulp was used on all treatments. A high de novo milk fat diet was formulated by adding rapeseed meal and molasses in the total mixed ration [39 mg of Zn/kg of dry matter (DM)], and a low de novo diet by adding saturated fat, fat-rich rapeseed cake, and corn (34 mg of Zn/kg of DM). Dietary Zn levels were increased by addition of ZnO to 83 and 80 mg of Zn/kg of DM. Treatments did not affect daily DM intake, or yield of energy-corrected milk, milk fat, or milk protein. The high de novo diet significantly increased milk fat percentage and milk content of fatty acids with chain length from C6 to C16, and decreased content of C18 and C18:1. Treatments did not influence milk free fatty acids at 4 degrees C at 0 or 28 h after milking. The average diameter of milk fat globules was significantly greater in milk from cows offered low de novo diets. Furthermore, the low de novo diet significantly increased the concentration of nonesterified fatty acids and d-beta-hydroxybutyrate in blood plasma, the latter was also increased in milk. Treatments did not affect the enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase and N-acetyl-beta-d-glucosaminidase in milk or the activity of isocitrate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase in blood plasma. The low de novo diet significantly increased plasma Zn and milk Zn content, whereas dietary Zn level did not in itself influence these parameters. This indicates that the transfer of fat from diet to milk might facilitate transfer of Zn from diet to milk. PMID:18349247

Wiking, L; Larsen, T; Sehested, J

2008-04-01

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Blood lipids profile in hyperlipidemic children undergoing different dietary long chain polyunsaturated supplementations: a preliminary clinical trial.  

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The aim of this preliminary study was to explore the effect size of different dietary long chain polyunsaturated supplementations on blood lipid profile in children with primary hyperlipidemia. Thirty-six children (8-13 years) were recruited. After an 8-week stabilization period on the Step I diet, they were randomized to additionally receive for a 16-week period one capsule (500?mg) daily of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) alone or a DHA plus eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) mixture (45.6% DHA; 41.6% EPA) or wheat germ oil (control). An effect size (as percentage change from baseline) of +8%, -12% and -16% for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), total cholesterol/HDL-C ratio and triglycerides was observed in children supplemented with DHA, compared to +2%, -8% and -12%, respectively, in children supplemented with DHA plus EPA. This preliminary study suggests powered trials appear feasible and are warranted to evaluate efficacy of n-3 long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid dietary supplementations on the blood lipid profile of children with primary hyperlipidemia. PMID:24228803

Verduci, Elvira; Agostoni, Carlo; Radaelli, Giovanni; Banderali, Giuseppe; Riva, Enrica; Giovannini, Marcello

2014-05-01

58

Melanocortin activity in the amygdala controls appetite for dietary fat.  

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The amygdala is rich in melanocortin 4 receptors. Because the reduction in dietary fat intake after enterostatin is injected in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) is blocked by a melanocortin 4 receptor antagonist, we investigated the role of melanocortin activity in the CeA in regulating food intake and macronutrient choice. Sprague-Dawley rats, fitted with CeA cannulas, were fed either chow, a high-fat (HF) diet, or adapted to a two-choice HF or low-fat (LF) diet. Injections of the MC4R agonist melanotan II (MTII) in the CeA had a dose-dependent inhibitory effect on food intake that lasted for at least 24 h. This response was greater in rats fed a HF diet. The inverse agonist agouti-related protein (AgRP) and antagonist SHU-9119 increased food intake in a dose-dependent manner, with the hyperphagia lasting for 60 h. In rats adapted to a two-choice HF/LF diet, MTII decreased HF consumption but had no effect on LF consumption, resulting in a long-lasting decrease in total calorie intake (-35.5% after 24 h, P < 0.05). Total calorie intake increased in both AgRP- and SHU-9119-treated rats (32 and 109% after 24 h, respectively) as the result of increased intake of HF diet. There was no modification of LF consumption with AgRP treatment and a transient nonsignificant decrease with SHU-9119 treatment. Amygdala brain-derived neurotrophic factor expression was increased by AgRP in fed rats. These results identify the amygdala as a site of action for the melanocortin system to control food intake and dietary preferences. PMID:19923360

Boghossian, Stéphane; Park, MieJung; York, David A

2010-02-01

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Dietary meat fats and burden of cardiovascular disease risk factors, in the elderly: a report from the MEDIS study  

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Abstract Dietary fats have long been associated with human health, and especially cardiovascular disease (CVD). Some observational studies have shown that reduction in dietary fats, and particularly cholesterol is associated with lower cardiovascular risk; however, other prospective studies or randomized controlled trials of dietary fat reduction or modification have shown varying results on CVD morbidity and mortality. In this work we evaluated the relationships between dietary fat...

Metallinos George; Gotsis Efthimios; Qira Brikena-Eirini; Tsiligianni Ioanna; Zeimbekis Akis; Bountziouka Vassiliki; Pounis George; Polychronopoulos Evangelos; Lionis Christos; Panagiotakos Demosthenes

2010-01-01

60

Product Fat-1 Transgenic Simmental Crossbred Cattle Endogenously Synthesizing Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Using OSM  

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Full Text Available Meat products normally contain low omega-3 fatty acids and high ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids may contribute to the prevalence of many diseases. In order to obtained in such beef with high levels of omega-3 fatty acids will be more healthy to meet people’s diet, researchers generated the fat-1 transgenic simmental crossbred cattle expressing the Caenorhabditis elegans c fat-1 gene encoding an omega-3 fatty acid desaturase that converts omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids and the gene is absent in mammals. In this study, researchers successful product the embryo of fat-1 transgenic simmental crossbred cattle using OSM. The results of Western Blotting and fluoroscopic examination have proved that the fat-1 gene has been into genome of clone embryo and translated into proteins which could be used to embryo transfer.

Song-Jia Lai

2012-01-01

 
 
 
 
61

Dietary n-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids and energy balance in overweight or moderately obese men and women: a randomized controlled trial  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary n-3-polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3-PUFA have been shown to reduce body weight and fat mass in rodents as well as in humans in one small short-term study. We conducted this controlled randomized dietary trial to test the hypothesis that n-3-PUFA lower body weight and fat mass by reducing appetite and ad libitum food intake and/or by increasing energy expenditure. Methods Twenty-six overweight or moderately obese (body mass index 28–33 kg/m2 men and women were included, and received either a diet rich in n-3-PUFA from both plant and marine sources or a control diet. Diets were administered in an isocaloric fashion for 2 weeks followed by 12 weeks of ad libitum intake. The n-3-PUFA and control diets were identical in all regards except for the fatty acid composition. All foods were provided to subjects, and leftovers were weighed back to assess actual food intake accurately for each day of the study. This design gave us 80% power to detect a difference in weight change between the n-3-PUFA and control diet groups of 2.25 kg at an ?-error level of 5%. Results Both groups lost similar amounts of weight when these diets were consumed ad libitum for 12 weeks [mean (SD: -3.5 (3.7 kg in the control group vs. -2.8 (3.7 kg in the n-3-PUFA group, F(1,24 = 13.425, p = 0.001 for time effect; F(1,24 = 0.385, p = 0.541 for time × group interaction]. Consistent with this finding, we also found no differences between the n-3-PUFA and control groups with regard to appetite as measured by visual analogue scale, ad libitum food intake, resting energy expenditure as measured by indirect calorimetry, diurnal plasma leptin concentrations, or fasting ghrelin concentrations. Conclusion Our results suggest that dietary n-3-PUFA do not play an important role in the regulation of food intake, energy expenditure, or body weight in humans.

Matthys Colleen C

2009-05-01

62

Effects of dietary fat and saturated fat content on liver fat and markers of oxidative stress in overweight/obese men and women under weight-stable conditions.  

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Dietary fat and oxidative stress are hypothesized to contribute to non-alcoholic fatty liver disease and progression to steatohepatitis. To determine the effects of dietary fat content on hepatic triglyceride, body fat distribution and markers of inflammation and oxidative stress, overweight/obese subjects with normal glucose tolerance consumed a control diet (CONT: 35% fat/12% saturated fat/47% carbohydrate) for ten days, followed by four weeks on a low fat (LFD (n = 10): 20% fat/8% saturated fat/62% carbohydrate) or high fat diet (HFD (n = 10): 55% fat/25% saturated fat/27% carbohydrate). Hepatic triglyceride content was quantified by MRS and abdominal fat distribution by MRI. Fasting biomarkers of inflammation (plasma hsCRP, IL-6, IL-12, TNF?, IFN-?) and oxidative stress (urinary F2-? isoprostanes) were measured. Body weight remained stable. Compared to the CONT, hepatic triglyceride decreased on the LFD (mean (95% CI): change -2.13% (-3.74%, -0.52%)), but did not change on the HFD and there was no significant difference between the LFD and HFD. Intra-abdominal fat did not change significantly on either diet, but subcutaneous abdominal fat increased on the HFD. There were no significant changes in fasting metabolic markers, inflammatory markers and urinary F2-? isoprostanes. We conclude that in otherwise healthy overweight/obese adults under weight-neutral conditions, a diet low in fat and saturated fat has modest effects to decrease liver fat and may be beneficial. On the other hand, a diet very high in fat and saturated fat had no effect on hepatic triglyceride or markers of metabolism, inflammation and oxidative stress. PMID:25353663

Marina, Anna; von Frankenberg, Anize Delfino; Suvag, Seda; Callahan, Holly S; Kratz, Mario; Richards, Todd L; Utzschneider, Kristina M

2014-11-01

63

Validation of the MEDFICTS dietary questionnaire: A clinical tool to assess adherence to American Heart Association dietary fat intake guidelines  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary assessment tools are often too long, difficult to quantify, expensive to process, and largely used for research purposes. A rapid and accurate assessment of dietary fat intake is critically important in clinical decision-making regarding dietary advice for coronary risk reduction. We assessed the validity of the MEDFICTS (MF questionnaire, a brief instrument developed to assess fat intake according to the American Heart Association (AHA dietary "steps". Methods We surveyed 164 active-duty US Army personnel without known coronary artery disease at their intake interview for a primary prevention cardiac intervention trial using the Block food frequency (FFQ and MF questionnaires. Both surveys were completed on the same intake visit and independently scored. Correlations between each tools' assessment of fat intake, the agreement in AHA step categorization of dietary quality with each tool, and the test characteristics of the MF using the FFQ as the gold standard were assessed. Results Subjects consumed a mean of 36.0 ± 13.0% of their total calories as fat, which included saturated fat consumption of 13.0 ± 0.4%. The majority of subjects (125/164; 76.2% had a high fat (worse than AHA Step 1 diet. There were significant correlations between the MF and the FFQ for the intake of total fat (r = 0.52, P 70 [high fat diet] was negligible (kappa statistic = 0.036. The MF was accurate at the extremes of fat intake, but could not reliably identify the 3 AHA dietary classifications. Alternative MF cutpoints of 50 (high fat diet were highly sensitive (96%, but had low specificity (46% for a high fat diet. ROC curve analysis identified that a MF score cutoff of 38 provided optimal sensitivity 75% and specificity 72%, and had modest agreement (kappa = 0.39, P Conclusions The MEDFICTS questionnaire is most suitable as a tool to identify high fat diets, rather than discriminate AHA Step 1 and Step 2 diets. Currently recommended MEDFICTS cutpoints are too high, leading to overestimation of dietary quality. A cutpoint of 38 appears to be providing optimal identification of patients who do not meet AHA dietary guidelines for fat intake.

Bindeman Jody

2003-06-01

64

Effects of monensin and dietary soybean oil on milk fat percentage and milk fatty acid profile in lactating dairy cows.  

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The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of monensin (MN) and dietary soybean oil (SBO) on milk fat percentage and milk fatty acid (FA) profile. The study was conducted as a randomized complete block design with a 2 x 3 factorial treatment arrangement using 72 lactating multiparous Holstein dairy cows (138 +/- 24 d in milk). Treatments were [dry matter (DM) basis] as follows: 1) control total mixed ration (TMR, no MN) with no supplemental SBO; 2) MN-treated TMR (22 g of MN/kg of DM) with no supplemental SBO; 3) control TMR including 1.7% SBO; 4) MN-treated TMR including 1.7% SBO; 5) control TMR including 3.4% SBO; and 6) MN-treated TMR including 3.4% SBO. The TMR (% of DM; corn silage, 31.6%; haylage, 21.2%; hay, 4.2%; high-moisture corn, 18.8%; soy hulls, 3.3%; and protein supplement, 20.9%) was offered ad libitum. The experiment consisted of a 2-wk baseline, a 3-wk adaptation, and a 2-wk collection period. Monensin, SBO, and their interaction linearly reduced milk fat percentage. Cows receiving SBO with no added MN (treatments 3 and 5) had 4.5 and 14.2% decreases in milk fat percentage, respectively. Cows receiving SBO with added MN (treatments 4 and 6) had 16.5 and 35.1% decreases in milk fat percentage, respectively. However, the interaction effect of MN and SBO on fat yield was not significant. Monensin reduced milk fat yield by 6.6%. Soybean oil linearly reduced milk fat yield and protein percentage and linearly increased milk yield and milk protein yield. Monensin and SBO reduced 4% fat-corrected milk and had no effect on DM intake. Monensin interacted with SBO to linearly increase milk fat concentration (g/100 g of FA) of total trans-18:1 in milk fat including trans-6 to 8, trans-9, trans-10, trans-11, trans-12 18:1 and the concentration of total conjugated linoleic acid isomers including cis-9, trans-11 18:2; trans-9, cis-11 18:2; and trans-10, cis-12 18:2. Also, the interaction increased milk concentration of polyunsaturated fatty acids. Monensin and SBO linearly reduced, with no significant interaction, milk concentration (g/100 g of FA) of short- and medium-chain fatty acids (total saturated FA and increased total monounsaturated FA. These results suggest that monensin reduces milk fat percentage and this effect is accentuated when SBO is added to the ration. PMID:18292273

AlZahal, O; Odongo, N E; Mutsvangwa, T; Or-Rashid, M M; Duffield, T F; Bagg, R; Dick, P; Vessie, G; McBride, B W

2008-03-01

65

Effects of Dietary Fat Intake on HDL Metabolism  

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High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a lipoprotein which has anti-atherogenic property by reversing cholesterol transport from the peripheral tissues to liver. Low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) as well as high low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) is associated with the development of coronary heart diseases (CHD). Various epidemiological studies have suggested that the development of CHD increase in individuals with less than 40 mg/dL of HDL-C. In spite of accumulation of evidences suggesting a significant association between low HDL-C and CHD, effects of dietary factors on HDL metabolism remained largely unknown. We reviewed published articles about effects of dietary fat intake on HDL metabolism. The substitution of fatty acids (FA) for carbohydrates is beneficially associated with HDL metabolism. Monounsaturated FA intake may not affect HDL-C. Trans-FA is significantly associated with reduction of HDL-C, and is also adversely related with total cholesterol/HDL-C. Fish oils consumption, especially docosahexaenoic acid consumption, may be favorably associated with HDL metabolism. Although plant sterols and stanols may not affect HDL-C, policosanol intake is associated with a clinically significant decrease in the LDL/HDL ratio. PMID:25584098

Yanai, Hidekatsu; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Abe, Shinichi; Tada, Norio; Sako, Akahito

2015-01-01

66

Effects of Dietary Fat Intake on HDL Metabolism.  

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High-density lipoprotein (HDL) is a lipoprotein which has anti-atherogenic property by reversing cholesterol transport from the peripheral tissues to liver. Low HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) as well as high low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) is associated with the development of coronary heart diseases (CHD). Various epidemiological studies have suggested that the development of CHD increase in individuals with less than 40 mg/dL of HDL-C. In spite of accumulation of evidences suggesting a significant association between low HDL-C and CHD, effects of dietary factors on HDL metabolism remained largely unknown. We reviewed published articles about effects of dietary fat intake on HDL metabolism. The substitution of fatty acids (FA) for carbohydrates is beneficially associated with HDL metabolism. Monounsaturated FA intake may not affect HDL-C. Trans-FA is significantly associated with reduction of HDL-C, and is also adversely related with total cholesterol/HDL-C. Fish oils consumption, especially docosahexaenoic acid consumption, may be favorably associated with HDL metabolism. Although plant sterols and stanols may not affect HDL-C, policosanol intake is associated with a clinically significant decrease in the LDL/HDL ratio. PMID:25584098

Yanai, Hidekatsu; Katsuyama, Hisayuki; Hamasaki, Hidetaka; Abe, Shinichi; Tada, Norio; Sako, Akahito

2015-03-01

67

Dietary milk fat globule membrane improves endurance capacity in mice.  

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Milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) comprises carbohydrates, membrane-specific proteins, glycoproteins, phospholipids, and sphingolipids. We evaluated the effects of MFGM consumption over a 12-wk period on endurance capacity and energy metabolism in BALB/c mice. Long-term MFGM intake combined with regular exercise improved endurance capacity, as evidenced by swimming time until fatigue, in a dose-dependent manner. The effect of dietary MFGM plus exercise was accompanied by higher oxygen consumption and lower respiratory quotient, as determined by indirect calorimetry. MFGM intake combined with exercise increased plasma levels of free fatty acids after swimming. After chronic intake of MFGM combined with exercise, the triglyceride content in the gastrocnemius muscle increased significantly. Mice given MFGM combined with exercise had higher mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-? coactivator 1? (Pgc1?) and CPT-1b in the soleus muscle at rest, suggesting that increased lipid metabolism in skeletal muscle contributes, in part, to improved endurance capacity. MFGM treatment with cyclic equibiaxial stretch consisting of 10% elongation at 0.5 Hz with 1 h on and 5 h off increased the Pgc1? mRNA expression of differentiating C2C12 myoblasts in a dose-dependent manner. Supplementation with sphingomyelin increased endurance capacity in mice and Pgc1? mRNA expression in the soleus muscle in vivo and in differentiating myoblasts in vitro. These results indicate that dietary MFGM combined with exercise improves endurance performance via increased lipid metabolism and that sphingomyelin may be one of the components responsible for the beneficial effects of dietary MFGM. PMID:25163913

Haramizu, Satoshi; Ota, Noriyasu; Otsuka, Atsuko; Hashizume, Kohjiro; Sugita, Satoshi; Hase, Tadashi; Murase, Takatoshi; Shimotoyodome, Akira

2014-10-15

68

Interactive effects between dietary fat and a vegetables-fruit mixture on colorectal carcinogenesis.  

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Several dietary compounds are associated with colorectal cancer risk. These include the amount of dietary fat, which is positively associated with colorectal cancer, and a variety of vegetables and fruit, which are suggested to possess anticarcinogenic potential. Because diet is complex and dietary factors most probably interact, it is likely that these interactive effects between dietary components, rather then the effects of individual components, may account for a large part in the risk fo...

Rijnkels, J. M.

1998-01-01

69

Dietary ?-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid DHA: A Potential Adjuvant in the Treatment of Cancer  

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?-3 Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), mainly present in fish oil, are part of the human diet. Among PUFAs, docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) has received particular attention for its anti-inflammatory, antiproliferative, proapoptotic, antiangiogenetic, anti-invasion, and antimetastatic properties. These data suggest that DHA can exert antitumor activity potentially representing an effective adjuvant in cancer chemotherapy. This review is focused on current knowledge supporting the potential use ...

Merendino, Nicolo?; Costantini, Lara; Manzi, Laura; Molinari, Romina; D Eliseo, Donatella; Velotti, Francesca

2013-01-01

70

Product Fat-1 Transgenic Simmental Crossbred Cattle Endogenously Synthesizing Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Using OSM  

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Meat products normally contain low omega-3 fatty acids and high ratio of n-6/n-3 fatty acids may contribute to the prevalence of many diseases. In order to obtained in such beef with high levels of omega-3 fatty acids will be more healthy to meet people’s diet, researchers generated the fat-1 transgenic simmental crossbred cattle expressing the Caenorhabditis elegans c fat-1 gene encoding an omega-3 fatty acid desaturase that converts omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids and the gene is ab...

Song-Jia Lai; Jian Wang; Xiao-Mao Guo; Wei Wang,

2012-01-01

71

Milk Fat Intake and Conjugated Linoleic Acid (CLA) Supplementation : Dietary Markers and Associations to Clinical and Biochemical Characteristics  

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In the present thesis dietary markers for intake of milk fat, associations between intake of milk fat and risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD), and the effects of supplementation with conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) to healthy humans are investigated. The dietary fat quality is one of the main lifestyle factors affecting risk for CHD. When studying the associations between diet and health it is important to have accurate dietary information. Objective dietary markers increase the poss...

Smedman, Annika

2005-01-01

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Dietary Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Modulate Resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis in Guinea Pigs12  

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It is well established that the nutritional status of the host affects resistance to disease. The impact of dietary lipids on experimental pulmonary infection with mycobacteria has not been investigated. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the role of dietary (n-3) and (n-6) fatty acids on immunity and resistance to aerosol infection with virulent Mycobacterium tuberculosis in guinea pigs. Weanling guinea pigs were fed purified, isocaloric diets differing only in lipid sourc...

Mcfarland, Christine T.; Fan, Yang-yi; Chapkin, Robert S.; Weeks, Bradley R.; Mcmurray, David N.

2008-01-01

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Enrichment of anhydrous milk fat in polyunsaturated fatty acid residues from linseed and rapeseed oils through enzymatic interesterification.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lipozyme TL IM was used in a solvent-free batch and microaqueous system for enzymatic interesterification of anhydrous milkfat (AMF) with linseed oil (LO) in binary blends and with rapeseed oil (RO) in one ternary blend. The aim was to obtain and characterize physicochemically fats enriched with unsaturated C 18 fatty acids (oleic, linoleic, and, especially, linolenic acids) from natural vegetable oils. Binary blends of AMF/LO 100/0, 90/10, 80/20, 70/30, and 60/40 (w/w) were interesterified. The change in triacylglycerol (TAG) profiles showed that quasi-equilibrium conditions were reached after 4-6 h of reaction. Free fatty acid contents products originating from the blends 70/30 and 60/40. This was confirmed by textural measurements. Melting profiles determined by differential scanning calorimetry showed complete disappearance of low-melting TAGs from LO and the formation of intermediary species with a lower melting temperature. Oxidative stability of the interesterified products was diminished with increasing LO content, resulting in low oxidation induction times. A ternary blend composed of AMF/RO/LO 70/20/10 gave satisfactory rheological and oxidative properties, fulfilling the requirements for a marketable spread and, moreover, offering increased potential health benefits due to the enriched content in polyunsaturated fatty acid residues. PMID:18271538

Aguedo, Mario; Hanon, Emilien; Danthine, Sabine; Paquot, Michel; Lognay, Georges; Thomas, Annick; Vandenbol, Micheline; Thonart, Philippe; Wathelet, Jean-Paul; Blecker, Christophe

2008-03-12

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Citrus pulp as a dietary source of antioxidants for lactating holstein cows fed highly polyunsaturated Fatty Acid diets.  

Science.gov (United States)

The effects of feeding pelleted citrus pulp (PCP) as a natural antioxidant source on the performance and milk quality of dairy cows fed highly polyunsaturated fatty acid (FA) diets were evaluated. Four lactating Holstein cows were assigned to a 4×4 Latin-square. Treatments, on a dry matter (DM) basis, were i) control diet; ii) 3% soybean oil; iii) 3% soybean oil and 9% PCP and; iv) 3% soybean oil and 18% PCP. When cows fed on citrus pulp, the DM intake tended to decrease. The total tract apparent digestibility of DM and ether extract decreased when cows fed on the control diet compared to other diets. Cows fed PCP had higher polyphenols and flavonoids content and higher total ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) in milk compared to those fed no pelleted citrus pulp. Cows fed 18% PCP showed higher monounsaturated FA and lower saturated FA in milk fat compared with cows fed the other diets. The lowest n-6 FA proportion was in milk fat from cows fed control. The present study suggests that pelleted citrus pulp added to 9% to 18% DM increases total polyphenols and flavonoids concentration, and the FRAP in milk. PMID:25083104

Santos, G T; Lima, L S; Schogor, A L B; Romero, J V; De Marchi, F E; Grande, P A; Santos, N W; Santos, F S; Kazama, R

2014-08-01

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The fat mass- and obesity-associated locus and dietary intake in children.  

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BACKGROUND: A region of chromosome 16 containing the fat mass-and obesity-associated gene (FTO) is reproducibly associated with fat mass and body mass index (BMI), risk of obesity, and adiposity. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to assess the possibility that appetite plays a role in the association between FTO and BMI. DESIGN: Detailed dietary report information from the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children allowed the exploration of relations between FTO variation and dietary intake. Analyse...

Timpson, Nj; Emmett, Pm; Frayling, Tm; Rogers, I.; Hattersley, AT; Mccarthy, Mi; Davey Smith, G.

2008-01-01

76

Effects of dietary fats and phytosterol on serum fatty acid composition and lipoprotein cholesterol in rats.  

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The effects of dietary fats and phytosterol on the fatty acid composition and lipoprotein cholesterol in serum were studied in female rats, with the following results. (1) The addition of 1% cholesterol to the 20% butter diet decreased the ratio of polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) to saturated fatty acid (SFA) in serum. This phenomenon was negated when there was an intake of cod liver oil and wheat germ oil. (2) When cholesterol was added to the 20% butter diet, the serum total cholesterol increased 3.7-fold, due to an increase in the lower density lipoprotein (LDL + VLDL). (3) The addition of 5% phytosterol to the 10% butter-cholesterol diet reduced the total cholesterol level and increased the ratio of cholesterol in high density lipoprotein (HDL) to the cholesterol in LDL + VLDL. Although a 10% cod liver oil addition also reduced the total cholesterol level, the ratio of HDL/LDL + VLDL was similar to that of the 10% butter-cholesterol diet. (4) A direct relationship was found between the concentration of oleic acid (18:1) in serum and the total cholesterol level (r = 0.947) and also the level of LDL + VLDL-cholesterol (r = 0.935). These results show that cod liver oil, wheat germ oil, and phytosterol induce an increase in the PUFA/SFA ratio, promote hypocholesterolemia, and change lipoprotein concentration. However, there were indications that no relationship exists between the change in the total cholesterol level and the change in the ratio of HDL/LDL + VLDL, and that the increase of total cholesterol and LDL + VLDL-cholesterol was consistent with the increase of oleic acid in serum. PMID:6590802

Hirai, K; Ohno, Y; Nakano, T; Izutani, K

1984-04-01

77

Dietary saturated and monounsaturated fats protect against acute acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by altering fatty acid composition of liver microsomal membrane in rats  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary polyunsaturated fats increase liver injury in response to ethanol feeding. We evaluated the effect of dietary corn oil (CO, olive oil (OO, and beef tallow (BT on fatty acid composition of liver microsomal membrane and acute acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed 15% (wt/wt CO, OO or BT for 6 weeks. After treatment with acetaminophen (600 mg/kg, samples of plasma and liver were taken for analyses of the fatty acid composition and toxicity. Results Treatment with acetaminophen significantly elevated levels of plasma GOT and GPT as well as hepatic TBARS but reduced hepatic GSH levels in CO compared to OO and BT groups. Acetaminophen significantly induced protein expression of cytochrome P450 2E1 in the CO group. In comparison with the CO diet, lower levels of linoleic acid, higher levels of oleic acids and therefore much lower ratios of linoleic to oleic acid were detected in rats fed OO and BT diets. Conclusions Dietary OO and BT produces similar liver microsomal fatty acid composition and may account for less severe liver injury after acetaminophen treatment compared to animals fed diets with CO rich in linoleic acid. These findings imply that types of dietary fat may be important in the nutritional management of drug-induced hepatotoxicity.

Shim Eugene

2011-10-01

78

Dietary saturated and monounsaturated fats protect against acute acetaminophen hepatotoxicity by altering fatty acid composition of liver microsomal membrane in rats  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Dietary polyunsaturated fats increase liver injury in response to ethanol feeding. We evaluated the effect of dietary corn oil (CO), olive oil (OO), and beef tallow (BT) on fatty acid composition of liver microsomal membrane and acute acetaminophen hepatotoxicity. Methods Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed 15% (wt/wt) CO, OO or BT for 6 weeks. After treatment with acetaminophen (600 mg/kg), samples of plasma and liver were taken for analyses of the fatty acid composition and toxicity. Results Treatment with acetaminophen significantly elevated levels of plasma GOT and GPT as well as hepatic TBARS but reduced hepatic GSH levels in CO compared to OO and BT groups. Acetaminophen significantly induced protein expression of cytochrome P450 2E1 in the CO group. In comparison with the CO diet, lower levels of linoleic acid, higher levels of oleic acids and therefore much lower ratios of linoleic to oleic acid were detected in rats fed OO and BT diets. Conclusions Dietary OO and BT produces similar liver microsomal fatty acid composition and may account for less severe liver injury after acetaminophen treatment compared to animals fed diets with CO rich in linoleic acid. These findings imply that types of dietary fat may be important in the nutritional management of drug-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:22011590

2011-01-01

79

High content of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in red blood cells of Kenyan Maasai despite low dietary intake  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing land restrictions and a reduced livestock-to-human ratio during the 20th century led the Maasai to lead a more sedentary, market-orientated lifestyle. Although plant-derived food nowadays contributes substantially to their diet, dairy products being high in saturated fatty acids (SFA and low in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA still are an important energy source. Since reliable data regarding the Maasai diet date back to the 1980s, the study objective was to document current diet practices in a Kenyan Maasai community and to investigate the fatty acid distribution in diet and red blood cells. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted among 26 Maasai (20 women, 6 men from Loodokilani, Kajiado District, Kenya. Food intake was described by the subjects via 24-h recall, and both food and blood samples were analysed. Results Two main foods - milk and ugali - constituted the Maasai diet in this region. A total of 0.9 L of milk and 0.6 kg of ugali were consumed per person and day to yield an energy intake of 7.6 MJ/d per person. A major proportion of ingested food contributing 58.3% to the total dietary energy (en% was plant-derived, followed by dairy products representing 41.1 en%. Fat consumed (30.5 en% was high in SFA (63.8% and low in PUFA (9.2%. Long-chain n-3 PUFA (EPA, DPA and DHA made up only 0.15% of the ingested fatty acids, but 5.9% of red blood cell fatty acids. Conclusion The study indicates the Maasai diet is rich in SFA and low in PUFA. Nevertheless, red blood cells are composed of comparable proportions of long-chain n-3 PUFA to populations consuming higher amounts of this fatty acid group.

Kiage-Mokua Beatrice N

2011-08-01

80

Phase II Prospective Randomized Trial of a Low-Fat Diet with Fish Oil Supplementation in Men Undergoing Radical Prostatectomy  

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Preclinical studies suggest lowering dietary fat and decreasing the ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids decreases the risk of prostate cancer development and progression. We conducted a phase II randomized trial to test the effect of decreasing dietary fat combined with decreasing the dietary omega-6:omega-3 ratio on biomarkers related to prostate cancer development and progression. Patients undergoing radical prostatectomy were randomly assigned to receive a low-fat diet ...

Aronson, William J.; Kobayashi, Naoko; Barnard, R. James; Henning, Susanne; Jardack, Patricia M.; Liu, Bingrong; Gray, Ashley; Wan, Junxiang; Konijeti, Ramdev; Freedland, Stephen J.; Castor, Brandon; Heber, David; Elashoff, David; Said, Jonathan; Cohen, Pinchas

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
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Defective dietary fat processing in transgenic mice lacking aquaporin-1 water channels  

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Immunocytochemistry showed expression of aquaporin-1 (AQP1) water channels at sites involved in dietary fat processing, including intrahepatic cholangiocytes, gallbladder, pancreatic microvascular endothelium, and intestinal lacteals. To determine whether AQP1 has a role in dietary fat digestion and/or absorption, mice were placed on a diet that contained 50% fat. Whereas wild-type mice (3–3.5 wk of age, 10–12 g) gained 49 ± 5% (SE, n = 50) body weight in 8 days, and heterozygous mice ga...

Ma, Tonghui; Jayaraman, Sujatha; Wang, Kasper S.; Song, Yuanlin; Yang, Baoxue; Li, Jiang; Bastidas, J. Augusto; Verkman, A. S.

2001-01-01

82

Effects of removal of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on plasma extravasation and mechanical allodynia in a trigeminal neuropathic pain model  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Neuropathic pain (NP is partially mediated by neuroinflammatory mechanisms, and also modulates local neurogenic inflammation. Dietary lipids, in particular the total amount and relative proportions of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs of the ?-3 and ?-6 families, have been reported to modify the threshold for thermal and mechanical allodynia in the partial sciatic nerve ligation model of NP in rats. The effects of dietary lipids on other popular NP models, such as the chronic constriction injury (CCI, have not yet been examined. It is also unknown whether dietary PUFAs exert any effect on the capsaicin (CAP-induced neurogenic inflammation under control or NP conditions. In this study we investigated these interrelated phenomena in the trigeminal territory, which has been much less explored, and for which not all data derived from limb nerves can be directly applied. Results We studied the effects of a CCI of the infraorbital nerve (IoN on the development of mechanical allodynia and CAP-induced plasma extravasation in rats fed either a regular diet (RD, or a modified diet (MD with much lower total content and ?-3:?-6 ratio of PUFAs. In rats kept on MD, mechanical allodynia following CCI-IoN was more pronounced and developed earlier. Extravasation was substantially increased in naive rats fed MD, and displayed differential diet-depending changes one and four weeks after CCI-IoN. When compared with basal levels (in naive and/or sham cases, the net effect of CCI-IoN on ipsilateral extravasation was a reduction in the MD group, but an increase in the RD group, effectively neutralizing the original intergroup differences. Conclusion In summary, PUFA intake reduces CAP-induced neurogenic plasma extravasation in the trigeminal territory, and their removal significantly alters the mechanical allodynia and the plasma extravasation that result from a unilateral CCI-IoN. It is likely that this "protective" effect of dietary lipids is temporary. Also, the presence of contralateral effects of CCI-IoN precludes using the contralateral side as control.

Avendaño Carlos

2009-02-01

83

Effects of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on fatty acid composition in muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue of lambs.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lambs (n = 48) were used in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments to evaluate effects of inclusion of oil containing PUFA in high-concentrate diets (with or without) and duration of oil supplementation (pre- vs. postweaning) on CLA concentration of muscle and adipose tissue. Lambs were fed preweaning creep diets (with or without oil) corresponding to the dietary lactation treatment diet (with or without oil) of the dam. Dams blocked by lambing date and rearing type were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 lactation dietary treatments with or without oil supplementation. Creep diets contained approximately 70% concentrate and 30% roughage and were provided to lambs for ad libitum intake. At weaning (58.7 +/- 2.5 d of age), lambs (n = 48) were randomly assigned within preweaning treatment groups to 1 of 2 postweaning dietary treatments (with or without oil) and 16 pens in a randomized block design, blocked by sex and BW. Postweaning diets were formulated to contain approximately 80% concentrate and 20% roughage and were fed once daily for ad libitum intake. Soybean and linseed oil (2:1, respectively) replaced ground corn and provided 3% additional fat in pre- and postweaning diets. Lambs were slaughtered at 60.3 +/- 4.2 kg of BW. A subcutaneous fat (SQ) sample was obtained within 1 h postmortem and a LM sample at the 12th rib was obtained 24 h postmortem, and both were analyzed for fatty acid profile. Feedlot performance and carcass measurements were not affected (P >or= 0.26) by oil supplementation. Total CLA content of LM and SQ was not affected (P >or= 0.08) by oil supplementation pre- or postweaning, but trans-10, cis-12 CLA was greater (P = 0.02) in SQ from lambs supplemented with oil postweaning. Total PUFA content in LM was greater (P = 0.02) in lambs supplemented with oil pre- or postweaning as a result of increased concentrations of 18:2cis-9, cis-12 and longer chain PUFA. Conversely, pre- and postweaning oil supplementation resulted in less (P = 0.04) MUFA content in LM. Only postweaning oil supplementation increased (P = 0.001) SQ PUFA content. Feeding oils containing PUFA to lambs pre- and postweaning did not increase CLA content of muscle, whereas postweaning oil supplementation minimally increased CLA concentration of SQ fat. Inclusion of soybean and linseed oil in pre- and postweaning diets increased total PUFA content of SQ fat and muscle tissue without adversely affecting growth performance or carcass characteristics. PMID:19717771

Radunz, A E; Wickersham, L A; Loerch, S C; Fluharty, F L; Reynolds, C K; Zerby, H N

2009-12-01

84

Dietary Fat Content and Fiber Type Modulate Hind Gut Microbial Community and Metabolic Markers in the Pig  

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Obesity leads to changes in the gut microbial community which contribute to the metabolic dysregulation in obesity. Dietary fat and fiber affect the caloric density of foods. The impact of dietary fat content and fiber type on the microbial community in the hind gut is unknown. Effect of dietary fat level and fiber type on hindgut microbiota and volatile fatty acid (VFA) profiles was investigated. Expression of metabolic marker genes in the gut, adipose tissue and liver was determined. A 2×2...

Yan, Hui; Potu, Ramesh; Lu, Hang; Vezzoni Almeida, Vivian; Stewart, Terry; Ragland, Darryl; Armstrong, Arthur; Adeola, Olayiwola; Nakatsu, Cindy H.; Ajuwon, Kolapo M.

2013-01-01

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Effect of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on Stearoyl CoA-Desaturase gene expression in intramuscular lipids of lamb  

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Full Text Available The effect of replacement of dietary sunflower oil (SO with linseed oil (LO on Stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD gene expression was investigated. Thirty-six lambs were randomly assigned to four groups and fed with one of the experimental diets, consisting of lucerne pellets with oil (60 g/Kg. The diets varied in the percentage of the oil supplemented and were: 100% SO; 66.6% SO plus 33.3% LO; 33.3% SO plus 66.6% LO and 100% LO. The trial period was of 7 weeks. Longissimus dorsi was removed from each carcass and stored at - 80°C until the analysis. Total fatty acids composition was determined by gas-chromatograph, while SCD gene expression was assessed by Real-Time Reverse-Transcription PCR. Replacement of SO with LO decreases significantly the SCD mRNA content with a concomitant increment of polyunsatured fatty acids (PUFA n-3. These results are related to the higher level of PUFA n-3 present in linseed than sunflower. Although, there were differences on mRNA level, there was not a simultaneously changes on SCD activity. In conclusion, PUFA n-3 act on the regulation of mRNA SCD level without affecting the activity of the relative enzyme.

Marcello Mele

2012-10-01

86

Olive oil, dietary fat and ageing, a mitochondrial approach  

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Full Text Available Ageing represents a great concern in developed countries because the high number of people included in this group (indeed, a further increase in the rate of old people it is expected in the near future. Another important aspect concerning ageing is the number of pathologies related with this phenomenon like Alzheimer, Parkinson, diabetes, cardiovascular disease and cancer. According to the free radical theory of ageing and its further mitochondrial extension, ageing is the result of the oxidative insult to the organism throughout the life. Some of the damages are not entirely repaired and are accumulated, leading to organism malfunction. Such oxidative-stress related events are particularly important in mitochondria and specially at the mitochondrial DNA level (less protected and more prone to oxidation than nuclear DNA and with a not well established repairing system. Such mitochondrial damage directly affects to the cell energy delivery system, being that, at least in part, the explanation for the structural and functional impairments related to age. Oxidative stress is related with the fatty acid composition of membranes. The intake of a type of fat affects in a direct way the fatty acids and antioxidants composition of subcellular membranes (including mitochondrial membranes and in an indirect way the susceptibility of the membrane to oxidation. Thus, if we build specific biological membranes according to particular types of fats, we would be able to positively affect the way and intensity in which different organs would age. This work hypothesis represents a new point of view in the investigation of ageing and might have important consequences. According to the above-mentioned premises, this work reviews the convenience to use virgin olive oil as dietary fat from the point of view of mitochondrial ageing.El envejecimiento preocupa enormemente en los países desarrollados por el alto número de personas incluidas en este grupo de población (se espera un aumento de este colectivo en el futuro. También es importante la incidencia de patologías relacionadas con el envejecimiento tales como Alzheimer, Parkinson, diabetes, enfermedades cardiovasculares y cáncer. Según la teoría de los radicales libres del envejecimiento y su posterior extensión mitocondrial, el envejecimiento proviene del daño oxidativo al organismo a lo largo de la vida. Parte del daño no es reparado y se acumula, dando lugar a un funcionamiento celular incorrecto. Tales eventos oxidativos son muy importantes a nivel mitocondrial, especialmente en su ADN, menos protegido y más susceptible a la oxidación que el nuclear y con un sistema de reparación aun sin elucidar en su totalidad. El daño mitocondrial afecta a la producción de energía celular, lo cual puede explicar las alteraciones estructurales y funcionales asociadas al envejecimiento. El estrés oxidativo se relaciona con la composición en ácidos grasos de las membranas biológicas. La ingesta de un tipo de grasa afecta a la composición en ácidos grasos y antioxidantes de las membranas subcelulares y a la susceptibilidad de las mismas a la oxidación. Por tanto, si construyéramos membranas basadas en determinadas grasas, podríamos condicionar el modo e intensidad del envejecimiento en determinados órganos y tejidos. Esta hipótesis de trabajo representa un novedoso enfoque dentro del estudio del envejecimiento que podría tener importantes consecuencias. Según las premisas anteriores, el presente trabajo revisa la conveniencia del empleo en la dieta de aceite de oliva virgen de forma preferencial desde el punto de vista del envejecimiento mitocondrial.

Quiles, José L.

2004-03-01

87

Beneficial Effects of an Alternating High- Fat Dietary Regimen on Systemic Insulin Resistance, Hepatic and Renal Inflammation and Renal Function  

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Background An Alternating high- cholesterol dietary regimen has proven to be beneficial when compared to daily high- cholesterol feeding. In the current study we explored whether the same strategy is applicable to a high- fat dietary regimen. Objective To investigate whether an alternating high- fat dietary regimen can effectively diminish insulin resistance, hepatic and renal inflammation and renal dysfunction as compared to a continuous high- fat diet. Design Four groups of male ApoE*3Leiden mice (n?=?15) were exposed to different diet regimens for 20 weeks as follows: Group 1: low- fat diet (10 kcal% fat); Group 2: intermediate- fat diet (25 kcal% fat); Group 3: high- fat diet (45 kcal% fat) and Group 4: alternating- fat diet (10 kcal% fat for 4 days and 45 kcal% fat for 3 days in a week). Results Compared to high fat diet feeding, the alternating and intermediate- fat diet groups had reduced body weight gain and did not develop insulin resistance or albuminuria. In addition, in the alternating and intermediate- fat diet groups, parameters of tissue inflammation were markedly reduced compared to high fat diet fed mice. Conclusion Both alternating and intermediate- fat feeding were beneficial in terms of reducing body weight gain, insulin resistance, hepatic and renal inflammation and renal dysfunction. Thus beneficial effects of alternating feeding regimens on cardiometabolic risk factors are not only applicable for cholesterol containing diets but can be extended to diets high in fat content. PMID:23049881

Yakala, Gopala K.; van der Heijden, Roel; Molema, Grietje; Schipper, Martin; Wielinga, Peter Y.; Kleemann, Robert; Kooistra, Teake; Heeringa, Peter

2012-01-01

88

Dietary fat intake and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

There are inconsistent and limited data available to assess the relationship between fat intake and risk of epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC). We examined the consumption of total fat, fat sources and fat subtypes in relation to risk of EOC and its major histologic subtypes in the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition which includes incident invasive (n=1095) and borderline (n=96) EOC. Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). In multivariate models, we observed no association with consumption of total fat, animal or plant fat, saturated fat, cholesterol, monounsaturated fat, or fatty fish and risk of invasive EOC. There was, however, an increased risk of invasive EOC in the highest category of intake (Quartile 4 vs. Quartile 1) of polyunsaturated fat (HR=1.22, 95% CI=1.02-1.48, Ptrend=0.02). We did not observe heterogeneity in the risk associations in comparisons of serous and endometrioid histologic subtypes. This study does not support an etiological role for total fat intake in relation to EOC risk; however, based on observations of a positive association between intake of polyunsaturated fat and invasive EOC risk in the current and previous studies, this fat subtype warrants further investigation to determine its potential role in EOC development.

Merritt, Melissa A; Riboli, Elio

2014-01-01

89

Effects of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, breed and dietary vitamin E on the fatty acids of lamb muscle, liver and adipose tissue.  

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The effect of feeding n-3 PUFA on the fatty acid composition of muscle, adipose tissue and liver of lambs was investigated. Groups of eight ram lambs per breed, SuffolkxLleyn (24 kg live weight) and Scottish Blackface (18 kg live weight), were each fed one of six diets containing one of three fat sources (50 g fatty acids/kg DM; Megalac((R)) (calcium soap of palm fatty acid distillate; Volac Ltd, Royston, Herts., UK) and formaldehyde-treated whole linseed (Trouw Nutrition UK, Northwich, Ches., UK) either alone or with fish oil (1:1, w/w) and either 100 or 500 mg alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg DM. Feed was offered ad libitum until slaughter at approximately half breed mature live weight. The type of dietary fat had no effect on intake, growth rate or feed conversion ratio. The 3.0-fold higher concentration of 18 : 3n-3 in the linseed compared with the Megalac((R)) diet approximately doubled (Plinseed also increased (Plinseed-fish oil raised the 20 : 5n-3 concentrations above those for the linseed diet and also increased 22 : 6n-3. Scottish Blackface lambs had lower concentrations of 18 : 3n-3 in all lipids compared with Suffolk x Lleyn lambs, but more 20 : 5n-3 in the polar lipids of muscle and liver. High levels of dietary vitamin E were associated with small decreases in the concentration of monounsaturated fatty acids and increases in PUFA. Linseed raised the PUFA : saturated fatty acid ratios in liver and adipose tissue but not in muscle, and improved the n-6 : n-3 fatty acid ratio, as did the linseed-fish oil. Different combinations of dietary fatty acids and better protection against rumen biohydrogenation are required to improve muscle PUFA : saturated fatty acids ratios. PMID:15035682

Demirel, G; Wachira, A M; Sinclair, L A; Wilkinson, R G; Wood, J D; Enser, M

2004-04-01

90

The lipid messenger OEA links dietary fat intake to satiety  

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The association between fat consumption and obesity underscores the need to identify physiological signals that control fat intake. Previous studies have shown that feeding stimulates small-intestinal mucosal cells to produce the lipid messenger oleoylethanolamide (OEA) which, when administered as a drug, decreases meal frequency by engaging peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-? (PPAR-?). Here we report that duodenal infusion of fat stimulates OEA mobilization in the proximal small ...

Schwartz, Gary J.; Fu, Jin; Astarita, Giuseppe; Li, Xiaosong; Gaetani, Silvana; Campolongo, Patrizia; Cuomo, Vincenzo; Piomelli, Daniele

2008-01-01

91

Dietary Role of Omega - 3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid (PUFA: A Study with Growing Chicks, Gallus domesticus  

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Full Text Available The 7 days old chicks, Gallus domesticus were fed with a diet supplemented with 2.5%, 5% and 10% of ?-3 enriched PUFA (containing 180mg of eciosapentaenoic acid and 120mg docosahexaenoic acid per gram oil for a period of 30 days. Dietary supplementation of PUFA promotes the growth of the birds that was reflected in the elevation of tissue protein, cholesterol and phospholipid along with a reduction in tissue triglycerides concentrations. Accumulation of ?-3 PUFA along with the depletion of ?-6 PUFA, oleic acid, myristic acid and stearic acid in the tissues was detected. Supplementations of 10% ?-3 enriched PUFA promote the health status of the bird as evident from 20% increase in the haemoglobin concentration of blood, 60% decrease in the serum LDH activity and with no change in the serum cholesterol profiles. 75% reduction in HMG CoA reductase activity along with 62% augmentation of the HMG CoA synthase activity in the liver was recorded which suggest the alteration of cholesterol metabolism in the bird.

R. Roy

2008-01-01

92

The effects on boar sperm quality of dietary supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids differ among porcine breeds.  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study was undertaken to shed light on the relationship between boar sperm quality and dietary supplementation with omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, which has been reported inconsistently in the literature. With this aim, such effects were evaluated and compared among three different porcine breeds: Duroc, Large-White, and Pietrain. Animals were randomly separated into two groups and fed either with a control diet or with a diet supplemented with omega-3. Sperm quality of these boar (ejaculate volume, sperm concentration, sperm viability, acrosome and mitochondrial sheath integrity, sperm motility, sperm morphology, and osmotic resistance of spermatozoa) was assessed every week for a 26-week period. Supplementing boar's diet with omega-3 did not affect ejaculate volume, sperm concentration, sperm motility, sperm viability, and acrosome and mitochondrial sheath integrity. In contrast, supplemented diet positively affected both sperm morphology in Large-White and Pietrain breeds and the osmotic resistance of Pietrain spermatozoa. No effects were seen for the same sperm parameters in Duroc breed. These breed-differences in boar fed with the supplemented diet could explain the contradictions in literature and might be related with differences in the composition of plasma membrane among breeds reported by other authors. Because no harmful effects were observed in the three evaluated breeds, but positive effects in Large-White and Pietrain boar, we can conclude that omega-3 fatty acids may be added to boar's diet at the levels used in this study to improve their sperm quality. More research is, however, needed to determine how these fatty acids differently affect the morphology and the osmotic resistance of the spermatozoa in these breeds. PMID:21458051

Yeste, Marc; Barrera, Xavier; Coll, David; Bonet, Sergi

2011-07-01

93

Effect of dietary fat type on anxiety-like and depression-like behavior in mice  

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Dietary fat plays an important role in higher brain functions. We aimed to assess the short and long term intake of three different types of dietary fat (soybean oil, lard, and fish oil) on anxiety-like and depression-like behavior in mice. For the short term intake assessment, a behavioral test battery for anxiety and depression was carried out for a 3-day feeding period. For the long term intake assessment, a behavioral test battery began after the 4-week feeding period. During the short te...

Mizunoya, Wataru; Ohnuki, Koichiro; Baba, Kento; Miyahara, Hideo; Shimizu, Naomi; Tabata, Kuniko; Kino, Takako; Sato, Yusuke; Tatsumi, Ryuichi; Ikeuchi, Yoshihide

2013-01-01

94

Dietary fat influences on polyp phenotype in multiple intestinal neoplasia?mice  

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Significant differences in colon cancer incidence worldwide have led to the hypothesis that this variation can be explained largely by environmental, notably dietary influences. Although a positive correlation between dietary fat intake and incidence is suggested from some human epidemiological and rodent carcinogenesis studies, a direct association remains contentious. Using a spontaneous mouse tumor model of multiple intestinal neoplasia, we demonstrate that there is a generalized increase ...

Wasan, Harpreet S.; Novelli, Marco; Bee, Julie; Bodmer, Walter F.

1997-01-01

95

Chronic and acute regulation of intestinal triglyceride metabolism genes by dietary fat  

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Excess dietary fat is associated with obesity and metabolic syndrome. The small intestine efficiently absorbs a range of dietary triglyceride, suggesting intestinal adaptation to various triglyceride intakes. In the current study, we analyze intestinal mRNA levels of proteins involved in intestinal triglyceride metabolism in lean and diet induced obese mice. Obese mice show increased intestinal adipose differentiation related protein, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ?, peroxisome ...

Rosen, Mary C. W.

2011-01-01

96

On the binding ratio of ?-cyclodextrin to dietary fat in humans  

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KL Catherine Jen,1,2 George Grunberger,3 Joseph D Artiss2,4 1Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA; 2ArtJen Complexus Inc, Windsor, ON, Canada; 3The Grunberger Diabetes Institute, Bloomfield Hills, MI, USA; 4Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: ?-Cyclodextrin (?-CD), a soluble dietary fiber, has been shown to bind and eliminate nine times of its own weight in dietary fat. Studie...

Klc, Jen; Grunberger G; Jd, Artiss

2013-01-01

97

IMPACTS OF HIGH DIETARY FAT ON SERUM CHOLESTEROL AND DEVELOPMENT OF FATTY LIVER IN RATS  

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The present study was designed to evaluate the impacts of high dietary fat on serum Total cholesterol and fatty liver syndrome in rats. Rats are fed on diets containing cholesterol; they develop fatty livers which are characterized by the presence in the liver of excessive amounts of cholesteryl esters, and glyceride. Increasement of glyceride content depend on a number of factors, such as the dietary contents of choline, While the nature of the "cholesterol" fatty liver and the effects on i...

Rajesh Pandey et al

2012-01-01

98

Acute liver failure caused by ‘fat burners’ and dietary supplements: A case report and literature review  

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Globally, people are struggling with obesity. Many effective, non-conventional methods of weight reduction, such as herbal and natural dietary supplements, are increasingly being sought. Fat burners are believed to raise metabolism, burn more calories and hasten fat loss. Despite patient perceptions that herbal remedies are free of adverse effects, some supplements are associated with severe hepatotoxicity. The present report describes a young healthy woman who presented with fulminant hepati...

Radha Krishna, Y.; Mittal, V.; Grewal, P.; Fiel, Mi; Schiano, T.

2011-01-01

99

Metabolism and secretory function of white adipose tissue: effect of dietary fat  

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Approximately 40% of the total energy consumed by western populations is represented by lipids, most of them being ingested as triacylglycerols and phospholipids. The focus of this review is to analyze the effect of the type of dietary fat on white adipose tissue metabolism and secretory function, particularly on haptoglobin, TNF-?, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and adiponectin secretion. Previous studies have demonstrated that the duration of the exposure to the high-fat feeding, am...

Oller Do Nascimento, Cla?udia M.; Ribeiro, Eliane B.; Oyama, Lila M.

2009-01-01

100

Dietary fat and reproduction in the post partum sow.  

Science.gov (United States)

Lactating sows are not able to ingest sufficient energy to produce the large amount of milk they are presently capable of. Therefore, sows use a considerable amount of body reserves to maintain their milk production. Body weight loss is negatively associated with subsequent reproductive performance. Addition of fat to the diet is often used to increase energy intake during lactation. This review examines the effects of adding fat to the diet on subsequent reproductive performance. Fat may affect reproduction in three different ways; first, by increasing milk fat output. Higher milk fat output limits or even nullifies the effect of a higher energy intake on body weight loss in ad libitum fed sows. It has even been demonstrated that sows fed an isocaloric fat-rich diet lost more body reserves than sows fed a carbohydrate-rich diet. Second, fat-rich diets increase blood metabolite levels (non esterified fatty acids, beta-hydroxybutyrate, urea), which might negatively impact reproductive performance. Third, fat-rich diets depress secretion of insulin and IGF-1, which directly or indirectly affects LH, oestradiol and progesterone secretion and follicle development. We concluded that adding fat to the diet of lactating sows disrupts the balance between C2 and C3 compounds, which is necessary to run the Krebs cycle in an efficient way, and may negatively affect the sows' subsequent reproductive performance. Therefore, increasing energy intake during lactation might be accomplished better by adjusting other management procedures to support feed intake, such as housing temperature, water intake, and prevention of overfeeding in early lactation. PMID:16866317

van den Brand, H; Kemp, B

2006-01-01

 
 
 
 
101

Effect of dietary oil supplementation on fatty acid profile of backfat and intramuscular fat in finishing pigs  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Two groups of finishing gilts were fed, for 4 weeks, a commercial feed enriched (2% with either rapeseed oil or sunflower oil. Pig growth was monitored bi-weekly and the fatty acid composition of backfat and Longissimus muscle was determined after slaughtering. Type of dietary oil affected significantly the fatty acid profile of pork fat, especially the C18:3n-3 concentration which was higher in pigs fed rapeseed oil than in those fed sunflower oil. The content of monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA of Longissimus muscle was significantly higher than that of backfat, due to the its higher concentration of C18:1cis9 and C16:1. Differently, the long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA content was higher in backfat than in Longissimus muscle. These results confirm that it is possible to manipulate the fatty acid composition of the diet, in order to improve the health properties of the adipose tissues of pork meat.

Giuseppe Pulina

2010-01-01

102

On the binding ratio of ?-cyclodextrin to dietary fat in humans  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available KL Catherine Jen,1,2 George Grunberger,3 Joseph D Artiss2,4 1Department of Nutrition and Food Science, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA; 2ArtJen Complexus Inc, Windsor, ON, Canada; 3The Grunberger Diabetes Institute, Bloomfield Hills, MI, USA; 4Department of Pathology, School of Medicine, Wayne State University, Detroit, MI, USA Abstract: ?-Cyclodextrin (?-CD, a soluble dietary fiber, has been shown to bind and eliminate nine times of its own weight in dietary fat. Studies with different animal models have reported that ?-CD preferentially binds saturated fatty acids, reducing saturated and trans fatty acid levels in blood. A clinical trial demonstrated that ?-CD prevented weight gain in obese diabetic patients. The present study was designed to examine whether ?-CD also shows a preference in binding saturated fatty acids in humans and to confirm the 1:9 binding ratio in humans. Sixty-six obese diabetic patients were recruited at the beginning of this 3-month, double-blind, and placebo-controlled study. Patients were randomly assigned to the Active or Placebo group. Blood samples and 3-day dietary records were collected at baseline and at the end of months 1, 2, and 3. A bottle of 180 tablets of active or placebo tablets was dispensed to each participant at the beginning of each month. Dietary records were analyzed using The Food Processor software. It was observed that ?-CD has a higher affinity towards saturated fats than to unsaturated fats. Participants with higher intakes of total and saturated fat lost more weight than those with lower intakes (P < 0.05 and < 0.01, respectively. These data support the earlier observation in both in vitro and animal studies that ?-CD binds with dietary fat in a 1:9 ratio and further demonstrate the efficacy of ?-CD in binding to and eliminating dietary fat, especially saturated fats. ?-CD may play a significant role in reducing blood cholesterol and triglyceride levels as well as stopping chronic weight gain. Keywords: FBCx®, fat binding capacity, 1:9 binding ratio, reducing blood cholesterol levels, saturated, dietary analysis

Jen KLC

2013-07-01

103

Relationship between Dietary Beef, Fat, and Pork and Alcoholic Cirrhosis  

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Nanji and French [1] investigated the relationship between per-caput consumption of total fat, beef, and pork and for alcohol consumption and rates of mortality for cirrhosis for 16 countries for 1965. The present study reports significant and positive associations for 1996 and 2003 between the following: alcohol consumption and cirrhosis mortality, pork consumption and cirrhosis mortality, the product of alcohol and pork consumption and the product of alcohol and fat consumption. These suppo...

Francis Stephen Bridges

2009-01-01

104

Dietary fat and reproduction in the post partum sow  

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Lactating sows are not able to ingest sufficient energy to produce the large amount of milk they are presently capable of. Therefore, sows use a considerable amount of body reserves to maintain their milk production. The high amount of body weight loss is negatively associated with subsequent reproductive performance. Addition of fat to the diet is often used to increase energy intake during lactation. The intent of this review is to examine the effect of fat addition to the diet on subsequen...

Brand, H.; Kemp, B.

2006-01-01

105

The effect of dietary fat on the fatty acid composition and cholesterol content of Hy-line and Warren hen eggs  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present study analyzed the effect of dietary fat and strain on the fatty acid and cholesterol contents of eggs over a 20 month-period. Hy-line and Warren hens received three consecutive 7% lipid diets in which the basal constituents of the diet supplied 3% of the fats while the remaining 4% was composed of fats, oils or oleins added to progressively increase polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA levels, while decreasing dietary levels of both saturated fatty acids (SFA and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA. In general, the percentages of most fatty acids in egg lipids were affected by changes in dietary lipids but not by the strain. Data suggest the existence of a dietary threshold for elaidic acid to appear in eggs. Mufa decreased and total PUFA increased throughout the study. The cholesterol egg content was higher at the animal fat plus soybean oil than at the animal fat or the olein plus soybean oil blend. Overall, results showed that changes in dietary lipids influenced fatty acid composition and hence atherogenic and thrombogenic indexes much more than the strain.El objetivo del presente estudio fue analizar los efectos de la grasa de la dieta de dos estirpes de ponedoras (Hy-line y Warren sobre el contenido de ácidos grasos y colesterol del huevo durante un periodo del ciclo de puesta de 20 meses. Ambas estirpes recibieron 3 dietas consecutivas que contenían 7% de lípidos de los cuales 3% provenía de los componentes basales de la dieta y 4% fue adicionado en forma de grasa, aceites u oleínas con objeto de aumentar progresivamente el contenido de ácidos grasos poliinsaturados y disminuir el contenido de los ácidos grasos saturados y monoinsaturados. El cambio de grasa en la dieta afectó al perfil de la mayoría de los ácidos grasos del huevo, sugiriéndose la existencia de un mínimo de ácido elaídico en la grasa añadida para su aparición en el huevo. El contenido de AGP se incrementó mientras que el de AGM disminuyó en el huevo a lo largo del estudio. El contenido de colesterol fue mas elevado con la mezcla de grasa animal/aceite de soja que con la grasa animal o con la mezcla oleica/aceite de soja. La grasa añadida a la dieta más que la estirpe de ponedora influyó sobre la composición de ácidos grasos el cociente AGS/AGP contenido de colesterol e índices aterogénicos y trombogénicos.

Vergara, G.

2009-09-01

106

EFFECTS OF HIGH DIETARY FAT ON SERUM CHOLESTEROL AND FATTY LIVER SYNDROME IN BROILERS  

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The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of high dietary fat on serum cholesterol and fatty liver syndrome in broilers. For this purpose, 90 day-old chicks were divided into three equal groups A, B and C. Group A acted as control. The birds of group B were fed on diet containing vegetable fat while birds of group C were fed on diet containing animal fat. It was observed that the serum cholestrol values in chicks of groups B and C were higher than those of the control group. Furt...

I A Qureshi, S. A. Khan

2004-01-01

107

INFLUENCE OF DIETARY FAT ON LEPTIN AND INSULIN IN MALE ALBINO RATS  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Sixty male albino rats were arranged into 5 equal groups which were used in this study to investigate the relation between leptin and insulin hormones under high fat intake and to assess the role of fresh vegetable intake on minimizing dyslipidemia.The results denoted that dietary fat caused significant increase in the levels of blood glucose and leptin hormone with significant decrease in insulin concentration and with prolonged high fat intake, insulin level was increased. However, the increased leptin and glucose indicated that prolonged fatty diet may cause insulin resistance. Addition of green vegetables to the diet normalized to a great extent the level of cholesterol, triglycerides, VLDL, glucose and insulin

108

Influence of Self-Efficacy on Fat-Related Dietary Behavior in Chinese Americans  

Science.gov (United States)

The purpose of this study was to describe the relationship between self-efficacy and fat-related dietary behavior among a sample of first and second generation Chinese Americans living in New York City. A survey questionnaire was administered to a purposive sample of 743 Chinese Americans, ranging from ages 21 to 73. The questionnaire measured…

Liou, Doreen

2004-01-01

109

The intake of saturated fat and dietary fibre: a possible indicator of diet quality  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The aim of the present study was to assess if a simple dietary quality index (SDQI) is a useful indicator for nutritional quality in the Danish diet. Data from the Danish National Dietary Survey 2000-2 for adults (n 3151; age 18-75 years) were used to construct an SDQI based on the intake of dietary fibre and saturated fat. The SDQI was used to rank the individuals into three subgroups: the 25 % closest in meeting the recommended intakes of saturated fat and dietary fibre (compliers), the 25 % furthest away (non-compliers) and the 50 % in between (intermediates). Significant differences in food and nutrient intake between these subgroups were identified by intakes of food groups and intakes of nutrients followed by non-parametric tests. Compared with the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations 2004 and the Danish Dietary Guidelines 2005, compliers had a significantly better nutrient profile than intermediates and non-compliers, as the diet of compliers contained more whole-grain cereals, fruits, vegetables and fish,and more frequently low-fat dairy products, lean meats and boiled potatoes. The diet of all subgroups, especially non-compliers, had a high content of nutrient-poor, energy-dense foods, for example, salty snacks, confectionery, and beverages, for example, soft drinks and alcohol. The SDQI is a simple and useful tool to characterise the diet quality of Danish adults.

Biltoft-Jensen, Anja Pia; Fagt, Sisse

2008-01-01

110

Dietary fat content and fiber type modulate hind gut microbial community and metabolic markers in the pig.  

Science.gov (United States)

Obesity leads to changes in the gut microbial community which contribute to the metabolic dysregulation in obesity. Dietary fat and fiber affect the caloric density of foods. The impact of dietary fat content and fiber type on the microbial community in the hind gut is unknown. Effect of dietary fat level and fiber type on hindgut microbiota and volatile fatty acid (VFA) profiles was investigated. Expression of metabolic marker genes in the gut, adipose tissue and liver was determined. A 2 × 2 experiment was conducted in pigs fed at two dietary fat levels (5% or 17.5% swine grease) and two fiber types (4% inulin, fermentable fructo-oligosaccharide or 4% solka floc, non-fermentable cellulose). High fat diets (HFD) resulted in a higher (Psolka floc, attenuated (Psolka floc feeding. Cluster analysis of pairwise Dice similarity comparisons of the DGGE profiles showed grouping by fiber type but not the level of dietary fat. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) of PCR- DGGE profiles showed that inulin feeding negatively correlated with back fat thickness. This study suggests a strong interplay between dietary fat level and fiber type in determining susceptibility to obesity. PMID:23573202

Yan, Hui; Potu, Ramesh; Lu, Hang; Vezzoni de Almeida, Vivian; Stewart, Terry; Ragland, Darryl; Armstrong, Arthur; Adeola, Olayiwola; Nakatsu, Cindy H; Ajuwon, Kolapo M

2013-01-01

111

Dietary whey protein decreases food intake and body fat in rats.  

Science.gov (United States)

We investigated the effects of dietary whey protein on food intake, body fat, and body weight gain in rats. Adult (11-12 week) male Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into three dietary treatment groups for a 10-week study: control. Whey protein (HP-W), or high-protein content control (HP-S). Albumin was used as the basic protein source for all three diets. HP-W and HP-S diets contained an additional 24% (wt/wt) whey or isoflavone-free soy protein, respectively. Food intake, body weight, body fat, respiratory quotient (RQ), plasma cholecystokinin (CCK), glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), peptide YY (PYY), and leptin were measured during and/or at the end of the study. The results showed that body fat and body weight gain were lower (P < 0.05) at the end of study in rats fed HP-W or HP-S vs. control diet. The cumulative food intake measured over the 10-week study period was lower in the HP-W vs. control and HP-S groups (P < 0.01). Further, HP-W fed rats exhibited lower N(2) free RQ values than did control and HP-S groups (P < 0.01). Plasma concentrations of total GLP-1 were higher in HP-W and HP-S vs. control group (P < 0.05), whereas plasma CCK, PYY, and leptin did not differ among the three groups. In conclusion, although dietary HP-W and HP-S each decrease body fat accumulation and body weight gain, the mechanism(s) involved appear to be different. HP-S fed rats exhibit increased fat oxidation, whereas HP-W fed rats show decreased food intake and increased fat oxidation, which may contribute to the effects of whey protein on body fat. PMID:21331067

Zhou, June; Keenan, Michael J; Losso, Jack N; Raggio, Anne M; Shen, Li; McCutcheon, Kathleen L; Tulley, Richard T; Blackman, Marc R; Martin, Roy J

2011-08-01

112

Coassimilation of dietary fat and benzo(a)pyrene in the small intestine: an absorption model using the killifish  

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Benzo(a)pyrene (BP) was dissolved in dietary fat and fed in a single dose to killifish (Fundulus heteroclitus). Fluorescence microscopic examinations of small intestinal content and frozen sections of whole small intestine revealed that during fat digestion BP was codispersed in liquid crystalline product phases produced during lipolysis and then coabsorbed with dietary lipid followed by its reappearance in intracellular fat droplets. During the time that the absorbed fat remained in the enterocytes, BP fluorescence was initially concentrated in the intracellular fat droplets and then spread throughout the cytosol of the enterocytes. Tissue analyses showed that BP was rapidly metabolized in the intestine and transported to the gallbladder. These studies show that separation of a dissolved hydrophobic carcinogen from dietary fat occurs primarily after the fat has been digested, dispersed, absorbed, and reassembled in the enterocyte. The inability of the enterocyte to discriminate between dietary fat and dissolved carcinogenic compounds may be a partial explanation of the observed link between high fat diets and the incidence of some cancers. In vertebrates, the intestine and not the liver, appears to be the major site of metabolism of dietary polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs).

Vetter, R.D.; Carey, M.C.; Patton, J.S.

1985-04-01

113

Oral and gastrointestinal sensing of dietary fat and appetite regulation in humans: modification by diet and obesity  

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Dietary fat interacts with receptors in both the oral cavity and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract to regulate fat and energy intake. This review discusses recent developments in our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the effects of fat, through its digestive products, fatty acids (FAs), on GI function and energy intake, the role of oral and intestinal FA receptors, and the implications that changes in oral and small intestinal sensitivity in response to ingested fat may have for the de...

TanyaJLittle

2010-01-01

114

Effect of dietary fat level on carcass traits and flesh quality of European Sea Bass (Dicentrarchus labrax from mariculture  

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Full Text Available The study aimed at evaluating the effect of the reduction of dietary fat on juvenile European sea bass nutritional value and quality traits. Fish were reared in floating cages (Trieste Gulf, Italy from July (11 to October (10. Two isoproteic diets were compared: LF (low fat, EE = 19.4% vs. HF (high fat, EE = 24.6%. No significantly different growth performance was observed. LF diet-fed fish were characterized by the reduction of celomatic fat (not edible fraction and by the increase in dressing percentage. The tested dietary fat level also affected both fillet and epiaxial white muscle proximate composition, resulting in a significantly lower fillet lipid concentration in LF diet-fed fish. Dietary treatment influenced cooked fillet colour and texture probably as a consequence of the different intramuscular fat deposition. Fillet from HF-fed fish, in fact, presented higher lightness (L* value and lower instrumental strengthness.

Severino Segato

2010-01-01

115

TFAP2B Influences the Effect of Dietary Fat on Weight Loss under Energy Restriction  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Numerous gene loci are related to single measures of body weight and shape. We investigated if 55 SNPs previously associated with BMI or waist measures, modify the effects of fat intake on weight loss and waist reduction under energy restriction. Methods and Findings Randomized controlled trial of 771 obese adults. (Registration: ISRCTN25867281.) One SNP was selected for replication in another weight loss intervention study of 934 obese adults. The original trial was a 10-week 600 kcal/d energy-deficient diet with energy percentage from fat (fat%) in range of 20–25 or 40–45. The replication study used an 8-weeks diet of 880 kcal/d and 20 fat%; change in fat% intake was used for estimation of interaction effects. The main outcomes were intervention weight loss and waist reduction. In the trial, mean change in fat% intake was ?12/+4 in the low/high-fat groups. In the replication study, it was ?23/?12 among those reducing fat% more/less than the median. TFAP2B-rs987237 genotype AA was associated with 1.0 kg (95% CI, 0.4; 1.6) greater weight loss on the low-fat, and GG genotype with 2.6 kg (1.1; 4.1) greater weight loss on the high-fat (interaction p-value; p?=?0.00007). The replication study showed a similar (non-significant) interaction pattern. Waist reduction results generally were similar. Study-strengths include (i) the discovery study randomised trial design combined with the replication opportunity (ii) the strict dietary intake control in both studies (iii) the large sample sizes of both studies. Limitations are (i) the low minor allele frequency of the TFAP2B polymorphism, making it hard to investigate non-additive genetic effects (ii) the different interventions preventing identical replication-discovery study designs (iii) some missing data for non-completers and dietary intake. No adverse effects/outcomes or side-effects were observed. Conclusions Under energy restriction, TFAP2B may modify the effect of dietary fat intake on weight loss and waist reduction. PMID:22952648

Banasik, Karina; Harder, Marie N.; Taylor, Moira A.; Hager, Jörg; Arner, Peter; Oppert, Jean-Michel; Martinez, J. Alfredo; Polak, Jan; Rousseau, Francis; Langin, Dominique; Rössner, Stephan; Holst, Claus; MacDonald, Ian A.; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Pfeiffer, Andreas F. H.; Kunesova, Marie; Saris, Wim H. M.; Hansen, Torben; Pedersen, Oluf; Astrup, Arne; Sørensen, Thorkild I. A.

2012-01-01

116

TFAP2B Influences the Effect of Dietary Fat on Weight Loss under Energy Restriction  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Background: Numerous gene loci are related to single measures of body weight and shape. We investigated if 55 SNPs previously associated with BMI or waist measures, modify the effects of fat intake on weight loss and waist reduction under energy restriction. Methods and Findings: Randomized controlled trial of 771 obese adults. (Registration: ISRCTN25867281.) One SNP was selected for replication in another weight loss intervention study of 934 obese adults. The original trial was a 10-week 600 kcal/d energy-deficient diet with energy percentage from fat (fat%) in range of 20-25 or 40-45. The replication study used an 8-weeks diet of 880 kcal/d and 20 fat%; change in fat% intake was used for estimation of interaction effects. The main outcomes were intervention weight loss and waist reduction. In the trial, mean change in fat% intake was -12/+4 in the low/high-fat groups. In the replication study, it was -23/-12 among those reducing fat% more/less than the median. TFAP2B-rs987237 genotype AA was associated with 1.0 kg (95% CI, 0.4; 1.6) greater weight loss on the low-fat, and GG genotype with 2.6 kg (1.1; 4.1) greater weight loss on the high-fat (interaction p-value; p=0.00007). The replication study showed a similar (non-significant) interaction pattern. Waist reduction results generally were similar. Study-strengths include (i) the discovery study randomised trial design combined with the replication opportunity (ii) the strict dietary intake control in both studies (iii) the large sample sizes of both studies. Limitations are (i) the low minor allele frequency of the TFAP2B polymorphism, making it hard to investigate non-additive genetic effects (ii) the different interventions preventing identical replication-discovery study designs (iii) some missing data for non-completers and dietary intake. No adverse effects/outcomes or side-effects were observed. Conclusions: Under energy restriction, TFAP2B may modify the effect of dietary fat intake on weight loss and waist reduction.

Stocks, T.; Angquist, L.

2012-01-01

117

Interleukin-6 Gene Polymorphisms, Dietary Fat Intake, Obesity and Serum Lipid Concentrations in Black and White South African Women  

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This study investigated interactions between dietary fat intake and IL-6 polymorphisms on obesity and serum lipids in black and white South African (SA) women. Normal-weight and obese, black and white women underwent measurements of body composition, serum lipids and dietary fat intake, and were genotyped for the IL-6 ?174 G>C, IVS3 +281 G>T and IVS4 +869 A>G polymorphisms. In black women the IVS4 +869 G allele was associated with greater adiposity, and with increasing dietary fat...

Joffe, Yael T.; Lize van der Merwe; Juliet Evans; Malcolm Collins; Lambert, Estelle V.; September, Alison V.; Goedecke, Julia H.

2014-01-01

118

The role of Odontella aurita, a marine diatom rich in EPA, as a dietary supplement in dyslipidemia, platelet function and oxidative stress in high-fat fed rats  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary changes are a major factor in determining cardiovascular risk. n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids modulate the risk factors for metabolic syndrome via multiple mechanisms, including the regulation of the lipid metabolism. We therefore investigated the effect of Odontella aurita, a microalga rich in EPA, which is already used as a food supplement, on the risk factors for high-fat diet induced metabolic syndrome in rats. Methods Male Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups and were fed with a standard diet (control; with the standard diet supplemented with 3% freeze-dried O. aurita (COA; with a high-fat diet (HF; or with the high-fat diet supplemented with 3% of freeze-dried O. aurita (HFOA for 7 weeks. In this study we evaluated the impact of these different diets on the risk factors for metabolic syndrome, such as hyperlipidemia, platelet aggregation, thromboxane B2 production, and oxidative stress. Results After 7 weeks of treatment, high fat feeding had increased final body weight, glycemia, triacylglycerol, and total cholesterol levels in plasma and liver compared to the control diet. Collagen-induced platelet aggregation and basal platelet thromboxane B2 were also higher in the high-fat fed rats than in those in the control group. In the liver, oxidative stress was greater in the HF group than in the control group. O. aurita intake in HFOA-fed rats resulted in lower glycemia and lipid levels in the plasma and liver relative than in the HF group. Thus, in the HFOA group, n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid levels in the tissues studied (plasma, liver, and platelets were higher than in the HF group. Platelet hyper-aggregability tended to decrease in HFOA-fed rats as basal platelet thromboxane B2 production decreased. Finally, O. aurita reduced oxidative stress in the liver, with lower malondialdehyde levels and increased glutathione peroxidase activity. Conclusions O. aurita is a marine diatom rich in EPA as well as in other bioactive molecules, such as pigments. The synergistic effect of these microalgal compounds, displayed a beneficial effect in reducing the risk factors for high-fat induced metabolic syndrome: hyperlipidemia, platelet aggregation, and oxidative stress.

Haimeur Adil

2012-10-01

119

Effect of dietary fat levels on the susceptibility of colonic cells to nuclear-damaging agents  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The effect of two levels and types of dietary fats on the susceptibility of colonic cells to the nuclear-damaging effect of 1,2-dimethylhydrazine dihydrochloride (DMH), 2-amino-3,4-dimethylimidazo(4,5-f)quinoline (MeIQ), and gamma-radiation was investigated. Corn oil and beef tallow were added to the semisynthetic diet at 5% and 20% levels (weight/weight). A diet-related effect was not evident until after two weeks of feeding. Animals (C57BL/6J female mice) that were given the 20% corn oil or beef tallow diets had significantly (p less than 0.05) more nuclear aberrations in their colons 24 hours following treatment with DMH (5 mg or 10 mg/kg body wt or MeIQ (100 mg/kg body weight) than did those given low-fat diets (5% corn oil or beef tallow). The nuclear-damaging effect of gamma radiation was unaffected by dietary treatments. A high-fat diet had the most pronounced effect on DMH-treated animals, and maximum nuclear aberrations were observed 24 hours following the treatment. Thus, we concluded that increased levels of dietary fats elevate the toxicity of DMH and MeIQ to colonic epithelial cells

120

EFFECTS OF HIGH DIETARY FAT ON SERUM CHOLESTEROL AND FATTY LIVER SYNDROME IN BROILERS  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of high dietary fat on serum cholesterol and fatty liver syndrome in broilers. For this purpose, 90 day-old chicks were divided into three equal groups A, B and C. Group A acted as control. The birds of group B were fed on diet containing vegetable fat while birds of group C were fed on diet containing animal fat. It was observed that the serum cholestrol values in chicks of groups B and C were higher than those of the control group. Furthermore, the serum cholesterol value was higher in birds of group C than group B. Grossly, the livers of birds of groups B and C were enlarged, pale in colour, soft in consistency and were having petechial haemorrhages with fat and fibrin deposits. Histopathologically, livers of groups B and C showed fatty infiltration, haemorrhages and mass of eosinophilic materials. The vacuoles coalesced to create clear space that displaced the nucleus to the periphery of the cell. It was concluded that addition of dietary fat from animal and vegetable sources in the diet of broiler chicks not only resulted in increase in serum cholesterol but also in marked macroscopic and microscopic changes in liver.

I. A. Qureshi, S.A. Khan, Z. I. Chaudhry, N. A. Mian1, M. Y. Tipu and M. F. Rai

2004-10-01

 
 
 
 
121

Template to improve glycemic control without reducing adiposity or dietary fat  

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Drugs that improve chronic hyperglycemia independently of insulin signaling or reduction of adiposity or dietary fat intake may be highly desirable. Ad36, a human adenovirus, promotes glucose uptake in vitro independently of adiposity or proximal insulin signaling. We tested the ability of Ad36 to improve glycemic control in vivo and determined if the natural Ad36 infection in humans is associated with better glycemic control. C57BL/6J mice fed a chow diet or made diabetic with a high-fat (HF...

Krishnapuram, R.; Dhurandhar, E. J.; Dubuisson, O.; Kirk-ballard, H.; Bajpeyi, S.; Butte, N.; Sothern, M. S.; Larsen-meyer, E.; Chalew, S.; Bennett, B.; Gupta, A. K.; Greenway, F. L.; Johnson, W.; Brashear, M.; Reinhart, G.

2011-01-01

122

Effects of dietary high fat on prostate intraepithelial neoplasia in TRAMP mice  

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Increased fat intake is known to be a major cause of prostate cancer. In this study, we investigated the effect of dietary high fat on prostate intraepithelial neoplasia using transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate (TRAMP) mice. Six-week-old male TRAMP mice were fed AIN93G (control group, 4.0 kcal/kg, n=6) and AIN93G-HFD (experimental group, 4.8 kcal/kg, n=7) for 10 weeks. Prostate histopathology, urogenital tract (UGT) weight, epididymal white adipose tissue weight, argyrophilic nucleolar ...

Park, Sung-hoon; Chang, Seo-na; Baek, Min-won; Kim, Dong-jae; Na, Yi-rang; Seok, Seung-hyeok; Lee, Byoung-hee; Kim, Kyung-sul; Park, Jae-hak

2013-01-01

123

The impact of dietary calcium on body weight and fat mass  

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Studies demonstrate that increased intakes of calcium are associated with weight loss, which is specific to loss of fat mass. The purpose of this study was to determine if long term increases in dairy calcium consumption alter body weight and fat mass in young, healthy women. In this one year dairy calcium intervention, 135 young, healthy women with dietary calcium intakes <800 mg/day, caloric intakes ?2200 kcal/day and willing to consume dairy products were randomized to one of three group...

Gunther, Carolyn Woods

2004-01-01

124

Effect of Inuline and Oatmeal Addition on Fat and Dietary Fiber Content in Hot Press Wheat Flour Tortilla  

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Full Text Available Reduced fat wheat tortilla was formulated A formulation reduced in shortening with the fiber dietary properties of the whole grain has been proposed. The aim of this research was to evaluate the effect of the replacement of wheat flour by oatmeal and shortening by inuline, on some physical characteristics and fat and dietary content of wheat tortillas. Three treatments of tortilla were tested: refined, whole and a 4:3:3 refined: whole flour: oatmeal plus 9:1 shortening: inuline. Analysis of dietary fiber, fat, texture, diameter, thickness and color were performed. Results showed that this oatmeal-inuline tortillas had similar texture and thickness and lower diameter that conventional wheat tortillas. Oatmeal-inuline tortillas are redder than refined wheat tortilla. Oatmeal-inuline substitution tortilla had 45% less fat and 71% more dietary fiber than refined flour tortilla with same textural characteristics.

Erick Heredia-Olea

2014-12-01

125

Effect of the form of dietary fat and the concentration of dietary neutral detergent fiber on ileal and total tract endogenous losses and apparent and true digestibility of fat by growing pigs.  

Science.gov (United States)

An experiment was conducted to determine the effect of the form of dietary fat (extracted or intact fat) and of dietary NDF on ileal and total tract endogenous losses of fat (ELF), on apparent ileal (AID) and apparent total tract digestibility (ATTD) of fat, and on true ileal (TID) and true total tract digestibility (TTTD) of fat in growing pigs. A cornstarch-based basal diet that contained 1.27% fat was prepared and 3 diets were formulated by adding 2.0, 4.0, or 6.0% extracted fat (corn oil) to the basal diet at the expense of cornstarch. Three additional diets were formulated by adding 3.1, 6.2, or 9.3% Solka-Floc (International Fiber Corp., North Tonawanda, NY) to the diet containing 4.0% corn oil at the expense of cornstarch. The remaining 4 diets were prepared by adding whole corn germ meal to the diet at the expense of defatted corn germ meal to contain 3.0, 6.0, or 9.0% intact fat. Solka-Floc was also included in this diet at the expense of cornstarch in an attempt to keep NDF constant. Eleven barrows (initial average BW of 38.1 +/- 1.3 kg) were fitted with a T-cannula in the distal ileum, allotted to the 11 diets in an 11 x 11 Latin square design, and fed the diets at 3 times the energy requirement for maintenance. Increasing dietary extracted fat increased (linear and quadratic, P < 0.001) the AID and ATTD of fat. Increasing dietary intact fat also increased (linear and quadratic, P < 0.05) the AID and ATTD of fat. The average apparent digestibility of extracted fat (81.9%) was greater (P < 0.001) than that of intact fat (63.2%). Estimates of ELF were smaller (P < 0.05) for extracted fat than for intact fat at the end of the ileum and over the entire intestinal tract, but the TID (93.8%) and TTTD (94.2%) of extracted fat were greater (P < 0.05) than the TID (78.6%) and TTTD (84.1%) of intact fat. Increasing dietary extracted fat had no effects on the TID and TTTD of fat, but increasing dietary intact fat resulted in a quadratic reduction (P < 0.05) in the TTTD of fat. Increasing dietary NDF had a quadratic effect (P < 0.05) on the ATTD of fat but did not influence the AID, TID, and TTTD of fat. In conclusion, extracted fat induces a smaller amount of ELF and has a greater apparent and true digestibility than intact fat at the end of the ileum and over the entire intestinal tract. Purified NDF has little influence on apparent and true digestibility of fat. PMID:20453088

Kil, D Y; Sauber, T E; Jones, D B; Stein, H H

2010-09-01

126

Dietary fat, abdominal obesity and smoking modulate the relationship between plasma complement component 3 concentrations and metabolic syndrome risk  

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Objective: Chronic inflammation plays a role in the pathogenesis of metabolic syndrome (MetS) and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Complement component 3 (C3) is a novel cardiometabolic risk factor. Whether dietary fat intake modulates MetS risk conferred by elevated C3 concentrations is unknown. Our objective is to investigate the relationship between C3 concentrations and risk of the MetS and its phenotypes, and to further examine whether dietary fat intake modulates these relationships. ...

Mc Manus, Ross

2012-01-01

127

Socio-Demographic Characteristics and Nutritional Status of Individuals by Stages of Change for Dietary Fat Reduction  

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Changes in lifestyle and food habits have been implicated in the increasing rate of nutrition related chronic diseases in Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was conducted to identify socio-demographic characteristic and nutritional status of individuals by their readiness to reduce dietary fat intake. A total of 202 non-academic staff aged 18-56 years at Universiti Putra Malaysia participated in the study. Information on demographic, socio-economic and stages of change related to dietary fat r...

Wong, C. Y.; Zalilah, M. S.; Yap, L. D.

2009-01-01

128

Testing the predictive power of the transtheoretical model of behavior change applied to dietary fat intake  

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This study evaluated how well predictions from the transtheoretical model (TTM) generalized from smoking to diet. Longitudinal data were used from a randomized control trial on reducing dietary fat consumption in adults (n =1207) recruited from primary care practices. Predictive power was evaluated by making a priori predictions of the magnitude of change expected in the TTM constructs of temptation, pros and cons, and 10 processes of change when an individual transitions between the stages o...

Wright, Julie A.; Velicer, Wayne F.; Prochaska, James O.

2009-01-01

129

Hypercholesterolemia screening. Does knowledge of blood cholesterol level affect dietary fat intake?  

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OBJECTIVE: To assess whether knowing blood cholesterol test results influences people's intention to lower their dietary fat intake and to assess changes in diet after 3 months. DESIGN: Randomized clinical study. SETTING: Two hospital-based family medicine centres. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 526 patients aged 18 to 65, without prior knowledge of their blood cholesterol levels, were recruited. Seventy did not appear for their appointments, and 37 did not meet study criteria, leaving 419 particip...

Aubin, M.; Godin, G.; Ve?zina, L.; Maziade, J.; Desharnais, R.

1998-01-01

130

IMPACTS OF HIGH DIETARY FAT ON SERUM CHOLESTEROL AND DEVELOPMENT OF FATTY LIVER IN RATS  

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Full Text Available The present study was designed to evaluate the impacts of high dietary fat on serum Total cholesterol and fatty liver syndrome in rats. Rats are fed on diets containing cholesterol; they develop fatty livers which are characterized by the presence in the liver of excessive amounts of cholesteryl esters, and glyceride. Increasement of glyceride content depend on a number of factors, such as the dietary contents of choline, While the nature of the "cholesterol" fatty liver and the effects on its composition of a number of dietary and other factors. In the present paper, we investigated the quantitative changes which occur in the "cholesterol" fatty liver, as a result of variations in the fat content of the diet, with particular reference to the deposition of cholesterol and of glyceride on diets of constant cholesterol content. Investigation was conducted on 90 day old Wister rats. It was observed that the serum TC values in rats of groups B and C were higher than control group. Furthermore, the serum TC and TG value was higher in rats of group C than group B. Grossly, the livers of rats of groups B and C were enlarged, pale in colour, soft in consistency and were having petechial haemorrhages with fat and fibrin deposits. Histopathologically, livers of groups B and C showed fatty infiltration, haemorrhages and mass of eosinophilic materials. The vacuoles coalesced to create clear space that displaced the nucleus to the periphery of the cell. The results suggested that addition of dietary fat from animal and vegetable sources in the diet of rats not only resulted in increase in serum TC and TG but also in marked macroscopic and microscopic changes in vital organ liver.

Rajesh Pandey et al

2012-09-01

131

Dietary protein and urinary nitrogen in relation to 6-year changes in fat mass and fat-free mass  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

BACKGROUND: In contrast to the physiological expectation, observational studies show that greater protein intake is associated with subsequent body weight (BW) gain. An increase in fat-free mass (FFM) due to the anabolic effects of protein could explain this. OBJECTIVE: To examine associations between protein intake and subsequent changes in fat mass (FM) and FFM in longitudinal, observational data. DESIGN: A health examination, including measures of FM and FFM by bioelectrical impedance at baseline and follow-up 6 years later, was conducted. Diet history interviews (DHI) were performed, and 24-h urinary nitrogen collection at baseline was done. In total, 330 participants with DHI, of whom 227 had validated and complete 24-h urine collection data, were analyzed. Macronutrient energy substitution models were used. RESULTS: Mean estimated protein intake was 14.6 E% from DHI and 11.3 E% from urinary nitrogen. Estimated from DHI, FM increased 46?g per year, with every 1 E% protein substituted for fat (95% confidence interval (CI)=13, 79; P=0.006), and FFM increased 15?g per year (1, 30; P=0.046). RESULTS were similar in other substitution models. Estimated from urinary nitrogen, FM increased 53?g per year, with 1 E% protein substituted for other macronutrients (24, 81; P<0.0005), and FFM increased 18?g per year (6, 31; P=0.004). CONCLUSION: Within a habitual range, a greater protein intake was associated with BW gain, mostly in FM. This is in contrast to the expectations based on physiological and clinical trials, and calls for a better understanding of how habitual dietary protein influences long-term energy balance, versus how greater changes in dietary proteins may influence short-term energy balance.

Ankarfeldt, M Z; Gottliebsen, K

2015-01-01

132

Effect of dietary krill oil supplementation on the endocannabinoidome of metabolically relevant tissues from high-fat-fed mice  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (?-3-PUFA are known to ameliorate several metabolic risk factors for cardiovascular disease, and an association between elevated peripheral levels of endogenous ligands of cannabinoid receptors (endocannabinoids and the metabolic syndrome has been reported. We investigated the dose-dependent effects of dietary ?-3-PUFA supplementation, given as krill oil (KO, on metabolic parameters in high fat diet (HFD-fed mice and, in parallel, on the levels, in inguinal and epididymal adipose tissue (AT, liver, gastrocnemius muscle, kidneys and heart, of: 1 the endocannabinoids, anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG, 2 two anandamide congeners which activate PPAR? but not cannabinoid receptors, N-oleoylethanolamine and N-palmitoylethanolamine, and 3 the direct biosynthetic precursors of these compounds. Methods Lipids were identified and quantified using liquid chromatography coupled to atmospheric pressure chemical ionization single quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-APCI-MS or high resolution ion trap-time of flight mass spectrometry (LC-IT-ToF-MS. Results Eight-week HFD increased endocannabinoid levels in all tissues except the liver and epididymal AT, and KO reduced anandamide and/or 2-AG levels in all tissues but not in the liver, usually in a dose-dependent manner. Levels of endocannabinoid precursors were also generally down-regulated, indicating that KO affects levels of endocannabinoids in part by reducing the availability of their biosynthetic precursors. Usually smaller effects were found of KO on OEA and PEA levels. Conclusions Our data suggest that KO may promote therapeutic benefit by reducing endocannabinoid precursor availability and hence endocannabinoid biosynthesis.

Cohn Jeffrey S

2011-07-01

133

Acute liver failure caused by 'fat burners' and dietary supplements: a case report and literature review.  

Science.gov (United States)

Globally, people are struggling with obesity. Many effective, nonconventional methods of weight reduction, such as herbal and natural dietary supplements, are increasingly being sought. Fat burners are believed to raise metabolism, burn more calories and hasten fat loss. Despite patient perceptions that herbal remedies are free of adverse effects, some supplements are associated with severe hepatotoxicity. The present report describes a young healthy woman who presented with fulminant hepatic failure requiring emergent liver transplantation caused by a dietary supplement and fat burner containing usnic acid, green tea and guggul tree extracts. Thorough investigation, including histopathological examination, revealed no other cause of hepatotoxicity. The present case adds to the increasing number of reports of hepatotoxicity associated with dietary supplements containing usnic acid, and highlights that herbal extracts from green tea or guggul tree may not be free of adverse effects. Until these products are more closely regulated and their advertising better scrutinized, physicians and patients should become more familiar with herbal products that are commonly used as weight loss supplements and recognize those that are potentially harmful. PMID:21499580

Yellapu, Radha K; Mittal, Vivek; Grewal, Priya; Fiel, Mariaisabel; Schiano, Thomas

2011-03-01

134

Acute liver failure caused by ‘fat burners’ and dietary supplements: A case report and literature review  

Science.gov (United States)

Globally, people are struggling with obesity. Many effective, non-conventional methods of weight reduction, such as herbal and natural dietary supplements, are increasingly being sought. Fat burners are believed to raise metabolism, burn more calories and hasten fat loss. Despite patient perceptions that herbal remedies are free of adverse effects, some supplements are associated with severe hepatotoxicity. The present report describes a young healthy woman who presented with fulminant hepatic failure requiring emergent liver transplantation caused by a dietary supplement and fat burner containing usnic acid, green tea and guggul tree extracts. Thorough investigation, including histopathological examination, revealed no other cause of hepatotoxicity. The present case adds to the increasing number of reports of hepatotoxicity associated with dietary supplements containing usnic acid, and highlights that herbal extracts from green tea or guggul tree may not be free of adverse effects. Until these products are more closely regulated and their advertising better scrutinized, physicians and patients should become more familiar with herbal products that are commonly used as weight loss supplements and recognize those that are potentially harmful. PMID:21499580

Radha Krishna, Y; Mittal, V; Grewal, P; Fiel, MI; Schiano, T

2011-01-01

135

Concordant lipoprotein and weight responses to dietary fat changein identical twins with divergent exercise levels  

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Background/Objective: The purpose of this study is to testthe extent that individual lipoprotein responses to diet can beattributed to genes in the presence of divergent exercise levels.Design:Twenty-eight pairs of male monozygotic twins (one mostly sedentary, theother running an average of 50 km/week more than the sedentary twin) wentfrom a 6-week 40 percent fat diet to a 6-week 20 percent fat diet in acrossover design. The diets reduced fat primarily by reducing saturatedand polyunsaturated fat (both from 14 percent to 4 percent), whileincreasing carbohydrate intake from 45 percent to 65 percent. Results:Despite the twins' differences in physical activity, the dietarymanipulation produced significantly correlated changes (P<0.05) in thetwin's total cholesterol (r=0.56), low-density lipoprotein(LDL)-cholesterol (r=0.70), large, buoyant LDL (Sf7-12, r=0.52), apo A-I(r=0.49), Lp(a) (r=0.49), electrophoresis measurements of LDL-I (LDLsbetween 26 and 28.5 nm diameter, r=0.48), LDL-IIB (25.2-24.6 nm, r=0.54),LDL-IV (22-24.1 nm, r=0.50), and body weights (r=0.41). Replacing fatswith carbohydrates significantly decreased the size and ultracentrifugeflotation rate of the major LDL, the LDL mass concentrations of Sf7-12,LDL-I, high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and apo A-I, andsignificantly increased LDL-IIIA (24.7-25.5 nm diameter) and Lp(a).Conclusions: Even in the presence of extreme exercise difference, genessignificantly affect changes in LDL, apo A-I, Lp(a) and body weight whendietary fats are replaced with carbohydrates.

Williams, Paul T.; Blanche, Patricia J.; Rawlings, Robin; Krauss, Ronald M.

2004-06-01

136

Dietary Calcium Had No Reducing Effect on Body Fat and Weight Gain in Sprague-Dawley Rats  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Recently, studies have focused on the effects of dietary calcium on the weight and fatness. Some of these studies have indicated that there is negative relationship between dietary calcium and body fat, while others have reported no such effects. There are also controversies over serum parathyroid hormone, as its mechanism, on body fat and weight. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effects of three dietary calcium levels (0.2%, 0.5% or 1.2% Ca2+ on body fat and weight gain in male Sprague-Dawley rats, using same diet composition for nutrients other than calcium. The study duration was 72 days. At the end, truncal blood samples were drawn from decapitated rats to measure the effects of diets on serum calcium, PTH and vitamin D. The carcasses were minced and homogenized to measure their body fat percent by the methods of Soxhelet. There were no significant effects of dietary calcium on food intake (p>0.05, body weight gain (p>0.05 or carcass fat content (p>0.05, while the serum PTH levels were inversely related to calcium intake (p<0.05. In conclusion, our findings do not support the effects of dietary calcium and parathyroid hormone on body fat and weight.

J.M. Malekzadeh

2007-01-01

137

Dietary trimethylamine N-oxide exacerbates impaired glucose tolerance in mice fed a high fat diet.  

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Trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO) is an oxidation product of trimethylamine (TMA) and is present in many aquatic foods. Here, we investigated the effects of TMAO on glucose tolerance in high fat diet (HFD)-fed mice. Male C57BL/6 mice were randomly assigned to the control, high fat (HF), and TMAO groups. The HF group was fed a diet containing 25% fat, and the TMAO group was fed the HFD plus 0.2% TMAO for 4 weeks. After 3 weeks of feeding, oral glucose tolerance tests were performed. Dietary TMAO increased fasting insulin levels and homeostasis model assessment-estimated insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) and exacerbated the impaired glucose tolerance in HFD-fed mice. These effects were associated with the expression of genes related to the insulin signal pathway, glycogen synthesis, gluconeogenesis and glucose transport in liver. mRNA levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine MCP-1 increased significantly and of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 greatly decreased in adipose tissue. Our results suggest that dietary TMAO exacerbates impaired glucose tolerance, obstructs the hepatic insulin signaling pathway, and causes adipose tissue inflammation in mice fed a high fat diet. PMID:24721123

Gao, Xiang; Liu, Xiaofang; Xu, Jie; Xue, Changhu; Xue, Yong; Wang, Yuming

2014-10-01

138

En Balance Participants Decrease Dietary Fat and Cholesterol Intake as Part of a Culturally Sensitive Hispanic Diabetes Education Program  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess dietary intake habits of Mexican American Hispanic adults participating in the En Balance diabetes education program. Methods En Balance is a 3-month culturally sensitive diabetes education intervention for Spanish-speaking Hispanics. Of the 46 participants enrolled, 39 mainly Mexican American Hispanic adults with type 2 diabetes completed the En Balance program. Participants lived in the Riverside and San Bernardino counties of California, and all participants completed the program by June 2008. Dietary intake was assessed at baseline and at 3 months using the validated Southwest Food Frequency Questionnaire. Results Clinically important decreases in glycemic control and serum lipid levels were observed at the end of the 3-month program. The baseline diet was characterized by a high intake of energy (2478 ± 1140 kcal), total fat (87 ± 44 g/day), saturated fat (28 ± 15 g/day), dietary cholesterol (338 ± 217 mg/day), and sodium (4236 ± 2055 mg/day). At 3 months, the En Balance group mean intake of dietary fat (P = .045) and dietary cholesterol (P = .033) decreased significantly. Low dietary intakes of docosahexaenoic acid, eicosapentaenoic acid, and vitamin E were also observed in these adults with type 2 diabetes. Conclusions The En Balance program improved glycemic control and lipid profiles in a group of Hispanic diabetic participants. En Balance also promoted decreases in dietary fat and dietary cholesterol intake. PMID:21343598

Salto, Lorena M.; Cordero-MacIntyre, Zaida; Beeson, Lawrence; Schulz, Eloy; Firek, Anthony; De Leon, Marino

2011-01-01

139

Effects of dietary lipids and Clostridium butyricum on fat deposition and meat quality of broiler chickens.  

Science.gov (United States)

The effects of dietary lipids and Clostridium butyricum on carcass quality, fat deposition, meat quality, and fatty acid contents of breast meat in broiler chickens were investigated. One hundred sixty one-day-old broiler chicks (Arbor Acres) were divided into 4 treatment groups in a 2x2 factorial arrangement and fed 4 diets with 2 lipid sources (soybean oil or fish oil) and 2 levels of C. butyricum (0 or 5 g/kg of diets) were used. Abdominal fat was significantly reduced when chicks were fed the fish oil diet compared with the soybean oil diet (Poil diets increased drip losses of the breast and thigh muscles, thawing losses of breast muscle, and boiling losses of thigh muscle (Psupplementation of C. butyricum increased i.m. fat, the contents of C20:5n-3 (Pimproves meat quality and fatty acid profiles of breast meat in male broilers, particularly interacting with a fish oil diet. PMID:20075277

Yang, X; Zhang, B; Guo, Y; Jiao, P; Long, F

2010-02-01

140

Effects of Cactus Fiber on the Excretion of Dietary Fat in Healthy Subjects: A Double Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Clinical Investigation  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Conclusions: Cactus fiber has been shown to significantly promote fecal fat excretion in healthy adults. The results of our study support the hypothesis that cactus fiber helps in reducing body weight by binding to dietary fat and increasing its excretion, thus reducing dietary fat available for absorption. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01590667.

Ralf Uebelhack, MD, PhD

2014-12-01

 
 
 
 
141

Dietary Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids Suppress NHE-1 Upregulation in a Rabbit Model of Volume- and Pressure-Overload  

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Background: Increased consumption of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (?3-PUFAs) from fish oil (FO) may have cardioprotective effects during ischemia/reperfusion, hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF). The cardiac Na+/H+-exchanger (NHE-1) is a key mediator for these detrimental cardiac conditions. Consequently, chronic NHE-1 inhibition appears to be a promising pharmacological tool for prevention and treatment. Acute application of the FO ?3-PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexa...

RubenCoronel; Marcelvan Borren; HesterMDen Ruijter; ArieOVerkerk

2012-01-01

142

Effects of dietary protein, fat and beta-carotene levels on beta-carotene absorption in rats.  

Science.gov (United States)

It is important that the factors influencing functional carotenoid absorption be made clear. The effect of rat diets containing different combinations of dietary protein, fat, and beta-carotene levels on beta-carotene absorption was evaluated. In the mid-level beta-carotene diet groups (1.8 mg beta-carotene/100 g diet), the retinol content in the liver and the ratio of the liver retinol content to the beta-carotene intake (namely, retinol accumulation rate) were both greater in the mid-level dietary protein groups (20 g protein/100 g diet) than in lower dietary protein groups (5 g protein/100 g diet), but were not affected by dietary fat level (10 g or 2 g fat/100 g diet). The liver beta-carotene content and its accumulation rate were lower in the mid-level dietary fat groups (10 g fat/100 g diet). beta-carotene 15,15'-dioxygenase (CDO) activity in the small intestine increased in the mid-level dietary protein groups, which resulted in an increase in the content of liver retinol converted from dietary beta-carotene. With respect to the mid-level dietary fat groups, the fecal beta-carotene excretion rate (%) increased. The low beta-carotene diet groups (0.006 mg beta-carotene/100 g diet) showed a higher serum retinol accumulation rate, CDO activity, and liver beta-carotene accumulation rate than the mid-level beta-carotene diet groups. These results suggest the marked effect of protein, fat, and beta-carotene level in diets on the absorption and metabolism of beta-carotene. PMID:16229344

Hosotani, Keisuke; Kitagawa, Masahiro

2005-07-01

143

The effects of dietary taurocholate, fat, protein, and carbohydrate on the distribution and fate of dietary beta-carotene in ferrets.  

Science.gov (United States)

Dietary beta-carotene has been shown to have cancer chemopreventive action on the basis of epidemiologic evidence and studies in animals. Because the anticarcinogenic property of beta-carotene may be exerted per se, it is desirable to achieve the maximum absorption and accumulation of intact beta-carotene in various parts of the body. Therefore the effects of dietary taurocholate, fat, protein, and carbohydrate on the absorption, accumulation, and fate of dietary beta-carotene (3.730 nmol/g diet) in selected tissues of ferrets were explored. Taurocholate (0.2-1.0% wt/wt) and fat (6-23% wt/wt) caused two- to threefold (p < 0.05) increases in the absorption and accumulation of beta-carotene in the liver, lungs, and adipose tissue in a dose-dependent manner. In contrast, neither dietary protein (10-40% wt/wt) nor carbohydrate (25-55% wt/wt) affected the absorption and accumulation of beta-carotene in various tissues. Significantly, taurocholate, 23% fat, or 40% protein also markedly increased the amounts of hepatic retinol and retinyl esters derived from dietary beta-carotene. These results indicate that dietary taurocholate, fat, and high protein have a marked influence on the exposure of beta-carotene to intestinal carotene cleavage enzyme or its activity. Thus an ideal combination of dietary components (wt/wt) in ferrets for the maximal absorption and accumulation of beta-carotene in different tissues is 0.5% taurocholate and 13.4% fat, whereas 1% taurocholate, 23% fat, or 40% protein stimulates its conversion to vitamin A. PMID:8844721

Lakshman, M R; Liu, Q H; Sapp, R; Somanchi, M; Sundaresan, P R

1996-01-01

144

Effects of Dietary Fibers on Weight Gain, Carbohydrate Metabolism and Gastric Ghrelin Gene Expression in High Fat Diet Fed Mice  

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Diets that are high in dietary fiber are reported to have substantial health benefits. We sought to compare the metabolic effects for three types of dietary fibers, i.e. sugar cane fiber (SCF), psyllium (PSY) and cellulose (CEL) on body weight, carbohydrate metabolism and stomach ghrelin gene expression in a high-fat diet fed mouse model. Thirty-six male mice (C57BL/6) were randomly divided into four groups that consumed high fat-diets or high fat diet containing 10% SCF, PSY, and CEL respect...

Wang, Zhong Q.; Zuberi, Aamir; Zhang, Xian H.; Macgowan, Jacalyn; Qin, Jianhua; Ye, Xin; Son, Leslie; Wu, Qinglin; Lian, Kun; Cefalu, William T.

2007-01-01

145

Dietary fat sources differentially modulate intestinal barrier and hepatic inflammation in alcohol-induced liver injury in rats  

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Endotoxemia is a causal factor in the development of alcoholic liver injury. The present study aimed at determining the interactions of ethanol with different fat sources at the gut-liver axis. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were pair fed control or ethanol liquid diet for 8 wk. The liquid diets were based on a modified Lieber-DeCarli formula, with 30% total calories derived from corn oil (rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids). To test the effects of saturated fats, corn oil in the ethanol diet was ...

Zhong, Wei; Li, Qiong; Xie, Guoxiang; Sun, Xiuhua; Tan, Xiaobing; Sun, Xinguo; Jia, Wei; Zhou, Zhanxiang

2013-01-01

146

Are the Dietary Guidelines for Meat, Fat, Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Appropriate for Environmental Sustainability? A Review of the Literature  

Science.gov (United States)

This paper reviews the current literature around the environmental impacts of dietary recommendations. The focus of the review is on collating evidence relating to environmental impacts of the dietary advice found in the World Health Organisation guidelines, and environmental impact literature: reducing the consumption of fat, reducing the consumption of meat-based protein and animal-based foods, and increasing the consumption of fruit and vegetables. The environmental impact of reducing dietary fat intake is unclear, although reducing consumption of the food category of edible fats and oils appears to have little impact. However most, but not all, studies support environmental benefits of a reduced consumption of animal-based foods and increased consumption of fruit and vegetables. In general, it appears that adhering to dietary guidelines reduces impact on the environment, but further study is required to examine the environmental impacts of animal-based foods, and fruit and vegetable intake in depth. PMID:24926526

Reynolds, Christian John; Buckley, Jonathan David; Weinstein, Philip; Boland, John

2014-01-01

147

The influence of dietary nucleotides and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on the incorporation of [³H] arachidonic acid on experimental liver cirrhosis  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Venezuela | Language: English Abstract in portuguese Influência dos nucleotídeos dietéticos e ácidos graxos poliinsaturados na incorporação de ácido araquidônico na cirrose hepática experimental. Os objetivos deste estudo foram determinar: a) a incorporação de [...] fbpe/alan/v50n3/art07for1.6.gif" WIDTH=36 HEIGHT=21>ácido araquidônico na mucosa intestinal, fígado e plasma, após 1, 3 e 5 horas de administração da emulsão radioativa, b) a incorporação preferencial em diferentes tecidos e c) os efeitos do tratamento dietético, por quatro semanas, com nucleotídeos e ácidos graxos poliinsaturados, em ratos com cirrose hepática induzida por tioacetamida. 209 ratas da raça Wistar, foram divididas em dois grupos (controle e TAA). O grupo TAA recebeu a tioacetamida na concentração de 300 mg/L, dissolvido na água de bebida, por quatro meses. Após este período, uma amostra de 6 animais de cada grupo foram sacrificados para confirmação das mudanças bioquímicas e histológicas, características do modelo experimental e trinta e seis animais foram utilizados para determinar a incorporação do radioisótopo. O restante dos animais foram divididos emquatro subgrupos. Cada grupo recebeu uma dieta suplementada com ácidos graxos poliinsaturados e nucleotídeos, isoladamente ou combinados. Após quatro meses de tioacetamida, a incorporação do ácido araquidônico resultou em: a) aumentada retenção na mucosa intestinal após 3 h, b) reduzida retenção no fígado após 3 e 5 horas, c) uma importante redução no plasma após 3 e 5 horas. O tratamento dietético com ácidos graxos poliinsaturados e nucleotídeos combinados promoveu uma redução do ácido araquidônico acumulado na mucosa intestinal e num aumento da incorporação no fígado e plasma. A suplementação simultânea de ácidos graxos poliinsaturados e nucleotídeos dietéticos foi benéfica para reverter anormalidades do metabolismo lipídico existentes, neste modelo experimental de cirrose hepática. Abstract in english The purposes of this study were to determine: a) the incorporation of labeled arachidonic acid on the intestinal mucosa, the liver and plasma, after 1, 3 and 5 hours of administration, b)preferential incorporation by different t [...] issues, c) and the effects on experimental rats with thioacetamide-induced cirrhosis, after four weeks of a dietary supplementation with nucleotides and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids. 209 female Wistar rats were divided into two groups (control and TAA group). The TAA group was given 300 mg of thioacetamide/L, in their drinking water for four months. After this period, a sample of 6 rats were taken from each group and examined, to evaluate the biochemical and histological changes of the experimental model, and 36 rats were taken to determine the incorporation of radioactivity by the groups. The rest of the animals were divided into four subgroups. Each group, receiving a supplementary diet with only long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and/or nucleotides or neither, for 4 weeks. After four months of thioacetamide, the incorporation of the arachidonic acid showed: a) an increased within 3 h in the intestinal mucosa, b) a decreased in the liver after 3 lo 5 h c) and a drastic decrease in the plasma after 3 to 5 h. With a dietary supplementation of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids and nucleotides combined, there was a decrease of accumulate arachidonic acid in the intestine and a increase in the liver and plasma. The simultaneous supply of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids and nucleotides was beneficial in the reversal of abnormalities of the lipid metabolism, in this experimental model of liver cirrhosis.

Luísa R.M., Leite; Eliane, Moreira- Vaz; Glorimar, Rosa; Andréa C., Pereira; Christianne R., Monteiro; Femanda J., Medeiros; Vera L.A., Chagas.

2000-09-01

148

Reduced triglyceride secretion in response to an acute dietary fat challenge in obese compared to lean mice.  

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Full Text Available Obesity results in abnormally high levels of triglyceride (TG storage in tissues such as liver, heart and muscle, which disrupts their normal functions. Recently, we found that lean mice challenged with high levels of dietary fat store TGs in cytoplasmic lipid droplets in the absorptive cells of the intestine, enterocytes, and that this storage increases and then decreases over time after an acute dietary fat challenge. The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of obesity on intestinal TG metabolism. More specifically we asked whether TG storage in and secretion from the intestine are altered in obesity. We investigated these questions in diet-induced obese (DIO and leptin-deficient (ob/ob mice. We found greater levels of TG storage in the intestine of DIO mice compared to lean mice in the fed state, but similar levels of TG storage after fasting. In addition, we found similar TG storage in the intestine of lean and DIO mice at multiple time points after an acute dietary fat challenge. Surprisingly, we found remarkably lower TG secretion from both DIO and ob/ob mice compared to lean controls in response to an acute dietary fat challenge. Furthermore, we found altered mRNA levels for genes involved in regulation of intestinal TG metabolism in lean and DIO mice at fasting and in response to an acute dietary fat challenge. More specifically, we found that many of the genes related to TG synthesis, chylomicron synthesis, TG storage and lipolysis were induced in response to an acute dietary fat challenge in lean mice, but this induction was not observed in DIO mice. In fact, we found a significant decrease in intestinal mRNA levels of genes related to lipolysis and fatty acid oxidation in DIO mice in response to an acute dietary fat challenge. Our findings demonstrate altered TG handling by the small intestine of obese compared to lean mice.

KimberlyK.Buhman

2012-02-01

149

Effects of dietary chromium polynicotinate supplementation on performance, fat deposition and plasma lipids of broiler chickens  

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Full Text Available The present study was conducted to determine the effect of chromium polynicotinate supplementation on performance, fat deposition and plasma lipids of broiler chickens. A total of 540 male broiler chicks (Cobb 500 were allotted to 6 dietary treatments. The dietary chromium polynicotinate levels were 0 (Control, 250, 500, 750, 1000 or 1250 ?g/kg, respectively. At 10-28 days of age (grower phase, the 500 ?g/kg concentration of chromium polynicotinate supplementation had a beneficial effect on feed intake and body weight gain of broilers (P<0.05. At 29-42 days of age (finisher phase, feed conversion ratio was decreased (P<0.05 in broilers fed with chromium polynicotinate supplement at levels of 250, 750, 1000 or 1250 ?g/kg. Chromium polynicotinate did not affect the abdominal fat pad deposition. The results indicated that the 500 ?g/kg level of chromium polynicotinate supplement decreased the plasma cholesterol concentration in the finisher phases. The chromium concentrations of 1000 and 500 ?g/kg were more effective at grower and finisher phases, respectively (P<0.05. Plasma triglyceride was not affected by dietary chromium concentration. The results from this study suggest that supplementation of chromium polynicotinate improved growth performance and influenced blood cholesterol concentrations, but in this respect, there was not dose related effects.

Yadollah Chashnidel

2010-02-01

150

Cell signaling mechanisms of oro-gustatory detection of dietary fat: advances and challenges.  

Science.gov (United States)

CD36 and two G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR), i.e., GPR120 and GPR40, have been implicated in the gustatory perception of dietary fats in rodents. These glycoproteins are coupled to increases in free intracellular Ca²? concentrations, [Ca²?](i), during their activation by dietary long-chain fatty acids (LCFA). The transient receptor potential type M5 (TRPM5) channel, activated by [Ca²?](i), participates in downstream signaling in taste bud cells (TBC). The mice, knocked-out for expression of CD36, GPR120, GPR40 or TRPM5 have a reduced spontaneous preference for fat. The delayed rectifying K? (DRK) channels believed to lie downstream of these receptors are also important players in fat taste transduction. The trigeminal neurons by triggering increases in [Ca²?](i) may influence the taste signal to afferent nerve fibers. Why are there so many taste receptor candidates for one taste modality? We discuss the recent advances on the role of CD36, GPR120, GPR40, TRPM5 and DRK channels, in signal transduction in TBC. We shed light on their cross-talk and delineate their roles in obesity as a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind their regulation could eventually lead to new strategies to fight against this condition. PMID:24269201

Gilbertson, Timothy A; Khan, Naim A

2014-01-01

151

Citrus Pulp as a Dietary Source of Antioxidants for Lactating Holstein Cows Fed Highly Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Diets  

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The effects of feeding pelleted citrus pulp (PCP) as a natural antioxidant source on the performance and milk quality of dairy cows fed highly polyunsaturated fatty acid (FA) diets were evaluated. Four lactating Holstein cows were assigned to a 4×4 Latin-square. Treatments, on a dry matter (DM) basis, were i) control diet; ii) 3% soybean oil; iii) 3% soybean oil and 9% PCP and; iv) 3% soybean oil and 18% PCP. When cows fed on citrus pulp, the DM intake tended to decrease. The total tract app...

Santos, G. T.; Lima, L. S.; Schogor, A. L. B.; Romero, J. V.; Marchi, F. E.; Grande, P. A.; Santos, N. W.; Santos, F. S.; Kazama, R.

2014-01-01

152

Failure to ferment dietary resistant starch in specific mouse models of obesity results in no body fat loss  

Science.gov (United States)

Resistant starch (RS) is a fermentable fiber that decreases dietary energy density and results in fermentation in the lower gut. The current studies examined the effect of RS on body fat loss in mice. In a 12 week study (study 1), the effect of two different types of RS on body fat was compared with two control diets (0% RS) in C57Bl/6J mice: regular control diet or the control diet that had equal energy density as the RS diet (EC). All testing diets had 7% (wt/wt) dietary fat. In a 16 week study (study 2), the effect of RS on body fat was compared with EC in C57BL/6J mice and two obese mouse models (NONcNZO10/LtJ or Non/ShiLtJ). All mice were fed control (0% RS) or 30% RS diet for 6 weeks with 7% dietary fat. On the 7th week, the dietary fat was increased to 11% for half of the mice, and remained the same for the rest. Body weight, body fat, energy intake, energy expenditure, and oral glucose tolerance were measured during the study. At the end of the studies, the pH of cecal contents was measured as an indicator of RS fermentation. Results: Compared with EC, dietary RS decreased body fat and improved glucose tolerance in C57BL/6J mice, but not in obese mice. For other metabolic characteristics measured, the alterations by RS diet were similar for all three types of mice. The difference in dietary fat did not interfere with these results. The pH of cecal contents in RS fed mice was decreased for C57BL/6J mice but not for obese mice, implying the impaired RS fermentation in obese mice. Conclusion: 1) decreased body fat by RS is not simply due to dietary energy dilution in C57Bl/6J mice, and 2) along with their inability to ferment RS; RS fed obese mice did not lose body fat. Thus, colonic fermentation of RS might play an important role in the effect of RS on fat loss. PMID:19739641

Zhou, June; Martin, Roy J; Tulley, Richard T; Raggio, Anne M; Shen, Li; Lissy, Elizabeth; McCutcheon, Kathleen; Keenan, Michael J

2009-01-01

153

Effects of dietary fat energy restriction and fish oil feeding on hepatic metabolic abnormalities and insulin resistance in KK mice with high-fat diet-induced obesity.  

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We investigated the effects of dietary fat energy restriction and fish oil intake on glucose and lipid metabolism in female KK mice with high-fat (HF) diet-induced obesity. Mice were fed a lard/safflower oil (LSO50) diet consisting of 50 energy% (en%) lard/safflower oil as the fat source for 12 weeks. Then, the mice were fed various fat energy restriction (25 en% fat) diets - LSO, FO2.5, FO12.5 or FO25 - containing 0, 2.5, 12.5, or 25 en% fish oil, respectively, for 9 weeks. Conversion from a HF diet to each fat energy restriction diet significantly decreased final body weights and visceral and subcutaneous fat mass in all fat energy restriction groups, regardless of fish oil contents. Hepatic triglyceride and cholesterol levels markedly decreased in the FO12.5 and FO25 groups, but not in the LSO group. Although plasma insulin levels did not differ among groups, the blood glucose areas under the curve in the oral glucose tolerance test were significantly lower in the FO12.5 and FO25 groups. Real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis showed fatty acid synthase mRNA levels significantly decreased in the FO25 group, and stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 mRNA levels markedly decreased in the FO12.5 and FO25 groups. These results demonstrate that body weight gains were suppressed by dietary fat energy restriction even in KK mice with HF diet-induced obesity. We also suggested that the combination of fat energy restriction and fish oil feeding decreased fat droplets and ameliorated hepatic hypertrophy and insulin resistance with suppression of de novo lipogenesis in these mice. PMID:22901684

Arai, Takeshi; Kim, Hyoun-ju; Hirako, Satoshi; Nakasatomi, Maki; Chiba, Hiroshige; Matsumoto, Akiyo

2013-01-01

154

Effect of the amount and type of dietary fat on cardiometabolic risk factors and risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer : a systematic review  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The effects of both the amount and quality of dietary fat have been studied intensively during the past decades. Previously, low-fat diets were recommended without much attention to the quality of fat, whereas there is general emphasis on the quality of fat in current guidelines. The objective of this systematic review (SR) was to assess the evidence of an effect of the amount and type of dietary fat on body weight (BW), risk factors, and risk of non-communicable diseases, that is, type 2 diabetes (T2DM), cardiovascular diseases (CVD), and cancer in healthy subjects or subjects at risk for these diseases. This work was performed in the process of updating the fourth edition of the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations from 2004. The literature search was performed in October 2010 covering articles published since January 2000. A complementary search was done in February 2012 covering literature until December 2011. Two authors independently selected articles for inclusion from a total of about 16,000 abstracts according to predefined criteria. Randomized controlled trials (RCT) and prospective cohort studies (PCS) were included as well as nested case-control studies. A few retrospective case-control studies were also included when limited or no data were available from other study types. Altogether 607 articles were quality graded and the observed effects in these papers were summarized. Convincing evidence was found that partial replacement of saturated fat (SFA) with polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) or monounsaturated fat (MUFA) lowers fasting serum/plasma total and LDL cholesterol concentrations. The evidence was probable for a decreasing effect of fish oil on concentration of serum/plasma total triglycerides as compared with MUFA. Beneficial effect of MUFA both on insulin sensitivity and fasting plasma/serum insulin concentration was considered as probable in comparisons of MUFA and carbohydrates versus SFA, whereas no effect was found on fasting glucose concentration in these comparisons. There was probable evidence for a moderate direct association between total fat intake and BW. Furthermore, there was convincing evidence that partial replacement of SFA with PUFA decreases the risk of CVD, especially in men. This finding was supported by an association with biomarkers of PUFA intake; the evidence of a beneficial effect of dietary total PUFA, n-6 PUFA, and linoleic acid (LA) on CVD mortality was limited suggestive. Evidence for a direct association between total fat intake and risk of T2DM was inconclusive, whereas there was limited-suggestive evidence from biomarker studies that LA is inversely associated with the risk of T2DM. However, there was limited-suggestive evidence in biomarker studies that odd-chain SFA found in milk fat and fish may be inversely related to T2DM, but these associations have not been supported by controlled studies. The evidence for an association between dietary n-3 PUFA and T2DM was inconclusive. Evidence for effects of fat on major types of cancer was inconclusive regarding both the amount and quality of dietary fat, except for prostate cancer where there was limited-suggestive evidence for an inverse association with intake of ALA and for ovarian cancer for which there was limited-suggestive evidence for a positive association with intake of SFA. This SR reviewed a large number of studies focusing on several different health outcomes. The time period covered by the search may not have allowed obtaining the full picture of the evidence in all areas covered by this SR. However, several SRs and meta-analyses that covered studies published before year 2000 were evaluated, which adds confidence to the results. Many of the investigated questions remain unresolved, mainly because of few studies on certain outcomes, conflicting results from studies, and lack of high quality-controlled studies. There is thus an evident need of highly controlled RCT and PCS with sufficient number of subjects and long enough duration, specifically regarding the effects of the amount and quality of dietary fat on insulin se

Schwab, Ursula; Lauritzen, Lotte

2014-01-01

155

Cell mechanisms of gustatory lipids perception and modulation of the dietary fat preference.  

Science.gov (United States)

Dietary lipids are usually responsible of several metabolic disorders. Recent compelling evidences suggest that there is a sixth taste modality, destined for the detection of oro-gustatory fats. The lipid-binding glycoprotein CD36, expressed by circumvallate papillae (CVP) of the mouse tongue, has been shown to be implicated in oro-gustatory perception of dietary lipids. We demonstrate that linoleic acid (LA) by activating sPLA2, cPLA2 and iPLA2 via CD36, produced arachidonic acid (AA) and lyso-phosphatidylcholine (Lyso-PC) which triggered Ca(2+) influx in CD36-positive taste bud cells (TBC), purified from mouse CVP. LA induced the production of Ca(2+) influx factor (CIF). CIF, AA and Lyso-PC exerted different actions on the opening of store-operated Ca2+ (SOC) channels, constituted of Orai proteins and regulated by STIM1, a sensor of Ca(2+) depletion in the endoplasmic reticulum. We observed that CIF and Lyso-PC opened Orai1 channels whereas AA-opened Ca(2+) channels were composed of Orai1/Orai3. STIM1 was found to regulate LA-induced CIF production and opening of both kinds of Ca(2+) channels. Furthermore, Stim1(-/-) mice lost the spontaneous preference for fat, observed in wild-type animals. Our results suggest that fatty acid-induced Ca(2+) signaling, regulated by STIM1 via CD36, might be implicated in oro-gustatory perception of dietary lipids and the spontaneous preference for fat. Other cell types are involved in, and external factors can influence this preference. PMID:24997404

Dramane, Gado; Akpona, Simon; Besnard, Philippe; Khan, Naim A

2014-12-01

156

Dietary meat fats and burden of cardiovascular disease risk factors, in the elderly: a report from the MEDIS study  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Dietary fats have long been associated with human health, and especially cardiovascular disease (CVD. Some observational studies have shown that reduction in dietary fats, and particularly cholesterol is associated with lower cardiovascular risk; however, other prospective studies or randomized controlled trials of dietary fat reduction or modification have shown varying results on CVD morbidity and mortality. In this work we evaluated the relationships between dietary fats and a cluster of CVD risk factors (i.e., diabetes, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension, among elderly individuals without known CVD. In particular, dietary and clinical data from 1486 elderly (aged 65 to 100 years men and women living in Cyprus, Mitilini, Samothraki, Cephalonia, Crete, Lemnos, Syros, Naxos, Corfu and Zakynthos islands, and participated in the MEDIS study, were analysed. Data analysis revealed that 18.5% of males and 33.3% of females had three or four cardiovascular disease risk factors; the major source of fat was olive oil (mean intake for men and women 50.0 ± 19.3 g/day and 46.0 ± 16.8 g/day, p

Metallinos George

2010-03-01

157

Relationship of dietary fat and lysine level with body composition in broiler chickens  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

The effect of varying dietary energy to protein/lysine ratio on the body composition of 300, day-old meat-type Tetra-82 hybrid broiler chicks was studied. Body composition was measured by computed tomography (CT) and direct chemical analysis.Ten chickens from each treatment group were euthanized, frozen and subjected to CT, after which carcasses were dissected and ground to obtain homogeneous samples for chemical analysis.Supplementation of the diet with lysine 6 g/kg did not change total body composition but positively influenced final body weight.In the group receiving added fat 40 g/kg and lysine 3 g/kg feed (F-LYS-I) the higher body weight ran parallel with a higher fat content

158

Effect of dietary fat source on fatty acid profile and lipid oxidation of eggs  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO South Africa | Language: English Abstract in english This study investigated the effects of supplementary dietary lipid sources on the fatty acid profile and lipid oxidation of eggs. Five isoenergetic (12.6 MJ AME/kg DM) and isonitrogenous (170 g CP/kg DM) diets were formulated, using a control diet (50 : 50 blend of fish- and linseed oil), fish oil, [...] sunflower oil, high oleic acid (HO) sunflower oil and tallow at a 30 g/kg inclusion level. Two hundred individually caged HyLine Silver-Brown hens (20 weeks of age) were randomly allocated to the five dietary treatments (n = 40 hens/treatment). Birds received the experimental diets from 20 weeks of age. At 30 weeks of age, 12 eggs per treatment were randomly selected for analyses of egg yolk fatty acid methyl esters (FAME), thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and peroxide values (PV). Dietary lipid sources affected FAME, TBARS and PV of egg yolk significantly. The fish oil treatment resulted in the highest TBARS (0.27 mg malonaldehyde/kg yolk) and PV (3.96 milli-equivalent peroxide/kg fat) whereas the HO sunflower oil resulted in the lowest TBARS (0.13 mg malonaldehyde/kg yolk) and PV (2.77 milli-equivalent peroxide/kg fat). Fish oil also resulted in the lowest n-6 to n-3 ratio (1.16 to 1), while sunflower oil resulted in the highest ratio (24.6 to 1). Results indicate that the fatty acid profile of eggs could be altered by means of dietary intervention. However, an improvement of omega-3 type fatty acids of eggs will result in a higher susceptibility to lipid oxidation and possibly a shorter shelf-life of stored eggs.

E.J., King; A., Hugo; F.H., de Witt; H.J., van der Merwe; M.D., Fair.

159

Dietary Fat and Aging Modulate Apoptotic Signaling in Liver of Calorie-Restricted Mice.  

Science.gov (United States)

Imbalance between proliferation and cell death accounts for several age-linked diseases. Aging, calorie restriction (CR), and fat source are all factors that may influence apoptotic signaling in liver, an organ that plays a central metabolic role in the organism. Here, we have studied the combined effect of these factors on a number of apoptosis regulators and effectors. For this purpose, animals were fed diets containing different fat sources (lard, soybean oil, or fish oil) under CR for 6 or 18 months. An age-linked increase in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway was detected with CR, including a decrease in Bcl-2/Bax ratio, an enhanced release of cytochrome c to the cytosol and higher caspase-9 activity. However, these changes were not fully transmitted to the effectors apoptosis-inducing factor and caspase-3. CR (which abated aging-related inflammatory responses) and dietary fat altered the activities of caspases-8, -9, and -3. Apoptotic index (DNA fragmentation) and mean nuclear area were increased in aged animals with the exception of calorie-restricted mice fed a lard-based fat source. These results suggest possible protective changes in hepatic homeostasis with aging in the calorie-restricted lard group. PMID:24691092

López-Domínguez, José Alberto; Khraiwesh, Husam; González-Reyes, José Antonio; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; Ramsey, Jon Jay; de Cabo, Rafael; Burón, María Isabel; Villalba, José Manuel

2014-04-01

160

Dietary meat fats and burden of cardiovascular disease risk factors, in the elderly: a report from the MEDIS study.  

Science.gov (United States)

Dietary fats have long been associated with human health, and especially cardiovascular disease (CVD). Some observational studies have shown that reduction in dietary fats, and particularly cholesterol is associated with lower cardiovascular risk; however, other prospective studies or randomized controlled trials of dietary fat reduction or modification have shown varying results on CVD morbidity and mortality. In this work we evaluated the relationships between dietary fats and a cluster of CVD risk factors (i.e., diabetes, obesity, hypercholesterolemia, hypertension), among elderly individuals without known CVD. In particular, dietary and clinical data from 1486 elderly (aged 65 to 100 years) men and women living in Cyprus, Mitilini, Samothraki, Cephalonia, Crete, Lemnos, Syros, Naxos, Corfu and Zakynthos islands, and participated in the MEDIS study, were analysed. Data analysis revealed that 18.5% of males and 33.3% of females had three or four cardiovascular disease risk factors; the major source of fat was olive oil (mean intake for men and women 50.0 +/- 19.3 g/day and 46.0 +/- 16.8 g/day, p < 0.001). In addition it was observed that a 5% increase in energy adjusted fat intake from meat was associated with a 21% increase in the likelihood of having one additional CVD risk factor (95%CI 6%-39%); no significant associations were observed regarding the other types of fat consumed by the elderly participants. These findings may state a hypothesis that the consumption of fat only from meat or its products seems to increase the burden of CVD risk factors among CVD-free, elderly people. PMID:20298545

Polychronopoulos, Evangelos; Pounis, George; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Zeimbekis, Akis; Tsiligianni, Ioanna; Qira, Brikena-Eirini; Gotsis, Efthimios; Metallinos, George; Lionis, Christos; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes

2010-01-01

 
 
 
 
161

Effect of the amount and type of dietary fat on cardiometabolic risk factors and risk of developing type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer: a systematic review  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The effects of both the amount and quality of dietary fat have been studied intensively during the past decades. Previously, low-fat diets were recommended without much attention to the quality of fat, whereas there is general emphasis on the quality of fat in current guidelines. The objective of this systematic review (SR was to assess the evidence of an effect of the amount and type of dietary fat on body weight (BW, risk factors, and risk of non-communicable diseases, that is, type 2 diabetes (T2DM, cardiovascular diseases (CVD, and cancer in healthy subjects or subjects at risk for these diseases. This work was performed in the process of updating the fourth edition of the Nordic Nutrition Recommendations from 2004. The literature search was performed in October 2010 covering articles published since January 2000. A complementary search was done in February 2012 covering literature until December 2011. Two authors independently selected articles for inclusion from a total of about 16,000 abstracts according to predefined criteria. Randomized controlled trials (RCT and prospective cohort studies (PCS were included as well as nested case–control studies. A few retrospective case–control studies were also included when limited or no data were available from other study types. Altogether 607 articles were quality graded and the observed effects in these papers were summarized. Convincing evidence was found that partial replacement of saturated fat (SFA with polyunsaturated fat (PUFA or monounsaturated fat (MUFA lowers fasting serum/plasma total and LDL cholesterol concentrations. The evidence was probable for a decreasing effect of fish oil on concentration of serum/plasma total triglycerides as compared with MUFA. Beneficial effect of MUFA both on insulin sensitivity and fasting plasma/serum insulin concentration was considered as probable in comparisons of MUFA and carbohydrates versus SFA, whereas no effect was found on fasting glucose concentration in these comparisons. There was probable evidence for a moderate direct association between total fat intake and BW. Furthermore, there was convincing evidence that partial replacement of SFA with PUFA decreases the risk of CVD, especially in men. This finding was supported by an association with biomarkers of PUFA intake; the evidence of a beneficial effect of dietary total PUFA, n-6 PUFA, and linoleic acid (LA on CVD mortality was limited suggestive. Evidence for a direct association between total fat intake and risk of T2DM was inconclusive, whereas there was limited-suggestive evidence from biomarker studies that LA is inversely associated with the risk of T2DM. However, there was limited-suggestive evidence in biomarker studies that odd-chain SFA found in milk fat and fish may be inversely related to T2DM, but these associations have not been supported by controlled studies. The evidence for an association between dietary n-3 PUFA and T2DM was inconclusive. Evidence for effects of fat on major types of cancer was inconclusive regarding both the amount and quality of dietary fat, except for prostate cancer where there was limited-suggestive evidence for an inverse association with intake of ALA and for ovarian cancer for which there was limited-suggestive evidence for a positive association with intake of SFA. This SR reviewed a large number of studies focusing on several different health outcomes. The time period covered by the search may not have allowed obtaining the full picture of the evidence in all areas covered by this SR. However, several SRs and meta-analyses that covered studies published before year 2000 were evaluated, which adds confidence to the results. Many of the investigated questions remain unresolved, mainly because of few studies on certain outcomes, conflicting results from studies, and lack of high quality–controlled studies. There is thus an evident need of highly controlled RCT and PCS with sufficient number of subjects and long enough duration, specifically regarding the effects of the amount and quality of dietary f

Ursula Schwab

2014-07-01

162

Fats  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... and palm kernel oil Coconut and coconut oil Poultry (chicken and turkey) skin The goal for people ... and other organ meats High-fat meat and poultry skin Healthy Fats Monounsaturated Fat Monounsaturated fats are ...

163

Fats  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... pork High-fat meats like regular ground beef, bologna, hot dogs, sausage, bacon and spareribs High-fat ... oil is made into a solid fat. This process is called hydrogenation. Trans fats act like saturated ...

164

Fats  

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Full Text Available ... a Member Donate Now! One Time Monthly In Memory In Honor Become a Member En Español Type ... fat. Trans Fat Like saturated fat, trans fat increases blood cholesterol levels. It is actually worse for ...

165

Fats  

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Full Text Available ... provider. Saturated fat grams are listed on the Nutrition Facts food label under total fat. As a ... than saturated fat and for a heart-healthy diet, you want to eat as little trans fat ...

166

Fats  

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Full Text Available ... Carbohydrate Counting Make Your Carbs Count Glycemic Index Low-Calorie Sweeteners Sugar and Desserts Fitness Exercise & Type ... or less saturated fat per serving are considered low in saturated fat. Trans Fat Like saturated fat, ...

167

Fats  

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Full Text Available ... have improved your heart health with that single change! Unhealthy Fats Saturated Fat Why should you eat less saturated fat? Because saturated fat raises blood cholesterol levels. High blood cholesterol is a risk factor for ...

168

Dietary structured lipids for post-weaning piglets: fat digestibility, nitrogen retention and fatty acid profiles of tissues  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

In four groups of post-weaning piglets the effects of triacylglycerol structure and fatty acid profiles of four dietary fats on apparent faecal nutrient digestibility, nitrogen retention and fatty acid profiles of platelet and erythrocyte membranes, liver, adipose tissue and skeletal muscle were examined. Dietary fats included as 10% (w/w) of the diets were two structured fats of rapeseed oil interesterified with tridecanoin (R1) or coconut oil (R2), respectively, one mixture of rapeseed oil and coconut oil (R3) and rapeseed oil as control (R4). Faeces and urine from piglets weaned at 28 days of age were collected quantitatively during three periods each of 5 days, in which the piglets were kept in metabolism cages for measurement of apparent faecal nutrient and energy digestibility and nitrogen retention. Apparent faecal fat digestibilities were significantly improved in groups fed interesterified fats or the physical mixtures (R1, R2 and R3) compared with rapeseed oil (R4). Apparent faecal nitrogen digestibility and retention were similar in all four groups in the three periods, but increased with time. Apparent faecal fat digestibilities were significantly improved from the first to the third week in the groups R1 and R2. Fatty acid profiles in platelet and erythrocyte membranes and in tissues reflected the fatty acid profile of the dietary fat, except for medium-chain fatty acids, which were only found in low proportions, indicating that 10:0 was mainly used as an energy source.

Straarup, Ellen Marie; Danielsen, V.

2006-01-01

169

Influence of Dietary Energy and Poultry Fat on the Response of Broiler Chicks to Heat Therm  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Heat stress and the associated production losses and mortality are a challenge to commercial broiler production. A total number of 1000 one day old unsexed Arbor Acres broiler chicks were used in this study. Birds were offered with water and grower diet containing 23% crude protein and 3100 kcal ME/ kg of the diet from 1 to 4 weeks of age. At 29 day of age, 900 birds of nearly similar live body weight (about 850 g were chosen to study the effect of different levels of metabolizable energy (ME and poultry fat (PF on broiler performance, nutrients digestibility and carcass characteristics during the hot summer season (29 - 36 °C and 50 - 60% H. The birds were randomly distributed into 9 treatments, each contained 100 birds in 4 replicates of 25 birds each. Three levels of ME and three levels of PF were tested in 3 X 3 factorial designs to alleviate the side effects of heat stress on broiler chick performance. The tested ME levels (kcal/ kg were 3100 (low level, ME1, 3200 (recommended level, ME2 and 3300 (high level, ME3. The tested three levels of PF were 0 % (PF1, 2.5% (PF2 and 5% (PF3 for each level of ME. Chicks were allocated in a littered floor poultry house in an open system under the same management conditions. Water and feed were offered ad-libitum and artificial lighting was provided 24 hours daily for the either experimental period, which lasted for 7 weeks.The overall results showed that the average body weight, body weight gain, feed conversion ratio and performance index were improved significantly with high levels of either metabolizable energy or poultry fat. Data showed that the digestion coefficient of both crude protein and ether extract were improved significantly when broiler chicks were fed diets containing high level of either metabolizable energy or poultry fat. Results indicated that the average values of abdominal fat increased significantly with high levels of either metabolizable energy or poultry fat. While, there were no significant differences for either dressing percentage or giblets due to dietary treatments. Therefore, it is suggested to increase dietary metabolizable energy more than recommended level and adding fat up to 5 % of the diet to alleviate the side effects of heat stress on the performance of broiler chicks.

A.A. Ghazalah

2008-01-01

170

A common polymorphism near the interleukin-6 gene modifies the association between dietary fat intake and insulin sensitivity  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Cristina Cuda1, Bibiana Garcia-Bailo1,2, Mohamed Karmali1,2, Ahmed El-Sohemy1, Alaa Badawi21Department of Nutritional Sciences, University of Toronto, 2Office of Biotechnology, Genomics and Population Health, Public Health Agency of Canada, Toronto, Ontario, CanadaBackground: Increasing evidence suggests a role for inflammation in the development of type 2 diabetes. Elevated levels of inflammatory cytokines, including interleukin-6, have been associated with insulin resistance, and dietary lipids can increase cytokine production. The objective of this study was to determine whether a single nucleotide polymorphism near the IL6 gene (rs7801406 modifies the relationship between dietary fat and markers of insulin sensitivity.Methods: Subjects were healthy men and women aged 20–29 years from the Toronto Nutrigenomics and Health Study. Dietary intake was estimated using a one-month semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Fasting blood samples were taken for genotyping and biomarker measurement.Results: The single nucleotide polymorphism was not associated with any of the measures of insulin sensitivity. However, it modified the relationship between total dietary fat and the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (P = 0.053 for interaction. Total fat intake was positively related to HOMA-IR in individuals homozygous for the G allele (ß = 0.005 ± 0.002, P = 0.03, but not among heterozygotes. There was an inverse relationship between total fat intake and HOMA-IR in individuals who were homozygous for the A allele (?= –0.012 ± 0.006, P = 0.047.Conclusion: These findings suggest that dietary fat influences insulin sensitivity differently depending on genotype.Keywords: interleukin-6, insulin sensitivity, nutrigenomics, dietary fat

Cuda C

2012-01-01

171

Dietary fat affects heat production and other variables of equine performance, under hot and humid conditions.  

Science.gov (United States)

Does dietary fat supplementation during conditioning improve athletic performance, especially in the heat? Fat adaptation has been used to increase energy density, decrease bowel bulk and faecal output and reduce health risks associated with hydrolysable carbohydrate overload. It may also reduce spontaneous activity and reactivity (excitability), increase fatty acid oxidation, reduce CO2 production and associated acidosis, enhance metabolic regulation of glycolysis, improve both aerobic and anaerobic performance and substantially reduce heat production. A thermochemical analysis of ATP generation showed the least heat release during the direct oxidation of long chain fatty acids, which have a 3% advantage over glucose and 20 to 30% over short chain fatty acids and amino acids. Indirect oxidation via storage as triglyceride increased heat loss during ATP generation by 3% for stearic acid, 65% for glucose and 174% for acetic acid. Meal feeding and nutrient storage, therefore, accentuates the advantage of dietary fat. A calorimetric model was based on initial estimates of net energy for competitive work (10.76 MJ for the Endurance Test of an Olympic level 3-day-event), other work (14.4 MJ/day) and maintenance (36 MJ), then applied estimates of efficiencies to derive associated heat productions for the utilisation of 3 diets, Diet A: hay (100), Diet B: hay and oats (50:50) and Diet C: hay, oats and vegetable oil (45:45:10), the difference between the last 2 diets representing fat adaptation. During a 90.5 min speed and stamina test, heat production was estimated as 37, 35.4 and 34.6 MJ for the 3 diets, respectively, an advantage 0.8 MJ less heat load for the fat adapted horse, which would reduce water needed for evaporation by 0.33 kg and reduce body temperature increase by about 0.07 degree C. Total estimated daily heat production was 105, 93 and 88 MJ for the 3 diets, respectively, suggesting a 5 MJ advantage for the fat adapted horse (Diet C vs. Diet B). Estimated intake energy was 348, 269 and 239 MJ for the 3 diets, respectively, and corresponding daily intakes as fed were 22.2, 16.6 and 12.9 kg, an advantage of 3.7 kg for the fat adapted horse. Water requirement was estimated to decrease by about 6 kg/day in the fat adapted horse: 4 kg less faecal water output and 2 kg less water for evaporation. This model indicated that the fat supplemented diet reduced daily heat load by 5%, feed intake by 22%, faecal output (and bowel ballast) by 31% and water requirement by 12%. The advantage of fat supplementation over hay and oats was in general about half that gained by hay and oats over hay alone. PMID:8894547

Kronfeld, D S

1996-07-01

172

Effect of dietary fat and vitamin E on mouse lung lipids.  

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To examine the effect of dietary fat on lung lipids, male weanling mice (CD-1 strain) were fed purified diets containing 5% stripped lard or corn oil and kept in chambers supplied with air filtered free of airborne bacteria. Vitamin E was fed at 0, 10.5 or 105 mg dl-alpha-tocopheryl acetate/kg diet. Dietary fat and vitamin E (0 or 10.5 mg/kg) had no significant effects on the lung levels of triacylglycerol (TG) or phospholipid (PL) molecular species through 4 weeks of intake. Alterations in lung fatty acid composition were followed through 6 weeks of intake at 0, 10.5 and 105 mg vitamin E/kg diet. Vitamin E, at all levels of supplementation, had no significant effect on mouse lung fatty acid composition. Saturated fatty acids of the lung also showed little alteration by diet, but feeding the lard diet significantly elevated oleic and palmitoleic acids. In mice fed the corn oil diet the levels of linoleic acid (18:2) were twice those of lard-fed mice, and arachidonic acid (20:4) was elevated by 15.8%. The diet elevated the mean peroxidizability index (PI) on lung tissue in corn oil-fed mice. PMID:501437

Donovan, D H; Menzel, D B

1979-11-01

173

Contrasting cellularity on fat deposition in the subcutaneous adipose tissue and longissimus lumborum muscle from lean and fat pigs under dietary protein reduction.  

Science.gov (United States)

The production of pork with high amounts of intramuscular fat (IMF) without an increase in subcutaneous fat is highly desirable for the pig industry and consumers. Herein, we question the impact of dietary protein reduction (18% v. 13%) on fat deposition in the subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and longissimus lumborum (LL) muscle using genetically diverse pigs for body fatness (lean v. fat). A clear effect of genotype was observed on plasma insulin (P=0.004) and leptin (Pfat pigs having higher values. Accordingly, IMF was higher in the fat pigs, when compared with their lean counterparts (P=0.003), which was supported by enlarged adipocytes (Pdroplets within the LL fibres (P=0.039) and extramyocellular lipids number (P=0.017) were increased in pigs fed reduced protein diets, regardless of genotype, which is consistent with higher levels of plasma triacylglycerols (P=0.002). The gene-expression pattern of lipogenic factors in the SAT was distinct from the LL muscle. In the SAT, PPARG expression was similar among genotypes (P>0.05), whereas in the LL muscle it was higher in the lean pigs (P=0.023), especially when fed on low protein diet (P=0.057). The CEBPA and FABP4 mRNA levels were increased in the SAT of fat pigs (P0.05). The influence of diet on FABP4 expression in the SAT was dependent on pig's genetic background (P=0.005). In conclusion, fat deposition was clearly influenced by genotype and, to a lesser extent, by dietary protein level, the SAT being more sensitive than the LL muscle. One can speculate that the pathways involved in lipid metabolism are downregulated in intramuscular adipocytes when compared with SAT fat cells. This result might be a direct consequence of the relatively low proportion of adipocytes found in the LL muscle. PMID:24636826

Lopes, P A; Costa, A S H; Costa, P; Pires, V M R; Madeira, M S; Achega, F; Pinto, R M A; Prates, J A M

2014-04-01

174

Linseed dietary fibers reduce apparent digestibility of energy and fat and weight gain in growing rats  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Dietary fibers (DF) may affect energy balance, an effect often ascribed to the viscous nature of some water soluble DF, which affect luminal viscosity and thus multiple physiological processes. We have tested the hypothesis that viscous linseed DF reduce apparent nutrient digestibility, and limit weight gain, in a randomized feeding trial where 60 male, growing, Wistar rats, with an initial weight of ~200 g, were fed different diets (n = 10 per group): low DF control (C), 5% DF from cellulose (5-CEL), CEL + 5% DF from whole (5-WL) or ground linseed (5-GL), CEL + 5% DF from linseed DF extract (5-LDF), and CEL + 10% DF from linseed DF extract (10-LDF). Diets were provided ad libitum for 21 days. Feed intake and faecal output were measured during days 17-21. Faecal fat excretion increased with increasing DF content and was highest in the 10-LDF group. Apparent fat digestibility was highest with the C diet (94.9% ± 0.8%) and lowest (74.3% ± 0.6%) with the 10-LDF diet, and decreased in a non-linear manner with increasing DF (p <0.001). Apparent fat digestibility also decreased with increased accessibility of DF (5-WL vs. 5-GL) and when the proportion of viscous DF increased (5-GL vs. 5-LDF). The 10-LDF resulted in a lower final body weight (258 ± 6.2 g) compared to C (282 ± 5.9 g), 5-CEL (281 ± 5.9 g), and 5-WL (285 ± 5.9 g) (p <0.05). The 10-LDF diet reduced body fat compared to 5-CEL (p <0.01). In conclusion, DF extracted from linseed reduced apparent energy and fat digestibility and resulted in restriction of body weight gain in growing rats.

Kristensen, Mette Bredal; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

2013-01-01

175

Linseed dietary fibers reduce apparent digestibility of energy and fat and weight gain in growing rats.  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Dietary fibers (DF) may affect energy balance, an effect often ascribed to the viscous nature of some water soluble DF, which affect luminal viscosity and thus multiple physiological processes. We have tested the hypothesis that viscous linseed DF reduce apparent nutrient digestibility, and limit weight gain, in a randomized feeding trial where 60 male, growing, Wistar rats, with an initial weight of ~200 g, were fed different diets (n = 10 per group): low DF control (C), 5% DF from cellulose (5-CEL), CEL + 5% DF from whole (5-WL) or ground linseed (5-GL), CEL + 5% DF from linseed DF extract (5-LDF), and CEL + 10% DF from linseed DF extract (10-LDF). Diets were provided ad libitum for 21 days. Feed intake and faecal output were measured during days 17-21. Faecal fat excretion increased with increasing DF content and was highest in the 10-LDF group. Apparent fat digestibility was highest with the C diet (94.9% ± 0.8%) and lowest (74.3% ± 0.6%) with the 10-LDF diet, and decreased in a non-linear manner with increasing DF (p<0.001). Apparent fat digestibility also decreased with increased accessibility of DF (5-WL vs. 5-GL) and when the proportion of viscous DF increased (5-GL vs. 5-LDF). The 10-LDF resulted in a lower final body weight (258 ± 6.2 g) compared to C (282 ± 5.9 g), 5-CEL (281 ± 5.9 g), and 5-WL (285 ± 5.9 g) (p<0.05). The 10-LDF diet reduced body fat compared to 5-CEL (p<0.01). In conclusion, DF extracted from linseed reduced apparent energy and fat digestibility and resulted in restriction of body weight gain in growing rats.

Kristensen, M.; Knudsen, K. E. B.

2013-01-01

176

Linseed dietary fibers reduce apparent digestibility of energy and fat and weigth gain in growing rats  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Dietary fibers (DF) may affect energy balance, an effect often ascribed to the viscous nature of some water soluble DF, which affect luminal viscosity and thus multiple physiological processes. We have tested the hypothesis that viscous linseed DF reduce apparent nutrient digestibility, and limit weight gain, in a randomized feeding trial where 60 male, growing, Wistar rats, with an initial weight of ~200 g, were fed different diets (n = 10 per group): low DF control (C), 5% DF from cellulose (5-CEL), CEL + 5% DF from whole (5-WL) or ground linseed (5-GL), CEL + 5% DF from linseed DF extract (5-LDF), and CEL + 10% DF from linseed DF extract (10-LDF). Diets were provided ad libitum for 21 days. Feed intake and faecal output were measured during days 17–21. Faecal fat excretion increased with increasing DF content and was highest in the 10-LDF group. Apparent fat digestibility was highest with the C diet (94.9% ± 0.8%) and lowest (74.3% ± 0.6%) with the 10-LDF diet, and decreased in a non-linear manner with increasing DF (p < 0.001). Apparent fat digestibility also decreased with increased accessibility of DF (5-WL vs. 5-GL) and when the proportion of viscous DF increased (5-GL vs. 5-LDF). The 10-LDF resulted in a lower final body weight (258 ± 6.2 g) compared to C (282 ± 5.9 g), 5-CEL (281 ± 5.9 g), and 5-WL (285 ± 5.9 g) (p < 0.05). The 10-LDF diet reduced body fat compared to 5-CEL (p < 0.01). In conclusion, DF extracted from linseed reduced apparent energy and fat digestibility and resulted in restriction of body weight gain in growing rats.

Kristensen, Mette; Knudsen, Knud Erik Bach

2013-01-01

177

Maternal dietary fat affects the LT muscle fatty acid composition of progeny at weaning and finishing stages in pigs.  

Science.gov (United States)

The present study was conducted to investigate whether maternal dietary fat affects the fatty acid composition of the longissimus thoracis (LT) muscle in offspring pigs at weaning and finishing stages. Fourteen sows were randomly assigned to a control or a high fat (HF) group. The HF sows received a diet containing 8% corn oil starting seven days before farrowing until weaning. The results showed that a high-fat diet significantly increased the contents of serum-lipid-related indexes in the sows. Although the triglyceride content did not change, the C18:2n-6 content was higher in the colostrum and in the LT muscle of offspring pigs at both investigated stages. The total n-6 content and the n-6/n-3 ratio generally increased. This study demonstrated that maternal dietary fat during lactation affects the fatty acid composition of the LT muscle of progeny at weaning, and can have persistent effects in later life. PMID:24334032

Ci, Le; Sun, Hailin; Huang, Yanping; Guo, Jun; Albrecht, Elke; Zhao, Ruqian; Yang, Xiaojing

2014-03-01

178

Are the Dietary Guidelines for Meat, Fat, Fruit and Vegetable Consumption Appropriate for Environmental Sustainability? A Review of the Literature  

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This paper reviews the current literature around the environmental impacts of dietary recommendations. The focus of the review is on collating evidence relating to environmental impacts of the dietary advice found in the World Health Organisation guidelines, and environmental impact literature: reducing the consumption of fat, reducing the consumption of meat-based protein and animal-based foods, and increasing the consumption of fruit and vegetables. The environmental impact of reducing diet...

Christian John Reynolds; Jonathan David Buckley; Philip Weinstein; John Boland

2014-01-01

179

Effect of dietary fat on the fatty acid composition and fertilizing ability of fowl semen.  

Science.gov (United States)

Broiler breeder roosters received two diets, containing either 5% salmon oil (SO) or 5% corn oil (CO). The diets differed essentially in their polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition, with n-6:n-3 fatty acid ratios of 41.6 in SO and 1.5 in CO. The effects of these diets on the fatty acid composition of spermatozoa and seminal plasma, and on fertility evaluated after artificial insemination were observed. Whatever the diet, the fatty acid composition of spermatozoa showed notable amounts of 20:4n-6 (5-9%) and 22:4n-6 (15-21%). These essential fatty acids were not detected in the diets and were synthesized from 18:2n-6, which was abundant in the diet (15-16%) but low in spermatozoa (2-3%). Spermatozoa were also very rich in saturated fatty acids (39%). There was a clear influence of dietary lipids on the spermatozoa fatty acid profile: the proportion of n-3 fatty acids in spermatozoa from males fed SO compared to CO was higher (9.6% vs. 4.3%) and that of n-6 fatty acids was lower (22.4% vs. 33.3%). The fatty acid composition of seminal plasma included a higher proportion of saturated fatty acids (49%) than the proportion in spermatozoa, whereas minor fatty acids (14:0, 16:1n-7, 16:1n-9, 22:5n-3) were not detected. The influence of dietary lipids on the seminal plasma fatty acid profile was the same as for the spermatozoa, especially in the PUFA profile. In addition, the SO diet gave significantly higher fertility rates (96%) than the CO diet (91.6%). These results clearly show that the lipid composition of the diet may modify the fatty acid composition of the semen and its fertilizing ability. PMID:9160721

Blesbois, E; Lessire, M; Grasseau, I; Hallouis, J M; Hermier, D

1997-05-01

180

Metabolism and secretory function of white adipose tissue: effect of dietary fat  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Approximately 40% of the total energy consumed by western populations is represented by lipids, most of them being ingested as triacylglycerols and phospholipids. The focus of this review is to analyze the effect of the type of dietary fat on white adipose tissue metabolism and secretory function, particularly on haptoglobin, TNF-?, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and adiponectin secretion. Previous studies have demonstrated that the duration of the exposure to the high-fat feeding, amount of fatty acid present in the diet and the type of fatty acid may or may not have a significant effect on adipose tissue metabolism. However, the long-term or short-term high fat diets, especially rich in saturated fatty acids, probably by activation of toll-like receptors, stimulated the expression of proinflammatory adipokines and inhibited adiponectin expression. Further studies are needed to investigate the cellular mechanisms by which dietary fatty acids affect white adipose tissue metabolism and secretory functions.Aproximadamente 40% do total de energia consumida pela população ocidental é representada pelos lipídios, a maioria dela sendo ingerida na forma de triglicerídeos e fosfolipídios. O foco desta revisão foi analisar o efeito dos tipos de gordura da dieta sobre o metabolismo e função secretora do tecido adiposo branco, principalmente, sobre a secreção de haptoglobina, TNF-?, inibidor do ativador de plasminogênio-1 e adiponectina. Estudos prévios demonstraram que durante a exposição de dietas hiperlipídicas, a quantidade e o tipo de ácidos graxos presentes na dieta podem ou não ter um efeito significante sobre o metabolismo do tecido adiposo. Entretanto, o tratamento a curto ou longo prazo com dieta hiperlipídica, especialmente rica em ácidos graxos saturados, provavelmente por ativar receptores toll-like, estimula a expressão de adipocinas pró-inflamatórias e inibe a expressão de adiponectina. Estudos adicionais são necessários para investigar os mecanismos celulares pelos quais os ácidos graxos da dieta afetam a função secretória e metabólica do tecido adiposo branco.

Cláudia M. Oller do Nascimento

2009-09-01

 
 
 
 
181

Impact of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on cognition, motor skills and hippocampal neurogenesis in developing C57BL/6J mice.  

Science.gov (United States)

Maternal intake of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA) is critical during perinatal development of the brain. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) is the most abundant n-3 PUFA in the brain and influences neuronal membrane function and neuroprotection. The present study aims to assess the effect of dietary n-3 PUFA availability during the gestational and postnatal period on cognition, brain metabolism and neurohistology in C57BL/6J mice. Female wild-type C57BL/6J mice at day 0 of gestation were randomly assigned to either an n-3 PUFA deficient diet (0.05% of total fatty acids) or an n-3 PUFA adequate diet (3.83% of total fatty acids) containing preformed DHA and its precursor ?-linolenic acid. Male offspring remained on diet and performed cognitive tests during puberty and adulthood. In adulthood, animals underwent (31)P magnetic resonance spectroscopy to assess brain energy metabolites. Thereafter, biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses were performed assessing inflammation, neurogenesis and synaptic plasticity. Compared to the n-3 PUFA deficient group, pubertal n-3 PUFA adequate fed mice demonstrated increased motor coordination. Adult n-3 PUFA adequate fed mice exhibited increased exploratory behavior, sensorimotor integration and spatial memory, while neurogenesis in the hippocampus was decreased. Selected brain regions of n-3 PUFA adequate fed mice contained significantly lower levels of arachidonic acid and higher levels of DHA and dihomo-?-linolenic acid. Our data suggest that dietary n-3 PUFA can modify neural maturation and enhance brain functioning in healthy C57BL/6J mice. This indicates that availability of n-3 PUFA in infant diet during early development may have a significant impact on brain development. PMID:25444517

Janssen, Carola I F; Zerbi, Valerio; Mutsaers, Martina P C; de Jong, Bas S W; Wiesmann, Maximilian; Arnoldussen, Ilse A C; Geenen, Bram; Heerschap, Arend; Muskiet, Frits A J; Jouni, Zeina E; van Tol, Eric A F; Gross, Gabriele; Homberg, Judith R; Berg, Brian M; Kiliaan, Amanda J

2015-01-01

182

Dietary long chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids prevent impaired social behaviour and normalize brain dopamine levels in food allergic mice.  

Science.gov (United States)

Allergy is suggested to exacerbate impaired behaviour in children with neurodevelopmental disorders. We have previously shown that food allergy impaired social behaviour in mice. Dietary fatty acid composition may affect both the immune and nervous system. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LCPUFA) on food allergy-induced impaired social behaviour and associated deficits in prefrontal dopamine (DA) in mice. Mice were fed either control or n-3 LCPUFA-enriched diet before and during sensitization with whey. Social behaviour, acute allergic skin response and serum immunoglobulins were assessed. Monoamine levels were measured in brain and intestine and fatty acid content in brain. N-3 LCPUFA prevented impaired social behaviour of allergic mice. Moreover, n-3 LCPUFA supplementation increased docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) incorporation into the brain and restored reduced levels of prefrontal DA and its metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid, 3-methoxytyramine and homovanillic acid in allergic mice. In addition to these brain effects, n-3 LCPUFA supplementation reduced the allergic skin response and restored decreased intestinal levels of serotonin metabolite 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid in allergic mice. N-3 LCPUFA may have beneficial effects on food allergy-induced deficits in social behaviour, either indirectly by reducing the allergic response and restoring intestinal 5-HT signalling, or directly by DHA incorporation into neuronal membranes, affecting the DA system. Therefore, it is of interest to further investigate the relevance of food allergy-enhanced impairments in social behaviour in humans and the potential benefits of dietary n-3 LCPUFA supplementation. PMID:25445491

de Theije, Caroline G M; van den Elsen, Lieke W J; Willemsen, Linette E M; Milosevic, Vanja; Korte-Bouws, Gerdien A H; Lopes da Silva, Sofia; Broersen, Laus M; Korte, S Mechiel; Olivier, Berend; Garssen, Johan; Kraneveld, Aletta D

2015-03-01

183

Impact of dietary protein level and source of polyunsaturated Fatty acids on lipid metabolism-related protein expression and Fatty Acid concentrations in porcine tissues.  

Science.gov (United States)

The study assessed the effects of reduced protein (RPD) vs high protein diet (HPD) in combination with n-3/n-6 PUFA-containing plant oils [linseed oil (LO)/sunflower seed oil (SO)] supplementation on lipid metabolism-related protein expression and fatty acid concentrations in porcine tissues. Forty male Landrace pigs (castrates) were allocated into four groups fed diets different in dietary protein and PUFA level and one control group. SCD-1 protein expression in pig muscle, back fat, and liver was not affected by diet. The protein expression of precursor (pSREBP-1c) and active nuclear form of SREBP-1c (mSREBP-1c) in muscle and back fat was affected by diet, however not in liver of pigs. In contrast, the expression of ACC and FAS expression was significantly affected by diet only in the liver. The fatty acid concentrations in muscle, liver, and back fat resulted in higher n-3 PUFA concentrations of LO groups compared to the SO groups. PMID:25429687

Dannenberger, Dirk; Nuernberg, Karin; Nuernberg, Gerd; Priepke, Antje

2014-12-24

184

Effect of high versus low doses of fat and vitamin A dietary supplementation on fatty acid composition of phospholipids in mice  

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Dietary fat and vitamin A provide important precursors for potent bioactive ligands of nuclear hormone receptors, which regulate various enzymes involved in lipid homeostasis, metabolism and inflammation. We determined the effects of dietary fat and dietary vitamin A on hepatic expression of two fatty acid metabolizing enzymes, elongase 6 (ELOVL6) and stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD1) and the concentration of saturated fatty acids (SAFA) and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) of phosphol...

Weiss, Kathrin; Miha?ly, Johanna; Liebisch, Gerhard; Marosvo?lgyi, Tama?s; Garcia, Ada L.; Schmitz, Gerd; Decsi, Tama?s; Ru?hl, Ralph

2013-01-01

185

A high-fat diet differentially affects the gut metabolism and blood lipids of rats depending on the type of dietary fat and carbohydrate.  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this model study was to investigate how selected gut functions and serum lipid profile in rats on high-fat diets differed according to the type of fat (saturated vs. unsaturated) and carbohydrate (simple vs. complex). The experiment was conducted using 32 male Wistar rats distributed into 4 groups of 8 animals each. For 4 weeks, the animals were fed group-specific diets that were either rich in lard or soybean oil (16% of the diet) as the source of saturated or unsaturated fatty acids, respectively; further, each lard- and soybean oil-rich diet contained either fructose or corn starch (45.3% of the diet) as the source of simple or complex carbohydrates, respectively. Both dietary factors contributed to changes in the caecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations, especially to the butyrate concentration, which was higher in rats fed lard- and corn starch-rich diets compared to soybean oil- and fructose-rich diets, respectively. The lowest butyrate concentration was observed in rats fed the soybean oil- and fructose-rich diet. On the other hand, the lard- and fructose-rich diet vs. the other dietary combinations significantly increased serum total cholesterol concentration, to more than two times serum triglyceride concentration and to more than five times the atherogenic index. In conclusion, a high-fat diet rich in fructose can unfavorably affect gut metabolism when unsaturated fats are predominant in the diet or the blood lipids when a diet is rich in saturated fats. PMID:24496299

Jurgo?ski, Adam; Ju?kiewicz, Jerzy; Zdu?czyk, Zenon

2014-01-01

186

Examining the minimal required elements of a computer-tailored intervention aimed at dietary fat reduction: Results of a randomized controlled dismantling study  

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This study investigated the minimally required feedback elements of a computer-tailored dietary fat reduction intervention to be effective in improving fat intake. In all 588 Healthy Dutch adults were randomly allocated to one of four conditions in an randomized controlled trial: (i) feedback on dietary fat intake [personal feedback (P feedback)], (ii) P feedback and feedback on one's own behavior relative to that of peers [personal-normative feedback (PN feedback)], (iii) PN feedback and pra...

Kroeze, W.; Oenema, A.; Dagnelie, P. C.; Brug, J.

2008-01-01

187

Fats  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Fundraising Events Close www.diabetes.org > Food and ... fats Healthy fats No doubt about it, carbohydrate gets all of the attention in diabetes management. More important than total fat is the type ...

188

Fats  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... carbohydrate gets all of the attention in diabetes management. More important than total fat is the type ... oil is made into a solid fat. This process is called hydrogenation. Trans fats act like saturated ...

189

Dietary Fat Intake and Exercise among Two- and Four-Year College Students: Differences in Behavior and Psychosocial Factors  

Science.gov (United States)

Given the demographic differences among two-year colleges and four-year universities and the relatively limited access to health education and campus-based health resources, this study compares the frequency of limiting dietary fat intake and exercising among two- and four-year college students. A total of 2,265 undergraduate students aged 18-25…

Berg, Carla J.; An, Lawrence C.; Ahluwalia, Jasjit S.

2013-01-01

190

Effect of early dietary deficiency in polyunsaturated fatty acids on two lectin binding sites in the small intestine of postweanling rats.  

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This study was designed to determine whether dietary lipids influence the development of intestinal cell glycosylation, in relationship to diet-induced changes in phospholipid fatty acid composition. The ability of two different lectins, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and Maackia amurensis agglutinin (MAA), to combine specifically with particular carbohydrate residues was used to investigate the surface characteristics of epithelial cells of rats fed different dietary lipids from birth to 6 weeks of age. Diets contained 5% (weight) peanut oil (PO), rich in n-6 fatty acids; salmon oil (SO), rich in n-3 fatty acids; hydrogenated palm oil (HPO), deficient in both n-6 and n-3 fatty acids or a PO and rapeseed oil (RO) mixture (PRO), the control diet. Pieces of jejunal and ileal villi were excised from postweanling rats and prepared for lectin histochemical study. Concurrently, epithelial cells were removed from jejunal and ileal segments for determining their phospholipid fatty acid compositions. Polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) deficiency was evidenced in the HPO group by the appearance of eicosatrienoic acid (20:3n-9) in both jejunal and ileal phospholipids, which paralleled the decrease in arachidonic acid content. Accretion of 18:1n-9 and 20:3n-9 in cell phospholipids of group HPO was not sufficient to match the unsaturation level in rats fed nonhydrogenated vegetable oils (PRO, PO) or fish oil (SO). The lectin histochemical study showed that WGA strongly labelled the brush border membrane microvilli whereas binding of MAA was specific to goblet cells and mucus. Regardless of the type of diet, WGA binding was weaker in the ileum than in the jejunum. In comparison to all other groups, WGA-labelling of villi was less intense in the jejunum and disappeared almost completely in the ileum of HPO-fed rats. Although SO- and PO-fed rats had, respectively, very low and high ratios of n-6 to n-3 in their intestinal phospholipids, binding of WGA in both groups was not markedly different from that in the control (PRO). MAA-labelling was very intense in jejunal and ileal villi of n-3-fed (SO) rats, whereas it was strongly attenuated in the n-3- and n-6 deficient (HPO) group. These results suggest that intestinal glycosyltransferase activities involved in cell differentiation were altered relative to the overall unsaturation index of dietary fatty acids. Alterations of epithelial glycosylation mainly resulted from a drop in total n-6 and n-3 fatty acids, although it may be speculated that there is a specific effect of n-3 fatty acids. PMID:7472903

Alessandri, J M; Joannic, J L; Delpal, S; Durand, G

1995-08-01

191

The effect of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids supplementation of rams on semen quality and subsequent quality of liquid stored semen.  

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The objective of this study was to examine the effect of dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) supplementation of rams on semen quality and subsequent sperm function of liquid stored semen. Mature rams of proven fertility were individually housed and were blocked according to breed, body weight, and body condition score and randomly allocated within block to one of two dietary treatments (N = 7 per treatment). Rams were offered a base diet of hay and concentrate, with the concentrate enriched with either: (1) saturated palmitic acid (CON) or (2) high n-3 PUFA fish oil (FO) supplements. Both lipid supplements were added at 2% (wt/wt) of the total diet as fed and both were partially rumen-protected. The animals were fed their respective diets for a total of 9 weeks and blood samples were collected on weeks 0 (pre-experimental), 4, and 9, relative to initial allocation of diet (week 0), for measurement of plasma concentration of fatty acids, metabolites, insulin like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) and insulin. Semen was collected from each ram (on 1 day in each week) in weeks 4, 5, 7, 8, and 9, and each ejaculate was assessed for volume, wave motion, and concentration of sperm, after which it was diluted in a skim milk-based extender and stored at 4 °C. A second ejaculate was collected on weeks 4, 7, and 9, centrifuged, and the sperm frozen for subsequent lipid analysis. A sample of semen from each ram was assessed at 24, 48, and 72 hours after collection for sperm progressive linear motion, ability to penetrate artificial mucus, and the ability to resist lipid peroxidation (at 24 and 48 hours only) using the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances assay. There was no effect of diet on plasma insulin concentrations or on any of the metabolites measured, however, there was a diet by week interaction for plasma IGF-1 concentration (P rams having higher IGF-1 concentrations on week 9 compared with the control treatment (P rams (P rams supplemented with FO yielded a higher semen concentration (P semen quality parameters including semen volume, wave motion, progressive linear motion, ability to penetrate artificial mucus, or ability to resist lipid peroxidation. In conclusion, dietary supplementation of rams with n-3 PUFA successfully increased the n-3 PUFA content of plasma and sperm but has limited effects on the quality of liquid stored semen. PMID:24100164

Fair, S; Doyle, D N; Diskin, M G; Hennessy, A A; Kenny, D A

2014-01-15

192

The effects of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on attention and impulsivity in an animal model of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD  

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Full Text Available Background: Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is one of the commonest psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. The main symptoms of ADHD are hyperactivity, inattention and impulsivity. Both etiology and neurobiological basis of ADHD are unknown. In this context, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs, especially omega-3 (n-3 PUFAs, have become a focus of interest. The symptoms of ADHD have been suggested to be associated with a deficiency of n-3 PUFAs. In addition, the impact of a supply of dietary n-3 PUFAs in the treatment of ADHD has frequently been discussed. Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine the influence of n-3 PUFA supplementation on attention and impulsivity in the spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR which has been proposed to be a valid genetic animal model of ADHD. Methods: Seven-week-old male SHRs were randomly divided into two groups of 15 rats and fed one of two experimental diets (n-3 PUFA-enriched or n-3 PUFA-deficient prior to and during behavioral testing. Attention and impulsivity were assessed using a three-choice??serial-reaction-time-task (3CSRTT which is based on the five-choice-serial-reaction-time??task. The experiment was performed with three-month-old rats. Results: Our findings demonstrate a marked difference between groups regarding impulsivity but not attention. The n-3 PUFA-enriched diet significantly reduced impulsivity in SHRs compared with rats fed with the n-3 PUFA-deficient diet. Conclusion: The present data show a decrease in impulsivity following a dietary n-3 PUFA supplementation, but no changes in attention. A possible explanation for these results is that the attention displayed by SHR may not be linked to n-3 PUFA supply. It is important to note that inattention and impulsiveness are two of the main symptoms of ADHD. Our results regarding dietary n-3 PUFA supply may support the positive findings in human studies demonstrating that n-3 PUFA administration can improve the cognitive or behavioral symptoms in children with ADHD

Ewelina Makulska-Gertruda

2014-07-01

193

Dietary canitine maintains energy reserves and delays fatigue of exercised african catfish (Clarias gariepinus fed high fat diets  

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Full Text Available Lipids, together with proteins, are traditionally considered as primary fuels during aerobic swimming. The effects of dietary fat and carnitine supplements and exercise on the energy metabolism of juvenile fish were investigated. One hundred African catfish (Clarias gariepinus were fed four isonitrogenous diets containing a fat level of 100 or 190 g kg-1 diet and one of the two levels of carnitine (15 and 1000 mg kg-1. Fish grew from 61 to 162 g in 10 wk. Thereafter, 6 fish per group swam vigorously for 3 h and the results were compared with unexercised groups. Fish receiving 1,000 mg carnitine accumulated 2- to 3-fold more carnitine than fish receiving 15 mg carnitine. Plasma acyl-carnitine level was affected by an interaction between dietary treatment and exercise (P < 0.05. Adenosine triphosphate and phosphocreatine concentrations were higher in the white muscle (WM of exercised fish fed the high-carnitine supplements, compared with the low-carnitine fed fish (P < 0.05. Adenilate energy charge indexes were higher and ammonia concentrations were lower in WM of fish fed high-carnitine and high-fat diets. Dietary carnitine supplements may be needed in growing fish when dietary lipid level is high. In that case extra dietary carnitine can maintain the body energy reserves at adequate level when fish is exposed to a short-term, exhaustive exercise, a physiologic stress common both in nature and in intensive aquaculture systems.

Ozório Rodrigo

2005-01-01

194

High dietary fat exacerbates weight gain and obesity in female liver fatty acid binding protein gene-ablated mice.  

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Since liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) facilitates uptake/oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in cultured transfected cells and primary hepatocytes, loss of L-FABP was expected to exacerbate weight gain and/or obesity in response to high dietary fat. Male and female wild-type (WT) and L-FABP gene-ablated mice, pair-fed a defined isocaloric control or high fat diet for 12 weeks, consumed equal amounts of food by weight and kcal. Male WT mice gained weight faster than their female WT counterparts regardless of diet. L-FABP gene ablation enhanced weight gain more in female than male mice-an effect exacerbated by high fat diet. Dual emission X-ray absorptiometry revealed high-fat fed male and female WT mice gained mostly fat tissue mass (FTM). L-FABP gene ablation increased FTM in female, but not male, mice-an effect also exacerbated by high fat diet. Concomitantly, L-FABP gene ablation decreased serum beta-hydroxybutyrate in male and female mice fed the control diet and, even more so, on the high-fat diet. Thus, L-FABP gene ablation decreased fat oxidation and sensitized all mice to weight gain as whole body FTM and LTM-with the most gain observed in FTM of control vs high-fat fed female L-FABP null mice. Taken together, these results indicate loss of L-FABP exacerbates weight gain and/or obesity in response to high dietary fat. PMID:20035485

Atshaves, Barbara P; McIntosh, Avery L; Storey, Stephen M; Landrock, Kerstin K; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

2010-02-01

195

Association between dietary fat and skin cancer in an Australian population using case-control and cohort study designs  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Human studies of dietary fat as a possible risk factor for cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM and non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC – principally basal cell carcinoma (BCC and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC – have produced inconsistent results. We had the opportunity to examine the association concurrently for all three types of skin cancer in a population-based study in Tasmania, Australia, involving 652 cases of CMM, BCC and SCC and a common set of 471 controls. Methods Histopathologically-confirmed cases of CMM, BCC and SCC were ascertained from the Tasmanian Cancer Registry (TCR, and controls were selected at random from the state's electoral roll. We compared subjects categorised by thirds of dietary fat intake score measured by the 'Dobson short fat questionnaire', with logistic regression models that adjusted for age, sex, skin type and usual sun exposure. We then followed all subjects for 56–80 months until 31 August, 2004 for a new NMSC using record linkage with both the TCR and the Births, Deaths, and Marriages registry. Incidence rates were calculated and ratios of rates were estimated using Poisson models. Results Relative to subjects in the lowest fat intake category, the odds ratios (OR comparing cases and controls were OR = 0.76 (95% CI: 0.56–1.03 for medium fat intake, and OR = 0.62 (95% CI: 0.45–0.85 for high fat intake, with a significant (p p = 0.30. Conclusion Using the same dietary instrument with two study designs in the same Caucasian population, we found no evidence that high fat intake increases the risk of developing melanoma or non-melanoma skin cancers. Instead, our results suggest a risk reduction for high fat intake.

Fryer Jayne L

2006-05-01

196

Dietary fiber and fat-derivatives prevent mineral oil toxicity in rats by the same mechanism.  

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The inclusion of 8% mineral oil in a fat-free diet causes severe growth retardation in rats. In the present study, this growth retardation was found to be primarily due to the reduction in nutrient intake, but not to the exacerbation of essential fatty acid deficiency. In addition, the growth retardation caused by mineral oil ingestion was prevented by the concurrent inclusion of 10% water-insoluble dietary fiber [gobo fiber prepared from Arctium lappa L. (gobo in Japanese) or cotton cellulose powder] or 5% fatty acids (C12-C18) as well as glycerol monostearate. The prevention of growth retardation by these substances was due to their ability to inhibit mineral oil absorption from the intestinal lumen. PMID:8395595

Morita, T; Ebihara, K; Kiriyama, S

1993-09-01

197

Dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids suppress NHE-1 upregulation in a rabbit model of volume- and pressure-overload  

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Full Text Available Background: Increased consumption of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (?3-PUFAs from fish oil may have cardioprotective effects during ischemia/reperfusion, hypertrophy, and heart failure (HF. The cardiac Na+/H+-exchanger (NHE-1 is a key mediator for these detrimental cardiac conditions. Consequently, chronic NHE-1 inhibition appears to be a promising pharmacological tool for prevention and treatment. Acute application of the fish oil ?3-PUFAs eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA inhibit the NHE-1 in isolated cardiomyocytes. We studied the effects of a diet enriched with ?3-PUFAs on the NHE-1 activity in healthy rabbits and in a rabbit model of HF induced by volume- and pressure-overload. Methods: Rabbits were allocated to four groups. The first two groups consisted of healthy rabbits, which were fed either a diet containing 1.25% (w/w fish oil (?3-PUFAs, or 1.25% high-oleic sunflower oil (?9-MUFAs as control. The second two groups were also allocated to either a diet containing ?3-PUFAs or ?9-MUFAs, but underwent volume- and pressure-overload to induce HF. Ventricular myocytes were isolated by enzymatic dissociation and used for intracellular pH (pHi and patch clamp measurements. NHE-1 activity was measured in HEPES-buffered conditions as recovery rate from acidosis due to ammonium prepulses. Results: In healthy rabbits, NHE-1 activity in ?9-MUFAs and ?3-PUFAs myocytes was not significantly different. Volume- and pressure-overload in rabbits increased the NHE-1 activity in ?9-MUFAs myocytes, but not in ?3-PUFAs myocytes, resulting in a significantly lower NHE-1 activity in myocytes of ?3-PUFA fed HF rabbits. The susceptibility to induced delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs, a cellular mechanism of arrhythmias, was lower in myocytes of HF animals fed ?3- PUFAs compared to myocytes of HF animals? fed??9-MUFAs. In our rabbit HF model, the degree of hypertrophy was similar in the ?3-PUFAs group compared to the ?9-MUFAs group. Concl

RubenCoronel

2012-04-01

198

Socio-Demographic Characteristics and Nutritional Status of Individuals by Stages of Change for Dietary Fat Reduction  

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Full Text Available Changes in lifestyle and food habits have been implicated in the increasing rate of nutrition related chronic diseases in Malaysia. A cross-sectional study was conducted to identify socio-demographic characteristic and nutritional status of individuals by their readiness to reduce dietary fat intake. A total of 202 non-academic staff aged 18-56 years at Universiti Putra Malaysia participated in the study. Information on demographic, socio-economic and stages of change related to dietary fat reduction were collected using a pre-tested interview-administered questionnaire. Subjects were measured for weight, height and waist circumference. Fasting blood through venipuncture was obtained for triglycerides, LDL-, HDL- and total cholesterol. Energy and dietary fat intake were estimated based on two days 24 h diet recall. Chi-square test and Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA were used for data analysis. Of the respondents, about 12% reported reduced fat intake, 20% were not committed to change and more than half (68% were in preparation stage. There was no significant association between stages of change and socio-demographic factors. Body mass index was highest in preparation group (Mean±SE = 24.93±0.35 kg/m2 [F = 5.686; p<0.01]. Men in action/maintenance group (Mean±SE = 76.22±4.17 cm had significantly lower adjusted mean waist circumference than those in preparation group (Mean±SE = 89.77±1.85 cm [F = 5.324, p<0.01]. No significant difference across stages was observed in waist circumference for women, lipid profile, caloric and fat intake. It is important to identify characteristics of individuals by their readiness to change dietary behaviors so that effective nutrition strategies can be developed and implemented to meet their dietary needs and goals.

C.Y. Wong

2009-01-01

199

Normolipidic dietary fat modifies circulating Renin-Angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidase activities in rat with breast cancer.  

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Hypothesis. Renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has been considered not only as a regulator of systemic volume and electrolyte balance but also has been recently involved in various pathological processes such as cancer. In the etiology of breast cancer, dietary factors have been analyzed and especially the influence of dietary fat has been studied, but the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we analyzed RAS-regulating enzymes in serum of rats with N-methyl nitrosourea (NMU)-induced breast cancer fed with different diets. Study Design. Four groups of rats were injected intraperitoneally with 3 doses of 50 mg/kg body weight of NMU at different days after birth and were fed with an AIN-93 commercial diet or AIN-93 diets with 4% fat constituted respectively by extra virgin olive oil, refined sunflower oil, and refined sunflower oil enriched to 50% with oleic acid. Method. After sacrifice, blood and tumor samples were collected by spectrophotometric determinations of RAS-regulating enzymes in plasma and histopathology studies. Results. We show that the type of dietary fat does not influence latency period, incidence of animals with tumors, incidence of mortality, or tumor yield per rat. However, changes were observed in tumor volume and the histopathology. The type of dietary fat also differently modified the enzymes involved in RAS regulation. Conclusions. It might suggest that one of the mechanisms by which dietary fat affects breast cancer is the modification of the RAS system, which may be consider as a new target for integrative therapies. PMID:25515171

Ruíz-Sanjuan, María Dolores; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel; Carrera-González, María Pilar; Mayas, María Dolores; García, María Jesús; Arrazola, Marcela; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús

2015-03-01

200

Effect of dietary fatty acid pattern on growth, body fat composition and antioxidant parameters in broilers.  

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The effects of dietary fat supplementation on performance, fatty acid (FA) composition of tissues and antioxidant defence system of broilers were studied. Male broilers were placed in 20 floor pens (60 broilers per pen). The broilers were fed by diets with added different energy sources: lard (L); sunflower oil (SFO); soybean oil (SBO); and linseed oil (LSO). The treatments did not modify significantly growth performance and feed intake of the broilers. There was no effect of dietary FA pattern on reduced glutathione level and glutathione peroxidase activity of plasma, erythrocyte and liver samples. However, higher PUFA content of the diet resulted in a significant increase in malondialdehyde level of erythrocytes and liver. The broilers fed LSO diet more effectively maintained their antioxidant status with enhanced plasma radical scavenger capacity. FA composition in tissues reflected the FA pattern of the diets, although proportion of FAs with four or more double bonds was metabolic specific. LSO diet increased the level of C18:3, C20:5 and C22:6 in tissue lipids in relation to L, SFO and SBO diets. Significantly increased plasma radical scavenging capacity in concert with the enhanced C20:5 and C22:6 proportion in liver and muscle during LSO feeding indicate metabolic changes to counteract the oxidative injury. This may be related to the compounds produced after different biochemical pathways of n-6 and n-3 FAs. PMID:18477319

Fébel, H; Mézes, M; Pálfy, T; Hermán, A; Gundel, J; Lugasi, A; Balogh, K; Kocsis, I; Blázovics, A

2008-06-01

 
 
 
 
201

Clostridium perfringens challenge and dietary fat type affect broiler chicken performance and fermentation in the gastrointestinal tract.  

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The aim of the present work was to examine how different fats commonly used in the feed industry affect broiler performance, nutrient digestibility and microbial fermentation in the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens challenged with virulent Clostridium perfringens strains. Two experiments were carried out, each including 480-day-old male broilers (Ross 308), which were randomly distributed to eight experimental groups using six replicate pens per treatment and 10 birds per pen. In Experiment 1, birds were fed diets containing soybean oil, palm kernel fatty acid distillers, rendered pork fat and lard. In Experiment 2, birds were fed diets containing rapeseed oil, coconut oil, beef tallow and palm oil. In both experiments, the birds were either not challenged or challenged with a mixture of three C. perfringens type A strains. Irrespective of the fat type present in the diet, C. perfringens did not affect broiler chicken body weight gain (BWG) and mortality in either of the two experiments. The BWG was affected by dietary fat type in both experiments, indicating that the fatty acid composition of the fat source affects broiler growth performance. In particular, the inclusion of animal fats tended to improve final BW to a greater extent compared with the inclusion of unsaturated vegetable oils. In Experiment 2, irrespective of the dietary fat type present in the diet, C. perfringens challenge significantly impaired feed conversion ratio in the period from 14 to 28 days (1.63 v. 1.69) and at 42 days (1.65 v. 1.68). In both experiments apparent metabolizable energy values were affected by dietary fat type. Irrespective of the fat type present in the diet, C. perfringens challenge decreased the digesta pH in the crop and ileum, but had no effect in cecal contents. Moreover, in Experiment 1, total organic acid concentration in the ileum was two to three times lower on soybean oil diets as compared with other treatments, indicating that C. perfringens as well as dietary fat type significantly affects microbiota activity in the broiler chicken gastrointestinal tract. PMID:24674938

Józefiak, D; Kiero?czyk, B; Rawski, M; Hejdysz, M; Rutkowski, A; Engberg, R M; Højberg, O

2014-06-01

202

Dietary fat interacts with PCBs to induce changes in lipid metabolism in LDL receptor deficient mice  

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From epidemiological studies, there is substantial evidence that cardiovascular diseases are linked to environmental pollution and that exposure to polycyclic and/or polyhalogenated aromatic hydrocarbons can lead to human cardiovascular toxicity. A major route of exposure to PCBs in humans is via oral ingestion of contaminated food products. Therefore, circulating environmental contaminants derived from diets, such as PCBs, are in intimate contact with the vascular endothelium. Endothelial activation and dysfunction is an important factor in the overall regulation of vascular lesion pathology. In addition to endothelial barrier dysfunction, another functional change in atherosclerosis is the activation of the endothelium that is manifested as an increase in the expression of specific cytokines and adhesion molecules. These cytokines and adhesion molecules are proposed to mediate the inflammatory aspects of the disease by regulating the vascular entry of leukocytes. Alterations in lipid profile and lipid metabolism as a result of exposure to PCBs may be important components of endothelial cell dysfunction. Little is known about the interaction of dietary fats and PCBs in the pathology of atherosclerosis. We have reported a significant disruption in endothelial barrier function when cells were exposed to linoleic acid. In the current study we aimed to demonstrate the PCB-fatty acid interaction in vivo and hypothesized that PCB toxicity can be modulated by the type of fat consumed.

Hennig, B.; Reiterer, G.; Toborek, M.; Matveev, S.V.; Daugherty, A.; Smart, E. [Univ. of Kentucky, Lexington (United States); Robertson, L.W. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City (United States)

2004-09-15

203

Fat source and dietary forage-to-concentrate ratio influences milk fatty-acid composition in lactating cows.  

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On the basis of the potential benefits to human health there is an increased interest in producing milk containing lower-saturated fatty acid (SFA) and higher unsaturated fatty acid (FA) concentrations, including cis-9 18:1 and cis-9, trans-11-conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). Twenty-four multiparous Holstein cows were used in two experiments according to a completely randomized block design, with 21-day periods to examine the effects of incremental replacement of prilled palm fat (PALM) with sunflower oil (SFO) in high-concentrate diets containing 30 g/kg dry matter (DM) of supplemental fat (Experiment 1) or increases in the forage-to-concentrate (F : C) ratio from 39 : 61 to 48 : 52 of diets containing 30 g/kg DM of SFO (Experiment 2) on milk production, digestibility and milk FA composition. Replacing PALM with SFO had no effect on DM intake, but tended to increase organic matter digestibility, yields of milk, protein and lactose, and decreased linearly milk fat content. Substituting SFO for PALM decreased linearly milk fat 8:0 to 16:0 and cis-9 16:1, and increased linearly 18:0, cis-9 18:1, trans-18:1 (??4 to 16), 18:2 and CLA concentrations. Increases in the F : C ratio of diets containing SFO had no effect on intake, yields of milk, milk protein or milk lactose, lowered milk protein content in a quadratic manner, and increased linearly NDF digestion and milk fat secretion. Replacing concentrates with forages in diets containing SFO increased milk fat 4:0 to 10:0 concentrations in a linear or quadratic manner, decreased linearly cis-9 16:1, trans-6 to -10 18:1, 18:2n-6, trans-7, cis-9 CLA, trans-9, cis-11 CLA and trans-10, cis-12 CLA, without altering milk fat 14:0 to 16:0, trans-11 18:1, cis-9, trans-11 CLA or 18:3n-3 concentrations. In conclusion, replacing prilled palm fat on with SFO in high-concentrate diets had no adverse effects on intake or milk production, other than decreasing milk fat content, but lowered milk fat medium-chain SFA and increased trans FA and polyunsaturated FA concentrations. Increases in the proportion of forage in diets containing SFO increased milk fat synthesis, elevated short-chain SFA and lowered trans FA concentrations, without altering milk polyunsaturated FA content. Changes in fat yield on high-concentrate diets containing SFO varied between experiments and individual animals, with decreases in milk fat secretion being associated with increases in milk fat trans-10 18:1, trans-10, cis-12 CLA and trans-9, cis-11 CLA concentrations. PMID:24176091

Vazirigohar, M; Dehghan-Banadaky, M; Rezayazdi, K; Krizsan, S J; Nejati-Javaremi, A; Shingfield, K J

2014-01-01

204

The impact of dietary long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids on bone and cartilage in gilts and sows.  

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Dietary long-chain PFO including arachidonic acid (ARA), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA), and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) are precursors for several inflammatory mediators. The objective of this study was to characterize the effects of dietary PFO supplementation on bone, cartilage, and synovial fluid in 2 ages of pigs. Sows and gilts were fed either control corn/soybean meal based diets or the control diet supplemented with PFO from Gromega (PFO; JBS United, Sheridan, IN). Sows were fed their diets for 24.5 mo and slaughtered at 43 mo while gilts were fed their diets from weaning until slaughter at 111 kg. Cartilage was harvested from both humeroulnar joints of 14 sows (7/treatment) and 16 gilts (8/treatment) within 30 h of slaughter for fatty acid analysis and explant cultures. Synovial fluid was collected from the carpal joints of each pig postmortem. The right fused radius/ulna was collected for computed tomography (CT) analysis. Cortical width and density were determined and trabecular density was measured at the distal radius. Cartilage explants were allocated to 24-well culture plates with 2 discs per well and cultured over 72 h at 37°C in serum-free Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium: nutrient mixture F-12 (Ham) medium. Six wells/pig were treated with 10 ng/mL of recombinant porcine interleukin-1 (rpIL-1). At 24, 48, and 72 h of culture, media were removed and reserved for analysis of proteoglycans, nitric oxide (NO), and PGE2 concentrations. The CT scans of the radius/ulna from gilts revealed no differences for cortical width and bone density. Sows fed PFO had greater cortical width of the proximal ulna (P diet increased omega-3 incorporation into chondrocytes, the biological significance is unclear since concentrations of ARA were at least 9-fold higher than EPA or DHA. Therefore, if omega-3 fatty acids can mitigate inflammation in joints, the benefit would likely either be the result of systemic changes in inflammatory mediators or higher concentrations in the diet. PMID:25184850

O'Connor-Robison, C I; Spencer, J D; Orth, M W

2014-10-01

205

Metabolism and secretory function of white adipose tissue: effect of dietary fat  

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Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese Aproximadamente 40% do total de energia consumida pela população ocidental é representada pelos lipídios, a maioria dela sendo ingerida na forma de triglicerídeos e fosfolipídios. O foco desta revisão foi analisar o efeito dos tipos de gordura da dieta sobre o metabolismo e função secretora do tecid [...] o adiposo branco, principalmente, sobre a secreção de haptoglobina, TNF-?, inibidor do ativador de plasminogênio-1 e adiponectina. Estudos prévios demonstraram que durante a exposição de dietas hiperlipídicas, a quantidade e o tipo de ácidos graxos presentes na dieta podem ou não ter um efeito significante sobre o metabolismo do tecido adiposo. Entretanto, o tratamento a curto ou longo prazo com dieta hiperlipídica, especialmente rica em ácidos graxos saturados, provavelmente por ativar receptores toll-like, estimula a expressão de adipocinas pró-inflamatórias e inibe a expressão de adiponectina. Estudos adicionais são necessários para investigar os mecanismos celulares pelos quais os ácidos graxos da dieta afetam a função secretória e metabólica do tecido adiposo branco. Abstract in english Approximately 40% of the total energy consumed by western populations is represented by lipids, most of them being ingested as triacylglycerols and phospholipids. The focus of this review is to analyze the effect of the type of dietary fat on white adipose tissue metabolism and secretory function, p [...] articularly on haptoglobin, TNF-?, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and adiponectin secretion. Previous studies have demonstrated that the duration of the exposure to the high-fat feeding, amount of fatty acid present in the diet and the type of fatty acid may or may not have a significant effect on adipose tissue metabolism. However, the long-term or short-term high fat diets, especially rich in saturated fatty acids, probably by activation of toll-like receptors, stimulated the expression of proinflammatory adipokines and inhibited adiponectin expression. Further studies are needed to investigate the cellular mechanisms by which dietary fatty acids affect white adipose tissue metabolism and secretory functions.

Cláudia M. Oller do, Nascimento; Eliane B., Ribeiro; Lila M., Oyama.

2009-09-01

206

Effect of Dietary n ? 3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Oxidant/Antioxidant Status in Macrosomic Offspring of Diabetic Rats  

Science.gov (United States)

The aim of this work was to determine the effect of dietary n ? 3 PUFA on oxidant/antioxidant status, in vitro very low and low density lipoprotein (VLDL-LDL), and VLDL-LDL-fatty acid composition in macrosomic pups of diabetic mothers. We hypothesized that n ? 3 PUFA would improve oxidative stress in macrosomia. Diabetes was induced in female Wistar rats fed with the ISIO diet (control) or with the EPAX diet (enriched in n ? 3 PUFAs), by streptozotocin. The macrosomic pups were killed at birth (day 0) and at adulthood (day 90). Lipid parameters and VLDL-LDL-fatty acid composition were investigated. The oxidant/antioxidant status was determined by measuring plasma oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC), hydroperoxides, carbonyl proteins, and VLDL-LDL oxidation. Macrosomic rats of ISIO fed diabetic mothers showed an increase in plasma and VLDL-LDL-triglycerides and VLDL-LDL-cholesterol levels and altered VLDL-LDL-fatty acid composition. Plasma ORAC was low with high hydroperoxide and carbonyl protein levels. The in vitro oxidizability of VLDL-LDL was enhanced in these macrosomic rats. The EPAX diet corrected lipid parameters and improved oxidant/antioxidant status but increased VLDL-LDL susceptibility to oxidation. Macrosomia is associated with lipid abnormalities and oxidative stress. n ? 3 PUFA exerts favorable effects on lipid metabolism and on the oxidant/antioxidant status of macrosomic rats. However, there are no evident effects on VLDL-LDL oxidation. PMID:24987679

Guermouche, B.; Soulimane-Mokhtari, N. A.; Bouanane, S.; Merzouk, H.; Merzouk, S.; Narce, M.

2014-01-01

207

Effect of Dietary Omega-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids on Heart Rate and Heart Rate Variability in Animals Susceptible or Resistant to Ventricular Fibrillation  

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Full Text Available The consumption of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFAs has been reported to reduce cardiac mortality following myocardial infarction as well as to decrease resting heart rate (HR and increase heart rate variability (HRV. However, it has not been established whether n-3 PUFAs exhibit the same actions on HR and HRV in individuals known to be either susceptible or resistant to ventricular fibrillation (VF. Therefore, HR and HRV (high frequency and total R-R interval variability were evaluated before and 3 months after n-3 PUFA treatment in dogs with healed myocardial infarction that were either susceptible (VF+, n = 31 or resistant (VF-, n = 31 to ventricular tachyarrhythmias induced by a 2 min coronary artery occlusion during the last minute of a submaximal exercise test. HR and HRV were evaluated at rest, during submaximal exercise and in response to acute myocardial ischemia at rest before and after either placebo (1 g/day, corn oil, VF+, n = 9; VF- n = 8 or n-3 PUFA (docosahexaenoic acid + eicosapentaenoic acid ethyl esters, 1-4g/day, VF+, n = 22; VF-, n = 23 treatment for 3 months. The n-3 PUFA treatment elicited similar increases in red blood cell membrane, right atrial, and left ventricular n-3 PUFA levels in both the VF+ and VF- dogs. The n-3 PUFA treatment also provoked similar reductions in baseline HR and increases in baseline HRV in both groups that resulted in parallel shifts in the response to either exercise or acute myocardial ischemia (that is, the change in these variables induced by physiological challenges was not altered after n-3 PUFA treatment. These data demonstrate that dietary n-3 PUFA decreased HR and increased HRV to a similar extent in animals known to be prone to or resistant to malignant cardiac tachyarrhythmias.

GeorgeEBillman

2012-03-01

208

Flaxseed dietary fibers lower cholesterol and increase fecal fat excretion, but magnitude of effect depend on food type  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary fibers have been proposed to play a role in cardiovascular risk as well as body weight management. Flaxseeds are a good source of dietary fibers, and a large proportion of these are water-soluble viscous fibers. Method Here, we examine the effect of flaxseed dietary fibers in different food matrices on blood lipids and fecal excretion of fat and energy in a double-blind randomized crossover study with 17 subjects. Three different 7-d diets were tested: a low-fiber control diet (Control, a diet with flaxseed fiber drink (3/day (Flax drink, and a diet with flaxseed fiber bread (3/day (Flax bread. Total fat and energy excretion was measured in feces, blood samples were collected before and after each period, and appetite sensation registered 3 times daily before main meals. Results Compared to control, Flax drink lowered fasting total-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol by 12 and 15%, respectively, (p Conclusion Both Flax drink and Flax bread resulted in decreased plasma total and LDL-cholesterol and increased fat excretion, but the food matrix and/or processing may be of importance. Viscous flaxseed dietary fibers may be a useful tool for lowering blood cholesterol and potentially play a role in energy balance. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00953004

Kristensen Mette

2012-02-01

209

Effect of dietary fat on hepatic liver X receptor expression in P-glycoprotein deficient mice: implications for cholesterol metabolism  

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Full Text Available Abstract Pgp (P-glycoprotein, MDR1, ABCB1 is an energy-dependent drug efflux pump that is a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC family of proteins. Preliminary studies have reported that nonspecific inhibitors of Pgp affect synthesis and esterification of cholesterol, putatively by blocking trafficking of cholesterol from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum, and that relative increases in Pgp within a given cell type are associated with increased accumulation of cholesterol. Several key efflux proteins involved in the cholesterol metabolic pathway are transcriptionally regulated by the nuclear hormone liver X receptor (LXR. Therefore, to examine the interplay between P-glycoprotein and the cholesterol metabolic pathway, we utilized a high fat, normal cholesterol diet to upregulate LXR? without affecting dietary cholesterol. Our research has demonstrated that mice lacking in P-glycoprotein do not exhibit alterations in hepatic total cholesterol storage, circulating plasma total cholesterol levels, or total cholesterol concentration in the bile when compared to control animals on either a normal (25% calories from dietary fat or high fat (45% calories from dietary fat diet. However, p-glycoprotein deficient mice (Mdr1a-/-/1b-/- exhibit increased hepatic LXR? protein expression and an elevation in fecal cholesterol concentration when compared to controls.

Lee Stephen D

2008-06-01

210

Dietary fat-dependent transcriptional architecture and copy number alterations associated with modifiers of mammary cancer metastasis  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Breast cancer is a complex disease resulting from a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Among environmental factors, body composition and intake of specific dietary components like total fat are associated with increased incidence of breast cancer and metastasis. We previously showed that mice fed a high-fat diet have shorter mammary cancer latency, increased tumor growth and more pulmonary metastases than mice fed a standard diet. Subsequent genetic analysis identified several modifiers of metastatic mammary cancer along with widespread interactions between cancer modifiers and dietary fat. To elucidate diet-dependent genetic modifiers of mammary cancer and metastasis risk, global gene expression profiles and copy number alterations from mammary cancers were measured and expression quantitative trait loci (eQTL) identified. Functional candidate genes that colocalized with previously detected metastasis modifiers were identified. Additional analyses, such as eQTL by dietary fat interaction analysis, causality and database evaluations, helped to further refine the candidate loci to produce an enriched list of genes potentially involved in the pathogenesis of metastatic mammary cancer Udgivelsesdato: May 2010

Gordon, Ryan A; Merrill, Michele La

2010-01-01

211

Dietary fats in relation to depressive symptoms by cardiovascular disease risk factors status of elderly people living in Mediterranean islands.  

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Mental disorders are among the leading causes for disability, with depression a common compilation of hypertension, and other metabolic disorders (lipid abnormalities, diabetes, and obesity). Fat (lipid) intake plays a significant role in the prevention of various chronic diseases. The present cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the role of fat intake in depression among hypertensive elderly people living in the Mediterranean Islands. Fish lipid intake was inversely associated with depression status among hypertensive participants (P <  0.01), while fat intake of sweets and legumes was positively associated with depression in participants with no clinical condition. The aforementioned findings may state hypotheses for further investigation about the role of dietary fat on the depression status of elderly people. PMID:21043581

Polychronopoulos, Evangelos; Bountziouka, Vassiliki; Zeimbekis, Akis; Tsiligiani, Ioanna; Pounis, George; Gotsis, Efthimios; Metallinos, George; Lionis, Christos; Panagiotakos, Demosthenes B

2010-11-01

212

Effects of dietary fat saturation on fatty acid composition and gene transcription in different tissues of Iberian pigs.  

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The effect of two diets, respectively enriched with SFA (S) and PUFA (P), on FA tissue composition and gene expression was studied in fattened Iberian pigs. The FA composition of adipose, muscular and liver tissues was affected by dietary treatment. S group showed higher MUFA and MUFA/SFA ratio and lower PUFA and n-6/n-3 ratio than P group in all analyzed tissues. In muscle and liver the extracted lipids were separated into neutral lipids and polar lipid fractions which showed significantly different responses to the dietary treatment, especially in liver where no significant effect of diet was observed in NL fraction. The expression of six candidate genes related to lipogenesis and FA oxidation was analyzed by qPCR. In liver, stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD), acetyl CoA carboxylase alpha (ACACA) and malic enzyme 1 (ME1) genes showed higher expression in S group. SCD, ACACA, ME1, and fatty acid synthase (FASN) gene expression levels showed a wide variation across the tested tissues, with much higher expression levels observed in adipose tissue than other tissues. Tissue FA profile and gene expression results support the deposition of dietary FA, the lipogenic effect of dietary saturated fat in liver and the employment of saturated dietary fat for endogenous synthesis of MUFA in all the analyzed tissues. PMID:25549539

Benítez, R; Núñez, Y; Fernández, A; Isabel, B; Fernández, A I; Rodríguez, C; Barragán, C; Martín-Palomino, P; López-Bote, C; Silió, L; Óvilo, C

2015-04-01

213

Fats  

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Full Text Available ... provider. Saturated fat grams are listed on the Nutrition Facts food label under total fat. As a ... 24, 2014 Articles from Diabetes Forecast® magazine: wcie-nutrition, In this section Food What Can I Eat ...

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Full Text Available ... that contain it. Trans fats are produced when liquid oil is made into a solid fat. This ... do not contain hydrogenated oil or where a liquid oil is listed first in the ingredient list. ...

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Full Text Available ... calories the same by cutting back on the sources of saturated and trans fats, while substituting the ... oil is listed first in the ingredient list. Sources of trans fat include: Processed foods like snacks ( ...

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Full Text Available ... What Can I Eat > Making Healthy Food Choices Share: Print Page Text Size: A A A Listen ... and trans fat — the unhealthy fats. At the same time, you can protect your heart by eating ...

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Full Text Available ... For most people, eating this is about 20 grams of saturated fat per day. That is not ... just one ounce of cheese can have 8 grams of saturated fat. Many adults, especially women or ...

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Full Text Available ... Home Take Action Take Action at the State Level Advocacy Priorities State Priorities Federal Priorities Advocacy Accomplishments ... saturated fat? Because saturated fat raises blood cholesterol levels. High blood cholesterol is a risk factor for ...

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Full Text Available ... LDL) cholesterol. Sources of monounsaturated fat include: Avocado Canola oil Nuts like almonds, cashews, pecans, and peanuts ... more monounsaturated fats, try to substitute olive or canola oil instead of butter, margarine or shortening when ...

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Full Text Available ... Non-starchy Vegetables Grains and Starchy Vegetables Fats Alcohol What Can I Drink? Fruit Dairy Food Tips ... Eat Making Healthy Food Choices Diabetes Superfoods Fats Alcohol Non-starchy Vegetables Grains and Starchy Vegetables Protein ...

 
 
 
 
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Fats  

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Full Text Available ... and "unhealthy fats." To lower you risk of heart disease, try to eat less saturated and trans fat — ... High blood cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease. People with diabetes are at high risk for ...

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Full Text Available ... with diabetes are at high risk for heart disease and limiting your saturated fat can help lower your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Foods containing saturated fat include: Lard Fatback and salt ...

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Fats  

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Full Text Available ... fat as possible, you must read the ingredient list on food labels. Look for words like hydrogenated ... liquid oil is listed first in the ingredient list. Sources of trans fat include: Processed foods like ...

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Optimization of dietary protein to energy level for commercial emu (Dromaius novaehollandiae) production to maximize fat yield  

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This research was conducted to study the optimum dietary protein and energy ratio of finishing diets to sub-adult emu birds for greater fat accretion. The research was done at African Emu Ranch in Muldersdrift, Gauteng. Twenty-six, four to five months old emu birds were reared to an average target weight of 30.72kg on a control diet containing 17% crude protein (CP). The birds were weighed fortnightly before and during the feeding trial. Dietary treatments, containing 14% and 20% CP were spec...

Matlhoko, Prudence Motlagomang

2009-01-01

225

EGFR is required for Colonic Tumor Promotion by Dietary Fat in the Azoxymethane/Dextran Sulfate Sodium Model: Roles of TGF-? and PTGS2  

Science.gov (United States)

Purpose Colon cancer is a major cause of cancer-deaths. Dietary factors contribute substantially to the risk of this malignancy. Western style diets promote development of azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colon cancer. While we showed that epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) controlled AOM tumorigenesis in standard fat conditions, the role of EGFR in tumor promotion by high dietary fat has not been examined. Experimental Design A/JxC57BL6/J mice with wild type Egfr (Egfrwt) or loss-of-function waved-2 Egfr (Egfrwa2) received AOM followed by standard (std 5% fat) or Western style (20% fat) diet. As F1 mice were resistant to AOM, we treated mice with AOM followed by one cycle of inflammation-inducing dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) to induce tumorigenesis. Mice were sacrificed 12 wks after DSS. Tumors were graded for histology and assessed for EGFR ligands and proto-oncogenes by immunostaining, Western blotting and real time PCR. Results Egfrwt mice gained significantly more weight and had exaggerated insulin resistance compared to Egfrwa2 mice on high fat diet. Dietary fat promoted tumor (71.2% vs. 36.7%, p<0.05) and cancer incidence (43.9% vs. 16.7%, p<0.05) only in Egfrwt mice. The lipid-rich diet also significantly increased tumor and cancer multiplicity only in Egfrwt mice. In tumors, dietary fat and Egfrwt up-regulated TGF??, amphiregulin, CTNNB1, MYC, and CCND1, whereas PTGS2 was only increased in Egfrwt mice and further up-regulated by dietary fat. Notably, dietary fat increased TGF-? in normal colon. Conclusions EGFR is required for dietary fat-induced weight gain and tumor promotion. EGFR-dependent increases in receptor ligands and PTGS2 likely drive diet-related tumor promotion. PMID:19903783

Dougherty, Urszula; Cerasi, Dario; Taylor, Ieva; Kocherginsky, Masha; Tekin, Ummuhan; Badal, Shamiram; Aluri, Lata; Sehdev, Amikar; Cerda, Sonia; Mustafi, Reba; Delgado, Jorge; Joseph, Loren; Zhu, Hongyan; Hart, John; Threadgill, David; Fichera, Alessandro; Bissonnette, Marc

2009-01-01

226

Fats  

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Full Text Available ... dairy products such as full-fat cheese, cream, ice cream, whole milk, 2% milk and sour cream. Butter ... fat dairy products (whole or 2% milk, cream, ice cream, full-fat cheese) Egg yolks Liver and other ...

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Full Text Available ... can help lower your risk of having a heart attack or stroke. Foods containing saturated fat include: Lard Fatback and salt pork High-fat meats like regular ground beef, bologna, hot ... you than saturated fat and for a heart-healthy diet, you want to eat as little ...

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Fats  

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Full Text Available ... can have 8 grams of saturated fat. Many adults, especially women or sedentary men, may need less. To find out a specific goal for you, talk with your dietitian or health care provider. Saturated fat grams are listed on the Nutrition Facts food label under total fat. As a ...

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Fats  

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Full Text Available ... as full-fat cheese, cream, ice cream, whole milk, 2% milk and sour cream. Butter Cream sauces Gravy made ... include: High-fat dairy products (whole or 2% milk, cream, ice cream, full-fat cheese) Egg yolks ...

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Full Text Available ... fat? Because saturated fat raises blood cholesterol levels. High blood cholesterol is a risk factor for heart disease. People ... label if the food contains it. Sources of cholesterol include: High-fat dairy products (whole or 2% milk, cream, ...

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High Dietary Fat Exacerbates Weight Gain and Obesity in Female Liver Fatty Acid Binding Protein Gene-Ablated Mice  

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Since liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) facilitates uptake/oxidation of long-chain fatty acids in cultured transfected cells and primary hepatocytes, loss of L-FABP was expected to exacerbate weight gain and/or obesity in response to high dietary fat. Male and female wild-type (WT) and L-FABP gene-ablated mice, pair-fed a defined isocaloric control or high fat diet for 12 weeks, consumed equal amounts of food by weight and kcal. Male WT mice gained weight faster than their female WT c...

Atshaves, Barbara P.; Mcintosh, Avery L.; Storey, Stephen M.; Landrock, Kerstin K.; Kier, Ann B.; Schroeder, Friedhelm

2010-01-01

232

A High-Fat Diet Differentially Affects the Gut Metabolism and Blood Lipids of Rats Depending on the Type of Dietary Fat and Carbohydrate  

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Full Text Available The aim of this model study was to investigate how selected gut functions and serum lipid profile in rats on high-fat diets differed according to the type of fat (saturated vs. unsaturated and carbohydrate (simple vs. complex. The experiment was conducted using 32 male Wistar rats distributed into 4 groups of 8 animals each. For 4 weeks, the animals were fed group-specific diets that were either rich in lard or soybean oil (16% of the diet as the source of saturated or unsaturated fatty acids, respectively; further, each lard- and soybean oil-rich diet contained either fructose or corn starch (45.3% of the diet as the source of simple or complex carbohydrates, respectively. Both dietary factors contributed to changes in the caecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations, especially to the butyrate concentration, which was higher in rats fed lard- and corn starch-rich diets compared to soybean oil- and fructose-rich diets, respectively. The lowest butyrate concentration was observed in rats fed the soybean oil- and fructose-rich diet. On the other hand, the lard- and fructose-rich diet vs. the other dietary combinations significantly increased serum total cholesterol concentration, to more than two times serum triglyceride concentration and to more than five times the atherogenic index. In conclusion, a high-fat diet rich in fructose can unfavorably affect gut metabolism when unsaturated fats are predominant in the diet or the blood lipids when a diet is rich in saturated fats.

Adam Jurgo?ski

2014-02-01

233

Shifts in microbiota species and fermentation products in a dietary model enriched in fat and sucrose.  

Science.gov (United States)

The gastrointestinal tract harbours a 'superorganism' called the gut microbiota, which is known to play a crucial role in the onset and development of diverse diseases. This internal ecosystem, far from being a static environment, can be manipulated by diet and dietary components. Feeding animals with high-fat sucrose (HFS) diets entails diet-induced obesity, a model which is usually used in research to mimic the obese phenotype of Western societies. The aim of the present study was to identify gut microbiota dysbiosis and associated metabolic changes produced in male Wistar rats fed a HFS diet for 6 weeks and compare it with the basal microbial composition. For this purpose, DNA extracted from faeces at baseline and after treatment was analysed by amplification of the V4-V6 region of the 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) gene using 454 pyrosequencing. Short-chain fatty acids, i.e. acetate, propionate and butyrate, were also evaluated by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. At the end of the treatment, gut microbiota composition significantly differed at phylum level (Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes and Proteobacteria) and class level (Erisypelotrichi, Deltaproteobacteria, Bacteroidia and Bacilli). Interestingly, the class Clostridia showed a significant decrease after HFS diet treatment, which correlated with visceral adipose tissue, and is likely mediated by dietary carbohydrates. Of particular interest, Clostridium cluster XIVa species were significantly reduced and changes were identified in the relative abundance of other specific bacterial species (Mitsuokella jalaludinii, Eubacterium ventriosum, Clostridium sp. FCB90-3, Prevotella nanceiensis, Clostridium fusiformis, Clostridium sp. BNL1100 and Eubacterium cylindroides) that, in some cases, showed opposite trends to their relative families. These results highlight the relevance of characterising gut microbial population differences at species level and contribute to understand the plausible link between diet and specific gut bacterial species that are able to influence the inflammatory status, intestinal barrier function and obesity development. PMID:25213025

Etxeberria, U; Arias, N; Boqué, N; Macarulla, M T; Portillo, M P; Milagro, F I; J A, J A

2015-03-01

234

Dietary alpha-cyclodextrin lowers LDL-C and alters plasma fatty acid profile in LDLr-KO mice on a high-fat diet  

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High dietary intake of saturated fat and cholesterol, and elevated low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels are some of the modifiable risk factors for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Alpha-cyclodextrin (?-CD) when given orally has been shown in rats to increase fecal saturated fat excretion, and to reduce blood total cholesterol levels in obese hypertriglyceridemic subjects with type 2 diabetes. In this study, the effects of dietary ?-CD on lipid metabolism in LDL receptor knock-out ...

Wagner, Elke M.; Catherine Jen, K-l; Artiss, Joseph D.; Remaley, Alan T.

2008-01-01

235

Modulating absorption and postprandial handling of dietary fatty acids by structuring fat in the meal: a randomized crossover clinical trial.  

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BACKGROUND: Prolonged postprandial hypertriglyceridemia is a potential risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. In the context of obesity, this is associated with a chronic imbalance of lipid partitioning oriented toward storage and not toward ?-oxidation. OBJECTIVE: We tested the hypothesis that the physical structure of fat in a meal can modify the absorption, chylomicron transport, and further metabolic handling of dietary fatty acids. DESIGN: Nine normal-weight and 9 obese subjects were ...

Vors, Ce?cile; Pineau, Gae?lle; Gabert, Laure; Drai, Jocelyne; Louche-pe?lissier, Corinne; Defoort, Catherine; Lairon, Denis; De?sage, Michel; Danthine, Sabine; Lambert-porcheron, Ste?phanie; Vidal, Hubert; Laville, Martine; Michalski, Marie-caroline

2013-01-01

236

Quality of Raw, Frozen and Cooked Duck Meat as Affected by Dietary Fat and ?-Tocopheryl Acetate Supplementation  

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Poultry meat, particularly that of duck, has relatively high levels of unsaturated fatty acids and low levels of antioxidants. Ducks consume twice as much feed as broilers during growth, therefore, duck meat is more likely to be influenced by diet than chicken meat. The effects of dietary fat differing in unsaturation level (2.5% tallow or olive, sunflower or linseed oils) together with ?-tocopheryl acetate ( ?-TA) at either a control (20 mg ?-TA/kg feed) or a supplemented level (400 mg ?...

Russell, E. A.; Lynch, A.; Galvin, K.; Lynch, P. B.; Kerry, J. P.

2003-01-01

237

Global, regional, and national consumption levels of dietary fats and oils in 1990 and 2010 : a systematic analysis including 266 country-specific nutrition surveys  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

OBJECTIVES: To quantify global consumption of key dietary fats and oils by country, age, and sex in 1990 and 2010. DESIGN: Data were identified, obtained, and assessed among adults in 16 age- and sex-specific groups from dietary surveys worldwide on saturated, omega 6, seafood omega 3, plant omega 3, and trans fats, and dietary cholesterol. We included 266 surveys in adults (83% nationally representative) comprising 1,630,069 unique individuals, representing 113 of 187 countries and 82% of the global population. A multilevel hierarchical Bayesian model accounted for differences in national and regional levels of missing data, measurement incomparability, study representativeness, and sampling and modelling uncertainty. SETTING AND POPULATION: Global adult population, by age, sex, country, and time. RESULTS: In 2010, global saturated fat consumption was 9.4%E (95%UI=9.2 to 9.5); country-specific intakes varied dramatically from 2.3 to 27.5%E; in 75 of 187 countries representing 61.8% of the world's adult population, the mean intake was <10%E. Country-specific omega 6 consumption ranged from 1.2 to 12.5%E (global mean=5.9%E); corresponding range was 0.2 to 6.5%E (1.4%E) for trans fat; 97 to 440 mg/day (228 mg/day) for dietary cholesterol; 5 to 3,886 mg/day (163 mg/day) for seafood omega 3; and <100 to 5,542 mg/day (1,371 mg/day) for plant omega 3. Countries representing 52.4% of the global population had national mean intakes for omega 6 fat ? 5%E; corresponding proportions meeting optimal intakes were 0.6% for trans fat (? 0.5%E); 87.6% for dietary cholesterol (<300 mg/day); 18.9% for seafood omega 3 fat (? 250 mg/day); and 43.9% for plant omega 3 fat (? 1,100 mg/day). Trans fat intakes were generally higher at younger ages; and dietary cholesterol and seafood omega 3 fats generally higher at older ages. Intakes were similar by sex. Between 1990 and 2010, global saturated fat, dietary cholesterol, and trans fat intakes remained stable, while omega 6, seafood omega 3, and plant omega 3 fat intakes each increased. CONCLUSIONS: These novel global data on dietary fats and oils identify dramatic diversity across nations and inform policies and priorities for improving global health.

Micha, Renata; Khatibzadeh, Shahab

2014-01-01

238

Mitochondrial ultrastructure and markers of dynamics in hepatocytes from aged, calorie restricted mice fed with different dietary fats.  

Science.gov (United States)

In this paper we analyzed changes in hepatocyte mitochondrial mass and ultrastructure as well as in mitochondrial markers of fission/fusion and biogenesis in mice subjected to 40% calorie restriction (CR) for 18 months versus ad libitum-fed controls. Animals subjected to CR were separated into three groups with different dietary fats: soybean oil (also in controls), fish oil and lard. Therefore, the effect of the dietary fat under CR was studied as well. Our results show that CR induced changes in hepatocyte and mitochondrial size, in the volume fraction occupied by mitochondria, and in the number of mitochondria per hepatocyte. Also, mean number of mitochondrial cristae and lengths were significantly higher in all CR groups compared with controls. Finally, CR had no remarkable effects on the expression levels of fission and fusion protein markers. However, considerable differences in many of these parameters were found when comparing the CR groups, supporting the idea that dietary fat plays a relevant role in the modulation of CR effects in aged mice. PMID:24704714

Khraiwesh, Husam; López-Domínguez, José A; Fernández del Río, Lucía; Gutierrez-Casado, Elena; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; de Cabo, Rafael; Ramsey, Jon J; Burón, María I; Villalba, José M; González-Reyes, José A

2014-08-01

239

Effects of Feed Restriction and Dietary Fat Saturation on Performance and Serum Thyroid Hormones of Broiler Chickens  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available This experiment carried out to study the effects of dietary fat saturation on performance and serum thyroid hormones of broilers under free or skip a day nutrition at 18-28 days of age. We used 720 male Ross 308 broiler chickens in a completely randomized design with a 2*4 factorial arrangement with 3 replicate and 30 chicks for each replicate. Experiment factors were: 1- skip a day or free feeding at days 10-28 of age and, 2- diets with different unsaturated to saturated fatty acid ratios (2, 3.5, 5 and 6.5 formulated using different levels of sunflower oil and tallow. At 28 and 42 days of age, weight gain and feed consumption recorded and blood samples were taken. SAS software used for Variance analysis and means comparing. Skip a day nutrition at days 18-28 of age significantly reduced feed intake and weight gain and increased feed conversion, But free nutrition at days 29-42 of age removed this differences. At day 28, diet with unsaturated to saturated ratio of 6.5 significantly reduced feed intake and weight gain and increased feed conversion. At day 42 of age dietary fat type didn`t have any significant effect on feed intake and weight gain but altered feed conversion as a manner same to day 28 of age. Skip a day nutrition significantly decreased T3 and increased T4 levels at day 28 of age but this effects were disappeared after re-feeding at day 42 of age. This survey showed that feed restriction didn`t affect bird`s ability to utilize fats with different degrees of saturation. Fat type and feed restriction affect broilers performance separately without any interaction. Dietary fat saturation didn`t have any significant effect on serum thyroid hormones levels, while feed restriction have a pronounce effect.

B. Navidshad

2006-01-01

240

Hypolipidemic effect of fruit fibers in rats fed with high dietary fat.  

Science.gov (United States)

The hypolipidemic effect of 10% fruit fibers in rats fed with high-fat diet (HFD) was evaluated. This study was conducted on a total of 50 male Albino rats divided into 10 equal groups fed with different types of dietary fruits. The feeding period lasted for 24 weeks. Fasting blood samples were collected and sera separated and subjected to lipid profile assay and atherogenic index. In addition, total antioxidant activity of different fruits was determined. The results obtained showed that pomegranate had higher content of antioxidants followed by apple, strawberry and guava compared with other fruits. Rats fed with 20% coconut oil showed a highly significant elevation in the levels of serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and atherogenic factor while the level of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol was significantly decreased when compared with control rats. Histological examination revealed that there was a large lipid and cholesterol deposition in the livers of rats fed with HFD. The potential in lowering the levels of plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride is in the following order: pomegranate > apple > strawberry > guava > papaya > mandarin and orange. Accumulation of hepatic lipid droplets was diminished when compared with the HFD group. Also, antiatherogenic is better than the untreated groups. Accordingly these hypolipidemic effects may be due to high-fiber content and antioxidant activity of these fruits. PMID:23315090

Esmael, O A; Sonbul, S N; Moselhy, S S; Kumosani, T A

2013-01-11

 
 
 
 
241

Effect of increased intake of dietary animal fat and fat energy on oxidative damage, mutation frequency, DNA adduct level and DNA repair in rat colon and liver  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The effect of high dietary intake of animal fat and an increased fat energy intake on colon and liver genotoxicity and on markers of oxidative damage and antioxidative defence in colon, liver and plasma was investigated in Big Blue rats. The rats were fed ad libitum with semi-synthetic feed supplemented with 0, 3, 10 or 30% w/w lard. After 3 weeks, the mutation frequency, DNA repair gene expression, DNA damage and oxidative markers were determined in liver, colon and plasma. The mutation frequency of the lambda gene cII did not increase with increased fat or energy intake in colon or liver. The DNA-adduct level measured by P-32-postlabelling decreased in both liver and colon with increased fat intake. In liver, this was accompanied by a 2-fold increase of the mRNA level of nucleotide excision repair (NER) gene ERCC1. In colon, a non-statistically significant increase in the ERCC1 mRNA levels was observed. Intake of lard fat resulted in increased ascorbate synthesis and affected markers of oxidative damage to proteins in liver cytosol, but not in plasma. The effect was observed at all lard doses and was not dose-dependent. However, no evidence of increased oxidative DNA damage was found in liver, colon, or urine. Thus, lard intake at the expense of other nutrients and a large increase in the fat energy consumption affects the redox state locally in the liver cytosol, but does not induce DNA-damage, systemic oxidative stress or a dose-dependent increase in mutation frequency in rat colon or liver.

Vogel, Ulla Birgitte; Danesvar, B.

2003-01-01

242

Effect of dietary fat on uptake of lysine, phenylalanine, leucine and methionine by bovine mammary tissue slices in vitro  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

Four mature Holstein cows in late lactation were blocked in two groups based on milk production, in a 2x2 reversal with 21-day periods, and fed: (A) control diet; (B) A plus 1 kg/day tallow. Cows were fed sorghum silage ad libitum. Blood samples were collected from the jugular vein on day 15, 17, and 19 of each period. Fat did not effect DM intake or milk yield, however milk CP yield was 20% lower. Plasma lipids increased 33.6%, glucose decreased 9% and insulin/glucagon ratio decreased 21.2% in cow fed fat. After period two, cows were slaughtered and mammary tissue sampled for incubation in Krebs Ringer bicarbonate buffer containing 22 AA at arterial concentration and .225 ?Ci/ml of 14C-labelled L-Leu, L-Phe, L-Lys or D/L Met. Dietary fat decreased tissue AA uptake rate by 21.2%. Uptake was 4.8, 10.3, 17.8 and 2.4 x 10-3 ?M/min/gm of tissue DM for Phe, Lys, Leu and Met, respectively. Results suggest that dietary fat may decrease milk protein synthesis by lowering the rate of AA uptake

243

Process monitoring and quality control for dietary fats and bio fuels. Necessary for the consumer protection; Prozessueberwachung und Qualitaetskontrolle fuer Nahrungsfette und Biokraftstoffe. Unerlaesslich fuer den Verbraucherschutz  

Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

The quality control of food-grade oils, fats and fatty acid containing products is expensive, but essential for the manufacturers of such products and for the consumer protection. The analysis has the task not only to analyze the purity of fats and oils, but also to analyze the content and composition of fats. Dietary fats contain long chain, often multi-unsaturated fatty acids. An insufficient supply of so-called essential fatty acids may result in deficiency symptoms by the human species. A similar composition of fatty acids also is observed in biodiesel which is produced by transesterification of vegetable oils and fats.

Heise, Michael; Fritzsche, Joerg; Tkatsch, Helena [Fachhochschule Suedwestfalen, Iserlohn (Germany); Kuepper, Lukas [Infrared Fiber Sensors, Aachen (Germany)

2011-02-15

244

Effect of a low fat versus a low carbohydrate weight loss dietary intervention on biomarkers of long term survival in breast cancer patients ('CHOICE'): study protocol  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background Weight loss in overweight or obese breast cancer patients is associated with an improved prognosis for long term survival. However, it is not clear whether the macronutrient composition of the chosen weight loss dietary plan imparts further prognostic benefit. A study protocol is presented for a dietary intervention to investigate the effects of weight loss dietary patterns that vary markedly in fat and carbohydrate contents on biomarkers of exposure to me...

Daeninck Elizabeth A; Wisthoff Mark R; McGinley John N; Wolfe Pamela; Playdon Mary C; Sedlacek Scot M; Jiang Weiqin; Zhu Zongjian; Thompson Henry J

2011-01-01

245

Postprandial Spillover of Dietary Lipid into Plasma Is Increased with Moderate Amounts of Ingested Fat and Is Inversely Related to Adiposity in Healthy Older Men123  

Science.gov (United States)

Adverse effects on health mediated by increased plasma FFA concentrations are well established and older individuals are particularly susceptible to these effects. We sought to determine the effects of the amount of dietary fat on increasing the plasma FFA concentrations as a result of “spillover” of dietary fat into the plasma FFA pool during the postprandial period in older men. Healthy, older participants (63–71 y old) were studied in a randomized, crossover design following ingestions of low (LF) and moderate (MF) amounts of [1,1,1-13C]-triolein-labeled fat, corresponding to 0.4 and 0.7 g of fat/kg body weight, respectively. Spillover of dietary fatty acids into plasma during the 8-h postprandial period (AUC; mmol???L?1???h) after MF ingestion was 1.2 times greater than that after LF ingestion (2.8 ± 0.4 vs. 1.2 ± 0.1; P < 0.05). The spillover of dietary fatty acids following the MF, but not the LF, ingestion was correlated with the percent body fat (rs = ?0.89) and percent body fat-free mass (rs = 0.94) of the men (P < 0.05). After adjusting to the amount of ingested fat, the spillover of dietary fatty acids in the MF trial was disproportionally higher than that in the LF trial (P < 0.05), but the corresponding postprandial plasma TG responses did not differ between trials. In conclusion, spillover of dietary lipid into plasma is disproportionally increased at higher doses of dietary fat and this response is inversely related to adiposity in healthy men of advanced age. PMID:22955513

Puga, Guilherme M.; Meyer, Christian; Mandarino, Lawrence J.; Katsanos, Christos S.

2012-01-01

246

Impact of dietary fat source and concentration and daily fatty acid intake on the composition of carcass fat and iodine value sampled in three regions of the pork carcass.  

Science.gov (United States)

The increased inclusion of unsaturated fats in pig diets has raised issues related to pork carcass fat quality. The objective of this experiment was to more precisely measure how differing levels of daily fatty acid intake alters the fatty acid composition in 3 different fat depots. A total of 42 gilts and 21 barrows (PIC 337×C22/29) with an average initial weight of 77.80±0.38 kg were allotted randomly based on sex and BW to 7 treatments: 3 and 6% of each of tallow (TAL; iodine value [IV]=41.9), choice white grease (CWG; IV=66.5), or corn oil (CO; IV=123.1) and a control (CNTR) corn-soybean meal-based diet with no added fat. Pigs were individually housed to allow accurate measurement of individual feed intake, in particular, daily dietary fatty acid and energy intake. Fat samples were collected from the jowl, belly, and loin at slaughter. Diet and carcass fat samples were analyzed for IV. Belly weights were recorded at slaughter along with a subjective belly firmness score (1=firmest to 3=least firm). Carcass lipid IV was increased (P0.05) by inclusion levels; however, carcass lipid IV was greater (P<0.001) in pigs fed 6 than 3% CO (80.0 vs. 72.6), and carcasses of gilts had greater IV (P<0.001) than carcasses of barrows (71.5 vs. 69.1). Increasing the level of TAL and CO but not CWG from 3 to 6% decreased the apparent total tract digestibility of GE, resulting in a source×level interaction (P<0.05). Dietary fat source had no effect (P?0.66) on apparent total tract digestibility of either DM or GE, but feeding 6% dietary fat increased G:F (P=0.006) over pigs fed 3% fat (0.358 vs. 0.337). Of all the fatty acids measured, only linoleic acid intake presented a reasonable coefficient of determination (R2=0.61). Overall, IV product (IVP) was approximately equal to linoleic acid intake as a predictor of carcass IV (R2=0.93 vs. R2=0.94). When inclusion of dietary fat and PUFA intake increased, IVP placed more emphasis on the dietary fat inclusion level rather than the dietary fat composition. Linoleic acid intake corrected the overemphasis placed on dietary fat inclusion by IVP. To conclude, linoleic acid intake showed a strong relationship with carcass IV and can be used as a predictor. PMID:25367509

Kellner, T A; Prusa, K J; Patience, J F

2014-12-01

247

Influence of Stage of Change, Self-Efficacy and Socio-Economic Factor on Dietary Fat Intake Behavior among Saudi Women  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Diet high in fat contributes significantly to development of major chronic diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of stage of change, self-efficacy and socio-economic factors on dietary fat intake behavior among university employee's women in Saudi Arabia. A total 74 non-academic staff aged 23-52 years in of King Faisal University participated in the study. A pre-tested interview questionnaire was used to measure socio-economic, stages of change and self-efficacy related to dietary fat intake, also anthropometric measurement, total energy and dietary fat intake were determined. Chi square test, one way analysis of variance and multiple regression analysis were used for data analysis. Results showed that about 20% of subjects reduce their daily fat intake and more than two-third of subjects (67.5% intend to change. There were significant differences between stages of change for dietary fat and energy from fat (F = 6.57-7.64, respectively; p = 0.00 and significant association between stages of change and age (p = 0.014. The anthropometric measurement did not differ significantly by stages. Stages of change (p = 0.00 and self-efficacy (p = 0.044 were the most relevant predictor for dietary fat intake. This study revealed important relationship between stage of change, self-efficacy and dietary fat intake, which is useful insight for health professionals and nutrition educators to explore other target groups in the community and to design effective intervention.

Hala Hazam Al Otaibi

2011-01-01

248

Fats  

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Full Text Available ... eat small portions of these foods. For example, 6 almonds or 4 pecan halves have the same number of calories as 1 teaspoon of oil or butter. Work with your dietitian to include healthy fats into your meal plan without increasing your total calories. Monounsaturated fats ...

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Full Text Available ... sauces Gravy made with meat drippings Chocolate Palm oil and palm kernel oil Coconut and coconut oil Poultry (chicken and turkey) skin The goal for ... contain it. Trans fats are produced when liquid oil is made into a solid fat. This process ...

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Full Text Available ... produced when liquid oil is made into a solid fat. This process is called hydrogenation. Trans fats ... food items such as french fries Cholesterol Your body makes some of ... help prevent clogging of the arteries. Some types of fish are high in omega-3 fatty ...

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Full Text Available ... Diabetes Meal Plans Create Your Plate Gluten Free Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning ... provider. Saturated fat grams are listed on the Nutrition Facts food label under total fat. As a ...

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Full Text Available ... However, if there is not at least 0.5 grams or more of trans fat in a food, the label can claim 0 grams. If you want to avoid as much trans fat as possible, you must read the ingredient list on food labels. Look for words like hydrogenated ...

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Full Text Available ... from the FDA . Patient Education Materials — Protect Your Heart: Choose Healthy Fats This two-page introduction to choosing healthy fats is in PDF format so you can download it, print it, and hand it out to patients. You can also download ...

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Incorporating dairy foods into low and high fat diets increases the postprandial cholecystokinin response in men and women.  

Science.gov (United States)

The postprandial period is a dynamic state of hormone and lipoprotein metabolism that can be influenced by dietary composition. The objective of this study was to determine whether the source of dietary fat [dairy (D) vs. nondairy (ND)] would modify the lipemic, insulin and cholecystokinin (CCK) response to high or low fat meals. Men and women (n = 24) consumed 4 test meals with a similar polyunsaturated:saturated (P:S; 0.12:1) fat ratio. The diets were high (38% energy) or low (20% energy) in fat, with or without fat from dairy sources. CCK responses were greater after consumption of meals containing D than ND, and for high compared with low fat meals. Women had higher CCK responses than men and were more sensitive to the differences in dietary treatments. Consumption of low fat meals resulted in greater insulin responses than high fat meals. However, after consumption of the low fat meals, the insulin response of D was about half of the ND response; no differences in insulin response were detected after the high fat meals. Triacylglyceride response was influenced primarily by the fat content of the diet. Consumption of dairy products containing fat was associated with an enhanced CCK response, which may have implications for the regulation of food intake. Blunting glucose and insulin response in low fat meals containing fat from dairy products may be useful for glycemic control. PMID:14652359

Schneeman, Barbara O; Burton-Freeman, Britt; Davis, Paul

2003-12-01

255

Eating behavior toward oil and fat consumption versus dietary fat intake / Comportamento alimentar para consumo de óleos e gorduras versus consumo alimentar de lipídeos da dieta  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese Objetivo: Analisar se os estágios de mudança, segundo o Modelo Transteórico, estão de acordo com o consumo de gorduras por parte de usuárias da Academia da Cidade de Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. Métodos: Estudo seccional com amostra aleatória simples de usuárias (?20 anos) da Academia da Cida [...] de. Avaliou-se o comportamento alimentar para consumo de óleos e gorduras pelo Modelo Transteórico; posteriormente, confrontou-se tal comportamento com a adequação da ingestão de lipídeos, obtida pela média de três recordatórios 24 horas, e coletaram-se dados antropométricos e sociodemográficos. Adicionalmente, verificou-se se os estágios de mudança, após reclassificação, estavam em consonância com o consumo de alimentos gordurosos, lipídeos e frações. Resultados: Avaliaram-se 131 mulheres com média de idade de 53,9±12,1 anos, apresentando consumo mediano de óleo de 556,0 mL; ingestão excessiva de alimentos ricos em gorduras, lipídeos (20,6%), ácidos graxos saturados (31,3%) e poli-insaturados (38,2%) e colesterol (16,0%). Os estágios de comportamento alimentar foram significativamente diferentes após reclassificação, com redução de mulheres em ação e manutenção; ao final, 4,6% das mulheres estavam em pré-contemplação, 19,8% em contemplação, 26,0% em decisão, 28,2% em ação e 21,4% em manutenção. O consumo de pele de frango, de molho com gordura para salada, de pães, rosquinhas ou bolos com manteiga/margarina, de lipídeos, de ácidos graxos saturados e monoinsaturados foi inferior nos estágios finais do Modelo Transteórico. Conclusão: O algoritmo, após reclassificação, apresenta-se em consonância com a ingestão de alimentos ricos em lipídeos, o que denota sua aplicabilidade para avaliar o comportamento alimentar e subsidiar ações de educação alimentar e nutricional Abstract in english Objective: To analyze whether the stages of change of the Transtheoretical Model are in accordance with the fat consumption of members of the Academia da Cidade of Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais. Methods: This cross-sectional study included a simple random sample of users aged ?20 years frequent [...] ing an Academia da Cidade. Eating behavior toward oil and fat consumption was evaluated by the transtheoretical model and compared with fat intake adequacy, obtained through mean fat intake was investigated by three 24-hour recalls. Anthropometric and sociodemographic data were also collected. Additionally, the stages of change were verified, after reclassification the stages of change agreed with the consumption of fatty foods, fats, and fractions. Results: A total of 131 women with a mean age of 53.9±12.1 had an average fatty acid consumption of 556.0 mL. Some participants consumed high-fat foods, lipids (20.6%), saturated (31.3%) and polyunsaturated (38.2%) fatty acids, and cholesterol (16.0%) in excess. The stages of eating behavior were significantly different after reclassification. The number of women in action and maintenance decreased in a way that in the end, 4.6% were in precontemplation, 19.8% were in contemplation, 26.0% were in preparation, 28.2% were in action, and 21.4% were in maintenance. The consumption of chicken skin; fatty salad dressing; bread, doughnuts or cake with butter/margarine; and fats, saturated fatty acids, and monounsaturated fatty acids was lower in the final stages of the transtheoretical model. Conclusion: After reclassification the algorithm is in agreement with the ingestion of high-fat foods, which denotes its applicability for the evaluation of eating behavior and for providing data to food and nutrition education actions.

Renata Andrade de Medeiros, Moreira; Luana Caroline dos, Santos; Mariana Carvalho de, Menezes; Aline Cristine Souza, Lopes.

2014-08-01

256

Steatohepatitis in laboratory opossums exhibiting a high lipemic response to dietary cholesterol and fat.  

Science.gov (United States)

Plasma VLDL and LDL cholesterol were markedly elevated (>40-fold) in high-responding opossums, but moderately elevated (6-fold) in low-responding opossums after they had consumed a high-cholesterol and high-fat diet for 24 wk. In both high- and low-responding opossums, plasma triglycerides were slightly elevated, threefold and twofold, respectively. Dietary challenge also induced fatty livers in high responders, but not in low responders. We studied the lipid composition, histopathological features, and gene expression patterns of the fatty livers. Free cholesterol (2-fold), esterified cholesterol (11-fold), and triglycerides (2-fold) were higher in the livers of high responders than those in low responders, whereas free fatty acid levels were similar. The fatty livers of high responders showed extensive lobular disarray by histology. Inflammatory cells and ballooned hepatocytes were also present, as were perisinusoidal fibrosis and ductular proliferation. In contrast, liver histology was normal in low responders. Hepatic gene expression revealed differences associated with the development of steatohepatitis in high responders. The accumulation of hepatic cholesterol was concomitant with upregulation of the HMGCR gene and downregulation of the CYP27A1, ABCG8, and ABCB4 genes. Genes involved in inflammation (TNF, NFKB1, and COX2) and in oxidative stress (CYBA and NCF1) were upregulated. Upregulation of the growth factor genes (PDGF and TGFB1) and collagen genes (Col1A1, Col3A1, and Col4A1) was consistent with fibrosis. Some of the histological characteristics of the fatty livers of high-responding opossums imitate those in the livers of humans with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. PMID:22556142

Chan, Jeannie; Sharkey, Francis E; Kushwaha, Rampratap S; VandeBerg, Jane F; VandeBerg, John L

2012-07-01

257

Thermogenesis associated to the intake of a diet non-supplemented or supplemented with n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich fat, determined in rats receiving the same quantity of metabolizable energy.  

Science.gov (United States)

The beneficial effects of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) are well known, but their consumption in western countries is chronically insufficient, and so it is recommended that diets should be supplemented with a fat rich in these fatty acids. However, the effect of such diets on the energy expenditure remains a controversial question. Precise data concerning the effect of using under the same metabolizable energy intake, a diet non-supplemented or supplemented with a fat rich in n-3 PUFA are not available. This type of information was obtained using rats at weaning fed a diet supplemented or non-supplemented with 10% of fish oil. Between the 30th and 60th day after starting the experiment, the energy and protein balance was established by means of the comparative slaughter method. The blood levels of different metabolites were also determined. Although total thermogenesis did not vary between the two groups, consumption of the fish oil diet led to a lower level of thermogenesis associated with the oxidation of protein, and a higher one of that associated with the oxidation of fat. We conclude that the thermic effect of feeding is a combination of independent processes. Due to their specific metabolism, n-3 PUFA may be considered essential compounds to maintain the energy balance. PMID:16407644

Sanz Sampelayo, M R; Fernández Navarro, J R; Hermoso, R; Gil Extremera, F; Rodríguez Osorio, M

2006-01-01

258

Effect of prepartal and postpartal dietary fat level on performance and plasma concentration of metabolites in transition dairy cows.  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective of this study was to determine the effects of 2 levels of dietary fat (low and high) offered during the prepartal and postpartal periods on dry matter intake (DMI), plasma concentration of metabolites, and milk yield and composition. Twenty-four Holstein dry cows were assigned on d 21 relative to expected parturition date to 1 of 4 treatments in a 2×2 factorial arrangement of 2 levels of fat fed during the prepartal period and 2 levels of fat fed during the postpartal period: prepartal low fat and postpartal low fat (LF-LF), prepartal low fat and postpartal high fat (LF-HF), prepartal high fat and postpartal low fat (HF-LF), or prepartal high fat and postpartal high fat (HF-HF). Prepartal and postpartal LF diets contained no fat supplement. Prepartal HF diets contained 1.60% calcium salts of soybean oil. The proportion of calcium salts of soybean oil was increased to 1.70% of DM for the first 21 d of lactation and to 2.27% of DM from d 21 to 56 of lactation in the HF diet. Diets were fed for ad libitum intake from d 21 before calving until d 56 of gestation. Prepartal DMI was lower for cows fed the HF diet compared with those fed the LF diet (12.6 vs. 16.2kg/d). Postpartum, cows fed the HF-HF and HF-LF diets had, respectively, the lowest and highest DMI, although no significant differences existed between HF-LF and LF-LF. Net energy intake was higher for cows fed the postpartal HF diets compared with those fed the LF diets. Prepartal fat level had no effect on net energy intake. Cows offered the prepartal HF diet had higher milk yield when offered the postpartal LF diet compared with those offered the postpartal HF diet and no effect of the postpartal fat level was detected when cows were fed the prepartal LF diet. Milk composition was similar among treatments. Plasma cholesterol concentration postpartum was higher for cows fed the prepartal LF diet than for those fed the prepartal HF diet (5.16 vs. 3.74mmol/L) and postpartal fat level had no effect. Prepartal diet had no significant effect on postpartal plasma triglyceride concentration but the postpartal HF diet increased triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein concentrations compared with the postpartal LF diet. In conclusion, switching from a high to a low fat proportion in the postpartal diet may alleviate the negative effects of a high proportion of fat in the prepartal diet as shown by increased feed intake and milk production during the first 56 d of lactation. PMID:25468706

Karimian, M; Khorvash, M; Forouzmand, M A; Alikhani, M; Rahmani, H R; Ghaffari, M H; Petit, H V

2015-01-01

259

Dietary Fibers and Cardiometabolic Diseases  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available The high prevalence of cardiovascular disease (CVD is largely attributable to the contemporary lifestyle that is often sedentary and includes a diet high in saturated fats and sugars and low ingestion of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs, fruit, vegetables, and fiber. Experimental data from both animals and humans suggest an association between increased dietary fiber (DF intakes and improved plasma lipid profiles, including reduced low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C concentrations. These observations underline that the intake of DF may protect against heart disease and stroke.

Nicolantonio D’Orazio

2012-02-01

260

Comparison of Dietary Control and Atorvastatin on High Fat Diet Induced Hepatic Steatosis and Hyperlipidemia in Rats  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Treatment with atorvastatin (ATO or dietary control has been demonstrated to benefit patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD and hyperlipidemia. However, little is known on whether combination of dietary control and ATO treatment could enhance the therapeutic effect. Methods We employed a rat model of NAFLD to examine the therapeutic efficacy of dietary control and/or ATO treatment. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with normal chow diet as normal controls or with high fat diet (HFD for 12 weeks to establish NAFLD. The NAFLD rats were randomized and continually fed with HFD, with normal chow diet, with HFD and treated with 30 mg/kg of ATO or with normal chow diet and treated with the same dose of ATO for 8 weeks. Subsequently, the rats were sacrificed and the serum lipids, aminotranferase, hepatic lipids, and liver pathology were characterized. The relative levels of fatty acid synthesis and ?-oxidation gene expression in hepatic tissues were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR. Hepatic expression of hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA reductase was determined by Western blot assay. Results While continual feeding with HFD deteriorated NAFLD and hyperlipidemia, treatment with dietary control, ATO or ATO with dietary control effectively improved serum and liver lipid metabolism and liver function. In comparison with ATO treatment, dietary control or combined with ATO treatment significantly reduced the liver weight and attenuated the HFD-induced hyperlipidemia and liver steatosis in rats. Compared to ATO treatment or dietary control, combination of ATO and dietary control significantly reduced the levels of serum total cholesterol and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C. However, the combination therapy did not significantly improve triglyceride and free fatty acid metabolism, hepatic steatosis, and liver function, as compared with dietary control alone. Conclusions ATO treatment effectively improved NAFLD-related hyperlipidemia and inhibited liver steatosis, accompanied by modulating the expression of genes for regulating lipid metabolism. ATO enhanced the effect of dietary control on reducing the levels of serum total cholesterol and LDL-C, but not triglyceride, free fatty acid and hepatic steatosis in HFD-induced fatty liver and hyperlipidemia in rats.

Liu Peiyi

2011-01-01

 
 
 
 
261

Effect of excessive intake of dietary carbohydrates and fats on incidence of apoptosis and proliferation in male rats  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

This study was planned to investigate the programmed cell death and cellular aging by estimating the relation between cell proliferation and cell death in tissue of pancreas and testis. All the biochemical parameters in this study were carried out on two aged groups (adult and senile) of male albino rats. Moreover, the study extended to emphasize the possible effect of certain dietary elements such as carbohydrate and fat on the rate of apoptosis and proliferation in some tissues and their physiological functions. Two aged groups of rats (adult and senile) were included in this study. According to the data obtained, it could be concluded that excess dietary carbohydrate could be considered as a high risk factor when given to the adult and senile age, since it produced some significant changes in the blood chemistry with non-significant changes on the proliferative and apoptotic balance of the tested tissues. Moreover, excess dietary fat could be considered as high risk factor when given to adult and senile age groups

262

Dietary supplementation of chinese ginseng prevents obesity and metabolic syndrome in high-fat diet-fed mice.  

Science.gov (United States)

Abstract Obesity and diabetes are growing health problems worldwide. In this study, dietary provision of Chinese ginseng (0.5?g/kg diet) prevented body weight gain in high-fat (HF) diet-fed mice. Dietary ginseng supplementation reduced body fat mass gain, improved glucose tolerance and whole body insulin sensitivity, and prevented hypertension in HF diet-induced obese mice. Ginseng consumption led to reduced concentrations of plasma insulin and leptin, but had no effect on plasma adiponectin levels in HF diet-fed mice. Body temperature was higher in mice fed the ginseng-supplemented diet but energy expenditure, respiration rate, and locomotive activity were not significantly altered. Dietary intake of ginseng increased fatty acid oxidation in the liver but not in skeletal muscle. Expression of several transcription factors associated with adipogenesis (C/EBP? and PPAR?) were decreased in the adipose tissue of HF diet-fed mice, effects that were mitigated in mice that consumed the HF diet supplemented with ginseng. Abundance of fatty acid synthase (FASN) mRNA was greater in the adipose tissue of mice that consumed the ginseng-supplemented HF diet as compared with control or un-supplemented HF diet-fed mice. Ginseng treatment had no effect on the expression of genes involved in the regulation of food intake in the hypothalamus. These data suggest that Chinese ginseng can potently prevent the development of obesity and insulin resistance in HF diet-fed mice. PMID:25076190

Li, Xiaoxiao; Luo, Jing; Anandh Babu, Pon Velayutham; Zhang, Wei; Gilbert, Elizabeth; Cline, Mark; McMillan, Ryan; Hulver, Matthew; Alkhalidy, Hana; Zhen, Wei; Zhang, Haiyan; Liu, Dongmin

2014-12-01

263

Adipose tissue dysregulation and metabolic consequences in childhood and adolescent obesity: potential impact of dietary fat quality.  

Science.gov (United States)

Evidence suggests that at a population level, childhood and adolescent obesity increase the long-term risk of chronic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and CVD. At an individual level, however, the metabolic consequences of obesity in youth vary immensely. Despite comparable BMI, some adolescents develop impaired glucose tolerance while others maintain normal glucose homeostasis. It has been proposed that the variation in the capacity to store lipid in the subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) may partially discriminate metabolically healthy from unhealthy obesity. In positive energy balance, a decreased capacity to expand SAT may drive lipid accumulation to visceral adipose tissue, liver and skeletal muscle. This state of lipotoxicity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation, insulin resistance and dyslipidaemia. The present review examines the differential adipose tissue development and function in children and adolescents who exhibit metabolic dysregulation compared with those who are protected. Additionally, the role of manipulating dietary fat quality to potentially prevent and treat metabolic dysfunction in obesity will be discussed. The findings of the present review highlight the need for further randomised controlled trials to establish the effect of dietary n-3 PUFA on the metabolic phenotype of obese children and adolescents. Furthermore, using a personalised nutrition approach to target interventions to those at risk of, or those with established metabolic dysregulation may optimise the efficacy of modifying dietary fat quality. PMID:25497038

McMorrow, Aoibheann M; Connaughton, Ruth M; Lithander, Fiona E; Roche, Helen M

2015-02-01

264

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Full Text Available ... Type 2 Diabetes Know Your Rights Employment Discrimination Health Care Professionals Law Enforcement Driver's License For Lawyers Food & ... goal for you, talk with your dietitian or health care provider. Saturated fat grams are listed on the ...

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Full Text Available ... a Monthly Donor Donate by Mail Give by Phone 1-800-DIABETES (800-342-2383) Other Ways ... fat as possible, you must read the ingredient list on food labels. Look for words like hydrogenated ...

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Full Text Available ... Student Resources History of Diabetes Resources for School Projects How to Reference Our Site Diabetes Basics Myths ... carbohydrate gets all of the attention in diabetes management. More important than total fat is the type ...

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Full Text Available ... cheese stick for an afternoon snack, have 12 almonds. The calories are about the same, but you ... monounsaturated fat include: Avocado Canola oil Nuts like almonds, cashews, pecans, and peanuts Olive oil and olives ...

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Full Text Available ... and Starchy Vegetables Fats Alcohol What Can I Drink? Fruit Dairy Food Tips Eating Out Quick Meal ... and Starchy Vegetables Protein Foods What Can I Drink? Dairy Fruits donate en -- Acknowledge Your Hero - 2015- ...

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Full Text Available ... Diets Meal Planning for Vegetarian Diets Cook with Heart-Healthy Foods Holiday Meal Planning What Can I ... and "unhealthy fats." To lower you risk of heart disease, try to eat less saturated and trans ...

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Full Text Available ... oil Nuts like almonds, cashews, pecans, and peanuts Olive oil and olives Peanut butter and peanut oil Sesame seeds The ... To include more monounsaturated fats, try to substitute olive or canola oil instead of butter, margarine or ...

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Full Text Available ... What Can I Eat Making Healthy Food Choices Diabetes Superfoods Fats Alcohol Non-starchy Vegetables Grains and Starchy Vegetables Protein Foods What Can I Drink? Dairy Fruits donate ...

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Full Text Available ... Eating Out Quick Meal Ideas Snacks Nutrient Content Claims Understanding Carbohydrates Types of Carbohydrates Carbohydrate Counting Make ... trans fat in a food, the label can claim 0 grams. If you want to avoid as ...

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Full Text Available ... More Oral Health & Hygiene Women A1C Insulin Pregnancy 8 Tips for Caregivers Health Insurance Health Insurance Update ... consider just one ounce of cheese can have 8 grams of saturated fat. Many adults, especially women ...

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Full Text Available ... Healthy Food Choices Diabetes Superfoods Non-starchy Vegetables Grains and Starchy Vegetables Fats Alcohol What Can I ... or sunflower seeds on a salad, yogurt, or cereal is an easy way to eat more monounsaturated ...

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Full Text Available ... young children. Your fish and shellfish consumption should be limited to no more than 12 oz. per week. Get a more detailed explanation from the FDA . Patient Education Materials — Protect Your Heart: Choose Healthy Fats This ...

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Full Text Available ... fats are: Corn oil Cottonseed oil Safflower oil Soybean oil Sunflower oil Walnuts Pumpkin or sunflower seeds ... 3 fatty acids. Sources include: Tofu and other soybean products Walnuts Flaxseed and flaxseed oil Canola oil ...

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Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... I Eat? Making Healthy Food Choices Diabetes Superfoods Non-starchy Vegetables Grains and Starchy Vegetables Fats Alcohol ... omega-3 fatty acids. The Association recommends eating non-fried fish 2 or 3 times a week. ...

278

Role of anorectic N-acylethanolamines in intestinal physiology and satiety control with respect to dietary fat  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Anandamide is a well-known agonist for the cannabinoid receptors. Along with endogenous anandamide other non-endocannabinoid N-acylethanolamines are also formed, apparently in higher amounts. These include mainly oleoylethanolamide (OEA), palmitoyelethanolamide (PEA) and linoleoylethanolamide (LEA), and they have biological activity by themselves being anorectic and anti-inflammatory. It appears that the major effect of dietary fat on the level of these molecules is in the gastrointestinal system, where OEA, PEA and LEA in the enterocytes may function as homeostatic signals, which are decreased by prolonged consumption of a high-fat diet. These lipid amides appear to mediate their signaling activity via activation of PPAR? in the enterocyte followed by activation of afferent vagal fibers leading to the brain. Through this mechanism OEA, PEA and LEA may both reduce the consumption of a meal as well as increase the reward value of the food. Thus, they may function as homeostatic intestinal signals involving hedonic aspects that contribute to the regulation of the amounts of dietary fat to be ingested.

Hansen, Harald S.

2014-01-01

279

Role of anorectic N-acylethanolamines in intestinal physiology and satiety control with respect to dietary fat.  

Science.gov (United States)

Anandamide is a well-known agonist for the cannabinoid receptors. Along with endogenous anandamide other non-endocannabinoid N-acylethanolamines are also formed, apparently in higher amounts. These include mainly oleoylethanolamide (OEA), palmitoyelethanolamide (PEA) and linoleoylethanolamide (LEA), and they have biological activity by themselves being anorectic and anti-inflammatory. It appears that the major effect of dietary fat on the level of these molecules is in the gastrointestinal system, where OEA, PEA and LEA in the enterocytes may function as homeostatic signals, which are decreased by prolonged consumption of a high-fat diet. These lipid amides appear to mediate their signaling activity via activation of PPAR? in the enterocyte followed by activation of afferent vagal fibers leading to the brain. Through this mechanism OEA, PEA and LEA may both reduce the consumption of a meal as well as increase the reward value of the food. Thus, they may function as homeostatic intestinal signals involving hedonic aspects that contribute to the regulation of the amounts of dietary fat to be ingested. PMID:24681513

Hansen, Harald S

2014-08-01

280

Dietary (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acids inhibit HER-2/neu-induced breast cancer in mice independently of the PPARgamma ligand rosiglitazone.  

Science.gov (United States)

Overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2/neu) characterizes a molecular subtype of breast cancer associated with poor clinical outcome. Preventive strategies for HER-2/neu-positive breast cancer, which is often estrogen and progesterone receptor negative, remain undefined. Activators of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARgamma), a nuclear hormone receptor also expressed in breast cancer, hold potential as cancer prevention agents. PPARgamma ligands include specific fatty acids and synthetic compounds, such as the thiazolidinediones, which appear to inhibit cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. We hypothesized that a thiazolidinedione, rosiglitazone, may serve as a chemopreventive agent for HER-2/neu-associated mammary carcinogenesis, but that efficacy may be influenced by dietary fat content. We studied the effects of diets enriched with corn or fish oil (25% of energy) with and without rosiglitazone (12 g/kg) in a 2 x 2 factorial design on mammary tumorigenesis in murine mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-HER-2/neu transgenic mice. Despite in vitro evidence of antiproliferative effects in an MMTV-HER-2/neu tumor cell line, rosiglitazone did not affect mammary carcinogenesis in vivo. Interestingly, fish oil-based diets markedly suppressed breast tumor incidence (57% of mice vs. 87% of corn oil-fed mice, P = 0.0001) as well as tumor multiplicity (P = 0.001) and mammary gland dysplasia (P = 0.001). These findings demonstrate a potent preventive effect of (n-3) PUFA on HER-2/neu-mediated mammary carcinogenesis, without interaction with a synthetic PPARgamma activator. Further studies focusing on the mechanisms by which (n-3) fatty acids suppress HER-2/neu signaling pathways involved in the pathogenesis of breast cancer are warranted. PMID:15867269

Yee, Lisa D; Young, Donn C; Rosol, Thomas J; Vanbuskirk, Anne M; Clinton, Steven K

2005-05-01

 
 
 
 
281

Physicochemical and functional properties of micronized jincheng orange by-products (Citrus sinensis Osbeck) dietary fiber and its application as a fat replacer in yogurt.  

Science.gov (United States)

Orange by-products from juice extraction are generally discarded or used in animal feed due to their low market value. However, orange by-products show potential as dietary fiber (DF) and fat replacers in products such as yogurt. This study assessed the benefits of using orange by-products in DF-enriched materials such as DF powders (OP) and micronized DF with ball-milling (MDF). The study also investigated the effects of adding different levels of OP and MDF on the quality of low-fat yogurt. Results show that MDF showed better physicochemical and functional properties than OP, and that 2% MDF as a fat replacer in yogurt retained most of the textural and sensory properties of full-fat yogurt. Therefore, this study showed that MDF is a promising alternative as a fat replacer in low-fat yogurt, without sacrificing good taste and other qualities of full-fat yogurt. PMID:24625022

Yi, Tian; Huang, Xingjian; Pan, Siyi; Wang, Lufeng

2014-08-01

282

Influence of supplemental dietary fat on the relative proportions of three classes of lipid in the epiphyseal cartilage of dwarf and non-dwarf chicks.  

Science.gov (United States)

One hundred and forty-four day-old chicks were allotted to six groups in a 2 x 3 factorial design involving two strains (dwarf, dw and non-dwarf, Dw+) and three levels of supplemental dietary fat (none, moderate and high). The birds were killed at four weeks of age. The overall weight gain and the total lipid content, amount of neutral lipids, glycolipids and phospholipids in the epiphyseal cartilage of the tibia were examined. Supplemental dietary fat resulted in improved weight gain, with the non-dwarfs showing a greater increase. There was no change in total lipid in epiphyseal cartilage with different levels of dietary fat. Increase in dietary fat elicited, in both strains of birds, an increase in the proportion of glycolipids and a concomitant decrease in the proportion of neutral lipids and no change in that of phospholipids. That the stimulatory effect of dietary fat on growth was exerted through an increase in glycolipids at the site of calcification is suggested. PMID:632014

Kensett, B C; Ho, S K; Touchburn, S P

1978-01-01

283

Effect of dietary fiber or fat in low-crude protein, crystalline amino acid-supplemented diets for finishing pigs.  

Science.gov (United States)

Three experiments were conducted to determine the effect of reducing NE, by adding dietary fiber in Exp. 1 and 2 and decreasing dietary fat in Exp. 3, of low-CP, crystalline amino acid (CAA)-supplemented diets for finishing pigs on growth performance and carcass characteristics. In Exp. 1 and 2, 64 barrows (Exp. 1) or gilts (Exp. 2) were allotted to four treatments with four replicates of four pigs each. Average initial and final BW were 74 and 117 kg in Exp. 1 and 74 and 102 kg in Exp. 2. The following diets were fed in Exp. 1: 1) corn-soybean meal (C-SBM); 2) low-CP (-3.5%), supplemented with CAA; 3) CAA + rice hulls (CAA+RH; NE equal to Diet 1); and 4) CAA+RH+OIL (NE equal to Diet 2). Experiment 2 was similar to Exp. 1, except RH were replaced with wheat middlings (WM), oil was replaced with dry fat, and the CP was decreased by 3.1% in the low-CP diets. In both experiments, serum urea-N (SUN, corrected for initial SUN by covariance analysis) was higher (Pfree lean (FFLEAN), lean gain per day, retained energy (RE) in FFLEAN, and lean:fat ratio than barrows fed C-SBM, along with less FFLEAN than barrows fed CAA+RH+OIL. Barrows fed CAA+RH had smaller longissimus muscle areas than barrows fed any other diet, and barrows fed C-SBM had higher dressing percentage and lower percentage total fat than barrows fed any other diet. Barrows fed C-SBM had higher lean:fat ratio and lower total fat than barrows fed CAA. In Exp. 2, gilts fed CAA+WM+FAT had heavier heart weights than gilts fed C-SBM or CAA (Pamino acid ratio) and three levels of NE (2,650, 2,617, or 2,584 kcal/kg), resulting in a 2x3 factorial arrangement of treatments. Gilts fed 15.5% CP had higher gain:feed ratio than gilts fed 11.7% CP (P<.01). Longissimus depth was greater for gilts fed 15.5% CP than for gilts fed 11.7% CP and was decreased as NE decreased only in gilts fed 11.7% CP (CP effect, P<.09; NE linear effect, P<.04; CP x NE effect, P<.01). Gilts fed the diet with 2,617 kcal NE had lighter carcasses and less total fat, fat gain per day, RE, and RE as fat regardless of protein level than gilts fed 2,650 or 2,584 kcal NE/kg (NE quadratic, P<.09). Loin color score increased as NE decreased (linear, P<.06), but longissimus fat depth was increased by the lowest level of NE (NE quadratic effect, P<.09). Overall, the reduction of NE in low-CP, CAA-supplemented diets did not affect growth performance and was not an effective means of reducing fat in finishing pigs. PMID:9856391

Knowles, T A; Southern, L L; Bidner, T D; Kerr, B J; Friesen, K G

1998-11-01

284

Diet digestibility in growing rabbits: effect of origin and oxidation level of dietary fat and vitamin e supplementation  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The effects of the dietary inclusion of fats with different origin (lard or vegetal oil), fatty acid profile (linseed or sunflower), oxidation level (fresh, peroxidised: 11 d at 55ºC or oxidised: 31 h at 140ºC) and vitamin E supplementation (0 or 100 ppm) on the rabbit diet apparent digestibility were studied. Digestibility coefficients of dry matter, organic matter, crude protein, ether extract and gross energy were determined in eight diets using 58 rabbits aged 49 d. Contrast analysis be...

Casado, C.; Moya, V. J.; Ferna?ndez, C.; Pascual Amoro?s, Juan Jose?; Blas, E.; Cervera, C.

2010-01-01

285

Omega-3 fats: Good for your heart  

Science.gov (United States)

... 3 fatty acids are a type of polyunsaturated fat . We need these fats to build brain cells and for other important ... several ways. They reduce triglycerides , a type of fat in your blood. They reduce the risk of ...

286

High-viscosity dietary fibers reduce adiposity and decrease hepatic steatosis in rats fed a high-fat diet.  

Science.gov (United States)

Viscous dietary fiber consumption lowers the postprandial glucose curve and may decrease obesity and associated comorbidities such as insulin resistance and fatty liver. We determined the effect of 2 viscous fibers, one fermentable and one not, on the development of adiposity, fatty liver, and metabolic flexibility in a model of diet-induced obesity. Rats were fed a normal-fat (NF) diet (26% energy from fat), a high-fat diet (60% energy from fat), each containing 5% fiber as cellulose (CL; nonviscous and nonfermentable), or 5% of 1 of 2 highly viscous fibers-hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC; nonfermentable) or guar gum (GG; fermentable). After 10 wk, fat mass percentage in the NF (18.0%; P = 0.03) and GG groups (17.0%; P < 0.01) was lower than the CL group (20.7%). The epididymal fat pad weight of the NF (3.9 g; P = 0.04), HPMC (3.9 g; P = 0.03), and GG groups (3.6 g; P < 0.01) was also lower than the CL group (5.0 g). The HPMC (0.11 g/g liver) and GG (0.092 g/g liver) groups had lower liver lipid concentrations compared with the CL group (0.14 g/g liver). Fat mass percentage, epididymal fat pad weight, and liver lipid concentration were not different among the NF, HPMC, and GG groups. The respiratory quotient was higher during the transition from the diet-deprived to fed state in the GG group (P = 0.002) and tended to be higher in the HPMC group (P = 0.06) compared with the CL group, suggesting a quicker shift from fatty acid (FA) to carbohydrate oxidation. The HPMC group [15.1 nmol/(mg ? h)] had higher ex vivo palmitate oxidation in muscle compared with the GG [11.7 nmol/(mg ? h); P = 0.04] and CL groups [10.8 nmol/(mg ? h); P < 0.01], implying a higher capacity to oxidize FAs. Viscous fibers can reduce the adiposity and hepatic steatosis that accompany a high-fat diet, and increase metabolic flexibility, regardless of fermentability. PMID:24991042

Brockman, David A; Chen, Xiaoli; Gallaher, Daniel D

2014-09-01

287

Fats  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... Some fast food items such as french fries Cholesterol Your body makes some of the cholesterol in your blood. The rest comes from foods ... eat. Foods from animals are sources of dietary cholesterol. Cholesterol from the food you eat may increase ...

288

Dietary Intakes in Asthmatic and Non-Asthmatic Female Pupils of Tehran  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available "nDietary factors are suggested to be involved in recent increases in the prevalence of asthma. The differences in dietary intake of 23 asthmatic and 317 non-asthmatic students were investigated, who were chosen by multistage stratified cluster sampling. The dietary data were assessed by food frequency questionnaire and a 24-h recall form. Total calorie and fat intake were similar. Daily intake of Saturated and poly-unsaturated fatty acids, and calcium and sodium were significantly higher in asthmatics. There was no significant difference between dietary antioxidant intake of asthmatic and non asthmatics. It seems that in this age, the type of consumed fat may be more important than the amount of fat intake in inducing asthma. For accurate results, n-6 and n-3 fatty acid intake must be assessed. Higher sodium and calcium intake may also be associated with asthma. Randomized controlled trials with restricting diets can help to elucidate the results.

Leili Nazemi

2011-07-01

289

Effects of dietary supplementation of saturated fatty acids and of n-6 or n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on plasma and red blood cell membrane phospholipids and deformability in weanling guinea pigs.  

Science.gov (United States)

The fatty acid composition of plasma cholesteryl esters, plasma phospholipids, red blood cell (RBC) membrane phosphatidylcholine (corresponding to the outer membrane leaflet), and phosphatidylethanolamine (corresponding to the inner membrane leaflet) was investigated in weanling guinea pigs fed with diets of cacao (saturated fatty acids), sunflower oil [n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA)] or fish oil (n-3 PUFA) for 20 wk. RBC deformation was measured by means of a cell-transit analyzer (filtration) and a cone-plate rheoscope. The contents of saturated fatty acids in plasma phospholipids and RBC membrane leaflets were similar in all three groups. Diets with sunflower oil resulted in a high content of linoleic acid in plasma cholesteryl esters and in the outer leaflet of RBC membranes. Fatty acids of fish oil were mainly incorporated in plasma phospholipids and in the inner leaflet of RBC membranes. The arachidonic acid content was high in all groups in the plasma phospholipids and in the inner leaflet. The n-6 and n-3 PUFA were mainly incorporated in the inner leaflet. In all groups the polyunsaturated/saturated fatty acid ratio and the total PUFA content were similar in the inner RBC membrane. The RBC filtration times and the RBC deformation indices were not affected by the dietary treatment. PMID:10380118

Pöschl, J M; Paul, K; Leichsenring, M; Han, S R; Pfisterer, M; Bremer, H J; Linderkamp, O

1999-05-01

290

Associations between toenail arsenic concentration and dietary factors in a New Hampshire population  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Dietary factors such as folate, vitamin B12, protein, and methionine are important for the excretion of arsenic via one-carbon metabolism in undernourished populations exposed to high levels of arsenic via drinking water. However, the effects of dietary factors on toenail arsenic concentrations in well-nourished populations exposed to relatively low levels of water arsenic are unknown. Methods As part of a population-based case–control study of skin and bladder cancer from the USA, we evaluated relationships between consumption of dietary factors and arsenic concentrations in toenail clippings. Consumption of each dietary factor was determined from a validated food frequency questionnaire. We used general linear models to examine the associations between toenail arsenic and each dietary factor, taking into account potentially confounding effects. Results As expected, we found an inverse association between ln-transformed toenail arsenic and consumption of vitamin B12 (excluding supplements and animal protein. Unexpectedly, there were also inverse associations with numerous dietary lipids (e.g., total fat, total animal fat, total vegetable fat, total monounsaturated fat, total polyunsaturated fat, and total saturated fat. Finally, increased toenail arsenic concentrations were associated with increased consumption of long chain n-3 fatty acids. Conclusion In a relatively well-nourished population exposed to relatively low levels of arsenic via water, consumption of certain dietary lipids may decrease toenail arsenic concentration, while long chain n-3 fatty acids may increase toenail arsenic concentration, possibly due to their association with arsenolipids in fish tissue.

Gruber Joann F

2012-06-01

291

Effect of Dietary Fats on Oxidative-Antioxidative Status of Blood in Rats  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

This study was performed to examine the effect of different fat sources, lard, sunflower oil (SO), and fish oil (FO) in high-fat and low-fat diet on reactive oxygen species generation by blood phagocytes, glutathione redox status in erythrocytes, and total plasma antioxidant ability in rats. Whole blood chemiluminescence (CL) did not differ between three low-fat fed groups. However, baseline and phorbol myristate acetate (PMA)-stimulated CL in blood of high-lard fed rats were lower than in lo...

Walczewska, Anna; Dziedzic, Barbara; Stepien, Tomasz; Swiatek, Elzbieta; Nowak, Dariusz

2010-01-01

292

Effects of Cactus Fiber on the Excretion of Dietary Fat in Healthy Subjects: A Double Blind, Randomized, Placebo-Controlled, Crossover Clinical Investigation  

Science.gov (United States)

Background Cactus (Opuntia ficus-indica) fiber was shown to promote weight loss in a 3-month clinical investigation. As demonstrated by in vitro studies, cactus fiber binds to dietary fat and its use results in reduced absorption, which in turn leads to reduced energy absorption and ultimately the reduction of body weight. Objective The objective of our study was to elucidate the dietary fat binding capacity of cactus fiber through determination of fecal fat excretion in healthy volunteers. Subjects and Methods This clinical investigation was performed as a double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover study in healthy subjects for a period of approximately 45 days. Twenty healthy volunteer subjects were randomized to receive cactus fiber or placebo, 2 tablets thrice daily with main meals. All subjects were provided with meals during the study period (except washout) according to a standardized meal plan, with 35% of daily energy need coming from fat. Two 24-hour feces samples were collected during both the baseline and treatment periods for analysis of the fat content. Results Cactus fiber showed an increased fecal fat excretion compared with placebo (mean [SD] = 15.79% [5.79%] vs 4.56% [3.09%]; P < 0.001). No adverse events were reported throughout the study period. Conclusions Cactus fiber has been shown to significantly promote fecal fat excretion in healthy adults. The results of our study support the hypothesis that cactus fiber helps in reducing body weight by binding to dietary fat and increasing its excretion, thus reducing dietary fat available for absorption. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01590667. PMID:25067985

Uebelhack, Ralf; Busch, Regina; Alt, Felix; Beah, Zhi-Ming; Chong, Pee-Win

2014-01-01

293

Low-fat dietary pattern and risk of benign proliferative breast disease: a randomized, controlled dietary modification trial  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Modifiable factors, including diet, might alter breast cancer risk. We used the WHI Dietary Modification (DM) trial to test the effect of the intervention on risk of benign proliferative breast disease, a condition associated with increased risk of and considered to be on the pathway to invasive breast cancer. The WHI DM trial was a randomized, controlled, primary prevention trial conducted in 40 US clinical centers from 1993–2005. 48,835 postmenopausal women, aged 50–79 years, without pr...

Rohan, Thomas E.; Negassa, Abdissa; Caan, Bette; Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Curb, J. David; Ginsberg, Mindy; Lane, Dorothy S.; Neuhouser, Marian L.; Shikany, James M.; Wassertheil-smoller, Sylvia; Page, David L.

2008-01-01

294

Fats  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... foods. However, if there is not at least 0.5 grams or more of trans fat in a food, the label can claim 0 grams. If you want to avoid as much ... almonds or 4 pecan halves have the same number of calories as 1 teaspoon of oil or ...

295

Changes in cholesterol homeostasis modify the response of F1B hamsters to dietary very long chain n-3 and n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background The plasma lipoprotein response of F1B Golden-Syrian hamsters fed diets high in very long chain (VLC) n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) is paradoxical to that observed in humans. This anomaly is attributed, in part, to low lipoprotein lipase activity and is dependent on cholesterol status. To further elucidate the mechanism(s) for these responses, hamsters were fed diets containing supplemental fish oil (VLC n-3 PUFA) or safflower oil (n-6 PUFA) (both...

Rader Daniel J; Billheimer Jeffrey T; Matthan Nirupa R; Lecker Jaime L; Lichtenstein Alice H

2011-01-01

296

The effects of dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid supplementation on attention and impulsivity in an animal model of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Background: Attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the commonest psychiatric disorders in children and adolescents. The main symptoms of ADHD are hyperactivity, inattention and impulsivity. Both etiology and neurobiological basis of ADHD are unknown. In this context, long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFAs), especially omega-3 (n-3) PUFAs, have become a focus of interest. The symptoms of ADHD have been suggested to be associated with a deficienc...

Ewelina Makulska-Gertruda; Joachim Hauser; Thomas-A. Sontag; Lange, Klaus W.

2014-01-01

297

Dietary Supplementation with Conjugated Linoleic Acid Plus n-3 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Increases Food IntakeBrown Adipose Tissue in Rats  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

The effect of supplementation with 1% conjugated linoleic acid and 1% n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (CLA/n-3) was assessed in rats. Food intake increased with no difference in body weights. White adipose tissue weights were reduced whereas brown adipose tissue and uncoupling protein-1 expression were increased. Plasma adiponectin, triglyceride and cholesterol levels were reduced while leptin, ghrelin and liver weight and lipid content were unchanged. Hypothalamic gene expression ...

Sneddon, Alan A.; Rayner, D. Vernon; Mitchell, Sharon E.; Bashir, Shabina; Ha, Jung-heun; Wahle, Klaus W.; Morris, Amanda C.; Williams, Lynda M.

2009-01-01

298

High content of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in red blood cells of Kenyan Maasai despite low dietary intake  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

Abstract Background Increasing land restrictions and a reduced livestock-to-human ratio during the 20th century led the Maasai to lead a more sedentary, market-orientated lifestyle. Although plant-derived food nowadays contributes substantially to their diet, dairy products being high in saturated fatty acids (SFA) and low in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) still are an important energy source. Since reliable data regarding the Maasai diet date back to the 1980s, the study...

Kiage-Mokua Beatrice N; Kyallo Florence M; Kuhnt Katrin; Knoll Nadja; Jahreis Gerhard

2011-01-01

299

Dietary long-chain n-3 PUFA, gut microbiota and fat mass in early postnatal piglet development--exploring a potential interplay.  

Science.gov (United States)

Dietary n-3PUFA and gut bacteria, particularly Bacteroidetes, have been suggested to be related to adiposity. We investigated if n-3PUFA affected fat storage and cecal bacteria in piglets. Twenty-four 4-day-old piglets were allocated to formula rich in n-3PUFA (?3E%) from fish oil (FO) or n-6PUFA from sunflower oil (SO) for 14 days. We assessed body weight, fat accumulation by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and microbial molecular fingerprints. Dietary PUFA-composition was reflected in higher erythrocyte n-3PUFA in the FO- than the SO-group (Pgut Bacteroides. Hence, this study does not support an impact of n-3PUFA or microbiota on fat accumulation during the postnatal maturation period. The impact of dietary PUFA on the gut Bacteroides warrants further investigation. PMID:21880476

Andersen, A D; Mølbak, L; Thymann, T; Michaelsen, K F; Lauritzen, L

2011-12-01

300

Hepatic and biochemical repercussions of a polyunsaturated fat-rich hypercaloric and hyperlipidic diet in Wistar rats / Repercussões hepáticas e bioquímicas da dieta hipercalórica e hiperlipídica rica em gordura poliinsaturada em ratos Wistar  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in portuguese CONTEXTO: A doença hepática gordurosa não-alcoólica caracteriza-se por depósito de lipídios nos hepatócitos. Desperta grande interesse por sua associação com obesidade, dislipidemias e diabetes mellitus tipo 2. É considerada a manifestação hepática da síndrome metabólica, cujo principal componente é [...] a resistência à insulina, com consequente hiperinsulinemia e produção aumentada de citocinas inflamatórias. Dietas ricas em gorduras saturadas promovem hipertrigliceridemia, diminuição do colesterol de alta densidade, aumento do colesterol de baixa densidade e hiperinsulinemia, enquanto dietas ricas em gordura poliinsaturada podem apresentar efeitos hipolipidêmicos, antiinflamatórios e imunorreguladores. OBJETIVO: Investigar as repercussões hepáticas e bioquímicas da dieta rica em gordura poliinsaturada em ratos Wistar. MÉTODOS: Os animais (22) foram distribuidos nos grupos GI-dieta padrao (Biobase Bio-tec Ratos e Camundongos®) com 3000 kcal/kg e GII-dieta hipercalorica e hiperlipidica, com 4250 kcal/kg, relação ?-6: ?-3 = 3:1. Foram mortos apos 23 semanas de administração das dietas. Avaliaram-se peso, exames bioquimicos e alteracoes histológicas do fígado. RESULTADOS: Foram utilizados testes de análise de variância com nível de significância de 5% (P Abstract in english CONTEXT: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is characterized by lipid deposits in the hepatocytes and has been associated with obesity, dyslipidemia and type-2 diabetes. It is considered a hepatic manifestation of the metabolic syndrome, of which the main component is insulin resistance leading to hy [...] perinsulinemia and increased production of inflammatory cytokines. Saturated fat promotes hypertriglyceridemia and hyperinsulinemia, reduces levels of high-density cholesterol and increases levels of low-density cholesterol, while polyunsaturated fat is associated with hypolipidemic, antiinflammatory and imunoregulating action. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the hepatic and biochemical repercussions of a polyunsaturated fat-rich diet in Wistar rats. METHODS: Twenty-two rats were distributed equally in two groups: GI - standard diet (Biobase Bio-tec Ratos e Camundongos®) providing 3.000 kcal/kg and GII - hypercaloric and hyperlipidic diet providing 4.250 kcal/kg (?-6:?-3 = 3:1). The animals were euthanized after 23 weeks of experiment. The weight, biochemical parameters and hepatohistological changes were registered. RESULTS: Findings were submitted to variance analysis with the level of statistical significance at 5%. The average weight did not differ significantly between the groups at baseline (P = 0.711), but was greater in Group II by the end of the experiment (P = 0.000). The levels of triglycerides (P = 0.039), total cholesterol (P = 0.015) and HDL (P = 0.005) were higher in Group I than in Group II. Macrovesicular steatosis was significantly more common in Group II than in Group I (P = 0.03). CONCLUSION: Hypercaloric and hyperlipidic diet rich in polyunsaturated fat promotes weight gain and favors the development of hepatic steatosis while reducing serum levels of triglycerides, total cholesterol and HDL.

Idália M. B., Burlamaqui; Conceição A., Dornelas; José Telmo, Valença Jr; Francisco J. C., Mesquita; Lara B., Veras; Lusmar Veras, Rodrigues.

2011-06-01

 
 
 
 
301

Composition of ?-tocopherol and fatty acids in porcine tissues after dietary supplementation with vitamin E and different fat sources  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

The present study evaluated the effect of increasing supplementation of all-rac-?-tocopheryl acetate and dietary fatty acid composition during a four week period after weaning on porcine tissue composition of ?-tocopherol stereoisomers and fatty acids, and on hepatic expression of genes involved in transfer of ?-tocopherol, and oxidation and metabolism of fatty acids. From day 28 to 56 of age, pigs were provided 5% of tallow, fish oil or sunflower oil and 85, 150, or 300 mg/kg of all-rac-?-tocopheryl acetate. Samples of liver, heart, and adipose tissue were obtained from littermates at day 56. Tissue fatty acid composition was highly influenced by dietary fat sources. Dietary fatty acid composition (P<0.001) and vitamin E supplementation (P<0.001) influenced the ?-tocopherol stereoisomer composition in liver, i.e. less proportion of the RRR-?-tocopherol was observed in pigs provided fish oil and the highest dose of vitamin E in comparison with other dietary treatments. In addition, the stereoisomer composition of ?-tocopherol in heart, and adipose tissue was influenced by dietary treatments. Expression of genes in liver involved in the regulation of FA conversion, SCD (P=0.002) and D6D (P=0.04) were lower in pigs fed fish oil compared to other treatments, whereas the fatty acid oxidation, as indicated by the expression of PPAR-?, was higher when sunflower and fish oil was provided (P=0.03). Expression of ?-TTP in liver was higher in pigs fed fish oil (P=0.01). Vitamin E supplementation did not influence significantly the hepatic gene expression.

Lauridsen, Charlotte; Theil, Peter Kappel

2013-01-01

302

Partial restoration of dietary fat induced metabolic adaptations to training by 7 days of carbohydrate diet  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

We tested the hypothesis that a shift to carbohydrate diet after prolonged adaptation to fat diet would lead to decreased glucose uptake and impaired muscle glycogen breakdown during exercise compared with ingestion of a carbohydrate diet all along. We studied 13 untrained men; 7 consumed a high-fat (Fat-CHO; 62% fat, 21% carbohydrate) and 6 a high-carbohydrate diet (CHO; 20% fat, 65% carbohydrate) for 7 wk, and thereafter both groups consumed the carbohydrate diet for an eighth week. Training was performed throughout. After 8 wk, during 60 min of exercise (71 +/- 1% pretraining maximal oxygen uptake) average leg glucose uptake (1.00 +/- 0.07 vs. 1.55 +/- 0.21 mmol/min) was lower (P <0.05) in Fat-CHO than in CHO. The rate of muscle glycogen breakdown was similar (4.4 +/- 0.5 vs. 4.2 +/- 0.7 mmol. min(-1). kg dry wt(-1)) despite a significantly higher preexercise glycogen concentration (872 +/- 59 vs. 688 +/- 43 mmol/kg dry wt) in Fat-CHO than in CHO. In conclusion, shift to carbohydrate diet after prolonged adaptation to fat diet and training causes increased resting muscle glycogen levels but impaired leg glucose uptake and similar muscle glycogen breakdown, despite higher resting levels, compared with when the carbohydrate diet is consumed throughout training.

Helge, JØrn Wulff; Watt, Peter W

2002-01-01

303

Impacts of dietary fat level and saturation when feeding distillers grains to high producing dairy cows.  

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This experiment was conducted to determine whether increasing the net energy (NEL ) of a total mixed ration (TMR) with mainly unsaturated fat from corn distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) vs. rumen inert (RI)-saturated fat has similar impacts on animal performance. The experiment was an incomplete Youden square with three treatments and four 28-days periods, completed on a large commercial dairy using three early lactation pens each with approximately 380 multiparity cows. The TMR for all treatments was the same, except for 150 g/kg dry matter (DM) of each TMR which contained 90 g/kg high-protein DDGS (HPDDGS) and 60 g/kg beet pulp (i.e. low-fat control diet; LFC); 150 g/kg DDGS (i.e. high-fat diet with unsaturated fat; HFU); or 111 g/kg HPDDGS, 20 g/kg beet pulp and 19 g/kg RI fat (i.e. high-fat diet with saturated fat; HFS). The DM intake was highest (p < 0.05) for HFU-fed cows. Milk, fat and true protein yields, as well as milk energy output, were higher (p < 0.01) when cows were fed HFS vs. HFU and LFC diets. Milk true protein concentration was lowest (p < 0.01) for HFS-fed cows, but milk fat % was lowest (p < 0.01) for HFU and highest (p < 0.01) for HFS-fed cows. There were numerous differences (p < 0.01) in milk fatty acid levels amongst diets. The increase in body condition score was lowest (p < 0.01) for LFC. Whole tract digestibility of acid detergent fibre was lower (p < 0.01) for LFC vs. HFS cows, and fat digestion was lowest (p < 0.01) for LFC-fed cows. This DDGS, high in unsaturated fatty acids, was fed at high levels (i.e. 152 g/kg DM) with little impact on animal performance vs. a lower fat control diet, although addition of an RI-saturated fat to create a diet with a similarly higher fat level resulted in higher animal productivity. PMID:25040565

Havlin, J M; Robinson, P H; Karges, K

2014-07-01

304

Dietary fat source affects metabolism of fatty acids in pigs as evaluated by altered expression of lipogenic genes in liver and adipose tissues.  

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Little is known about pig gene expressions related to dietary fatty acids (FAs) and most work have been conducted in rodents. The aim of this study was to investigate how dietary fats regulate fat metabolism of pigs in different tissues. Fifty-six crossbred gilts (62 ± 5.2 kg BW) were fed one of seven dietary treatments (eight animals per treatment): a semi-synthetic diet containing a very low level of fat (no fat (NF)) and six fat-supplemented diets (ca. 10%) based on barley and soybean meal. The supplemental fat sources were tallow (T), high-oleic sunflower oil (HOSF), sunflower oil (SFO), linseed oil (LO), blend (FB) (55% T, 35% SFO and 10% LO) and fish oil (FO) blend (40% FO and 60% LO). Pigs were slaughtered at 100 kg BW and autopsies from liver, adipose tissue and muscle semimembranousus were collected for qPCR. The messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) abundances of genes related to lipogenesis were modified due to dietary treatments in both liver (sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1), acetyl CoA carboxylase (ACACA) and stearoyl CoA desaturase (SCD)) and adipose tissue (fatty acid synthase (FASN), ACACA and SCD), but were not affected in semimembranousus muscle. In the liver, the mRNA abundances of genes encoding lipogenic enzymes were highest in pigs fed HOSF and lowest in pigs fed FO. In adipose tissue, the mRNA abundances were highest in pigs fed the NF diet and lowest in pigs fed T. The study demonstrated that dietary FAs stimulate lipogenic enzyme gene expression differently in liver, fat and muscles tissues. PMID:22444377

Duran-Montgé, P; Theil, P K; Lauridsen, C; Esteve-Garcia, E

2009-04-01

305

Dietary long-chain n-3 PUFA, gut microbiota and fat mass in early postnatal piglet development—exploring a potential interplay  

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Dietary n-3PUFA and gut bacteria, particularly Bacteroidetes, have been suggested to be related to adiposity. We investigated if n-3PUFA affected fat storage and cecal bacteria in piglets. Twenty-four 4-day-old piglets were allocated to formula rich in n-3PUFA (?3E%) from fish oil (FO) or n-6PUFA from sunflower oil (SO) for 14 days. We assessed body weight, fat accumulation by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and microbial molecular fingerprints. Dietary PUFA-composition was reflected in hi...

Andersen, A. D.; Mølbak, Lars; Thymann, T.; Michaelsen, K. F.; Lauritzen, L.

2011-01-01

306

Dietary meat and fat intake and prevalence of rhinoconjunctivitis in pregnant Japanese women: baseline data from the Kyushu Okinawa Maternal and Child Health Study  

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Abstract Background Dietary fat exerts numerous complex effects on proinflammatory and immunologic pathways. Several epidemiological studies have examined the relationships between intake of fatty acids and/or foods high in fat and allergic rhinitis, but have provided conflicting findings. The current cross-sectional study investigated such relationships in Japan. Methods Study subjects were 1745 pregnant women. The definition of rhinoconjunctivitis was based on...

Miyake Yoshihiro; Tanaka Keiko; Okubo Hitomi; Sasaki Satoshi; Arakawa Masashi

2012-01-01

307

Effects of dietary Angelica keiskei on serum and liver lipid profiles, and body fat accumulations in rats.  

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Angelica keiskei (Ashitaba) is a perennial plant belonging to the Umbelliferae family. Recently, much attention has been focused on Ashitaba products as a so-called health food for the breakdown of cellulite among various physiological benefits of Ashitaba. The current study was carried out to investigate the physiological efficacy of dietary Ashitaba on serum and liver lipid profiles and body fat accumulation in rats. Rats were fed a high-fat diet with various amounts of Ashitaba for 28 d. Perirenal adipose tissue weights of rats fed the x 10 (170 mg/100 g BW) Ashitaba diet were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those of the control group. Serum triacylglycerol concentrations of rats fed the x 100 (1,700 mg/100 g BW) Ashitaba diet were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those of the x 1 (17 mg/100 g BW) group. Fecal weights and bile acid excretions of rats fed the x 10 or x 100 Ashitaba diet were significantly higher (p < 0.05) than those of the control group. However, there were no significant differences in the body weight gain, epididymal adipose tissue weight, serum cholesterol or liver lipid concentrations or other biochemical profiles in the serum. Furthermore, even the excessive ingestion of Ashitaba had no significant pathological impact on the liver or kidney. These results indicate that the large intake of Ashitaba products may supply dietary fiber and thus improve gastrointestinal condition through the increased excretion of feces containing high level of bile acids, although even excessive intake of Ashitaba for a short period of 28 d did not show any impact on the decrease in body fat or modification of lipid profiles in this study. PMID:17616000

Nagata, Junichi; Morino, Tomoko; Saito, Morio

2007-04-01

308

Interactive Effects of Dietary Fat/Carbohydrate Ratio and Body Mass Index on Iron Deficiency Anemia among Taiwanese Women  

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Full Text Available Whether being overweight or obese is associated with increased risk of iron deficiency anemia (IDA remains controversial. We evaluated the dietary intakes and risk for IDA in relation to body mass index (BMI. One thousand two hundred and seventy-four females aged ?19 years, enrolled in the third Nutrition and Health Survey in Taiwan (NAHSIT 2005–2008, were selected. Half of the women were either overweight (24.0% or obese (25.3%. The overall prevalence of anemia, iron deficiency and IDA among adult women was 19.5%, 8.6% and 6.2%. BMI showed a protective effect on IDA: overweight (odds ratio, OR: 0.365 (0.181–0.736 and obese (OR: 0.480 (0.259–0.891 when compared with normal weight. Univariate analysis identified increased IDA risk for overweight/obese women who consumed higher dietary fat but lower carbohydrate (CHO (OR: 10.119 (1.267–80.79. No such relationship was found in IDA women with normal weight (OR: 0.375 (0.036–4.022. Analysis of interaction(s showed individuals within the highest BMI tertile (T3 had the lowest risk for IDA and the risk increased with increasing tertile groups of fat/CHO ratio; OR 0.381 (0.144–1.008; p = 0.051, 0.370 (0.133–1.026; p = 0.056 and 0.748 (0.314–1.783; p = 0.513; for T1, T2 and T3, respectively. In conclusion, a protective effect of BMI on IDA may be attenuated in women who had increased fat/CHO ratio.

Jung-Su Chang

2014-09-01

309

Dietary fat modulates dl-?-tocopheryl acetate (vitamin E) bioavailability in adult cockerels.  

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Abstract 1. A trial was designed to assess the effect of fat supplementation (amount and type of fatty acids) on vitamin E bioavailability in adult cockerels. 2. A total of 60 birds were force-fed three different diets: a semi-purified diet without added fat (Control diet) or supplemented with 3% fat as linseed (Linseed diet) or hydrogenated coconut oil (Coconut diet). The 3 experimental diets were also supplemented with dl-?-tocopheryl acetate to provide 40 mg vitamin E per bird. 3. After one week of depletion, blood was collected from the wing vein before (baseline) and 6, 12, 24 and 96 h after the gavage. Plasma samples were analysed for their ?-tocopherol, cholesterol and triglycerides concentrations. 4. Results showed that the addition of 3% fat in the experimental diet increased post-gavage plasma ?-tocopherol response by 153% for Linseed diet and by 75% for Coconut diet (P Coconut diet (P < 0.0001). There was no effect of treatments on either plasma triglycerides (P = 0.91) or cholesterol (P = 0.45) responses. 5. In conclusion, this study shows that the addition of 3% fat to the diet significantly increases dl-?-tocopheryl acetate bioavailability in adult cockerels. Supplementation of fat rich in unsaturated fatty acids also leads to a higher dl-?-tocopheryl acetate bioavailability than fat rich in saturated fatty acids. PMID:25354175

Prévéraud, D P; Devillard, E; Borel, P

2014-10-29

310

The Effect of Food Images on Mood and Arousal Depends on Dietary Histories and the Fat and Sugar Content of Foods Depicted  

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Full Text Available Background: While brain imaging studies show that reward regions in the human brain that regulate reward-guided behavior and integrate sensory modalities of smell, taste, and texture respond preferentially to high calorie foods, few studies account for dietary histories or account for recent behavioral evidence showing preferential responding for fruits (a low calorie food that tastes sweet. To address these concerns, the present study tested the hypothesis that images of high/low fat and sugar foods, even sugary foods that are low calorie (i.e., fruits, will enhance emotional responsiveness and that these changes may be related to dietary histories with fat and sugar intake. Method: Participants were shown 4 sets of 15 food images with each food image automatically timed every 9 s to transition to a new food image; participant pre-post mood and arousal was measured. The 4 sets of food images were high fat-high sugar (HFHS; desserts, high fat-low sugar (HFLS; fried foods, low fat-high sugar (LFHS; fruits, or low fat-low sugar (LFLS; vegetables foods. To account for dietary histories, participants also completed estimated daily intake scales (EDIS for sugar and fat. Results: Mood and arousal significantly increased in all groups, except Group LFLS, and even in a group that was low calorie but shown foods that taste sweet, i.e., Group LFHS. Interestingly, changes in arousal, but not mood, were dependent on participant histories with sugar and fat intake. Conclusion: Changes in emotional responsiveness to food images were nutrient-specific, which can be a more detailed level of analysis for assessing responsiveness to food images. Also, participant histories with sugar and fat should be taken into account as these histories can explain the changes in arousal observed here.

Heather E. Creary

2013-02-01

311

Effect of high versus low doses of fat and vitamin A dietary supplementation on fatty acid composition of phospholipids in mice.  

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Dietary fat and vitamin A provide important precursors for potent bioactive ligands of nuclear hormone receptors, which regulate various enzymes involved in lipid homeostasis, metabolism and inflammation. We determined the effects of dietary fat and dietary vitamin A on hepatic expression of two fatty acid metabolizing enzymes, elongase 6 (ELOVL6) and stearoyl-coenzyme A desaturase 1 (SCD1) and the concentration of saturated fatty acids (SAFA) and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) of phospholipids in serum and liver. Mice (n = 6) were fed 4 weeks with diets containing 2, 5 and 25 % of fat or vitamin A (0, 2,500 and 326,500 RE/kg as retinyl palmitate). MUFAs and SAFAs were measured using GC and ESI-MS/MS. Hepatic expression of metabolizing enzymes was determined using QRT-PCR. ELOVL6 was significantly down-regulated in response to a high-fat diet (p < 0.001) and significantly up-regulated in response to low-fat diet (p < 0.05). SCD1 expression was significantly lower in high- versus low-fat diet (p < 0.05). The vitamin A content in the diet did not influence the hepatic expression of both enzymes. In plasma, the amounts of MUFAs bound to phospholipids significantly decreased in response to a high-fat diet and increased after a low-fat diet. This tendency was also observed in the liver for various phospholipids sub-classes. In summary, this study shows that fat content in the diet has a stronger impact than the content of vitamin A on hepatic gene expression of SCD1 and ELOVL6 and thereby on MUFA and SAFA concentrations in liver and plasma. PMID:24306959

Weiss, Kathrin; Mihály, Johanna; Liebisch, Gerhard; Marosvölgyi, Tamás; Garcia, Ada L; Schmitz, Gerd; Decsi, Tamás; Rühl, Ralph

2014-01-01

312

TFAP2B influences the effect of dietary fat on weight loss under energy restriction  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Numerous gene loci are related to single measures of body weight and shape. We investigated if 55 SNPs previously associated with BMI or waist measures, modify the effects of fat intake on weight loss and waist reduction under energy restriction.

Stocks, Tanja; Angquist, Lars

2012-01-01

313

Effect of dietary energy restriction on retention of protein, fat and energy in broiler chickens.  

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1. Broiler chickens were fed 60-100% of recommended energy intakes to study the effects of energy restriction on protein and fat retention. 2. At an energy retention of 179 kJ/kg W0.75 d, only protein was retained. At higher energy intakes, each increment in retention had a rather constant composition: about 85% energy in fat and 15% in protein. At lower energy intakes body fat was mobilised whereas protein was deposited. 3. The efficiencies of energy retention in protein and fat were estimated to be 0.66 and 0.86 respectively. 4. The rather constant composition of additional retained energy after additional energy supply provides an explanation for a linear relationship between energy intake and energy retention. PMID:7828016

Boekholt, H A; van der Grinten, P; Schreurs, V V; Los, M J; Leffering, C P

1994-09-01

314

Insulin-tumour interrelationships in EL4-lymphoma or thymoma-bearing mice. II. Effects of dietary omega-3 and omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids.  

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Male C57BL/65 mice received a basal diet supplemented with 4% soya-bean oil, linseed oil or fish oil, in which the major polyunsaturated fatty acids were linoleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid and long chain omega-3 fatty acids, respectively. Groups of animals were injected into the right flank with EL4-lymphoma cells, others with thymoma cells. Tumour implantation caused a gradual decrease in food consumption with both types of tumour, while body weight increased, especially in the EL4-bearing ...

Yam, D.; Fink, A.; Nir, I.; Budowski, P.

1990-01-01

315

4-Hydroxynonenal, a lipid peroxidation product of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids, has anticarcinogenic properties in colon carcinoma cell lines through the inhibition of telomerase activity  

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The effects of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) obtained from the diet on colorectal cancer have been widely explored. However, controversial results have been obtained about the role played by the lipid peroxidation products of PUFAs, such as 4-hydroxy-nonenal (HNE), in the control of colon cancer growth. This aldehyde, indeed, showed both procarcinogenic and protective effects. In an attempt to verify the action of HNE, we studied the effects of a low dose of HNE (1 muM), similar to thos...

Menegatti, Elisa; Barrera, Giuseppina; Ferretti, Carlo; Pettazzoni, Piergiorgio; Minelli, Rosalba; Pizzimenti, Stefania; Toaldo, Cristina; Dianzani, Mario Umberto

2010-01-01

316

Responses of dietary ileal amino acid digestibility to consumption of different cultivars of potatoes and conventional fibers in grower pigs fed a high-fat basal diet.  

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Whereas dietary fibers are well recognized for nutritional management of human health issues, fiber is also known to be one of the dietary factors potentially affecting digestive use of dietary proteins. As a staple food, potato (Solanum tuberosum) may be a significant dietary fiber source. The objective of this study was to examine effects of dietary supplementation of six potato cultivar-genotype samples that differ in soluble fiber content and two conventional fiber components (i.e., cellulose and guar gum) on the apparent ileal AA digestibility in pigs fed a high-fat basal diet. The basal diet was formulated as a zero-fiber negative control (NC) to contain 41.5% poultry meal, 4% casein, 15% animal fat-oil blend, 2.8% sucrose, 31% corn (Zea mays) starch, 0.50% salt, and 0.40% trace mineral-vitamin supplement with fat contributing to 47% of the dietary GE. The two fiber diets were formulated by respectively diluting the basal diet with 10% guar gum and 10% cellulose at the expense of corn starch. Six other test diets were formulated by including 8.5% guar gum and further diluting the basal diet with 25.1% one of the six cultivar-genotype samples of dehydrated potato tuber powder to contain about 10% total dietary fiber at the expense of corn starch. Eighty-one 25-kg barrows were fitted with a simple T-cannula at the distal ileum and fed the diets according to a completely randomized block design with each block lasting 28 d. Compared with the NC, the ileal digestibility of Ala, Gly, and Pro were decreased (P digestibility of Gly was reduced (P digestibility of several AA was decreased (P digestive use of dietary protein. PMID:23365378

Wang, Q; Yang, X; Leonard, S; Archbold, T; Sullivan, J A; Duncan, A M; Ma, W D L; Bizimungu, B; Murphy, A; Htoo, J K; Fan, M Z

2012-12-01

317

Influence of Supplemental Dietary Poultry Fat on the Yolk Characteristics of Commercial Layers Inoculated Before or at the Onset of Lay with F-Strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum  

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The effects of F-strain Mycoplasma gallisepticum (FMG) inoculation and 1.5 % supplemental dietary poultry fat (PF) on the egg yolk characteristics of commercial layers between 24 and 58 wk of age were investigated. Sham and FMG inoculations were administered at 12 (before lay) and 22 (early in lay)...

318

Dietary fat induces sustained reward response in the human brain without primary taste cortex discrimination  

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Full Text Available To disentangle taste from reward responses in the human gustatory cortex, we combined high density electro-encephalography with a gustometer delivering tastant puffs to the tip of the tongue. Stimuli were pure tastants (salt solutions at two concentrations, caloric emulsions of identical taste (two milk preparations differing in fat content and a mixture of high fat milk with the lowest salt concentration. Early event-related potentials showed a dose-response effect for increased taste intensity, with higher amplitude and shorter latency for high compared to low salt concentration, but not for increased fat content. However, the amplitude and distribution of late potentials were modulated by fat content independently of reported intensity and discrimination. Neural source estimation revealed a sustained activation of reward areas to the two high-fat stimuli. The results suggest calorie detection through specific sensors on the tongue independent of perceived taste. Finally, amplitude variation of the first peak in the event-related potential to the different stimuli correlated with papilla density, suggesting a higher discrimination power for subjects with more fungiform papillae.

JulieHudry

2013-02-01

319

The role of the small intestine in the development of dietary fat-induced obesity and insulin resistance in C57BL/6J mice  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Obesity and insulin resistance are two major risk factors underlying the metabolic syndrome. The development of these metabolic disorders is frequently studied, but mainly in liver, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue. To gain more insight in the role of the small intestine in development of obesity and insulin resistance, dietary fat-induced differential gene expression was determined along the longitudinal axis of small intestines of C57BL/6J mice. Methods Male C57BL/6J mice were fed a low-fat or a high-fat diet that mimicked the fatty acid composition of a Western-style human diet. After 2, 4 and 8 weeks of diet intervention small intestines were isolated and divided in three equal parts. Differential gene expression was determined in mucosal scrapings using Mouse genome 430 2.0 arrays. Results The high-fat diet significantly increased body weight and decreased oral glucose tolerance, indicating insulin resistance. Microarray analysis showed that dietary fat had the most pronounced effect on differential gene expression in the middle part of the small intestine. By overrepresentation analysis we found that the most modulated biological processes on a high-fat diet were related to lipid metabolism, cell cycle and inflammation. Our results further indicated that the nuclear receptors Ppars, Lxrs and Fxr play an important regulatory role in the response of the small intestine to the high-fat diet. Next to these more local dietary fat effects, a secretome analysis revealed differential gene expression of secreted proteins, such as Il18, Fgf15, Mif, Igfbp3 and Angptl4. Finally, we linked the fat-induced molecular changes in the small intestine to development of obesity and insulin resistance. Conclusion During dietary fat-induced development of obesity and insulin resistance, we found substantial changes in gene expression in the small intestine, indicating modulations of biological processes, especially related to lipid metabolism. Moreover, we found differential expression of potential signaling molecules that can provoke systemic effects in peripheral organs by influencing their metabolic homeostasis. Many of these fat-modulated genes could be linked to obesity and/or insulin resistance. Together, our data provided various leads for a causal role of the small intestine in the etiology of obesity and/or insulin resistance.

Bromhaar Mechteld

2008-05-01

320

Effects of dietary supplementation with L-carnitine and fat on blood acid-base responses to handling in slaughter weight pigs.  

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Blood acid-base responses to handling were evaluated in slaughter weight pigs fed diets supplemented with l-carnitine and fat. The study was carried out as a randomized block design with a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of treatments: 1) dietary L-carnitine supplementation (0 vs. 150 ppm, as-fed basis); and 2) dietary fat supplementation (0 vs. 5%, as-fed basis). Sixty pigs (91.1 +/- 5.14 kg BW) were housed in mixed-gender groups of five and had ad libitum access to test diets (0.68% true ileal digestible lysine, 3,340 kcal of ME/kg, as-fed basis) for 3 wk. At the end of the feeding period (110.3 +/- 7.52 kg BW), pigs were subjected to a standard handling procedure, which consisted of moving individual animals through a facility (12.2 m long x 0.91 m wide) for eight laps (up and down the facility), using electric prods (two times per lap). There was no interaction between dietary L-carnitine and fat supplementation for any measurement. Pigs fed 150 ppm of supplemental L-carnitine had lower baseline blood glucose (P < 0.05) and higher baseline blood lactate (P < 0.05) concentrations than the nonsupplemented pigs. After handling, pigs fed L-carnitine-supplemented diets had a higher (P < 0.05) blood pH and showed a smaller (P < 0.05) decrease in blood pH and base excess than those fed the nonsupplemental diets. Baseline plasma FFA concentrations were higher (P < 0.01) in pigs fed the 5% fat diet. After the handling procedure, blood glucose, lactate, and plasma FFA were higher (P < 0.05) in pigs fed the 5 vs. 0% fat diets, but blood pH, bicarbonate, and base excess were not affected by dietary fat. The handling procedure decreased (P < 0.01) blood pH, bicarbonate, base excess, and total carbon dioxide and increased (P < 0.01) blood lactate, partial pressure of oxygen, and glucose, and also increased (P < 0.01) rectal temperature. Free fatty acid concentrations were increased by handling in pigs fed both 0 and 5% fat and 150 ppm L-carnitine. In conclusion, dietary L-carnitine supplementation at the level and for the feeding period evaluated in the current study had a relatively small but positive effect on decreasing blood pH changes in finishing pigs submitted to handling stress; however, dietary fat supplementation had little effect on blood acid-base balance. PMID:15583045

Bertol, T M; Ellis, M; Hamilton, D N; Johnson, E W; Ritter, M J

2005-01-01

 
 
 
 
321

Dietary fat and antioxidant vitamin intake in patients of neurodegenerative disease in a rural region of Jalisco, Mexico  

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Objective To evaluate and compare the intake of lipids and (A, E, and C) vitamins in patients with and without possible neurodegenerative diseases. Methods Twenty adults with possible Alzheimer's disease or Parkinson's disease and 41 control subjects (50–89 years old) from a rural region were studied. Dietary intake was evaluated with the analysis of macronutrients and micronutrients conducted by a food frequency questionnaire and 24 hours dietary record. Analyses were adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, and energy intake. Through interrogation and use of medical record form of health secretary we obtained information about the sociodemographic characteristics. Multivariate analysis of variance to allow for covariated adjustment was used. Results Patients had a lower energy intake, vitamin C (P = 0.016), fruits (P < 0.001), vegetables (P = 0.037), and oils and fat (P = 0.002), than the controls. Interestingly, the C vitamin intake in patients was still higher than the recommended. Patients had a higher consumption of cereals (P = 0.017), high-animal fat diet (P = 0.024), and whole milk (P < 0.001); 2.4% of the controls smoke and 5% are alcohol consumers. Eighty-five percent of patients and 78% of the controls do not have physical activity. Family history of subjects in this study indicated chronic diseases. Conclusion The subjects included in this study had a high intake of C vitamin, this is due to the consumption of fruits and vegetables. However, patients with possible Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease had a lower intake of fruits and vegetables, which could be due to type of food to which they have access. PMID:24257159

Navarro-Meza, Mónica; Gabriel-Ortiz, Genaro; Pacheco-Moisés, Fermín P.; Cruz-Ramos, José A.; López-Espinoza, Antonio

2014-01-01

322

The effects of a controlled worksite environmental intervention on determinants of dietary behavior and self-reported fruit, vegetable and fat intake  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Eating patterns in Western industrialized countries are characterized by a high energy intake and an overconsumption of (saturated fat, cholesterol, sugar and salt. Many chronic diseases are associated with unhealthy eating patterns. On the other hand, a healthy diet (low saturated fat intake and high fruit and vegetable intake has been found important in the prevention of health problems, such as cancer and cardio-vascular disease (CVD. The worksite seems an ideal intervention setting to influence dietary behavior. The purpose of this study is to present the effects of a worksite environmental intervention on fruit, vegetable and fat intake and determinants of behavior. Methods A controlled trial that included two different governmental companies (n = 515: one intervention and one control company. Outcome measurements (short-fat list and fruit and vegetable questionnaire took place at baseline and 3 and 12 months after baseline. The relatively modest environmental intervention consisted of product information to facilitate healthier food choices (i.e., the caloric (kcal value of foods in groups of products was translated into the number of minutes to perform a certain (occupational activity to burn these calories. Results Significant changes in psychosocial determinants of dietary behavior were found; subjects at the intervention worksite perceived more social support from their colleagues in eating less fat. But also counter intuitive effects were found: at 12 months the attitude and self-efficacy towards eating less fat became less positive in the intervention group. No effects were found on self-reported fat, fruit and vegetable intake. Conclusion This environmental intervention was modestly effective in changing behavioral determinant towards eating less fat (social support, self-efficacy and attitude, but ineffective in positively changing actual fat, fruit and vegetable intake of office workers.

Chin A Paw Marijke

2006-10-01

323

Effect of linoleic acid and dietary vitamin E supplementation on sustained conjugated linoleic acid production in milk fat from dairy cows.  

Science.gov (United States)

Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA; cis-9,trans-11 18:2), a bioactive fatty acid (FA) found in milk and dairy products, has potential human health benefits due to its anticarcinogenic and antiatherogenic properties. Conjugated linoleic acid concentrations in milk fat can be markedly increased by dietary manipulation; however, high levels of CLA are difficult to sustain as rumen biohydrogenation shifts and milk fat depression (MFD) is often induced. Our objective was to feed a typical Northeastern corn-based diet and investigate whether vitamin E and soybean oil supplementation would sustain an enhanced milk fat CLA content while avoiding MFD. Holstein cows (n=48) were assigned to a completely randomized block design with repeated measures for 28 d and received 1 of 4 dietary treatments: (1) control (CON), (2) 10,000 IU of vitamin E/d (VE), (3) 2.5% soybean oil (SO), and (4) 2.5% soybean oil plus 10,000 IU of vitamin E/d (SO-VE). A 2-wk pretreatment control diet served as the covariate. Milk fat percentage was reduced by both high-oil diets (3.53, 3.56, 2.94, and 2.92% for CON, VE, SO, and SO-VE), whereas milk yield increased significantly for the SO-VE diet only, thus partially mitigating MFD by oil feeding. Milk protein percentage was higher for cows fed the SO diet (3.04, 3.05, 3.28, and 3.03% for CON, VE, SO, and SO-VE), implying that nutrient partitioning or ruminal supply of microbial protein was altered in response to the reduction in milk fat. Milk fat concentration of CLA more than doubled in cows fed the diets supplemented with soybean oil, with concurrent increases in trans-10 18:1 and trans-11 18:1 FA. Moreover, milk fat from cows fed the 2 soybean oil diets had 39.1% less de novo synthesized FA and 33.8% more long-chain preformed FA, and vitamin E had no effect on milk fat composition. Overall, dietary supplements of soybean oil caused a reduction in milk fat percentage and a shift in FA composition characteristic of MFD. Supplementing diets with vitamin E did not overcome the oil-induced reduction in milk fat percentage or changes in FA profile, but partially mitigated the reduction in fat yield by increasing milk yield. PMID:23063161

O'Donnell-Megaro, A M; Capper, J L; Weiss, W P; Bauman, D E

2012-12-01

324

Effect of various dietary fats on antibody production and lymphocyte proliferation n chickens  

International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

One-day old Babcock-300 female chicks (n = 80) were fed one of four corn-soybean meal based diets which differed only in fat source. Diets contained 7% by weight: corn oil (CO), canola oil (CA), lard (LA), or fish oil (FO). Chicks (n = 12/trt) were injected with sheep red blood cells (sRBC) at day 21 and antibody titers were measured by haemagglutination at d 28. On d 22 (n = 4/trt) and 26 (n = 4/trt) concanavalin A (Con A), pokeweed mitogen (PWM) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated proliferation of splenocytes was assessed by 3H-thymidine incorporation. The results show that feeding young chicks a diet containing fish oil (rich in n-3 fatty acids) significantly increased weight gain, antibody production, and had a tendency to decrease splenocyte proliferation in response to mitogens compared to other fat sources

325

Gender Differences in Adult`s Knowledge about Dietary Fats, Cholesterol, Fiber and Energy  

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Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to determine of adults` knowledge in Ankara, Turkey, about fat, cholesterol, fiber and energy contents of food depending on gender differences. The sample of 200 subjects was composed of 74 males and 126 females. It was determined that the question which received the highest number of correct answers was "Which has more fat: roast chicken leg or fried chicken leg?" (89.5% and the question which received the highest number of incorrect answers was "Which is higher in calories: Butter or Margarine?" (12.5%. Except the question "Based on your knowledge, which has more fiber: Kidney beans or Lettuce?", all the other questions were answered correctly by the women.

Ayse Ozfer Ozcelik

2008-01-01

326

TFAP2B influences the effect of dietary fat on weight loss under energy restriction  

Digital Repository Infrastructure Vision for European Research (DRIVER)

BACKGROUND: Numerous gene loci are related to single measures of body weight and shape. We investigated if 55 SNPs previously associated with BMI or waist measures, modify the effects of fat intake on weight loss and waist reduction under energy restriction. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Randomized controlled trial of 771 obese adults. (Registration: ISRCTN25867281.) One SNP was selected for replication in another weight loss intervention study of 934 obese adults. The original trial was a 1...

2012-01-01

327

Food energy values of dietary fibre components and decreased deposition of body fat.  

Science.gov (United States)

The effects of guar gum (GG) and solka floc cellulose (SF) on food intake, stomach emptying and body fat deposition in rats were assessed together with their food energy values. Voluntary food intake in meal-fed rats (ca 100 g, male Wistar kept at 21C) was depressed initially by 40 per cent on adding 10 g GG to 100 g fibre free (FF) semisynthetic diet. This effect was not sustained, intake doubling within 15 d. Similar effects were not observed with SF. In pair-fed animals neither GG nor SF affected the rate of stomach emptying after 28 days. Digestible energy (DE) intake per rat over the 28 days was GG diet = 4616, SF diet = 4410, FF diet = 4373 kJ but body fat was lower in GG (25%) and SF (16%) fed rats than in FF fed rats. The calculated DE values of the fibre components were 10.1 kJ/g GG and 1.5 kJ/g SF (sem 1 kJ/g). After including body fat into the equations for metabolizable energy, the energy values were -7.1 kJ/g GG and -4.8 kJ/g SF (sem 2 kJ/g). This is equivalent to an increased energy expenditure of 17.2 kJ/g GG and 6.3 kJ/g SF. For GG an increased intestinal mucosal mass and cell turnover explains part of the apparent increase in energy demand. Our overall conclusion is that under certain circumstances and with regard to fat deposition some fibre components can be attributed negative energy values. PMID:3032821

Davies, I R; Johnson, I T; Livesey, G

1987-01-01

328

Dietary enrichment with the polyunsaturated fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid prevents proteinuria and prolongs survival in NZB x NZW F1 mice.  

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Prostaglandins and related compounds are active mediators of inflammation, but data concerning their role in the pathogenesis of the glomerulonephritis of New Zealand Black x New Zealand White (NZB x NZW) F1 mice are conflicting. Dietary eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5), a fatty acid analogue of arachidonic acid (C20:4), has been shown to impair platelet aggregation in humans, apparently through inhibition of the synthesis of prostaglandins and thromboxanes from arachidonic acid. We report ...

Prickett, J. D.; Robinson, D. R.; Steinberg, A. D.

1981-01-01

329

High dietary intake of saturated fat is associated with reduced semen quality among 701 young Danish men from the general population  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

BACKGROUND: Saturated fat intake has been associated with both cardiovascular disease and cancer risk, and a newly published study found an association between saturated fat intake and a lower sperm concentration in infertile men. OBJECTIVE: The objective was to examine the association between dietary fat intake and semen quality among 701 young Danish men from the general population. DESIGN: In this cross-sectional study, men were recruited when they were examined to determine their fitness for military service from 2008 to 2010. They delivered a semen sample, underwent a physical examination, and answered a questionnaire comprising a quantitative food-frequency questionnaire to assess food and nutrient intakes. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed with semen variables as outcomes and dietary fat intakes as exposure variables, adjusted for confounders. RESULTS: A lower sperm concentration and total sperm count in men with a high intake of saturated fat was found. A significant dose-response association was found, and men in the highest quartile of saturated fat intake had a 38% (95% CI: 0.1%, 61%) lower sperm concentration and a 41% (95% CI: 4%, 64%) lower total sperm count than did men in the lowest quartile. No association between semen quality and intake of other types of fat was found. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings are of potentially great public interest, because changes in diet over the past decades may be part of the explanation for the recently reported high frequency of subnormal human sperm counts. A reduction in saturated fat intake may be beneficial for both general and reproductive health.

Jensen, Tina Kold; Heitmann, Berit L

2013-01-01

330

The effect of fatty acid positioning in dietary triacylglycerols and intake of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids on bone mineral accretion in growing piglets  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Long-chain n-3 PUFA (LCPUFA) and palmitate (16:0) positioning in the triacylglycerol (TAG) of infant formula may affect calcium-uptake which could affect bone health. We investigated if a human milk fat substitute (HMFS) with a modified TAG structure holding 16:0 predominantly in the sn-2-position compared with a control (CONT) and if increasing n-3LCPUFA intake giving fish oil (FO) compared with sunflower oil (SO) would affect bone parameters in piglets in two sets of controlled 14d-interventions (n=12/group). We assessed this by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, and ex vivo peripheral quantitative computed tomography and mechanical strength. Bone mineral content (BMC) was higher in the FO compared to the SO-group (p=0.03). Despite similar weight gain in HMFS- and CONT-groups, body fat accumulation was higher with HMFS (p

Andersen, Anders Daniel; Ludvig, Stine E

2013-01-01

331

Quantitative trait loci for obesity- and diabetes-related traits and their dietary responses to high-fat feeding in LGXSM recombinant inbred mouse strains.  

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Genetic variation in response to high-fat diets is important in understanding the recent secular trends that have led to increases in obesity and type 2 diabetes. The examination of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for both obesity- and diabetes-related traits and their responses to a high-fat diet can be effectively addressed in mouse model systems, including LGXSM recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains. A wide range of obesity- and diabetes-related traits were measured in animals from 16 RI strains with 8 animals of each sex fed a high- or low-fat diet from each strain. Marker associations were measured at 506 microsatellite markers spread throughout the mouse genome using a nested ANOVA. Locations with significant effects on the traits themselves and/or trait dietary responses were identified after correction for multiple comparisons by limiting the false detection rate. Nonsyntenic associations of marker genotypes were common at QTL locations so that the significant results were limited to loci still significant in multiple QTL models. We discovered 91 QTLs at 39 locations. Many of these locations (n = 31) also showed genetic effects on dietary response, typically because the loci produced significantly larger effects on the high-fat diet. Fat depot weights, leptin levels, and body weight at necropsy tended to map to the same locations and were responsible for a majority of the dietary response QTLs. Basal glucose levels and the response to glucose challenge mapped together in locations distinct from those affecting obesity. These QTL locations form a panel for further research and fine mapping of loci affecting obesity- and diabetes-related traits and their responses to high-fat feeding. PMID:15561968

Cheverud, James M; Ehrich, Thomas H; Hrbek, Tomas; Kenney, Jane P; Pletscher, L Susan; Semenkovich, Clay F

2004-12-01

332

Effect of dietary fatty acid supplements, varying in fatty acid composition, on milk fat secretion in dairy cattle fed diets supplemented to less than 3% total fatty acids.  

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Dietary fatty acids can affect both milk fat yield and fatty acid (FA) composition. This relationship is well established when the dietary level of FA exceeds 3% of diet dry matter (DM). We could find no reports directly examining the effects of dietary FA profile on milk fat at levels below 3%. Twenty-four primiparous and 36 multiparous lactating cows were paired by production (1 high with 1 low, within parity) to form 30 experimental units. Pairs were fed 6 diets in five 6×6 balanced Latin squares with 21-d periods, and data were collected during the last 5d of each period. Two control diets were fed: a corn control diet (CC; 29% corn silage, 16% alfalfa silage, 19% corn grain, and 8% distillers grain on a DM basis) containing 1.8% FA; and a low-oil control diet (LOC; 9% corn silage, 35% alfalfa silage, 20% food-grade corn starch, and 8% corn gluten feed on a DM basis) containing 1.2% FA. A portion of the food-grade corn starch in LOC was replaced with 4 different FA supplements to create the 4 treatment diets. Treatments were 1.7% (DM basis) of a 50:50 blend of corn oil and high-linoleic safflower oil (LO), 1.7% high-oleic sunflower oil (OO), 1.7% palm oil (PO), or 1.8% calcium salts of palm fatty acids (PFA). The resultant diets were thus enriched in linoleic (LO), oleic (OO), or palmitic acid (PO and PFA). Dietary treatments did not affect dry matter intake. Addition of any of the fat sources to LOC resulted in increased milk yield, but milk fat yields and milk FA composition were variable for the different treatments. The LO treatment resulted in lower milk fat yield, fat concentration, and C16:0 yield but increased both trans-10 C18:1 and trans-10,cis-12 C18:2 yields compared with the other added FA treatments. Diets PO and PFA resulted in increased milk C16:0 yield and decreased total milk C18 yield compared with OO. Regression analysis revealed a negative coefficient for dietary linoleic acid content over basal (LOC) for both milk short-chain FA yield and C16:0 yield. Dietary linoleic acid content also had a positive coefficient for milk trans-10 C18:1 and trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid yield. These results demonstrate that even when total dietary FA are below 3%, free oils rich in linoleic acid can reduce milk fat yield by reducing secretion of milk FA with fewer than 18 carbons. Fatty acid composition of fat supplements is important even at this low level of total dietary fat. PMID:25468700

Stoffel, C M; Crump, P M; Armentano, L E

2015-01-01

333

An Investigation into the Association between DNA Damage and Dietary Fatty Acid in Men with Prostate Cancer.  

Science.gov (United States)

Prostate cancer is a growing problem in New Zealand and worldwide, as populations adopt a Western style dietary pattern. In particular, dietary fat is believed to be associated with oxidative stress, which in turn may be associated with cancer risk and development. In addition, DNA damage is associated with the risk of various cancers, and is regarded as an ideal biomarker for the assessment of the influence of foods on cancer. In the study presented here, 20 men with prostate cancer adhered to a modified Mediterranean style diet for three months. Dietary records, blood fatty acid levels, prostate specific antigen, C-reactive protein and DNA damage were assessed pre- and post-intervention. DNA damage was inversely correlated with dietary adherence (p = 0.013) and whole blood monounsaturated fatty acids (p = 0.009) and oleic acid (p = 0.020). DNA damage was positively correlated with the intake of dairy products (p = 0.043), red meat (p = 0.007) and whole blood omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (p = 0.015). Both the source and type of dietary fat changed significantly over the course of the dietary intervention. Levels of DNA damage were correlated with various dietary fat sources and types of dietary fat. PMID:25580814

Bishop, Karen S; Erdrich, Sharon; Karunasinghe, Nishi; Han, Dug Yeo; Zhu, Shuotun; Jesuthasan, Amalini; Ferguson, Lynnette R

2015-01-01

334

An Investigation into the Association between DNA Damage and Dietary Fatty Acid in Men with Prostate Cancer  

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Full Text Available Prostate cancer is a growing problem in New Zealand and worldwide, as populations adopt a Western style dietary pattern. In particular, dietary fat is believed to be associated with oxidative stress, which in turn may be associated with cancer risk and development. In addition, DNA damage is associated with the risk of various cancers, and is regarded as an ideal biomarker for the assessment of the influence of foods on cancer. In the study presented here, 20 men with prostate cancer adhered to a modified Mediterranean style diet for three months. Dietary records, blood fatty acid levels, prostate specific antigen, C-reactive protein and DNA damage were assessed pre- and post-intervention. DNA damage was inversely correlated with dietary adherence (p = 0.013 and whole blood monounsaturated fatty acids (p = 0.009 and oleic acid (p = 0.020. DNA damage was positively correlated with the intake of dairy products (p = 0.043, red meat (p = 0.007 and whole blood omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (p = 0.015. Both the source and type of dietary fat changed significantly over the course of the dietary intervention. Levels of DNA damage were correlated with various dietary fat sources and types of dietary fat.

Karen S. Bishop

2015-01-01

335

Dietary cocoa reduces metabolic endotoxemia and adipose tissue inflammation in high-fat fed mice.  

Science.gov (United States)

In diet-induced obesity, adipose tissue (AT) is in a chronic state of inflammation predisposing the development of metabolic syndrome. Cocoa (Theobroma cacao) is a polyphenol-rich food with putative anti-inflammatory activities. Here, we examined the impact and underlying mechanisms of action of cocoa on AT inflammation in high fat-fed mice. In the present study, male C57BL/6 J mice were fed a high fat diet (HF), a HF diet with 8% (w/w) unsweetened cocoa powder (HFC), or a low-fat diet (LF) for 18 weeks. Cocoa supplementation decreased AT mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor-?, interleukin-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase, and EGF-like module-containing mucin-like hormone receptor-like 1 by 40-60% compared to HF group, and this was accompanied by decreased nuclear protein levels of nuclear factor-?B. Cocoa treatment reduced the levels of arachidonic acid in the AT by 33% compared to HF controls. Moreover, cocoa treatment also reduced protein levels of the eicosanoid-generating enzymes, adipose-specific phospholipase A2 and cyclooxygenase-2 by 53% and 55%, respectively, compared to HF-fed mice. Finally, cocoa treatment ameliorated metabolic endotoxemia (40% reduction in plasma endotoxin) and improved gut barrier function (as measured by increased plasma levels of glucagon-like peptide-2). In conclusion, the present study has shown for the first time that long-term cocoa supplementation can reduce AT inflammation in part by modulating eicosanoid metabolism and metabolic endotoxemia. PMID:24561154

Gu, Yeyi; Yu, Shan; Park, Jong Yung; Harvatine, Kevin; Lambert, Joshua D

2014-04-01

336

Effects of Dietary Carbohydrate Replaced with Wild Rice (Zizania latifolia (Griseb Turcz on Insulin Resistance in Rats Fed with a High-Fat/Cholesterol Diet  

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Full Text Available Wild rice (WR is a very nutritious grain that has been used to treat diabetes in Chinese medicinal practice. City diet (CD is based on the diet consumed by Asian area residents in modern society, which is rich in saturated fats, cholesterol and carbohydrates. The present study was aimed at evaluating the effects of replacing white rice and processed wheat starch of CD with WR as the chief source of dietary carbohydrates on insulin resistance in rats fed with a high-fat/cholesterol diet. Except the rats of the low-fat (LF diet group, the rats of the other three groups, including to high-fat/cholesterol (HFC diet, CD and WR diet, were fed with high-fat/cholesterol diets for eight weeks. The rats fed with CD exhibited higher weight gain and lower insulin sensitivity compared to the rats consuming a HFC diet. However, WR suppressed high-fat/cholesterol diet-induced insulin resistance. WR decreased liver homogenate triglyceride and free fatty acids levels, raised serum adiponectin concentration and reduced serum lipocalin-2 and visfatin concentrations. In addition, the WR diet potently augmented the relative expressions of adiponectin receptor 2, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors, alpha and gamma, and abated relative expressions of leptin and lipocalin-2 in the tissues of interest. These findings indicate that WR is effective in ameliorating abnormal glucose metabolism and insulin resistance in rats, even when the diet consumed is high in fat and cholesterol.

Chengkai Zhai

2013-02-01

337

Effect of dietary fat and omega-3 fatty acids on urinary eicosanoids and sex hormone concentrations in postmenopausal women: a randomized controlled feeding trial.  

Science.gov (United States)

Substantial evidence relates increased sex hormone concentrations with increased breast cancer risk. Varying omega-3 (n-3) fatty acid (FA) intake may lead to alterations in eicosanoid balance and changes in circulating sex hormones that reduce risk. To clarify effects of dietary fat and n-3 FA intake on breast cancer risk markers, circulating sex hormones and urinary eicosanoids were measured in response to controlled feeding of diets designed to increase plasma concentrations of n-3 FA. A controlled cross-over feeding trial in postmenopausal women was conducted using 3 diets: high fat (HF; 40% energy from fat), low fat (LF; 20% energy from fat), and low fat plus n-3 FA (LFn3; 20% of energy from fat plus 3% of energy from n-3 FA) in 8-wk feeding periods. Plasma phospholipid fatty acid n-3 increased with the LFn3 relative to HF and LF (P < 0.0001). Plasma estradiol increased by 51% with HF (P = 0.03). Urinary prostaglandin E metabolite increased with HF relative to LF (P = 0.02) and urinary 11-dehydro-thromboxane B(2) increased with HF (P = 0.01). These results do not support a role of n-3 FA in the reduction of sex hormone levels. PMID:21745038

Young, Lindsay R; Kurzer, Mindy S; Thomas, William; Redmon, J Bruce; Raatz, Susan K

2011-01-01

338

Dietary fat composition modifies the effect of boron on bone characteristics and plasma lipids in rats.  

Science.gov (United States)

Female and male rats weighing about 170 g and 200 g, respectively, were fed diets (approximately 70 microg boron/kg) in a factorial arrangement with supplemental boron at 0 (deficient) and 3 (adequate) mg/kg and canola oil or palm oil at 75 g/kg of diet as variables. After 5 weeks, six females in each treatment were bred. Dams and pups continued on their respective dietary treatments through gestation, lactation and post-weaning. Thirteen weeks after weaning, plasma and bones were collected from 12 male and 12 female offspring in each treatment. Boron supplementation increased femur strength measured by the breaking variable bending moment; tibial calcium and phosphorus concentrations; and plasma alkaline phosphatase. Femur breaking stress was greatest in boron-supplemented rats fed canola oil, and lowest in boron-deprived females fed canola oil; this group also exhibited the lowest femur bending moment. Minerals associated with bone organic matrix, zinc and potassium, were increased by boron supplementation in tibia. Plasma phospholipids were decreased by boron deprivation in females, but not males. Plasma cholesterol was decreased in boron-supplemented males by replacing canola oil with palm oil. The findings suggest that a diet high in omega-3 alpha-linolenic acid promotes femur strength best when the dietary boron is adequate. PMID:15665386

Nielsen, Forrest H

2004-01-01

339

Importância da gordura alimentar na prevenção e no controle de distúrbios metabólicos e da doença cardiovascular Importance of the dietary fat on the prevention and control of metabolic disturbances and cardiovascular disease  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available A Organização Mundial da Saúde (OMS reiterou recentemente que o consumo de dietas inadequadas e a inatividade física estão entre os dez principais fatores de mortalidade. Diversos ensaios aleatorizados demonstram que intervenções alimentares adequadas podem diminuir ou prevenir significativamente o aparecimento de várias doenças crônicas não transmissíveis. Neste contexto, o papel da dieta vem sendo exaustivamente avaliado em estudos clínicos e epidemiológicos. Assim, já foi bem estabelecido na literatura que a quantidade e o tipo de gordura alimentar exercem influência direta sobre fatores de risco cardiovascular, tais como a concentração de lípides e de lipoproteínas plasmáticas, bem como sua associação a processos inflamatórios. Os ácidos graxos participam de complexos sistemas de sinalização intracelular, função que vem sendo bastante explorada. Os ácidos graxos poli-insaturados não somente influenciam a composição das membranas, metabolismo celular e sinais de tradução, mas também modulam a expressão de genes, regulando a atividade e a produção de diversos fatores de transcrição. A proposta deste artigo é rever tópicos relevantes referentes ao metabolismo de lípides e os relacionar a terapias nutricionais que possam contribuir para a prevenção e o tratamento de doenças associadas.The World Health Organization (WHO has recently reinforced the fact that inadequate diets, along with physical inactivity, are among the ten main determinant factors of mortality. Several randomized trials demonstrated that dietary interventions may lower or even prevent the occurrence of several non-communicable diseases. In this context, the role of diet has been exhaustively evaluated in several clinical and epidemiological studies. Thus, it is well established in literature that the amount and type of dietary fat have a direct influence on cardiovascular risk factors, such as lipids and plasma lipoprotein concentration, as well as their association with inflammatory processes. Fatty acids also participate in complex intracellular signaling systems, a function which has been currently investigated. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA act not only by altering membrane lipid composition, cellular metabolism and signal transduction, but also modulating gene expression by regulating the activity and/or production of different nuclear transcription factors. The aim of this article is to review important topics regarding the lipids metabolism and correlate them with nutritional therapies that may contribute to the prevention and treatment of related diseases.

Ana Maria Pita Lottenberg

2009-07-01

340

Importância da gordura alimentar na prevenção e no controle de distúrbios metabólicos e da doença cardiovascular / Importance of the dietary fat on the prevention and control of metabolic disturbances and cardiovascular disease  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese A Organização Mundial da Saúde (OMS) reiterou recentemente que o consumo de dietas inadequadas e a inatividade física estão entre os dez principais fatores de mortalidade. Diversos ensaios aleatorizados demonstram que intervenções alimentares adequadas podem diminuir ou prevenir significativamente o [...] aparecimento de várias doenças crônicas não transmissíveis. Neste contexto, o papel da dieta vem sendo exaustivamente avaliado em estudos clínicos e epidemiológicos. Assim, já foi bem estabelecido na literatura que a quantidade e o tipo de gordura alimentar exercem influência direta sobre fatores de risco cardiovascular, tais como a concentração de lípides e de lipoproteínas plasmáticas, bem como sua associação a processos inflamatórios. Os ácidos graxos participam de complexos sistemas de sinalização intracelular, função que vem sendo bastante explorada. Os ácidos graxos poli-insaturados não somente influenciam a composição das membranas, metabolismo celular e sinais de tradução, mas também modulam a expressão de genes, regulando a atividade e a produção de diversos fatores de transcrição. A proposta deste artigo é rever tópicos relevantes referentes ao metabolismo de lípides e os relacionar a terapias nutricionais que possam contribuir para a prevenção e o tratamento de doenças associadas. Abstract in english The World Health Organization (WHO) has recently reinforced the fact that inadequate diets, along with physical inactivity, are among the ten main determinant factors of mortality. Several randomized trials demonstrated that dietary interventions may lower or even prevent the occurrence of several n [...] on-communicable diseases. In this context, the role of diet has been exhaustively evaluated in several clinical and epidemiological studies. Thus, it is well established in literature that the amount and type of dietary fat have a direct influence on cardiovascular risk factors, such as lipids and plasma lipoprotein concentration, as well as their association with inflammatory processes. Fatty acids also participate in complex intracellular signaling systems, a function which has been currently investigated. Dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) act not only by altering membrane lipid composition, cellular metabolism and signal transduction, but also modulating gene expression by regulating the activity and/or production of different nuclear transcription factors. The aim of this article is to review important topics regarding the lipids metabolism and correlate them with nutritional therapies that may contribute to the prevention and treatment of related diseases.

Ana Maria Pita, Lottenberg.

2009-07-01

 
 
 
 
341

Dietary Hizikia fusiformis glycoprotein-induced IGF-I and IGFBP-3 associated to somatic growth, polyunsaturated fatty acid metabolism, and immunity in juvenile olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus.  

Science.gov (United States)

This study was aimed to examine the effect of dietary glycoprotein extracted from the sea mustard Hizikia fusiformis (Phaeophyceae: Sargassaceae) as a dietary supplement on growth performance in association with somatotropin level, proximate compositions, and immunity in juvenile olive flounder Paralichthys olivaceus. Water-ethanol extracted glycoprotein from H. fusiformis was supplemented to three fishmeal-based diets at the concentration of 0, 5, and 10gkg(-1) diet (designated as H0, H5, and H10, respectively). After a 12week-long feeding trial, growth performance and biochemical responses were analyzed including proximate composition, and whole body amino acids and fatty acids. We also measured plasma insulin like growth factor (IGF), IGF-binding protein (IGFBP) and interleukin (IL). The fish fed H5 showed the greatest weight gain among the dietary treatments. In parallel with the growth, the fish fed the diets containing H. fusiformis glycoprotein showed an increased plasma IGF-I activity and increased expression of 43-kDa IGFBP-3 compared to that in the control, whereas an opposite trend was observed for 34-kDa IGFBP-1. Although no differences were found in the level of whole body linoleic acid (C18:2n-6) and linolenic acid (C18:3n-3) among treatments, increases in arachidonic acid (ARA, C20:4n-6), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, C20:5n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, C22:6n-3) were observed in fish fed H5 compared to control. IL-2 and -6 levels increased significantly in fish fed H10 compared to those in the control indicating increased immunity. These results suggest that supplementation of H. fusiformis glycoprotein in fish diet may be beneficial for fish growth and immunity in juvenile olive flounder. PMID:24064233

Choi, Youn Hee; Kim, Kang-Woong; Han, Hyon-Sob; Nam, Taek Jeong; Lee, Bong-Joo

2014-01-01

342

Dietary intake of total marine n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic acid, docosahexaenoic acid and docosapentaenoic acid and the risk of acute coronary syndrome - a cohort study  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Dietary intake of marine n-3 PUFA has been negatively associated with the risk of CHD among subjects with known CHD, whereas an effect in healthy subjects is less documented. We assessed the hypothesis that dietary intake of marine n-3 PUFA is negatively associated with the risk of acute coronary syndrome (ACS) in healthy subjects. In the Danish Diet, Cancer and Health cohort study, 57 053 participants were enrolled. Dietary intake of total n-3 PUFA, including EPA, docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) and DHA, was assessed. During a mean follow-up period of 7.6 years, we identified all cases (n 1150) from this cohort with an incident ACS diagnosis in the Danish National Patient Registry or the Cause of Death Registry. Diagnoses were verified through medical record review. In Cox proportional hazard models, we adjusted for established risk factors for CHD. Men in the four highest quintiles of n-3 PUFA intake (>0.39 g n-3 PUFA per d) had a lower incidence of ACS compared with men in the lowest quintile. The hazard ratiowas 0.83 (95 % CI 0.67, 1.03) when we compared men in the second lowest and lowest quintile of n-3 PUFA intake. Higher intake of n-3 PUFA did not strengthen this association. Associations for EPA, DPA and DHA were all negative, but less consistent. No convincing associations were found among women. In conclusion, we found borderline significant negative associations between the intake of marine n-3 PUFA and ACS among healthy men.

Joensen, Albert M; Schmidt, Erik B

2010-01-01

343

Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Composition of Maternal Diet and Erythrocyte Phospholipid Status in Chilean Pregnant Women  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Chilean diets are characterized by a low supply of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 PUFA, which are critical nutrients during pregnancy and lactation, because of their role in brain and visual development. DHA is the most relevant n-3 PUFA in this period. We evaluated the dietary n-3 PUFA intake and erythrocyte phospholipids n-3 PUFA in Chilean pregnant women. Eighty healthy pregnant women (20–36 years old in the 3rd–6th month of pregnancy were included in the study. Dietary assessment was done applying a food frequency questionnaire, and data were analyzed through the Food Processor SQL® software. Fatty acids of erythrocyte phospholipids were assessed by gas-liquid chromatography. Diet composition was high in saturated fat, low in mono- and PUFA, high in n-6 PUFA (linoleic acid and low in n-3 PUFA (alpha-linolenic acid and DHA, with imbalance in the n-6/n-3 PUFA ratio. Similar results were observed for fatty acids from erythrocyte phospholipids. The sample of Chilean pregnant women showed high consumption of saturated fat and low consumption of n-3 PUFA, which is reflected in the low DHA content of erythrocyte phospholipids. Imbalance between n-6/n-3 PUFA could negatively affect fetal development. New strategies are necessary to improve n-3 PUFA intake throughout pregnancy and breast feeding periods. Furthermore, it is necessary to develop dietary interventions to improve the quality of consumed foods with particular emphasis on n-3 PUFA.

Karla A. Bascuñán

2014-11-01

344

Effects of dietary fat and crude protein on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and meat quality in finishing steers fed differing levels of dried distillers grains with solubles.  

Science.gov (United States)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of dietary protein and fat from distillers dried grains with solubles (DDGS) on feedlot performance, carcass characteristics, and meat quality in finishing steers. Angus-cross steers (n = 105; 443 +/- 20 kg of BW) were blocked by BW and randomly assigned to 1 of 5 dietary treatments: 1) corn-based diet with DDGS included at 25% of DM (CON), 2) CON with DDGS included at twice the amount of CON (50% of DM; 50DDGS), 3) CON with added corn protein to equal the CP in the 50DDGS diet (CON+CP), 4) CON with added vegetable oil to equal the fat in the 50DDGS diet (CON+VO), and 5) CON with protein and fat added to equal the CP and fat in the 50DDGS diet (CON+CPVO). Steers were fed to a common 12th-rib fat depth endpoint (1.3 +/- 0.2 cm; 68 to 125 d on trial). Loins and rounds were collected from 44 carcasses for Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF), ether extract, and case-life analyses. Data were analyzed using the MIXED procedure of SAS. Contrasts between 1) CON vs. elevated CP diets (50DDGS, CON+CP, and CON+CPVO; EP), 2) CON vs. elevated fat diets (50DDGS, CON+VO, and CON+CPVO; EF) and 3) CON vs. diets with elevated CP and fat (50DDGS and CON+CPVO; EPF) were analyzed. There were no differences in days on feed or DMI among treatments. Steers fed CON had greater ADG (P area, KPH, and yield grade were not affected by treatment (P >or= 0.06). Steers fed the CON diet had greater marbling scores (P or= 0.44). However, CON steers had greater (P = 0.02) L* values than EF-fed steers and greater b* values than EP, EF, and EPF steers (P stability of ground product during retail display are negatively affected when DDGS are increased from 25 to 50% of the diet DM. This response appears to be due to elevated dietary fat, elevated CP, and a combination of elevated fat and protein within in the diet. PMID:19465502

Gunn, P J; Weaver, A D; Lemenager, R P; Gerrard, D E; Claeys, M C; Lake, S L

2009-09-01

345

Influence of dietary fat type on benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] biotransformation in a B(a)P-induced mouse model of colon cancer  

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In the US alone, around 60,000 lives/year are lost due to colon cancer. Diet and environment have been implicated in the development of sporadic colon tumors. The objective of this study was to determine how dietary fat potentiates the development of colon tumors through altered B(a)P biotransformation, using the Adenomatous polyposis coli with Multiple intestinal neoplasia mouse model. Benzo(a)pyrene was administered to mice through tricaprylin, and unsaturated (USF; peanut oil) and saturate...

Diggs, Deacqunita L.; Myers, Jeremy N.; Banks, Leah D.; Niaz, Mohammad S.; Hood, Darryl B.; Roberts, L. Jackson; Ramesh, Aramandla

2013-01-01

346

The interplay among dietary fat, sugar, protein and açai (Euterpe oleracea Mart.) pulp in modulating lifespan and reproduction in a Tephritid fruit fly  

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Macronutrient balance is a critical contributor in modulating lifespan and health. Consumption of diets rich in fruits and vegetables provides numerous health benefits. The interactions among macronutrients and botanicals and how they influence aging and health remain elusive. Here we employed a nutritional geometry approach to investigate the interplay among dietary fat, sugar, protein and antioxidant- and polyphenolic-rich freeze-dried açai pulp in modulating lifespan and reproductive outp...

Liedo, Pablo; Carey, James R.; Ingram, Donald K.; Zou, Sige

2012-01-01

347

Milk fat depression induced by dietary marine algae in dairy ewes: Persistency of milk fatty acid composition and animal performance responses  

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Addition of marine algae (MA) to the diet of dairy ruminants has proven to be an effective strategy to enhance the milk content of some bioactive lipids, but it has also been associated with the syndrome of milk fat depression. Little is known, however, about the persistency of the response to dietary MA in sheep. Based on previous experiments with dairy ewes fed sunflower oil plus MA, it was hypothesized that the response might be mediated by time-dependent adaptation...

Bichi, Elena; Herva?s, Gonzalo; Toral, Pablo G.; Loor, Juan J.; Frutos, Pilar

2013-01-01

348

Methane emission and community composition patterns of rumen bacteria and methanogens in Holstein dairy cows as affected by silage type and dietary fat  

DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

Silage type and dietary fat supplementation can affect enteric methane (CH4) emissions from dairy cows. However, the impact of dietary interventions on the rumen microbiota is still not fully understood. The present study used six rumen cannulated Holstein cows (6x4 incomplete Latin Square) to investigate effects of silages with different methanogenic potential (early grass, late grass, and maize) combined with a CH4-reducing feed additive (crushed rapeseed) on bacterial and methanogenic communities in the rumen. Bacterial and methanogenic community patterns were evaluated by T-RFLP analysis of 16S rRNA and methyl co-enzyme M reductase (mcrA) genes, respectively. Methanogen abundances were evaluated by qPCR using two mcrA-targeting primer sets. Silage type significantly affected CH4 emissions and rumen acetate:propionate ratios, being highest for late grass and lowest for maize. Dietary fat significantly reduced the gross energy lost as CH4 regardless of silage type. Silage type significantly affected the bacterial community composition pattern; the grass silages favored potential hemicellulose- and cellulose-degrading bacteria, while the maize silage mainly favored potentially starch-degrading bacteria. The silages also significantly affected the methanogenic community composition pattern as indicated by the relative abundances of T-RFs representing methylotrophic and H2/CO2-dependent methanogens. In contrast, fat supplementation had only little effect on the community composition patterns of bacteria and methanogens. Total methanogen abundance was not affected by dietary manipulations, indicating that shifts occurred within the methanogen community without affecting its overall size. The current study illustrates that the bacterial and methanogenic communities in the rumen are susceptible to manipulation through dietary interventions.

Poulsen, Morten; HØjberg, Ole

349

The effect of a moderate zinc deficiency and dietary fat source on the activity and expression of the ?(3)? (2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase in the liver of growing rats.  

Science.gov (United States)

Auxiliary enzymes participate in ?-oxidation of unsaturated fatty acids. The objective of the study was to investigate the impact of a moderate zinc deficiency and a high intake of polyunsaturated fat on ?(3)?(2)-enoyl-CoA isomerase (ECI) in the liver and other tissues. Five groups of eight weanling rats each were fed moderately zinc-deficient (ZD) or zinc-adequate (ZA) semisynthetic diets (7 or 50 mg Zn/kg) enriched with 22 % cocoa butter (CB) or 22 % safflower oil (SO) for 4 weeks: (1) ZD-CB, fed free choice; (2) ZA-CBR, ZA-CB diet fed in equivalent amounts consumed by the ZD-CB group; (3) ZD-SO, fed free choice; (4) ZA-SOR, ZA-SO diet fed in equivalent amounts consumed by the ZD-SO group; and (5) ZA-SO, fed free choice. Growth and Zn status markers were markedly reduced in the ZD groups. ECI activity in the liver of the animals fed the ZD- and ZA-SO diets were significantly higher (approximately 2- and 3-fold, respectively) as compared with the CB-fed animals, whereas activities in extrahepatic tissues (kidneys, heart, skeletal muscle, testes, adipose tissue) were not altered by dietary treatments. Transcript levels of the mitochondrial Eci gene in the liver did not significantly differ between ZD and ZA rats, but were 1.6-fold higher in the ZA-SO- than in the ZD-CB-fed animals (P?

Justus, Jennifer; Weigand, Edgar

2014-06-01

350

Effects of stereospecific positioning of fatty acids in triacylglycerol structures in native and randomized fats: a review of their nutritional implications  

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Abstract Most studies on lipid lowering diets have focused on the total content of saturated, polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fatty acids. However, the distribution of these fatty acids on the triacylglycerol (TAG) molecule and the molecular TAG species generated by this stereospecificity are characteristic for various native dietary TAGs. Fat randomization or interesterification is a process involving the positional redistribution of fatty acids, which leads to the generation o...

Sundram Kalyana; Karupaiah Tilakavati

2007-01-01

351

n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids: a nutritional tool to prevent insulin resistance associated to type 2 diabetes and obesity?  

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n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFA), mainly eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5 n-3) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6 n-3), are present in mammal tissues both from endogenous synthesis from desaturation and elongation of 18:3 n-3 and/or from dietary origin (marine products and fish oils). In rodents in vivo, n-3 LC-PUFA have a protective effect against high fat diet induced insulin resistance. Such an effect is explained at the molecular level by the prevention of many al...

Delarue, Jacques; Lefoll, Christelle; Corporeau, Charlotte; Lucas, Danie?le

2004-01-01

352

Ingestão de lipídios na dieta e indicadores antropométricos de adiposidade em policiais militares / Dietary fats and measures of adiposity in military policemen  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: Portuguese Abstract in portuguese OBJETIVO: Investigar se há relação entre a ingestão de lipídios e os indicadores antropométricos de adiposidade em policiais militares do Município de Cascavel, (PR). MÉTODOS: A amostra constituiu-se de 183 policiais militares do sexo masculino do 6º Batalhão da Polícia Militar de Cascavel (PR), com [...] idade entre 21 e 50 anos. Avaliou-se o peso, a estatura, o índice de massa corporal, a circunferência abdominal e a ingestão alimentar, por meio do recordatório de 24horas. Relacionaram-se os resultados de ingestão de lipídios da dieta com os indicadores antropométricos índice de massa corporal, circunferência abdominal e percentual de gordura corporal. RESULTADOS: O diagnóstico nutricional mais freqüente em 117 (63,9%) dos policiais, segundo o índice de massa corporal, foi de sobrepeso e obesidade; 22 (12,0%) apresentaram risco elevado para complicações metabólicas associadas à obesidade pelo indicador circunferência abdominal e 26 (18,6%) elevado percentual de gordura corporal. A ingestão de lipídios se mostrou aumentada em 53 (70,7%) dos 75 inquéritos validados, no entanto apenas 24 (32,0%) ingeriam lipídios saturados acima da recomendação. Houve correlação positiva apenas entre a ingestão de lipídios totais e o indicador antropométrico de adiposidade circunferência abdominal (p=0,03). CONCLUSÃO: Este estudo sugere que a ingestão de lipídios acima das recomendações pode ser um fator relacionado à adiposidade abdominal na população estudada. Abstract in english OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate whether there is any relationship between dietary fats and measures of adiposity in military policemen from Cascavel (PR), Brazil. METHODS: The study evaluated 183 male military policemen from the 6th. Military Police Force of Cascavel (PR), [...] aged from 21 to 50 years. Weight, height, body mass index and waist circumference were measured and food intake was determined by the 24-hour dietary recall. Dietary fats were related with the anthropometric indicators body mass index, waist circumference and percentage of body fat. RESULTS: The most common nutritional diagnoses found in 117 (63.9%) of the policemen were overweight and obesity. Waist circumference showed that 22 (12.0%) of these men were at high risk of metabolic complications associated with obesity and 26 (18.6%) had high body fat percentiles. Fat intake was high in 53 (70.7%) of the 75 validated surveys, however, only 24 (32.0%) ingested saturated fats above the recommended levels. There was a positive correlation only between total fat intake and the anthropometric indicator waist circumference (p=0.03). CONCLUSION: This study suggests that fat intake above the recommended levels may be associated with abdominal adiposity in this population.

Cristina, Donadussi; Ana Flávia, Oliveira; Elis Carolina de Souza, Fatel; Jane Bandeira, Dichi; Isaias, Dichi.

2009-12-01

353

The apolipoprotein E gene promoter (-219G/T) polymorphism determines insulin sensitivity in response to dietary fat in healthy young adults.  

Science.gov (United States)

Insulin sensitivity (IS) is determined by genetic and environmental factors, including diet. The apoE gene promoter -219G/T polymorphism is associated with coronary heart disease and increased postprandial triacylglycerol-rich lipoprotein concentration, circumstances related to insulin resistance. Thus, our aim was to determine whether this polymorphism modified the IS response to dietary fat in healthy young adults. Volunteers (n = 43) with the apoE3/E3 genotype (8 GG, 25 GT and 10 TT) completed 3 dietary periods, each lasting 4 wk. They first consumed a SFA-rich diet [38% fat (% of energy in the total diet), 20% SFA (% of energy in the total diet)], and then, in a randomized, crossover design, a carbohydrate (CHO)-rich diet (30% fat, 55% CHO) or a monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA)-rich diet (38% fat, 22% MUFA). After each diet period, we investigated peripheral IS using the insulin suppression test. The steady-state plasma glucose (SSPG) concentration was lower (P SSPG and plasma nonesterified FFA (NEFA) concentrations. Thus, the shift from the SFA-rich diet to the MUFA- or CHO-rich diets decreased (P SSPG and NEFA concentrations in GG and GT, but not in TT subjects. In conclusion, carriers of the -219T allele are less insulin sensitive than GG individuals. Furthermore, only carriers of the -219G allele have improved IS when MUFA- or CHO-rich diets are consumed instead of a SFA-rich diet. PMID:16251607

Moreno, Juan Antonio; Pérez-Jiménez, Francisco; Marín, Carmen; Pérez-Martínez, Pablo; Moreno, Rafael; Gómez, Purificación; Jiménez-Gómez, Yolanda; Paniagua, Juan Antonio; Lairon, Denis; López-Miranda, José

2005-11-01

354

Trans Fats and Memory  

Medline Plus

Full Text Available ... 2014 Related MedlinePlus Pages Dietary Fats Memory Transcript Eating foods that are high in trans fats may ... notably worse performance” on the memory test. Participants eating the highest amounts recalled about 11 fewer words ...

355

Fat deposition and flesh quality in seawater reared, triploid brown trout (Salmo trutta) as affected by dietary fat levels and starvation  

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Three isoproteic (crude protein content: 56%) diets with different fat levels (11%, 20%, and 26%) were fed to triplicate groups of triploid brown trout (initial average body weight of 1.5 kg), reared in seawater. At the end of 3 months of feeding, fish fed the high-fat (HF) diet were split into two groups: a triplicate group of fish received the low-fat diet and another triplicate group was kept unfed for a further 2-month period. Fish initially fed the low-fat diet during the first period we...

Regost, Christelle; Arzel, Jacqueline; Cardinal, Mireille; Laroche, M.; Kaushik, Sadasivam

2001-01-01

356

Chronic Dietary n-6 Polyunsaturated Fatty Acid Deprivation Leads to Conservation of Arachidonic Acid and a More Rapid Loss of Docosahexaenoic Acid in Rat Brain Phospholipids.  

Science.gov (United States)

To determine how the level of dietary n-6 PUFA affects the rate of loss of arachidonic acid (ARA) and DHA in brain phospholipids, male rats were fed either a deprived or adequte n-6 PUFA diet for 15 weeks post-weaning, and then subjected to an intracerebroventricular infusion of 3H-ARA or 3H-DHA. Brains were collected at fixed times over 128 days to determine half-lives and the rates of loss from brain phospholipids (Jout). Compared to the adequate n-6 PUFA rats, the deprived n-6-PUFA rats had a 15% lower concentration of ARA and 18% higher concentration of DHA in their brain total phospholipids. Loss half-lives of ARA in brain total phospholipids and fractions (except phosphatidylserine) were longer in the deprived n-6 PUFA rats while the Jout was decreased. In the deprived versus adequate n-6 PUFA rats, the Jout of DHA was higher. In conclusion, chronic n-6 PUFA deprivation decreases the rate of loss of ARA and increases the rate of loss of DHA in brain phospholipids. Thus, a low n-6 PUFA diet can be used to target brain ARA and DHA metabolism. PMID:25477531

Lin, Lauren E; Chen, Chuck T; Hildebrand, Kayla D; Liu, Zhen; Hopperton, Kathryn E; Bazinet, Richard P

2014-12-01

357

Effect of high-fat diets on body composition, lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity, and the role of exercise on these parameters  

Scientific Electronic Library Online (English)

Full Text Available SciELO Brazil | Language: English Abstract in english Dietary fat composition can interfere in the development of obesity due to the specific roles of some fatty acids that have different metabolic activities, which can alter both fat oxidation and deposition rates, resulting in changes in body weight and/or composition. High-fat diets in general are a [...] ssociated with hyperphagia, but the type of dietary fat seems to be more important since saturated fats are linked to a positive fat balance and omental adipose tissue accumulation when compared to other types of fat, while polyunsaturated fats, omega-3 and omega-6, seem to increase energy expenditure and decrease energy intake by specific mechanisms involving hormone-sensitive lipase, activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?) and others. Saturated fat intake can also impair insulin sensitivity compared to omega-3 fat, which has the opposite effect due to alterations in cell membranes. Obesity is also associated with impaired mitochondrial function. Fat excess favors the production of malonyl-CoA, which reduces GLUT4 efficiency. The tricarboxylic acid cycle and beta-oxidation are temporarily uncoupled, forming metabolite byproducts that augment reactive oxygen species production. Exercise can restore mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity, which may be crucial for a better prognosis in treating or preventing obesity.

D.F., Coelho; L.O., Pereira-Lancha; D.S., Chaves; D., Diwan; R., Ferraz; P.L., Campos-Ferraz; J.R., Poortmans; A.H., Lancha Junior.

2011-10-01

358

Effect of high-fat diets on body composition, lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity, and the role of exercise on these parameters  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Dietary fat composition can interfere in the development of obesity due to the specific roles of some fatty acids that have different metabolic activities, which can alter both fat oxidation and deposition rates, resulting in changes in body weight and/or composition. High-fat diets in general are associated with hyperphagia, but the type of dietary fat seems to be more important since saturated fats are linked to a positive fat balance and omental adipose tissue accumulation when compared to other types of fat, while polyunsaturated fats, omega-3 and omega-6, seem to increase energy expenditure and decrease energy intake by specific mechanisms involving hormone-sensitive lipase, activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR? and others. Saturated fat intake can also impair insulin sensitivity compared to omega-3 fat, which has the opposite effect due to alterations in cell membranes. Obesity is also associated with impaired mitochondrial function. Fat excess favors the production of malonyl-CoA, which reduces GLUT4 efficiency. The tricarboxylic acid cycle and beta-oxidation are temporarily uncoupled, forming metabolite byproducts that augment reactive oxygen species production. Exercise can restore mitochondrial function and insulin sensitivity, which may be crucial for a better prognosis in treating or preventing obesity.

D.F. Coelho

2011-10-01

359

Dietary recommendations for patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease.  

Science.gov (United States)

Changes to patients' lifestyle, especially a modified dietary approach, play a key role in the treatment of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). A balanced, limiting and individually tailored nutritional scheme enables weight loss and an improvement in the clinical picture of NAFLD. According to nutritional recommendations for patients with NAFLD, carbohydrates should comprise 40-50% of total dietary energy. It is advisable to increase the amount of complex carbohydrates rich in dietary fibre. A major role in the aetiology of NAFLD is played by excessive intake of fructose, which is related to the rise in consumption of nonalcoholic beverages among subjects in developed countries. Fat intake should comprise < 30% of daily calories. It is essential to increase consumption of food products rich in mono- and polyunsaturated fatty acids. Ingestion of protein should constitute 15-20% of total energy. PMID:24868294

Kargulewicz, Angelika; Stankowiak-Kulpa, Hanna; Grzymis?awski, Marian

2014-01-01

360

21 CFR 101.75 - Health claims: dietary saturated fat and cholesterol and risk of coronary heart disease.  

Science.gov (United States)

...in the United States. Intakes of cholesterol are, on...less than 10 percent of calories from saturated fat, and...percent or less of total calories from all fat. Recommended daily cholesterol intakes are 300 mg or less...

2010-04-01

 
 
 
 
361

Extrinsic and intrinsic regulation of DOR/TP53INP2 expression in mice: effects of dietary fat content, tissue type and sex in adipose and muscle tissues  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background DOR/TP53INP2 acts both at the chromosomal level as a nuclear co-factor e.g. for the thyroid hormone receptor and at the extrachromosomal level as an organizing factor of the autophagosome. In a previous study, DOR was shown to be down-regulated in skeletal muscle of obese diabetic Zucker fa/fa rats. Methods To identify sites of differential DOR expression in metabolically active tissues, we measured differences in DOR expression in white adipose tissue (WAT, brown adipose tissue (BAT, skeletal muscle (SM and heart muscle (HM by qPCR. To assess whether DOR expression is influenced in the short term by nutritional factors, NMRI mice were fed different fat rich diets (fat diet, FD: 18% or high fat diet, HFD: 80% fat for one week and DOR expression was compared to NMRI mice fed a control diet (normal diet, ND: 3.3% fat. Additionally, DOR expression was measured in young (45?days old and adult (100?days old genetically obese (DU6/DU6i mice and compared to control (DUKs/DUKsi animals. Results ANOVA results demonstrate a significant influence of diet, tissue type and sex on DOR expression in adipose and muscle tissues of FD and HFD mice. In SM, DOR expression was higher in HFD than in FD male mice. In WAT, DOR expression was increased compared to BAT in male FD and HFD mice. In contrast, expression levels in female mice were higher in BAT for both dietary conditions. DOR expression levels in all tissues of 100?days old genetically obese animals were mainly influenced by sex. In HM, DOR expression was higher in male than female animals. Conclusions DOR expression varies under the influence of dietary fat content, tissue type and sex. We identified target tissues for further studies to analyze the specific function of DOR in obesity. DOR might be part of a defense mechanism against fat storage in high fat diets or obesity.

Fromm-Dornieden Carolin

2012-09-01

362

Reproducibility and validity of dietary assessment instruments. II. A qualitative food frequency questionnaire.  

Science.gov (United States)

The reproducibility and validity of a food frequency questionnaire designed to measure intakes of total fat, saturated and polyunsaturated fats, vitamins A, C, and E, selenium, and dietary fiber were tested from March to October 1984 among 297 Finnish men aged 55-69 years. The questionnaire asked about consumption of 44 food items. In the reproducibility study, 107 subjects filled in the questionnaire three times, at three-month intervals. Intraclass correlations varied from 0.52 for vitamin A to 0.85 for polyunsaturated fat. In the validity study, 190 subjects kept food consumption records for 12 two-day periods distributed evenly over a period of six months and filled in the questionnaire both before and after this period. Correlations between the nutrient intake values from the food records and those from the food frequency questionnaires ranged from 0.33 for selenium to 0.68 for polyunsaturated fat. On the average, 40-45% of the subjects in the lowest and highest quintiles based on food records were in the same respective quintiles when assessed by the food frequency questionnaire, and 70-75% were in the two lowest and two highest questionnaire quintiles, respectively. The food frequency questionnaire and a quantitative food use questionnaire tested in the same study were compared. Use of these two instruments in large-scale epidemiologic studies is discussed. PMID:2843041

Pietinen, P; Hartman, A M; Haapa, E; Räsänen, L; Haapakoski, J; Palmgren, J; Albanes, D; Virtamo, J; Huttunen, J K

1988-09-01

363

Validity and Reproducibility of a Self-Administered Semi-Quantitative Food-Frequency Questionnaire for Estimating Usual Daily Fat, Fibre, Alcohol, Caffeine and Theobromine Intakes among Belgian Post-Menopausal Women  

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A novel food-frequency questionnaire (FFQ) was developed and validated to assess the usual daily fat, saturated, mono-unsaturated and poly-unsaturated fatty acid, fibre, alcohol, caffeine, and theobromine intakes among Belgian post-menopausal women participating in dietary intervention trials with phyto-oestrogens. The relative validity of the FFQ was estimated by comparison with 7 day (d) estimated diet records (EDR, n 64) and its reproducibility was evaluated by repeated administrations 6 w...

Selin Bolca; Mia Verschraegen; Inge Huybrechts; Stefaan De Henauw; Tom van de Wiele

2009-01-01

364

Dietary fiber showed no preventive effect against colon and rectal cancers in Japanese with low fat intake: an analysis from the results of nutrition surveys from 23 Japanese prefectures  

Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

Full Text Available Abstract Background Since Fuchs' report in 1999, the reported protective effect of dietary fiber from colorectal carcinogenesis has led many researchers to question its real benefit. The aim of this study is to evaluate the association between diet, especially dietary fiber and fat and colorectal cancer in Japan. Methods A multiple regression analysis (using the stepwise variable selection method was performed using the standardized mortality ratios (SMRs of colon and rectal cancer in 23 Japanese prefectures as objective variables and dietary fiber, nutrients and food groups as explanatory variables. Results As for colon cancer, the standardized partial correlation coefficients were positively significant for fat (1,13, P = 0.000, seaweeds (0.41, P = 0.026 and beans (0.45, P = 0.017 and were negatively significant for vitamin A (-0.63, P = 0.003, vitamin C (-0.42, P = 0.019 and yellow-green vegetables (-0.37, P = 0.046. For rectal cancer, the standardized partial correlation coefficient in fat (0.60, P = 0.002 was positively significant. Dietary fiber was not found to have a significant relationship with either colon or rectal cancers. Conclusions This study failed to show any protective effect of dietary fiber in subjects with a low fat intake (Japanese in this analysis, which supports Fuchs' findings in subjects with a high fat intake (US Americans.

Sugawara Kazuo

2001-10-01

365

The effects of a high fibre, low fat and low sodium dietary regime on diabetic hypertensive patients of different ethnic groups.  

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Fifty-three diabetic patients with mild hypertension were allocated to a treatment diet with a high fibre, low fat and low sodium dietary regime or a control diet. After a 1-month treatment period, the modified-diet treated group (n = 35) showed a highly significant reduction in mean diastolic blood pressure (P less than 0.001) accompanied by significant reduction in urinary sodium excretion (P less than 0.01). The mean values of diastolic pressure (P less than 0.05) and urinary sodium/potass...

Dodson, P. M.; Pacy, P. J.; Beevers, M.; Bal, P.; Fletcher, R. F.; Taylor, K. G.

1983-01-01

366

Induction of Fatal Inflammation in LDL Receptor and ApoA-I Double-Knockout Mice Fed Dietary Fat and Cholesterol  

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Atherogenic response to dietary fat and cholesterol challenge was evaluated in mice lacking both the LDL receptor (LDLr?/?) and apoA-I (apoA-I?/?) gene, LDLr?/?/apoA-I?/? or double-knockout mice. Gender- and age-matched LDLr?/?/apoA-I?/? mice were fed a diet consisting of 0.1% cholesterol and 10% palm oil for 16 weeks and compared to LDLr?/? mice or single-knockout mice. The LDLr?/? mice showed a 6- to 7-fold increase in total plasma cholesterol (TPC) compared ...

Zabalawi, Manal; Bhat, Shaila; Loughlin, Tara; Thomas, Michael J.; Alexander, Eric; Cline, Mark; Bullock, Bill; Willingham, Mark; Sorci-thomas, Mary G.

2003-01-01

367

Comparison of Dietary Control and Atorvastatin on High Fat Diet Induced Hepatic Steatosis and Hyperlipidemia in Rats  

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Abstract Background Treatment with atorvastatin (ATO) or dietary control has been demonstrated to benefit patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) and hyperlipidemia. However, little is known on whether combination of dietary control and ATO treatment could enhance the therapeutic effect. Methods We employed a rat model of NAFLD to examine the therapeutic efficacy of dietary control and/or ATO treatment. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with normal ch...

Liu Peiyi; Leng Liang; Zhao Xihong; Ji Guiyuan; Jiang Zhuoqin

2011-01-01

368

Dietary intake of fish, omega-3, omega-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamin D and the prevalence of psychotic-like symptoms in a cohort of 33 000 women from the general population  

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Full Text Available Abstract Background Low intake of fish, polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA and vitamin D deficiency has been suggested to play a role in the development of schizophrenia. Our aim was to evaluate the association between the intake of different fish species, PUFA and vitamin D and the prevalence of psychotic-like symptoms in a population-based study among Swedish women. Methods Dietary intake was estimated using a food frequency questionnaire among 33 623 women aged 30-49 years at enrolment (1991/92. Information on psychotic-like symptoms was derived from a follow-up questionnaire in the years 2002/03. Participants were classified into three predefined levels: low, middle and high frequency of symptoms. The association between diet and psychotic-like symptoms was summarized in terms of relative risks (RR and corresponding 95% confidence intervals and was evaluated by energy-adjusted multinomial logistic regression. Results 18 411 women were classified as having a low level of psychotic-like symptoms, 14 395 as middle and 817 as having a high level. The risk of high level symptoms was 53% (95% CI, 30-69% lower among women who ate fish 3-4 times per week compared to women who never ate fish. The risk was also lower for women with a high intake of omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA compared to women with a lower intake of these fatty acids. The effect was most pronounced for omega-6 PUFAs. The RR comparing the highest to the lowest quartile of omega-6 PUFAs intake was 0.78 (95% CI, 0.64-0.97. The associations were J-shaped with the strongest reduced risk for an intermediate intake of fish or PUFA. For fatty fish (herring/mackerel, salmon-type fish, the strongest inverse association was found for an intermediate intake (RR: 0.81, 95% CI, 0.66-0.98, whereas a high intake of fatty fish was associated with an increased risk of psychotic-like symptoms (RR: 1.90, 95% CI, 1.34-2.70. Women in the highest compared with the lowest quartile of vitamin D consumption experienced a 37% (95% CI, 22-50% lower risk of psychotic-like symptoms. Conclusion Our findings raise a possibility that adult women with a high intake of fish, omega-3 or omega-6 PUFA and vitamin D have a lower rate of psychotic-like symptoms.

Lewander Tommy

2010-05-01

369

Beneficial effect of dietary Ephedra sinica on obesity and glucose intolerance in high-fat diet-fed mice  

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Obesity is a major contributor to both glucose intolerance and metabolic syndrome. In this study, we investigated the anti-obesity and anti-hyperglycemic effects of Ephedra sinica on high-fat diet-fed mice. Male ICR mice were divided into four groups; the normal group, the obese and diabetic control group treated with a high-fat diet, the positive control group treated with a high-fat diet containing acarbose, and the experimental group treated with a high-fat diet containing Ephedra sinica. ...

Song, Moon-koo; Um, Jae-young; Jang, Hyeung-jin; Lee, Byung-cheol

2012-01-01

370

Effect of dietary soybean oil addition on the odd-numbered and branched-chain fatty acids in rabbit meat.  

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The effect of dietary soybean oil (SO) inclusion (20g/kg) on the odd-numbered (ONFA) and branched-chain (BCFA) fatty acids (FA) of two muscles, differing in fatness (Longissimus lumborum and Biceps femoris), was studied in 24 New ZealandxCalifornian rabbits. The increased muscle fatness in Biceps femoris (Psaturated (Pfatty acids. Intramuscular ONFA and BCFA contents were not affected, but their proportions were reduced (P<0.01 and P<0.001) by SO addition, suggesting a dilution effect of the dietary polyunsaturates accumulated in both muscles, except for 17:0i which decreased only in Longissimus lumborum due to significant (P<0.05) soybean oilxmuscle interaction. The higher (P<0.05) BCFA contents and the FA profile in Biceps femoris were not affected by fatness, indicating an association with other muscle properties. The present study supplies new information on ONFA and BCFA in rabbit meat. PMID:20493641

Papadomichelakis, George; Karagiannidou, Areti; Anastasopoulos, Vasilios; Fegeros, Konstantinos

2010-10-01

371

A High-Fat Diet Differentially Affects the Gut Metabolism and Blood Lipids of Rats Depending on the Type of Dietary Fat and Carbohydrate  

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The aim of this model study was to investigate how selected gut functions and serum lipid profile in rats on high-fat diets differed according to the type of fat (saturated vs. unsaturated) and carbohydrate (simple vs. complex). The experiment was conducted using 32 male Wistar rats distributed into 4 groups of 8 animals each. For 4 weeks, the animals were fed group-specific diets that were either rich in lard or soybean oil (16% of the diet) as the source of saturated or unsaturated fatty ac...

Adam Jurgo?ski; Jerzy Ju?kiewicz; Zenon Zdu?czyk

2014-01-01

372

ABCD2 is abundant in adipose tissue and opposes the accumulation of dietary erucic acid (C22:1) in fat[S  

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The ATP binding cassette transporter, ABCD2 (D2), is a peroxisomal protein whose mRNA has been detected in the adrenal, brain, liver, and fat. Although the role of this transporter in neural tissues has been studied, its function in adipose tissue remains unexplored. The level of immunoreactive D2 in epididymal fat is >50-fold of that found in brain or adrenal. D2 is highly enriched in adipocytes and is upregulated during adipogenesis but is not essential for adipocyte differentiation or lipi...

Liu, Jingjing; Sabeva, Nadezhda S.; Bhatnagar, Saloni; Li, Xiang-an; Pujol, Aurora; Graf, Gregory A.

2010-01-01

373

Composition and textural properties of Mozzarella cheese naturally-enriched in polyunsaturated fatty acids.  

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The effects of adding flaxseed or fish oil to the diet of dairy cows on the chemical and physical profile of Mozzarella cheese production were studied. The experiment involved 24 Friesian cows, divided into 3 groups accordingly fat supplementation: basal diet (CT), diet supplemented with flaxseed (FS) or fish oil (FO). Mozzarella cheeses were manufactured from bulk milk of each group. Bulk milk was analysed for chemical composition and renneting parameters. Mozzarella cheeses were analysed for chemical composition, fatty acid profile, and textural properties. Results suggest that Mozzarella cheese from cows receiving flaxseed supplementation showed a decrease in saturated fatty acids (SFA), an increase in monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA), and in polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) compared with control Mozzarella cheese. The increased dietary intake of C18:3 in flaxseed supplemented cows resulted in increased levels of trans-11 C18:1, and of CLA cis-9 trans-11 C18:2, and in low Atherogenic and Trombogenic Indexes. FO Mozzarella cheese showed compositional and textural properties quite similar to CT Mozzarella cheese; however, increased levels of n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids in FO Mozzarella were found. PMID:23611673

Caroprese, Mariangela; Sevi, Agostino; Marino, Rosaria; Santillo, Antonella; Tateo, Alessandra; Albenzio, Marzia

2013-08-01

374

Effects of rearing density and dietary fat content on burst-swim performance and oxygen transport capacity in juvenile Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.  

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The effects of hatchery rearing density (conventional or one third of conventional density) and feeding regime (high or reduced dietary fat levels) on burst-swim performance and oxygen transport capacity were studied in hatchery-reared Atlantic salmon Salmo salar, using wild fish as a reference group. There was no effect of rearing density or food regime on swimming performance in parr and smolts. The maximum swimming speed of wild parr was significantly higher than that of hatchery-reared conspecifics, while no such difference remained at the smolt stage. In smolts, relative ventricle